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NOVEMBER 2009

FASHION

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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7 6 1 & 3: Ali Tuggle & Eric Madry wedding, A La Vie Photography 2 & 5: Stephanie Murland & Jarrod MacKay wedding, Eclectic Images Photography

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4, 6, & 7: Ashley Lundgren & Jason Floyd wedding, Studio 563 Photography

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Fall Bridal Vendor Showcase Sunday, November 15th

Laguna Gloria

Our fall Rare Weddings event brings together anything and everything a bride could want for her austin wedding. For more information and tickets, visit

www.rareweddings.com Participants include:

CLINK

American Laser Centers

Cory Ryan Photography

An Affair to Remember Alexia Gavela Bridal The Allan House Annemarie Photography

Crave Catering Delish Digitalegacy Eliza Page

Joe Simon Productions

Paper Place

Unbridaled

KK Bloom Couture Papier

Pink Avocado Catering

Underdown Studios

Prive Floral

Verbena Floral Design

L’s Cupcake Café

Simon Lee Bakery

The Living Clay Co.

Simply Abundant Blooms

Mansion at Judges’ Hill

Southern’s Fine Dining

Austin Cake Ball

Exquisite Petals

Mélange Bridal

Stardust Pastry

Blue Note Bakery

Horseshoe Bay Resort

Milk & Honey

Texas Blooms

Number 9 Photography

Thanks for the Memories

Chelsey Schrader Photography

Inviting Affairs

Villa St. Clair Word of Mouth and more!

note from the editor publisher Taylor Perkins

editor Caitlin Ryan

art director Lindsey Eden Turner

director of sales & marketing Meredith Davis

director of events Jason Hicks

account executives Lauren Caffey Paul Kimbiris Katie Lesnick Jamie Moore Brittany Oster Alex Winkelman

writers Jessie Cibik Darcie Duttweiler JB Hager Laura Hensley Paul Kimbiris Carly Kocurek JJ McLaughlin Tara Pettinato Scarlett Steakly Tiffany Tso

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Amy Wald Arden Ward Lauren Wolf

photographers Davis Ayer Carlos Benavides Alan Foreman Chad Harlan Jake Holt Shawn Kennedy Brian Mihealsick Annie Ray Cory Ryan Ed Verosky

accountant Hoat Ung

design intern Maren Jepsen

editorial interns Jessie Cibik Tara Pettinato

marketing intern Jordan Martin

cover art Alyson Fox, bunnies, ink, pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor, 8 x 11 inches (p 6)

You’ve seen the Devil Wears Prada, you’ve heard of Anna Wintour, and you may know more of Rachel Zoe’s catch phrases than you’re willing to admit. Trends come and go, but the general practice of fashion is an unavoidable mainstay and conversation piece across the globe. In 50 years, you can consider this issue of Rare as a little gem of cultural history. You’ll be able to look back and say, aghast, “What were we thinking!” Or your kid will be able to flip through our fall fashion photoshoot, find an old trend to resuscitate and bring back to life, thus earning them credit as a forward-thinker. Moreover, from working on this issue, I’ve learned that there have been defining moments of fashion that coincide with defining moments of history. Take our Hatbox story, for example, where we learned that JFK started a major trend by abstaining from wearing a hat during his

inauguration. Or take our Caycee Black perspective where we learn how bold actress Myrna Loy, circa 1937, influenced a 2009 collection. It’s no secret that there are loads of talented people in the world vying for the spotlight, but I can confidently say that this city is ripe with up and comers who are well on their way to becoming industry icons, be it among Austinites or among the worldwide fashion elite. And, yes, some say fashion is superficial. But I’d venture to say it’s another form of art when used properly. From a perfectly groomed ‘stache to a reconstructed piece of your mothers clothing, I’d challenge you to see it as something that helps shape you, give you another outlet for expression, and encourage you to use it as an avenue for individuality. The worst that can happen is that you’ll be able to give yourself a hearty laugh when you look back on photos of your heyday of being on top of the fashion world. Or so you thought. Caitlin Ryan editor

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Alyson Fox page

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Above: pink boxes, ink, pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor, 11 x 14 inches

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On The Cover :: Alyson Fox JB Rants Fall Fashion Shoot :: Sweet + Vicious Fashion Shoot Behind the Scenes

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downtown

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campus/hyde park

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midtown

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east side

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south side

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Rockabilly and Pinup Style Stage Style Marnie Bugs Style Blogging Sneak Attack Fairy Godmother Academy Todd Wolfson Jules Marie Fine Jewelry On Mustaches and Men Sarah Bird Hatbox Arrow + Arrow Caycee Black Stephanie A. Steel Martha Lynn Barnes Designer Clearance House Reuse, Recycle, Revamp

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Rare Gives Back :: Art from the Streets Maps/Index November Happenings

The Domain Sew Sister

ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

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– Alyson Fox Artist, Designer, Illustrator www.alysonfox.com

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Alyson Fox Caitlin Ryan Photo by Amanda Elmore

Alyson Fox is the picture of a quietly demure, enviably creative, and fiercely savvy woman. She's drawn attention across the nation with her illustrations, clothing line, and forthcoming housewares line. Born in El Paso and transplanted to Austin, this city is lucky to have her call it her irreplaceable home. How would you describe your aesthetic? I’d describe it as a blend of masculine and feminine with interesting pops of color and patterns on a neutral background. I’d say that it’s always evolving some, which is why I change my house constantly and recycle my wardrobe all the time. When you are illustrating, who [or what] are you thinking of? I really don’t try to think that much when I actually sit down to draw. All of my thinking comes before the actual process of making marks on paper begins. Things always seem to unfold a little more naturally that way for me. It’s a bit more of a playground to turn my brain off and see where I go with things. Sometimes, I listen to music that can direct me, but often times, I draw in silence. And when I am stuck, I get up and look through books, Google something to look at, or I just lie down and ask myself questions to help me finish the piece. But before I draw, I create lists of random things or situations that I want to explore. They are often little stories that pop into my head after reading or seeing something that triggers a “YES” in my brain. Often times, I’m exploring

my own thoughts, beliefs, desires, insecurities, relationships, and memories. Is there a certain message you’d like your art to convey? “Familiar and alarming.” Discovering new boundaries and comfort zones. How is your time divided between your art and your fashion line? Right now, most of my focus is on my art. That is where I feel most at home. The only fashion I am doing right now is a collaboration line with Brooklyn designer Caitlin Mociun called FOX in MOCIUN. When I started A Small Collection, I did not have a set plan of always making garments for it. I wanted, literally, a small collection that could change freely into different ideas and products that I was interested in. With the first collection, it happened to be clothes, because that is something that I have always loved and been inspired by. I think I mostly wanted to make illustrations, videos, and photos. Through that process, I realized that it was the art direction that I loved more. I have a lot of different ideas but not all the patience, background,

money or resources to produce a line that I can sketch. So my collaboration with Caitlin is prefect. We each draw elements of our textile patterns that are printed on totes, tees, and soon to be on organic undergarments. All of the production is done in New York City. Currently for A Small Collection, I am working on limited edition objects for the home area that spin off some of my sculpture pieces and a couple of my jewelry pieces. I am also working on a dinnerware set with a company in LA that will launch in 2010 with a couple patterns of my images. Do the two areas of your business ever overlap as far as inspiration, ideas, and themes go? Is there a constant source of inspiration? Yes, it all bleeds together for me. I draw inspiration from everything. It can be from my favorite artist’s work to a chair that I love. It’s too hard for me to distinguish where it mostly comes from. What is it that keeps you based in Austin, rather than a typical artistic mecca like New York or LA? The comfort of my husband, our home, our dog and my friends. I love visiting everything that NY and LA has to offer, but usually, after three days, I am ready to return home. Austin has everything that NY and LA have, just in different ways. Better ways, for me. I think you can be creative anywhere, and Austin has some of the best artists, designers, and architects working and creating here; so, that is inspiring. And as long as I can travel a bit and be with my loves, I am happy to call Austin my home.

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jb

RANTS

At the Dawn of Time... There was

Fashion JB Hager Illustration by Maren Jepsen

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As the father of a 7-year-old girl, I’ve learned one thing for certain: Girls are wired to care about what they wear and how they look more than their male counterparts. Fashion is not learned; it’s inherent. We have attempted to teach our daughter not to stress over her appearance. Yet somehow, most likely because of genetics, she still stands in front of a full-length mirror, disappointed, making a minimum of 10 clothing changes before leaving the house. You can’t fight it. Which begs the important question, “When did this start?” I’m imagining Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. At some point, they decided that they needed to cover things up a bit, which was probably a good idea. I’ve seen that area in photos up through the 1970’s. I can’t imagine what was going on down there back then. Not to get too graphic, but I’d guess it looked like everyone was sitting on a Bosu Ball. All the time. So, Eve decides she wants a fig leaf to prevent overexposure. You can bet she roped Adam into going fig leaf shopping. She most likely gathered an armful of various leaves, went behind a tree, and came out wearing one after another. “What do you think of this one?” Adam, again and again, would try to guess which one she liked, because he really had no opinion. Eve would ask, “Does this leaf make me look fat?” Adam responds, “Honey, it’s impossible for you to look fat, especially on that apple diet of yours.” Thus, Eve decides to get them all. Adam picks one leaf for himself and wears it until his death some 30 years later, causing all of his friends to laugh at him for being stuck in year zero. Now, fast-forward 600 million years (or backwards about 15,000 years, depending on religious beliefs), to the cavewoman. This had to be the defining moment when fashion really took off.

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Do you think they had fashion shows then? Editors would have taken notes from the front row, “Beaver pelt is so out. It’s all Saber Tooth for fall.” Maybe this is where the tradition of runway models being so thin began, only because, back

that’s what runway models do when they’re not working. They smoke. Now, fast-forward another 13,000 years or so to the beginnings of makeup. The Egyptians started

The fact that animal print comes and goes in fashion is primal and not subject to Anna Wintour’s dictation. It will always come back; so, do not take that stuff to Buffalo Exchange. then, the runway was made of bamboo and they needed the lightest specimens. Can you picture the models knuckle walking and spinning like chimps at the end of the runway? And something tells me that even 20,000 years ago, they figured out how to smoke, because

the art of makeup. The Egyptians are also known for hieroglyphics, which have helped us pinpoint the origins of the very first fashion critic. It’s true. Experts have deciphered wall markings in Cairo to say, “They’re Just Like Us,” adjacent to a drawing of Cleopatra with a zit.  

And when did lipstick start? My guess is that the men went crazy over the first woman who was able to chase down a gazelle on her own. The deep red blood dripping from her lips drove the boys crazy, and it hasn’t stopped since. So, over the course of time, fashion has evolved from leaves and vines to skins, pelts, and “Ta Dah… Accessories.” The fact that animal print comes and goes in fashion is primal and not subject to Anna Wintour’s dictation. It will always come back; so, do not take that stuff to Buffalo Exchange. Owing to all of my research, it’s become evident that some things will never change. Humans have been wired a certain way, for millions of years, beyond their control. Women have deftly learned how to deal with it, regardless of the cost. And men? Well, they just have to grin and bare it.

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Where Austin will ring in 2010

NEW YEAR’S EVE 2010 Seaholm Power Plant: Where Austin will party this New Year’s Eve. Entertainment TBA

Photo by Jonathan Garza

For information and updates, and to purchase tickets for this historic event, visit and register at www.liveatseaholm.com

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statement necklace +

MENSWEAR TROUSERS Caycee Black suspender pants, $525. Something Else shirt, $95; Kickpleat. Carolina Amato gloves, $65; Intermix. Chie Mihara shoes, $322; by george. Necklace, assistant own. NOVEMBER 2009 12stylist’s RARE

fall has brought a tougher edge to fashion and, with that, a new breed of woman. her natural beauty has been crossed with brooding attitude and biting accents. this woman is undeniably cool, enchantingly tough, and leaves a wake of intrigue behind her. we've documented the top fall trends that will sustain even the sharpest city girl in her quest of urban domination.

photographer stylist assistant stylist model hair and makeup art direction

Alan Foreman Caitlin Ryan Lauren Fournier Caroline Hinton with Campbell Agency and Foreman Management Brett Wilson and Willow Witten Lindsey Eden Turner RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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classic white blouse + FAUX FUR

Ruffle shorts, $18; Feathers. Tights, $14; Urban Outfitters. Caycee Black belt, inquire. Caycee Black shirt, $388. Deena & Ozzy shoes, $68; Urban Outfitters. Faux fur coat, $62; Feathers.

frilly skirt +

COMBAT BOOTS Snakeskin bag, $30; Feathers. Bracelets; assistant stylist’s own. Betsey Johnson skirt, $198. Vintage Tee. Shoes, $58; Feathers. Hat, Kickpleat.

optical stripes +

LEATHER Brighton leather vest, $595; Intermix. IW tank, $78; Intermix. Pleasure Doing Business striped skirt, $110; Intermix. Theory wood-soled shoes, $295; Intermix. Bracelet, $245; Intermix.

asymmetrical minidress +

ANIMAL PRINT Betsey Johnson leggings, $88. Diane Von Furstenburg dress, $425; Intermix. Rachel Comey boots, $474; Kickpleat. Necklace, assistant stylist’s own.

