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The Guild’s Guide to Beef — Veal — Goat — Lamb

ISSUE

AUSTRALIAN BUTCHER

No. 02

I N S I D E Meet The Maker / Short Ribs #1694 / The Guild


Australian Butcher T h e G u i l d ’ s G u i d e T o B e e f, V e a l , G o a T & l a m B NO °2 t 2014

As butchers, we’re proud of our skills. And those skills aren’t for the faint hearted. A lifetime of learning each and every way around muscle and bone is an art, a science and requires a sensitivity that only in Butcher is born. But like any skill set, we can always gain more from sharing what we know. Australian Butcher is exactly that: a journal written for butchers about butchery – not just another pretty piece of marketing gear for your shelf or meat counter – the stories within these pages are meant only for YOU. Within this issue, you’ll discover some of the specifics of smoking meat (right down to what type of wood does what), plus we meet the Knoll family of Barossa Fine Foods – a dynasty of passionate smallgoods makers who have been producing award winning goods since 1924... and they quite literally have their love of the meat game seared into their flesh. We also head to Bingil Bay in northern Queensland to take a look at where the action happens – the slaughter floor of an abattoir. Abattoirs are incredibly special places to a butcher. You are the fulcrums of the meat industry – the link between farms and communities. What happens at an abattoir has a huge impact on the quality of the meat you break down, value add and provide to your customers. Take this journal, share it with your fellow butchers and pass on what you know – this industry is a special one, and its future relies on the brotherhood of butchers banding together!

Carve it up, ABG


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Copyright This publication is published by Meat & Livestock Australia Limited / ABN 39 081 678 364 / (MLA). Care is taken to ensure the accuracy of information in the publication; however, MLA cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained in the publication. Readers should rely on their own enquiries in making decisions concerning their interests. Reproduction in whole or in part of this publication is prohibited without the prior written consent of MLA. Š2014 Published May 2014.

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Journal Enquiries Connaugh Sheehan &csheehan@mla.com.au

Paper Stock Revive Laser W. spicers.com.au

Artwork MASH W. mashdesign.com.au

Printing Southern Colour Pty Ltd W. southerncolour.com.au

Illustration Andy McIntyre W. littlebones.com.au


CoNTeNTs

meaT TuToRial

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Where there's smoke...

meeT The maKeR

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The Guild

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Short Ribs #1694

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Short Ribs #1694

shoP To PlaTe Texas BBQ Beef Ribs Teriyaki Beef Short Ribs Sticky Asian Beef Short Ribs

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A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

meaT TuToRial Where there's smoke...

Historically, smoking was a way of preserving food in the absence of refrigeration, however modern technology has changed all this and it’s now possible to have fresh BOEAQSFTFSWFENFBUTBMMZFBSSPVOE4NPLJOHJTOP longer prized for shelf-life but for its flavour profiles, appearance and point of difference. Smoking is essentially a gaseous marinade in which hundreds of wood based chemicals work together to contribute the flavour, texture, surface finishes, colours and preservation we associate with our favourite smoked meats. There are two techniques within smoking – hot and cold – and the two techniques have dierent aims. Before any smoking occurs meat should be allowed to air-dry long enough to form a 'tacky' skin, known as a pellicle. Pellicle plays a key role in producing excellent smoked items. It acts as a kind of protective barrier for the smaller or more delicate cuts of meat, and also plays an important role in capturing the flavour and colour of smoke. Properly dry your cuts by placing them on racks or by hanging them on hooks or trees. It is important for air to be able to flow around all sides. To encourage pellicle formation, meat cuts should be air-dried uncovered, in the refrigerator or a cool room. The exterior of the item must be suďŹƒciently dry if the smoke is to adhere. Temperature of the wood then determines the flavour profiles in the smoke and – ultimately – the flavour of the end product. The liquid molecules in wood that hold flavour have dierent boiling points and the wood must reach the correct temperature to turn the liquid into gas (smoke). Once boiled, the flavour can travel and permeate meat.

hoT smoKiNG The goal of hot smoking is to cook and pasteurise meat. It is done at higher temperatures (70°C to 80°C) than cold smoking but for shorter periods of time. As you would expect, the higher temperature hastens the formation of colour and surface finish. Hot-smoking works well for red meat because the high temperatures and elevated humidity tenderise tougher cuts by melting and dissolving collagen fibres. The flavour profile of hot smoking tends to be vanilla and clove as these flavour compounds within wood have higher boiling points and need the higher temperatures to be released from the wood.

Cold smoKiNG Cold smoking takes place between 20°C to 30°C and at these temperatures the focus is more on drying out and preserving. Depending on individual operators, cold smoked products are cured first with curing salts and then smoked. The salts prevent the growth of bacteria, and combined with the smoke, inhibits spore growth. Some contemporary cold smokers don’t cure at all because they use refrigerated smokers. These modern smokers have lessened the length of time meat is cold smoked for – from days or even weeks down to hours. Cold smoking brings out unique flavour notes of toast, earth, spice and, of course, smoke.





