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– I ssue #02: Smok i n g , Cu r i n g , Cor n i n g , P ick l i n g –

T H E C H E F ' S J O U R N A L O F A U S T R A L I A N B E E F, L A M B & G O AT

M E A T

&

L I V E S T O C K

A U S T R A L I A


Rare-Medium #02 Level 1, 165 Walker Street North Sydney, NSW 2059 Phone 02 9463 9308 Email raremedium@mla.com.au Editor Connaugh Sheehan csheehan@mla.com.au Free Subscription 1800 550 018 raremedium@mla.com.au Magazine Enquiries Connaugh Sheehan csheehan@mla.com.au Design MASH mashdesign.com.au Printing Southern Colour (VIC) Pty Ltd southerncolour.com.au Photographer John Laurie johnlauriephoto.com Prop Stylist Sonia Rentsch soniarentsch@hotmail.com

MLA Foodservice Contacts

National Marketing Manager Foodservice Claire Tindale ctindale@mla.com.au N.S.W/A.C.T Doug Piper dpiper@mla.com.au QLD/N.T Glen Burke gburke@mla.com.au S.A Brett Atkinson batkinson@mla.com.au VIC/TAS Gerard Doherty gdoherty@mla.com.au W.A Rafael Ramirez rramirez@mla.com.au

Food Stylist Deborah Kaloper deborahkaloper@hotmail.com Contributor Melissa Leong mleong@fooderati.com.au

The Chef's Journal of Australian Beef, Lamb & Goat


I-S-S-N 2201-1609

Paper Stock Grange by K.W Doggett Elemental chlorine free pulps, sourced with responsible forestry practices.

Published February 2013

░ Copyright This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited ABN 39 081 678 364 (MLA). Care is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in the publication; however, MLA cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited without the prior written consent of MLA. Š 2013


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MLA

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Feature One Certified Suffolk Lamb - Milk Fed Lamb 06

TENT

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Master Class Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling 10

Feature Two Thank you for Smoking 14

18

Four Cut Wonders Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling 28

Bite Sized That's a Wrap! What's hot in 2013 from America's National Restaurant Association 38

Momentary Sammy Minzly aka Mr Sammy

Momentary Salted Beef Beigel

40

41

On the Menu The EntrĂŠe Menu

C O N T E N T S

ON


EDITOR'S NOTE Dear Rare Medium Reader, This is the second issue of Rare Medium, Australia’s only meat journal. Our second issue focuses on one of the trends we’ve identified as ‘hot’ in 2013 - smoking, curing, corning & pickling. We think this trend is bigger than ever with chefs everywhere shoving anything not nailed down in vinegar, or covering the weird and wonderful in a salty, sugary mix. The prehistoric preparation of smoking has become a modern culinary art form, with the wood choice as important as the cut of meat. If you’re going to DIY you should think broader than the products readily available from your suppliers. Forget Bresaola, look to Dutch loaf, headcheese, legua or carne seca for some inspiration. Our masterclass is there to help you brush up on your skills or dust off what you learnt years ago about the different techniques, plus we’ve got three recipes from chefs around Australia plus one from London to enthuse you. Our contributor, Melissa Leong, sat down with Gregory Llewellyn, from Hartsyard, in my birthplace: Newtown, Sydney, to psychoanalyse him about his obsession with smoking. This man gives Bob Hart a run for his money; smoking to perfection everything he can get his hands on - even water. Check it out on page 14. I’m also asking for your advice this issue. I want to know if our team are taking the journal in a direction that is relevant to you, if you enjoy reading it and, if you were me, what you’d change about the publication. Tell us what you think - warts and all about the content, the artwork, the features list; we want to know everything. Fill out our reader’s survey and pop it in the post back to us. The survey shouldn’t take up too much of your time and, as a thanks for taking part, there is a chance to win one of 17 Sous Vide Supreme machines, valued at $545 each.

Read on my Fleischmeister in the making, Connaugh


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e i d f i t r e C k l o Suff b La m - Milk d e F La m b Richard Gunner

F E A T U R E

O N E

South Australia


F E A T U R E O N E

Richard Gunner is a name synonymous with Suffolk Lamb. His lamb brand, Pure Suffolk Lamb, takes its name from the distinctive blackfaced Suffolk breed of sheep which has a deeper lamb flavour and marbling flecks throughout the meat. Richard produces his lamb during its natural season so Pure Suffolk Lamb is only available from November through to July; his milk fed Pure Suffolk Lamb available fleetingly during late May to November. Richard invited Rare Medium onto his Tintinara property to find out how he produces his scarce, subtlety flavoured milk fed lamb. ❖❖❖

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RG: For the first 4 weeks of

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RM: What is milk fed lamb?

a lamb’s life it only drinks its mother’s milk then, over the next 6-8 weeks, its diet gradually changes to a grass based diet. Milk fed lamb is lamb that gets most of its nutrition from milk and grows up to 8 weeks old. Just like veal production, Australian milk fed lamb production is a little misunderstood. People tend to apply production systems that occur overseas to Australian product but here, in Australia, we have really strict animal welfare laws and our milk fed lamb is grown outside and are never locked up. We also use specially designed yarding and transport protocol which minimises the stress on the lambs, and they are not tail docked, castrated or marked in the conventional manner.

