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OCTOBER 2009

FOOD

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RARE WEDDING GUIDE

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7 6 1 & 3: Ali Tuggle & Eric Madry wedding, A La Vie Photography 2 & 5: Stephanie Murland & Jarrod MacKay wedding, Eclectic Images Photography

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4, 6, & 7: Ashley Lundgren & Jason Floyd wedding, Studio 563 Photography

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Fall Bridal Vendor Showcase Sunday, November 15th

Laguna Gloria

We’re gearing up for our Fall Rare Weddings Event, a glorious gathering of food vendors, photographers, a fashion show of wedding attire, plus much more! Hundreds joined us in the Spring—be sure to be a part of this exciting event!

For more information and tickets, visit us at

www.rareweddings.com


publisher Taylor Perkins

editor Caitlin Ryan

director of sales & marketing Meredith Davis

sales manager Brittany Oster

account executives Lauren Caffey Paul Kimbiris Ashley Leitch Katie Lesnick Jamie Moore Alex Winkelman

art director

Ashley Rose Moreno Sarah Morgan Scarlett Steakly Amy Wald Arden Ward Lauren Wolf

photographers Carlos Benavides Brad Chapin Chad Harlan Jake Holt Cameron Jordan Shawn Kennedy Annie Ray Cory Ryan Ed Verosky

design intern Maren Jepsen

editorial interns Jessie Cibik Tara Pettinato

Lindsey Eden Turner

cover art

writers

Serial Mom, digital collage by Melissa Grimes (p 8)

Nicole Carbon Darcie Duttweiler JB Hager Laura Hensley Carly Kocurek JJ McLaughlin Elaina J. Martin

Originally published in Suburban Legends: True Tales of Murder, Mayhem, and Minivans by Sam Stall, reprinted with permission from Quirk Books.

editor’s note: In the Art Issue, photos for “Where Art is King” featured art by Nathan Green that went uncredited. 4

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note from the editor Food is comfort. Food is celebration. Food is sustainment. Food serves as the centerpiece to some of the most important, impactful moments of our lives. Across the world, it is used as a tool to bond people, as a method to heal heavy hearts, and as a facilitator to bridge communication where it might otherwise be lost. But no matter our personal views on the purpose of food, we as humans can relate on at least one level: we need it to survive. And when fortunate, we are able to indulge our taste buds, our stomachs, and our souls in meals cooked with fervor and an aim for perfection. We at Rare have spent the past month compiling pieces on some of the most interesting chefs, restaurateurs, entrepreneurs, companies, and establishments in Austin for your literary digestion —no pun intended. We have done our best to find such rich and diverse stories that reading the entire issue will probably earn you a few inches to the waistline through sheer osmosis. Moreover, I am hopeful that completing this issue will leave you with an uplifted spirit, as a good meal— paired with even better company-—often does.

The year of 2009 has brought many changes to the world and to our city—this magazine included. It may not feel like a time for any sort of decadence, but I am encouraged to have returned to Austin, after several years away, to see the growth that has persisted despite the economic setbacks prevalent across the nation. And let it be known that Rare Magazine, in and of itself, is no stranger to a challenge. We pledge to continue to set our sights high in order to uncover what you love about Austin, expand upon some of the wonderful trends that were begun when this publication was launched, as well as bring a fresh perspective that is, hopefully, relatable and respectable. This city grows each day, giving us so much more to discover than what’s already been done. I am certainly determined to chip away at those hidden gems, one issue at a time. I, personally, look forward to the journey we are about to embark on, and I can’t think of a better way to kick off this moment in Rare’s history than with an issue replete with talented people, passionate about sharing their culinary creations and convictions with all of Austin. Caitlin Ryan editor


10.09

Melissa Grimes page Above: Spice Girl #4b (detail)

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06 08 10 12 14 18 20 22 26 30 34 36 40 44 46 48 52 54 56 60 64 66 74 76 82 84 86 88 112 114 128

Meet the New Crew On The Cover :: Melissa Grimes JB Rants ACL Survival Guide Trailer Park Eateries

downtown (512) Brewing Company Quincy Erikson Taste Tripping Kareem Hajjar

campus/hyde park Veggie Lifestyles Aster Kassaye

midtown Leslie Haak Comfort Food

east side Carlos Rivero East Side Show Room Randall and Donya Stockton

south side Local Libations

west side Maggie Hoffman

north side Karen Morgan Sustainable Food Center Rare Wedding Guide Rare Gives Back :: Race for the Cure Maps/Index Happenings


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UP FRONT

publisher

Taylor Perkins

MEET the W E R C W E N

We’re super excited to introduce you to our new staff at Rare. We come from all backgrounds and places, but there are a few things we all have in common: we were all drawn to Austin, and we aim for this publication to serve as a reflection of this city. Without further ado, meet the crew and learn a bit about us... Photos by Annie Ray

1. DB’s (Dirty Bill’s) 2. www.CharityBash.org, www.Craigslist.org, www.YouTube.com 3. A great magazine is... driven by what the community wants it to be. 4. Surfing and fly-fishing 5. Experiencing and learning new things 6. To be able to be two places at once 7. What doesn’t kill you makes you. 8. Ben Harper

art director

Lindsey Turner

editor

Caitlin Ryan

1. Creekside 2. www.Notcot.org, www.Digg.com, www.BrooklynVegan.com 3. A great magazine is... one that looks like an effortless and complete thought. 4. Relocate to Stockholm, Sweden. Forever. 5. 8-10 hours of sleep 6. “Time Out,” à la Zack Morris 7. My story? In just six words? 8. The Dead Weather

events director

Jason Hicks

Rare Q&A 1. what is your favorite local weeknight hangout? 2. what are your three favorite websites? 3. finish this sentence: a great magazine is... 4. what would you do if you didn’t do this? 5. what can’t you live without? 6. if you could have one superpower, what would it be? 7. write your six-word memoir. 8. what acl act is not-to-miss?

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1. The Mohawk 2. www.TheSelby.com, www.ItsNiceThat.com, www.dListed.com 3. A great magazine is... audacious. 4. Travel the world 5. Coffee 6. Teleportation 7. It made sense at the time. 8. Grizzly Bear

1. Grizzly Bar or Nomad 2. www.Austinist.com, www.Pandora.com, www.Orangebloods.com 3. A great magazine is... kept around, even after the next issue comes out. 4. Be a brokenhearted Hoover fixer-sucker-guy 5. My beautiful wife Lauren, and baby boys Jax and Beck 6. Lead Vocals 7. In rising action can’t spoil ending. 8. Dr. Dog and Blitzen Trapper


director of sales

sales manager

account executive

account executive

Meredith Davis

Brittany Oster

Lauren Caffey

Paul Kimbris

1. J. Black’s 2. www.BusinessofFashion.com, www.LadiesWhoLaunch.com, www.BoutiqueBuyz.com 3. A great magazine is... something that is beautiful enough to pick up and interesting enough to not put down. 4. Corporate fashion retail or PR 5. My iPhone 6. Flying 7. It was all about the fashion. 8. Girl Talk

1. Key Bar for Jukebox Heros 2. www.Do512.com , www.Pandora.com, www.Nola.com 3. A great magazine is… one that encompasses a diverse set of subjects. 4. Sell, drink, and learn about wine 5. Internet. Oh yeah, and pizza, too! 6. Mind-reading 7. She lived only for the fun. 8. Ghostland Observatory

1. J. Black’s 2. www.Facebook.com, www.Austin360.com, www.Google.com 3. A great magazine is... just like a woman: complicated, complex, and captivating. 4. Share my love of dance through teaching 5. Adventure 6. Mind-reading 7. Got too lucky; karma bit back.  8. Pearl Jam

1. Barton Springs Saloon 2. www.WatchTVSitcoms.com, www.NME.com, www.WebMD.com 3. A great magazine is... one that tells me something I don’t already know. 4. Be an award winning record producer who only worked with real talent 5. Vinegar 6. Time travel 7. He went down with the ship. 8. Arctic Monkeys

account executive

account executive

account executive

Katie Lesnick

Jamie Moore

Alex Winkelman

1. Alamo Drafthouse 2. www.Facebook.com, www.Youtube.com, www.FashionLayne.com 3. A great magazine is...innovative and inspiring. 4. Become the next American Idol 5. My iPod 6. Flying 7. Ray of light dedicated to love. 8. Kings of Leon

1. Continental Club 2. www.AustinChronicle.com, www.Pandora.com, www.RadioParadise.com 3. A great magazine is… easy to read. 4. Host my own travel show 5. Lip balm and dancing 6. Flying 7. I only need four: Damn, that was fun! 8. Phoenix

1. Imperia 2. www.Facebook.com, www.PopSugar.com, www.Google.com 3. A great magazine is... informative and educational, yet entertaining. 4. Become a matchmaker 5. My family and dog, Ricky Bobby 6. The power of Cupid 7. Annie ain’t got nothin’ on me. 8. Citizen Cope

design intern

Maren Jepsen

1. Santa Rita 2. www.CakeWrecks.com, www.PaperCrave.com, www.CreasedComics.com 3. A great magazine is... like a favorite pair of jeans: well-designed, easy to get into, and never thrown away. 4. Write chick-lit 5. Erasers on the ends of pencils 6. Omnilingualism 7. I’d have made a better cat. 8. I think they should do an ACL Fest with just 80’s bands. RARE OCTOBER 2009

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MELISSA GRIMES’ CUT AND PASTE WORLD Carly Kocurek Photo by Brad Chapin

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Austin artist Melissa Grimes is a pioneer of collage-based illustration. Now, as Grimes teaches the tools of the trade to college students, she works to incorporate digital tools and resources into her work—even as she continues to scour the city for old magazines, sheet music, and other ephemerata. Put mildly, Melissa Grimes likes old things. The illustrator, turned collage artist, turned painter lives in a Victorian house in Austin loaded up not only with antique and vintage furnishings, but with filing cabinets and book cases that attempt to contain the magazines, books, bits and bobs she’s accumulated as raw materials for her artwork. “There’s an element of it that appealed to my country Texas roots in that you get to save old stuff and rescue it from the trash pile and turn it into something useful—kind of like how my grandmother would have made a quilt out of old fabric,” Grimes says. Much as Grimes creates order and cohesive images from the diverse sources that inspire her, she creates order among the thousands of images she has accumulated over the years. “I like categorizing things, so I’ve amassed a huge collection,” Grimes says. “I’ve got separate files for black and white art and color art, and everything’s organized alphabetically, anatomy, and animals and birds. I can remember specific images even though I’ve got hundreds of thousands of them.” Grimes’ collage work relies on a sense of the right image in precisely the right place. The decontextualization and juxtaposition allow Grimes to radically alter the meaning of the images in a playful way, poking fun at the same culture she uses for source images. Advertise-

ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

ments for spices combine with photos of 1950s housewives and scrawled shopping lists. Dozens of knives, neatly clipped from catalogs, become a menacing arsenal. “I like the surreal aspect of it, how you can take an image from a magazine that was maybe an ad and turn it on its head and use it as a way of commenting ironically on culture,” Grimes says. “I still love to do collages after all these years. I used to do them by hand, and now I do them digitally.” These days, Grimes also teaches college students around the area, primarily in illustration and figure drawing, although her own work has long strayed from conventional illustration practices. “It’s addictive really, because the kids are just in such an impressionable state, and you get a chance to give them something that might influence them their whole life, and that’s priceless,” Grimes says. “Their work inspires me, seeing them so ambitious and with everything in front of them, it inspires me.” In the classroom, Grimes says she encourages students to try to combine fine art skills with computer skills and teaches them to see computer-based tools and older style art supplies as equally viable creative outlets. Despite her antique obsessions, Grimes is not one to avoid innovations. In addition to utilizing digital editing tools like Photoshop, the artist

Collage is about appropriating other stuff, so I can never complain about people appropriating my collage style. now peruses sources like Flickr for images and ideas. “There’s more art out there because of the internet, and there’s more imagery available. I love it,” Grimes says. “I look at Flickr all the time. What I was looking at recently was people who have matchbook collections and paperbag book cover collections. Now, anybody can have access to all these old images online.” The increase in access has meant a rise in collage, but Grimes takes the flood of younger collage artists in stride. “Collage is about appropriating other stuff, so I can never complain about people appropriating my collage style.” – Melissa Grimes Painter and Illustrator www.melissagrimes.com

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RANTS

Festival Bound

JB Hager Photo by Cameron Jordan

I used to be somebody, I swear. Yeah, I was at Lollapalooza in 1991, back before the brand had been abused into the likes of Petapalooza, Danceapalooza, Hair Cutapalooza. I was there in the midst of it, just 24 years old. I moshed to Jane’s Addiction, Nine Inch Nails, and The Butthole Surfers. I left bloodied and elated. I still have the T-shirt to prove it. That being said… how did it come to pass that I feel completely awkward at outdoor festivals? Have I lost my edge? Is it because my hair is thinning? My age? I’m not sure what it is, but I’ll divulge what has happened and welcome your thoughts.

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UP FRONT

First, I have to decide which festival I should go to, Bonnaroo, Coachella, Austin City Limits, or the newly revised Lolla. Let’s see…I can go to the one with all the white people, the one with white people, the one with white people in my hometown, or the newly revised one with—you guessed it— white people. Usually, the first thing I notice as I enter a festival is that I’m exhausted. The drive to the city parking, the bus line, the bus ride, the pedicab ride, and the remaining walk completely drained me. As I enter the festival gates, I realize that I’m the only man in there wearing a shirt. My six pack of abs is not what it used to be back in ’91; it’s more like a loaf of bread. And my underwear is not showing. I’m also the only one not wearing a backpack. It’s just a theory of mine, but when you see a guy without a shirt and with a backpack, there are drugs in that backpack. I don’t know why the authorities haven’t figured that out. White guy + no shirt + backpack = drugs. Now, I’m not opposed to people consuming drugs as part of their concert-going experience; it’s just that I’m not good at it (never have been), which leads me to the beer line. I’m not going to lie. I’m on a quest for a buzz when I get there. What I’ve found, over the years, is that it’s impossible. I spend my time going from the beer line to the bathroom line, and then repeat until the concert is over. I don’t know if it’s because I drink more beer than I used to, because my body mass is more, or because my bladder has given out on me. I think it’s a classic case of “old man has to pee all the time.” Have you seen the Flowmax commercials? Notice that they always show a group of old guys riding in a Mustang convertible or fly fishing

and never in the front row of a Silversun Pickups show. Beer in hand and bladder giving me a reprieve, I should be feeling good now. Well, there’s one small problem. I can’t find anyone who I was supposed to connect with, and the cell phones are all jammed. So, I wander. I walk for miles and miles, back-and-forth trying to find people. They are people I see all the time. I can easily see them on Monday, but I need to find them today. I feel like I’m pretty well-versed on the music. I keep up. I know who I want to see: The Raconteurs, Ghostland Observatory, Phoenix. I’m confident in my self-created schedule. I swap it with others, looking for approval, only to have it handed back to me unimpressed. As a general rule, everyone loves to share their schedule with you, but no one has any interest in yours. Another rule is that no matter what you saw, they saw something better. Take, for instance: me: Saw String Cheese, and it was incredible. They brought in the old pig from the Pink Floyd tour and flew it over the crowd. them: I was at G Love. Manu Chao came out and they did a Flaming Lips song in Portuguese. Then they took everyone back to the Four Season’s, had sex, and gave them all a new Prius. This is similar to the not-so-VIP phenomenon. No matter what level of VIP you are, you will always be one-upped. If you’re admitted to the VIP section under the trees with free food and Tito’s, you’ll soon find that there is a VIP section on the side of the main stage. You’ll spend three hours pulling strings to get there, only to find

that there is another level. Except in this VIP section, you get to play the tambourine while piggy-back riding on Michael Stipe during “Losing my Religion.”