Satampondaci criam. Nos issenam patuus vilicio eorunte rfincero consulici peressi publiamdiem temurop ublium alarimm ovesidis cur, con dio videmolicia? Fes inem paritintiame core rei iacto inatius; num pripte cotemum Rommor actorum in sendii sum patusse rceps, C. Quitum et Catuder ferniris

neon +

CHAIN ACCENTS Hemut Lang jacket, stylist’s own. Lush jumpsuit, $62; by george. Belt, $245; Intermix. Rachel Comey boots, $495; Kickpleat. Kooba purse, stylist’s own.

legging pant

+ BUCKLE BOOT

Gemma top, $128; Barney’s co-op. Under.ligne pants, $495; Barney’s co-op. Alexander Wang boots, $720; Barney’s co-op.

leotard +

CROPPED TOP Caycee Black shirt and leotard $475. Missoni hat, $145; Intermix. Belt, $125; Intermix. Pink Studio brown suede boots, $142; by george.

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Anatomy of a Fashion Shoot Beautiful people take beautiful photographs, but it never hurts to have support from the pros. From setting up a shoot, to styling the clothes, to directing the model, each step is an integral ingredient in the making of a killer shot. Here’s a glimpse at our process— pins, tape, and all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

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Setting up the perfect shot Checking that everything is in working order with the camera Cutting tape for the bottom of shoes to prevent scuff marks Readying make-up to apply on the model Putting the finishing touches on the model’s hair Securing accessories to avoid wardrobe malfunctions Gathering all of the fashion components for the shoot Pinning pants for the perfect fit

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Alyson Fox :: horse kiss ink, pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor 8 x 11 inches RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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Devuska owner, Jenny Howe from NOVEMBER 2009 the 2009RARE Devushka Calendar

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Preserving the Classics Jessie Cibik Photos by Frederik Alme and Davis Ayer

Antique cars, rockabilly music, pinup models, and burlesque dancers: Although they are all independent of one another, each possesses a delightfully classic and defining quality that ties them together, and Austin is home to a continuously expanding scene that supports this 1950s revival. The rebirth of the classics through these four expressive traditions has brought forth a vibrant culture that goes hand in hand with a vital Austin attribute: There is beauty in preservation. The common component between these lifestyles, is that each attempts to preserve what was present in the ‘50s that is no longer around today; namely, expressing beauty through fashion, music, and cars for no reason other than for the appreciation of the beauty itself and the inner confidence that it creates. Austin born Jenny Howe expresses her affinity for ‘50s fashion through her clothing line, Devushka. “Devushka evokes the fashion of the ‘50s with a classy spin,” says Howe. Through her clothing line, Howe is attempting to add a new dimension of class, despite the common misconception that the discipline lacks a classy side. Howe, along with her best friend, Kimberly Jaques, started the company when Howe was in her last semester of graduate school at St. Edward’s University in

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Austin. It started as a school project and quickly became a hugely successful fashion show as well as an entire line of dresses, all within three months time.

designs. “We are trying to break that mold and move these rockabilly chicks into a contemporary version of themselves—one that Coco Chanel would have applauded,” says Howe.

Howe acknowledges the importance of individuality, even in the rapidly expanding rockabilly scene. She says that the scene is no longer underground and has, in fact, become slightly generic over the past couple of years.

While Howe and her girlfriends choose to convey their personalities through fashion, others within the scene elect to be expressive through classic cars. Custom auto service, Crushproof Custom Auto, owner, Lux Blue, opened his shop on the Eastside nearly seven years ago. They don’t work on anything newer than 1973, and pride themselves on being able to do anything, from subtle repairs to building to cars from the ground up.

“People adopt the culture, but don’t really make it their own, so you see a lot of repetition, and the style ultimately loses some of it’s flair,” she says. “That is why Devushka is setting out to alter the trends, ever so slightly, if only to give women choices when it comes to style and appearance within the rockabilly realm.” Devushka, meaning girl, was inspired by Howe’s Russian roots. She lived in Russia and took a great interest in the fashion. “One thing I loved about the country was the fact that women always dressed to the nines,” she says. “They weren’t doing this to impress men, or to impress each other. They genuinely have an appreciation for looking and feeling beautiful, which ultimately gives them confidence.” Howe saw this quality as something worth bringing back to the United States. She explains that the rockabilly style spin derived from her own upbringing, and from the culture that her and her friends know best. The main goal of Devushka is to give women an outlet to express their sexuality and their class through their fashion choices. She shares, “We think that form fitting, flattering dresses are making a comeback. And the patterns and shapes that were introduced in the 1950s are the best place to start.” Many rockabilly icons such as skulls, crossbones, and cherries do not always make it into their

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Blue recognizes the unique personality of antique cars. “These cars have a certain beauty to them. If you look at any of them next to a new Scion box kind of thing, you see that new cars are kind of soulless. There’s always going to be a natural beauty about these [classic] cars,” he says. “For example, the 1954 Cadillac—that’s one of the best looking cars,” he says as he takes a moment from working on a 1971 Cutlass to direct his attention to another car in the garage. Since he was 13 years old, Blue has been working on classic cars. Years later, his passion for the hobby hasn’t faded in the least. “Some guys just fit the pants really well. But I’m not really a rockabilly guy, I just love the cars,“ he says. “And after 21 years of doing this, it’s never stopped. I’ve never even considered stopping.” Blue explains that 10 years ago, the car culture wasn’t nearly as big in Austin, but it has grown substantially. “As far as hot rods are concerned, all roads lead to Austin. If you look at the guys building them and doing a good job, more and more

One thing I loved about [Russia] was the fact that women always dressed to the nines. They genuinely have an appreciation for looking and feeling beautiful. jenny howe, devushka are moving to town,” he says. He has a genuine appreciation for this and understands the commitment it takes to succeed and earn respect from those involved. “This hobby, you’ve got to bleed for it,” Blue says. “It’s a guarded scene. We’re pretty proud of this.” Kellie Gonzales, independent burlesque dancer —stage name, Ruby Rockit—expresses her love for the classics through burlesque. Like the car scene, the burlesque scene has also shown a huge increase in the past decade. Gonzales explains that one of her burlesque dance troupes, Red Light Burlesque, has been around almost 10 years, and in the beginning, there were only a few troupes. Now, however, there are too many to count. “Austin is a fun, open minded town, and people have recently caught on to the little secret we’ve known about for years. I think it’s been big in Austin, but it’s only going to get bigger,” she says.   She explains that the term “pin-up” literally came from a picture of a girl pinned up on a wall: A cheesecake calendar, a post card with a pretty face, a poster of a starlet; a lot of pin ups are a result of war. Mass produced pin-up pictures were created during war to boost moral within the troops. “A pin-up girl is a pretty face to look at, a girl you wish you could have,” she says. “The pictures

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might depict a pretty girl doing an everyday task, but she has managed to get her dress caught and reveals a bit of gartered leg, or a lingerie clad gal posed in a provocative way. Always classy though, never slutty.” For Gonzales, pin up modeling came first, and burlesque followed shortly after. “Doing pin up warmed me up by making me comfortable with my body, and when my pictures got good responses, it definitely boosted my confidence,” she says. “I love to dance, I love to play dress up, I love the showy hair and make up: Burlesque is the total package.” All three of these vintage enthusiasts agree that these lifestyles constantly overlap. They’re each involved in classic scenes that pay respect the importance of simple beauty. Austin is a remaining hot bed for this type of idea, as the culture and people still take time to appreciate expressive style and art beyond gartered legs and glossy finishes. The common thread between these lifestyles is a love and need for expressive meaning through a style and culture that has not yet lost its soul. In many ways, modernity has sucked the souls from the fashion, cars, and culture that once served as an expression of self, and now is simply materialistic and dry. The fifties revolution is attempting to once again give meaning and significant life to what has been lost in commercial materialism. – Jenny Howe, Devushka www.myspace.com/devushkaclothing Kellie Gonzales, Ruby Rockit Burlesque www.myspace.com/rubyrockit Lux Blue, Crushproof Custom Auto www.crushproof.net

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STAGE STYLE Tiffany Tso Photos by Davis Ayer

In a city where laid-back can ofttimes be considered high-fashion, several Austin frontwomen are unapologetically making their mark as more notable forces of fashion, giving their audiences another creative element to ingest at their sold-out shows around town.

erin jantzen & yadira brown l.a.x. :: www.myspace.com/dancewithlax Date group founded: L.A.X started in July 2005, Brown joined February this year. Fashion influence: erin: My fashion influences have a lot to do with the people around me. yadira: My mother, Heart meets the 80s, Madonna meets Kurt Cobain, and the Olsen Twins Embarrassing lapse in taste: erin: There are too many! yadira: I wore cutoff denim shorts and white shoes after Labor Day. Dream tourmate: erin: Erlend Oye, Royksopp, Yelle yadira: The Yeah Yeah Yeahs City seen with the most fashion: erin: For my personal style, Austin yadira: Tokyo Two vocal front-women of L.A.X., a six-piece electro pop band, Erin Jantzen, 26, and Yadira Brown, 27, define their musical style as “a really, really, really, really fun, yet inspiring and empowering dance party.” Though Brown and Jantzen have their own unique fashion senses, they were in agreement about the message behind their look.

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“Put forth effort and try to have it be a performance; it’s all tied together,” says Jantzen. “Have fun, get dressed up,” Brown chimed in. Jantzen dresses in clothing from wider known stores, like Urban Outfitters and American Apparel, while Brown prefers vintage and thrift store pieces.Furthermore, while Brown likes to spend hours sifting through secondhand clothing to find one gem, Jantzen says she likes to be in and out of a store in minutes. Both said dressing up for a show, for them, is all about expressing themselves. The two also call themselves “psychic dressers,” somehow coordinating outfits for every show without effort. “It feels good to look good; you get energy from the way you feel,” says Jantzen. “I believe that on and off stage.” The only suggestion they had concerning dressing for a concert was to wear heels for dancing, “something you can dance and sweat in.”

jen matthews the white white lights :: www.myspace.com/thewhitewhitelights Date group founded: June 2008 Fashion influence: Japanese Himegyaru style, the 1920s – 1950s, pin-ups, Blondie and Karen O. Embarrassing lapse in taste: I did the whole dresses-over-pants thing. Dream tour mate: The Flaming Lips City seen with most fashion: Austin or Chicago Keyboardist and vocalist for The White White Lights, an experimental rock band, Jen Matthews, 20, describes her band’s music as “fantasy-like” and “dark but fun.” The same could be said for Matthews’ taste in fashion, which she summarizes as “a little cute and a little creepy,” often wearing colors like black, white, and red. Matthews also calls her style “rough around the edges,” finding most of her clothing at vintage and thrift stores, as well as online.

