Issuu on Google+


D E A R AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R S ' G U I L D R E A D E R

Welcome to the first issue of the Australian Butcher – The Guild's Guide to Beef, Veal, Goat & Lamb. With the launch of the Australian Butchers’ Guild, formally the Red Meat Networking Club , we are taking the program in a new and exciting direction aimed at providing the independent butcher with a modern and informative educational resource. This issue, we are celebrating summer with a steak feature… 'one for every day of the week' . We explore the mysteries of dry aging and find out what a fourth generation butcher has on his menu and more. Now is the time for the independent butcher to be seen as true artisans within the community and to build a fraternity with other butchers, where ideas are shared and friendships forged. We hope you enjoy reading the first issue and join us on the journey of many more to come.

The Guild's Guide t o Be e f, Ve a l, Goa t & L a m b •

ABG

I nt r o d u ct io n

N o . 01

Su mmer

2 014


• M L A R E TA I L C O N TA C T S •

AUST R A LIA

S t e p h e n Po c oc k

Tra d e M a r ke t i ng M an ag e r T. 03 9249 9510 F. 0411 680 506 E. s p o co ck @ m l a. co m . au NSW / A C T

M atth e w C ar mody

S ta te P r ogr a m M an ag e r T. 02 9463 9236 F. 0411 680 507 E. m car m o d y @ m l a. co m . au QLD / NT

G ar y M cP h e rson

S ta te P r ogr a m M an ag e r T. 07 3620 5211 F. 0411 680 515 E. g m cp h e r s o n @ m l a. co m . au SA

B r e tt Atk inson

Sta te P r ogr a m M an ag e r T. 08 8471 5800 F. 0411 680 519 E. b atk in s o n @ m l a. co m . au VIC / TA S

A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01 The Guild’s Guide to Beef, Veal, Goat & Lamb

Meat & Livestock Australia Limited (MLA) Level 1, 40 Mount Street North Sydney, NSW 2059 T. +61 2 9463 9333 F. +61 2 9463 9393 E. butchers@mla.com.au Copyright This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited / ABN 39 081 678 364 / (MLA). Care is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in the publication; however, MLA cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited without the prior written consent of MLA. ©2014 Published January 2014.

I S S N / 2202 - 6894

M ich ae l Tan

Sta te P r ogr a m M an ag e r T. 03 9249 9593 F. 0408 385 873 E. m t an @ m l a. co m . au WA

R af ae l R am irez

Sta te P r ogr a m M an ag e r T. 08 9209 2890 F. 0408 083 014 E. r r am ir e z@ m l a. co m . au

Journal Enquiries Elisha Moran E. emoran@mla.com.au

Paper Stock Revive Laser W. spicers.com.au

Artwork MASH W. mashdesign.com.au

Printing Southern Colour Pty Ltd W. southerncolour.com.au


CONTENTS

MEAT TUTORIAL

6

Dry Aging • Aging Gracefully How to Dry Age Meat Is it worth the wait?

MEET THE MAKER

10

Aronui Feedlot • Greg Gibbons

STEAK FEATURE

12

One for each day of the week

THE GUILD

18

Gary's Quality Meats • Gary McBean

CUT OF THE QUARTER

20

The Bolar Blade The Oyster Blade

SHOP TO PLATE Masterclass Orange Mustard BBQ Steaks Bushman's Beef Blade

24


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

06

MEAT TUTORIAL Dry Aging • Aging Gracefully

Dry aging is not a new technique, in fact until developments in chilling and vacuum packaging occurred in the 1960s dry aging was the most common, if not the only way to prepare meat for long term storage and transport. These days dry aging meat is done more as a point of difference rather than a spoilage preventative.

Meat is dry aged under tightly controlled conditions: air flow, air temperature, relative humidity and number of days of aging are all considered when determining a desired outcome. The celebrated characteristics of dry aged meat; a deep full flavour, a wonderful nutty aroma, superior tenderness and juiciness – develop within the meat as a result of all of these conditions being considered together – not as separate entities.

D R Y AUSTRALIAN BUTCHER

A G E

F OR AN I N CREA SED

T H E G U I L D ' S G U I D E T O B E E F, V E A L , G O A T & L A M B

FLAVOUR • AROMA • TENDERNESS • JUICINESS SECTION

Meat Tutorial

ISSUE

No. 01

SEASON

SUMMER

YEAR

2014


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

08

MEAT TUTORIAL How to Dry Age Meat

YOUR CUT 1

Select a large, tender primal such as short loin or ribs prepared. Aging meat does not affect connective tissue so large primals of more tender muscles benefit most from dry aging and result in a higher saleable meat yield after the crust has been trimmed. For the best outcome choose only MSA Graded beef cuts to dry age.