As a general rule...no matter what you saw, they saw something better. Even so, I will attend ACL again this year. I’ve always wanted to see Pearl Jam. And here are some things that I know I can be certain of: 1. I will lose something valuable before the event is over, wallet, camera, phone, or a loved one 2. I will have a falling out with a friend who said I “blew them off” 3. I will be seen, at some point, in the “Tag-A-Kid” line 4. I will try to play hacky-sack and be mistaken for a man under attack from fire ants 5. I will be that guy that yells, “Get off my blanket!” 6. I will see a lot of dirty feet I’m thinking about being one of those flag guys. You know, with something run up a 20-foot stick so your friends can find you. I can’t decide what to run up the pole. Possibly my ’91 Lolla shirt. Or a pair of Depends. See you at the Festival. Buy me a beer. I’ll probably be in the potty line.

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UP FRONT

ACL SURVIVAL GUIDE Caitlin Ryan

The days are hot, the nights are long, and the crowd is thick. Do your best to embark on 72 hours of musical mayhem prepared for any situation. Follow our recommended guidelines, and you should find yourself out of the First Aid tent, with all of your belongings, and without having damaged any important friendships. Godspeed, festival-head.

SURVIVAL KIT

Bandana. The tried and true handkerchief will serve as a barrier between your mouth and the dust, or as a sweat mop. There’s no pretty way to put it. Shirt. If you are so inclined to bare your bod, a gnarly sunburn is imminent. Bring a cover-up.

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Unopened water. The gate-masters will swiftly confiscate any sort of open bottle. Sunscreen. Come October, you’re not as tan as you think you are. 1 backpack. Rotate the carrying responsibility between your friends. 1 sheet. It’s lighter-weight than a towel and covers more surface area. Cash. The ATMs will slap you with an exorbitant service fee. Wet wipes. The quickest, pre-dinner clean-up method. Toilet paper. Enough said.

BEST MODES OF TRANSPORT

Legs. Use them for their original intent. Bike. Consider renting a bicycle for the weekend if you don’t already own one. Parking is horrendous and, because of high demand, cabs are few and far between. Pedicab. They are far more adept in navigating unruly crowds than a vehicle*. * If you must drive, your best bet is to park deep in the surrounding neighborhood of Barton Hills. Just be nice to the neighbors.

BEST PLACES TO EAT

The ACL Food Court. The most praised establishments in Austin set up shop for three days. It’s simply one of the biggest perks of this fest. Barton Springs Rd. It’s famed year round for places like Shady Grove and Chuy’s, but you must be prepared to wait. A while.

Lake Austin Blvd. Exit the Northside of the festival and cross the Town Lake bridge to find Daily Juice, Maudie’s, Thundercloud, Magnolia, and Mangia. Lamar. Exit the Southside of the festival, walk east on Barton Springs, and find yourself descending upon the less crowded fast-food mecca of South Lamar. For an Austin original, beef up at P. Terry’s.

BEST SOUVENIRS

Sweet Leaf Tea Plastic Cups. They are super-sized and last a lifetime. You’ll be able to pass them down to your children’s children.

BEST PLACES TO PASS OUT & SLEEP

Barton Springs Pool. You can still hear the music, even under the water, for $3. Barton Springs Pool “Free Side.” If you’d rather spend your $3 elsewhere. Deep Eddy Pool. Not as close as Barton Springs, but you can actually see to the bottom of the pool. High visibility is always reassuring.

BEST GET-BACK-IN-THEGAME WATERING HOLES

El Arroyo. The place is large enough to facilitate a high volume crowd. Barton Springs Saloon. These guys are officially teaming up with ACL to host afterparties and will be serving stiff ones all day long. Deep Eddy Cabaret. The best place

in Austin to find a cold beer sans side of attitude.

DO’S

Pacing it. The afternoon sun seems to slow the hands of time. Going with the flow. There is always going to be someone abnormally tall standing right in front of you at a show. Don’t worry about it. Making plans [and sticking to them]. Make an agreement with your friends on a time and a place to meet if separation occurs. It’s likely your cell-phone will not get service, so think of it as channeling the days of yore, and rely strictly upon a promise.

DON’TS

Wearing makeup. That stuff is going to slide right off. Incessant texting. You paid a pretty penny, so look up and enjoy the show. Dehydration. Keeping your body healthy is worth the frequent portapotty trips; otherwise, you’ll never make it to that aftershow. Imbibing too much, too fast. Remember “Pacing it”?


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A Street Cart Named Desire Rolls into the Trailer Park JJ McLaughlin Photos by Ed Verosky

Depending on your palate and perspective, trailer park dining is either less tasteful than Spam and beer or an authentic experience that smacks with delicious down-home appeal. Either way, one thing certainly holds true, there’s a fun, hip, and impossibly tasty food trailer craze in Austin. Dining at any of Austin’s unique, food trailers is more than just dressing down, eating cheap, and getting in tune with your inner Bubba. These lively pockets of food, along South 1st Street, South Congress Avenue, and other various independent locations around Austin, contribute an inimitable pizzazz to the city’s personality. Food is the way to the heart of South Austin; and the down-to-earth, funky flare of food trucks epitomizes, and almost exaggerates, the comfort of the Austin lifestyle. Let’s be honest, nothing swells the taste buds with excitement quite like a bowl of zesty queso in a setting that welcomes mustard-stained wife beaters, dogs, bare feet, and patrons bringing their own booze. In case you haven’t heard, Austin’s keepin’ it trashy and tasty with a food trailer fad that’s expanding like the pasty, hip underbelly that is South Austin. Humble Airstream RVs hug the shoulders of

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Austin streets like mullets. Designated food trailer lots, such as South 1st Street’s Trailer park & Eatery—1311 South 1st Street—and the 1600 block of South Congress Avenue, are popping up around Austin. The trailer park ambiance is fashioned by picnic tables, lawn chairs, hay bins, gravel driveways, open fire pits, and plastic flamingos that attract enclaves of young people to the vibrant mobile food scene. It’s safe to say that Austin’s at the epicenter of the foodquake that’s shaking the pedestrian fare of eating at food carts. The food trailers are quickly becoming dining destinations as more and more street vendors sprout onto the mobilefood playing field. With that said, there are plenty of food carts and Airstreams to choose from; if you’re a novice,

it’s important to consider a plan when trekking through the trailer food mayhem, because it can get overwhelming. There’s only one rule of thumb: It’s all about ease and charm, so culinary achievement in food truck dining is only reached once grease trickles down your cheek and you grab the roll of paper towels on a stick. Here’s a strategic approach to enjoying the food truck culture of South Austin...


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Begin at one of South Austin’s original trailers, Torchy’s Tacos, located at the Trailer Park & Eatery. Their slogan, “damn good tacos,” is an understatement. It strikes a deliciously sinful chord with its comforting greasiness, offering an amped-up menu of cheeky taco names. Until now, the phrase “Dirty Sanchez” ($3.50) has been evocative of crude, nauseating associations that have no place in the food industry. The taco consists of scrambled eggs, guacamole, and poblano pepper. All of Torchy’s meats and vegetables are hand cut, the pork is slow roasted, and the chicken is all-natural, so freshness and quality are preserved. The Baja shrimp taco is also a fan favorite. www.torchystacos.com Open Mon-Wed 7 a.m. – 10 p.m., Thu-Fri 7 a.m. – 11 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.- 11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

OTHER AIRSTREAMS AND FOOD CARTS IN AUSTIN

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If you want something similar, but with a hint of gourmet, make your way over to Izzoz Tacos—located next to the Trailer Park & Eatery at 1207 South 1st Street. Think of it as upscale tacos on a beer budget. The “Padre,” which contains braised pork, avocado, pineapple, and tomatillo salsa tucked in a thick, chewy tortilla is a popular choice. Head cook, John Galindo, even offers wine recommendations that pair well with his tacos. (They don’t serve wine, but you can bring your own). The landscaping is pleasant, with lush grass, colorful umbrellas, and shady trees, offering a great view of the Austin skyline. www.izzoztacos.com Open Tue-Thu 8 a.m. – 9 p.m., Fri 8 a.m. – 10 p.m., Sat & Sun 9 a.m. – 10 p.m. Closed Mon

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Trailer Park & Eatery Torchy’s Lah- Tee- Da and Treat

Flip Happy Crepes: 400 Jessie St.

1600 Block of South Congress Avenue Cornucopia Hey Cupcake Mighty Cone Mambo Berry Vaquero Cocina

Kebabalicious: 7th St. & Trinity
St.

Independent Trailers Crepes Mille: 1324 S. Congress
Ave.

Chris’ Little Chicago: 3600 S. Lamar Blvd


Giovanni’s Pizza Stand: 2900-B S. Lamar (at Barton Skyway/ Manchaca) Lulu B’s: 2113 S. Lamar
 mmmpenadas: 5th St. & Brazos
St. Hey Cupcake: Ranch Road 620


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Nothing caps off a meal like an irresistible treat with a chef-created, fine touch. Housed in the same parking lot as Izzoz Tacos is Holy Cacao. It’s tough to top the little morsel of moist cake ($1.50) and icing, covered in a layer of chocolate all perched on a Popsicle stick. There are six flavors, but we like “Holly’s Favorite Cake Ball,” the “Velvet Red Cake Ball,” which is red velvet cake and cream cheese frosting, and the “Brass Ball” to sate your peanut butter and chocolate fix. There’s even a cake shake drink that can only be described as liquid decadence, marrying ice cream and cake in divine sweetness. www.theholycacao.com Open Tue-Thu & Sun 12 – 8 p.m., Fri – Sat 12 – 10 p.m., Mon closed.

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For a dessert with a little extra, head back next door to the Trailer Park & Eatery. Lah-Dee-Dah & Treat, a neat little two-inone Airstream, sells unique gift items like plants and handmade jewelry inside of the truck, and offers campfire s’mores ($9.95) over an open fire pit outside of the trailer. Choose from a variety of exotic marshmallow flavors such as key lime, whiskey, vanilla, lemon lavender, chocolate mint, and butterscotch. There’s an actual soda fountain, or you can purchase crazy, Japanese soda by the bottle. In addition to that array of goodies, they sell Tylenol, Alka-Seltzer, newspapers, and condoms in true trailer park fashion.

Finally, once you’ve satisfied your sweet tooth, stick around the trailer park for a movie. Every night, there’s a cinematic treat, and you’ll finally be able to say you watched a film in a park that uses a trailer as the screen. The schedule can be found at www.austintreat.com. www.designld.com & www.austintreat.com Open Mon-Wed 12 p.m. – 9 p.m., Thu 12 p.m. – 10 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m. – 10 p.m., Sun 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Culinary achievement in food truck dining is only reached once grease trickles down your cheek and you grab the roll of paper towels on a stick. As the night begins to wind down, you’ll realize this: In the slow-moving world of trailer food, there’s an intriguing swirl of life that tickles your taste buds and truly offers an indelible snapshot of what makes Austin tick.

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Melissa Grimes :: The Real Dr. Pepper, paper and digital collage RARE OCTOBER 2009

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

Brew ( 512 ) Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Shawn Kennedy / Pint glass photos by John Knox

Kevin Brand may have thought he was receiving an education at the University of Texas, but little did he know that his real education was taking place during his college job at Pronto Food Mart selling beer. “We just had so many beers I had never even heard of,” he says. Couple that with a stingy, but creative, friend who learned he could make beer cheaper than buying it, and Brand was well on his way of becoming a brew master—but it would take him 12 years before he decided to ditch his real day job in favor of the burgeoning world of craft beer. “I started making beer by mixing water with a syrup in a kit I bought, and then I quickly moved to all grain,” Brand says. “I kept learning about it for 12 years and fell in love with the whole

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concept. I loved to cook and create things, so it was a good fit.” After a 10-year stint in California in medical device development, Brand and his wife headed back home to Austin. When the startup he was working for folded, he decided that it was time to dive headfirst into brewing fulltime. (512) Brewing Company sold its first keg July 28, 2008. “Austin really likes beer,” Brand laughs. “We have a huge college, a big music scene, and a ton of great bars. We have some bars here that have more than 50 beers on draft, and that’s not very common. So it made total sense to open the brewery here.” Moving from homebrews to professional brews wasn’t an easy task, but Brand says the craft beer industry welcomed him and helped teach him how to scale his recipes up. Brand also researched how to draft beers made from mainly local and organic products—an aspect that was really important to him. Brand has now perfected (512)’s four standbys and one seasonal beer that are sold in 55 bars

across the city, such as Gingerman, Flying Saucer, Opal Divine’s, and Dog and Duck Pub. Be on the lookout for a new seasonal beer later this month, as well as the seasonal events (512) hosts. Brand hints that the winter brew might be one of their best yet: “It will be a super special version of the Pecan Porter.” – Kevin Brand (512) Brewing Company 407 Radam, F200 www.512brewing.com


SOPHIE’S CHOICE When asked what his favorite beer is, Brand has a hard time deciding, and it’s no wonder. The answer? “The Pecan Porter is my favorite right now… as in today,” Brand says. “I like them all, but the Porter is so unique and enjoyable to drink.”

BRAND’S PICK O’ THE DAY Wit “Belgian-style wheat beer that’s light and crisp; has a little bit of spice and a hint of grapefruit.”

Pale “Pale ale with a nice, earthy taste; mixes a hop bitterness with a malty background that doesn’t wash out the hops.”

IPA “India pale ale that’s amped up in hops and higher alcohol content; very balanced malt and hop ratio.”

Pecan Porter “This fall seasonal last year was so delicious that we kept it. It’s a robust porter with a subtle nutty character and hints of chocolate and coffee notes.”

(512) One “The current seasonal; It’s a Belgian-style strong in which we use Goodflow honey to bump up the alcohol content without adding body.”