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09




A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

The Guild OČ˘ÄŒÇ?ʇɄ{Ç?Ç ĆšĆšÉ„ÄşÉ„ÄŒČ˘Ç ČŞČŞÄŒÉ„OĆĽÇ?Ĺ˜É„OÇ Ç ĹŒČŞ

4NBMMHPPETEPOUKVTUSVOJOUIF,OPMMGBNJMZTCMPPEoUIFZ are literally branded with them. When Franz Knoll’s four sons had the Barossa Fine Foods logo tattooed on their, er, rumps – it was testament to the family’s proud heritage of crafting traditional and innovative smallgoods. Here, Franz opens the door to a complex, yet complimentary, business model involving four generations who focus on good food. such as goat, emu, branded beef and lambs from Kangaroo Island. We now sell 300 dierent products Australia-wide, under three labels, produced at two factories and a butcher shop. The craft of smallgoods is declining – it’s a niche industry now – but we are keeping traditional methods alive in our speciality range. For example, our brine mixture is a recipe created in the 1930s. We also blend traditional and innovative products, such as smoked wagyu and beef versions of traditional pork sausages.

In an industry driven by trends, you have a firm hold on your heritage as smallgoods craftsmen. How do you blend old with new? My family has been manufacturing meat since 1924. When I bought a retail shop in Adelaide Central Markets 22 years ago, I thought I had moved out of manufacturing – but a successful meat retail business needs a point of dierence. That point of dierence, for us, was manufacturing speciality products. We started with just one side of beef and one pig a week, and expanded to oer all sorts of interesting products,

The family business incorporates three aspects, how are they integrated? Our initial business, Barossa Fine Foods, has grown to include eight retail stores. We bought the Schulz Butchers at Angaston in 2002, which is an iconic Barossa business. In August 2013, we purchased the Adelaide-based Standom Smallgoods, which includes a factory and five stores. Each business has dierent philosophies, and therefore products. Barossa Fine Foods focuses on minimal ingredients, natural, home-blended seasonings and innovative ingredients targeted at the ‘foodie’ consumer. We produce many traditional products but also follow food trends, such as chorizo which is enjoying current popularity in Spanish-inspired recipes. Schulz Butchers provides an angle of ‘old fashioned and traditional’, so we draw on the region’s German heritage with a very traditional range like heavily smoked products, black and white puddings. Standom’s, on the other hand, has mainly Eastern European/ Slavic influence, with products like baked sausages.


19

#"3044"'*/&'00%4 &TU   Do your customers dier? Yes, definitely. Our customer base ranges from foodies looking for on-trend products, to cultural groups seeking traditional smallgoods, to the community at Angaston who like shopping at their local country butcher. When people think of smallgoods, they don’t usually think of red meat – how have you changed this around? Almost all cured pork products can be done with beef. We use a lot of beef in our traditional range of smallgoods (e.g. salamis, dry-cured beef and beef pastrami) and in our more innovative products, such as smoked wagyu beef and biltong (South African style of air-dried beef). We even have 10 dierent varieties of beef sausages. A driver in this variety of beef products is our recognition of dierent ethnic groups, many of whom do not eat pork. Beef is a great material which suits a range of products. We look for a good MSA-graded beef, often from a larger carcase as these animals have a stronger flavour profile which suits smoked products. Barossa Fine Foods is characterised by smoked products – take us through the process of smoking meat. Smoking is a very traditional process of curing meat, and there is a huge variation throughout Europe depending on the climate. There are two main smoking techniques. Traditionally, cold smoking occurred in large barns, which had a large fire for heat. Meat was hung high above the fire for curing. The other method, of hot smoking, is one most people will be familiar with, traditionally involving a small smokehouse, using sawdust for smoke, coals, wood or gas for heat. At Schulz, we use an oven fired with Mallee stumps and sawdust to create smoke, and smoke products overnight. The modern machines we use in the Standom’s and Barossa Fine Foods factories allow us to modify smoke, wind velocity and timber to recreate a range of traditional flavours and textures in our smoked products. How important is the wood used in smoking? Wood is very important; it actually becomes one of the ingredients in our smallgoods. Dierent wood gives meat a dierent flavour. A lot of northern Europeans prefer beechwood or pine, while hickory and apple wood chips are used in the US. We use a range of dierent wood chips to suit each of our