YOUR STORAGE 2

CHILL 3

The rate of tenderness improvement during aging is related to temperature level. The higher the temperature, the more rapid the change although too high and you’ll promote more rapid bacterial growth, resulting in off odours and flavours but too low and the enzymes which break down muscle fibre cease to work. Your air temperature will need to be kept stable and between -0.5°C and 1.0°C. Temperature stability is important – your dry aging room should open into another refrigerated room to prevent warm, moist air from entering the area.

MANAGE YOUR HUMIDITY 4

TRIM/SHRINKAGE & YIELD 6

Trim away the dry crust and bone. Once trimmed, dry aged meat can be portioned, vacuum packed and kept refrigerated or frozen. Although moisture loss is positive from a flavour standpoint, this shrinkage results in reduced saleable meat yield. With this moisture loss and the trim, yield loss can be up to 8.5%. Dry aging isn’t for the faint hearted: it takes almost twice the original amount of meat to “make” a dry-aged steak...

Airflow is of paramount importance in the process of dry aging and needs to be addressed when looking at how to store your primals. It should be low and even (0.2–0.5m/s) and airflow around the individual primals should be unrestricted. There should be no dead spots within the room or areas of high velocity. Storage such as wire racks, perforated shelves, trees and hooks are best so that all sides of the product are exposed to correct air temperature that allows uniform drying. However you choose to dry age, make sure you put a drip tray beneath the primal.

Just like air temperature relative humidity needs to be just so. A high humidity will encourage spoilage bacteria to grow and a low humidity will result in excess yield loss. Aim for relative humidity that sits between 75% and 85%. The Relative Humidity of a normal chiller or cool room would not be suitable for dry aging.

C O U N T T H E D AY S 5

Determining how long to age your primal for will depend on the results you’d like to achieve. Flavour, aroma, tenderness and juiciness are all altered the longer you age for and are a result of not only days aging but also temperature, relative humidity and airflow. Dry aging periods of between 14–35 days appear to be able to achieve the results desired from a dry aged primal.

The production of dry aged meat must be done in appropriate environmental conditions – Establishments interested in dry aging will need to test the parameters to ensure they produce a quality product in a safe manner.


09

SUMMER 2013

MEAT TUTORIAL Is it worth the wait?

FLAVOUR The greatest reason for dry aging beef is the affect it has on flavour. Flavour notes such as round, sweet, full, roasted, dark, beefy-intensity, umami and caramel have been used to describe dry aged meat. Loss of moisture is the main reason for this – as the meat starts to shrink the flavour gets concentrated – similar how a reducing sauce become richer.

AROMA Slow oxidisation of fat and fat-like molecules within the meat produce aromas such as sweetness, nuttiness and bite.

TENDERNESS During the aging of meat, proteins that give a muscle its structure and functionality break down to increase tenderness through a process known as proteolysis. As meat ages large proteins begin to break down into smaller fragments and as this process continues, the meat becomes more tender. This process happens in wet and dry aging.

JUICINESS As meat ages enzymes present in the muscles cells start to break down protein structure and reduce the water holding capacity of the meat. This means that the meat isn’t capable of holding onto its own juices when being chewed and releases more juice.


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

10

MEET THE MAKER Aronui Feedlot • Greg Gibbons

Greg Gibbons only intended to work at Aronui Feedlot, located on the fertile Darling Downs in southern Queensland, for 6 weeks before heading west; however 25 years later he and his family still call it home.

Greg joined Aronui in 1987 as a feed trailer driver and was lucky enough to work under the ‘godfather’ of the Australian grain feeding industry, Dugald Cameron. It was Dugald who stirred Greg’s pursuit of innovation, quality and sustainability – three principles that now guide Greg’s management of Aronui Feedlot.

ARONUI FEEDLOT E S TA B L I S H E D

1964

SOUTHERN

QLD

AREA (HA.)

865

QUESTIONS

AUSTRALIAN BUTCHER

ABG

GREG GIBBONS

ANSWERS

2014

2014

R a infa ll: 674m m • C a t eg o r y: Feed l o t • B r eed : Pr ed o mina nt l y Wa g yu C a pa cit y: 15,000 Adult Equiv a le nt • Tu r no f f : A p p r o x . 30, 000 h ea d /yea r • St a f f : 26 (Fu l l Time)


