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APRIL/MAY 2010 LIVING

MODERN vs. TRADITIONAL COWORKING from HOME LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY for the FUTURE ALLEY FLAT INITIATIVE HELLO KITCHEN + AUSTIN’S FLIPPED MARKET

featuring art by

JOSEPH PHILLIPS


710 WEST 6TH STREET 512.694.2469 AUSTIN, TEXAS WWW.THERANCHAUSTIN.COM


DON’T DALLAS MY AUSTIN


editor’s note publisher

photographers

Taylor Perkins

Casey Dunn Mark Herron Brian Mihealsick Annie Ray Cory Ryan Trevor Ray Thompson Ed Verosky

editor Caitlin M. Ryan

art director Lindsey Eden Turner

director of events Jason Hicks

director of sales & marketing

director of finance & accounting Arian Mobasser

web developer Josiah Spence

Meredith Davis

sales manager Brittany Oster

account executives Maggie Gori Jamie Moore Kensey Olsen Cissy Stasio Emily Tayman Alex Winkelman

writers Misty Adair Adrienne Breaux Jessie Cibik Mark Collins JB Hager Elaina J. Martin Sarah Morgan Amy Wald Arden Ward

copy editor Samantha Pitchel

interns Justine Pombo Oscar Gonzales Sarah Malik

cover art Joseph Phillips, Beachcomber Condo with Palms and Umbrellas, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 17 x 14 inches, 2010

contents art Joseph Phillips, Glacier with Helipad, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 18 x 24 inches, 2008 Copyright © 2010 Rare Magazine. All rights reserved.

Follow us: @rareaustin / Friend us: facebook.com/rareaustin Subscriptions are $38 per year. Sign up at www.rareaustin.com

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While the perfect Spring weather is beckoning us all to spend more time outdoors, it doesn’t change the fact that people instinctively and constantly search out a peaceful place to call their own, whether it be it a coffee shop, library, or personal living room. For April/May’s Living issue, our goal was to unlock the secrets of how these highly regarded places are designed. Learning about the human points of views and thought-processes behind concepts and institutions—like translating a love for derelict houses into some of the most frequented bars in Austin—has been awe-inspiring. The most striking thing we found is that Austin is full of a lot of ingenious people dedicated to “making it work,” to borrow from Tim Gunn’s guiding principle. This issue profiles architects, planners, designers, and families who are no strangers to translating an idea in a smart, eye-catching way... and the obstacles that arise along the way. In reading these stories, you’re sure to learn something about that peaceful place you frequent, or even find a way to replicate that feeling within your very own home. Enjoy.

Caitlin M. Ryan editor


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on the cover: joseph phillips

04/05 2010

Casey Dunn

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up front

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08 10 12

On The Cover JB Rants In Context

16 18 20

downtown

24 26 28

campus

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midtown

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Rainey Street Bars Jewell House Aviary Decor Modern vs. Traditional Mod Green Pod Coworking

42 44 48

east

54 56 62

south

68 70

west

76 78

north

Alley Flat Initiative Hello Kitchen Mead/Markel House Library of the Future Landscape Architecture Austin’s Flipped Market

plus 82 96

Maps/Index April/May Happenings

rare home tour: mead/markel house


YOGAVIDA.NET


ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

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UP FRONT

JOSEPH PHILLIPS A SLICE OF LIFE Jessie Cibik Photo by Mark Herron

Joseph Phillips’ architecturally-driven art isolates chunks of life and highlights their most basic elements, exposing the naked truth beneath our developing world. Phillips’ unzipped images of the Western world show layers of development, from conception to completion. He makes landmasses comprehensible by showing interior cross-sections of the natural and the artificial—and the ways in which these materials complement and interact with one another. Phillips’ simplified versions of reality act as a balance to the larger theme of serious environmental concerns present within his art. But the Austinite’s dissection of concrete culture did not come from an engineering background. Rather, Phillips’ primary attraction to this theme evolved from an interest in the way people use land, how different areas develop, and how the whole affects our interaction with communities. “[This interest] is about ownership, he explains. “It’s the idea of owning something that is connected to everything else.” Phillips pokes fun at humans’ inherent need to “clean things up.” He says that nature is—and should be—fairly chaotic and varied; however, we’ve managed to create a world that is

orderly and familiar. “We’re scared of accidents and things that don’t fit,” he says. All of the diagrammatic cutaways float on a neutral background, allowing the slices of land to stand alone for inspection. “Everything is split open for you to study and laugh at,” Phillips says. He describes the initial concept for his art as an “Ikea-type” situation, where he’s able to create a perfect world with a variety of pre-fab materials. To capture this generic, plastic feel, Phillips uses a limited palette. Each piece begins as a series of sketches layered over one another. Using gouache, an appropriately commercial yet ancient medium, Phillips then adds color and goes back to draw one final layer with pencil or ink. Surprisingly, the finished product is nearly identical to the initial sketch, but the subtle changes are fundamental steps in an altogether mechanical and methodical process. “I feel it’s an honest approach for dealing with my subject matter in that it mirrors the systematic way we develop

our surroundings,” Phillips explains. Phillips wants his work to inspire a path of introspection, and his dissections offer a brightly lit trail. He sees this series as more of a light-hearted critique

Everything is split open for you to study and laugh at. joseph phillips rather than a serious judgment call on our way of life or globalization, and he hopes that it will serve as a comfortable jumping-off point for people interested in reality. “I want it to be reassuring, simple, and easy,” he says.

– Joseph Phillips is Co-founder of the non-profit Big Medium, Co-organizer of the Texas Biennial, Co-organizer of East Austin Studio Tour, and member of threeperson artist collaborative, sodalitas. www.josephphillipsart.com

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15 STEPS TO MAN CAVE HEAVEN

JB Hager

I must admit that I’m a very simple guy. I do have a few things that bring me pleasure: bikes, cars, computers, heated toilets seats, and embarrassingly, puppy calendars. In general, I feel like there is nothing I need in order to make me happy. I, like many other men, really just want one thing: to have a private place to go and just…be a man. For fantasy purposes—and to keep my marriage intact—let’s pretend I’m a single man. In the event that I were a single man and money were no object, I would want the Ultimate Man Cave (U.M.C.). Every guy deserves a U.M.C., which is something I have thought a great deal about since my friend Nelson turned a bomb-shelter under his house into an extravagant gunroom. Sure, I could name off the obvious things to put in the U.M.C. like a full bar, stripper pole, and a shark tank. However, I don’t want anything in my U.M.C. that would remind me of Qua downtown or Kanye’s limo. Too predictable.

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behind spectator glass and have the classic Roadrunner Acme Explosive detonation box. 2. Guest Jet-Packs. In the event that my guests needed to jettison to another destination, I would be ready. 5. Retractable Periscope. It would be nice to occasionally break from what I’m doing and search for undiscovered land. 6. Bartender. I know that I began with this being a place to be alone, but I will need some personnel. Not only would this fellow serve drinks, he would ideally be Hervé Vallechaize, otherwise known as “Tattoo” from Fantasy Island.

I love vintage martial arts movies, so with each and every move I make, I would like my SFX artist to exaggerate with “whisssh” and “thwak.” Even if I just turn my head, the movement ought to be brought to life. 9. A flight-simulator, a drum set, and an escape-hatch. 10. Male-Stripper-Style-Tear-Away Clothing. Also, attached to thin cables. That way, when I went from one area of the cave to the next, the cable would reach full extension and rip them from my body.