TEXAS BREW STEP How (512) Brewing Company perfects its beers 1. Hand blown grain is processed through a mill to expose its internal structure 2. Next, the mixture goes into a holding tank, where hot water is added 3. The mixture sits for an hour to allow enzymes to convert to starches, creating a sugary mixture 4. The wort (the sweetened grain mixture) is boiled, and hops are added; flour and natural preservatives are also added 5. The mixture is then chilled down to prepare for fermentation and then transferred to a whirlpool to cool down more and ferment 6. Yeast is added, and the beer ferments for a couple of days, which creates natural alcohol and carbon dioxide 7. Most of the carbon dioxide is blown off, and the beer is allowed to naturally carbonate more 8. Dry hops are added to the IPAs 9. More carbon dioxide is added to finish carbonation 10. The beer is cooled down and transferred into kegs before shipping off to your local bar

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Quincy Adams Erikson fĂŠte accompli

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BON APPÉTIT! Amy Wald Photo by Brad Chapin

Internationally trained and locally cultivated, Chef Quincy Adams Erickson has recently built Fête Accompli, a takeout and catering empire in which the quality of food always comes first.

– Quincy Erickson Fête Accompli 917 West 12th Street www.feteaustin.com

When you first step into the small 12th Street kitchen that Fête Accompli calls its home, your senses immediately go into overdrive. An array of salads, vegetables, and soups quickly meets your eye and leaves your mouth watering for a taste. And taste them you will. Chef Quincy Adams Erickson will be the first to offer you a sample of her team’s delectable creations, from a creamy Thai noodle salad drenched in peanut sauce and colored with carrots, red peppers, scallions, and spinach, to a ruby gazpacho with cherries, pistachios, and mint. Daughter of a dietician, Erickson was raised to be a firm believer in pure ingredients. “I was brought up by a very militant ‘what-do-you-put-inyour-body’ type of person,” she explains. And so, it is no wonder that she displays a devotion to incorporating organic foods into her recipes and scoffs at a Mascarpone cheese made primarily from milk instead of cream. After all, quality is a word that Erickson knows well as a graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, arguably one of the most prestigious culinary institutes in the world. Through a rigorous nine months of training in cuisine and pastry, Erickson refined her life-long commitment to producing top-notch delicacies in a visuallystunning manner. And her passion for food extends well beyond the kitchen. Erickson was a founding member of the Austin chapter of Les Dames d’Escoffier, a culinary organization by and for female food professionals,

and has served on the board of the Wine and Food Foundation of Texas for 10 years. She even co-chairs the annual Stephan Pyles pastry competition (which awards a $15,000 scholarship to the lucky winner) and teaches cooking classes at Central Market in her spare time. Though Fête Accompli has a mostly word-ofmouth following, Erickson remains determined that her business always adheres to her high standards. “We really care about the food over anything else,” asserts Erickson. “We don’t take events unless we can do them really, really well. We just don’t do it.” But when they do cater an event, unique gourmet cuisine is guaranteed. From themed birthday parties to dinner functions, Erickson provides a plethora of inventive dishes that keeps her events fresh and interesting. And Erickson’s fans keep coming back for more. “I don’t know how people do this business if they don’t get the feedback we do,” she says. “We’ve had waiters say we love working with you guys, because people are always happy.” While Erickson’s menu is ever-changing, her desire to leave her customers salivating for another bite never wavers. Whether sipping a basil lime refresco or indulging in couscous with pistachios and currants, thanks to Chef Quincy Adams Erickson, your taste buds will surely be in for a treat.

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Scarlett Steakly

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Miracle fruit is the name, and flavor-tripping is the game. For those of you who have hoped for a personal “Willie Wonka & the Chocolate Factory” experience, here is your golden ticket. Flavor-tripping is the latest craze in culinary parties: popular on the East and West coast, the latest food experience has made its way south.


I was running a foodie group prior to this, so this thing is just a complete turn-on for people who are really into food. jenny wang, the berry fairy The miracle berry plant (synsepalum dulcificum) is a small red berry native to West Africa. It was discovered in the 18th century by French explorer, Chevalier des Marchais, after watching natives chew the berry prior to meals. This unusual berry has the ability to rewire taste receptors to receive only the sweet out of any digestible food. The assumed cause of this sweetener is the protein Miraculin, found within the berry. According to different studies, Miraculin binds to taste buds and triggers a sweet taste when the palate comes in contact with acids. Limes taste like candy, Guinness tastes like an ice cream float, and goat cheese tastes like cake frosting. Each flavor-trip lasts 20 minutes to two hours, depending on the person. These berries can only be grown in tropical environments; therefore Florida is one of the few places in the United States that has the appropriate climate. The miracle berries are also a very fragile fruit and must be consumed within three days of being picked, or they will perish. The berries’ climate and fragility make them difficult to procure. When ordering from a miracle berry farmer, next-day shipping is a must. Purchasing in bulk is the most cost-efficient solution to the high shipping prices. With all those berries on hand, flavor-tripping parties make for a great invitation.  The Berry Fairy, Jenny Wang, and her miracle berry parties have recently hit Austin. In July of this year, Wang brought her berry business to the local Belmont. Wang, who is largely a food critic based out of Houston, began throwing miracle berry parties after learning of their existence through friends who attended these parties at Harvard. Wang, also founder of the Houston Chowhounds, hosted her first miracle berry party a year ago. After the overwhelming popularity of that

event, she decided to continue the parties in Houston while incorporating a charity element of her choice. “I was running a foodie group prior to this, so this thing is just a complete turn-on for people who are really into food,” says Wang. Wang orders her berries from overseas and prepares the party with unique and typically bitter food combinations and libations. The average cost for each person attending is $40. When attending one of Wang’s miracle berry parties, the guests can expect an array of foods and drinks, one miracle berry per person, and the ability to purchase miracle berry tablets to continue the fun long after the party ends. Wang says local mixologist David Allen specifically designed cocktails using balsamic-vinegar and Tito’s Vodka, adding a booze element to the Belmont party experience. Wang says her favorite items to trip with are Greek yogurt, which taste like custard, and grape tomatoes, which taste like a sweet fruit. “If you ever doubt that tomatoes are really a fruit, just eat them with a miracle berry and you’ll see its true,” Wang says. Some of the items Wang brings to the spread of foods are lemons, limes, blue cheese, grapefruit, strawberries, rhubarb, and tomatillos. She even included a pickled-relish cupcake, created by a local pastry chef, at the Belmont party. So, rather than throwing your typical house party bash, consider the Berry Fairy and giving your taste buds a trip.

– Jenny Wang The Berry Fairy www.theberryfairy.com

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WEEKEND PASS Get the hottest happenings, exclusive invitations, and a full weekend itinerary in your inbox. Subscribe at www.rareaustin.com


Kareem Hajjar

hajjar sutherland & kelly llp

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PERSPECTIVES

RAISING THE BAR Amy Wald Photo by Carlos Benavides

Danger is not a concept one normally associates with bars and restaurants. But according to hospitality lawyer Kareem Hajjar, what started out as a dream come true can quickly turn into a nightmare if not planned properly.

From zoning issues to alcohol licensing, there are miles of invisible red tape that must be crossed before a person’s vision of starting his or her own bar or restaurant can become a safe reality. “I’ve seen a lot of very bad things happen to a lot of very good people because they didn’t look at everything,” explains Hajjar. “They think of rent, the menu, how much it costs to build; but they don’t consider the licensing issues, the labor, the logistics of having 25 employees, or the effort that it takes.” But that’s where Hajjar comes in to save the day. With a law degree from the University of Texas and experience serving the real estate needs of over 107 (and counting) bars and restaurants in the Austin area, Hajjar is well-versed in the hidden pitfalls that plague the hospitality business. Whether negotiating leases, dealing with construction contracts, or drafting partnership agreements, it is his job to ensure that bar and restaurant owners have the protection they need to triumph over any unexpected problems.

– Kareem Hajjar Hajjar Sutherland & Kelly LLP 1205 Rio Grande Street www.hsklegal.com

Hajjar’s high-profile clients include Uchi, Waterloo Icehouse, Doc’s Motorworks, Key Bar, Prague, and 219 West, among others. But despite Hajjar’s rapidly-expanding reputation as the “go-to” person in the restaurant business, his

heavy involvement in this aspect of real estate was not an intentional decision. “I sort of fell into the bar and restaurant niche by accident,” admits Hajjar. “I started representing Doc’s Motorworks. I did some work for them and they liked what I did. One of the principals there was a principal at Waterloo Icehouse. So I sort of went from one unit to eleven units overnight.” Hajjar’s continued presence in this market is no coincidence, however. His devotion to his clients results in a typical 12-hour workday and leads him to bill 30 hours, even on vacation. And he’s no stranger to the businesses that he represents. “I’m involved in a number of organizations, and I’ll go out of my way to make sure we have happy hours in my clients’ locations as a way to thank them for the business,” says Hajjar. “To be able to bring a 300–400-person happy hour on an off-night, like a Tuesday or a Wednesday, is huge for a place.” In fact, he rarely goes to a place that he doesn’t represent; and it is this kind of commitment that has earned him the title of Austin’s bar and restaurant lawyer. With every page of a contract or signature on a dotted line, Hajjar makes his clients’ business his business.

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I Think, Therefore I Veg Lauren Wolf Photo by Carlos Benavides

Children can have prejudice when it comes to food. If it’s green, it’s mean. If it has seeds, it will grow a plant in your stomach. If it looks like a small tree and rhymes with “woccoli,” then it’s probably poisonous. When they become adults, some take pride in their food choices, and that pride comes with a fancy name.

The avenues to unique dietary preferences can be long, wide, and varying. Take, for example, the Austinite who has recently learned that the amount of grain we feed cows for their meat could feed hundreds of millions of people. This Austinite, however, has a palette for smoked salmon and an affinity for sushi. Thus, based on strong convictions and personal taste, his diet surrounds grains and fish. He is a pescetarian. The Italian word for fish, “pesce,” gives this type of vegetarian diet an exotic sound, but it also has its danger. Recall Jeremy Piven, aka Ari from Entourage, who suffered from mercury poisoning last year due to a diet over-abundant in sushi and fish. It is an extreme example, but one that touches on the issue that can arise with many diets; repercussions can be found in too much, or too little, of a good thing. Some vegetarians argue that the pescetarians, pollotarians (poultry eaters), and poplescetarians (poultry and fish eaters) of the world are not really vegetarians. Many vegetarians make distinctions between those who eat eggs (ovo

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vegetarian), dairy (lacto vegetarian), or both (lacto-ovo vegetarian). In turn, strict vegetarians, known as vegans, do not eat meat, dairy, eggs, or any animal-derived ingredients. A popular local restaurant in Hyde Park, Mother’s Café and Garden, has an entirely vegetarian menu with symbols marking the dishes that can be prepared vegan. “It seems a majority of our clientele are vegetarians. If they aren’t, then they are usually with a family member or friend who is vegetarian, so they are willing to give it a try,” Kendra Bremer, a waitress at Mother’s Café, explains. “The menu includes Italian, Tex-Mex, American dishes, and more, and it’s worked for a long time.” A less common category of vegans is raw vegans who do not cook their food above 118 degrees Fahrenheit, with the argument that nutrients are destroyed at higher temperatures. Daily Juice Café in Austin is an incredible source for a variety of raw foods, juices, and smoothies. Other versions of raw vegans include fruitarianism, juicearianism and sproutarianism.


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Mother’s Cafe and Garden


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Making the switch to vegetarianism is a process of trial and error for some, namely when parents are incorporating the change in their children’s diets. In 1992, the Austin American-Statesman reported on the Acorn Café and its owner, Helga Morath, who called her food regiment “flexitarian.” The term has since caught on and describes those who eat mostly vegetarian food with occasional exceptions. Truth be told, a good springtime crawfish boil with potatoes and corn-on-the-cob would be severely lacking without the crawfish. There are, of course, reasons beyond personal preference that people choose to follow certain diets. Some religions, such as Hinduism, hold beliefs that prevent followers from eating meats. Medical scares also prove to impact people’s appetite, or lack thereof, for certain foods. It is

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Being from Texas, I’m sure we all know the folks who consider eating good barbecue an intrinsically religious experience. probably not a bad idea to avoid beef tartare during a mad cow disease scare, for example. On the flipside, being from Texas, I’m sure we all know the folks who consider eating good barbecue an intrinsically religious experience. Surprisingly, there is no fancy word for a meat-eater. Aside from the umbrella term “carnivore,” diets that consist of mostly meat

are most often called “low-carbohydrate diets.” The Inuit people who live in the Arctic regions of the world have maintained such a diet for centuries. As hunters and fishers, their meals are extremely high in protein and fat thanks to whales, walruses, polar bears, and seals. Sitting at the top of the food chain, meat eater or vegetarian, one thing we all have in common is our position as apex predators. You, me, and the grizzly bear are a force to be reckoned with, minus the fact that grizzly bears aren’t the ones filling our oceans with plastic. And here’s some food for thought, pun intended; perhaps, in addition to being focused on every morsel we consume, we should deeply consider whatever happens to all of those plastic containers out of which we eat.


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GRUB GUIDE Here’s a cheat sheet for a few of the many lifestyle diets out there. Just something to throw around at your next dinner party.

raw food diets

Macrobiotic Juicearian Fruitarian Sproutarian

restricted diets

vegetarianism

Vegan Lacto vegetarian Ovo vegetarian Lacto-ovo vegetarian Pescetarian Pollotarian Polpescetarian

meat eaters

Flexitarian Omnivore Carnivore often consumes

occasionally consumes

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Aster Kassaye

aster’s ethiopian restaurant

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ASTER’S CULTURAL CLASSROOM Carly Kocurek Photo by Chad Harlan

Aster’s Ethiopian Restaurant is a standout in a city perhaps best known for Tex-Mex and barbecue. The family business showcases the excellent culinary work of owner Aster Kassaye, who sees her restaurant not only as a place to have a meal, but a place to learn about Ethiopian culture and cuisine.

– Aster Kassaye Aster’s Ethiopian Restaurant 2804 N. IH-35 www.astersethiopian.com

Texans’ love of travel by car has influenced restaurant culture in profound ways, and so any reasonable foodie has to admit that many of the state’s best restaurants are tucked away in stripmalls, under overpasses, and along access roads. Aster’s Ethiopian Restaurant is one such place. The Ethiopian restaurant is located in central Austin in the shadow of the IH-35 upper deck. Inside, however, Aster’s has the cozy ambience of a family diner, and owner Aster Kassaye is quick to point out that her restaurant is an excellent place for families, particularly as the family-style service offers the shared experience of a shared meal. Kassaye also sees the restaurant, filled with posters and decorative objects from Ethiopia, as a learning space. “[Customers] learn culture when they come here,” Kassaye says. “People are surprised by the culture and food we have. We cook the way we eat back home. There’s no use for me to change it.” Kassaye is one in a line of restaurateurs—both her mother and grandmother operated restaurants in Ethiopia. Aster herself previously owned a restaurant in the Austin area, but moved away for a few years. Upon returning, she began catering and selling food through area grocers and farmers. However, former customers kept begging for her to open up shop, and so, finally she did just over two years ago.