SUMMER 2013

On the feedlot, cattle are constantly supervised during their stay. Alongside qualified veterinarians, our staff are trained in animal welfare, husbandry and handling, so that the safety and comfort of the cattle is maintained. If an animal is sick they are quickly identified, separated, treated and returned to the herd once a clean bill of health is issued. The cleanliness of the yards at Aronui is important, not only for animal welfare but also in terms of upholding environmental standards. Cattle waste is regularly removed from yards and then composted and sold as valuable soil conditioner to farms, nurseries and market gardens, while runoff from yards is collected in ponds and used to irrigate crops on Aronui Farm, which are used in the feedlot. Once cattle reach their goal market weight, they are transported for processing. Animal stress and wellbeing is of prime consideration here, as it can affect the eventual quality of the product. At Aronui we’re fully aware of our environmental and animal welfare responsibilities. We’re utilising sustainable feedlot and farming practices and constantly innovating and updating our standards and practices by looking both within and outside the industry for possible solutions and ideas for improvements. What kinds of cattle are in the feedlot? The majority of cattle on feed at Aronui are wagyu. We started with wagyu in 1997. Learning about wagyu is non-stop. It’s a constant evaluation of genetics; seeing what works and improving on it. We just love their extraordinary flavour and tenderness, and their innate suitability for the feedlot environment. There’s nothing in the world like a piece of wagyu.

11

Tell us a little about Aronui Feedlot. Aronui Feedlot is the oldest commercial feedlot in Australia. It was established in the 1960s by the Cameron family and became part of the Australian Agricultural Company (AACo) in 2002. The feedlot is near Dalby in Southern Queensland and is fortunate to draw its water supply from underground bores in the Great Artesian Basin. The water is of high quality and very suitable and reliable as a source of drinking water for our cattle. Aronui is situated in a grain belt on the rich and fertile Darling Downs. The grain mix we feed our cattle includes sorghum, barley, wheat, corn, straw, hay, and liquid supplement, with most being sourced locally. Can you talk us through what happens in the feedlot? The cattle are transported to Aronui Feedlot by truck. Animal welfare is of paramount importance during this process and is governed by legislation that ensures cattle travel as short a distance as possible and with care. Once at Aronui, the cattle are inducted, a process that identifies each animal and records breed, age and weight, allowing similar breeds, as well as cattle that are going to similar markets, to be grouped together. Cattle are checked to ensure they are free of parasites and pests before being introduced into the yards. Each yard is quite large – enough space for all cattle to behave naturally in terms of movement and interaction. Plentiful clean fresh water and feed are available to the cattle 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and the feed is formulated by nutritionists depending on how long the cattle will stay at Aronui. Because we’re feeding wagyu, most of the cattle will be long fed. We also have some domestic cattle at Aronui which are fed 60-70 days for the local market.


12

A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

STEAK FEATURE One for each day of the week

Forget the Fillet and Scotch Fillet steak – did you know there are around 16 other beef steak cuts on the carcase? Each with their own flavour, use and levels of tenderness, there is one for every menu and mood.

BLADE STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

S t e ak Featu r e

TOMAHAWK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a mb

Sum me r

No. 01 / 2 014

Blade steak comes from the shoulder blade. It is a versatile cut that can be barbecued and pan-fried, cut into strips and stir-fried or diced for slow-cooking in a braise. When using it as a steak cut it is important to cook to medium rare.

T H E C U T S • B lad e S tea k / Toma ha wk / C huck St e a k / Oy st e r B l a d e S t e a k / Ten d er loi n Steak / Tri - Tip / Ey e R ump Side / Inside Skirt S t ea k F l a n k Steak / Flat Ir on Stea k / R ump St e a k / Ey e R um p C e nt re / R ib E ye S t e ak / Hang er S teak / Rump C a p St e a k / Sirloin St e a k / T - bone St ea k

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

Su mmer

No. 01 / 2 014

The Tomahawk is one of the largest steaks in Australia weighing up to 1.9kg. The Tomahawk is essentially a Rib Eye and takes its name from the 30cm rib bone that is left on when served to the table. A standard sized Tomahawk is shared between 4 guests. When you order a Tomahawk steak from your wholesaler make sure you specify that it is from a carcase weight range of 390-420kg as you’d like the average weight of your Tomahawk to be 1.2-1.6kg. Each rib is frenched leaving the intercostals intact, however the intercostals can be removed if required and rib bones cleaned. A true Tomahawk steak has a rib bone cut to around 30cm in length. Sear the steaks on both sides before transferring to indirect heat for 30-35 minutes, depending on degree of doneness required.


13

SUMMER 2013

CHUCK STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

S t e ak Featu r e

OYSTER BLADE STEAK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a mb

No. 01 / 2 014

Sum me r

The often overlooked Chuck steak is separated from the Rib Eye at the sixth rib on the carcase and it shares many characteristics with the Rib Eye, but for a much better price. With many different muscles running through it, the boneless Chuck Eye steak is not a particularly pretty piece of meat, but it is well-marbled and very tasty. Chuck steak is often braised because it has some gristle, but it also takes happily to the grill if it is not overcooked.

EXCITING RECIPES

FO R

SELECTED CUTS

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

S t e ak Featu r e

No. 01 / 2 014

CA N B E FOU N D I N T H E

NEW

I SSU E OF

M E AT & C O.