F E A T U R E

O N E

RM: Where in South Australia do you produce the milk fed lambs?

RG: Our properties are located in the cool climate, south-eastern region of South Australia from Meningie right through Tintinara, Naracoorte and Lucindale. By having the properties in four different regions the sheep feed on grasses that go to seed at different times due to the microclimates of the particular area. The sheep accordingly have their lambs earlier or later. It's a way of using the natural cycle of the environment without any unnatural force or influence on our part. We grow the milk fed lambs at both our Meningie and Tintinara properties. The season for the milk feds matches well with the seasonal flush of other lambs in those areas.

RM: Do the mothers need more nutrients than other lamb producing sheep or are the lambs on the mothers for the same amount of time?

RG: As a product, it is most

in tune with our Mediterranean climate. In essence we run the milk fed producing ewes (the mothers) like wethers (a castrated male sheep kept for wool production) for 8-9 months of the year, then we feed them up, on quality pasture in late pregnancy and keep them on the best pasture for the 2 months they are suckling a lamb. We do this for a 6 month period we do rotate the different groups of ewes through the best pasture over the season and move them from our Meningie property to the Tintinara property for the last couple of months. Normally we would leave the lambs on the ewes for about 8 weeks. RM: What’s the difference

between milk fed lamb and other lamb?

RG: Milk fed lamb is very deli-

cate and tender and has a bright pink hue to the meat. Once lambs eat more pasture the meat darkens and takes on more of the flavours of the grasses. RM: What breed are the milk

fed lambs - why that breed?

RG: We use the black face Suf-

folk for all our milk fed lamb, whether it is pure or cross bred. Australias world leading sheep genetics program has shown that the black faced Suffolk delivers significantly more tender lamb and we, and our chef and butcher shop customers happen to agree with the science.


process them at?

O N E

RG: They come in at a 10-14kg carcase weight. And we supply the lambs as either whole carcases or as a 5 way cut (shoulder, leg, saddle, rack and breast). We also sell the offal which, in my opinion, is as good as the best veal offal.

k La mb e d S u f f ol - Milk F ed L a m b

Ce r ti fi

F E A T U R E

RM: What weight do you

RM: Do you need to cook

the milk fed lamb differently to older lambs?

0 8

RG: You certainly do – it is a more delicate and subtle meat and so both the cooking methods and flavour combinations need to be adjusted to compensate. That said, the most basic method of cooking such as fire roasting works for all lamb. You will just get an end result that tastes substantially different from a conventional lamb.

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2

Smoking

╳ How to smoke a beef brisket in your humble oven

5

No.1 ––– Preheat oven to 120°C. Soak your wood chips such as hickory, cherry or oak, in water for an hour. Drain but leave a film of water on the bottom of the roasting pan.

Master Class

Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling

No.2 ––– Put a rack on the roasting pan that will elevate the meat 5cm or so above the wood chips. No.3 ––– Make a tent of aluminium foil that completely seals the roasting pan on all sides and has room in the top for the smoke to circulate. The more tightly the foil is sealed, the more the smoky flavour will penetrate the meat. N .4 ––– Place your meat on the rack. Smoke for around eight hours for a 3-5kg piece of beef. The meat is done if it is fork-tender. o

3

No.5 ––– Marinade is a barrier for the smoke to properly penetrate the meat. Only after you’ve smoked for the required amount of time should you apply your marinade. Grill on high for a few minutes to caramelise. ❖

5

Quintessential Smoked Brisket Marinade (Makes 2 ½ cups ) Ingredients: 2

cups of cola cup olive oil ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon salt ¼

Preparation

Combine all ingredients and mix until the salt is completely dissolved. Apply to the brisket after smoke has penetrated the meat. Crisp up under the grill.


Master Class

1

Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling

Corning

╳ The Classic Corned Beef Eye Rump Side

No.1 ––– Combine 3 tbsp of pickling spice, 2½ cups of salt and ½ cup brown sugar with enough water to cover the eye rump side. Boil to dissolve sugar and salt, and then cool. Submerge the eye rump side and refrigerate for 5-7 days, flipping frequently to brine evenly. No.2 ––– Remove the eye rump side from the brine and rinse with cold water. Place in a large pot that just fits the eye rump side and cover with water. Add a tablespoon of the pickling spices to the pot. No.3 ––– Bring to a boil, reduce to a very low simmer and cook 3-4 hours, until the meat is fork tender. ❖

10 . 11

2


12 . 13

2

Curing

╳ The Curing Beef Tenderloin

No.1 ––– Mix together the 1kg salt, 1kg sugar plus preferred herbs and spices. Suggestion : 1 bunch rosemary chopped, 1 bunch thyme chopped, 3 tbs peppercorns, 1 tbsp chilli flakes. No.2 ––– Place half of the mixture in a tray, place beef on top and cover with the remaining mixture.