The restaurant remains a family affair, with Kassaye’s two children and husband helping from time to time and the entire family taking care of whatever needs tending—ranging from table service to business errands. “It’s a family business,” Kassaye says. “That’s the way we are. We help each other—carry each other.” For those new to Ethiopian cuisine, the restaurant’s Tuesday through Sunday lunch buffet offers an opportunity to sample at least 18 menu items, including lamb and beef dishes as well as vegetarian options. True to the insistence that the restaurant is a place not just to eat, but to learn, Kassaye and her staff are happy to answer customers’ questions. “Our food takes time,” Kassaye says. “You have to be patient and love cooking if you want to make Ethiopian food. It is an art, so I just love staying in the kitchen to cook,” Aster says. “I don’t like to come out here [to the restaurant]—I’m shy.” Shy or not, Kassaye remains committed to sharing her culture and her knowledge of cooking. For those who want to learn more, Kassaye is beginning to offer small classes in Ethiopian cooking. Potential students should inquire at the restaurant.

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Melissa Grimes :: Cat & Goldfish, digital collage RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Leslie Haak personal chef

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THE VEGGIE CHEF Laura Hensley Photo by Chad Harlan

Leslie Haak remembers her last hamburger. At a young 13, she could no longer stomach the thought of eating meat. So, she bid farewell to burgers, and decided to become a vegetarian. That dietary choice, made in the throws of adolescent rebellion, eventually became her life’s passion.

Raised amid a family of meat-eaters, the young Haak began experimenting with specialized recipes and started cooking strictly vegetarian meals for herself. Now, the 27-year-old personal chef specializes in preparing organic, vegetarian, and macrobiotic meals for her growing list of clients. Although Haak recently resumed eating some portions of meat for health reasons, her food philosophy remains inextricably rooted in vegetarian and organic cooking. Haak, also a former vegan and self proclaimed intuitive cook, trained with the Natural Epicurean Academy of Culinary Arts here in Austin and also worked as head chef and manager at the local vegan and macrobiotic restaurant, Casa de Luz. She became a personal chef, teacher, and caterer in 2005 and has been debunking the myth that natural food doesn’t taste good ever since. What inspired you to become a vegetarian? It was very much ethically and environmentally motivated. That was about the time my family got the Internet. I had never actually met another vegetarian, but it was always something I felt.

– Leslie Haak Personal Chef www.austinveggiechef.com

animal products at times, and it has made a big difference. I think what macrobiotics teaches is how to be in touch with yourself, and figure out what you need. I don’t ever try to advocate one way or the other. Everybody needs different things. We are clearly not meant to have meat as our only food source. Humans are meant to be more herbivore. At certain times in your life, certain diets may be more appropriate. What is always in your fridge or pantry? Probably quinoa. I always have grains and canned beans, that’s really handy and fast. I also try to keep some coconut milk around for when I want to make a curry. What is it about cooking that you enjoy? For me, it’s the process of working with these beautiful ingredients to create meals that can be satisfying on so many levels. I get to go through that process every day with my job. I feel very fortunate.

You are no longer a vegetarian. What do you tell your clients about eating meat? It has been a recent transition after 14 years. For me, personally, my body really needed some

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Remaking the Classics Arden Ward Frank photos by Cory Ryan / Chedd’s photo by Jessie Cibik

Between the trailers and the five stars, there’s a new middle ground of comfort food surfacing in Austin. The classics have been updated, and several Austin restaurants are capitalizing on this new niche, evoking the simplicity of days gone by. The way people view, order, and consume food has undergone a reinvention around town. You’ve seen the Airstream trailers littered about South Congress. And, if you’ve been paying attention, you’ve noticed top notch restaurants adding simple options, such as corn dogs and mac-n-cheese, to their menus. Chefs are recognizing that it’s all about taking one classic item, reinventing it with a gourmet twist, and keeping it affordable. I recently ventured into Frank on Colorado Street, housed in the final location of Austin’s beloved Starlite. The building, still adorned with that iconic blue star, is no typical hot dog stand. With owners known for their influence in the Austin restaurant and nightlife scenes, it should come as no surprise. Owners, Geoff and Yancy Peveto of The Decoder Ring, Jenn and Daniel Northcutt previously of the Woodland, and Michael Terrazas of Club DeVille and Fun Fun Fun Fest (to name a few), have teamed up to bring Chicago-style dogs to Austin. The premise of Frank is simple, and one I don’t find hard to support: “Hot Dogs, Cold Beer.” Its interior is warm and rich, and the bar offerings far outweigh what one would expect to accompany a hot dog (think homemade, bacon-infused

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Makers Mark). Meeting with Jenn Northcutt shed light on the restaurant’s concept, which was born two years ago from one of Geoff Peveto’s frequent trips to Chicago. Peveto noticed the need for a solid hot dog place in Austin—some place other than a drive-thru. Namely, a place with beer and 100 percent beef franks. A virtual four-way comfort stop for downtown dwellers, Frank intends to provide coffee, a grocery for specialty items, an upstairs lounge, and a pickup window for late night cravings. But comfort doesn’t end with a hot dog—drinks are served in mason jars, and the menu even offers poutine, a Canadian comfort dish of waffle fries covered in gravy and cheese curds. The high quality, low brow environment has not gone unnoticed—Frank opened in late June to repeat business and wide support from the Austin restaurant community. Other recent Austin gems, such as Chedd’s Gourmet Grilled Cheese on North Lamar, provide an irreplaceable sense of home. Chedd’s meets the comfort quotient by serving up one of Mom’s specialties. The eatery offers a number of gourmet grilled cheese choices, all made with authentic Wisconsin cheeses, some that can’t even be found by scouring the aisles of Whole

Foods or Central Market. And, of course, there’s a cup of tomato basil bisque to accompany any sandwich. Owner, J.M. Simmonds, an Austin transplant, discovered the original Chedd’s in downtown Denver, when searching for grilled cheese stores online. A recent business school graduate interested in opening a restaurant, Simmonds’ choice was simple: “I grew up on grilled cheese. I don’t know anyone who didn’t,” he says. The logic is straightforward and proves true in Austin. Open since late July, Simmonds already states that the response has been so great, he’ll never leave Austin. In a world of chains with redundant offerings, Austin’s comfort cuisine niche is making a lasting impression. And why not? It could be the hint of nostalgia or love of reinvented classics, but I think Jenn Northcutt put it best, “Everyone can enjoy a chili dog and a Schlitz.”

– Chedd’s 4601 N. Lamar Blvd. www.chedds.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. www.hotdogscoldbeer.com


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11:00 am& - 12:15 pm Women Wine Nite at am the Races 11:00 - 12:15 pm November Friday, November 13 6:30 pm 5 - 9:00 pm 5:30 pm - 9:00 pmThursday, Brunch Champagne Brunch Tickets: $35 perNovember person Tickets: $35 Tickets: $30 per Tickets: $35 per person Thursday, 5 per person Friday, November 13person6:30 pmGospel - 9:00 pm 5:30 pm - 9:00 pm

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November Champagne 7-13 10 &Brunch 11 Gospel Brunch November 11:00 am - 12:15 pm 11:00 am - 12:15 pm Daily Tearoom Luncheons An Evening of Shopping Sunday, November 15 Sunday, November 8 11 am, 12:15$35 pm, pm daily Brunch 5:30$35 pmper - 8:00 pm Gospel Tickets: per1:30 person Champagne Brunch Tickets: person November 7-13 November 10 & 11 11:00 am 12:15 pm Tickets: $20 per person Tickets: $10 per person 11:00 am 12:15 pm Sunday, November 15 pm, 1:30 pm daily Sunday, November 8 11 am, 12:15 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm Tickets:Tearoom $35 per person Tickets: $35 person Daily Luncheons An Evening ofper Shopping $15 per senior citizen per person Tickets: $10 per person 11:00 am - 12:15 pm 11:00 am7-13 - 12:15 pm Tickets: $20 November November 10 & 11 $15 per senior citizen Tickets: $35 per person Tickets: Daily $35 per person Tearoom Luncheons An Evening of Shopping

11 am, 12:15 pm, 1:30 pm daily 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm Tickets go on sale September 1, 2009! Tickets: $20 per person November 7-13 Tickets: $10 per person November 10 &go11 Tickets on sale September 1, 2009! $15 per senior citizen For a complete schedule and to purchase tickets, please go to Luncheons An Evening of Shopping

Daily Tearoom November 7-13

11 am, 12:15 pm, 1:30 pm daily Tickets: $20 per person $15 per senior citizen

Forpm a complete 11 am, 12:15 pm, 1:30 pm daily 5:30 - 8:00 pm schedule and to purchase tickets, please go to www.austinjuniorforum.org or call 512-810-8223 www.austinjuniorforum.org or call 512-810-8223 Tickets:November $20 per person 10 & 11 Tickets: $10 per person Tickets go on sale September 1, 2009! $15 per5:30 senior citizen pm - 8:00 pm

For a complete schedule and to purchase tickets, please go to Tickets: $10 perwww.austinjuniorforum.org person or call 512-810-8223

Tickets go on sale September 1, 2009! For a complete schedule and to purchase tickets, please go to


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Melissa Grimes :: Ultimate Taco #2, digital collage. Similar version published in the Austin American Statesman’s XLent Magazine. RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Carlos Rivero

proprietor, el chile, el chilito, and red house pizzeria

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SIX YEARS, SIX RESTAURANTS Lauren Wolf Photo by Carlos Benavides

It is moments before happy hour at the Red House Pizzeria when the patio becomes packed with chattering patrons. Carlos Rivero has just walked over from El Chile, the first of the now six restaurants that he has opened in Austin since 2003. Glistening, he apologizes for the delay. The A/C went out next door.

For Rivero, a tired air-conditioning unit is a small price to pay at the real-estate investment that became El Chile. The native of La Paz, Bolivia found the East Austin property during a time when he was flipping houses. He ultimately crafted a value-conscious restaurant model that now includes a Northwest Hills El Chile and a new, downtown location. The baby brother of El Chile, El Chilito, has also expanded from its Manor Road location to include a spot on Barton Springs Road. With its interior-Mexican and Tex-Mex cuisine, the Congress Avenue El Chile shares the same menu as the other locations, but boasts the soaring ceilings and lofty feeling given by downtown buildings. Back at Rivero’s Red House, where the cowboy décor and smell of pizza bring “spaghetti western” to mind, he discusses the Austin restaurant scene with me.

– Carlos Rivero, Proprietor El Chile Café y Cantina, El Chilito, and Red House Pizzeria. El Chile Eastside 1809 Manor Road www.elchilecafe.com

What are your thoughts on the number of out-of-town restaurants opening in Austin? Outside operators look at Austin as a really great place to do business, and there’s always going to be good competition. I can’t blame them, I’m just not as anxious to go to Houston or Dallas as they are to come here. What can we expect next from you? The old filling station [on Manor] just got cleared in the past year, so we’ll probably put a restaurant there. It’s a good time to go into projects like this because contractors are more available, and the permit process isn’t backed up. I’d like to do a hamburger joint and icehouse. Six restaurants in six years has left Carlos Rivero a thankful restaurateur who feels very blessed for both his successes and his failures. We, too, are thankful for the food establishments he has crafted and shared with Austin.

What is your first piece of advice to someone starting a restaurant in Austin? The basis of all of our restaurants is a good real estate deal. That really is the starting point. And then, from there, you make a good business plan. I had a background in real estate from working in college, and I think it paid off tremendously.

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east side show room Sarah Morgan Photos by Jake Holt

Part steampunk speakeasy, part avant-garde bistro, the East Side Showroom is an amalgam of both vintage and modern in every aspect—from décor to food and drinks—bringing a European flair with a decidedly local flavor to Austin’s food scene. The highly stylized atmosphere is thanks to artist and owner, Mickie Spencer, who began the East Side Showroom as a space to display her pieces, as well as other artists’ works, in a unique and intimate setting. Her furniture and sculptural lighting is on permanent display at the Showroom, and her work is certainly what makes the space such a unique dining experience. Once seated at one of her tables, or at her stunning bar, the culinary journey begins. From the popular lamb and goat burger to the curry grits and greens, each dish is a unique combination of flavors featuring local ingredients. “It’s hard to go 100 percent local,” says Michael Brantley, one of the chefs at the East Side Showroom. “But we want to have as much local, seasonal food as possible.” Because they pride themselves on the desire to go local, the menu changes daily depending on what’s available and what’s freshest.

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It’s in constant flux. [We’re] always trying to hold that fascination; to have something unique every time someone comes in. adam bryan, bartender Though you may still order the short ribs or the lamb chops, one day you’ll find them accompanied by fresh summer peas, while another day might bring a side of herb salad.

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The same can be said for bartender Adam Bryan’s constantly evolving cocktail menu. On a street where new bars are popping up right and left, they have definitely set themselves apart from the crowd.

“Vintage cocktails, strange beers, and beautiful wine,” says Bryan. That is what the east Side Showroom’s bar is about. “We feature old school cocktails,” he explains. “None of our liquors are anything you would see in any other bar. We use the methods and theories of classic cocktails.” The same goes for their beer and wine selection. They order their draft beers in small quantities, so the selection is in a constant evolution.


“We have craft beers from around the world, not just Texas…big complex beers with a lot of flavor,” Bryan says. Some popular drink choices are the Pink Pony—a tart, gin-based drink with Italian bitters, grapefruit juice and bruised cucumber. Another popular choice is the Zanahorita—Repasado tequila, carrot, cilantro agave, and Turkish salt. Though both are popular choices, Brantley and Bryan both claim the Corpse Reviver as one of their current favorites on the menu.

Despite opening their doors just a few months ago, the East Side Showroom already has big plans for the future, including the addition of a live performance aspect, an ever-expanding selection of beer and wine, and visiting chefs. It seems their plan is to keep the East Side Showroom patrons on their toes. “It’s in constant flux,” Bryan says. “Always trying to hold that fascination; to have something new and unique every time someone comes in.”

Entrees range from $9 to $18; cocktails from $8 to $11; beers range from $3 to a $10 Belgium beer dubbed “the Cadillac of beers;” and wines are $6 to $12 a glass.