#

4

TRI-TIP

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a mb

Sum me r

Su mmer

Also known as a Feather steak. These very tender, juicy steaks are a delicious bargain cut from a full oyster blade, this primal can also be seam cut to produce Flat Iron steaks. Their only drawback is the thin ribbon of gristle that runs length wise through them but is easy enough to eat around. Before cooking, use the tip of a knife to score the gristle, which helps to keep the steaks from curling when cooking.

TENDERLOIN STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

No. 01 / 2 014

Typically, the most tender cuts of beef with the least amount of connective tissue are those cuts that sit along the spine of the animal as there they do the least amount of work. The Tenderloin (as the name suggests) is one such cut. As a result of its lazy life the Tenderloin is also delicate in flavour. The Tenderloin is best suited to portioning into steaks for pan-frying and barbecuing. There are two Tenderloins per carcase.

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

Su mmer

No. 01 / 2 014

The Tri-Tip is cut from a muscle usually 675 -1,150g per side of beef cut from the rump. The Tri-Tip is the 5th muscle removed from this primal after preparation turning it into a D-rump. Steaks cut from the whole Tri-Tip need to be cut across the grain and 21mm thick for best cooking results. This cut is popular in the US and is also referred to as a 'Newport Steak'. There are two Tri-Tips per carcase.


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

14

EYE RUMP SIDE AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

S t e a k Featu r e

INSIDE SKIRT STEAK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a m b

Summ e r

No. 01 / 2 014

One of the 5 muscles that make up the whole Rump, Eye of Rump side is a short, lean, log-shaped muscle ideally suited to cutting into medallions. These appealing medallions are perfect for fast cooking on a hot surface like a barbecue or pan. Cooked correctly this cut is tender and has the beefiness of the Rump. It can also be kept whole and tied with string to form a uniform shape for roasting – perfect for a Beef Wellington or wrapped in bacon for mignons.

IMAGE

H a ngi ng R i b S e t s

BUT C H ER

G ar y ' s Q u al ity Meats, V I C

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

S t e a k Featu r e

No. 01 / 2 014

T O D I SCOV ER MORE PLEA SE READ

PA G E

18

FLAT IRON STEAK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a m b

Summ e r

Su mmer

This steak is juicy and beefy in flavour, Skirt steak can be either of two long, flat, well-marbled muscles (the diaphragm and the transverse abdominal muscle). In terms of looks and flavour, they’re virtually indistinguishable. The Skirt steak has more of a chew than some of the other steaks but this can be softened with an acidic marinade making them a perfect value added cut. Its thick grain means it needs to be sliced before serving. Each carcase has two skirts.

FLANK STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

No. 01 / 2 014

This long and flat cut, from just below the Short Loin is quite lean and has a distinctive longitudinal grain – which means it is imperative to slice the steak thinly across the grain before serving. This coarse grain also means that the Flank steak is very porous so perfect for marinating. Plus, there is no waste due to any gristle fat or bone. There are two Flank steaks per carcase.

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

Su mmer

No. 01 / 2 014

Wide, long, and flat, hence the name, the Flat Iron is from the Oyster Blade, a muscle from below the shoulder blade, and is bisected by a long line of gristle. When the gristle is removed, you get two beautiful 300-450g steaks that then can be portioned. The Flat Iron is one of the most tender cuts on the animal (after the Tenderloin), and stays juicy and tender when cooked to medium-well.


15

SUMMER 2013

RUMP STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

St ea k Fea t u r e

No. 01 / 2 014

Su mmer

A traditional pub favourite, Rump steak has a great mix of texture and rich flavour. The Rump steak is made up of four different muscles – some meltingly tender and some with a satisfying chew.

EYE RUMP CENTRE AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

RIB EYE STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a m b St ea k Fea t u r e

No. 01 / 2 014

Su mmer

The lean centre muscle of the Rump, this steak is best suited to quick cooking on a hot barbeque or pan. For best cooking results, steaks should be cut a minimum of 21mm across. Take care with this steak – it’s very lean and can dry out so don't cook it more than medium-rare.

S t e a k Featu r e

Summ e r

No. 01 / 2 014

Also known as the Scotch Fillet. Take a full set of OP Ribs, bone out and remove the Cube Roll. Slice the Cube Roll into steaks of even thickness to create the Rib Eye Steak. This steak can also be left on the bone to create Rib Cutlets or Rib Eye on the Bone. These steaks are tender, full of flavour and are best when cooked over a high heat on a grill/barbecue or in a pan.

S T E A K F E AT U R E •

O N E F O R E A C H D AY O F T H E W E E K SE VE N T E E N

CU T S

N o . 01

Fl a vo u r

A r o ma

FO R

E VE RY

ME N U

ABG Tend er nes s

AN D

MOOD

2 014

Ju icin e s s


16

A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

HANGER STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

S t e ak Featu r e

RUMP CAP STEAK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a mb

Sum me r

No. 01 / 2 014

The Hanger steak hangs from the last rib and attaches to the diaphragm. The ribbon of gristle that runs through the thick, deep red centre needs to be removed, resulting in long, narrow strips of meat. The Hanger’s robust flavour lends itself to bold flavours which makes up for its relative lack of tenderness.