Master Class

Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling

No.3 ––– Place a tray on top and leave in the fridge for 48 hours. Curing time depends on the thickness of the meat and the cut selected. No.4 ––– Remove the beef from the salt mixture and wash well in cold water. ❖

4


Master Class

1

Smoking, Curing, Corning, Pickling

Pickling

╳ Veal sweetbreads pickled in a umami brine

Prepare sweetbreads by removing the outer membrane (refer to Chef ’s Special #74 for master class instruction)

Prepare your brining liquid:

No.1 ––– Weigh your meat and use the ratio 2:1 to calculate how much water you require i.e. 1kg sweetbreads will need 2L of water to cover. No.2 ––– Mix seasoning into the water and completely dissolve before submerging meat. The standard rule is 3 parts salt and 1 part sugar (in this case soy sauce and honey). No.3 ––– Refrigerate sweetbreads for 10 hours and rest for 30 minutes. The type of meat and the thickness of the cut you are pickling will determine the length of time required in this step. It can take anywhere between 4-12 hours, plus resting time. No.4 ––– Rinse with fresh water and cook as required. ❖

3


1 5 . 1 4

THANK YOU FOR SMOKING “ YOU C A N SMOK E PR E T T Y M UC H E V E RY T HI NG. I don’t think we’ve found an ingredient that doesn’t get better when it’s smoked,” says Gregory Llewellyn, chef and co-owner of Sydney’s Hartsyard, a newcomer known for its American fuel-injected cuisine, unpretentious atmosphere and unapologetic generosity.

❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖

F E A T U R E

T W O

MEL ISSA L EONG


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Counting culinary icons such as Daniel Boulud and Alain Ducasse as mentors, American Llewellyn worked extensively in the US, before moving to Australia with his Antipodean partner Naomi Hart, bringing with him a love of baseball caps in the kitchen and American BBQ culture. With a considerable chunk of the restaurant’s menu involving smoked components, it’s fair to say he knows a little more than a thing or two about the process. “We (hot and cold) smoke salt, sugar, cheese, hot sauce, oil, even water (in addition to vegetables and meat)”, Llewellyn explains, which adds a depth of flavour and an extra dimension to an overall dish.

F E A T U R E

T W O

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His smoked Wagyu brisket is testament to the virtues of smoke; combining the richness of slowly smoked Wagyu, cut with the sharpness of pickled green tomatoes, and served up alongside crunchy fried green tomatoes and barbecue mayo.

makes it good for smoking,” he explains. Cuts such as beef short ribs and lamb ribs also work well for the same reason, while keeping bones in helps retain shape “plus it’s always fun to make food you need to pick up and eat with your hands.”

The dish starts with a 7kg un-trimmed piece of brisket. “Basically any cut of meat you would braise long and slow, makes a good candidate for smoking,” Llewellyn says. “Fat absorbs the smoke’s essence really well, so meat with an even distribution of fat through the cut

The brisket is then dry rubbed, rather than brined or nitrate injected, (a technique used in pre-paring pastrami) using salt, sugar and a mixture of spices Americans call a ‘Dalmatian mix’ – “A little bit of this, a little bit of that”. The brisket is then turned regularly over 48 hours, allowing the salt to draw out some of the moisture and the sugar to lightly cure. It’s then smoked for around 7.5 hours, before the temperature drops for another 4 hours to allow the meat to ‘stall’, or stabilise.

“...IT ’S ALWAYS FUN TO MAKE FOOD YOU NEED TO PICK UP AND E AT WITH YOUR HANDS.”

When it comes to what wood to smoke with, Llewellyn likes to use a mixture of hickory and oak, both of which work particularly well with beef. Apple wood and alder can also feature in the mix, while birch imbues a lighter flavour and tends to work better when a lighter touch is necessary.

Of American barbecue culture’s crash-landing in Australia “(Australians) seem to really embrace it,” says Llewellyn, adding that while cooking over fire is already part of the culture, smoking and slow cooking technique seems newer territory. So could this be the end to the charred family BBQ? With skilled defectors like Llewellyn on our team, the future certainly looks promising.