– East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. www.eastsideshowroom.com

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Randall and Donya Stockton

rio rita, the good knight, beerland, shangri-la

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EAST SIDE DYNASTY JJ McLaughlin Photo by Ed Verosky

Randall and Donya Stockton, husband and wife, have an uncanny knack for making you feel warm and cozy in an edgy setting. Together they own Rio Rita, The Good Knight, Beerland, as well as co-own Shangri-la and Liberty. It’s the authenticity and charm of their bars that make them a guaranteed attraction.

– Randall and Donya Stockton Owners, Rio Rita, The Good Knight, Beerland Co-owners Shangri-La, Liberty East 6th Street

East 6th is adding a new dimension to Austin’s nightlife with trendy dive bars and corner joints that are abuzz. What’s the universal appeal of East Austin bars? More than anything, it’s the parking. But all establishments are different, and it comes down to offering a unique, yet quintessential, Austin experience. For whatever reason, we’re able to capture the legacy of Austin by setting up shop in its quirky, older buildings with character. How did you wind up in this industry? randall: I used to book punk shows at Bates Motel here in Austin, but when the lease was up, I found myself delivering Austin Chronicle newspapers and fixing jukeboxes. Then I found out that the Beerland space was available in 2001. So we got it. And you always walk into a place and say, “I want it, but what am I going to do with it?” We just had to do something different. Like with Shangri-la, the large patio was an unused parking lot, and when I went outside to look at it, a guy asked me why I was out there and told me that there was nothing there. I told him the patio was everything. donya: And with he Good Knight, it had a kitchen. That’s why we bought it, really. And because of that, we decided to start making food. Working with what’s available. r: And we had this idea of warm, dark, and cozy at The Good Knight.

It’s safe to say every establishment you’ve opened has been met with success. What’s your secret? I have no idea. We’ve been very blessed with our staff making invaluable contributions. Honestly, I’m surprised how well we’ve been received. If we have any skills in business, it’s problem solving and that we never stop moving—working nine days a week. I just don’t know. I never thought I’d open up a coffee shop. But you never know what your calling is going to be. Tell us a little about your recent opening of The Good Knight. My brother manages the Good Knight, and he had never bartended. But he trained for a month, and now he’s become like this old world speakeasy character who started reading books about vintage cocktails. We had this idea to turn it into a warm, dark, and cozy place; it’s working out well with him there, because it just says ‘welcome’ with him behind the bar. Who is the really white vigilante (dressed in a cape and Mexican wrestler’s mask) who makes random appearances at Shangri-la? [Laughs]… I promise you that I am not him. You all have any plans in the works for anything new? There’s definitely some more stuff to come. Possibly another bar, maybe a restaurant. But, again, I just don’t know, and you’ll have to wait and see. RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Better Food. Better Value. On any given day, our customers will be as varied as the city of Austin itself. From hippies and politicos, to frat boys and freaks, we feed ‘em all. And, many are regulars who have been dining with us for years. It’s all about the fresh food, the great value and the friendly, family atmosphere. That’s what keeps them coming back for more!

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5 locations in austin www.maudies.com

Distilled and bottled by Fifth Generation, Inc. Austin, Texas 40% alcohol by volume. ©2009 Tito’s Handmade Vodka.

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Melissa Grimes :: Magritte Burger, digital collage RARE OCTOBER 2009

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LOVELY LOCAL LIBATIONS Nicole Carbon Photos by Caitlin Ryan

Tears of joy nearly streamed down my face as I sat at the zinc-topped, horseshoe bar at Annies Café and Bar one recent afternoon. I watched David Alan, a bartender also known as the Tipsy Texan, halve pieces of fruit and extract the juice as he prepared his workspace for the evening. What a refreshing change. Nothing makes me cringe more than drink mixes shot out of a soda gun. Alan shares my drink philosophy and refuses to use a gun for any of his creations, including tonic and soda waters. Instead, he uses high-quality Q Tonic Water, which consists of handpicked quinine, Mexican, organic agave with champagne bubble carbonation. And at Annies, soda water comes from an old-fashioned soda siphon. Alan follows a philosophy similar to the farm-to-market way of life; he calls his version of making drinks garden-to-glass. The Tipsy Texan gets the majority of his ingredients from the Farmer’s Market and displays them neatly on his bar. “Garden-to-glass is how I roll,” he says in a very matterof-fact kind of way. He wouldn’t dare think to use commercial mixes, frozen concentrates, or anything prepackaged. Alan clarifies that this is nothing new; he is actually reverting back to an

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old-school style of mixing drinks, common before the 1840s prohibition movement. To compliment his vintage style, Alan is adamant about all things local, and he stocks his bar with local distilled liquors that include Treaty Oaks Rum, Paula’s Texas Orange Liquor, and Cointreau, which he considers the gold standard. While sitting perched at his bar, he explains to me the difference between two liquors. Cointreau uses dried orange peel, and Paula’s uses fresh oranges that erupt with citrus flavor. “If I didn’t live in Austin, Texas, I’d use Cointreau. But local flavor trumps,” he says. There is one clear benefit: the cost difference allows Alan to feature a $5 cocktail happy hour menu, and that’s something to which we can raise a glass. The Annies bartender prefers using gins, tequilas, and rums to vodkas; even though more vodka is sold than any other spirit in the country and is a favorite of yours


Mixologist’s Choice

Annies Bar’s Featured Recipes El Pepino 1 1/2 oz Republic Texas Tequila 2 oz fresh cucumber water 1 oz mint syrup 1/2 oz fresh squeezed lime juice

Combine ingredients in a mixing glass and shake with ice to chill. Strain into a rocks glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish abundantly with fresh mint and a cucumber wheel.

Treaty Oak Cocktail 2 oz Treaty Oak Rum 3/4 oz rosemary syrup 1/4 oz freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 oz Paula’s Texas Orange Yellow Chartreuse Rinse (optional) Combine all ingredients except Chartreuse in a mixing glass. Shake with ice to chill. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass that has been rinsed with Chartreuse. Garnish with a sprig of fresh rosemary.

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If I didn’t live in Austin, I’d use Cointreau. But local flavor trumps. david alan, mixologist truly. When he does choose to mix with vodka, he favors Tito’s Handmade Vodka. When I frowned at Alan’s lack of luster for vodka, he lightheartedly compared vodka to Kraft Singles and the rest of the bar as the cheese section of Whole Foods. “I want a variety. I want to try everything. Variety is exciting,” says Alan with conviction. Fair enough. I put him to work. Using the only certified organic, distilled liquor in Texas, Alan combined Treaty Oaks Rum, rosemary syrup, fresh-squeezed limejuice, and Paula’s Texas Orange into a tall mixing glass. Then, he shook it with ice, strained it into a Chartreuse-rinsed martini glass, and garnished it with a sprig of fresh rosemary. Chartreuse is an expensive French liquor made with 130 herbal extracts. Alan says you can omit the ingredient

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if you’re making the drink at home, but at Annies, you’ll always be treated to it. When I put my lips to the rim of the glass, the rich aroma of orange and rosemary fused together with the fresh lime. The combination was exquisite. I admit, I was skeptical about the rum, but Alan proved me wrong. His Treaty Oak is one I can see myself ordering, not only at happy hour, but pre and post-dinner, as rosemary is known to aid digestion. Next up, tequila! When I think of tequila, one thing comes to mind: margarita. So when I saw the assembly of cucumber and mint adorn the bar, I was pleasantly surprised. Into a glass went Republic Texas Tequila, fresh cucumber water, mint, and more fresh-squeezed limejuice. The ingredients were shaken and strained into a glass over perfectly crushed ice. Fresh mint was

“spanked” on top of the bar to release the sweet aroma and was then stuffed inside a glass while a cucumber wheel rested on the glass’s edge. Then, Alan strategically placed the straw next to the mint bunch, so the flavors were perfectly complementary. Oh my God! I may have a new cocktail! Will my favorite drink remain a screw driver? Yes. Will Alan privately sigh while he makes it, because he’d like me to broaden my horizons? Probably. However, has Alan, with his favorite local distilled liquors, opened my eyes to something new? Absolutely. And it is fabulous.

– Annies Cafe and Bar 319 Congress Avenue www.appleanniescatering.com


VODKA vs VODKA Two distinct flavors, two ways to mix it up.

The screwdriver, the fresh combination of orange juice and vodka, is mine, as well as Keith Richards’ drink of choice. At a Rolling Stones concert, Richards once said, “I’ll have a screwdriver, and throw a hammer in it!” I love that phrase, and I use it often, British accent and all. As an advocate of Keeping Austin Weird, I was intrigued to try some locally distilled vodka. Two, in particular, come to mind: Tito’s Handmade Vodka and Dripping Springs Texas Vodka. I enjoy the peppery bite of Tito’s and think it complements a classic bloody mary and drinks such as the Oyster Shooter at Perla’s: they layer a salted oyster and bloody mary mix, top it off with Tito’s, and garnish the shot glass with a lemon wedge. Comparitively, I like the silky smoothness of Dripping Springs and the way the flavor doesn’t interfere with the fresh citrus I sometimes use as my mix. But I went to the experts to learn more, and it turns out, this vodka-loving gal was not too far off. Tito’s is sold in all 50 states and Canada. It’s one of the top 17 growing spirit brands in the nation,

selling around 250,000 cases per year. In 2001, Tito’s was named winner of The Unanimous Judge’s Decision Double Gold Medal at the World Spirits Competition in San Francisco, the most prestigious spirits contest in the world. Distilled six times, its flavor is peppery with a sweeter finish. Those with a taste for a more full-flavored vodka enjoy it best in a martini or with a club soda and lime. Elizabeth Bellanti, Tito’s brand manager for over six years, says the best way to decide what vodka you like better is to try it warm and straight. “Using mixers with it and getting it cold will only hide its difference,” she explains. Bellanti likes the folks at Tito’s so much, she confessed to having worked there for free her first year. And in my opinion, treating people well is the secret so success. For that reason, I hold Tito’s in high regard. Although Tito’s is the number one selling distilled liquor, I have a soft spot in my heart for Dripping Springs. This vodka lends itself a bit of exclusivity and reminds me of my non-local favorites, Grey Goose and Belvedere, both in style and taste. It has the flavor profiles that match my tastes, and those characteristics are conducive to the cocktails I love most; they’re made with freshly-squeezed juices or straight

up, shaken over ice, and strained into a chilled martini glass. Gary Kelleher, master distiller, accepted—and almost dropped, due to unexpected weight—the Vodka Purity Trophy Gold, Best in Class, NonEuropean Vodka. In 2008, Dripping Springs was recognized as the Purest Vodka in the world at the International Wine and Spirits Competition in London. Kelleher explained that the vodka has a different flavor profile than any other in the marketplace. Made from 100 percent sweet Iowa corn, it’s micro distilled 20 times and blended with Hill Country Artesian Spring Water. Dripping Springs has a clean, lightly floral nose. The taste starts with a smooth, slightly sweet mouth-feel, changing to a full palate of flavor notes, including vanilla and chocolate, and ends with a mineral finish. Much like chocolate, it’s crafted to be sipped and savored. There you have it; the widely recognized Texas vodkas explained. One isn’t necessarily better than the other. In the end, personal preference will determine the winner of this battle. Now, where’s my hammer?

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and

I nvIte Y ou of the

to the

o Pera

B est P artY s eason

on Saturday Evening, November 7, 2009 Honoring Chairs Madame Amelia Bullock & L’Honorable Lee Leffingwell Join us for

a n e venIng I n P arIs Cocktails. Dinner. Opening Night of La Bohème . Dancing. Desserts and Apéritifs. Tickets Starting at $150 Limited Seating Available For reservations, call 512-472-5927 x 119

W e ’ ll s ee Y ou t here !


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Melissa Grimes :: Guy with Snail, digital collage RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Maggie Hoffman maggie’s austin blog

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PERSPECTIVES

YOUR AUSTIN DINING CONCIERGE Scarlett Steakly Photo by Annie Ray

Need ideas of where to take a first date? How is the menu at the newest eatery in town? Or at the oldest, for that matter? MaggiesAustin.com is your premiere resource for all those questions and more.

In the spring of 2008, Maggie Hoffman played with an idea, and maggiesaustin.com is the brainchild. Today, Hoffman’s blog is the go-to site for information on restaurants and entertainment in Austin. “I’m not a food critic, and I’m not a writer. But I know what I like, and that’s why it’s Maggie’s Austin.” Hoffman’s blog is flush with her personality. “I’ve always been the social chair with my friends,” she says. “I love getting groups together to go to a new restaurant and concerts on the weekend.” With daily updates of restaurants and music to her blog, it’s hard to believe Hoffman has time for anything else. Yet, she is employed full-time, and her boss, Josh Kerr, is her site partner. Thanks to his involvement, and their mutual love for eating out, balancing work and the blog is possible. Hoffman is originally from St. Louis and attended the University of Texas for her bachelor’s degree. Now, Hoffman might be Austin’s biggest fan. “I just love everything about Austin. Good concerts every night of the week, and so many food options—cheap or expensive—whatever you are in the mood for that day. Austin has it.”

– Maggie Hoffman Maggie’s Austin Food Blog www.maggiesaustin.com

Realizing the need for this type of niche blog when she moved to Austin, Hoffman filled the gap. “When I was a freshman at UT, I would have loved to read a blog like this,” she says. “When

my parents came to town I had no idea where to take them. I really could have used this resource.” Maggie picks each restaurant based on what she is craving and new business openings. “I make a point to cover smaller places that maybe wouldn’t be represented in the Statesman. Anyone can come to my site and search an Austin restaurant and, most likely, it’s going to be in there.” Hoffman and Kerr add their personal photographs of each dish ordered, along with a blurb of their dining experience to the site. Thanks to their descriptions and images, you can almost taste the food they’ve experienced. With an average of 500 hits a day, restaurant owners have recognized the power of Hoffman’s blog. She is invited to attend blogger events at least twice a month. And if she’s had a bad experience at a restaurant, they invite her back to improve their reputation on her site. In the future, Maggie plans to continue her blog so long as she’s having fun. “There’s no monetary value in this. I do it because I enjoy it,” she explains. “I love introducing people to new places! I want everyone to discover the city and support local businesses.” So next time you’re up for trying something new, be sure and consult your concierge to Austin: www.maggiesaustin.com.

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Life. On top of the World. From the moment you arrive, your eyes are overwhelmed with the picturesque Texas Hill Country view, while the Tuscan inspired architecture enraptures your soul and beckons you to the stylish home interiors. Then you discover the extraordinary resident privileges such as an exclusive Sky Lounge, Yoga Studio, Tranquil Pools with Wi-Fi Hot Spots, Wii Game Lounge, Culinary Presentation Kitchen with ongoing cooking classes, 24-Hr Fitness Studio… and you realize this is an exceptional life destination. Alexan Vistas… An Address With Altitude. Toll-free: 866.372.9738 | 512.794.8439 7201 RR 2222 • Austin, TX 78730 www.AlexanVistas.com AlexanVistas@NewHome1.com

VISTAS


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Melissa Grimes :: Breakfast, digital collage RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Breaking Bread on Common Ground Laura Hensley with Caitlin Ryan Photos by Shawn Kennedy

Texas may not be the first place that comes to mind once the word ‘multicultural’ is introduced into a dialogue. However, that type of response is likely the mentality of an antiquated era, as there are culinary pockets around Austin celebrating the diversification—and unification—of cultures within the great state’s capital.