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

S t e a k Featu r e

No. 01 / 2 014

T-BONE STEAK

Be e f • Ve a l • Goa t • L a m b

Summ e r

Su mmer

Rump Cap is a cut of beef that sits atop the Rump, hence its name. In some countries its considered to be the best cut of beef due to its marked flavour. It is famous and loved in South American countries, especially Brazil where it is known as 'Picanha'. Slice against the grain for petite steaks.

SIRLOIN STEAK AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

No. 01 / 2 014

Sirloin steaks are cut from Striploin which is located along the spine in the hindquarter and runs from the ribs to the Rump, sitting above the Tenderloin. Located along the spine where the muscles do less work, Sirloin steaks are tender and best suited to high temperature cooking such as pan-frying, barbecuing.

AU ST R A L I A N B U TC H E R

St ea k Fea t u r e

B eef • Vea l • G o a t • L am b

Su mmer

No. 01 / 2 014

The T-bone comes from the Short-Loin of a carcase. The Fillet and Sirloin muscles sit on opposite sides of this t-shaped bone to form the T-bone steak. With little or no fat or connective tissue the T-bone is a quintessential Aussie steak perfect for pan frying or barbecuing. There are two Short-Loins on a carcase.

R e g i st r ati on Nu mber : M M 004 525 • P rima r y C la ssifica t ion: C omm e rce & R et a il ing • Fo r ma t : N eg a t ive, B l a ck & Wh it e, 35mm • Cr ea t o r : W. Sh er w o o d St u di o, C i rc a 19 2 5

BUTCHER — AUSTRALIA / Circa 1925 DESCRIPTION OF CONTENT A but che r in his shop. Cu t s o f mea t a r e su sp e n d ed f r om h ooks, th e re is a se t of sca le s on t he le ft a nd t he b u t ch er h a s a l a r g e p i e ce of meat on h i s c h opping block. ©2 014 Mu seu m Vict oria ( M.V.)

Co p ied f r o m Zara Tay l o r, 19 8 7 A C Q U I S I T I O N I N F O R M AT I O N T h e B ig g es t Fa mil y A l b u m o f A u s tral i a, M. V. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Te c h n o l o g y DISCIPLINE


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

THE GUILD Gary's Quality Meats • Gary McBean

Fourth-generation Melbourne butcher Gary McBean has seen a whole gamut of consumer trends since he bought his butcher shop at just 25 years old. Today, he is paring back his Prahran Market business to focus on quality cuts, spiced up with tasty dry aged options.

GARY ’S QUALITY M E AT S — E st . 19 7 5

18

L o c a t i o n S h o p N o . 515 a t Prah ran Market 163 C o m m e r cial R oad S o u th Yar r a, Melbou r ne, V I C 3141 Phone ( 03) 9826 0815 We b s i t e o r g an icb u t ch e r m elbou r ne. c om

QU

ESTIONS

Australian Butcher ABG

No. 01

Gary McBean ANS

WERS


19

SUMMER 2013

Unlike many butchers, you have changed your focus away from value-added options in recent times – why? Our business is driven by consumer trends, and at the moment our customers want to be more involved in preparing their meals. They are inspired by the range of cooking shows and cook books currently on the market. We are bringing our shop back to a 1950s style business, cutting out all but our best value-added products. How have you changed your business in the past, to respond to consumer demands? When I bought the business 25 years ago, there was a strong Greek community at Prahran, so we sold a lot of half and full lambs, chops and other traditional cuts. Then in the 1980s and 1990s, as land values went up, the suburb’s demographics started changing, to young professionals. Back then, they wanted lean cuts so we trimmed off all the fat. Now, our customers are more aware about the nutritional aspects of animal fat (if eaten in moderation), so they prefer marbled beef. We have also changed our product range to only stock organic and free-range meat, because our consumers are concerned about issues like animal welfare and chemical use. Who is your typical customer today? Young, professional, well-educated and well-travelled. They like gourmet cooking, they have experienced international food trends and they want to know where their food comes from. How do you stay on-top of food trends, to meet consumers’ expectations? Quite simply, I talk to people. I talk to our customers and to chefs, I read food magazines and watch all the cooking shows. Speaking of cooking shows, you appeared on the 2013 series of MasterChef? That’s right, I demonstrated how to bone-out a lamb during the Barossa Valley segment of this year’s series. It was a great opportunity to profile our business on a national stage. You recently invested in a display fridge, to showcase dry aged beef – what is the significance of this? We have always dry aged beef, but never had it on display like this. It was a risk, but I had heard about restaurants in New York showcasing their dry aged cuts to diners, so I thought if a restaurant can do it, a butcher shop can! What have been the reactions from customers? The glass cool room shows the dry aging process. Some consumers have commented on the darker colouring of the dry aged beef, so we use this opportunity to educate them about the process and explain that when the cut is trimmed, it looks quite different.