SH

ORT

RIB

Chef Gregory Llewellyn ❖

Hartsyard Sydney, N.S.W

T W O

with K I M C H E E

F E A T U R E

Hartsyard’s Smoked

SERV ES 6 with 2 RIBS PER SERV E BEEF RIBS 12 Beef Ribs,

cut ‘Spare Rib’ style DRY CURE for RIBS: 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup salt ½ cup smoked paprika ¼ cup onion powder ¼ cup garlic powder cup black pepper ¼ cup yellow mustard seeds

Chilli

⇒ Coat liberally and let rest in fridge for more than 24 hours.

⇒ Hot smoke, using

hickory and oak chips, at 120°C for 8 hours. BONE MA R ROW

1 bone marrow per plate KIMCHEE

Chinese cabbage, soaked in seawater Chinese radish, julienned 1 bunch eshallots, Sliced Chilli, puréed (heat level as desired) 500g of garlic, puréed 250g fermented shrimp 4 tps white sugar Smoked sea salt

⇒ Soak cabbage in the sea water for 12 hours, peel back leaves.

⇒ Combine puréed

chilli with garlic, toss with julienned radish, season with fermented shrimp and the sugar.

T O PL AT E:

2 ribs served with Kimchee and roasted bone marrow.

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keep in a cool, dark place for 24-48 hours depending on temperature of location.

❖❖❖

1 6

⇒ Pack into something;

To roast bone marrow: ⇒ Sprinkle with a little bit of flour and some Togarashi spice, which is a Japanese spice.


ON THE MENU

R.M.

E

R T EE N MENUS

AN entrée is a dish served before the main course, unless you’re an American, in which case it would be the main - confusing! Meals found on entrée menus are usually of the lighter variety and are small portioned. It isn’t often you see red meat on an entrée menu, with diners traditionally preferring to progress from lighter to heavier as the meal moves on, however if you think outside the steak when it comes to red meat, options are open and choices are endless. VEAL and lamb are both naturally lighter proteins with their age brining subtlety to the flavour of the meat. Paired with light flavours and accompaniments, they’re an ideal break from traditional seafood and vego items. Don’t block your options with beef by thinking of it only as a huge chunk - think thin sliced, seared Wagyu with an Asian dipping sauce, beef carpaccio with all the trimmings, beef sliders… or turn the page for more inspiration from three Australian chefs.


ON THE MENU

No 1

CASSIA-BARK INFUSED VEAL RUMP with a BEETROOT POLENTA, SAUCED in a CORIANDER MOJO TOPPED with ONION FIG-JAM Chef Chris McIntyre Beef Masterpieces

No 2

20

BBQ ‘RIVERINA’ SUCKLING LAMB CUTLETS and BARRAMUNDI with HARISSA SPICED SAUSAGE MINCE Chef Neil Abraham Royal Canberra Golf Club

No 3

QLD

A.C.T

22

WHITE ROCKS VEAL BREAST, SWEETBREADS, PICKLED CARROTS and RHUBARB COMPOTE Chef Stephen Clarke Clarke's of North Beach

W.A

24


No 1 CASSIA-BARK INFUSED VEAL RUMP

with a BEETROOT POLENTA, SAUCED in a CORIANDER MOJO TOPPED with ONION FIG-JAM

Chef Chris McIntyre QLD


No 2 BBQ ‘RIVERINA’ SUCKLING LAMB CUTLETS and BARRAMUNDI with HARISSA SPICED SAUSAGE MINCE Chef Neil Abraham A.C.T.


No 3 WHITE ROCKS VEAL BREAST, SWEETBREADS, PICKLED CARROTS and RHUBARB COMPOTE Chef Stephen Clarke W.A.


No 1 CASSIA-BARK INFUSED VEAL RUMP with a BEETROOT POLENTA, SAUCED in a CORIANDER MOJO TOPPED with ONION FIG-JAM …

Chef Chris McIntyre QLD

Written for Beef Masterpieces SERVES 4 VEAL RUMP EYE SIDE 4 40ml 11 10 g 10 g

RUMP EYE SIDE MEDALLIONS OIL LARGE CASSIA BARK PIECES SEASONING CHERMOULA SPICE

Place rump eye side portions into a bowl. Add all other ingredients and marinate for 1 hour. Take medallions out of bowl and chargrill each side 5 minutes. Finish the veal off in the oven 170°C for 10 minutes.

whisk until blended. Stir constantly over moderate heat until mixture returns to the boil. Add beetroot mixture to polenta and stir. Reduce heat to very low and cook, stirring often for 20-30 minutes. Fold in 10g butter and grated parmesan, season with salt and pepper. ❖

Pour polenta on top of glad wrap and spread evenly with a spatula. Place in fridge for 30 minutes. Cut into even pieces with wet knife and reheat when needed. ONION FIG JAM 1 2

PEELED RED ONION FIGS: CUT INTO 8 PIECES EACH PALM SUGAR BALSAMIC VINEGAR BUTTER

30g 40ml 30g

Slice red onion and sweat with butter. Add palm sugar and figs making sure to stir. Mix in balsamic vinegar and simmer for 20 minutes.

