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THE

CHEF‘S

M E A T

Is su e

# 0 6 :

JOURNAL

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T h e

En t e r t ain e r

AUSTRALIAN

L I V E S T O C K

B E E F,

LAMB

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GOAT

A U S T R A L I A


R ARE MEDIUM #06 L E V E L 1 — 4 0 MOUN T ST R E ET — NORT H SY DNE Y — NSW 2 0 6 0 Phone

02 9463 9333

Email

raremedium@mla.com.au

Guest Writer

Editor

Andrew Levins

Melissa Leong

mleong@mla.com.au

Wine Writer

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Mike Bennie

1800 550 018

mikebennie.com.au

raremedium@mla.com.au

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THE

CHEF‘S

JOURNAL

OF

AUSTRALIAN

B E E F,

LAMB

&

GOAT


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PA P E R S T O C K — G R A N G E by K .W D O GG E T T > Elemental chlorine free pulps, sourced with responsible forestry practices.

COVER : Paper Tuxedo Invite — Sonia Rentsch

COPYRIGHT This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited ABN 39 081 678 364 (MLA). Care is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in the publication; however, MLA cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited without the prior written consent of MLA.

© 2014


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Galloways, all the way‌ to the Slow Food Ark of Taste Feature One :

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The Party Professional

Hanger Steak #2180

Special Feature :

Master Class :

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Feature Two :

What Goes with Goat?

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On The Menu :

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Feature Three :

Hanger Steak #2180 One Cut Wonders :

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Momentary :

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The Entertainer p g.3 0

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Beef Supply Chain p g .4 0

Bite Sized

Ross Lusted > The Bridge Room, NSW


Editor's Note A little while ago, I was asked to help put together a dining event for 300 people. I was daunted. I was freaked out. I was on my feet for 22 hours straight. Needless to say this gal was very happy to swap her events hat for a much more comfortable editor’s cap at the end of that day. In this issue, we cordially invite you into the world of events and functions and the food that comes with it. Whether it’s a wedding banquet or a cocktail cast of thousands, we’re in the entertainment business. These days it’s more than safe, unadventurous alternate courses, but the celebration of people, good times and great food. I’m delighted to introduce Mike Bennie: wine writer extraordinaire, to talk about the world’s most widely consumed meat (goat) and wines that make it great. The Dip’s Andrew Levins talks about his evolution from obsessed home entertainer to professional and we share elegant and interesting recipes on the menus of tasty functions around the country. This month’s Master Class features the ever popular hanger steak, and chefs Hamish Ingham, Jamie Thomas and Tony Hart show us their favourite ways with this tasty piece of flesh. We also head to Yass, NSW, to meet Galloway breeder Greg Stuart to find out why the breed has just been admitted into the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity’s Ark of Taste. Finally, if you’re in a winning mood, now’s your time to shine. Our annual reader’s survey is upon us and we’d love to hear what you think about the journal; the good, bad and how to make us better. To thank you for your efforts in sharing your thoughts with us, you’ll go in the running to win a voucher from Chef's Armoury worth up to $1000. We’d love to see what delectable beef and lamb dishes you are wowing guests with at your events, so don't be shy, post a little food selfie on our Facebook page or hashtag #raremedium on Instagram or Twitter. Let the kitchen craziness begin...

Melissa


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Galloways, all the way…

Earlier this year, the Galloway cattle breed was admitted into the International Slow Food Foundation of Biodiversity’s Ark of Taste. The Ark travels the world ‘collecting small-scale quality productions that belong to cultures, history and traditions of the entire planet’*… in essence, showcasing the presence of the rare and special parts of human food culture that we risk losing. Rare Medium speaks to Galloways Australia President and Minto Galloways breeder Greg Stuart at his stud in Yass to find out more…

F E A T U R E

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*source: www.slowfoodfoundation.com


• RM

F E A T U R E

-GS

O N E

Congratulations on the admission of the Galloway breed into the Ark. Before we get into the details, we should probably clear up the distinction between Galloways, vs Belted Galloways and Miniatures…

Thank you. And yes, that’s a good place to start. Galloways are distinct from Belties (Belted Galloway) and miniatures. They are the foundation of the breed. They’re a heritage breed that’s more than 350 years old and are believed to be descendants of the Dutch Royal cattle stock. Full blood Galloways eventually became a Celtic breed and are known for their exceptional meat quality. They’re single coloured, and therefore different to Belties, which have become very popular in recent times with small holders, for their striking hides. They get their belted hide from mixing a white dairy breed with the black Galloway. • RM

…and Miniature Galloways? -GS

Well, some would say they’re actually just really small Galloways, but there’s a place for them in the Australian Galloway family too!