“I mine for fashion gold,” she says, naming thrift stores like Salvation Army and Savers as a couple of her favorite stores. Her wardrobe consists mostly of “poofy skirts, ruffles, stripes, and bold patterns,” Matthews said. Her clothing takes up four-fifths of the closet she shares with her boyfriend and she calls herself a “hoarder,” keeping many pieces of clothing for years and years. Matthews’ plethora of clothing allows her sense of style to transform daily—being described as macabre by some but young and girly by others. “It’s all the same; aesthetic goes with sound. We want to present a visual to affect what we want the audience to get out of it,” Matthews says.

jess graves the eastern sea :: www.theeasternsea.com Date group founded: Full band formed in 2007 Fashion influence: Audrey Hepburn Embarrassing lapse in taste: When I had a perm. I was nine. Dream tour mate: My dog, Penny. City seen with most fashion: New York City Organist, pianist, and vocalist of The Eastern Sea, a folksy indie rock band, Jess Graves, 21, could describe her style in two words—“formal casual.” The band’s music, which Graves described as “pretty relaxing and exciting at the same time,” closely reflects Graves’ fashion sense, which echoes the mantra of dressing for comfort. The fact that the band plays a lot of stifling, hot house-parties and that Graves is always hidden by a keyboard mutes

her fashion expression. However, this does not keep Graves from always looking chic and well-put-together. Because she is in a band full of men, who she says typically do not care about fashion, Graves says she believes the audience looks “to the girl for trendy and unique style.” Graves maintains a simplistic approach to fashion, by dressing in realistic yet classically fashionable clothing—like button downs, straight-legged jeans, and light, airy dresses. Though Graves does not take the glitz and glam route to fashion, she manages to purvey an easy-going style that impresses but does not overwhelm.

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Buggin’ Out Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Carlos Benavides

“I never had the attention to focus on sewing,” Marnie Cooper laughs. This is an interesting sentiment, considering it’s coming from the creator and designer of Marnie Bugs, a successful line of leather handbags created in Austin more than 10 years ago. Cooper didn’t necessarily seek out the bag world. “I was really passionate, and the stores really responded well to that,” Cooper says. “And I She was content with selling beauty products was really aggressive about getting my purses but discovered one year, when going to Market, out there.” that she needed a cute bag to tote around all of her supplies. So, she cracked out a sewing Now that her purses are manufactured in machine her grandmother gave her, read the her factories, Cooper has the time to focus on directions on how to make a bag, and whipped designing the perfect bag for the each next one up. She even sewed in a little ladybug tag season. While adorable purses, the bags are inside. Once she discovered her bags were drawing more attention than her beauty products, also practical and functional. Cooper is constantly thinking about what she would want Cooper decided it was time for a new endeavor. out of her own bag. “Austin really inspired me,” Cooper says. “The “If I wouldn’t use it, I wouldn’t make it,” Cooper creative energy really fosters an avenue to explains. “It’s about creating quality, wearable, succeed in a creative industry.” and affordable bags that last for years.” Five years after launching her handbag line, This past season, Cooper debuted a new collection Cooper had so many requests for leather purses of leather cuffs, which have been incredibly that she took the plunge. Hardly knowing how popular. She also introduced leather moccasins to sew still, she found a leather sewer and started in hopes of expanding her leather brand. crafting. That first season she went national, This upcoming season, she is premiering a line even getting her bags into ultra swank shops of leather jewelry, which will exclusively launch like Fred Segal. at Girl Next Door around the holidays. As if that

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weren’t enough, she is also currently working on a sandal line and handmade, organic cotton tunics manufactured in India for her spring collection. As for the future, well, Cooper is always on the lookout for new ways to incorporate her leather. “I’m really interested in furniture, so maybe one day I’ll create some leather wingbacks,” Cooper says. “It’s so interesting to me, and I have so much leather. I’m always looking for additional applications for it.” From leather to purse When your Marnie Bugs handbag adorns your arm for the first time, it has already spent months being designed, produced, and marketed and then shipped to stores. Here’s how the magic happens: 1. Cooper is first inspired to create a design. “I always think, ‘What am I missing? What do I want?’” she says. She sketches ideas and begins to think about materials. 2. Next, she looks through swatches and calls suppliers for samples. She tries to form an entire collection with the supplies. 3. Cooper then creates a sample bag. She starts off with the most difficult leather and color in order to easily detect the corrections that need to fixed. She

mulls over the design for a couple of days. 4. After letting the sample sit for a while, Cooper then makes the changes on the sample and creates the bag in the other colors and materials. 5. After her factory has completed the entire collection, Cooper photographs the bags for her website. 6. Next, Cooper takes the handbags to market and takes orders from the stores.

7. After orders are taken, the bag is then scheduled for mass production at her factories. 8. The bags are then delivered for sale. Because fashion has a spring and a fall season, Cooper’s work on her collections overlap, and when one collection is being sent out to stores, she has already been fast to work on the next season. For example, at time of publication,

she has already photographed her spring collection in order to take it to market, while concurrently working on the second delivery phase of her fall line. – Marnie Cooper Marnie Bugs www.marniebugs.com

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The 47th Annual Production of

The Nutcracker Austin’s holiday tradition

Choreography by: Stephen Mills Music by: Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky Musical Accompaniment by The Austin Symphony

7:30 PM | DEC 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 21, 22 2 PM | DEC 6, 13, 19, 20, 23 THE LONG CENTER With the world’s most recognizable music, Tchaikovsky takes us to the land of the Sugar Plum Fairy. Come celebrate Texas’ longest running production of The Nutcracker.

For Tickets:

Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512.476.2163

The 2009 Austin Urban Lifestyle Guide is here. Request your free guide at: austinlifestyleguide.com

current listing: 4225 Camacho // furnishings: Threshold

512 457 8884 real estate for urban lifestyles

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STYLE BLOGGING, AUSTIN STYLE Tara Pettinato with Caitlin Ryan Photos by Annie Ray

Today's online channels are bursting with creative writers who have immersed themselves in the world of personal-style blogging. A simple internet search on any particular fashion item can now lead a reader deep down a trail of independently run websites, all dedicated to the art of dressing and devotion to trend-hunting. Nowadays, it's just as likely to find a revered style blogger from your own discrete neighborhood as it is to find one from a traditional fashion industry capital of the world. The three fashionistas who let Rare into their virtual world double as a mother, an actress, and a highschool student. Katie Reeves, Indiana Adams, and Isabel Legate, respectively, use their websites as inspirational virtual lookbooks, documenting their creative whims, thoughts, and forrays in the world of fashion. These Texans show us that enjoying fashion doesn't have to involve strict rules or depend upon a beefy bank account. But, most importantly, they prove that Austinites can keep up with the rest of the world in terms of making an indelible statement—be it in the form of words or dress.

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ISABEL LEGATE theanimaltalk.blogspot.com What inspired you to create a style blog? When I was 13, I realized that fashion was something worth paying attention to. I began following collections and pin pointing designers of interest. After discovering a few fashion and style blogs, it hit me that starting one of my own would be a great way of documenting trends as well as my own style. What kind of traffic does your blog receive? I have been blogging for about three years now. Traffic has picked up, not immensely, but I’ve been featured on TeenVogue.com. Which unique methods do you feel women are using to achieve great style during the recession? I feel that because I am a teenager, I am always looking for ways to save a little cash. As much as I'd like to, I can't exactly drop $400 on a pair of shoes. As far as the recession goes, I would say stay away from stores like Forever 21. Their clothing may be cheap, but it is meant to last a season and no more. Invest in key pieces of clothing like jeans and boots and for more interesting pieces, try vintage. My wardrobe is full of hand-me-down riding boots, Paige denim, and wild vintage pieces. The key is to shop in moderation. Do you consider yourself a trendsetter? I would consider myself somewhat of a trendsetter; I blog about designers and trends, and I vocalize my opinions about them. As far as the way I dress, lets just say, again, that I wish I were in New York City, and I could be as flamboyant as humanly possible. Favorite designers? Gareth Pugh for his sculptural genius, Christopher Kane for his innovative designs, and Alexander McQueen for always putting on a show. Favorite places for creative inspiration? MoMA in Manhattan, Domy Books, and Eastside galleries like Okay Mountain in Austin.

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KATIE REEVES private blog What inspired you to create a style blog? I started my first fashion blog after joining a fashion message board. I make some of my clothes myself and prefer vintage and thrift. I had so much fun talking with others that I decided to photograph things I made and outfits that I put together, in order to share them more easily. Do you consider yourself a trendsetter?  Well, I do have a lot of fun with clothes. I would not consider myself a trendsetter in an overall fashion, but I do feel I've inspired some friends to experiment more with their clothing, which is very fun to see! How do you do high-end fashion, but keep it funky and different? The best piece of advice I've heard regarding this is “to treat a garment as if it is not what it is.” In otherwords, don't keep a designer sequined dress reserved for a precious event—wear it out for lunch with some hot boots and a denim jacket. Do you think high end fashion plays a role in Austin? I think the casual, eclectic vibe of Austin is part of what makes it special. And while high-fashion is growing here, it is still not a huge concern, and I'm not complaining about it. What are your favorite shopping locales in Austin? My favorite shops in town are Girl Next Door, Betsey Johnson, and Intermix. For vintage, I love to see Henry at Big Bertha's. I have found great vintage home decor and clothing at Uptown Modern and Room Service. When shopping resale, I am never disappointed by the stock at Designer Exchange. Personally, I admire Gail Chovan of Blackmail for her unique style and all-around passion for life, and literally worship Kate Moss for her beauty and style.  Always have, always will.

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INDIANA ADAMS www.adoredaustin.com What inspired you to create a style blog? I love clothes, and that eventually led to me reading a lot of style blogs. I was struck by how none of them were very funny. Most of them take themselves way too seriously, and a lot of them just don't seem realistic. I wanted to have a spot where I could write candidly about fashion and myself. I wanted to create a space where I could synthesize my thoughts about style— both good and bad. Because, let's face it, sometimes fashion is ridiculous. What kind of traffic does Adorded Austin receive? I officially launched Adored Austin on July 31, 2009, but I had been networking and doing posts since July 2nd. My traffic for August was over 15,200 unique hits, which is incredible for a new blog. Someone high five me! How do you use your blog to document your personal style? I take between four and six photos of my self style each week. In addition to posting them on to Adored Austin and Flickr, I upload them to a variety of online fashion communities. Weardrobe.com is my favorite, because it allows you to tag each clothing item and accessory. You can then see how you've used the items before, and if others have the same item in their Weardrobe account, you can see how they use it, too. What is your most embarrassing lapse of taste in your fashion history? I'm tall. I'm 5'9'', and I've been this tall since middle school. Where I grew up, it was impossible to find pants that were long enough for me. In my full-length Student Council photo, I am proudly sporting some Guess jeans that are about five inches too short. I'd show you the yearbook photo, but I'm certain I've scribbled it out in a fit of adolescent embarrassment.

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Joah Spearman sneak attack

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PERSPECTIVES

GETTIN’ SNEAKY WITH IT Lauren Wolf Photo by Annie Ray

Walk a day in Spearman’s shoes, and your feet will hit the pavement with comfort, confidence, and a mind full of entrepreneurial ideas. With a background in marketing, public relations, and social marketing consulting, Spearman is a business-savvy sneakerhead with a plan to spread sneaker love and personal flair by way of his new blog and pop-up store, Sneak Attack. – Joah Spearman Sneak Attack www.sneakattackaustin.com

After spending several years working in Washington D.C., Spearman moved back to Austin a week after Obama’s inauguration. He soon began to miss three distinct aspects of urban culture: public transportation, shopping along the streets, and, of course, sneaker stores. A self-described “travel shopper,” Spearman has dedicated himself to checking out sneaker stores around the country in cities such as New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. It was during these trips that Spearman was inspired by pop-up stores: temporary shop locations that encompass a space for anywhere from a night to a week, or longer. The stores are a perfect way to bring a product to a new audience and win over new customers. That’s where the aptly named Sneak Attack comes in. During 2009’s South by Southwest, Spearman began his preliminary research for Sneak Attack by interviewing over 300 people wearing sneakers, 100 of which were from out-of-town. “The interviews were informally conducted to give me more of a foundation for what was missing in Austin, and it helped me come up with Sneak Attack,” Spearman reveals. What he found was that most of the 200 Austinites went to the same few stores in the city for their kicks, highlighting a dramatic need for diversity.

Spearman plans to produce a Sneak Attack pop-up 20 to 30 times a year around Austin, at events as large as Austin City Limits music festival or as small as a Monday night at a neighborhood bar. His marketing concept is what he calls a “natural link between sneaker culture and Asian martial arts cultures,” two of his great loves. “There would be a couple of consistent things at all of the pop-up stores, and one would be someone in a ninja costume,” Spearman said in discussing Sneak Attack and it’s fitting slogan, “Sneak around in style.” “Sneakerheads scour the Internet and look at books, magazines, and websites for those hardto-find shoes all over the world,” says Spearman, “The problem with a lot of the stores is that you have to be a sneakerhead to find them.” So, with that, Spearman plans neither to sit on his laurels nor to make his audience scavenge for their sought after shoes. Rather, he intends to take the products directly to them. “Austin is a big event driven city, so it’s important to show up where they [consumers] are. Don’t wait for them to come where you are.” Though a sneakerhead, Spearman is not a sneakersnob, and with Sneak Attack he hopes to share the comfort and style of a great pair of shoes with all the pairs of feet walking around Austin.