Indulge me for a few minutes as I build out my U.M.C., the place where I’d find solace in this post-Kardashian world:

7. A Bitchin’ Camaro. Parked with only enough room to smoke the tires.

11. Bank Teller Tubes. Communication to my underground lair would only be possible via these tubes. I could send the tube up requesting “Three ribs and a Mr. Pibb, please.”

1. An area designated to blowing-up stuff. The area would be viewable from

8. Sound-Effects Artist. It would be nice if he or she followed me everywhere.

12. Air Hockey Table. Preferably the size of a regulation hockey rink. When the

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UP FRONT

fig. 15 fig. 02

fig. 07

Every guy deserves a U.M.C. [Ultimate Man Cave], which is something I have thought a great deal about since my friend Nelson turned a bomb-shelter under his house into an extravagant gunroom. hockey rink was not in use, the cast of Cirque de Soleil would entertain me by reproducing with the Blue Man Group. 13. Rock Climbing Wall. Instead of typical rocks, the holds would ever so

slightly replicate female anatomy. 14. A Barbershop. Next to my full-time perfume model.

The only other guests allowed would be Willy Nelson, Jesse James, and James Gandolfini. Men, do not think that any of this is ridiculous or unobtainable, because it is my understanding that game developer and millionaire Richard Garriott has each of these items. Welcome, my friends, to my Ultimate Man Cave.

15. Former Child Stars (upon request).

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IN CONTEXT

ALEX SR. & ALEX JR. MARTINEZ TAXIDERMISTS

About the Space: MARTINEZ BROTHERS TAXIDERMY ON SOUTH LAMAR

“It’s my life. My everything. My livelihood, hobby, work, and sport. I get to spend time with my family, and I get to meet fellow hunters and fishermen. I feel privileged.” www.martinezbrothers.net

Images from our “In Context” series are shot by Annie Ray and feature prominent personalities in their environments. Each were asked to explain their space in their own words.

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The W Residences

The Austonian

Four Seasons

Your Downtown luxury real estate resource. Contact us to learn about which downtown luxury property best fits your urban lifestyle. urbanspacerealtors.com 512 457 8884 follow us:

2010

The Spring

real estate for urban lifestyles


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Joseph Phillips The Cosmopolitan Package, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2009

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All Her Lovely Scars

THE BARS OF RAINEY STREET Samantha Pitchel Photos by Trevor Ray Thompson

Hidden just below the intersection of Cesar Chavez and Red River lies Rainey Street, a mostly-residential area that’s also home to several of Austin’s most innovative—and visually striking—laid-back lounges. Lustre Pearl and Clive Bar are both new establishments but rely heavily on the historic elements of the vintage homes they occupy, creating a comfortable atmosphere for the many patrons who flock to their open porches and cozy interiors. We can expect to see even more commercial growth on Rainey Street, as proprietor Bridget Dunlap has two more projects in the works: 96 and Container Bar. Echoing the unique design of Lustre Pearl and Clive Bar, 96 will be housed in a residence originally built in 1907, while Container Bar’s layout strategically utilizes several metal shipping units. Dunlap, who is also co-owner of East side seafood staple Shuck Shack and Houston’s Pearl Bar, fell in love with Rainey Street upon first sight. “When we walked into that derelict house in October of 2008, I had an epiphany,” Dunlap says, recalling the birth of Lustre Pearl. “Let’s don’t tear down this obviously feral house that is being held together by some rusty nails and 2x4’s holding up the foundation. Fuck it, let’s keep her and show off all her lovely scars. That house’s long history is what gives her

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character. We just flew by the seat of our pants and asked some talented people to come and help give the lady some new life.  And it worked.“ After the success of Lustre Pearl, it was clear that the strategy of building up existing, historical structures rather than demolishing them was not only an aesthetically pleasing decision but one that preserves the warm atmosphere of the surrounding neighborhood. “We did the same with Clive Bar, we are doing the same with 96, and although the house at 91 Rainey Street is already gone, we will do the same with Container Bar,” says Dunlap, who regrets that the original home that stood on the site of Container Bar’s lot was demolished before they could attempt to preserve it. “We aren’t your average developers,” she explains. “We want to preserve as much as we can of the history of this neighborhood.”

“91 Rainey had incredible history. William P. Hardeman, known as ‘Old Gotch,’ lived at the house on 91 Rainey Street from 1889–1898.  After his death, his wife Mary Elizabeth lived there until her death in 1911. That house was still standing until 2007. Can you imagine?” Dunlap wonders. “It was torn down for ‘development’. It was just like Lustre Pearl, derelict and unloved.”   It’s clear that Dunlap and her fellow developers have a true connection to the Rainey Street area and are looking to exalt the legacy of the neighborhood rather than re-brand it as a more modern nightlife hotspot. They’re even planning to pay tribute to the land’s original inhabitants. Says Dunlap: “We will do something nice for ‘Old Gotch,’ and out of respect, have a shrine to him and his wife at Container Bar.”


Clockwise from top left: Lustre Pearl interior and exterior; Clive Bar exterior and interior

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JEWELRY BOX USING SPACE ARTFULLY Elaina J. Martin Photos provided by Webber + Studio

Good things come in small packages, and this cozy cottage in Austin’s Bouldin neighborhood, full of charm with a close proximity to downtown, is just that. Now known as the Jewell House, the original structure was an 824 square foot post-World War II bungalow boasting two bedrooms with a shared single bathroom, a living room, and a kitchen/dining room. The current owners’ ideas for modernizing Jewell House, built by David Wilkes Builders, were simple—they wanted to maintain the look and feel of the neighborhood, explore contemporary design, and utilize sustainable materials. Architect David Webber of Webber + Studio shared their vision and worked closely with them to bring their concepts to life. To preserve the classic feel of the existing structure, the recent addition to the second floor followed the previously established style of the home. A master bedroom with a nursery and a larger living room expand the area of the home while preserving the cozy and dark feel of a vintage house; an oasis from the bustling city. The lower floor has an entirely different feel. To promote an open, outwardly relaxing atmosphere, a kitchen, dining space, and a laundry/utility room were created. These additions expanded the area of the home, edging into the yard but maintaining a healthy dose of private space.

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Metal is so long-lasting and durable, and one of the materials that is most likely to be made up of recycled content so it nearly always makes sense. We love it. david webber

strong for its mass, and one of the materials that is most likely to be made up of recycled content so it nearly always makes sense. We love it.” Webber explains. The unfurling metal shape echoes that of the original house. “It acts like a loose wrap, allowing it to vent out hot air between the metal and the house, essentially pre-cooling or pre-shading the house. It is also extremely durable against our harshest sun and rain, so is one of the most long-lasting materials available. I also like it for its long legacy as a building material in Texas.”