CORIANDER MOJO ½

BUNCH CORIANDER

80g TOASTED ALMOND MEAL 1 0 0 m l AVOCADO OIL 1 0 g SEASONING 50ml SPARKLING MINERAL WATER

No 2 BBQ ‘RIVERINA’ SUCKLING LAMB CUTLETS and BARRAMUNDI with HARISSA SPICED SAUSAGE MINCE

Wash coriander and place in blender and blend, adding the avocado oil gradually. Add almond meal and seasoning. Finish with sparkling mineral water. Blend until smooth. BEETROOT POLENTA 240ml 1½ 80g 240g 320ml 40g 40g 12 0 g 8g 40g

MILK GARLIC CLOVES BUTTER BEETROOT CRANBERRY JUICE RED ONION BROWN SUGAR POLENTA SALT AND PEPPER GRATED PARMESAN CHEESE

Peel beetroot, onion and roughly cut. Melt 5g of butter in a pan add onions, beetroot and sweat 5 minutes. Add brown sugar and stir into mix. Add cranberry juice and simmer for 15 minutes. Take the beetroot mixture off the heat and blend.

Bring milk and garlic cloves to almost boiling. Strain the milk onto the polenta and

Chef Neil Abraham A.C.T Royal Canberra Golf Club MAKES 48 LAMB CUTLETS 48

1. 5 k g

1k g

SMALL LAMB CUTLETS: FRENCHED, SEALED ON THE CHARGRILL BARRAMUNDI: CLEANED AND PORTIONED TO 3 0 g m s EACH CREPINETTE: SOAKED IN WATER

SHOULDER MINCE 1k g 1e a c h

SHOULDER: FINELY MINCED DRIED RED CHILLIES: FINELY CHOPPED, ADJUST HEAT AS DESIRED 3g CUMIN SEEDS 3g CORIANDER SEEDS 3g CARAWAY SEEDS (SEEDS TOASTED AND GROUND) 1 CLOVE GARLIC, FINELY CHOPPED 200g COOKED CHICKPEAS, ROUGHLY CHOPPED 1 BUNCH FRESH CORIANDER, CHOPPED


No 3 WHITE ROCKS VEAL BREAST, SWEETBREADS, PICKLED CARROTS and RHUBARB COMPOTE …

R.M.

Chef Stephen Clarke W.A Clarke's of North Beach SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS 1k g

15 0 g

GRILLED MOROCCAN EGGPLANT SALSA 2each

MEDIUM EGGPLANTS: CUT INTO BATONS 3g TURMERIC POWDER 2g GROUND CORIANDER 2g GROUND CUMIN 50ml LEMON JUICE 50ml SHERRY VINEGAR 1 0 0 m l OLIVE OIL 50g SEEDED MUSTARD 10 0 g RED ONION, THINLY SLICED ½ BUNCH CORIANDER, FINELY CHOPPED

MINTED YOGHURT 600ml

MEREDITH SHEEP YOGHURT BUNCH MINT, FINELY CHOPPED 50ml LEMON JUICE 50ml OLIVE OIL SALT, PEPPER ½

METHOD ❖

Mix all shoulder mince ingredients together and spoon 30g on top of the sealed cutlet. Place a square of barramundi on top and wrap with crepinette. Roast for 8-10 minutes on 170°C. Rest.

Toss eggplant batons in spices and shallow fry until tender (must still keep their shape). Mix coriander with other ingredients and toss through eggplant. Season to taste. Mix all minted yoghurt ingredients together. TO PLATE

Place cutlet on plate, finish with minted sauce and eggplant salsa.

2 1 1 2 1L 2 30g

WHITE ROCKS VEAL BREAST WHITE ROCKS VEAL SWEETBREADS CARROTS LEEK BROWN ONION STAR ANISE VEAL STOCK RHUBARB STALKS CASTER SUGAR

VEAL BREAST ❖

Trim and remove the membrane from the veal breast then place in a braising tray with the stock and vegetables (carrots, leek, and onion) and star anise. Place in the oven at 150°C until tender. When the breast is cooked remove it from the braise and press it between two trays until cold, strain the braising stock and reduce to a rich sauce then strain again and reserve. When the veal breast is completely chilled, slice into desired portions, reserve until required then simply sauté in olive oil until golden. VEAL SWEETBREADS

Wash and soak the sweetbreads in cold salted water for 20 minutes then trim the sweetbreads. Cook in salted water and bring to the boil allow 10 minutes then refresh the sweetbreads in ice. Remove pat dry and reserve until required. Sauté and finish with the reduced strained braising stock. RHUBARB

Dice one rhubarb stalk. Place in a small pan with 20g castor sugar, 1 star anise and 1 table spoon of grenadine, cook until compote. With the other stalk slice as thin as possible on a mandolin, lightly poach in simple sugar syrup with 1 teaspoon of grenadine, remove and place in a dryer until crispy. To assemble the dish place the rhubarb compote down then the veal breast topping with the sweetbreads, finishing with the crisp rhubarb.