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Franz Knoll

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products, as well as native Australian woods such as red gum or Mallee, which gives an intense flavour. We match the wood to the product. For example, our smoked wagyu is suited to the smoke intensity of beech and oak. What are some of the other critical elements involved in smoking meat? The time and wind speed impact the finished product. For example, if we want a large sausage to have a roasted flavour we might smoke it overnight, but a smaller product might be smoked for an hour or two. Our smoking machines let us manipulate all inputs, for the right combination of wind, heat, steam and shower. What is the significance of the ‘shower’ function? Products receive a quick shower of water while they are in the smoker, to ensure the edges don’t dry out while the inside is still cooking. Once again, the process depends on what we want the finished product to taste like. Some products might require a softer skin, so the shower process will be dierent than a product with a crisp outside. Casing is an important smallgoods ingredient – what do you use? Pork and sheep casings are the traditional products, but we also use some beef casings. Beef casing are thicker so are better suited to products which we want to dry slowly and evenly. What does the future hold for the Knoll family? I am very proud that all four of my sons – Andreas, Stephan, Dieter and Alex – are now involved at some level in the business. It remains important to us to continue producing products with integrity which reflect our heritage. We are also involved in the Barossa community outside of our business and my sons and I hold various roles such as Chairman of Barossa Food, chairman of AMIC National Smallgoods Council, and Chair of the Adelaide Central Markets. Looking ahead, we will continue to oer a diverse range, as a one-stop-shop for smallgoods. We live in a meat-eating culture, which requires diversity in ways to eat meat, so we will continue to strive to follow trends and create products which reflect the changing tastes of our consumers.


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

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CuT of The QuaRTeR Short Ribs #1694

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meal suGGesTioNs foR youR CusTomeRs / Marinated and barbecued, boned out and thinly slice, Korean or Japanese BBQ-style, served with kimchi, and steamed rice or savoury pancakes 002 / Hearty Short Rib stew with winter vegetables and butter mashed potato 003 / South American grilled Short Ribs with chimmichurri 004 / Sticky hoisin glazed Short Ribs with cucumber, shallot and Peking pancakes 005 / Braised and shredded Short Ribs on soft rolls with slaw and homemade BBQ sauce  / Braised and char grilled Short Ribs with a soy, sake and mirin glaze, served with pickled tomato salad  / Short Ribs with panko ‘crackling’, anchovy beignet and bulgar salad  / Sticky braised Short Ribs with salad of pickled papaya and asparagus

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Specify sliced portion size requirements, fat cover removed.

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Weight range: 1.6 – 3kg.

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Recommended cooking methods: slow cook, grill.

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English Cut is where ribs are separated from one another along the bone, and the meat sits on top. This is ideal for braising.

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Flanken Style is where the Short Ribs are cut across several bones, this works well for slow cooking.

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G R i l l / P a N f R y / B B Q Äş Short Ribs can be marinated or seasoned with a wet or dry rub and then barbecued at a medium-high temperature for 10 -12 minutes. Alternatively, boned out and sliced thinly, they work well barbecued quickly at a high heat.

Traditionally popular in countries like Korea and Japan, Short Ribs are steadily increasing in popularity all over the globe, popping up in a myriad of meals. Their larger scale and considerable amount of fat and interconnective tissue makes Short Ribs a near foolproof cut that delivers tender results every time.

s l o w C o o K / B R a i s e ĺ Short Ribs’ collagen-rich properties make them perfect for stews and soups as they impart a density and flavour highly prized by many cultures across the world. When cooked in this way, the meat literally falls o the bone making it perfect for shredding and eating in a salad or using in a pasta sauce.

Koreans have a multitude of dishes that utilise Short Ribs, one of the most popular being galbijjim, a steamed dish made from the centre Short Ribs. The Short Ribs are par-boiled before being simmered in soy sauce, sesame oil, spring onions, garlic, ginger and sugar. When the meat is almost ready, ginko nuts, carrots, chestnuts and mushrooms are added before being served in bowls. Short Ribs are also popular in Korea when grilled either bone in (kalbi kui), or sliced thinly without the bones and cooked over charcoal. Perfect with spicy kimchi, savoury pancakes and a cold beer. Northern Americans love ribs too, but here we see pit culture take over and ribs are grilled to smoky perfection over charcoal and basted with homemade barbecue sauce. In South America, it’s all about Tirade Asado. Cross cut Short Ribs are seasoned generously with salt before being grilled over wood to impart a smoky flavour. It is most often paired with a garlicky, herb-charged chimmichurri to contrast with the richness of the meat. Flanken is a traditional Eastern European Jewish dish where Short Ribs cut on the cross angle are braised in a broth along with parsley, dill, carrot and barley. During the cooking process, the Short Ribs release their collagen into the broth, giving an unctuous texture to the soup.

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masTeR Class Short Ribs #1694

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1-2 Trim any excess fat from the top side of the ribs. 3-6 Remove Pleura by loosening the seam with the tip of your knife and pulling back gently using your hands. 7-11 Separate ribs by slicing along the bone.

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A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

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Depending on what your recipe calls for, Short Ribs can be cut anywhere between 30mm-50mm thick.