“The house desperately wanted to connect to the backyard and now it does, and it makes the house and yard each seem larger than the space had ever appeared before.” Webber explains. “There is actually less space if you consider that the addition occupies part of the yard. Before, there was no reason anyone would ever go out there, so the clients were essentially trapped in their house in an otherwise perfectly ample lot.” The addition of larger glass windows also acts as a counterpoint to the cozy interior of the original house. It allows the owners to have a quiet, cool, and moody space upstairs, with a bright, sunny, open space below. Windows on the upper level also offer a nod to nature; a glance out the master bedroom window runs parallel to treetops, and

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the small balcony outside was built on the same line to offer a similar view. Webber + Studio certainly has a knack for accentuating the strong points of an existing structure, but on the other end of the spectrum, they are also familiar with sustainable architecture. “We have found that building well is often consistent with building green, so we have been fairly aggressive about it over the years.” Webber says. “Some of the most advanced sustainable practices are completely unglamorous. Even so, it is a lot of this building science that we geek out about, and so we pursue them on nearly every project.” A striking new addition to the small cottage is the metal wrap. “Metal is so long-lasting and durable, extremely

In all, roughly 1,000 square feet were added to the existing structure. The existing house was renovated and updated to the highest standards, leaving it clean and distinct. The ground floor of the addition, though appearing larger due to its transparency, has a very small footprint. From the outside, the house appears cozy, almost too small to seem comfortable. But once inside, the ingenious use of space, coupled with a particularly perfect layout, leaves one amazed at not only the miniscule square footage, but the artfulness with which the inward and outward design coexist. With square footage equal to or smaller than many apartments, one can see why this house is another gem of our sparkling city. – Webber + Studio www.webberstudio.com


ready to roll capmetro.org/metrorail

Visit the Web site for schedules, fares and ‘how to ride’ information. 100222A MetroRail Ads_Rare.indd 1

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3/5/10 1:17:00 PM


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Joseph Phillips The Decoder Ring Wavemaker Beach with Bar and Waterslide, gouache Hold Steady Poster, 5 color screenprint ink and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2008

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Handpicked Arden Ward Photo by Trevor Ray Thompson

Since 2006, the owners of Aviary, husband and wife team Marco Fiorilo and Shanna Eldridge, have worked from scratch to build a home décor store whose catalog of items is simultaneously unique, modern, and functional. Scouring locales from as far as South America to as near as a local artisan’s workshop, Fiorilo and Eldridge stock their shelves with a guarantee: You won’t find these pieces in your neighbor’s house. “Our motto is handpicked designs from handpicked designers,” says Eldridge of their one-of-a-kind inventory. Aviary’s journey has been an evolutionary one, fueled by Fiorilo and Eldridge’s shared passion to continually redefine their store and its boundaries. Most recently, Aviary has undergone a transformation allowing the owners to extend their impeccable taste to

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encompass food and beverage. The storefront now doubles as a relaxing lounge seven days a week, where patrons are free to shop or just enjoy a glass of wine paired with a plate of locally cured meats and cheeses.

“As far as the transition from store to lounge goes, it’s virtually seamless,” says Eldridge. “We had always planned to do a wine bar and home décor store.” Drawing inspiration from travels in the Southern hemisphere and previous


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stint as New York City residents, Fiorilo and Eldridge melded elements from some of their favorite haunts into Aviary Lounge. Their concept echoes the couple’s favorite Manhattan bar, Paisley, which also masqueraded as a store during the daytime, and the atmosphere promotes the tradition of grazing over fine wine and small bites that they came to love of Argentina. Eldridge adds, “We want people to be adventurous in their tastes.” But most notably, the shop-turned-bar transformation lends customers a way to interact with Aviary’s collection as they would in their own home. After three years of cultivating Aviary’s success, Eldridge now says that their nights have become just as hectic as their days. “Not only do we have to meet and decide on furniture and design ideas, but we also have to keep

the bar new and fresh which entails wine tastings, food sourcing and event planning.”

Topan Pendant by Verner Panton $450

One of Fiorilo and Eldridge’s favorite takeaways from international travels has been “becoming friends with the people who owned [the] stores,” says Eldridge. And it happens at Aviary, too. Old patrons and new faces alike commonly note the friendly, knowledgeable, no-pressure atmosphere of Aviary, where all are invited by Fiorilo and Eldridge to “hang out as long as you want…and relax.” – Aviary 2110 South Lamar www.aviarydecor.com

Our motto is handpicked designs from handpicked designers. shanna eldridge

Section Bench by Derek Chen www.councildesign.com $2,250

Mute Chair by Mike and Maaike www.councildesign.com $2,975

Kraft Paper Softwall by Molo $890

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Modern vs. Traditional Spaces

WHICH SUITS YOU? Adrienne Breaux Photos by Cory Ryan for Eye Candy Photography

Is life in an ultra-modern house so different than living in an older, more traditional home? With no one regional prescribed style, you can find any number of different designs while driving through Austin’s many unique neighborhoods. Perhaps that’s why so many people flock here—there’s something for everyone. Despite differences, both modern and traditional houses have one important thing in common: They make great homes for the families living within. Sleek lines, innovative materials, open floor plans, big windows—the characteristics of a modern home are varied but often easy to spot. For Phil, Jen, and little Talia Wilhelm, their perfect home was discovered in a newly built, threebedroom, 2,700 square foot modern home in the Allandale neighborhood, designed by local architect Steve Zagorski. “Although the home was not built for us, it felt like it was,” explains Jen Wilhelm. “Phil was the first to see the house and he called me and said, ‘I found our home.’ When I walked in, I fell in love.” It’s easy to see why the Wilhelms felt an instant connection to the house. Tall ceilings, dark floors, and expansive windows greet you as you walk into the home. The living room, dining room, and kitchen flow into one another seamlessly. Natural light pours in from windows of all shapes and sizes, bathing furniture and accents with sunlight. Raw materials, wall

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KITCHEN Modern: State of the art stoves and fridges, and sleek cabinetry and countertops match the modern color palette of the rest of the house. Traditional: New countertops, cabinets and appliances were installed after a renovation, while the homeowners kept a gorgeous original vintage stove. Also features a fun tile floor in a unique color—light blue!


LIVING Modern: New wood floors in a deep, dark, rich brown support clean, modern furniture with straight-lines and a cool, gray color tone. High windows soar toward the ceiling, many in unconventional sizes. A sleek, wall-mounted gas fireplace sets the tone for cool.

COLOR Traditional: Comfy, slipcovered couch with a traditional shape and a warm, cozy quilt topper sit on original, honey-toned wood floors. Original paned windows lend charm to the space, despite lack of energy efficiency. A classic fireplace acts as a centerpiece to show off fun art and bright colors.

Modern: A base palette of dark browns, white, and grays, while occasional accent colors like bright orange are used sparingly for interest. Traditional: Sunny and bright neutrals peppered with bright, modern pops of color like reds, oranges, and bright greens—complemented by wood tones that range from a Scandinavian blonde to a honey-colored light brown.