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Once Upon a Closet Amy Wald Photo by Chad Harlan

O

nce upon a time, author and media producer Jan Bozarth had a dream. She imagined a fantasy world in which literature, fashion, and music could coexist in a way that inspired young girls to explore their true selves. And thus, the Fairy Godmother Academy—a multi-faceted brand with everything from books to virtual wardrobes— was born.

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The Fairy Godmother Academy is an eight-book series for pre-teen girls (ages 7–12) in which children interact with one another and use a variety of mediums to develop their own creativity. Bozarth’s first book, Birdie’s Book, was published in August 2009 by Random House. It introduces her audience to the land of Aventurine, a place where her characters engage in self-discovery and Fairy Godmother preparation by collecting pieces of information handed down by women from generation to generation known as Wisdoms. These wisdoms go on to relate to each book’s central theme and the characters’ lineages. “It’s about being in the world in a particular way,” explains Bozarth of the concept behind her books. “And we think girls will really resonate with that, because girls in this age group are really philanthropic. They’re about the things they believe in—animal rights, or world peace, or the green world—and we’ve tapped into that in a narrative sort of way.” The Fairy Godmother Academy encompasses more than just interesting stories. The brand gives new meaning to the term “interactive product” by featuring a website that enables young girls to participate in Bozarth’s magical world. For example, through the Million-Girl Choir segment, she encourages children to take part in sing-alongs. “It’s a global mission,” says Bozarth. “Girls from all over the world will sing together and effect some sort of change. We’ll ask our corporate sponsors to plant trees for every ten thousand girls that participate.”

The Million-Girl feature will vary annually, but one constant is the role of fashion in Bozarth’s vision. The brand offers a digital closet in which Bozarth’s characters can be dressed in rich, fantastical clothing. The website includes clothing-design and dress-up games that essentially allow girls to play with virtual paper dolls. “The book is the inspiration for all of it,” explains designer and illustrator Maria Vidal Meinert of the intentions behind the Fairy Godmother Academy’s fashion element. “For this age group, children are already being culturally bombarded with messages about how they’re supposed to look and dress, so fashion is a very external thing.” Meinert continues to say, “One of our biggest goals is to take clothing and dressing and make it more about play and creative expression—to make it more of an internal process of looking inside yourself and thinking about who you want to be.”

This is accomplished through two key components—the Aventurine Wardrobe and the Garment Maker. The Aventurine Wardrobe offers eight to 10 fashion collections based on each book, and it allows girls to experiment with different clothing and accessory combinations. The collections’ styles stay true to the fairy tale aspect, drawing on animation to create everything from blooming floral capes to magical fur coats that change from snow leopard material to deerskin. While the use of fish scales and bird feathers in these designs enables creative expression on an otherworldly level, the Garment Maker feature allows girls to construct garments from scratch via virtual patterns, textiles, and notions that can be mixed and matched. “It really does mirror the process of designing clothes,” explains Vidal Meinert, “because you pick a pattern and silhouette, and then add pieces to that.” The clothes will not remain merely digital for long. The company is in talks to turn the designs into actual clothing lines, and Austin will get a taste of what is to come at the Texas Book Festival in November when 10 of the outfits will be modeled at a live fashion show showcasing recreations by local designer Jennifer Ayers. And with the next two books in Bozarth’s series scheduled to come out in April 2010, the Fairy Godmother Academy will continue to make its mark on the next generation. “The message is that it’s what girls do in the world that is important,” stresses Bozarth. “They can save the world, or they can create something beautiful. We just encourage girls to believe in themselves and believe in what they want for their future.” – Jan Bozarth Fairy Godmother Academy www.fairygodmotheracademy.com

One of our biggest goals is to take clothing and dressing and make it more about play and creative expression—to make it more of an internal process of looking inside yourself and thinking about who you want to be. maria vidal meinert, designer and illustrator RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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THE WOLFSON AWAKENING Caitlin Ryan Photo by Chad Harlan

A morning with Todd Wolfson is best described as a meeting with one of your fondest playmates, exploring strange lands—imaginary and real— and leaving with a new piece of art to show your loved ones. That was, at least, how it went for me. He spun me around corners, showed me beloved photographs, and reflected on his gratitude for the artistic community in Austin.   Todd Wolfson greeted me on his front porch, wearing a cut off Daniel Johnston t-shirt, beckoning me to come inside. We went straight to his vintage kitchen table, the wall space dense with his art, his peers’ art, and what he calls “Jesus kitsch,” and began a conversation that remained virtually unbroken for the next two hours.  Together, he and I immediately addressed the most obvious topic at hand. In July, Wolfson

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suffered a severe bicycling accident that resulted in major reconstruction of three major bones in his right arm. Quite a blow, literally, for a man who deems photography his livelihood. But, the accident soon transformed itself into a rallying of his comrades and fans in support of his recovery, emotionally and financially.   When speaking of this period of his life, he becomes emotional with gratitude for the caliber of friends around him. In fact, he speaks of how the September 9th Todd V. Wolfson Benefit felt less like a fundraiser and more like a reunion of people within the creative community that he would call “one big, weird, crazy family.” Before landing a prime spot among Austin’s big, weird family, Wolfson grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He decided to pack up and move to Austin after having visited and dubbing it a cool enough town. Upon permanent arrival, he saw a niche for the type of portraiture that inspired him as a younger Wolfson.  “My heroes are people like Avedon and Herb Ritz, Helmut Newton, Philippe Halsman,” Wolfson says, “people that shot for Look and LIFE and did classical portraiture in the ‘50s, ‘60s, and ‘70s. I grew up looking at that thinking, ‘I want to do that.’”

So, in the ‘70s, he set out to become the “Avedon of Austin,” as he calls it. He finally transitioned into photographing professionally, full-time in the ‘90s. Wolfson admits to having been scared to jump into the industry full-time. After all, he would be projecting his art, which was a part of his soul, to the critiquing public who would either choose to accept or deny his vision. Even so, he boldly decided that he had no option but to throw himself into the trade and admits to a year spent dining on Ramen and mac ‘n cheese while establishing a name for himself. In the beginning, Wolfson took most gigs that came his way while acknowledging his deeper need to gradually become a more artistic, rather than commercial, photographer. To stay true to this goal, he made an effort to work with people that were more than mere business liasons; they were people that inspired him.   Wolfson credits being able to keep his sanity about him to setting realistic goals for himself, while simultaneously remaining thankful for the community in Austin where he isn’t strictly directed, but rather allowed and encouraged to explore artistic freedom. He prefers photography on a more personal level; as he has perfected

his craft, people have rarely told him what to do.   “Everything [of mine] that you see...I didn’t think about. I didn’t plan where I was going to shoot it,” he explains. On most shoots, Wolfson doesn’t know the state of the person, the state of the environment, or the state of the clothing. He calls it all “very spontaneous.” So, how does he work with his models and/or subjects? Well, he does what any good soul without a camera would do. He makes a connection.

In the 70s, [Wolfson] set out to become the ‘Avedon of Austin.’ “To me, it’s not about styling the clothes. It’s about pulling the soul out of people,” Wolfson deadpans.  

Wolfson particularly loves photographing his friends, and certainly has a plethora of beautiful ones. He drives the point home that all he wants

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TODD SHARES HIS FAVORITE PHOTOS sally allen

“One thing I know is lighting. We had to be on location by 7:30 am to get ‘that’ light. Sally knew we had to get it, so we got there with time to spare. That is why this was my favorite photo all summer.

rachel myhill

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“People of Austin, I tried to get greedy and run six of my photos. Then I decided four was enough, because I want to ‘pay it forward.’ To my best muse and great artist/ photographer/friend Dagny Piasecki. She totally gets it!” to do is show the beauty that he sees in someone. He hopes that they can then share it with the people that love them. A successful shoot ends in “showing a balance of humanity and beauty,” he says. Wolfson continues to say with conviction, “when you go into an art museum and see stuff, there’s art you can look at that is more scholastic and academic, and then there is art you can see and you want it. You want to touch it, eat it, and have it in your house. That’s the stuff that inspires me.” There’s no doubt that the psyche of Austin meshes well with the psyche of Wolfson, and onlookers with a discerning eye are able to see something profound behind each Wolfsonproduced photo.   His personal and psychological technique of shooting a subject opens the possibility for many interpretations of a single photo. Moreover, that technique has earned him four Reader’s Choice awards from The Austin Chronicle and landed his photography on the covers of thousands of CD covers, posters, and websites that have been seen across the globe.  As for the future, the 16 plates, pins, and screws in his arm haven’t stopped him.  

samera owhadian

“Just doing some photos for our soul. It is wonderful when you can have such beautiful best friends/muses. We have been shooting for around a decade.”

In fact, he is setting loftier goals, “I’d like to be in gallery shows and work on books...the stuff that’s more meaty.”  – Todd Wolfson Photographer www.toddvwolfson.com

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Heavy Metal Arden Ward Photos by Carlos Benavides

Think back to the first piece of jewelry that really grabbed you, maybe a childhood bracelet or grandmother’s engagement ring. There’s a rich, tangible history in that connection; one that is captured in each vintage-inspired mixed metal piece designed by Jules Marie Fine Jewelry.

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Mixed metal. Organic forms. Femininity. Jules Marie Fine Jewelry fuses these characteristics into a line of necklaces, earrings, and bracelets that achieves a natural, feminine aesthetic without being stereotypically dainty or overdone. The creative minds behind this new line are Julie Hsu and Leah Marie Ball, two metalsmiths who double as servers at Austin sushi staple Kenichi. The pair met four years ago at the restaurant, quickly forging a friendship that eventually led them to attending metalsmith classes together. Ball, who holds a design degree from the University of Texas, initially coaxed Hsu into joining her in class.

We wanted to do something artful that pays tribute to a greater feminine story.

“It was a breath of fresh air,” explains Hsu: An escape from an otherwise hectic schedule of working restaurant hours, while taking pre-med classes. Late this summer—one hot July night at Lustre Pearl to be exact—the two decided to unite their visions into a new marketable jewelry line. Ball previously launched her own collection called Liamb, but “had been craving a partnership and constructive criticism.” Merging their creative minds and talented hands resulted in the naissance of Jules Marie Fine Jewelry, a refined, honest line of mixed metal jewelry with a naturally understated charm. Using precious metals and semi-precious stones, Jules Marie creates pieces with protective qualities: amulets, or proverbial charms, that

guard their owners. One of their favorites, which plays on the classic tradition of using sapphires in engagement rings, features a simple hammered hoop encircling a single sapphire stone. The line extends to more substantial pieces, including a weightier pyrite drop, said to protect one from foolish acts (fool’s gold). Though youthful, Hsu and Ball possess thoughtful, grounded spirits that cannot be overlooked in their work. Drawing inspiration from natural forms and the feminine body, their pieces evoke a sense of history, much like a treasured family brooch or vintage locket. “Jewelry has played such a large role in my experience as a woman,” says Ball, offering a sentiment that appears in each piece they design. Combining their creative inspiration, each piece

leah marie ball, designer

maintains a reflection of their unique histories and experiences. Engrained in their aesthetic is the pair’s shared aspiration; “We wanted to do something artful that pays tribute to a greater feminine story.” In its short existence, Jules Marie has made an impression on the Austin boutique scene, recently spotted at Feathers, Spartan, and Blue Elephant. Currently working from their South Austin studio, Hsu and Ball are designing an updated, more defined collection that will be available for purchase on their website, www.julesmarie.com. – Julie Hsu and Leah Marie Ball Jules Marie Fine Jewelry www.julesmarie.com

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ON MUSTACHES AND MEN J.J. McLaughlin Photos by Jake Holt and Alison Narro

It fills rooms with an erotic charge intense enough to revive any rundown red-light district. Hipsters wear it with bravado, ironically accenting their American Apparel garb. It can be worn with anything—except humility. Attitude and confidence are a must if you have one. It commands the type of stop-in-your-tracks attention that 95 percent-off signs and high profile celebrities and sirens warrant. Above all, it’s inching its way back onto upper lips, whether you like it or not. Yes, it’s the advent of le mustache.