Take, for example, Michael and Ideh Mikati, the owners of Shandeez Grill. The two recently came together in marriage and currently tend to their family restaurant. Some may have said that they faced many obstacles right off the bat; he’s a Muslim who grew up Christian in Michigan and she’s a Christian who grew up Muslim in Iran. Despite all odds, the two met in Texas, fell fast in love, and created a powerful bond based on their shared culture. Today, they offer Austin a taste of that Middle Eastern heritage by way of Shandeez, specializing in Persian cuisine.  Shandeez got off the ground seven years ago, when Ideh’s parents, Mehdi and Farah Meschi, first immigrated to the United States from Iran.  It was then that they founded and began, quietly but contently, operating their business until the

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union of their daughter with their now son-in-law, Michael. Tucked inside a northwest Austin strip-center, the location is modest, quaint, welcoming, and off of most people’s radar. Even so, the restaurant has gained a following that visits regularly in order to sample new cuisine or satisfy a craving for their beloved, yet difficult to find, Persian food. Of their service to patrons, Mikati says, “We are able to give [them] the whole experience here.  When people walk in, it’s almost like they are coming into our home… That’s the environment we are pushing for, and I think that we’ve created.” Owing to the open-arms policy within Shandeez, the restaurant has secured its place as a gateway

into Middle Eastern culture, often linking members of Austin’s Iranian community together. The Mikatis

[I see myself as] a professor of Middle Eastern culture, and our customers are our students. michael mikati, owner frequently find themselves playing host to friends and family, whether it be those to breaking their fast during Ramadan or to those in need of a simple dose of Iranian TV.


– Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd. www.shandeez.com

But most exciting for the Mikatis is when Shandeez gives them the opportunity to broaden the scope of others, who may only know about Iranian culture from the sound bites they hear on the news or the snippets they read in the papers. “[I see myself as] a professor of Middle Eastern culture, and our customers are our students,” Mikati often says. Such a statement is particularly poignant seeing as how Iran spent much of the past summer steeped in political turmoil. The

fact that the Mikatis have opened up a safe place in a culinary setting for encouraged learning is something that many Austinites can appreciate and are encouraged to take advantage of. That said, it is not only Shandeez’s purpose to serve fine food, but to act as a place that preserves, shares, and promotes the culture the owners know and love. And that’s a mission worthy of a second helping.  

Shandeez’s menu features traditional Iranian fare such as: Naan: bread Maast-o-khiar: diced cucumber in yogurt and mint Dolmeh: stuffed grape leaves Kabobs: marinated chunks of meat on skewers Khorest gheymen: tender beef stew Dough: a yogurt drink

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Karen Morgan blackbird bakery

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BLACKBIRD, FLY Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Annie Ray

Karen Morgan grew up helping her grandmother make homemade pasta three times a week. So, imagine her surprise when she was diagnosed with Celiac disease in 2002, making her completely allergic to wheat and gluten. However, instead of treating her diagnosis as a setback, Morgan has paved the way for gluten-free baking and has been turning even those without allergies on to her delicious desserts.

“When most people think vegan or gluten-free, they think it tastes like cardboard, and most products out there do,” Karen Morgan says. “I don’t tell them until afterwards that it’s glutenfree and wait to see their reactions. It’s astonishing.”

– Karen Morgan Blackbird Bakery www.blackbird-bakery.com

“I went from a carb-heavy diet to a non-carb diet,” she explains. “All the pastas from my childhood were taken away. I wanted a high quality of life, and there wasn’t anything out there with a high quality of taste, so I got in the kitchen and experimented.”

In her early twenties, Morgan met her now ex-husband, Tim, who was classically trained at La Varenne, a legendary cooking school in Paris. With his guidance, Morgan learned the bulk of her basic cooking skills. “But when you find something that you’re passionate about, it truly takes over,” she says. “He opened up this world to me, but I took to it like fish to water.” After discovering her diagnosis for Celiac— aka the “day life changed”—Morgan had to practically abandon what she had learned and do a complete 180 when it came to cooking.

Part of her experimentation took place in France in 2006, where she was working at a chateau and cooking gluten-free desserts for its guests every day. “I never told the owner that everything I baked was gluten-free,” Morgan laughs. “We got

standing ovations every night. If you can fool the French, you can fool everyone.” At the height of the blogging craze, Morgan decided to post some of her recipes online. Excited readers told her she should share her products with the world; so in 2008, she opened Blackbird Bakery. An online bakery, Blackbird provides desserts that ship easily, such as chocolate chip cookies—which took Morgan 87 tries to perfect—and Almond Kisses, her bestselling product. She also caters events for clients, some of whom include Ben Harper, Courtney Cox Arquette, and Kelly Slater, but has no plans to open a physical location just yet. In addition to her bakery, Morgan is currently working on a gourmet gluten-free cookbook, Mastering the Art of Gluten Free Baking, which will have recipes for everything from crepes to pâte à choux. Look for it next fall. While she has a cult following among the glutenfree crowd, Morgan says that the highest compliment she’s ever received came from Edouard Hirsinger, a renowned chocolatier in France. “After I told him that the cake he just ate was gluten-free, he said that it was ‘clever,’” she says. “And he has the Meilleurs Ouvriers de France, the highest honor for a chocolatier!”

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

Sustainable Food Center Ashley Moreno with Jessie Cibik Photos by Cameron Jordan / Turnip photo by Carlos Benavides

Austin is a city known for its healthy practices and hearty appreciation, and this certainly rings true with Austinite’s appetites. For this reason, Austin is home to a number of organizations and programs that work to bring fresh, local food to the community. One example is the Sustainable Food Center, which encourages people to get on board with organic farming and sustainable food habits.

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The Sustainable Food Center works with a variety of individuals and organizations for organic gardening, farming, and culinary classes to inform the public and to encourage healthy living. The SFC is ensuring that Austinites lead healthy and vibrant lives, as they are driven by the motto, “from seed to table.” With the help of certain community partners, this non-profit organization works with schools around the city to guarantee that children are properly educated about organic living. The SFC’s farm-to-school and food systems education project, Sprouting Healthy Kids, provides schools with the necessary tools for living a nutritional life. SFC Community Relations Director, Susan Leibrock, explains that they match specific farmers to schools, given the farmers’ bandwidth,

to provide produce straight from the garden. “We [then] alter the existing menu, primarily adding the fresh produce wherever possible,” she says. Other components of the Sprouting Healthy Kids program include gardening, composting, and rainwater collection education. Jess Guffey, the SFC’s grow local program coordinator, works closely with the schools’ staffs and garden projects. Participating students learn about recipes, participate in cooking events, harvest parties, and garden celebrations. Additionally, the students take a field trip to a local farm. “Our programs give the kids an opportunity to interact with their food,” says Guffey. The success of Sprouting Healthy Kids is apparent from its rapid growth. During the 2007 to 2008 school year, with the help of the Michael and


Fresh, local food is the equivalent of long-term health insurance. Unfortunately, most Americans want a magic pill.

Shawn Cirkiel of Parkside, Jesse Griffiths of Dai Due, and Todd Duplechan of TRIO at Four Seasons. The SFC will also hold their annual “Farm to Plate” fundraiser at Barr Mansion on May 6.

susan leibrock, sfc community relations director Susan Dell Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the SFC received funding for Sprouting Healthy Kids at Dobie Middle School and at the Anne Richards School for Young Women Leaders. This past year, the program expanded to Webb Middle School and Garcia Middle School. Two additional schools are joining the program this fall: Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) and Pearce Middle School. Leibrock sees the clear, lasting benefits of educating people at a young age. “Fresh, local food is the equivalent of long-term health insurance,” she says.

“Unfortunately, most Americans want a magic pill.” In this quick fix society, it’s important to know that there are positive outcomes to patience. This is why the SFC is striving to change the way we eat. And with the help of various donors and events, Sprouting Healthy Kids will continually develop. Proceeds from the second half of Austin Restaurant Week will benefit the SFC. Other upcoming events include a chef series at La Condesa on Nov. 8. The event is the first in a series of exclusive dinners featuring renowned Austin chefs such as René Ortiz of La Condesa, Tyson Cole of Uchi,

With increasing success, the SFC hopes to reach out to more schools and to deepen relationships with local farmers. Without the help of interns, volunteers, and a dedicated community, progress would not be possible. “I would like to challenge the community to become more involved, to invest in the Sustainable Food Center,” says Leibrock. “We want to see systemic change and to provide lasting solutions.” – Sustainable Food Center 1106 Clayton Lane www.sustainablefoodcenter.org

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showcasing

7

weddings as unique as austin ................................................... ...................................................

plus

fabulous ideas for a tough economy RARE OCTOBER 2009

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Verbena Floral Design

RARE WEDDING GUIDE

In Good Times and in Bad Elaina J. Martin

Times are tough. The economy is in the tank. Unemployment is high. Your latte has been downgraded to a cup of joe. It’s enough to make any Austinite a bit depressed. But there are those that give us hope for a brighter future—those kissing, cuddling, happily engaged couples— because even in the hardest of times, love prevails.

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Togeth

er wit

The Austin wedding market is one of the best in the country. The brides here are creative and like to do things differently. michelle esaia, owner, inviting affairs

h thei

r fam

Emma M a and Chr i stopher Sy B rode tephen Jam es ilies,

reques t at the the pleasu re of  cerem yo on of th y and celeur compa eir mar ny br riage ation 

Invitation and Save the Date Card from Inviting Affairs

Saturd ay, th Two Th e firs t of ou At six sand and Te May O’clo n ck

Hou se o

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319 A ddie Austin  Roy Road , Texas

“Here’s the great thing about the wedding market—people will always get married, no matter what the economy is like,” says Denise Silverman, CEO of Clink, a full-service event production agency. “Most people have already set aside money for their weddings, so the economy has luckily affected the industry very little,” says Angela D. Jiles, Confection Composer aka owner of Blue Note Bakery. Throughout history, even as wars raged on and pennies were pinched during times of great depression, lovers wed. True, some adjustments may be made, but the show, or wedding in this case, must go on. “A smaller guest list provides brides with the ability to host a more intimate and homegrown wedding,” says LuAnn Dickson, owner of Verbena Floral Design. “It allows them to create handmade wedding favors and opens up the opportunity for hosting the event at a unique venue like a museum or restaurant.” If the happy couple has a place in mind for the big day, it’s good advice to act quickly. “All the great venues and vendors get booked up about a year in advance, so start planning early,” warns Silverman. “Using a wedding coordinator will help narrow the field because of our ability to match our clients with venues that meet their

style, needs, and budget.” As brides-to-be pore over glossy magazine pages and peruse the internet for what’s hot, here’s what’s next, now: The trends in the wedding industry seem to be leaning towards simplicity this year. “Clients want clean and modern designs with bold flavors like ginger orange cake with fresh strawberries or pistachio cake with chocolate espresso buttercream and honey rum fondant,” says Jiles. Florals appear not only simple but familial. “One of the biggest trends this year is a natural and homemade style,” says Dickson. “Many of our brides are requesting a homegrown aesthetic with wildflowers in antique compotes and mason jars collected by friends and family. We have also seen brides incorporate handmade wooden signs, crosses, homemade quilts, and vintage fabrics into the décor. These elements create an extremely comfortable and relaxing environment for the wedding guests.”

ill

unique food options like Whataburger and breakfast tacos or milk and cookies. Even the most high end, elegant affairs are doing comfort food stations with gourmet versions of childhood favorites such as panko-crusted five-cheese mac-n-cheese served in individual ramekins or French fries with truffle oil and a variety of dipping sauces.” As the temperature cools down, the wedding industry here in town just gets hotter. “The Austin wedding market is hot because of the young people moving here and choosing to have this great city as their wedding location,” says Michelle Esaias, owner of Inviting Affairs. “The brides here are creative and like to do things differently.” Dickson agrees, “The Austin wedding market is one of the best in the country. There are amazing places and people to create the wedding of your dreams here in Austin.”

Food, an integral part of any reception, errs on the side of comfort, as well. “In my seven years in the business, I have never seen such a huge focus on food,” says Silverman. “People are offering

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B

arton Creek Resort & Spa is a magical destination for rehearsal dinners, bridal luncheons, spa days, family or bachelor party golf outings, and of course, your once-in-a-lifetime wedding reception. Our expert team of wedding professionals handles all details, from large to small, to make your special day memorable and worry-free. Wedding services include specialty linens, lighting design, floral arrangements, valet parking, staging, dance floors, event coordination and design, custom wedding cakes and extraordinary cuisine.