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colors, and furnishings possess a cool gray and white color palette, accentuating sleek lines and painstakingly precise angles. The Wilhelms, who have lived in the house for about two years, label both the home and their own personal style as “contemporary modern,” and credit a stint in a cramped, eclectic (yet charming) Brooklyn apartment before this house for their appreciation of wide open, minimalist spaces. Though they love simplicity, they also prize warmth, and have incorporated furnishings from their previous apartment, sentimental items from their world travels, unique antique store finds, colorful pops of color, and a healthy toy collection (one-year-old Talia’s, of course). And though the house is certainly full of the latest appliances and furnishings, not everything is brand new: they have in their collection an Egyptian amulet from 305 BC. Along with an ever-growing population of hip, modern buildings, Austin is still home to a charming collection of older, more traditionally styled homes. These houses aren’t always large in size, but are certainly big in personality, with architectural details like ornate windows and hardwood floors stealing the show. Karen LaShelle’s two-bedroom, 1,100 square foot cottage-style house, built in 1941, is situated in the Cherrywood neighborhood. Huge original windows define the quaint exterior, allowing you a peek at the colorful, eclectic furnishings inside. The living room is a warm, greenish-yellow that absolutely glows under changing sunlight. A gentle blend of modern furniture from stores like Ikea mingles with more traditional accessories collected since LaShelle’s college years, complementing colorful, exotic items from her world travels and giving the whole home a brilliantly eclectic yet cohesive aesthetic. “I like to surround myself with things that remind me of family and friends…

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I am not really conscious of having a style. I just gather things and then assemble them all together. I guess most of my apartments and houses have had a similar look and feel,” remarks LaShelle. Though the house certainly features a number of original fixtures (like the windows, floors, and an adorable kitchen stove), in the five years that LaShelle has lived in the house, the kitchen and bathroom have been thoughtfully renovated to accommodate her lifestyle, and a sleek deck was added to the backyard last year. The rest of the house is a surprising medley of old and new contrasts, inspired by both LaShelle’s grandparents’ home (an antique-filled Victorian dream) and her own modern sensibilities, resulting in eclectic décor like a bold bedroom accent wall paired with a family furniture set from the 1800s, or a kitchen boasting both old and new appliances. No matter what style your house is, chances are you have to fight some of its natural characteristics. Modern homes are often accused of being too sparse and cold. More traditional homes are sometimes seen as outdated or boring. What makes these two particular nests stand out are the homeowners’ abilities to adapt these pre-defined styles to their individual needs. Jen and Phil Wilhelm love minimalist modern interiors, but with a young daughter, they also need a warm family–friendly environment, and have added furnishings with diverse textures and meaningful accessories to help make the house feel full of life. Karen LaShelle fell in love with her cottage’s charms, but wisely renovated rooms for her modern lifestyle while still treasuring the home’s most valuable original traits—giving it just the right balance of classic and current. Despite the differences between these two styles, they do share many similarities. The houses’ main rooms, like the living, dining, and kitchen areas, all follow a similar layout, allowing for

BEDROOM Traditional: Bedroom set from homeowners’ grandparents from the 1800s, fun accessories and exotic items from world travels, garage store finds, and bright, bold accent walls lend a warm, historic feel. Modern: Sleek, dark-wood platform bed with matching nightstands and bedside lamps highlight the interior architecture. White walls and minimalist furniture are offset by bold, modern art print.

an open and airy feeling. Both homes have a great style, and fit the personalities of the families living within perfectly. And proving that letting in Austin’s sunshine is perhaps the best trait to look for in a home, each homeowner chose the same thing as their favorite element: The unique windows.


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Joseph Phillips The Decoder Ring Valley Stream All Purpose Center, gouache ink Shout Out Louds Poster, 3 color screenprint and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2008

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MOD GREEN POD The Austin-based organic textile and wallpaper design firm has been gaining popularity for their uniquely ethical production methods, as well as their customizable, eye-catching patterns. Their growing legion of fans include Vans Shoes, who have optioned several fabrics for their classic slip-ons, and Yahoo, who commissioned a run of Mod Green Pod’s signature print—in their branded purple hue—for a global promotional project. And this is just the beginning of Mims’ growing, but perhaps unanticipated, success. A pre-med student in college, Mims decided to pursue art history in graduate school, eventually leading her to dabble in textile design and sell around 1,400 designs over the course of her eight-year career. “I was kind of pigeonholed in the ‘tween apparel market, so I was doing a lot of snarky bunnies and things,” Mims recalls. “It was great and really fun to do at the time, but I was trying to figure out a way to branch out into my own brand, and I wanted to do it in a way that tied in with my ethics and standards. I’ve been eating organic food since college, and I feel like I’ve lived pretty environmentally-friendly, so I wanted to make something that was in tune with what I was doing.” Mod Green Pod got its start in 2005

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Mod Green Pod owner and designer Nancy Mims knows that inspiration can be found in the unlikeliest of places, but that the secret to success is the ability to integrate one’s talents and ideals to create a product that’s not only beautiful, but sustainable. Samantha Pitchel Photos by Brian Mihealsick

when a brainstorming session with her sister-in-law led Mims to conclude that she wanted to explore the medium of organic cotton. After researching the emerging market for sustainable goods, the pair pulled together a business plan and hit the trade show circuit within a month. By the one-year mark, Mod Green Pod had released its first textile collection, which was completely hand-silkscreened. Expanding the business to offer coordinating wallpaper was a natural next step, and while Mims has designed many fabric-only prints, she recently unveiled her first wallpaper exclusive: “Delight,” a classic, striking pattern inspired by French artist Hector Guimard’s Metro station light fixtures. Creating a balance between design and production has proved to be a challenge for Mims. “We’re sort of in this weird zone between the design and sustainable worlds,” she says. “It’s an exciting but awkward place to be; people in the sustainable world are very hardcore about being green and the people in design, they want it to look good. So it’s kind of fun to be at that intersection. We go to great lengths to have no toxic chemicals in our production process, but I don’t want that to be our main focus. I want that to be a given, because I feel like that should be a given in the industry.”

Recently, a professor at Stanford University (who’s also positioned as Head of Sustainability at a notable design firm) had his students do a project comparing the sustainability of paint versus Mod Green Pod wallpaper; not surprisingly, the paper proved a better all-around choice, and when paired with eco-friendly adhesives, makes for a much safer home environment. Studies like these are important to Mims because they highlight safety concerns that most consumers overlook or aren’t even aware of. “In most wallpaper, either the backing is vinyl or they add vinyl to the inks because people associate vinyl with cleanability,” she explains. “Consumers think vinyl is good, but it’s PVC, it’s toxic. Ours doesn’t have that… We’re sourcing as green as we can.” Mod Green Pod has managed to keep up steady sales throughout this rough economic period, and is continuing to expand at a rapid pace; being based in Austin has certainly helped Mod Green Pod flourish. “I feel like there’s so much support for small creative businesses in Austin, and it’s really inspiring to be [here] doing something like this,” says Mims. “Austin just sort of fosters creativity and really encourages small, strange businesses. I feel like everybody has


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It’s an exciting but awkward place to be; people in the sustainable world are very hardcore about being green and the people in design, they want it to look good. So it’s kind of fun to be at that intersection. nancy mims, mod green pod great ideas for where I should go, and there are so many people here with interesting connections to other part of the country who have helped us grow. I can’t imagine being anywhere else, really.” On the horizon for Mod Green Pod? Some very exciting partnerships, a batch of new wallpaper releases, and a set of upholstery-weight designs in anticipation of one of Mims’ new

interests: expanding into the finished goods market. It’s an instinctive transition for a designer interested in sustainability, and Mims aims to bridge the gap between producing raw materials and creating lasting, re-usable items, a smart alternative to wasteful disposable furniture. Mims plans on starting with small items, like throw pillows, and working up to larger, more intricate household goods.