Though it’s had a much bumpier ride than its downstairs counterpart (the beard), there’s a new masculine mystique that has men poised at razor’s edge to make the ‘stache sexy again, or rather, sexy for the first time. Not because it’s the cool thing to do, but because growing a rugged lip sweater is as much a stylistic statement as it is a celebration of manliness. If wearing a beard is the vehicle for protest, then rocking a mustache is the vehicle for acceptance. “My mustache is an outward manifestation of what’s going on inside, which is joy and happiness,” local pre-school art teacher and facial hair enthusiast Dave Schwab, 29, says. “You have to take in all of me—with the mustache —because it’s me.” He began growing it three years ago as a test to see if he’d get fired. “I grew it as a joke but it’s really grown to become a part of who I am now,” Schwab says. His twisted whiskers are so much a part of him now that he couldn’t imagine life without it. Though, at times, he said he was tempted to take a razor to his lip.

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“It’s both a blessing and a curse to have a mustache, because I get approached all the time. But at least I don’t ever have to go out of my way to meet people,” he says. A celebrity in his own right, Allen Demling, 30, said the allure of his massive beard and mustache actually helped him in his recent run for Austin City Council, saying people were able to connect with him on a very down-to-earth level. Speaking of connecting, Mike Schrader, 32, wears what he calls friendly muttonchops and a robust mustache, because he can’t grow the facial hair on his chin in order to make a beard. But it’s okay; he makes up for it by connecting other bald face detractors to a world of manly men. “I grow for every man who can not grow a mustache,” Schrader says. Schrader says guys commonly ask him how to grow a mustache, and his response is always, “stop shaving.” (It’s important to note that they approach him with a man-crush like zeal, too.) It’s clearly easier said than done. And though many men have endured jabs for growing

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mustaches because of the shaky associations that include porn stars, villains, and sketchy uncles, it always seems to be grown for comedic effect, until recently, of course. There’s a clear message you’re sending in your mustache, but there’s a right way to say it. “You just gotta wear it with attitude, man. Go for it! That’s the only way to wear it. And just have fun with it, and it’ll look awesome,” competitive beard and mustache wearer Alex LaRoche, 30, says. Since he applies product to his mustache, it’s safe to call him a ‘stachenista. The mustache has always been on the cusp of a comeback, but only the cool kids and hipsters could pull it off in a semi-ironic, or post-ironic (whatever) way. A fixed gear bike and an affinity for tiny cutoff jean shorts are not requirements when offering handle bar rides. Demling, who is a prominent voice in the bicycling community, couldn’t answer why the ‘stache trend is prevalent in biking culture, but he mysteriously makes you believe in it when he simply says, “it looks good.” A man bearing a mustache need not say much in order to deliver a poignant message.

Dave Schwab

My mustache is an outward manifestation of what’s going on inside, which is joy and happiness. dave schwab

On the other side of the lip, a man wearing a mustache is both respected and feared at the same time. Schwab said he was in L.A. recently when he was approached by a group of tough guys who seemingly wanted to inflict harm on him, but instead they complimented the rolling thunder on his lip. That’s because his mustache is an emblem of rugged masculinity that acts as numchucks when danger lurks. The only real fear that might emerge from a lip sweater is how the ladies might react to that hairy leech attached to your grill. It’s a vicious misconception that women hate the ‘stache. Schrader met his girlfriend at a beard and

mustache competition, while LaRoche said his fair lady encourages his whisker growth. There’s even a growing trend for a ‘Miss-stache’ on the ladies, which is like lip liner. “It weeds out the girls that you don’t like,” Demling says. Like fashion trends, grooming styles swing in complete contrast with what came before it. Prior to the unruly beard look that grew with haste and fury, men were girly and glazed in clean-shaven, candy-coated, metrosexual tartness. But the waxed Boy Scout look ended and manhood was restored with the return of stubble, unemployment, and arm wrestling competitions. Back from a long hiatus, the mustache has become a tool that enhances the characteristics of a person while outwardly displaying them. Which brings us to the age-old question: Why should I sport a mustache? “It’s fun, and it suits me,” Schwab says. So take your index finger, graze your upper lip, and if it’s bare, you’re just not having as much fun. – Dave Schwab Sanctuary Printshop www.sanctuaryprintshop.com Allen Demling Bicycle Activist www.allendemling.org Alex LaRoche & Mike Schrader Members, Austin Facial Hair Club www.myspace.com/austinfacialhairclub Background wall art by Darm Darm

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Sarah Bird artist

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PERSPECTIVES

FROM RAGS TO BRITCHES Lauren Wolf Photo by Cory Ryan

On a drizzling, autumn day, a seamstress leads the way down a pebble path, under a vine-covered arbor, and into her workshop. Shelves housing colorful clothesline, the walls appear as stacked rainbows. Some items are clearly divided according to material and texture. Others look like unused winter clothes stuck on the top shelf of a closet. In fact, those might be some of your hand-me-downs in the corner.

– Sarah Bird Artist www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5203941

Sarah Bird is the seamstress, and in her workshop is a collection of used clothing that she fashions into hats, scarves, blankets, children’s clothes, and more. It all started six years ago with a box of irregular sweaters purchased at a Settlement Home garage sale. Her initial project was a time-consuming rag rug, but that winter, she decided to sew hats as gifts for her nieces. Ever the salesman, her husband took some of the hats to school, sold them, and surprised her with an order for more. Since then, Bird has sold thousands of items at the Armadillo Christmas Bazaar in Austin and at boutiques like Austin Baby and Parts & Labor. Some of her signature items include wool scarves and hats adorned with detailed flowers sewn from scraps. Her inspiration comes from wanting to reuse each item. “Everything is unique, so you have to be able to pair it with something. You have to have a good memory for your materials,” she says in reference to her process. And, as for those materials, they truly could be your old clothes. Sarah purchases some items from Savers and Goodwill type stores, particularly when she’s looking for quality and vintage fabrics for children’s clothes. The items unsold by second hand shops are often compressed into bundles and sold pennies-on-the-pound to rag dealers. Bird drives to a rag dealer warehouse in Laredo

every year, where giant fan blades sweep overhead and bobcat machinery distributes giant bundles of clothes to be organized for purchase. Describing her experiences at the warehouses, Bird says, “One woman I met down there had a father who was a used clothes dealer in Ethiopia. He made enough money to send her to the University of Texas.” Inspired by these stories and her own experiences of travelling in Africa, Bird is conscious of using every single scrap of material she gathers. She explained how the cashmere wool trade in Mongolia has devastated the fields and crops in the area due to overgrazing. Using, “as much of what’s there,” when working with the wool, she plans to donate a percentage of sold cashmere pieces to charities like Mercy Corp. Evident with each stitch, Sarah’s conscious sensitivity to the materials in her products is certainly an inspiration to anyone who touches her work. In fact, Bird conducts her life in a manner dedicated to responsible consumption. When departing from her workshop in her backyard, one notices the tanks used for water collection, the chickens nestling in their coops for egg laying, and the solar panels on top of her home’s roof. It’s those panels that provide energy to the workshop where the efficient seamstress creates a child’s new jumper from someone’s old sweater, each day.

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NECESSITY MEETS STYLE Linsey Krauss Photos by Jake Holt

Hat fashion has evolved over the decades, and this is no exception in Austin. The local haberdashery, Hatbox, has managed to keep up with each iteration of style, consistently serving-up unique, personalized styles to Austin’s men and giving a lesson in history, while at it. 70

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Originally a gift shop and custom art store, Vertigo—now Hatbox—was founded over 30 years ago. Because accessory items were Vertigo’s main focus, hats grew to be such a large portion of sales that locals began to refer to the shop as “that little hat store.” In late 2003, due to a desire to see the store expand beyond the limited space Guadalupe Street offered, Vertigo moved to East 6th Street. But it wasn’t until after a particularly successful SXSW Music Festival that the store went through a complete rebranding, resulting in the current name, Hatbox. So, where does one start when learning about hat fashion? Emily Conway, manager at Hatbox, recommends the beginning of hat history, claiming that there are as many stories about hats as

there are styles. Interestingly, hats haven’t always been at the forefront of fashion. In fact, some argue that hats, as a fashion statement, died when John F. Kennedy didn’t wear one during his 1961 inauguration, defying presidential trends

phases today’s men go through in the evolution of becoming a hat wearer: The first occurs when men begin to wear something functional, such as a baseball cap, upon being advised by dermatologists to protect their skin. The second

Every guy wants to be Fred Astaire or a cowboy, to live out that hero in their favorite movie. emily conway, manager, hatbox that preceded him. During this time and after, hats were mostly seen as a symbol of conformity. It’s fascinating how hats have once again become a tool for expression of personality and individuality. As Conway sees it, there are two

phase takes form once the women in their lives start suggesting more stylish looks, thus igniting the men’s curiosity. At some point in their lives, Conway explains that “Every guy wants to be Fred Astaire or a cowboy, to live out that hero in their favorite movie.” “Our male customers like to have a conversation piece, to know and understand the history of the hat they are buying, and then pass that knowledge along to friends,” she continues. Some of Hatbox’s most popular conversation pieces include the driver, an easy, simple transition hat from a baseball cap; the fedora, which is known as a good universal style, constructed with a high crown and wide brim; and most recently coming back into fashion is the porkpie hat, which was originally popular with jazz musicians back in the 1960s. It was with the spirit of helping people hone in on their confident individuality that Hatbox was created. Hatbox strives to make the hat-buying experience one that is as interesting as it is perfect. From customer styles to expert fittings, Conway and the rest of the Hatbox staff enjoy the reward that comes when someone unsuspecting or unfamiliar finds a unique piece that they love. – Hatbox 115 East 6th St., Suite N www.hatbox.com

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Alyson Fox :: deep end ink, pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor 11 x 17 inches RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

the straight + arrow Arden Ward Photo by Ed Verosky In my rulebook for the Internet, there’s not much worse than a seemingly legitimate website that turns out to be nothing more than one giant advertisement, albeit with pretty graphics and a catchy tagline. This also rings true for blogs. Too often, an obscure Google search leads me to an even more obscure blog, where I get lost in a sea of jumbled text and flashy links. Luckily, Person and Wilkins feel my pain. The duo, owners of sister stores Spartan and Bows + Arrows, launched a style blog this fall inspired by all that is currently rocking their worlds. A natural extension of their storefronts, Arrow and Arrow (www.arrowandarrow.com), features the latest trends that catch their eyes, while escaping the trap of becoming a blog-turned-advertisement. Known for carrying a well-edited selection of goods, the shops’ aesthetic translates effortlessly to their blog, which covers design, fashion, travel, food, and music. Two simple words meld into the theme of Arrow and Arrow: inspiration and conversation. From the time they opened their stores to today,

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Step into the worlds of Currie Person and Lauren Wilkins, two local shop owners who know a thing or two about style and design. With the launch of their new blog, Arrow and Arrow, they give us a glimpse into what inspires them and their favorite designers. Person and Wilkins have spent countless hours volleying ideas back and forth; ideas that typically transform into tangibles found in their shops. “We share images, songs, articles…anything that can ignite a conversation or idea,” says Person. The same goes for the blog; anything is game for the topics they cover. For Person and Wilkins, Arrow and Arrow is all about “what is informing the point of view that not only shapes the look and feel of our shops, but also adds beauty and enjoyment to our lives.” Outside of sharing their own inspirations, the two hope that the blog becomes a catalyst for readers to tap into a new and different community. Because Person and Wilkins are avid travelers, many posts will be inspired by their journeys and favorite locations, notably Wilkins’ frequent trips to New York City and Person’s yearly trek to Paris. The two explore many locales and uncover talented artists and designers still unknown to the greater public, a natural perk of being a shop owner. While they can share these unique talents directly with their customers, Arrow and

Arrow is a fresh avenue for introducing new artists to a general population that may not discover them otherwise. “We want to show a different side of designers,” explains Person. Many of the designers featured in Person and Wilkins’ stores have creative passions that lie outside of their signature styles. Take Alexander Olch, a New York tie designer carried at Bows + Arrows, whose original desire was to create a documentary called The Windmill Project, which took five years to produce. Or local artist Alyson Fox, who not only shops at Spartan, but has helped Person connect with many other artists and designers that now mold the look and feel of her store. Arrow and Arrow delves into the lives of designers like these, exploring new sides of creative people that Person and Wilkins admire. Now, fast-forward and take a look through the blog’s future archive. In a year or so, a trip through Arrow and Arrow’s history will uncover travel journals, designer profiles, and maybe a

– Currie Person and Lauren Wilkins www.spartan-shop.com www.shopbowsplusarrows.com www.arrowandarrow.com

We share images, songs, articles...anything that can ignite a conversation or idea. currie person, owner, spartan playlist or two of their favorite of-the-moment songs. But there are no limits to what will spark the pair’s next post, or what will ignite a new dialogue between the two and their readers.