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to the Slow Food Ark of Taste


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• RM

Aside from being a high quality meat breed, what are the other characteristics of Galloway cattle? -GS

Firstly, they’re really hardy. And you need to understand where they came from in order to see why. Galloways come from the extremely harsh south and west of Scotland, and their physiology evolved to cope with the extreme conditions and limited food supply. As such, they developed a double-layered hide, which insulates them from the elements (and is highly prized by hide merchants and collectors for the durability and luxurious texture).

• RM

That hardiness must come in handy during periods of drought… -GS

Absolutely. Winters used to be much harder around here for a long time. We noticed that even over this period, our cattle and especially our calves kept much better condition than we would have expected them to have with such little feed on the ground, even with supplemented feed.

The harsh conditions and hide composition did two things: Firstly, because their hides kept them very warm, a thick layer of fat on the carcase became redundant. Cattle possess a certain fat percentage, so the distribution changed and became part of the meat structure. This gives it a marbled quality, which influences tenderness and flavour. Secondly, Galloway became non-selective grazers, which means they work well on difficult terrain, eating thistle heads and other tough ground cover, where other breeds will not.

• RM

F E A T U R E

O N E

Galloways are a lot stockier than other breeds. Aside from the difference in shape, what are the differences in processing age and dressed weights? -GS

Galloways are a lot shorter and rounder than other breeds. We usually send them off between 24–30 months to be processed and they dress around 300–330kgs, so they’re a bit older and a little heavier. This gives them the qualities we look for in the meat; a beefier flavour, beautiful marbling and juiciness, which our customers love.


You’re a fairly tight knit global community… -GS

• RM

You used to farm other cattle before this, what was the tipping point that made you decide to dive head-first into the Galloway breed? -GS

Right at the beginning, we had Galloway x Hereford and I decided to enter our meat into a show. We had no idea at the time how much preparation producers put into the preparation of their meat, from recipes to presentation — we just did what we thought we should — give them a few cuts and a few sausages and hope for the best! Despite our greenness, we scored 100% on meat quality and I thought, “There must be something to this Galloway thing.” • RM

And you haven’t looked back? -GS

• RM

I hear the Master of the Dark Arts himself has tasted the virtues of Australian Galloway? -GS

Fergus Henderson ate our beef at a nose to tail dinner when he visited Australia for a food festival a few years ago. It was a proud moment for us. Fortunately you don’t have to be a famous chef to get a hold of our meat — you just need to get in quick at the farmer’s markets we participate in! • RM

What’s the one thing you want to share with Rare Medium readers about Galloways? -GS

That it’s important to celebrate breed diversity. Galloways might be a rare breed, but they’re an extremely high calibre one. We need to support variety and give heritage breeds their time in the sun in order to ensure their continued existence. This is why the Slow Food Ark of Taste admission is so important — it puts Galloway up on an international pedestal as a breed we should celebrate, not just for its rareness and contribution to the value of our food culture, but for its eating quality, too.

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We pride ourselves on championing the Galloway breed. We see their characteristics as unique and something that should be preserved. My partner Chris and I now spend a lot of time meeting with other producers around the world and sharing genetic information and bloodlines in order to help preserve the breed’s purity globally. We recently had breeders from Canada and Scotland (the Galloway mother country), asking us to participate in genetic exchange programs to help infuse their stocks with the purity of our own. We’re really pleased that the work we do here in Australia is so well regarded internationally.

O N E

Galloway producers are passionate about ensuring the perpetuation of the breed, and as there are so few of us, we see it as our responsibility to work together. Back at home, there are around 100 members of the Galloway community spread throughout most of Australia, and we communicate regularly about the best ways to champion the breed to the public and to the restaurant industry.

F E A T U R E

• RM


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Hanger Steak I T EM #218 0 *

M A S T E R

C L A S S

* Handbook of Australian Meat

Hanger steak is removed from thecarcaseatthe same time as the vital organs it is connected to.


Trim any pieces of excess fat and connective tissue.

(To remove the silverskin) hold one end and slide the knife under the silverskin layer, moving away from you.

C L A S S

Step 2.

M A S T E R

Step 1.

Step 3.

0 8 .

Flip the Hanger Steak and trim the other side.

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From backyard cook to full scale chef, in a few simple steps (or not). The Dip’s Andrew Levins talks about his accidental foray into the food industry, entertaining en masse and the thrills and spills of becoming a professional.

S P E C I A L

F E A T U R E

The Party Professional


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Throughout all the parties Bianca would help me prep, make sure everything was running on time and kick my arse when it needed kicking. After a good year of many epic parties and feasts, we realised we had gotten pretty good at service! An opportunity then arose — an empty kitchen space inside a good friend’s nightclub — and we took it, pulling together every favour we could and opening The Dip, serving the same food we'd cooked at our many BBQs. We'd taught ourselves how to serve food to over 100 people at a house party, how much more difficult could running a restaurant be? The answer to that question is "ridiculously more difficult", but we worked hard and tried to keep it fun for ourselves and after a short while things seemed to make sense. Busy nights became less stressful and the jobs we dreaded became easier through repetition. We loved the regular challenges thrown our way, not so much the challenges themselves, but that amazing feeling you get once you'd overcome those challenges.