2-4 Once you’ve removed the Pleura (to do so, follow previous instructions) slice your required sized ribs by scoring the meat right to the bone across the ribs. 5-6 Finish the cut through the bone with the bandsaw. 7-9 Cut through the meat between rib bones to separate pieces.


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Follow the previous steps for Short Ribs to separate the ribs and then remove any silver skin from the pieces.

1-6 Concertina (fan) the meat off the bone by making at least two cuts on the same side of each piece.

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shoP To PlaTe Texas BBQ Beef Ribs

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P R e Pa R aT i o N

BeefiNG uP youR PRofiTs

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Prepare kettle barbecue for cooking with indirect heat.

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Place ribs scored side up in 2 litre capacity foil baking tray. Pour in 250 - 500ml beef stock or water. Enough to half fill baking tray.

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Cover tightly with foil, pinching around edges of the foil tray to seal.

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Cook on upper rack of kettle barbecue over lowest possible heat for 2 hours.

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Lift edge of foil. Baste meat with juices. Reseal foil and cook for further 30 minutes or until meat has browned and is very tender.

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Serve with bean salad, meat juices and your favourite BBQ sauce.

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Score meaty side of ribs, cutting slits across the meat at right angles to the bone, 5mm deep and 20mm apart.

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Remove Pleura from bone side of ribs by placing the point of a small sharp knife under the corner and lifting the edge. The membrane will pull away easily.

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Display scored side up, in foil baking trays.


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

30

shoP To PlaTe Teriyaki Beef Short Ribs

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31

P R e Pa R aT i o N 1

Remove Pleura from bone side of ribs by placing the point of a small sharp knife under the corner and lifting the edge. The membrane will pull away easily.

2

Temper or part freeze ribs before running through a bandsaw at 8mm to 10mm in thickness.

3

Combine the remaining ingredients.

4

Add ribs and stir well until coated.

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Display on trays with extra sliced spring onions.

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Rest for 5 minutes.

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Serve with Asian style salad.

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Remove ribs to a warmed plate and cover loosely with foil.

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Cook ribs for 3-4 minutes on each side or until well browned.

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Preheat char grill barbecue on high heat.

2014

1

BeefiNG uP youR PRofiTs

Vol.5

CoNsumeR iNsTRuCTioNs


A U S T R A L I A N B U T C H E R / /P

32

shoP To PlaTe Sticky Asian Beef Short Ribs

Finger lickin’ good!

1. msa Beef ChuCK shoRT RiBs

2KG

70mm x 80mm

2. flaVouR maKeRs asiaN lime sTiCKy Glaze - NaTuRal 21706

150Gm

aPPlied dRy aT 7% aPPRox

3. sesame seeds

1 2 3

5Gm

6/*5

6/*54

6/*54

6/*54

6/*54

2kg 150gm 5gm

4kg 300gm 10gm

LH HN 20gm

20kg 1.5kg 50gm

40kg 3kg 100gm


BeefiNG uP youR PRofiTs

Vol.5

t

t

4UJDLZ Asian #FFG4IPSU 3JCT

Australian B u tch er °2

aBG

2014

33

P R e Pa R aT i o N 1

Remove Pleura from bone side of ribs by placing the point of a small sharp knife under the corner and lifting the edge. The membrane will pull away easily.

2

Score meaty side of ribs, at right angles to the bone. Cutting slits 5mm deep and 20mm apart. Cut into individual ribs.

3

Combine marinade and sesame seeds. Add ribs and mix well to coat in marinade, rubbing well into slits.

CoNsumeR iNsTRuCTioNs 1

Place ribs in deep foil roasting tray. Add 500ml beef stock or water. To depth of approx. 3cm. Cover tightly with foil, pinching around top edges of foil tray to seal.

2

Prepare kettle barbecue for indirect heat and cook ribs on upper rack over lowest possible heat for 2 ½ to 3 hours until meat is very tender and ribs have browned. Remove ribs from liquid.

ReCiPe NoTe ĺ

Serve ribs with noodles and Asian greens.

ReTail PReseNTaTioN ĺ

Display on trays cut side up. Sprinkle with extra sesame seeds.


AUSTRALIAN BUTCHER

NO °2 t 2014 .FBU  -JWFTUPDL "VTUSBMJB .-"

is a service company that invests in marketing and research and development on behalf of JUT   CFFG  MBNC  WFBM BOE HPBU QSPEVDFS members. Our role within industry is to bridge the gap between farm and consumer by providing butchers with cutting edge information and inspiration on how to market beef, lamb, veal & goat products.

ĺɄÊ[{Ʉú—ÔɄO—¶Ʉ¶4-aQɄĺ


Australian Butcher #2  

A lifetime of learning each and every way around muscle and bone is an art, a science and requires a sensitivity that only in Butcher is bor...

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