What are the benefits of dry aging? We dry age beef for between six and eight weeks, during which time it becomes very tender. There is a 10 -15% moisture loss during this time, which intensifies flavour. What is the secret to a great piece of dry-aged beef? It has to be a quality cut – there is no point thinking you can dry age a cheap cut, as it will just dry out. I dry age rib eyes, sirloin, rump and t-bones. How do you dry-age beef? The dry aging room is kept at 1°C and has a strong airflow, from two blower fans. We hang the meat so it isn’t touching, to allow full circulation. My ideal cut is off a 240-250kg dressedweight, black Angus beast, with a fair covering of fat which protects the meat during the dry aging process. How does the price of dry aged beef compare to ‘normal’ cuts? Dry aged beef costs about 20% more. Our customers have discerning tastes, and many have eaten dry aged beef at restaurants in Australia and overseas, so they enjoy being able to cook it at home. One of our customers just came back from the USA, where he ate dry aged beef at steakhouses across the country, but he said ours was the best he has ever had. And the key question – how do you cook a dry aged steak? Dry aged beef should be cooked at a higher heat, for a shorter period, so it is rare to medium-rare. It doesn’t need to rest after cooking, because all the juices have been removed during the drying process, but it is still very moist and tender. To use a food analogy, dry aged beef is the ‘icing on the cake’ at your business – what are some of your other top sellers? That’s right, the dry aged beef is popular, but our customers can get all their meat needs here. We source organic and free-range beef directly from farmers, and stock Dorper lamb finished on saltbush. We also have 15 different types of sausages, a condiment range to complement meat products, and a small range of value-added options such as ‘jumbucks’ (seasoned lamb mince in puff pastry), home-made sausage rolls, and even a nod to our origins with Greek-style lamb. And finally, what’s on the menu for you tonight? I’ve got a 12-week dry aged rib eye for the BBQ, to share with my two sons.


20

A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

CUT OF THE QUARTER The Bolar Blade

The bolar blade is prepared from the blade, otherwise known as the clod (H.A.M. 2300). It is made up of several muscles which have layers of fat and connective tissue within them. Each carcase has two bolar blades.

H.A.M.

B

O

L

A

R

B

L

A

D

E

2302

P R E PA R AT I O N O F C U T If roasting this cut, leave some fat cover to maximise juiciness and flavour. Ensure all red bark is removed. If thin slicing this product for pan frying separate the muscles and remove all connective tissue. To produce paper-thin slices, partially freeze and slice thinly on a slicing wheel.


21

SUMMER 2013

CUT SPECIFICATIONS •

Order MSA Graded product, pre-aged for a minimum of five days.

Recommended cooking methods: pan fry/grill, roast, stir-fry, thin slice, slow cook.

Average item weight: about 2.2kg.

BEST COOKING METHODS G R I L L • Slice thinly (6mm) for steak sandwiches or crumb for beef schnitzels. Alternatively, slice bolar blade into 30mm cubes and use on skewers over the grill. R O A S T • Keep some fat cover on top of the bolar blade and roast whole. Or, cut in half and tie the pieces to keep a uniform shape for roasting. S L O W C O O K • Bolar blade can be pot-roasted whole. For more creative options or to suit entrée portion sizes, denude and cut into 60mm cubes and slow braise over a low heat. Ensure the meat is not trimmed lean. If the connective tissue is retained, it will break down during cooking, adding flavour and texture to the cooking sauce. T H I N S L I C E • For poaching in steam boats and broths, first chill the bolar blade and then slice very thinly (2mm) on a slicing wheel. S T I R - F R Y • Trim the bolar blade into thin stir-fry strips (6mm wide by 75mm long) with little or no connective tissue.

GLOBAL FLAVOURS Bolar blade, sometimes called a butchers’ roast, is a big muscle layered with fat and connective tissue which makes it perfect for roasting and braising. Sliced thinly and quickly grilled, it also makes a very tender and tasty steak. Bolar blade is often used for pho bo, Vietnam’s famed beef noodle soup, which features thin strips of poached beef. This cut is a great choice for classic pot-roasted dishes such as the French beef bourguignon, Hungarian goulash, and the rich sweet and sour flavours of the Belgian dish carbonade flamande. Roast bolar blade leftovers make perfect additions to salads, fillings for sandwiches and wraps, and toppings for pizza.

FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS •

Ask your wholesaler if they sell pre-prepared, trussed bolar blades for roasting.

For thin-sliced steak sandwiches, choose a cut with some marbling for added juiciness and flavour.