F O U R

C U T

W O N D E R S

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F O U R

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W O N D E R S

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3 1 . 3 0

Salad of Tea Smoked Beef with Roasted Root Vegetables

Serve 4-5 as a small entrée 3 swedes 3 turnips 4 carrots 1kg oyster blade 50g ginger and Lemongrass tea Dressing:

T H R E E

C U T

W O N D E R S

50ml sauvignon blanc vinegar 100ml extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1 tsp finely chopped fresh mixed herbs (parsley, basil, tarragon and chervil) Salt and pepper Peel and cut turnips and swedes in half and then into 1cm wedges. Peel and cut carrots in halves and then into 1cm batons. Put vegetables in a baking tray and drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast vegetables at 200°C until tender and slightly coloured. Leave to cool.

⇒⇒⇒

Smoking,

Curing, Corning, Pickling.

Trim oyster blade of all fat and silverskin. Slice wafer thin sheets of beef, slicing against the grain. Lay the sliced beef out on a cake rack in a single thickness. Using a baking tray that will fit the cake rack, line the baking tray with foil. Put the tea leaves in the baking tray and place baking tray on the stovetop, straight onto the flame. Heat until the tea is smoking. Place the cake rack, with the beef, into the baking tray and cover completely with foil. Smoke the meat for 5 min. Leave meat on cake rack to cool. To serve place smoked meat and roasted vegetables in a bowl and toss with dressing until lightly coated. Season with salt and pepper.

Sarah McFarlane Written for Beef Masterpieces Adelaide, S.A


3 3 . 3 2

Pickled Brisket Sandwich with Green Tomato Chutney

Smoking,

Curing, Corning,

T H R E E

C U T

W O N D E R S

⇒⇒⇒

Pickling.

Chef John McFadden Trippas White Group, Sydney, N.S.W


Preheat the oven to 160°C. Carefully remove the brisket from the marinade pan and scrape the herbs back into the reserved marinade, which now is your braising liquid. Pat the meat dry with paper towels and liberally season it with salt and freshly ground pepper. Heat olive oil in a large fry pan over medium high heat and carefully brown the brisket for approx. 3 minutes per side. Do not overcook or the meat will become tough. Place the browned brisket back in the marinade tray with the braising liquid, fat side up. If the liquid does not cover the meat, add a bit more stock. On the stovetop, bring the liquid to a gentle boil over medium high heat. Remove from heat, cover tightly with foil, and place the pan in the preheated oven. Braise for 3 to 3.5 hours, or until the brisket feels fork tender. Slice the brisket, removing excess fat and place a portion onto two pieces of char grilled sourdough bread with a small dollop of grain mustard, a generous spoon of green tomato chutney, finely sliced Spanish onion (blanched in boiling water for 1 minute and refreshed) and fresh picked and washed watercress.

3 2 . 3 3

Remove seeds from tomatoes, chop onions and add sultanas. Dice peeled and cored apple. Place all into a stainless steel pot and add the pepper, salt and sugar and vinegar. Simmer all ingredients until it is reduced to a thick mixture. Spoon into sterilized jars. Leave to mature for one week prior to making the sandwich. It will keep for up to 3 months. Refrigerate after opening.

W O N D E R S

Green tomato chutney: 200g Granny Smith apples 500g sultanas 500g muscovado sugar 2 tbsp salt 1 tsp cayenne pepper 1 tsp ground green cardamom 500ml malt vinegar 500g green tomatoes 300g onion

C U T

12 – 14 portions 2.2kg pickled point end brisket, deckle off — with fat cover left on (order from your butcher a few days before) 750ml beef stock 250ml good quality red wine 2 tbsp fresh oregano 2 tbsp fresh thyme 3 bay leaves 4 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole 1 medium onion, roughly chopped Sea salt to taste Ground black pepper 2 tbsp olive oil Spanish onions, finely sliced Watercress Sourdough bread Grain mustard

Brisket: Wash brisket and pat dry with a clean paper towel. Place the brisket in a large non-reactive pan, fat side up. Combine the stock, wine, oregano, thyme, and bay leaves and pour the mixture over the meat. Tuck the garlic cloves and onions around the brisket. Place in a stainless steel, deep sided pan and cover tightly with baking paper and foil. Refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight.

T H R E E

Makes


T H R E E

C U T

W O N D E R S

3 4

.