“Everything from the lighting of a little restaurant, to the color palate of an art show, to the special way that a guy or gal on the street is styling a look can get us really excited, talking and

brainstorming ways to translate that inspiration into something new.”

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Caycee Black fashion designer

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BLACK STAR, BRIGHT FUTURE Caitlin Ryan Photo by David Hartman

When Caycee Black describes her collection, it’s easy to get lost in an ethereal world—a world of yesteryear that slowly passes through the mind like a washed out movie reel replete with soft colors, muted backdrops, and bold women draped in gorgeous swaths of dutifully crafted materials.  – Caycee Black Fashion Designer www.cayceeblack.com

Black is a Texas girl well on her way to making the Big Apple bow before her. Since launching her own line, Caycee Black, in February 2009, she’s garnered respect around the country; six boutiques now carry her line, and she produced a New York Fashion Week runway show this September where she debuted her Spring 2010 collection.  She left Texas at just 18 to begin her undergraduate career as a student at Parsons School of Design in New York City, and quickly rose through the ranks at companies like Tibi, Club Monaco, and Coach, where she concurrently works as a freelance designer for Reed Krakoff.  “Working for other people gave me a lot of confidence,” Black says in an acknowledging manner.  That impressive roster of experience in just a matter of years, mixed with a fresh perspective, earned Black top new designer accolades from the likes of Lucky Magazine, Women’s Wear Daily, and Vogue UK.  An aspect of her design that is garnering a great deal of notice is that the prints used on her garments are often a literal reflection of the art pieces she’s created on canvas.    Black offers the advice, “It’s hard to try to recreate everything that’s already out there, so the trick for your own line is coming from something personal.”  For example, this fall, she was influenced by the juxtaposition of nature’s soft shadows against

Myrna Loy

the gritty city streets of New York. She became captivated by the way trees cast intricate designs across the hard, used pavement, creating “a little oasis of life” deep within an otherwise unforgiving environment. Herein was born her print aptly named Shadow Forest. Aside from personal art, several key looks from Black’s collections pay homage to cinema. Her androgynous fall pieces mixed with fluid ballet-inspired materials are direct impacts of the protagonist in her favorite 1937 movie “The Thin Man.” “The main character, Nora, in “The Thin Man,” played by Myrna Loy, was a huge inspiration,” Black reveals. “They [Nora and Myrna] both embody femininity and masculinity.” Black believes that there is a modern way of being a woman, and she firmly supports the idea that a woman can be strong, accomplished, adventurous, and put-together. Black’s artistic tendencies expose themselves in the balance and structure of her garments. She’s able to use each artistic outlet, from ballet to cinema to painting, to compliment one another.  The culmination is a collection seasoned with rich storylines and a well-defined vision. Her ability to continuously create, refine, and seek out the uncommon angle in an every day occurrence or antiquated film are what keeps her perspective fresh and fashion critics around the world guessing. 

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FOOTBALL, FILM, AND FASHION Paul Kimbiris Photos by Brian Mihealsick

For Stephanie A. Steel, a typical day on the set of Friday Night Lights may not be as glamorous as it seems. She’s on the tail end of a 70-hour workweek. It’s 90 degrees at 10 p.m., and mosquitoes are on the offensive, most likely aggravated by the set lights, which mimic the daytime sun. Everyone’s skin shimmers with bug repellant. In between takes, she runs across the field to adjust the actors’ costumes. Some of them need more dirt on their uniforms, some need more blood, while some of them just need more hairspray. I first received wind of Steel while vacationing in Greece. I met a bartender who told me a friend in Austin worked in wardrobe on the set of the TV show Friday Night Lights. As it turns out, like me, the Greek isle of Santorini is one of Steel’s favorite getaways. The bartender gave me her contact info, poured me another shot, and sent Steel a Facebook message to introduce us. A few days later, I was back in Austin and had been invited to the set. A small world, indeed. As the key set costumer, Steel is responsible for maintaining the continuity of the wardrobe on the show. In other words, she and her crew must make sure that the costumes look exactly the same throughout each episode’s shoot, since they film in no specific order. “Countless photos are taken,” Steel explains, “The last thing you want to have is a character in a different outfit than they established in the beginning of the shoot. The photos that we take are carefully labeled so shirts are buttoned the

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same way, the same sleeves are rolled up, tucked in, etc.” The TV series takes place in modern day, so the wardrobe choices are endless. But Steel also worked on the original film, which was released in 2003 and set in the 1980s. She recalls how fun it was collaborating on the film’s wardrobe. “Everyone brought in their high school yearbooks as a frame of reference…acid washed jeans, high top sneakers, and scrunchy boots,” Steel says while laughing at the fact that all of these trends have made a comeback. But before arriving as a mainstay on the Friday Night Lights TV set, Steel built a solid production roster, beginning as a Production Assistant on the film The Life of David Gale. That position then led to other opportunities, such as working on the remake of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre and There Will be Blood. Most recently, Steel served as the key set costumer on Tree of Life,

starring his Excellency, Brad Pitt. Not surprisingly, one of her most memorable projects was the indie film Teeth, a tale of a high school virgin with a bad case of vagina dentata (look it up, folks). She was charged with creating “modesty pouches” so prosthetic limbs could be attached and then violently dismembered. Think Boogie Nights meets Jaws. But in all seriousness,Steel has nothing but great memories from each film she’s had the opportunity to work on. But the key word here is “work.”

Her advice for those wanting to pursue a career in wardrobe is simple, “Become an intern. That’s the way to go.” “It helps if you are a fashion or film major,” she continues, “Find a gig as a Production Assistant. Seek out student films and, in the beginning, be willing to suck it up and work for free. Send your resume to the Texas Film Commission. Be prepared to work long hours. If you do a good job and maintain a sense of humor, they will call on you again.” The years of attention to detail and commitment have had their lasting effect. “It’s hard to turn off. Even after

It’s hard to turn off. Even after a long day on the set, I find myself walking up to complete strangers and tucking their tags back into their shirts. stephanie a. steel, set costumer a long day on the set, I find myself walking up to complete strangers and tucking their tags back into their shirts,” she says. But the decades of hard work have given Steel the chance to do what she loves for a living, which is something any human craves. Working in fashion and film can be a dream come true, and the scene in Austin is bursting under the

radar. The world is small, and you never know who you’re going to meet. If you want to have a career in the costuming business, you’d better be ready to pay your dues. And it certainly would not hurt to be made of steel. – Stephanie A. Steel Set Costumer www.imdb.com/name/nm1751749

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photo by bookgrl

kerbeylanecafe.com

customer

Great Food Austin Style

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Alyson Fox :: laying ink, pencil, colored pencil, and watercolor 8 x 11 inches RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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Martha Lynn Barnes hair and makeup artist

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PERSPECTIVES

MAKING UP WITH MARTHA LYNN BARNES Carly Kocurek Photo by Cory Ryan

Martha Lynn Barnes is fast becoming one of Austin’s best-known hair and makeup artists. The former advertising professional relies on her love of the industry and her corporate know-how to build interesting collaborations with other fashion industry insiders. – Martha Lynn Barnes Hair and makeup artist José Luis Salon www.mlmadeyoulook.com Jewelry provided by Touch of Sass

At age eight, Martha Lynn Barnes was taking apart the other third graders’ French braids to see how they were put together. But, growing up in Alabama, Barnes never saw her fascination with hair and makeup as a viable career, so she pursued advertising. However, a few years in the sales trenches proved to be just the shove she needed to look into redirecting her career. And so, she quit her job and enrolled in Baldwin Beauty School. Now, Barnes is quickly becoming one of the most sought-after hair and makeup artists in Austin. While she’s glad to have made the career change, she attributes her success, in part, to her previous life in advertising. “My corporate background taught me to network and marry people together,” Barnes says. That attention to networking has helped Barnes build professional bridges and pursue creative partnerships, working with local photographers including Austin Fashion Week Reader’s Choice Winner for Best Fashion Photographer, Jonyrose. The work done with Jonyrose opened Barnes to more avant garde makeup stylings. “I do a lot of weddings and natural makeup, so starting to do the fashion stuff is more fun,” Barnes says.

“I’ve started getting a little braver with makeup. You don’t need formal training or a certificate.” Barnes credits seeking out editorial and fashion work as a means of pushing herself further. “Sometimes, it’s like a blank canvas, so you can just do whatever,” Barnes says. “Nine times out of 10, I don’t know what I’m doing until I get going.” In addition to building her career, Barnes uses her skill at making connections to help nonprofit organizations she cares about. Most recently, she helped build a partnership between Dress for Success Austin and the Baldwin Beauty Academy. Now, those served by Dress for Success will receive a fresh haircut in addition to interview clothing. Barnes, who works at José Luis Salon, is continuing to cultivate her skill set, both through continued professional training and through the opportunities provided by collaborating with others in the local fashion industry. “I love working with photographers,” Barnes says. “I love the collaboration. I’d love to see Austin grow to be a more inclusive fashion community.”

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Designer for Dimes Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Shawn Kennedy

Designer Clearance House has been open for six years, but not the way customers know it now. Ven Shoe Salon opened DCH in 2003 after discovering a niche in discounted high-end shoes, but it was only opened for appointments and events, so when Spring Castillo decided to buy the shop from her father-in-law more than a year ago, she decided DCH needed a retail location where women could go and browse for that perfect outfit.

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Even she will admit that opening up a retail shop in one of the worst recessions in the past century was kind of a crap shoot, but one that has paid off with tons of business and loyal customers. After working for Ven as a shoe designer and sales rep, Castillo knows and loves shoes, which is why DCH holds a plethora of fashionable pairs that would make any shoe lover swoon—especially at these prices. Everything in store is immediately marked down 65 percent upon arrival, and some shoes even go for as low as 30 bucks.

“Everything in the store is new merchandise from the best boutiques in the country,” Castillo says. “These stores are in more fashion-forward cities that have already moved onto the next season, and I wanted to bring in designers and brands you can’t get anywhere in Austin.” In addition to carrying deluxe shoes, bags, apparel, and jewelry, DCH also holds happy hour events for its clients. You supply the booze, they’ll provide your party with cheese and other nibbles, along with a makeup artist and exquisite customer service in helping you find the perfect new pair of shoes or fabulous dress.

“When I was selling my shoe line, I visited the best women’s boutiques in the Southeast, so I was developing important relationships,” Castillo says. “When I took over the shop, I called them up and asked what they did with their clearance items.”

“We’re the ultimate weapon for the gal who doesn’t want to pay full price and needs a little pizzazz in her wardrobe,” Castillo explains.

Although DCH sells top-notch shoes, from brands such as LAMB, Roberto Cavalli, Duscia Sacks, and Italian brands no one else in town carries, the shop also stocks up on designer apparel in all sizes. The most extravagant item? A gorgeous Escada dress for $600 that normally retails at $3,000 or more. But, most items top out at $100.