COOKING RECOMMENDATIONS / Carvery roast 003 / Curries, tagines, goulash 004 / Bulgogi 005 / Beef stir-fry / Roast beef Sandwiches 007 / Toppings for salad or pasta 008 / Parmesan-crusted beef schnitzel 009 / Steak sandwich (thinly sliced) with caramelised onions and barbecue sauce 010 / Greek marinated beef skewers with haloumi and red onion 001

006

/ Pot roast

002


22

A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

CUT OF THE QUARTER The Oyster Blade

Oyster blade is prepared from a blade (H.A.M. 2300) by removing the bolar blade (H.A.M. 2302) along the seam. There are two oyster blades per carcase.

H.A.M.

O B

Y L

S

T A

E D

R E

2303

P R E PA R AT I O N O F C U T Ensure the silver skin is removed (denuded) from the outside of the oyster blade. To produce flat iron steaks, see next page.


23

SUMMER 2013

CUT SPECIFICATIONS BEST COOKING METHODS G R I L L ��� Cut into flat iron steaks and cook over a char grill or pan fry. If the oyster blade has some marbling, the steak will be even juicier and more flavoursome. In many contemporary restaurants this cut is served sliced over a salad for lunch or in a gourmet steak sandwich that is lean and sinew free. R O A S T • For roasting, remove the silver skin and slow roast whole. Alternatively, the cut can be butterflied and trimmed of connective tissue before stuffing and trussing to form a uniform shape. S L O W C O O K • Denude the oyster blade by removing the silver skin and connective tissue and cut it into cubes at least 20mm in size for braising. Alternatively, to suit entrée portion sizes, cut it into larger chunks (about 60mm cubes) and slow braise over a low heat. T H I N S L I C E • To use for poaching in steam boats and broths, chill the oyster blade in the freezer to stabilise the fibres, then slice it very thinly (2mm thick) on a slicing wheel. Make sure you remove the internal sinew. S T I R - F R Y • Trim the oyster blade into thin stir-fry strips (6mm wide by 75mm long) with little or no connective tissue.

FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS •

For grilling, order a primal weight range from 0.8–1.2kg.

Ask your wholesaler about prepared oyster blade products (such as flat iron steaks).

Order MSA Graded product, pre-aged for a minimum of five days.

Recommended cooking methods: grill, roast, stir-fry and thin slice.

Average weight: 1.2–1.8kg for whole oyster blade.

Weight of available meat after trimming: 0.6–0.9kg.

GLOBAL FLAVOURS The oyster blade is one of the most tender, flavoursome and versatile cuts of beef. It performs brilliantly when roasted, grilled, stir-fried or braised. The oyster blade comes from the carcase forequarter and sits on the shoulder blade or scapula. It is covered by a silver skin and has a thick seam of connective tissue running through the middle. This tissue makes oyster blade ideal for slow cooking because it renders down to produce a gelatinous, rich sauce to the braise. The oyster blade can also be denuded and trimmed of connective tissue and cut into flat iron steaks. These steaks are often seen in restaurants and steakhouses in America and are extremely popular in fine dining restaurants because they are lean, tender and smaller in portion size than many other steak cuts. Many restaurants serve oyster blade because it performs just as well as loin cuts but costs less. In Japan and Korea, where it is highly regarded for flavour and tenderness, oyster blade features on restaurant menus in yakiniku (barbecue), stir-fry and hot pot cooking. Its flavour and tenderness also make the oyster blade ideal for a gourmet roast. A popular roasting method is to clean out the sinew in the middle before stuffing and trussing. Slow roasting the oyster blade on low heat for a few hours also gives a fantastic result.

COOKING RECOMMENDATIONS 001

/ Flat Iron steak / Classic roast beef 003 / Mediterranean stuffed roast beef 004 / Curries, tagines, goulash / Korean bulgogi (‘fire meat’) 006 / Beef stir-fry 007 / Roast beef sandwiches or wraps 008 / Thai beef salad 009 / Steak sandwich with caramelised onions and barbecue sauce 010 / Marinated beef skewers 011 / Mince for gourmet hamburger patties 012 / Hot pot 013 / Beef and Guinness pie 014 / Beef bourguignon

005

002


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

24

SHOP TO PLATE Masterclass

1

1

A flat iron steak is produced from a whole oyster blade by removing all the connective tissue and silver skin (that is, denuding it).

2

Turn the oyster blade over, fat side facing down. Gently slide the knife in between the silver skin and the meat, moving it away from your body and then doubling back to remove the remaining skin.

3

Discard the fat and silver skin.

2

4

Turn cut over.

5

Following the natural muscle seam, slowly separate the fat from the silver skin. Discard fat.

6

Gently slide the knife between the silver skin and meat.

7

Moving the knife away from your body, slice through all the way to the end of the oyster blade.