512-329-4057 • bartoncreek.com

Every

fairytale

ending needs a beginning


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

rare bride & groom #1

Amy Kopycinski & Gerald Bodle date

jewelry

February 21, 2009

Personal vintage jewelry

photography

dj

Jake Holt Photography

DJ Manny rentals/lighting

venue & reception site

St. Mary’s Cathedral, Design Center of Austin at Penn Field

Townsley Designs, Ilios transportation

Vintage cruiser bicycles

catering

stationary

Austin Catering

The Pink Tulip

baker

photobooth

Sugar Mama’s Bakeshop

Say Cheese Photobooths

florist

other

Merveille Flowers, Events

Grey Goose Vodka fete sponsorship with personalized martinis

bridal boutique

Alexia Gavela hair & makeup

ROAR Salon for hair, MAC makeup


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

rare bride & groom #2

Heather & Mike Banks

date

coordinator

videographer

stationary

January 17, 2009

Clink

Chris Jones with Mason Jar Productions

Jennifer Mills

photography

venue, catering, florist, baker, and dj

Red Fly Photography (with SMS Photography, Diana M Lott Photography, Photography by Vanessa, Eclectic Images)

Blue Parrot, Playa del Carmen, Mexico

bridal boutique

Unbridaled hairpiece

hair & makeup

Mandy Hernandez

Charm School Design (via Etsy)


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

rare bride & groom #3

Phyllis Kung & Joe Herda date

September 27, 2008 photography

June Blossom Photography wedding coordinator

Tanya Wood for Green Pastures venue, catering & bakery

Green Pastures florist

Central Market bridal boutique

Unbridaled hair & makeup

Cameo’s Atomic Hair Salon jewelry

Ring: Ben Bridges Earrings: David Yurman Garter: Kizette (via Etsy) Hair Clip: Topsy Turvy Design (via Etsy) music

Rock and Roll Rentals tux for kingsley the dog

Furr Factor

“Phyllis and Joe’s wedding such a beautiful, charming and unique celebration. Sharing such a grand experience with so many of their loved ones from all walks of life can be a big challenge but they managed to make it personal, intimate and true to themselves. The wedding really reflects their relationship in an honest and memorable way. Plus the bride was striking!” teresa lin, guest


rare bride & groom #4

Nils & Lara Ellis

date

entertainment

April 18, 2009

BBoy City Productions

photography

bridal boutique & jewelry

Mark Herron Photography

Alexia Gavela

coordinator

hair & makeup

Claire Kelly, Clink

Bella

venue

rentals

Mercury Hall

Marquee Rents and Tents

catering

Primizie Osteria baker

Michelle’s Pastisserie

lighting

Swank Audio Visuals invitations

Pilot-D

florist

Blue House Flower Farm (Sunset Valley Farmer’s Market)

transportation

Transportation Consultants photo booth

dj

DJ Manny

Say Cheese Photo Booths


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

"What an amazing wedding! Breakdancers?! Are you kidding me?" wedding guest


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

rare brides #5

Jenny Hanna & Stephanie Chambers

date

March 27, 2009 photography

Leah Muse of Whitney Lee Photography

venue, catering, baker, rentals & lighting

Barr Mansion, Reception in the Artisan Ballroom florist

coordinator

Abigail Daigle

“This wedding was like any other yet it was a lesbian wedding. No one made it feel as if there was something different going on, just two people who love each other wanting to share that with family and friends.” jenny hanna, bride

Abigail Daigle

hair

entertainment

Garbo a Salon

iPod Playlist

bridal boutique

stationary

Jenny: David’s Bridal Stephanie: Self Designed

Heather Hanna

jewelry

Vintage


rare bride & groom #6

Narissa & Frankie Adams

date

April 19, 2008 photography

Cory Ryan Photography coordinator

Bride with day of assistance by Patty LeBlanc of Shoreline Grill venue & catering

Shoreline Grill baker

Lucy’s Cakes florist

www.proflowers.com dj

A-Town DJ Service bridal boutique & jewelry

Unbridaled hair & makeup

Andrea Garcia at Salon Bellezza jewelry & invitations

Bride

“The bride’s goal was to take advantage of the very best of Austin to create a mood and aesthetic that was both simple and elegant. Being on the shores of Lady Bird Lake, having a front row seat as the bats flew from Congress Avenue Bridge at dusk as the reception slipped into nighttime...this wedding could have been nowhere but Austin.” heather beckel, guest


RARE WEDDING GUIDE


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

rare bride & groom #7

Steve & Charli Sowrey

date

August 23, 2008 photography

Anne Marie Photography wedding coordinator

Bride with day of coordination by Bethany Childress at 36th Street Events venue

Mercury Hall catering

Ciao Chow Beer from North by Northwest Brewery

bridal boutique

Unbridaled hair & makeup

Emily Kleinsorge accessories & styling

Erica Janke from Blush Bridal Lounge music

DJ Byme Rock rentals

Austin Party Central stationary & invitations

Paper Place transportation

baker

Cupcakes by friend Julie Maxwell; Groom’s Pies from the Bluebonnet Cafe florist

Visual Lyrics

Capital Pedicab entertainment

American Fireworks Partybooth Pix dog tuxedo

Petsmart

“From the celebratory dance down the aisle to the homemade pies in lieu of a traditional wedding cake, every aspect was reflective of the fun-spirited couple they truly are...and, oh yeah, they’re totally bad ass.” erica janke, wedding party member


PERFECT

If you’re looking to make your wedding celebration truly unforgettable, look no further than Horseshoe Bay Resort. A tropical oasis nestled into the Texas Hill Country, Horseshoe Bay Resort sits on the shores of constant-level lake LBJ. With a range of luxurious hotel and lakefront condominium accommodations, as well as exceptional catering and food service, three Robert Trent Jones, Sr. golf courses, a full service spa, restaurants, marina, tennis and more, it’s the perfect place for your perfect day. Find out more by visiting us online or by calling 1- 830-598-7880.

Texas’ premier lake and golf resort.

830.598.7880 | www.hsbresort.com


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

wedding coordinators

36th Street Events :: www.36thstreetevents.com :: 512.294.2315 Clink :: www.clinkevents.com :: 512.236.0264 High Beam Events :: www.highbeamevents.com :: 512.419.9401  Victoria Hentrick :: www.victoriahentrich.com :: 512.478.7975 Camille Styles :: www.camillestyles.com :: 512.924.4309  

venues + reception sites

Vendor Index

photographers + videographers A La Vie Photography :: www.hultsphotography.com :: 512-913-3304 Anne Marie Photography :: www.annemariephotography.com :: 512.644.3507 Diana M. Lott Photography :: www.dianamlottphotography.com :: 512.422.2803 Cory Ryan Photography :: www.coryryan.com :: 512.293.7212 Chelsea Schrader Photography :: www.cschraderphoto.com :: 210.391.3210 Eclectic Images :: www.eclecticimagesphotography.com :: 512.947.7864 Jake Holt Photography :: www.jakeholt.com :: 512.750.4753 June Blossom Photography :: www.juneblossomphotography.com :: 512.373.8308 Mark Herron Photography :: www.markherronphotography.com :: 469.223.6196 Mason Jar Productions :: www.masonjarfilms.com :: 1.800.masonjar Number 9 Photography :: www.number9photography.com :: 512.215.8698 The Nichols :: www.jnicholsphoto.com :: 512.585-9786 Photography by Vanessa :: www.photographybyvanessa.com :: 512.567.0174 Red Fly Photography :: www.redflyphotography.com :: 512.300.1080 SMS Photography :: www.smsphotography.com :: 512.964.3070 Studio 563 :: www.studio563.com :: 866.251.0677 Underdown Studios :: www.underdownstudios.com :: 512. 619.9846 Whitney Lee Photography :: www.whitneyleephotography.com :: 512.940.4362 Digitalegacy :: www.digitalegacy.com :: 512. 423.1404

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Barr Mansion :: www.barrmansion.com :: 512.926.6907 Mercury Hall :: www.mercuryhall.com :: 512.236.1226 Green Pastures :: www.greenpasturesrestaurant.com :: 512.444.4747 Shoreline Grill :: www.shorelinegrill.com :: 512.477.3300 Star Hill Ranch :: www.starhillranch.com :: 512. 565.6746 St. Mary’s Cathedral :: www.smcaustin.org :: 512.476.6182 Design Center of Austin at Penn Field :: www.designcenterofaustin.com Barton Creek Resort and Spa :: www.bartoncreek.com :: 512.329.4000 Horeshoe Bay Resort :: www.hsbresort.com :: 830.598.2511 Mansion at Judges' Hill :: www.mansionatjudgeshill.com :: 512.495.1800    

catering + restaurants

Austin Catering :: www.austin-catering.com :: 512.467.8776 Ciao Chow :: www.ciao-chow.com :: 512.301.4443 Crave Catering :: www.crave-catering.com:: 512.828-5797 Primizie Osteria :: www.primizieaustin.com :: 512.236.0088 Renee's Catering :: www.renees-catering.com :: 512.464.1155 An Affair to Remember Catering :: www.aatrc.com :: 512.443.3422 Fritz Catering :: www.fritzscatering.com :: 512 927-1948 Cissi's Market :: www.cissismarket.com :: 512.225.0521  

bakers

Bluebonnet Cafe :: www.bluebonnetcafe.net :: 830.693.2344 Blue Note Bakery :: www.bluenotebakery.com :: 512.797.7367 Delish :: www.delish-cupcakes.com :: 512.473.4118 Haute Cakes :: www.austinweddingcakes.net :: 512.909.1034 Lucy’s Cakes :: www.lucycakeshop.com :: 210.673.5965 L's Cupcake Café :: www.cupcakecafeaustin.com :: 512.689.7566 Matty Cakes :: www.mattycakesaustin.com Michelle’s Pastisserie :: www.michellespatisserie.com :: 512.736.6771 Simon Lee Bakery :: www.simonleebakery.com :: 512.990.4888


RARE WEDDING GUIDE

Stardust Pastry :: www.stardustpastry.com 512.659.2065 Sugar Mama’s Bakeshop :: www.sugarmamasbakeshop.com :: 512.448.3727

musicians

A-Town DJ Service :: www.atowndj.com :: 512.799.8887 DJ Byrne Rock :: www.byrnerock.com :: 512.736.6172 Gobo Entertainment :: www.austin.goboentertainment.com :: 512. 535.4700 Longhorn Live Music :: www.longhornlivemusic.com :: 699.9555 Music 4 Life DJs :: www.music4lifedjs.com :: 512.973.8686 The Original Recipe Band :: www.originalrecipeband.com Ricky DJs Austin :: www.rickydjsaustin.com :: 512.293.4635 Rock and Roll Rentals :: www.rocknrollrentals.com :: 512.447.5305 Roman Holiday Band :: www.romanholidayband.com :: 512-461-2643

florists

Blue House Flower Farm (Sunset Valley Farmer’s Market) :: www.sunsetvalleyfarmersmarket.org :: 361.293.2880 Callas Flowers :: www.callasflowers.com :: 512-577-1402 Central Market :: www.centralmarket.com :: 512.206.1000 Merveille Flowers and Events :: www.merveilleevents.com :: 512.419.8480 Prive Floral :: www.privefloral.com :: 512.422.5000 Verbena :: www.verbena.com :: 512.420.0720 Visual Lyrics :: www.visuallyrics.com :: 512.244.6720

Garbo a Salon :: www.garboasalon.com :: 512.458.4162 Hairy Situations :: www.hairysituationsaustin.com :: 512.442.6412 Keith Kristofer Salon and Spa :: www.keithkristofer.com :: 512.233.1910 Mandy Hernandez :: www.yourlooksnlocks.com ROAR Salon :: www.roar-roar.com :: 512.474.7627 Salon Bellezza :: www.bellezza-salon.com :: 512.402.9035    

rentals + lighting

Austin Party Central :: www.austinpartycentral.com :: 512.280.5233 Ilios :: www.ilioslighting.com :: 512.440.7045 Marquee Rentals :: www.marqueerents.com :: 512.491.7368 Swank Audio Visuals :: www.swankav.com Townsley Designs :: www.townsleydesigns.com :: 512.249.2229    

stationary + invitations

Inviting Affairs :: www.invitingaffairs.com :: 512.331.2133 Paper Place :: www.paperplace.com :: 512. 451.6531 Paper Pusher Design :: www.paperpusherdesign.com :: 512.448.1454 The Pink Tulip :: www.pinktulipinvitations.com :: 512.323.2626 Social Hindsight :: www.socialhindsight.com Vertallee Letterpress :: www.vertallee.com  

bridal boutiques + jewelry

Alexia Gavela :: www.agbride.com :: 512.419.7818 Ben Bridges :: www.benbridge.com :: 512.491.8014 Bridal Blush Lounge :: www.blushbridalsalon.com :: 512.407.9236 David Yurman :: www.davidyurman.com :: 512.834.8700 Serendipity Bridal :: www.seredipitybridal.com :: 512.374.9492 Unbridaled :: www.unbridaled.com :: 512.444.2743 Eliza Page :: www.elizapage.com :: 512.474.6500  

hair + makeup + grooming

Bella :: www.bellasalon.ypguides.net :: 512.474.5999 Cameo’s Atomic Hair Salon :: www.myspace.com/cameosatomichairsalon :: 512.947.7323 Emily Kleinsorge :: www.emilykleinsorge.com :: 512.627.7521 Avant Salons and Spa :: www.avantsalon.com :: 512.502.8268

transportation

Capital Pedicab :: www.capitalpedicab.com :: 512.448.2227 Carey Limousine :: www.carey-austin.com :: 512.929.5009 Transportation Consultants :: www.transconsultants.com :: 512.930.4835    

entertainment

American Fireworks :: www.bigthunderfireworks.com :: 800.274.4912 BBoy City Productions :: www.bboycity.com Party Booth Pix :: www.partyboothpix.com :: 512.804.6397 Say Cheese Photo Booths :: www.saycheeseforfun.com :: 512.484.4966    

pets

Furr Factor ::  512.502.5750

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RARE GIVES BACK

thank you

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A big thanks to our friends at Kerbey Lane Cafe for supporting local Austin non-profits. When you purchase Kerbey Lane Cafe gift cards through www.rareaustin.com in October 2009, a portion of the proceeds will benefit this organization. All four Kerbey locations will be selling pink pancakes during the month of October, with proceeds going to Race for the Cure. RARE OCTOBER 2009


Do we have a cure? Not yet. Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Ashley Rose Moreno Photo by Laurie Weaver

RARE GIVES BACK Spotlighting Austin’s Non-Profits

Let’s play a game of true or false: 1.The chance of a woman having invasive breast cancer some time during her life is about one in eight. 2. An estimated 1,990 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in men in the U.S. this year. 3. Only five to 10 percent of breast cancers are hereditary 4.One woman is diagnosed with breast cancer every three minutes The results? They’re all true. “The volunteers that make up these The truth is sobering. Which is why this committees are the driving force behind year’s theme for the 12th annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure is “Not yet.” the race,” says Noelke, whose wife is a breast cancer survivor. “People really Have you had your yearly mammogram? care about this disease and they come Not yet. Have we found the cure? Not back year after year.” yet. Are we ready to give up? Definitely not yet. Peg Neuhauser, a breast cancer survivor and race chair, is responsible for orgaThis year, the race will be Sunday, nizing the committees and volunteers. November 1 at The Domain. This year, the organization anticipates at least “It’s phenomenal that the volunteers 21,000 participants. With $1.7 million come back every year because it’s a lot raised, the Austin affiliate is certainly of work,” says Neuhauser. “I think they doing its part in fighting for a cure. like volunteering because we’re not a cliquey organization; we’re enthusiastic, George Noelke, president of the Komen accessible, and welcoming.” Austin Board of Directors, stresses that the volunteers are essential. Komen Austin employs only eight staff members, The race is always held on the first Sunday in November; but come January, some of which who are part-time. the organization already begins working Therefore, volunteers play a crucial role on the next year’s race. Anyone can get in the annual race. There are 17 involved, either by participating in the committees with 75 active leaders under race or by heading a fundraising group. each committee.

“We need every kind of volunteer,” says Neuhauser. “We’re very grassroots, and Austin likes grassroots.” Do your part to find a cure by volunteering and making a donation. Every dollar is significant. For every $1 raised, 25 cents goes to the national Susan G. Komen organization for cancer research, and 75 cents goes back to the community. To date, the Austin affiliate has raised $6 million to aid women in need. Remember, the registration fee gets you to the starting line, and fundraising gets us to the cure. “We cannot be complacent,” says Noelke. “Finding the cure requires a daily effort.”

– Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure www.komen.org

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D

downtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

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219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

11

Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankand angies.com

12

Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com

13

Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.296.2101 www.jblacks.com

14

Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

Blu 360 Nueces St. 512.904.5666 www.bluaustin.com Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreekside lounge.com

15

16

Key Bar 617 W. 6th St. 512.469.9610 www.keybaraustin.com La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondes aaustin.com

21

Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

32

Lofty Dog 403 W. 2nd St. 512.476.5050 www.austinloftydog.com

23

Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

33

Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com

24

The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

34

25

The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com

Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors.com

35

Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

36

Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

37

Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

26

Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarin texas.com

17

Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

18

Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

28

Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

Anthropologie 601 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.236.9301 www.anthropologie.com

29

By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

30

Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

19

20

Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfielddrug.com

Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

22

Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com

El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylaluna austin.com

31

27

Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltons-florist.com

41

42

Mexic-Art Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artmuseum.org Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

HEALTH & BEAUTY 43

Avant Salon 318 Colorado St. 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

44

Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

45

Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

46

Salon by Milk + Honey 237 W. 3rd St. 512.236.1112

LIVING

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE 38

39

40

46

Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com

47

AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512.472.4980 www.dcarch.com

48

Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org


enf

ield

20

/ 15t

h

2 30 31 36 12th

1

e

to

red

8th

23

7th

25 38 4

avez

lady bird/town lake

46 7 6 14 45

ess

r ch

17 32 16

h co

cesa

ngr

40

5 3

6th

41 9 10 22 1 12 48 43

river

es

ity

jacin

nech

21 42

san

os br az 9th

trin

15 27

34 49

ress

39

13

11

cong

colo

a lavac

28

26

r ado

alup guad

anto

ces nue

nio

de gr an rio

state capitol

sout

47

29 35

t

18

37

sout h 1s

33

san

24

lama

r

wes

west

t lyn

aven u

10th

n

mop ac / l

e

oop

1

11th

5th

8

44

4th

3rd

19 2nd

RARE OCTOBER 2009

115


C

campus | hyde park

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

116

Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com Food Heads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com

8

Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

9

Mansion at Judges’ Hill 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

10

11

12 13

14

15

Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. #100 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991 Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

16

Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystaco.com

17

Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE

18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

25

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

26

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

27

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservice vintage.com

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

21

22

23

24

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/ tripptshirts Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 29

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com

30

Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstone aesthetics.com

LIVING 31

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

32

M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

33

Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com


4

16

no20 4 NOrt 20 RTh l H Loo OOp

21

P// 53 53rd RD

511s StT s StTrRe E

eEtT

45t

hs

38th 3 st8rTeH ST et REET

T

30 15

32 10 7

28

17

6

18 22

2929 thTH stST reet NUECES

31

8

nueces

san ga SAbr iel

rio gr anGRA de NDE RIO

N GABRIEL

REET

3

25

4433Rrd D Sst TRrEe 2 EeTt

gu GaUd Aa

34sTtH reSeTtR EE

11

DlAup LUeP E

13 5

34th

T

RErDedR r IVEivRer

lLaAm MaAr R

EE

DU dVuAval L

45 tr TH e SeTtR

14 33 16

1

12

an DEAN KEde ETO N keeton

19

23 1

24th street 24TH

STREET

24 2 9

UNIVERSTY OF TEXAS

26

university of texas

mlk, jr.

a.vAe MLK, JR VE.

29

RARE OCTOBER 2009

27

117


M

midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

118

34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com

2

Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552

3

Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com

4

Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

5

Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

6

Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

7

Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaios restaurant.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

8

9

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

SHOPPING

15

16

17

Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera. com Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

10

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

11

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

18

12

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

19

13

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

14

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531

ARTS & LEISURE

HEALTH & BEAUTY 20

21

22

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 23

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com


justin ln.

2222

18

2

mopac / loop 1

ock

4

17 7 6 treet

19

k

alupe

ee

r

fe

f je

park way ical

ln.

med

bey

eet

20

str

treet

5

ker

35th s

38th

jeff

er s on

guad

1

cr

lama

ll

3

r

45th s

bu

p

north loo

burnet

hanc

lam

ar

11

n so

34t

10 22 9

hs

15 16 21

tre

et

12 13 14

8

1

38t

austin state hospital

hs

tre

et

23

RARE OCTOBER 2009

119


E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

3

Clementine Coffee Bar 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.clementinec offeebar.com

4

5

6

7

8

120

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

9

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainy St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearl austin.com

17

10

Primizie Osteria 1000 E. 11th St. 512.236.0088 www.primizieaustin.com

18

11

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

19

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorked tastingroom.com

12

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

13

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastside showroom.com

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

14

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

15

Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com

16

Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

20

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING 21

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

22

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

23

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

24

25

26

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com Mode Apparel 1601 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.436.8924 www.myspace.com/ modeaustin Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy. com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Bird’s Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com

31

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

32

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

33

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

ARTS & LEISURE 27

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

28

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

29

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

LIVING 34

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

35

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

36

Urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com


east 38 1/2 dean keaton

3 7

29

6

rt po

20 4

air

or

man

17 east

. k, jr

ml

n sa

ea

east 7

th 30 35 36 12 18 31 5 east 6th 23 11 22 ea 14 26 st 5th 32 21 34

24 25

es rna l

1

pede

chicon

comal

navaso ta

28 15

y

french legation

le al

east 11th

tv

2 19

od

ewo

ros

10 9

13 pl

red river

con

chi

33

16 27 8 r

cesa

chav

ez

RARE OCTOBER 2009

121


S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

11

Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

12

3

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

13

4

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com

14

Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com

5

6

7

8

9

122

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

10

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

15

16

17

18

Maudie’s Too 1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.440.8088 www.maudies.com

Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/ trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congres Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

SHOPPING 19

20

21

28

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com Back Home Furniture 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.327.7753 www.backhome furniture.com Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbowsplus arrows.com

22

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

23

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

24

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace.com/ 31622902

25

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/ austingoodietwoshoes

26

Off The Wall 1704 S. Congress Ave. 512.445.4701 www.offthewallaustin.com

27

The Black Sheep 1115 S. Congress Ave. 512.914.4771 www.blacksheep austin.com

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

36

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

37

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

ARTS & LEISURE 29

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

38

Pink Hair Salon 1204 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.2888 www.pinkaustin.com

30

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com

39

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

40

Yoga Yoga 1700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.326.3900 www.yogayoga.com

31

LIVING

HEALTH & BEAUTY 32

Ann Kelso Salon 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.467.2663 www.annkelsosalon.com

33

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

42

Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

34

Bird’s Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

43

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

35

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituation austin.com

41

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com


13 31

barton sprin

gs

1

17 21 28

/ lo op 1

29

lady bird /to wn riv lak er s e ide

eliz

abet

mon

40

milt

mo pac

12

h

roe

on

4

ann

live

5o

19

oak

15

ltorf

42 37

south

2

20 8 39

manch

aca

360

ry

cong ress

south 5th

10

m

la

24 18 26 35

t ma

1st

h

ut

so

wes

ar

south

30

ie

23

34

3 38 9 1 27 14 7 32 25 22 43 6

h

ite

en wh

0/b wy 29

290

36 16 11

33

41 RARE OCTOBER 2009

123


W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

2

Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

3

124

10

11

12

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961

4

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

5

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

6

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com

7

Magnolia Cafe 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com

8

Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com

9

Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

13

Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

22

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

Beehive 3300 Bee Caves Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

23

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

24

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

25

Valentines Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488

Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

17

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

18

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com

19

Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

20

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

21

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

27

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

28

Mix 94.7 4301 Westbank Dr. 512.390.5947 www.mix947.com

29

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

31

32

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

LIVING 33

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com


12 33

2222

29

31

ba l

lake austin

25 10 13 westlake dr

n co

es

mount bonnell

35th street

26

cap

4

1

11 1 6 19 lak ea 9 u

5

c / lo

enfield

sti nb

hw

c re ek

16 23 2244 24 20

bee

cav

er

oa

d

lvd .

3 8 2 22 7

14 18 21

b ar ton

27

17 30

360

y6

20

mopa

620

op 1

exposition

620

ita lo ft ex as h

wy

.

15 28 32

RARE OCTOBER 2009

125


N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

1

2

3

4

126

FOOD & DRINK

9

300 Austin 9504 N. IH-35 512.834.7733 www.3hundred.com

10

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Crú The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

5

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

6

Jasper’s 11506 Century Oaks Ter, Ste 128 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

7

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

8

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

RARE OCTOBER 2009

11

12

13

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com

17

Free People 11401 Century Oaks Terrace 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

25

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobalartsgroup.com

32

Birds Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com

Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com

18

Intermix 11600 Century Oaks # 116 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

26

Zara 3409 Esperanza Crossing 512.491.0920

33

Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com

19

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

27

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

34

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

20

Loft The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com

35

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

36

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

Barney’s New York Co-op 11601 Century Oaks # 121 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com Betsey Johnson 11506 Centure Oaks Ter 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

21

22

23

24

Luxe Apothetique The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique

ARTS & LEISURE 28

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com

29

Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com Tiffany & Co. 11601 Century Oaks Ter 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

LIVING 37

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

38

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

31

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com


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127


Second Sunday Sock Hop at the Shangri-La Photo by John Pesina

A

HAPPENINGS

Dan Deacon October 9 at Emo’s Photo by Josh Sisk

ART Texas Society of Sculptures Exhibit Exhibition through October 4 Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center www.wildflower.org Identity Paradox Exhibition October 4 – 19 Austin Museum of Digital Art www.amoda.org Big Easy Jazz Series Oct 1 – Oct 31 Artist Reception, October 8, 6-9pm Austin Art Garage www.austinartgarage.com Opening Reception October 8, 6 – 8 pm Women & Their Work www.womenandtheirwork.org Art Outside October 9 – 11 Apache Pass www.artoutside.org

128

RARE OCTOBER 2009

Third Thursday October 15, 5:30 – 9 pm The Blanton Museum of Art www.blantonmuseum.org Vida la Vida Fest October 24, 2 – 10 pm Mexic-Arte Museum www.mexic-artemuseum.org A Couple of Ways of Doing Something: Chuck Close Exhibition through November 8 Austin Museum of Art www.amoa.org The AMODA Digital Showcase Bimonthly, various locations www.amoda.org/showcase

ENTERTAINMENT Gospel Brunch | The Durdens October 11, 11 am

Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Lebowskifest: Movie Party October 9 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Second Sunday Sock Hop October 11, 8 pm The Shangri La www.shangrilaaustin.com Who’s Bad – The Ultimate MJ Tribute Band October 15 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Texas Longhorns Football vs. Oklahoma October 17, 11 am Darrell K Royal Texas Memorial Stadium www.texassports.com

Ballet Austin Guild’s Vive le Vin October 29, 6 – 9 pm AT&T Conference Center www.balletaustinguild.org Austin Poetry Slam Every Wednesday, 8 pm The Independent www.austinindependent.com Argentine Tango Classes Every Saturday, 1 pm Esquina Tango www.esquinatangoaustin.com

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz Every Wednesday, 8 pm Little Woodrow’s South Park Meadows www.littlewoodrows.com Glover Tango Every Tuesday, 7 pm Lamberts www.lambertsaustin.com

ColdTowne Improv Every Saturday, 10 pm Coldtowne Theater www.coldtownetheater.com

WELLNESS

Community Night Every Wednesday, 5 pm Austin Children’s Museum www.austinkids.org

Austin Farmers’ Market Every Saturday 8 am – 12 pm Every Wednesday 4 pm – 8 pm www.austinfarmersmarket.org


William Elliott Whitmore October 17 at Stubb’s BBQ Photo by Megan Sauter

Buddy Guy October 16 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Islands October 27 The Mohawk Patio www.mohawkaustin.com

Vivian Girls October 16 Red 7

Brother Ali, Evidence, Toki Wright October 28 Emo’s Jr www.emosaustin.com

Mono October 17 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com William Elliott Whitmore October 17 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Junior Boys October 19 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com Pinback October 19 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Manor Farmers’ Market Every Wednesday, 5 pm www.manorfarmersmarket.org Tai Chi with Guy Forsyth & Angel Quesada Every Tuesday, 1 pm Ruta Maya www.rutamaya.net

MUSIC Austin City Limits October 1 – 3 Zilker Park www.aclfestival.com David Bazan and Say Hi October 7 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Wilco October 8 Cedar Park Center www.cedarparkcenter.com Dan Deacon October 9 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com The Sounds October 9 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com Murder City Devils October 10 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Wavves, The Soft Pack, Ganglian October 10 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com A Place to Bury Strangers October 11 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com The Black Crowes October 13 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Japandroids October 14 Emo’s Jr www.emosaustin.com

Rodrigo y Gabriela October 20 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Built to Spill, Dinosaur Jr, Lou Barrow, Disco Doom October 24 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com White Denim October 24 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com The Tragically Hip October 25 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com

School of Seven Bells October 28 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Sea Wolf October 28 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com The Pogues, Justin Townes Earle October 28 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com The Gossip October 29 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Drive-By Truckers October 29 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Heartless Bastards October 30 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com MSTRKRFT October 30 Republic Live Widespread Panic October 30, 31 Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com

Dirty Projectors October 26 Antone’s

RARE OCTOBER 2009

129


Thank You

presented by

for the benefit of

Austin Restaurant Week would like to thank our fall 2009 participating restaurants as well as our generous sponsors who helped to make the event a success. We look forward to working with you in the spring of 2010!

1886 Café & Bakery

Fabi & Rosi

8212 Wine Bar & Grill

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse

Annies Café & Bar

Fogo de Chão

Aquarelle

Fortune Chinese Seafood Restaurant

Bess Bistro on Pecan Crú: A Wine Bar Daily Grill The Driskill Grill Eddie V’s Edgewater Grille

*pictured

Frank Green Pastures Hudson’s on the Bend Imperia*

J. Blacks Feel Good Lounge Jasper’s Jeffrey’s Joe DiMaggio’s Italian Chophouse Judges’ Hill Restaurant La Condesa Lamberts’ Downtown Barbeque

Louie’s 106

Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille

Sushi Zushi

McCormick & Schmick’s

Piranha Killer Sushi

The Melting Pot

Roaring Fork

Taverna Pizzeria & Risotteria

Mizu Prime Steak & Sushi

Roy’s Restaurant

Mulberry

Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse

NoRTH

Sagra

Paggi House

Satay

Parkside

Siena Restaurant

Perla’s Seafood & Oyster Bar

Sullivan’s Steakhouse

III Forks Truluck’s Seafood, Steak, and Crab Woodland Zax


132

RARE OCTOBER 2009

Rare Magazine :: October 2009 :: Food  

Rare Magazine :: October 2009 :: Food

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