– Designer Clearance House 5101 Burnet Road 512.467.9100 www.designerclearancehouse.com

White asymmetrical Greek Goddess dress: laundry by Shelli Segal / original $365 / designer clearance house $128 Shoes: Silver t-strap silver shoes by Claudia Ciuti / original $507 / designer clearance house $178 Purse: Michael Teperson silver purse with crystal wristlet attached / original price $1010 / designer clearance house $353.50 Model: Alisha Marie

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– Ashley Brown (right) and friend www.twitter.com/ashbrown

REUSE, RECYCLE,

REVAMP Darcie Duttweiler Photo by Annie Ray

In this economy, it’s easy to feel a little down when it comes to shopping. It’s hard to even think about shopping, an act that brings so many ladies sheer, utter joy coupled with the confidence of looking smashing in a cool, new outfit, if you’re worried about your job security. So, during this economic struggle, what’s a recessionista to do?

swap around the clock Imagine a place where you can bring your unwanted clothes and trade with another girl who sees your goods as total gems. Are you eying another girl’s super cute purse? This isn’t a mirage, ladies. Clothing swaps have been popping up all over the place. One such clothing swap is run by soon-to-be St. Edwards marketing graduate, Ashley Brown, who thought she and her friends could get together and trade clothes they no longer wanted. “One girl’s trash is another girl’s treasure,” Brown laughs. Her last clothing swap was hosted in her home with racks to hang clothes on and shelves for purses and shoes. After passing out nibbles and glasses of wine, it was a free-for-all in who wants what. “A lot of clothing swaps are more formal,” Brown says. “I didn’t want that. Everything is free, so if you like it, you take it.” But that doesn’t mean there was drama or tears. Every gal walked away with something special for absolutely no money.

“Clothing swaps are appealing with the current economy but also with college students,” Brown explains. “We don’t have the big salary, but we love to look through magazines, drool over the clothes, and shop.” Brown is hoping to host another clothing swap around the holidays, and she would eventually love to take the concept on a city-wide scale. Be on the lookout.

ace up your sleeve Another great way to get a brand new outfit for almost no money is to revamp your garment. Besides turning good clothes into great and well-fitting clothes, tailoring can also completely change an outfit, making it essentially new again. Vanessa Wilkerson, the Director of Operations at Ace Tailors, recently started a happy hour at The Garden Room, where she talks to ladies about how to overhaul their current wardrobe without having to purchase new items.

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“The idea is to have people look into their closets and reuse what they already have,” Wilkerson explains. “Then you can get a second opinion on how to make it new.” She gives them advice on what she would do to update their outfits to fit current trends or just give it that extra special oomph needed. Wilkerson also adamantly advises all shoppers to definitely consider tailoring their clothes, which might make them last in their closet longer if they’re deeply in love with it. “Tailoring is worth it,” she says. “Most things can be done, so don’t throw it away and think it can’t. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and tell them your ideas. Trust your tailor. We will only say ‘no’ because we don’t want to damage the garment.”

get that shoe to the hospital The Austin Shoe hospital opened its doors in Austin in 1983. Ever since then, Austinites are

– Hem Jeans www.hemjeans.com Photo by Sarah Kealing

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wondering what they did before having the “doctor” repair their broken soles. Owner Carroll Kelly says you should always think twice before throwing out a much beloved pair of shoes or handbag, because the Austin Shoe Hospital will try to repair practically any shoe crisis. “We can repair and refurbish most shoes, boots and purses for a fraction of what they cost new,” Kelly says. “After these repairs, our customers find they virtually have a new pair of shoes or boots that are already broken in and comfortable, for an economical price.” It’s especially important in this economic climate to have a place to repair your kicks. It’s difficult to lose a great pair of shoes that have served you well and are completely broken in. Also, shoes are incredibly expensive, which means that fixing them could save you a ton of money. “Every person in Austin has something in their closet they need repaired,” Kelly says. “Once

customers realize all the things Austin Shoe Hospital can do and the money we can save them, they’re usually hooked on shoe repair for life.”

stay lovely, austin In addition to revamping your wardrobe, you might want a place to sell your dearly loved articles of clothing, or, perhaps, you’re on the prowl for some affordable quality clothing. Opened just this past September, Lovely Austin is a new consignment shop on South First Street. “Consignment shopping offers buyers a ‘thrill of the hunt’ experience while giving sellers a classy way to sell and recycle valuables,” co-owner Danielle Tatro explains. Lovely Austin carries a nice selection of special occasion gear by designers such as Siri, Nicole Miller, and Donna Ricco. They also have a great sampling of styled jeans by designers such as Dolce & Gabanna and brands like Boom Boom

– Lovely Austin www.lovelyaustin.com Photo by Rebecca Burrier

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– Ace Tailors www.acetailors.com Photo by Jay Dean

and Younique. You can also peruse their cute home décor items. For those looking to sell, Tatro says they accept anything from formal wear to jeans and tees, but they are always on the lookout for designer duds. “At Lovely Austin, we provide an atmosphere that exudes quality,” she says. “We believe that consignment doesn’t have to feel thrifty, and a well-merchandised shop lends itself to a more fashion-forward audience.”

Consignment shopping offers buyers a ‘thrill of the hunt’ experience while giving sellers a classy way to sell and recycle valuables. danielle tatro, co-owner, lovely austin out on the floor for customers to purchase. Instead of the usual designer jean price tag of upwards to $300, these recycled jeans retail for around $60 to $100.

“People don’t always want to invest a ton of money for current trends,” Lindgren says. “Plus, “Jeans, if they’re taken care of, get better with age,” why get rid of something someone else could Hem Jeans owner, Loree Lindgren, explains. buy and love?” This is why in March she decided to start a recycled jean program. Customers can sell their Besides making these designer jeans more gently-used designer jeans and receive a $30 affordable for those who can’t normally splurge store credit for each pair, which can be tallied on a pricey pair, the recycled jean program also into an account to use at a later date. Lindgren broadens the horizons for green shoppers in and her team then clean the jeans and put them Austin who only buy recycled clothes, allowing

designer jeans, recycled prices

them to add premium wares to their closets. “The jean program works here because Austin is so environmentally-friendly, but also, who doesn’t like to find a good deal?” Lindgren says. Lindgren also says that the recycled jean program is a great way to find an elusive pair of jeans you may have been eyeing a season ago or a place to find a total gem, like a pair of limited True Religion jeans that normally retail for well over $300. “It’s a great way for people to not have to limit themselves,” she says. “You want to feel good about yourself and have a great pair of jeans that are affordable.”

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Life. On top of the World. From the moment you arrive, your eyes are overwhelmed with the picturesque Texas Hill Country view, while the Tuscan inspired architecture enraptures your soul and beckons you to the stylish home interiors. Then you discover the extraordinary resident privileges such as an exclusive Sky Lounge, Yoga Studio, Tranquil Pools with Wi-Fi Hot Spots, Wii Game Lounge, Culinary Presentation Kitchen with ongoing cooking classes, 24-Hr Fitness Studio… and you realize this is an exceptional life destination. Alexan Vistas… An Address With Altitude. Toll-free: 866.372.9738 | 512.794.8439 7201 RR 2222 • Austin, TX 78730 www.AlexanVistas.com AlexanVistas@NewHome1.com

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Alyson Fox :: her family ink, 8 x 11 inches RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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Amy Wald Photos provided by Simon Malls

Tiffany’s. Coach. Burberry. Barneys. No, this isn’t Fifth Avenue, nor is it Rodeo Drive. It’s not even the Houston or Dallas Gallerias. But a trip to The Domain, North Austin’s much-acclaimed shopping and entertainment hot spot, might just leave you second-guessing the zip code. The Domain opened its doors in March 2007 as an epicenter for fashion and fun—an expansive addition to the new generation of outdoor malls sweeping the country. With 57 acres of dining and retail venues, the shopping center quickly became known as the place to be thanks to mainstays such as Macy’s, the city’s first Neiman Marcus, and Border’s Books and Music. A stroll through this 750,000 square-foot shopper’s heaven also brings budding fashionistas into contact with high-end designers like Michael Kors, Cole Haan, Lilly Pulitzer, Ralph Lauren, Louis Vuitton, and Stuart Weitzman. Diverse restaurant options, ranging from McCormick and Schmick’s and

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Kona Grill to the California Pizza Kitchen, give shoppers plenty of meal choices when they begin to get weary. Other notable shops include an Apple store, Victoria’s Secret, Juicy Couture, Brighton Collectibles, Lucky Brand Jeans, and MAC Cosmetics. But the present Domain features only a fraction of what is to come. Endeavor Real Estate Group plans to expand upon Simon Property Group’s first phase of restaurant and shopping bliss by creating an extensive lifestyle center that offers the city everything from hotels, residential communities, and office space, to music venues

With three hotels, 4,500 residences, and countless shops and restaurants, The Domain promises to hold true to its nickname as ‘the second downtown.’ and a park. The Domain will also continue to sponsor and host a variety of events, from the Austin Wine Festival to the Susan G. Komen Austin Race for the Cure. Additions to the retail end will include a relocated and revamped Whole Food’s Market and Saks Fifth Avenue (currently located in the Gateway Shopping Center and the Arboretum, respectively), as well as the city’s second Nordstrom. Estimated to open in the fall of 2012, these stores will help The Domain expand eastward from Domain Drive. By the time the entire project is complete, the center will cover around eight million square feet of land between Braker Lane, MoPac, and Burnet Road. With three hotels, 4,500 residences and countless shops and restaurants on the horizon, The Domain promises to hold true to its nickname as “the second downtown.” And if the center’s trend of bringing upscale brands and shops to the Austin area continues, the city might just have to change its motto from “Keeping Austin Weird” to “Keeping Austin Trendy, Cutting-Edge, and Fashion-Forward.”

– The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Terrace www.thedomainaustin.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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Megan Summerville sew sister

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PERSPECTIVES

WHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING Scarlett Steakley Photo by Ed Verosky

Megan Summerville is a living testament to the idea that when doors open, you better walk through them, because you just might find your calling in life. Summerville, born and raised in Austin, took an unexpected business opportunity and is now the owner and lead designer of Sew Sister custom lingerie.

Summerville calls her experience the “Girl Scout Cookie Theory”—you’re never going to sell a box of cookies until you ask someone if they want a box of cookies. And that’s just what she did: had an idea for a business and reviewed it with a similar business owner, Ethel Prater. Summerville learned that the elderly, but tenacious, Prater was looking to sell her long-established custom bra business, Barely Maid, to an entrepreneur worthy of its longevity. She then reached out to Prater and, before Summerville knew it, she became the proud, first-time business owner of Sew Sister (formerly Barely Maid). Today, Sew Sister is an intimate apparel business with designs made specifically for the customer’s curves. The client can order from anywhere in the world sending measurements via email or by an in-person fitting with Summerville and her designers. Recently, Summerville’s talent was recognized as Texas’ Next Top Designer 2009, by the non-profit organization of the same name.

– Megan Summerville Owner, Founder, Lead Designer Sew Sister www.sewsister.com

“The award really changed the scope of what my work was,” Summerville explains, “because we are intimate apparel sometimes people don’t give it a chance, but what we have is really serious lingerie. It’s not trashy and it’s not costumey.” On top of her time-consuming custom lingerie creations, Summerville has recently added a men’s’ underwear line, named TYS after her husband’s initials.

Sew Sister offers anything from a Chantilly lace bustier to fresh-water, pearl-encrusted slips with customers from all over the world. The customer has no limit to her lingerie desires. After the order is placed, there is a three to four week turn around and “voila,” your lingerie dream is a reality. What’s your favorite part of this business? Waking up every day and doing exactly what I want to do. Where else on this planet can you do that? What are your future plans for Sew Sister? We want to continue progressing with the men’s underwear line and also updating our mastectomy line with the increase of breast cancer amongst all ages of women. Are you interested in designing other custom clothing? I’ve had several people request outerwear design, but when I think about all the factors that go into outerwear, I have some small block in my brain to the idea. I like focusing on small intricacies of intimate apparel. Fill in the blank: If I wasn’t the owner of Sew Sister, I’d be… Either working in an office or slinging sandwiches at Thundercloud. What’s an interesting fact about your business? 85 percent of women in the world are wearing the wrong bra size.

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Distilled and bottled by Fifth Generation, Inc. Austin, Texas 40% alcohol by volume. ©2009 Tito’s Handmade Vodka.