F E A T U R E

Before long I was BBQing every weekend, and turning any minor event into a cause for celebration, inviting over 100 people to my house for birthdays and public holidays. Yes, I loved that the more people I invited meant that I got more compliments, but I also loved the challenge that came with catering to a large group of people. Friends of mine or not, these guests needed to eat, especially with the amount of alcohol that was being consumed at those parties. I had to be prepared, to stay on top of many things at once and, for the first time in my life, I had to stress. I would put a huge piece of meat on the Weber 12 hours before the party started and let it smoke away all day. While it finished cooking I would cook burgers on the grill and fry up some hot wings. I'd write menus for all the different courses I served and at the end of the night, we'd finally lift the lid off the Weber and serve the final course of lamb shoulder, beef brisket or short ribs — fairly inexpensive meats that serve a lot a people and lend themselves well to being cooked slow and low.

S P E C I A L

It all started when my girlfriend Bianca gave me a Weber for Christmas five years ago. In the months leading up to that Christmas, I had spent hours watching a YouTube channel called "the BBQ Pit Boys", run by a couple of rotund men who would slow cook all kinds of meat and narrate each video in a humorous Southern (American) drawl. Up until that point I hadn't shown much interest in cooking, but I really wanted to be a BBQ Pit Boy. Almost immediately after unwrapping my Weber, I had bought a hulking piece of meat and began the long process of perfecting Southern BBQ, which I'd eaten in Memphis when I was 12 and was the first food I can remember absolutely loving. Southern style BBQ in Sydney was extremely scarce and the only food I could reference was a meal I'd eaten more than a decade ago. With each practice came the phone calls to friends, asking them to come over and eat my attempts at BBQ. After each cook I got cockier, slowly cooking new and bigger pieces of meat and needing to invite more mouths over to eat the fruits of my smoky labour.

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What

BY MIKE

with BENNIE


F E A T U R E T W O

goes In Australia, the culinary capabilities of goat are still somewhat undervalued. Overseas, however, many parts of the world regard goat as “the goods”. Australian goat can be classed into two categories; Rangeland; goats that graze on indigenous pastures and have a wild, forager’s diet, while Farmed goats are a product of breeding dairy or fibre goats with their meatier South African Boer cousins. The result is that chevon (adult) and capretto (kid) is now becoming far less seasonal and more readily available the year round. But what goes with goat? Wine writer and booze hound Mike Bennie looks at wine and goat pairings from around the world, handy for testing out chef Chris Goulding’s smoked and braised goat rump in On The Menu (page 26).

Bottoms up.

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goat?


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It would be pretty nice to work with a couple of absolutes when matching goat meat to wine. The world’s most consumed meat with the world’s most-planted grape variety finding a synergy on the dining table would make for a neat pairing. But the sheer versatility of goat meat and the flavour profiles of the dishes it finds itself in can make for tricky pairing, in terms of general rules.

Goat meat is often curried or heavily-spiced, particularly in Middle Eastern and South East Asian cuisine – strong flavours that require wines that can stack up to this more robust seasoning. You’ll find sweet spice, ripe red fruit character and some fine, dusty tannins in the wine grape variety Tempranillo. This grape couples well with spice-driven dishes, complementing spice and balancing vibrant flavours with freshness. Tempranillo finds a spiritual home in Spain, but is commonly planted in Australia, South America and the United States, too. The scope for wine matches is of course as adventurous as the dish that it might be matched to, and goat provides a broad palette for barbecuing, stewing, smoking, mincing, frying, grilling, sausaging or even making into jerky – with this comes a vinous matching adventure, but the general rule should be that lighter, spicier more savoury wine styles will usually find greater synergy with the glorious meat that is goat. 1 4 . 1 5

For dishes that celebrate gamey goat meat, such as slow braises and stews popular in the United States and other western cuisines, a light to medium-bodied, gently savoury red wine tends to be most apt. Try something produced from Spain’s most common wine grape variety, Garnacha, known in Australia as Grenache; the popular variety shows as a svelte, highly perfumed variety and best examples throw off floral scents, show a touch of spice in flavour and sit well as a foil for

In Japan and Korea, where raw or very lightly cooked goat meat finds vogue, the sweet red meat needs a touch of delicacy to find best wine matches. One of the world’s most noble varieties, Pinot Noir, sits right at the more delicate end of the spectrum of wine grape varieties, and is planted broadly in grape growing nations. The famed Burgundy region in France is dominated by the variety, and humble village versions are often most co-operative with Japanese cuisine, particularly those making red meat the star. If you are feeling adventurous, Gamay, the light, silky-textured red grape and hero variety of the French region Beaujolais, often shows gamey savouriness in its finer ‘Cru’ wines, making it a neat selection too, for goat.