Look for Mod Green Pod designs in craft stores beginning this May, when textile giant Robert Kaufman will be launching international distribution of Mims’ signature designs—which will not only be a highlight of Kaufman’s inventory, but the first major organic line of craft fabrics. – Mod Green Pod www.modgreenpod.com

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COWORKING FROM HOME Adrienne Breaux Photos by Trevor Ray Thompson

Get out of your pajamas and into a new state of mind. The freedom to sleep in, dress any way you want, and not have to fight morning traffic—working from home sounds like a dream, doesn’t it? With an economy in relatively uncertain territory, the number of people finding themselves without an office to travel to everyday is on the rise, as is the percentage of people who work from home.

up early, dress professionally (or even just put on pants), and stick to a work schedule is difficult; that’s where the global trend of coworking comes in. Coworkers are home-office workers or freelancers who gather at shared spaces, creating a comfortable atmosphere by bringing a laptop and other essential items. Like a gym, you can pay a membership to use coworking spaces with features ranging from private desks to office equipment and coffee. Surrounded by other people with similar work values and goals, a big benefit of this trend is that you’re being held accountable for your work; fans swear they’re more efficient coworking than when isolated at home.

Though many pitfalls can befall attempts to transition to a home-office (and even plague those who’ve been going at it solo for years), we’ve discoveredthe perfect way to find motivation and join a dedicated community of

movers and shakers: Move your home-office out of your home.

CONJUNCTURED

Currently, Austin boasts three excellent coworking spaces for creating your home-office away from home. Conjunctured came first, and was founded by four motivated young entrepreneurs: David Walker, Dusty Reagan, Cesar Torres, and John Metcalf. Situated in a charming older house on the East side, Conjunctured offers a cozy, vibrant, and youthful atmosphere, with a large public work space, lounge area, conference room, kitchenette with coffee and espresso makers, a quiet room, lockers, high speed internet, and bike racks.

1309 East 7th Street www.conjunctured.com

Distraction and lack of discipline are the main demons that doom most workat-homers. Training yourself to wake

You can use Conjunctured’s equipment (projectors, fax machine, and printer), host events, or use their address to receive business mail. Here, you’ll be able to park your laptop next to energetic members who frequent Conjunctured almost daily. At $250 a month, you can get 24-hour access to the space, or purchase a day pass for $25, and your first day of coworking is free.

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COSPACE 911 West Anderson Lane www.cospaceatx.com Cospace, Austin’s newest coworking site, finally offers North Austin residents a place to get work done. Enthusiastic founders Andrew Bushnell, Kirtus Dixon, and Pat Ramsey offer a streamlined, clutter-free coworking space with lots of natural light and ample parking, plus high speed internet, dedicated desks and offices, a large open work area, two conference rooms, high ceilings, lots of windows, and a lounge area and kitchenette with free coffee. Cospace provides people with a great place to network, host events, and accomplish tasks; the energy is both engaging and relaxing. A monthly membership is $200, and different membership levels range from $50 to $300 a month—and the first day of coworking is always free. When asked why he wanted to open such a unique professional resource, Dixon echoed the motivations behind all the founders of Austin’s growing collection of coworking spaces. “That’s where our passions lie: networking, building relationships, building community, collaborating with others—we’re big on projects and ideas and start-ups. That’s our long term goal as entrepreneurs, to be a part of those things, here in Austin especially. We figured there was no better way to give ourselves and others that platform than to open a coworking space.”

COWORKING CHECKLIST A list of essential items to bring on your first day of coworking If you’re thinking about stepping away from your home-office and venturing into the world of coworking, we’ve taken some of the fear and trepidation away by compiling suggestions from the founders of Conjunctured, Texas Coworking, and Cospace for the essential items you’ll need to complete your home office away from home. Be prepared and you’ll be ready and raring to go for your first day of coworking. Laptop and power cord Cell phone and charger Headphones :: “The mobile workers signal to ‘do not disturb,’” according to Reagan. Well-stocked iTunes library :: At Conjunctured, members can share their music across airport express with AirTunes. Pen and paper :: To jot down notes, brainstorm, or just doodle to clear your mind. Refillable water bottle Favorite tea, favorite drink :: Though coworking places provide lots of beverage choices. Hoodie or sweater :: In case you want to go on walk to clear your mind. Bike :: Or some other eco-friendly mode of transportation. Your own mug :: Should you see your coffee mug as an extension of your personality.

It’s not just the talking to one another; it’s the inspiration you get from other people who are doing work. When the guy next to you closes a deal, suddenly you’ve got this surge of energy to do something equally as cool. dusty reagan, co-founder, conjunctured

Good attitude :: Come down and expect to interact with people, but not be totally distracted. Clear intention :: Do you want to just get stuff done, meet people, or just learn about coworking? Decide what you want to get out of your first coworking day before you go—you’ll get a lot more out of it if you plan ahead.

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TEXAS COWORKING 200 East Sixth Street, Suite 301 www.texascoworking.com

Conveniently situated right in the heart of downtown Austin. Texas Coworking opened its doors on January 1st, 2010. Founded by two veterans of the tech community, Paul Terry Walhus and Blake Freeburg, Texas Coworking offers amenities like a reception area, large conference room, roof deck overlooking Sixth Street, server room, kitchen, free street parking, lots of available technology and equipment, a large common work area, and several private offices and cubicles—plus high speed internet.

Featuring exposed granite walls, big windows, and sleek technology, you’ll love the professional feel of this coworking space. Also priced at $250

a month (first day free, too), you can meet with clients in a quiet, convenient place, host an event, or just enjoy the hustle and bustle of urban Austin.

suddenly you’ve got this surge of energy to do something equally as cool,” says Reagan. Ask a question aloud while coworking, and without hesitation one or more fellow workers will jump to the challenge. The enthusiasm for work is infectious at these spaces, and the tools for inspiration and motivation are all around.

COFFEE SHOPS And let’s not forget the place where the idea of coworking first began—the coffee shop. Plenty of coworking fanatics still park themselves next to a latte every now and then, and Austin has plenty with free wi-fi to choose from. Just don’t settle for the closest location; find one that offers comfortable seating, easy outlet access, and a general population more interested in working than chatting. A few we like: Café Caffeine, Halcyon, Bennu Coffee (above left), Flight Path (above right), and Thunderbird Coffee.

So why change out of pajamas, leave the comfortable surroundings of your house, and trek over to a coffee shop or coworking site? Coworking’s undisputed main benefit is that it allows you to connect with other individuals from your community to discuss projects,

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overcome obstacles, and mutually inspire one another. “It’s not just the talking to one another; it’s the inspiration you get from other people who are doing work. When the guy next to you closes a deal,

“I’ve never been around so many different, motivated—self-motivated—people who really love what they’re doing, are passionate about coming to work every day and are also passionate about sharing with other individuals. I get a lot of energy from that,” says Walker. If the pitfalls of relying on a home-office have been getting the best of you, consider coworking. You don’t just have to be someone who works from home to participate; employees with side businesses, telecommuters, part time workers, retail owners, busy moms, even people currently looking for jobs all make great candidates for this efficient trend. Chances are whatever your profession or professional aspirations, there’s a spot in the coworking community for you.