3 5


T H R E E C U T W O N D E R S

Serves 2 2 russet potatoes 2 tbsp rendered bacon fat 2 onions, diced 3 cups of carrots, peeled and cut into small cubes 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves 500g corned beef, cut into small cubes 3 tbsp corned beef fat olive oil Preheat oven to 175°C. Pierce potatoes with fork; wrap in foil. Bake potatoes until tender, about 1 hour. Cool. Peel and cut into small cubes. Heat bacon fat in a large, heavy skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add onions and cook until tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes. Add carrots and cook until onions caramelise and carrots are tender, stirring often, about 15 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to bowl.

Mix in potatoes, thyme, corned beef, and corned beef fat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Partially mash with potato masher (mixture will begin to clump together). Shape hash into ten 2.5cm patties, using 3/4 cup hash for each. Place on baking sheet. Cover and chill until cold, about 2 hours. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large, heavy non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add hash patties and cook until crisp and brown, adding more oil to skillet as necessary, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to plates. Serve with poached egg and hollandise.

Smoking,

Curing, ⇒ ⇒ ⇒ Corning,

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Pickling.

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Corned Beef Hash with Poached egg and Hollandaise


3 7 . 3 6

Curing, Corning,

⇒⇒⇒

Smoking, Pickling.

Serve 6-8 as a small entrée The Spice Cure: 25g kosher salt 30g sugar 4g Insta Cure #2 or DC Curing Salt #2 5g freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp chopped fresh rosemary 1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves 5 crushed juniper berries

T H R E E

C U T

W O N D E R S

1.5kg veal Girello no more than 7.5cm in diameter, trimmed of sinew and fat Combine all the spice cure ingredients in a spice grinder and grind to fine powder. Rub half the spice cure all over the meat. Place in 8ltr Ziploc bag or nonreactive container and refrigerate for 7 days, turning every 2 days.

The Station Hotel's Veal Bresaola

Remove the veal from the liquid (discard it) and rub in the remaining spice cure. Return to refrigerator for 7 more days. Rinse the veal thoroughly under cold water to remove any remaining spices. Pat dry with paper towels. Set on a rack uncovered at room temperature for 2.5 hours. Tie the veal in butchers twine. Hang the meat (ideally at 15°C with 60 to 70% humidity) for about 3 weeks. The meat should feel firm on the outside and silky smooth when sliced. Presentation: Slice thinly and cover an entrée round plate, serve with cannellini beans dressed with tuna mayo, basil, rocket, lilliput capers, evo, and toasted ciabatta bread.

Chef Jacob Young The Station Hotel, Melbourne, V.I.C


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THATS A WR AP!

i

Wrapping your meat in thin cling wrap, such as the Glad variety, allows lots of oxygen to seep into the meat and bind with the myoglobin (meat's red molecules which gives meat its colour).

ii Over a short time, the myoglobin molecules change into metmyoglobin which also means a change in colour, from the cherry red, meat is known for, to brown.

iii This change is irreversible. If you, instead, vacuum pack your meat it would still change in colour (due to a lack of oxygen instead of too much) however when you opened it up to air it would bloom again into a fresh, cherry red.

What’s Hot in 2013 Culinary Forecast

Considering how many of our cultural trends come from the US, we thought we’d give you a squiz at The National Restaurant Association’s predictions into the hottest trends on restaurant food menus in the land of stars and stripes for the coming year. They survey more than 1,800 professional chefs to find these out. No.1 LOCALLY SOURCED MEATS AND SEAFOOD (why would you buy anything else?) ------------------No.2 LOCALLY GROWN PRODUCE (Dust off those gumbootsconsidering how big the Australian land mass is, you’d be surprised how close your local friendly red meat farmer is to you).

No.3

H E A LT H F U L :

that’s American for healthy-kids’ meals (Interestingly, here in Australia, 75% of restaurant goers agree that establishments should offer a kids menu with healthy options. (MLA Foodservice Consumer Report, Ruby Cha Cha, Oct 2012)

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(to find out what your beef, lamb and goat farmer is doing in Australia to ensure the sustainability of your meat cuts, check out Target 100, an initiative by Australian cattle and sheep farmers, along with the broader industry, to deliver sustainable cattle and sheep farming by 2020)

░ ░ ░ ░ ░ ░ ░

B I T E

S I Z E D

No. 4 Environmental sustainability

░ ░ ░

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America’s National Restaurant Association’s

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BITE SIZED


PG rated food for those mini food connoisseurs. Frozen nuggets and pizzas don’t cut it anymore. The recent wave of mini food critics want fresh, they want flavour and they want to feel included.