T W O

Likewise, if you were to ask a wine expert what the most widely-planted grape variety in the world was, you’d probably come up with Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot — surely one of these two world-famous, noble grapes covers the most vineyard land in the world? Again, a mistake. Those that said the humble table grape Thompson’s Seedless would be in the know — you’ll find more bunches of these in our fridges than in a winery, but then again, even some of the world’s favourite eating grape still finds its way into some wine.

richer dishes, offering cut and freshness for the palate. It’s a great start as a versatile match for goat.

F E A T U R E

If you were to say that the most consumed meat in the world is goat, you'd probably raise a few eyebrows. But that of course depends on what part of the globe you happen to be standing on at the time. Those born and raised in Central or South America, Africa or Asia, where the meat is a staple, might be more clued in, but the general consensus on the winning beast would more likely be something that moos or clucks rather than one that bleats.


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: SLOW BRAISED CRADOC HILL LAMB FOREQUARTER w ith BLACKENED CITRUS GLAZE, GOLDEN RAISINS a nd TARO DUMPLINGS

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CLAIRE VAN VUUREN

» B LO O DWO O D, N SW

T H E

M E N U

TOYS CO LLEC T I V E

CHEF


DUMPLING FILLING

} Makes approx. 24 dumplings

250g Lamb Mince 100g Golden Raisins 50g Slivered Almonds 2 Brown Onions, Peeled and Sliced 2 Garlic Cloves 1 tsp Tumeric 1/4 tsp Cinnamon 1 tbsp Sumac 1 tbsp Salt 1 tbsp Black Pepper 100g Unsalted Butter 250ml Apple Cider Vinegar 1 bunch Parsley, Chopped – Add sliced onions and chopped garlic to a pan on low heat, cook slowly until completely softened. Add in the mince, sauté until cooked through, making sure to separate the mince as much as possible. Add all spices, nuts, raisins. Add the apple cider vinegar and cook until the mixture is not too wet. Let the filling cool completely and adjust seasoning to taste.

Vegetable Oil for Deep Frying – Cut taro into slices around 1cm thick. – Arrange loosely in a steamer and steam until thoroughly cooked. Remove from steamer and smash while it’s still hot. – Stir 180ml of boiling water into wheat starch with a fork to form a rough dough. When the temperature has dropped a little bit, combine the dough with mashed taro, and then add butter, soda, salt and sugar, fold in and knead thoroughly.

(Make sure you knead the dough enough to remove any lumps of taro.)

– Roll the dough to form a ball, cut into 4 parts, and then roll each part into a stick. Cut into 6 pieces. – For each piece of dough, roll it out to

a dumpling wrap, scoop the filling on top, and then hold the dumpling in your hands to form an oval-shaped dumpling. – In a deep fryer, heat vegetable oil to 180°C and fry the dumplings until color turns golden brown and the skin is covered with crispy nettings. – Drain, and leave on paper towels to get rid of excess oil.

 CRUNCHY RICE MIX

Zest of 2 Oranges 100g Salt 50g Castor Sugar 250g Medium White Rice 250g Wild Rice 500ml Frying Oil – To make the golden citrus salt, combine the zest of the 2 oranges with the sugar and the salt. Let this dry out completely in the oven at around 80°C. When completely dry, blitz in a food processor until very fine. – In a large pot, heat the oil to smoking point. Add rice in batches to the smoking oil. The rice should pop like popcorn and puff up. Make sure not to add too much rice at once to ensure that the oil temp stays hot enough. Repeat the process until all rice is puffed. – Once puffed rice is drained of all oil, add to large bowl and add the citrus salt that was made prior. The heat from the rice will bring out the oils and scents from the oranges.

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> Remove the pressed lamb from the fridge

and unmould. Sear on all sides to caramelise the outside and heat the lamb through. >> Meanwhile, heat the reduced braising liquor. >>> Place the seared lamb and dumpling on the plate, along with greens and garnish with the crunchy rice mix.