Joseph Phillips Two Room Bunker with Paradise Garden, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 14 x 17 inches, 2010 Joseph Phillips Storefront Bunker with Evergreens, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 14 x 17 inches, 2010


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WHAT FITS IN YOUR BACKYARD? ALLEY FLAT INITIATIVE Sarah Morgan Photos provided by Alley Flat Initiative

Feel like living in Austin is eating up more and more of your paycheck each month? Well, you’re right, and the growing expense is due, in large part, to ever-increasing housing costs. The situation is even more dire for Austin’s lower-income populations. However, the Alley Flat Initiative has a plan—and it’s right in your backyard. “We are basically addressing this affordable housing shortage by utilizing the existing fabric of the city,” explains Sarah Gamble, an architect and the coordinator of the Alley Flat Initiative (AFI). Inspired by a 2005 University of Texas Sustainable Design and Development Workshop that found an underutilized, and often deserted, network of alleys throughout the East Austin community, AFI set out to find a way to use these alleys and the attached oversized residential lots to build what they dubbed “Alley Flats”— small, sustainable, and affordable structures built behind existing homes. “Adding these units adds no additional burden to the existing structure, and

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you’re utilizing land that is already owned by someone,” says Gamble.

structures are not representing a sustainable model supportive of the existing residents and their needs.

The Initiative is a partnership between “There are a lot of examples of bad the Guadalupe Neighborhood Development Corporation, the University alley flats,” Gamble says. “They have promoted gentrification and in-filled of Texas Center for Sustainable Develneighborhoods…in terms of longevity, opment, and the Austin Community these things have really caused property Design and Development Center. Each taxes to rise and pushed out long-term organization plays a part in finding residents.” potential land for an alley flat, contracting a pro-bono designer, and managing the The first AFI structure was completed construction of the unit as well as monitoring its success after completion. in 2008. The 700 square-foot flat features solar panels, a tankless hotwater heater, rainwater barrels, and The idea of building a garage apartment an energy-efficient heating and cooling or additional rental unit on your system, among other sustainable property is certainly not a new one, but technologies. The flat was constructed Gamble says many of these other


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Rendering by Brittany Cooper. Designed by UTSOA Studio Spring 2009.

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Second Street North facade, photo by Jody Horton Facing page: ribbon cutting, photo by Barbara Wilson


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on the same lot as an existing home, and the alley flat is now home to the original homeowner’s sister. “So now this one piece of property can house the whole extended family. You’re distributing the land cost over two structures, which keeps the cost down,” Gamble explains. The second alley flat, completed last year in East Austin, is another extendedfamily unit. It is completely wheelchair accessible and houses a long-time East Austin resident. Affordable housing may not mean what you think it does, says Gamble. According to the U.S. government, to officially qualify as affordable, your total housing costs including rent and utilities should take up no more than 30 percent of your income. A 2008 comprehensive housing market study conducted by the City of Austin’s Neighborhood Housing and Community Development Office found that Austin’s housing costs have risen 85 percent

So now this one piece of property can house the whole extended family. You’re distributing the land cost over two structures, which keeps the cost down. sarah gamble, architect, coordinator, alley flat initiative in the past decade. Looking at Austin residents earning less than $20,000 per year (approximately 44,700 renters), only 7,150 housing options were considered “affordable” for this population. “We are short 37,600 units of affordable housing,” Gamble says. “One in six of those people are students. So that’s a pretty bold number.” Along with a large number of students, that number includes seniors living on fixed incomes, retail, housekeeping, and grocery workers, and single parents, according to the study. “I think with our current zoning and codes, there’s about 3,000 potential

sites for alley flat units in our city with the current lot sizes,” says Gamble. Ten additional alley flats are currently in the design process. AFI will begin construction on the first five this year. “We’re trying to influence the comprehensive planning process that the city is working on, and trying to get more public dialogue about affordable housing to promote this as one of many options,” Gamble says. – AFI currently has an exhibit at City Hall called “Affordable Housing: What’s in Your Backyard?” that runs until April 9. www.thealleyflatinitiative.org

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Hello Kitchen, Goodbye Clutter Amy Wald Portrait by Ed Verosky, kitchen photos provided by Hello Kitchen

As an architect, cook, food-blogger, and all-around kitchen expert, Hello Kitchen creator Cindy Black knows what it takes to make a kitchen a truly workable and comfortable space. Her company guides its clients in all aspects of the renovation process, from the design phase to the contract bidding process, and Black makes it her personal mission to create a recipe for kitchen success. for a commercial baker—just anything For eight years, Black worked with her related to food.” husband, Rick, on designing modernstyle homes in the Austin area. However, The decision to make the kitchen her when their son, JR, was born in 2007, room of choice was therefore not a Black’s schedule changed dramatically. difficult one, and soon, all the pieces She decided to take a year-long hiatus fell into place. from active architectural duty, and it was during this period that the idea “It started out as just being consultafor Hello Kitchen was born. Since tions,” explains Black of her initial parenthood quickly proved to be a business plan. “I thought that would be full-time job, Black wanted to find the ultimate way to give someone a way to pursue smaller-scale design architectural feedback and design projects on the side. This led to her services, but just a snippet of it. So great epiphany—the fact that she could someone may be at the very beginning narrow her focus to a single space. of the process where they know nothing about construction and design and “It just occurred to me that I could need someone to get them on track, or specialize in something,” says Black. “I they may be mid-way through where loved the idea of designing any kind of now they need to pick finishes or tile. cooking space; it could be an indoor Or they might just have a kitchen kitchen, an outdoor kitchen, something

that they are sort of happy with, but it doesn’t work well for them.” Black’s approach to kitchen design centers around one golden rule: determining her clients’ logistical needs and fulfilling them in a way that captures their identities. “I like to really get a sense for how people like to cook, how they use their kitchen now, and how they want to use it,” Black explains. “Most people that I’ve worked with over the past year don’t come to me telling me what they want; they have a sensation or a feeling that they want out of the kitchen, but they don’t tell me how to do it. So it’s just kind of like reading someone’s personality.”

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Photos feature the “Bungalow Modern” kitchen, part of the Academy Addition project Black worked on with her husband, Rick.

I’ve seen this said over and over—that the kitchen is the heart of the house. I think Julia Child said that it was the beating heart and center. It’s just the place with the most energy and the most focus. cindy black, hello kitchen

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Black draws inspiration from her clients’ individuality, and translates it into a space that embodies who they are. This can result in everything from a kitchen modeled after a French country house to one with a minimalist, natural feel. Black’s current big project is a 1950s farmhouse kitchen, the center point of which is a beautiful copper sink that her client adores. The design part of Black’s services is just one aspect of Hello Kitchen’s offerings. While her clients can choose how much of the renovation process she is involved in, Black is willing to provide guidance all the way through construction. In addition, she loves to give insight into how people can de-clutter their kitchens. She has even posted a detailed map on her blog that describes Hello Kitchen’s preferred organization method, which includes getting rid of excess tools and storing materials where they are easiest to use. After all, according to Black, a kitchen can only reach its full potential when it becomes a space where the owner feels really and truly at home. “I’ve seen this said over and over—that the kitchen is the heart of the house. I think Julia Child said that it was the beating heart and center. It’s just the place with the most energy and the most focus.” If anyone can capture that energy, it’s Cindy Black. She looks at the kitchen as a canvas on which to paint, and she leaves no surface untouched. From the sink to the insides of a cabinet, Black believes that the kitchen should project an aura of organization and harmony, and she ensures that Hello Kitchen waves goodbye to the clutter and chaos in her clients’ lives. – Cindy Black Hello Kitchen www.hellokitchen.net

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Joseph Phillips Doublewide Bunker with Paradise Package, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2009 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

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The dining room chandelier was salvaged from the original house, but given new life 56 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010 with a coat of lime green paint.