N o. 6

No.12 Non-wheat noodles/pasta (e.g. quinoa, rice, buckwheat)

Children’s Nutrition

No.13

No. 14

Non-traditional F-I-S-H (e.g. branzino, Arctic char, barramundi)

Ethnic-inspired breakfast items (for inspiration check out Chef’s Special journal issue #75)

M O M E N T A R Y

No.5

NEW CUTS OF MEAT

Check out our Beef Masterpieces Programs #1 & #2 for cuts like the Flat Iron Steak and ‘Denver’ Steak. Order the info from: raremedium.com.au/masterpieces

No. 15 Fruit and Vegetable children's side items

❖ ❖ ❖ No. 7

HYPER-LOCAL SOURCING

N o .16 H E A LT H & N U T R I T I O N

No. 8 Gluten-free cuisine

CONSUMED 3 TIMES A WEEK BY MOST AUSTRALIANS, RED MEAT PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE AUSTRALIAN DIET – IT IS THE LARGEST CONTRIBUTOR OF READILY AVAILABLE IRON AND ZINC AND THE SECOND LARGEST CONTRIBUTOR OF OMEGA-3, AFTER FISH. WITH LESS THAN 4% SATURATED FAT, TRIMMED RED MEAT HAS THE HEART FOUNDATION’S TICK OF APPROVAL.

No.10 Whole grain items in kids’ meals

No. 17 –––– H A L F - P O R T I O N S / S M A L L

Think do-it-yourself curing and smoking and in-house dry ageing.

No. 9 Sustainable seafood

PORTIONS FOR A SMALLER PRICE

NO. 18 HOUSEMADE AND ARTISAN ICE CREAM

No. 19 Black/ forbidden rice

.

No. 20 Food trucks

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No.11 FARM AND ESTATE BRANDED ITEMS ------------------------------------------------Just like kids in a candy store we’re spoilt for choice when it comes to the variety and quality of red meat available in Australia. Consumers are become more and more aware of how their food is produced and they’re looking for the scoop direct from the farmer. Branded meats are exactly that - the romance of the farm found on a restaurant menu. Ask your friendly supplier for their branded beef, lamb and goat or look for red meat produced under the MSA grading system for something a little bit ‘spesh’.

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4 1 . 4 0

MOM E NTARY 07.12.2012

11:57pm

Sammy Minzly aka Mr. Sammy Beigel Bake Brick Lane Bakery, Brick Lane, London E1 6SB

T

he Beigel Bake Brick Lane Bakery is one of the oldest of the bagel shops in London. Open since 1976 (Sammy’s been working there from day dot), it's a thriving 24 hour bakery that produces over 7000 beigels a night. Don’t expect the bagel of New York; these babies are as distinctly different, (just like the spelling) smaller, softer, doughier and packed full of piping hot, salted brisket, mustard and pickles. Mr Sammy uses a recipe that his forefathers brought from Poland, but it is not simply a case of following that recipe, “it's how you work the recipe but more about how you treat the dough”. “IT'S HOW YOU WORK THE RECIPE BUT MORE ABOUT HOW YOU TREAT THE DOUGH”

M O M E N T A R Y

Mr Sammy

❖ ❖ ❖


M O M E N T A R Y

SA LT E D B E E F B E I G E L FOR THE BRINE 275g SOFT LIGHT-BROWN SUGAR 350g COARSE SEA SALT 2 tsp BLACK PEPPERCORNS ½ t b s p JUNIPER BERRIES 4 CLOVES 4 BAY LEAVES 4 SPRIGS OF THYME 55g SALTPETRE (OPTIONAL, BUT THIS IS WHAT GIVE THE BRISKETS THAT FAMOUS PINK SHADE)

FOR THE BEEF 2 .5kg 1

1 1 1 1 ½

PIECE OF BEEF BRISKET LARGE CARROT, ROUGHLY CHOPPED ONION, ROUGHLY CHOPPED CELERY STICK, ROUGHLY CHOPPED LEEK, CUT INTO LARGE CHUNKS BOUQUET GARNI HEAD OF GARLIC

No.1 ––– Put all the ingredients for the brine into a saucepan, pour in 2.5 litres of water and gradually bring to the boil to dissolve the sugar and salt. Boil for two minutes. Cool completely. No.2 ––– Pierce the meat all over and place in a non-reactive container. Cover the meat with the brine. Refrigerate for seven days. No.3 ––– Take the beef out of the brine and rinse it. Roll and tie the meat and put it in a pan with the vegetables, bouquet garni and garlic, adding enough cold water to cover. Bring the water to simmering point, then leave to poach gently for two and a half to three hours. Cook until the meat is completely tender. No.4 ––– Carve 250g of brisket per beigel and serve with mustard and pickles.

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N O T E S

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R.M.

ISSUE O2

THANK YOU FOR READING


Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) is a service company that invests in marketing and research and development on behalf of its 47,500 beef, lamb and goat producer members. Our role within foodservice is to bridge the gap between farm and kitchen by providing chefs with information and inspiration on red meat. For your FREE Subscription 1800 550 018 raremedium@mla.com.au

Rare Medium Issue #2  
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