M E N U

 TARO DU M PLI N G

600g Frozen Taro 113g Unsalted Butter (Room Temp) 113g Wheat Starch 180ml Boiling Water 1 tbsp Baking Soda 1/2 tbsp Salt 1 tbsp Sugar

T H E

2 large Lamb Forequarters, Bone In 2 Brown Onions, Peeled and Sliced 1.5L White Wine 2L Vegetable Stock 1/2 head Garlic, Peeled 3 Bay Leaves 1/2 bunch Thyme 1 cup Castor Sugar 1 tsp White Peppercorns 3 tsp Juniper Berries 1 Nutmeg 2 Cinnamon Sticks 2 Star Anise 1/2 tsp Cloves – Melt the sugar in a dry pot on a medium high heat. When it turns to caramel, add all of the dry spice. Toast off the spice 'til fragrant in the sugar. Fry off the onions, garlic, bay and thyme in the spice caramel. Add white wine and vegetable stock. – Sear each lamb leg on a chargrill. Pour the braising liquid over the lamb and cook for 6 hours or until the lamb is falling off the bone. – Remove lamb, leave to cool. Strain liquid, skim off excess fat and reduce to 1/4 of original volume. Pick all meat off the bones, season the picked lamb well with salt and pepper, add a little of the reduced stock to the lamb and mix well. Taste and adjust seasoning if required. – Press lamb into circular moulds. Set in fridge overnight. – Reduce the braising liquor to a thick glaze and taste for seasoning. Set aside.

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TARO WRAPPER

 BRAISED LAMB


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 BEEF

600g Beef Tenderloin 1 tsp Coriander Seeds, Toasted 2 tsp Sea Salt 1/2 tsp White Peppercorns 1/2 tsp Black Peppercorns 1 tbsp Oyster Sauce 1 tbsp Vegetable Oil – Split the tenderloin into 150mm lengths and then split into pieces. You should have a number of lengths roughly 30-40mm x 150mm. – In a mortar and pestle, pound the coriander seeds with the salt and peppercorns to form a fine spice powder. Coat the beef with the spices, oyster sauce and oil and marinate overnight. – Cook on the barbecue until rare and then set aside to cool. The beef may also be kept submerged in oil for several days and refrigerated until ready to use.

 GALE T T ES

250g Butter Puff Pastry – Roll the pastry out to approx. 2-3 mm thick. Cut into 12 rounds, about 10cm in diameter. – Bake in a hot oven until golden. Allow to cool to room temperature.

 LEEKS

2 large Leeks, Washed, Trimmed and Julienned (About 300g) 80g Brown Sugar 80g Butter 2 tbsp Red Wine Vinegar 1/2 cup Vegetable Stock

Salt and Pepper to Taste – Combine 250g of leeks and the other ingredients in a pan and simmer, covered for about 30 minutes until leeks are very soft. Remove the lid and reduce the syrup until thick. May be refrigerated, but bring to room temperature before serving to melt the butter. – Deep fry the remaining leek julienne for garnish. Drain well and sprinkle with a little salt and sugar.

 B R O A D B E A N S a nd P E A S

750g Broadbeans 500g Peas – Shellbroadbeansandpeas.– Blanchtheminboilingsaltedwaterthenrefresh in cold. – Slip the broadbeans from their skins.

 HORSERADISH CREAM

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300ml Pouring Cream 2 - 3 tbsp Prepared Horseradish

Salt and Pepper to Taste – Whip the cream and add the horseradish, salt and pepper to taste.

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> Place the galette on a plate. >> Top with the sweet and sour leeks and thin slices of beef. >>> Toss the broad beans and peas in a little extra virgin olive oil and scatter around the plate. >>>> Finish with a dollop of horseradish cream, crispy fried leeks and a good grind of black pepper.


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BEEF GALETTE w ith SWEET a nd SOUR LEEKS, BROADBEANS, PEAS a nd HORSERADISH CREAM

T H E M E N U

S er ve s

12

CHEF

KATRINA RYAN

» T H E GO LD E N PIG FO O D & W I N E S C H OO L , Q LD

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SMOKED a nd BRAISED GOAT RUMP, SWEETBREAD, ARTICHOKE, BROADBEANS a nd SUN DRIED OLIVES S er ve s

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» KOOYO N G L AW N T E N N I S CLU B, V IC

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CHRIS GOULDING

CHEF


 GOAT SWE ETB R EADS

2 Goat Rumps, Cap off, Cleaned of any Sinew

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 ARTICHOKE PURÉE

T H E

A Big Handful of Wood Chips for Smoking, soaked in water 4 sprigs Thyme 1 Lemon, Zested 2 Onions 2 Carrots 1 head Celery 2 Leeks 3 Garlic Cloves 100g Rosemary 500ml White Wine 1L Veal Stock – Using a smoker, add the soaked chips, the lemon and thyme over the heat source and create a light smoke. Smoke the rump for 7 minutes to create a subtle smoky flavour, then set aside. – Make a standard mirepoix with the onions, carrots, celery and leek. Sauté off and add the white wine, reduce. Add the veal stock and season the braising liquid. – Season and seal the rump pieces in a hot pan and place them in a tray. Cover with the braising liquid and cook in oven for 1 hour or until tender at 120°C.