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RARE GIVES BACK

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A big thanks to our friends at Kerbey Lane Cafe for supporting local Austin non-profits. When you purchase Kerbey Lane Cafe gift cards through www.rareaustin.com, a portion of the proceeds will benefit this organization. RARE NOVEMBER 2009

RARE GIVES BACK Spotlighting Austin’s Non-Profits

A Home for Art Laura Hensley Photo by Laurie Weaver

Austin’s homeless express their creativity through Art from the Streets Pat Bailey has struggled with homelessness for several years and has, at times, lived out of her car. But that’s not the way things were supposed to be. Bailey worked several clerical jobs before a flood of life circumstances left her on the streets. “Life happened,” she explains. But Bailey has found a refuge in art, and now it’s the only thing she can imagine doing. Twice a week, Bailey is among 100 people at the Austin Resource Center for the Homeless (ARCH) who cram into a tight workspace to paint and draw with Art From the Streets (AFTS)—a volunteer-driven program that provides a safe and encouraging environment for Austin’s homeless to create art. None of the AFTS artists are traditionally trained, but their raw talent is apparent. Some splatter bold colors across the canvas, others sketch with pencils or pastels. Each artist has a story here. Some are struggling with addiction or mental

illness. Others have been plagued by a string of circumstances that have left them without a stable income or a place to live. But once they pick up a paintbrush or a lump of charcoal, they can escape from their problems and create beautiful works of art. “One of the things that Art From The Streets is about is the creative part of every human being,” says Yvonne Baughman, a local artist who has volunteered with AFTS for more than four years. “With this population, there are so many ways that they are discounted or considered invisible. But with this project, they have an opportunity to come forward and bring out their creativity. They have a voice.” The highlight for AFTS, which began in 1991, is hosting an annual art show and sale. Approximately 2,000 pieces of artwork by more than 80 participating homeless and formerly homeless artists will be available to view or buy during the show. Pieces start at $35 and proceeds go directly to each artist.

In the past, money raised during the show has enabled artists to pay for necessities such as food, clothing, medical care, and housing. A $3 suggested admission donation helps defray the cost of AFTS supplies and materials. Last year’s show and sales were the best ever, raising more than $90,000 from more than 1,900 show visitors. For the artists, it’s a thrill to interact with people from the community and to be able to sell their works, which wind up on the walls of homes around Austin. “We may not have homes,” says Bailey. “But our art does.” This year, the 17th Annual Art From the Streets Show and Sale exhibition will be held on Saturday, Nov. 14 and Sunday, Nov. 15, from noon. to 5 p.m. at ARCH, 500 East 7th Street.

– Art from the Streets www.artfromthestreets.com

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MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

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7

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9

10

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219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

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Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankand angies.com

12

Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com

13

Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.296.2101 www.jblacks.com

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Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

Blu 360 Nueces St. 512.904.5666 www.bluaustin.com Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreekside lounge.com

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Key Bar 617 W. 6th St. 512.469.9610 www.keybaraustin.com La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondes aaustin.com

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Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

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Lofty Dog 403 W. 2nd St. 512.476.5050 www.austinloftydog.com

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Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

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Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com

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The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

34

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The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com

Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors.com

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Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

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Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

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Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

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Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarin texas.com

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Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

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Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

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Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

Anthropologie 601 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.236.9301 www.anthropologie.com

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By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

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Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

19

20

Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfielddrug.com

Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

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Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com

El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylaluna austin.com

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27

Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltons-florist.com

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Mexic-Art Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artmuseum.org Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

HEALTH & BEAUTY 43

Avant Salon 318 Colorado St. 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

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Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

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Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

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Salon by Milk + Honey 237 W. 3rd St. 512.236.1112

LIVING

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE 38

39

40

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Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com

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AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512.472.4980 www.dcarch.com

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Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org

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MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

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Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com Food Heads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com

8

Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

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Mansion at Judges’ Hill 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

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14

15

Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. #100 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991 Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

16

Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystaco.com

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Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE

18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

25

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

26

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

27

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservice vintage.com

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

21

22

23

24

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/ tripptshirts Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 29

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com

30

Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstone aesthetics.com

LIVING 31

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

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M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

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Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com

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university of texas

mlk, jr.

a.vAe MLK, JR VE.

29

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109

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midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

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34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com

2

Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552

3

Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com

4

Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

5

Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

6

Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

7

Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaios restaurant.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

8

9

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

SHOPPING

15

16

17

Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera. com Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

10

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

11

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

18

12

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

19

13

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

14

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531

ARTS & LEISURE

HEALTH & BEAUTY 20

21

22

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 23

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com

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RARE NOVEMBER 2009

111

E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

3

Clementine Coffee Bar 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.clementinec offeebar.com

4

5

6

7

8

112

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

9

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainy St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearl austin.com

17

10

Primizie Osteria 1000 E. 11th St. 512.236.0088 www.primizieaustin.com

18

11

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

19

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorked tastingroom.com

12

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

13

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastside showroom.com

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

14

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

15

Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com

16

Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

20

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING 21

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

22

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

23

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

24

25

26

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com Mode Apparel 1601 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.436.8924 www.myspace.com/ modeaustin Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy. com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Bird’s Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com

31

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

32

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

33

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

ARTS & LEISURE 27

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

28

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

29

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

LIVING 34

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

35

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

36

Urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

east 38 1/2 dean keaton

7 3 6 4 20

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29

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15

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east 11th

tv

19

french legation

ea

2

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10 9

13 pl

red river

con

chi

33

vez

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

113

S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

11

Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

12

3

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

13

4

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com

14

Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com

5

6

7

8

9

114

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

10

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

15

16

17

18

Maudie’s Too 1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.440.8088 www.maudies.com

Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/ trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congres Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

SHOPPING 19

20

21

28

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com Back Home Furniture 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.327.7753 www.backhome furniture.com Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbowsplus arrows.com

22

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

23

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

24

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace.com/ 31622902

25

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/ austingoodietwoshoes

26

Off The Wall 1704 S. Congress Ave. 512.445.4701 www.offthewallaustin.com

27

The Black Sheep 1115 S. Congress Ave. 512.914.4771 www.blacksheep austin.com

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

36

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

37

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

ARTS & LEISURE 29

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

38

Pink Hair Salon 1204 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.2888 www.pinkaustin.com

30

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com

39

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

40

Yoga Yoga 1700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.326.3900 www.yogayoga.com

31

LIVING

HEALTH & BEAUTY 32

Ann Kelso Salon 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.467.2663 www.annkelsosalon.com

33

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

42

Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

34

Bird’s Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

43

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

35

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituation austin.com

41

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com

13 31

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41RARE NOVEMBER 2009

115

W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

2

Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

3

116

10

11

12

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961

4

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

5

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

6

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com

7

Magnolia Cafe 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com

8

Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com

9

Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

13

Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

22

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

Beehive 3300 Bee Caves Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

23

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

24

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

25

Valentines Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488

Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

17

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

18

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com

19

Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

20

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

21

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

27

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

28

Mix 94.7 4301 Westbank Dr. 512.390.5947 www.mix947.com

29

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

31

32

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

LIVING 33

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com

12 33

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29

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RARE NOVEMBER 2009

117

N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

1

2

3

4

118

FOOD & DRINK

9

300 Austin 9504 N. IH-35 512.834.7733 www.3hundred.com

10

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Crú The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

5

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

6

Jasper’s 11506 Century Oaks Ter, Ste 128 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

7

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

8

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

11

12

13

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com

17

Free People 11401 Century Oaks Terrace 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

25

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobalartsgroup.com

32

Birds Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com

Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com

18

Intermix 11600 Century Oaks # 116 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

26

Zara 3409 Esperanza Crossing 512.491.0920

33

Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com

19

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

27

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

34

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

20

Loft The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com

35

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

36

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

Barney’s New York Co-op 11601 Century Oaks # 121 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com Betsey Johnson 11506 Centure Oaks Ter 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

21

22

23

24

Luxe Apothetique The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique

ARTS & LEISURE 28

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com

29

Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com Tiffany & Co. 11601 Century Oaks Ter 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

LIVING 37

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

38

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

31

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com

28

11

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A

HAPPENINGS

Thao & the Get Down Stay Down November 12 at The Mohawk Photo by Tarina Westlund, courtesy Kill Rock Stars

NOVEMBER ART Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works Thursday, November 5, Noon Harry Ransom Center www.hrc.utexas.edu Opening Reception Saturday, November 7, 6–8 pm L. Nowlin Gallery www.lnowlingallery.com

East Austin Studio Tour November 14 – November 22 www.eastaustinstudiotour.org

Opening Reception: My Wicked Twisted Love November 19, 6–8 pm Women & Their Work www.womenandtheirwork.org

ENTERTAINMENT

Drawn Toward Light November 1 – January 3 Blanton Museum of Art www.blantonmuseum.org Art From the Streets (AFTS) Show and Sale November 14 – November 15 Austin Resource Center for the Homeless www.artfromthestreets.org

120

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

Austin Poetry Slam Every Wednesday, 8 pm The Independent www.austinindependent.com Argentine Tango Classes Every Saturday, 1 pm Esquina Tango www.esquinatangoaustin.com ColdTowne Improv Every Saturday, 10 pm Coldtowne Theater www.coldtowntheater.com

Community Night Every Wednesday, 5 pm Austin Children’s Museum www.austinkids.org

Chuy’s Children Giving to Children Parade November 28 – November 28 Congress Avenue www.chuysparade.com

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz Every Wednesday, 8 pm Little Woodrow’s South Park Meadows www.littlewoodrows.com

Marshall ford Swing Band November 29 Hyde Park Bar and Grill: Westgate www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com

Nature Nights September 18 – November 13 The Wildflower Center www.wildflower.org

WELLNESS

Austin Celtic Festival November 7 – November 8 Fiesta Gardens www.austincelticfestival.com

Austin Farmer’s Market Every Saturday, 8 am – 12 pm Every Wednesday, 4 pm – 8 pm www.austinfarmersmarket.org

Manor Farmers’ Market Every Wednesday, 5 pm www.manorfarmersmarket.org Tai Chi with Guy Forsyth & Angel Quesada Every Tuesday, 1 pm Ruta Maya www.rutamaya.net Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure November 1 www.komenaustin.org

Split Lip Rayfield November 12 The Continental Club www.continentalclub.com

Max Tundra November 18 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

The Cool Kids (DJ Set) November 7 Beauty Bar www.beautybar.com

Thao & the Get Down Stay Down November 12 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

The Mountain Goats, Final Fantasy November 18 Antone’s www.antones.net

Trash Talk November 7 Red 7 www.red7austin.com

Bishop Allen November 13 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

The Get Up Kids November 18 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Deadmau5 November 7 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Monsters of Folk November 13 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Friendly Fires, the xx November 19 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

...Trail of Dead, An Albatross November 8 Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Amazing Baby November 14 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Eyedea & Abilities, Themselves November 19 Highball www.thehighball.com

Temper Trap November 8 The Parish www.theparishroom.com

Son Volt November 14 Antone’s www.antones.net

Generationals November 21 Stubbs BBQ www. stubbsaustin.com

Jay-Z November 22 Frank Erwin Center www.uterwincenter.com

Marc Broussard November 15 The Parish www.theparishroom.com

Lyle Lovett November 23 Bass Concert Hall www.austinmusichall.com

Rob Zombie November 10 Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com

The Swell Season November 15 Paramount Theatre www.austintheatre.org

Neko Case November 24 Antone’s www.antones.net

Regina Spektor November 11 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Peter Bjorn & John November 15 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com

J. Tillman November 27 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Nelo November 12 Antone’s www.antones.net

Rufus Wainwright November 16 The Paramount Theatre www.austintheatre.org

Cursive November 28 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

The New Heathers November 12 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Say Anything November 17 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Dale Watson November 28 Broken Spoke www.brokenspokeaustintx.com

Galactic, Mike Dillon’s GoGo Jungle November 6 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Austin Farmer’s Market Saturday mornings and Wednesday evenings Photo by Michael Yew

MUSIC Gogol Bordello, Apostle of Hustle November 1 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Pelican, Black Cobra November 1 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Le Loup November 2 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com Tech N9ne

November 4 Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com Voltaire November 5 Elysium www.elysiumonline.net AC/DC November 6 Frank Erwin Center www.uterwincenter.com Fun Fun Fun Fest November 7 – November 8 Waterloo Park www.funfunfunfest.com

RARE NOVEMBER 2009

121

An Evening of Canine Couture & Feline Finery

Benefiting the animals of the Austin Humane Society

ArmstrongCommunity MusicSchool We could all use a little play time. 2009 Winner Austin Family Magazine Readers’ Poll

FAvoRite PlAce to leARn MuSic internationally acclaimed instructors teaching

MuSic clASSeS FoR All AgeS Seasonal Songs & Music Together ® classes for children 6 weeks to 4 years old enrolling now! RegiSteR beFoRe noveMbeR 7 And Receive A 5% diScount. ASk About ouR bRing A FRiend SPeciAl.

Call 512-474-2331 or visit www.AustinLyricOpera.org

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RARE NOVEMBER 2009


Rare Magazine :: November 2009 :: Fashion