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MODERN LIVING, FAMILY-STYLE Misty Adair Photos by Casey Dunn

Architect Carey Dodson of Dunnam + Dodson designs homes by listening to her client’s unique needs. In the case of the Meads, a young family with two girls, the word Dodson repeatedly heard was “storage.” Following the primary need for storage solutions was the craving for a clean, modern look and rich, dark woods. The result is a stylish home with cleverly devised cabinetry and niches for just about everything a busy family needs, from crayons to diapers and skateboards. “We had a collective vision for the remodel, but really…I think we were both a bit surprised by how much we love it,” says owner Dave Mead. “We definitely feel like we created the perfect house for us and our family.” Although Dave and his wife, Bonnie Markel Mead, were initially looking for a mid-century home, they settled on this Barton Hills house built in 1966. The street where the house is located was once deemed the Barton Hills Parade of Homes, so each house was designed and constructed by a different builder. In 2006, the Meads purchased the home from the original owners, who had last remodeled the home in the 80s. With compartmentalized rooms, dark wood-paneling, and generally outdated everything, the home was long overdue for a makeover. The Meads hired Dodson to redesign the space to fit a contemporary lifestyle, while maintaining the home’s genuine character. “There was a duality of respecting the original house and its period while

drastically changing the design and function for a modern family,” says Dodson. “There is an added dynamic in modern homes that comes from the blurred lines between work, recreation, and family life. The Mead residence is a great example of a home that is used to its fullest capacity in all these activities.” A notable feature in almost every room is the beautiful but practical cabinetry built by Honea Woodworks. In fact, the focal point of the main living area is a floor to ceiling walnut wood “cube” with open and closed storage. One side of the cube has cabinets that face the living room, while the opposite side of the cube provides storage for a galley style kitchen. White quartz countertops wrap around the cube to define a bar in the living room and the workspace for the kitchen. The overall design exemplifies the simple and efficient use of storage and space in this home. “The kitchen is our favorite feature,” says Dave. “The walnut feels like art

to us, something we never get tired of looking at. The design and functionality of the cabinetry is remarkable.” In the living room, Dodson opted to keep the original fireplace but remove the outdated mantle. The floors were replaced with prefinished pecan in a golden stain that contrasts with the deeper walnut wood built-ins. Bonnie arranged the furniture in the large living room to separate three purposeful zones: a comfortable den for watching TV with the family, a conversation area for guests, and a casual dining room. Each space is anchored by a rug, including a graphic cowhide under the dining room table. The dining room chandelier was salvaged from the original house, but given new life with a coat of lime green paint. For the entryway, the Meads purchased a reproduction Sputnik light fixture but toned down the chrome with white paint. Artwork dots the crisp white walls throughout the living space. Pieces include a colorful photograph of campers in

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“The kitchen is our favorite feature,” says Dave. “The walnut feels like art to us, something we never get tired of looking at. The design and functionality of the cabinetry is remarkable.” Facing page: While Dave and Bonnie are working, the children can draw on the wall with zero consequences.

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the Pyrenees by Brent Humphreys, a mixed media sculptural piece by Robert Moreland, and a two-part Hatch Show print of a red trailer. Most fabulous of all is the commissioned portrait by Felice House. The image, which was reproduced for the couple’s holiday card, spotlights Bonnie and Dave dressed in retro garb and posed in a wood paneled room with a stuffed dog (yes, really).

The star of the master bedroom is a prototype Heywood-Wakefield bed against a storm blue accent wall.

The second phase of the remodel project primarily addressed the master suite upstairs and the studio workspace downstairs. In the master bedroom, Dodson opened up the exterior wall with full-length wood windows and a glass door to the balcony. Typical to the period, the master bedroom featured a vanity and sink outside the contained bath and toilet area. The Meads chose to gut the entire bathroom and start over with an open bathroom format, a floating sink console, a glass shower, and closet with customized sliding doors. The only relics that remain from the former master bathroom are two ornate gold mirrors that contrast against the simplicity of everything else. Dave, a photographer, and Bonnie, a photo stylist, both freelance from home. Because they have to balance their careers with parenthood 24/7, it was imperative that they have a studio workspace that worked for them. The Meads gave up a two-car garage for a dual office and family room, meaning items that would normally be in the garage had to be incorporated neatly into the multi-use space. Long custom closets along an entire wall took care of the job. “A key element of this design was to make sure that all components of modern life had a home,” says Dodson. “By our placement and careful use of storage throughout the house, we allowed each room to feel uncluttered and serene.” The studio has glass paned garage doors that let in light for photo shoots

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There was a duality of respecting the original house and its period while drastically changing the design and function for a modern family. There is an added dynamic in modern homes that comes from the blurred lines between work, recreation, and family life. carey dodson, dunnam + dodson and can be opened on pleasant days. The concrete floor was covered in white epoxy by Dave’s friend Travis Kimler. Strangely, the garage had been home to a lone toilet in the corner of its space. The architect kept the plumbing and designed a powder room to go around the toilet. A functional laundry room is concealed behind sliding doors covered

in chalkboard paint. While Dave and Bonnie are working, the children can draw on the wall with zero consequences. That’s not only kid-friendly but also parent-wise design. – Dunnam + Dodson www.dunnamdodson.com


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2010 CLARA DRISCOLL ARTS AWARD HONOREES

Rudolph “Rudy” Green & Joyce Christian AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center, Grand Ballroom

Benefiting AMOA’S Education Programs Artfully combining the elegance of a gala with the unique vibe that makes this city special, Art Ball is one of Austin’s most eagerly anticipated annual fundraisers. This chic gathering includes the liveliest art auction in town, a seated gourmet dinner, live music, and dancing. Art Auction featuring local and national artists including: Leon Alesi, Jules Buck Jones, Shawn Camp, Laurel Daniel, Carol Dawson, Steve Dubov, Richard Ewen, Christopher Fitzgerald, Clair Gaston, Hawkeye Glenn, Hector Hernandez, Joyce Howell, Shea Little, Andrew Long, Mark Macek, Gabriel Riveria, Andy St. Martin, Heather Tolleson, Will van Overbeek, and many others.

Tickets–$500 Tables start at $5,000 Event information:

www.amoa.org/artball

or call Nikki Sabo at 512-495-9224, ext.223


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The Library for the Future FOR THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE Amy Wald Photos by Paul Bardagjy

Affectionately called an “eclectic circus” by its pioneers, the new Twin Oaks Branch Library encompasses all that is unique about South Austin. Drawing inspiration from bookstores, coffee shops, and academic libraries alike, the creators have sought to turn this former post office location into a home away from home for the local community. Scheduled to open in late May 2010, the reinvented Twin Oaks branch marks a new chapter in Austin libraries, offering everything from self-checkout machines to an outdoor amphitheater with seating made of natural stone. And it is a library for the people and by the people in every way; John Gillum, the project’s leader, has been a South Austin resident since the 1960s and has ensured that the library’s engineers incorporated neighborhood input into every inch of the 10,120 square-foot structure. “We met and brainstormed with [the community] about what they would like to see in their new library,” explains Tom Hatch, whose firm, Hatch + Ulland Owen Architects, is responsible for the library’s architectural work. “There

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evolved a wide variety of desires for the library, and it being in South Austin meant that it needed to look and feel like it belonged in South Austin.”

economic times. The delay turned out to be a blessing in disguise, however, because it allowed the library group to reevaluate their vision for the new site.