2 Sweetbreads (75g Each) 2 tbsp White Vinegar 15g Seasoned Flour 500g Ice – Bring a pot of water to the boil and add the vinegar. – Blanch the sweetbreads for 3-4 minutes. – Drain and refresh in iced water. Once cool, remove the outer membrane and set aside until service.

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 S M O K E D a nd BRAISED RUMP

4 Artichokes, Cleaned and Choke Removed 800ml Vegetable Stock 100ml Cream 30g Butter 1 Lemon, juiced 3 Shallots 30ml Vegetable Oil – Sauté shallots in oil on a medium heat. Once slightly translucent, add the artichokes, cover with vegetable stock and simmer until soft. When soft, drain the vegetables and purée them with the cream and butter, finish with lemon juice and season to taste.

 B ROADB EAN S a nd B A B Y C A R R O T S

4 Baby Carrots, Peeled 4 Broadbean Pods – Shell the broadbeans, blanch, refresh and peel. – Roast the baby carrots in butter for 10 minutes in a moderate oven.

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> Remove the rumps from braising liquid and allow to sit for 10 to 15 minutes.

Slice each rump into 3 even pieces. >> Gently heat the purée. >>> Coat the sweetbreads in the seasoned flour and shallow fry for 4-5 minutes, until golden and cooked through. Drain onto some paper towel to absorb excess oil. >>>> Spread the purée on the base of the plate and place three slices of the rump on top. >>>>> Garnish with the broadbeans and carrots and place the sweetbreads

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Tom Dixon 'Eclectic' homewares, courtesy of Safari Living.

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H O W

ex

y l t ac does

AUSTR A LI A N

BEEF journey

F E A T U R E

T H R E E

make from

Pasture to

Plate


T H R E E

Here’s how it works, at a glance.

F E A T U R E

The relationships between all the players is complex and interrelated.

BEEF SUPPLY CHAIN in AUSTR ALIA P R OD U C E R

SA L E YA R D

F E E DL O T

A B B AT OI R S

L I V E E X P ORT

C O−P R OD U C E R

AUST R A L I A N M A RK ET

Hides, Fat, Bone (used in soap, furniture, pet food, clothes)

E X P ORT Over 110 countries

C A R C A SE

F O OD SE RV IC E

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C O N S UM E R 3 0 . 3 1


HANG ER STEAK # 2 1 8 0*

* Handbook of Australian Meat


Fast becoming one of the most popular new additions on menus around the country, we take a closer look at the one and only hanger steak.


O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S 3 4

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3 5


O N E

TO NY HART I NTE RCO NTI N E NTAL

C H E F

H OTEL

SA

C U T

METHOD

THE STEW ≈ In a separate pot, add the oil, carrots, sliced onions and sauté over a low heat, taking care not to colour. ≈ Add the white wine, sliced garlic, thyme stalksandthestockandbringtotheboiland cook until the vegetables are tender. Drain the beans and add to the stew. THE DRAGONCELLO SAUCE ≈ Place the bread and vinegar in a small bowl and leave for 15 minutes, then squeeze the bread of any excess liquid. Place the garlic on a work surface, sprinkle with half a teaspoon of sea salt and using the back of a large knife, crush garlic until a smooth paste forms. ≈Placesoakedbread,garlic,anchoviesand tarragon in a bowl, then, using a wooden spoon,stirtobreakupthesoakedbreaduntil well combined. Add the oil in a thin stream untilcombined,andthenseasontotastewith freshly ground black pepper. THE STEAK ≈ Preheat the char-grill on your BBQ. ≈ Drizzle the steaks with oil, season to taste and grill, turning once, until cooked to your liking (10-12 minutes for medium-rare), then set aside covered to rest (5-10 minutes).

Chargrilled Hanger Steak with Borlotti Bean Stew, Dragoncello Sauce and Shaved Parmesan SER INGREDIENTS

1.1kg hanger steak salt and pepper

BORLOTTI BEAN STEW

150g fresh borlotti beans 3 garlic cloves, sliced 80ml olive oil 1 brown onion, sliced 3 stalks thyme 250ml white wine 600ml chicken stock 2 carrots, peeled and sliced 50g butter, cubed and kept cold until needed

DRAGONCELLO SAUCE

3 slices sourdough, crusts removed 65ml red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, chopped 2 anchovy fillets, chopped 1/4 cup tarragon, chopped 125ml olive oil (good quality) 100g Grana Padano, shaved 4 tbsp basil leaves, sliced

W O N D E R S

THE BEANS ≈ Place the beans in a pot and cover with water. Bring to the boil and cook until tender. Remove from heat, leaving the beans in the water. Season the beans with salt and set aside while you make the stew.

VES

4

“A fantastic

dish that marries the charred smokiness of the BBQ with the texture of fresh borlottis.