3

4

•

H OW T O CU T A FL AT I RON ST E A K N o . 01

ABG

2 014

FROM A N OY ST E R B L A D E •

5

6

7


25

SUMMER 2013

8

8

Double back to remove the remaining skin. Discard skin.

9

Looking down the long side of the oyster blade, find the wedge of sinew at the thicker end and insert the knife between the meat and silver skin. Slice along the silver skin to butterfly, being careful not to slice all the way through.

10

Once the meat is butterflied along the silver skin, complete the cut by slicing all the way through to separate the two pieces.

9

10

11

11

Place denuded side of meat to one side.

12

Taking the other piece of the oyster blade, lightly slide the knife between the silver skin and the meat. Gently push the knife away from your body to separate the meat from the sinew. 13

15

16

12

14

13

Double back slowly to completely remove sinew, and discard.

14

Square up ends.

15

Slice 2–3 steaks from each half of the oyster blade, depending on your desired portion size.

16

Ready-to-use portioned flat iron steaks.


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

26

RECIPE Orange Mustard BBQ Steaks

This juicy beef is quickly barbequed and served with salad for a stunning, healthy meal.

4

S E RV E S

BEEF OYSTER BLADE NAVEL ORANGE

DENUDED AND BUTTERFLIED

SLICED

ORANGE JUICE WHOLEGRAIN MUSTARD

1KG 1 ½ CUP 2 TABLESPOONS

OLIVE OIL

1 TABLESPOON

HONEY

1 TABLESPOON


27

SUMMER 2013

METHOD 1

Lay oyster blade flat and cut in half lengthways.

2

Cut into 8 steaks by slicing through each piece on an angle.

3

Arrange steaks and orange slices on a shallow tray.

SERVING SUGGESTION •

Serve with crisp green salad and chargrilled vegetables. Allow 2 steaks per adult serve and 1 per child serve.

4

Combine orange juice, mustard, oil and honey. Pour over steaks. Marinate for at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours.

5

Preheat BBQ on medium to high heat. Cook steaks for 3 minutes each side.

6

Remove to a warm plate, cover loosely with foil and rest in a warm place for 5–10 minutes.

20 14

BEEFING UP YOUR PROFITS Australian Butcher / No. 01 / Summer

/// VOL. 3


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / No. 01

28

RECIPE Bushman's Beef Blade

The wonderful aroma when you lift the lid on this fabulous campfire roast will have everyone gathering for dinner!

8

S E RV E S

1.5KG

BEEF BOLAR BLADE

1 TABLESPOON

OLIVE OIL S E A S A LT F L A K E S

1 TEASPOON

CRACKED BLACK PEPPER

1 TEASPOON

FRESH ROSEMARY LEAVES

2 TEASPOONS

RED WINE / BEEF STOCK

2 CUPS

WATER

2 CUPS

LARGE BROWN ONIONS

CUT INTO THICK WEDGES

2


29

SUMMER 2013

METHOD

OVEN INSTRUCTIONS

1

Rub blade with oil. Season well with salt and pepper and sprinkle with rosemary.

2

Light campfire and wait for the wood to burn down to glowing embers.

3

Place blade roast, fat side up, into a 9 litre cast iron camp oven. Pour over red wine or beef stock and water. Add onions. Cover with lid.

4

Stand camp oven in hot coals and shovel extra hot embers onto the lid.

5

Cook gently for 2 hours. Remove lid to check that there is still liquid in the camp oven. Add extra if necessary. Replace lid, top with fresh embers and cook for further 30 minutes or until meat is tender and juices have reduced to form a sauce.

1

Preheat fan forced oven to 150°C.

2

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large heavy based casserole (preferably cast iron), over high heat. Add 2 brown onions, cut into thick wedges and cook stirring until softened. Remove from pan. Add beef and sear well on all sides. Reduce heat and add 2 cups beef stock or red wine. Return onions to pan.

3

Cover casserole with lid and cook in the oven for approx. 3 hours or until beef is tender. Check occasionally and top up with extra liquid if needed.

4

Remove beef from casserole. Reduce pan juices over medium heat until slightly thickened.

RECIPE NOTE •

Add potatoes and corn cobs wrapped in foil to campfire coals during the last hour of cooking.

SERVING SUGGESTION •

Carve roast into thick slices against the grain and serve with baked potatoes and corn.

ABG

No. 01 2014

SU M M E R

BBQ

BEEFING UP YOUR PROFITS ///// VOLUME

5


• THANK YOU FOR READING • Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) is a service company that invests in marketing and research and development on behalf of its 48,000 beef, lamb, veal and goat producer members. Our role within industry is to bridge the gap between farm and consumer by providing butchers with cutting edge information and inspiration on how to market beef, lamb, veal & goat products. No. 01

Summer

2014



Australian Butcher Issue 1