TO ASSEM BLE 3 4 . 3 5

Reheat the bean stew and then whisk in the cold cubed butter to emulsify the sauce. Place a couple of spoons of the stew into 4 bowls. Slice the well rested steak and place about 250g of sliced steak on top of the stew. Spoon one tablespoon of the sauce dragoncello on each dish and garnish with shaved Grana Padano, chopped basil and a slug of olive oil.


3 7 .

C H E F

3 6

D RI N K

JAM I E TH O MAS N SW ‘ N ’ DI N E

INGREDIENTS

CURRIED MAYO

METHOD

1 x 700g piece of hanger steak

JERK PASTE 6−10 habanero peppers, chopped finely 1 onion, chopped finely 3−4 green shallots, chopped finely 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tbsp fresh thyme 2 tsp salt 1 tsp black pepper 1 tsp sugar 1 tsp allspice 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp nutmeg

W O N D E R S

≈Blendallingredientstogether to form a paste. Rub thoroughly into hanger steak, cover with cling film and allow to refrigerate overnight.

VES SER 4–6

Jerk Hanger Steak with Pineapple Fritters and Salsa Hooch

400g whole egg mayonnaise 10g curry powder 2g turmeric 1/2 bunch coriander, chopped finely

SALAD

4−5 radishes, sliced finely 1/4 red cabbage, sliced finely 1/4 white cabbage, sliced finely juice of 1 lime

≈ Mix mayonnaise ingredients to combine. In a bowl, combine the finely sliced red and white cabbage,radishesandlimejuice. Add enough mayonnaise to nicelycoatthesaladingredients. Season to taste.

PINEAPPLE FRITTERS SALSA HOOCH

1 bunch mint 1 bunch coriander 2 large eschallots 1 long red chilli 2 garlic cloves juice of 1 lime extra virgin olive oil

500g plain flour 100g banana Nesquick 1 tbsp turmeric agoodhandfulshreddedcoconut 8 tinned pineapple rings

≈ Combine flour, Nesquick, tumeric and shredded coconut with enough water to create a pancake-like batter. Set aside.

≈ Place all of the ingredients except for the olive oil in a food processor. Turn it on and add the oil in a thin stream until every thing is incorporated (it should look like a salsa verde).

O N E

C U T

TO ASSEM BLE

Remove the steak from the fridge and allow it to come to room temperature. Grill the steak until rare and let it rest for as long as possible. Just before you are ready to serve, dip each pineapple ring in the batter and deep fry until the batter is golden and crisp. Remove from oil and set aside on some kitchen paper to absorb excess oil. Arrange the sliced steak on a plate or tray. Sprinkle with salsa hooch. Add the pineapple rings and slaw next to the steak and garnish with extra shredded coconut and fresh lime.


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C U T

W O N D E R S

3 6

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3 7


O N E

C U T

W O N D E R S 3 8

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3 9


HAM ISH BAR H

O N E

C H E F

I N G HAM N SW

6 black garlic cloves, blended in a mixer with a little water until smooth 8 eshallots, sliced and fried till golden brown 2 green shallots, sliced finely 60ml tamari 100ml olive oil 40ml brown rice vinegar 20g sugar 1 cucumber, peeled and cut in half, then each half cut in half 1 bunch shiso

VES

4

ain as m

cour

se

1 Chinese cabbage 1/4 cup sea salt water 1 tbsp garlic, grated 1 tsp ginger, grated 1 tsp sugar 3 tbsp Korean red pepper flakes 250g daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks 4 Chinese green shallots, trimmed and cut into 1 inch pieces

W O N D E R S

KIMCHI

4 x 180g pieces of hanger steak

C U T

SER

INGREDIENTS

Chargrilled Hanger Steak with Black Garlic and Kim Chi METHOD

≈ For the dressing, combine the blended garlic with fried eshallots, tamari, sugar, brown rice vinegar, olive oil and green shallots and whisk until all ingredients combined.

THE KIMCHI ≈ Cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters andremovethecores.Cuteachquartercrosswiseinto2 inch wide strips. ≈ Salt the cabbage. Place the cabbage and saltinalargebowl.Usingyourhands(glovesoptional), massagethesaltintothecabbageuntilitstartstosoften a bit, then add water to cover the cabbage. Put a plate on top and weigh it down with something heavy, and allow to stand for 1-2 hours. ≈Rinseanddrainthecabbageundercoldwater3times and drain in a colander for 15 minutes.

≈Meanwhile,combinethegarlic,ginger,sugar,andfish sauce in a small bowl and mix to form a smooth paste. Mix in the chilli powder. ≈Combinethevegetablesandpaste.Gentlysqueezeany remaining water from the cabbage and return it to the bowl along with the radish, shallots and chilli paste. ≈ Mix thoroughly. Using your hands, gently work the paste into the vegetables until they are adequately massaged. Pack the kimchi intoasterilisedjar,ensuringeverythingiscompacted. Leave at least 1 inch of headspace. Seal the jar with the lid. Let the jar stand at room temperature for 3 days to ferment. Check it daily and refrigerate when ready.

TO ASSEM BLE 3 8 . 3 9

Chargrill the hanger until medium rare. Set aside to rest. Meanwhile, char the cut side of the cucumber. To serve, slice each steak into 6 slices and place on serving plate with one piece of charred cucumber. Pour an even amount of dressing over each steak and garnish with kim chi and shiso leaves.


4 1 . 4 0

Bite Sized T I P S from the pros when it comes to cooking for the masses. It’s vital to ensure we rest the protein prior to service. This is a must as it allows the juices to settle from the centre of the cut and be reabsorbed ensuring a tender, juicy result and a better eating experience. GLENN FLOOD

> Food Development

B I T E

S I Z E D

Manager, Business & Industry – Alliance Catering

A great tip for creating atmosphere and keeping food hot when catering in challenging locations, is to bake using a salt or clay crust. Seal a pot roast with a salt crust, or bake veal loins in clay parcels and have the guests crack the clay or crust at the table. Not only does it keep the diner involved, but it delivers the food nice and hot! MONTY KOLUDROVIC

> Contract Cooking Assassin

I love lamb in all forms for catering; rack, backstrap and slow braised shoulder in particular. There are logistics to consider though, when it comes to volume. We find that for backstrap and racks, committing multiple chefs to carving at the last possible moment of plating retains all the integrity of its cooking median here. Warmed plates are a must and hot garnishes and simmering sauce on well-rested, carved lamb always gets us across the line! DARRYL GREY

> Executive Chef – Simon Ekas Catering


B I T E S I Z E D

When it comes to cooking for large groups and functions, fat is your friend. Whether it’s in the technique, like confit, or looking at cuts with forgiving intramuscular fat to prevent it from drying out during cooking, a bit of fat goes a long way towards an end result that is succulent and tender. MICHAEL FOX

> Chef / Gun-For-Hire

Catering is all about preparation. With smoked meats, smoke it in advance of the event, wrap the meat in foil and put it in an esky. Stuff towels around the foiled meat and it will retain the heat for almost 6 hours and re-distribute moisture throughout the drier parts of the meat. When you pull it out to serve, it will be at the perfect temperature for carving! ANDREW LEVINS

> The Dip

The aspiration and perspiration of a chef (who has recently become a caterer) is to deliver an experience that closely reflects a la carte cooking – each plate must reflect a personal touch and not feel like it came off a production line. For this reason, I love using the beef spinalis muscle. 30 or 300 guests, it matters less. Grill the marinated meat for 3 minutes per side, rest for 3 then carve one thick slice per guest. Set it on its side to reveal the cuisson. It delivers great depth of flavour and is moist and tender every time.

4 1

Al’FreshCo

.

> Executive Chef –

4 0

ALASTAIR MCLEOD


4 3 . 4 2

Peka – Lamb cooked under a Bell, memories of

M O M E N T A R Y

Croatia

When: 2006


Ross Lusted — head chef, owner > The Bridge Room, NSW

M O M E N T A R Y

Who:

It is not often as a chef who has been around the block that you get to stumble on a way of cooking that gets you thinking. Konavoski Dvori was the restaurant, just south of Dubrovnik, and the dish was Peka; lamb cooked “Under the Bell”. The flavour of the young lamb, mountain herbs surrounding the shoulder, potatoes crisp and smoky, onions so sweet, I had to learn more. I left the table and followed the smoke to the outdoor kitchen. There, the ladies were tending the charcoal fires and paddle wheel rotisserie powered by a clear, cool stream. The smell was intoxicating. I think it reminded me most of the smell of lamb cooked over an open fire that I remember from my childhood in South Africa. Peka, as this style of cooking is called all along the Dalmatian coast, starts with lamb, potatoes, onions, garlic, dried wild herbs and lots of super green olive oil fresh from the mill of the local monastery. The roasting dish is then covered with what could best be described as an inverted wok and placed on a bed of coals. A steel band is then placed on the dome and more coals are shoveled on top, the band holding the coals over the dome. The dish is left for a couple of hours to cook (in the case of Konavoski Dvori there are about twenty of them) and lightly trapped smoke puffs under the dome. The delight on people’s faces when the domes are removed is the real treat and memory of this dish for me. This way of eating is perfect for catering to large groups of people, in a rustic and honest way. When celebrating an event or occasion with friends and family, it's this, and not fine or complicated food, that I love to eat.

Where: . 4 3

> Croatia

4 2

South of Dubrovnik


*

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.R . M.

#06

T hank You For Reading


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Rare Medium Issue 6  

The Entertainer.