The Twin Oaks library has been part of “Since we were on hold, we thought we the South Austin community since 1956, would research what other people were when the original branch first opened at doing with their branch libraries,” explains East Oltorf and South Congress. The Gillum. “A little library called the Iron library, which was surrounded by massive Wood Branch in British Columbia came twin oaks, stood at only 300 square feet. up with this idea—‘all the book stores It moved two times in subsequent years are stealing all of our good ideas, so (all within the same shopping center), let’s steal some back’—and they call but the changes were nothing compared it the library for the future. Sometimes to the complete renovation of the new it’s called the bookstore model. It’s the location at 5th and Mary Street. newest and most popular thing people are doing in branch libraries.” The project has been in the works Gillum and his colleagues jumped at since the 1998 bond election, but it hit the chance to modernize the building a roadblock in 2003 due to turbulent


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machines and endless rows of computers. Then, with the help of Hatch, his partner Erik Ulland, and their team of expert interior designers, Gillum created a diverse, technologically advanced space that, in his words, “just kind of takes your breath away.”

while still giving it a South Austin edge. From a design perspective, the library merges the vibrant colors and diverse forms that define South Austin with the functionality and sustainability of new age structures. “It’s not a big building with multiple rooms inside of it,” Hatch notes. “It reads from the street as a collection of smaller buildings married to one another.” Each area of the library has its own unique exterior shape, and the site itself has two fronts that surround a

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central tower. Immediately upon stepping inside, customers are met with a beautiful Art in Public Places mobile constructed out of old typewriter keys by sculptor Stephanie Strange. This initial entryway leads to a large community room intended for town hall meetings. It is an area rich with natural light and equipped with doors that open into the outside plaza. On the other side of the tower lies the heart of the library itself. As part of the “library for the future” model, Gillum shrunk the circulation desk and used the extra space to add self-checkout

The main room contains wooden beams from a barge that plowed the Mississippi for one hundred years, and the photoviltaic panels that line the roof harvest light and energy in an environmentally friendly way. The main stacks lead to a separate children’s area, marked by a whimsical crooked-house-shaped entrance. This space then opens into the library’s Reading Garden—an outside terrace perfect for surfing the net (free Wi-Fi is provided for both members and non-members alike) or relaxing with a favorite book. Twin Oaks also contains a quiet study area reminiscent of college libraries and a clearly distinguished teen area, complete with a big screen TV, comfy furniture, and “wild and crazy” light fixtures. But that is not all—the library continues to expand beyond its internal walls, spilling over into a furniture-filled back porch and the aforementioned amphitheater, both of which will be


S

PERSPECTIVES

A little library called the Iron Wood Branch in British Columbia came up with this idea—‘all the bookstores are stealing all of our good ideas, so let’s steal some back’—and they call it the library for the future. john gillum, project leader

open to the South Austin community even on days when the library is closed. “There are no fences,” Gillum stresses. “It’s their area. [W]e want the library to reflect the [people] in the neighborhood and their values. That way they’ll love it, take ownership of it, and help us keep it nice.” Other notable features include a rainwater harvesting system, a back

door with a security scanner, and a dry creek bed that trails around the entire building. In addition, the library will literally stay true to its roots—Gillum and company plan to plant twin oaks out front prior to the grand opening and have incorporated a brick from the original post office into the structure. As Hatch puts it, the new branch is “not your cookie-cutter library.” With its user-friendly features, energy-efficient

technology, and community-oriented offerings, the Twin Oaks Library promises to become a true staple in the South Austin community, and it signals the dawning of a new age that will change the face of libraries as we know them.

– Hatch + Ulland www.hatcharch.com www.ci.austin.tx.us/library

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512.382.6197 2110 S. Lamar #F 78704 Sun - Mon 12pm - 6pm Tues - Sat 11am - 7pm

512.698.4686

elluminize.com


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Joseph Phillips Oak Ridge Gardening Club Sheds 6,7, and 8, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2008

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BEYOND FOUR WALLS EXTENDING THE HOME OUTDOORS Sarah Morgan Photos provided by Bill Bauer


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PERSPECTIVES

Somewhere in the Texas Hill Country, perched on the edge of a cliff, is one of the most beautiful and serene swimming pools you’ll ever see. No bright blue chlorine water here, no vinyl deck chairs— just a clear, dark pool of the deepest blue-gray surrounded by teak wood. It is as if nature, not man, created this oasis, floating here among the trees. But it was, of course, created by man—specifically by Bill Bauer, a landscape architect and designer who spent the last 17 years with Gardens, an Austin nursery and gardening center. Though Gardens closed this year, Bauer is continuing his work as an architect and designer. “That was one of our most challenging projects,” Bauer says of the hilltop oasis. “Anyone can stick a pool out onto this great view, but doing a pool that was worthy of that view, and had a really high level of design put into it, made a huge difference.” Often when we think of landscaping, we think plants and pots, flower beds, maybe a tree or two. But Bauer’s work is more than just superficial arrangement; by incorporating multiple elements, he is able to make an outdoor space an extension of the home. “One of the things we focus on in our work is that there’s sort of an architectural foundation there,” he says. “There’s a big emphasis on the built landscape, the hard landscape, the decks, pools, stairs, and how lighting might integrate into these things. All of that is decided before plants come into things.” As we all know, Austinites love their outdoors, from our parks and pools to our favorite restaurant patio. Bauer’s advice is to take those experiences to our own backyards.

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PERSPECTIVES

These outdoor spaces have value, and the people who have them and use them would agree that it gives you another layer of living and entertaining. bill bauer “What better way to enjoy the weather than to walk out your back door and take advantage of a great day?” Bauer asks. “There’s been an ongoing trend toward sustainability and the idea of growing your own food and cooking outside. There are more dinner parties being held outside and this whole movement of doing that at home as opposed to going out.” Most of us don’t have an amazing view of the Greenbelt, or a giant outdoor space to build a large-scale project, but Bauer emphasizes that any outdoor space can become a comfortable and unique hangout. “Think about that patio space you see out your back door and never use. What

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simple things could you do to really enliven it? Maybe just a few pieces of furniture or pots... It can be simple touches that can really transform a space and make you want to go out and use it.” Bauer’s goal is to harness the same emphasis on design and quality that you put in the interior of your home, and translate it to apply to your outdoor areas as well. “These outdoor spaces have value, and the people who have them and use them would agree that it gives you another layer of living and entertaining. In a way it extends the square footage of your home and creates a more enjoyable, usable space,” he says.

For those with bigger ambitions, Bauer advises getting your landscape architect involved in the early stages of a building or remodeling project. Often, he explains, landscape architects are able to manage many different aspects of a project and work through design and implementation issues as they arise. “We design everything and install everything. I feel very strongly about that as a model. I am there onsite all the time,” he says. “There isn’t this more traditional model of plans being handed off to a contractor. The design intent is very consistent and I enjoy getting involved at that level. I love seeing it come to life and being there to help it all come together.”


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HAnSEL & gRETEL April 24, 28, 30, May 2 at The Long Center K I d S 1 2 A n d u n d E R – T I C K E T S O n Ly $ 1 0

FOR T I C K E T S CA L L 5 1 2 - 4 7 2 -5992 OR vISIT www.AuSTInLyRICOpERA.ORg

Ignite Your Soul ! Season Sponsor

Bill Dic k So n

Don’t miss out on our Hansel & Gretel gingerbread house competition sponsored by The Texas culinary Academy and The Austin chronicle . Visit www.Austinlyricopera.org to download an entry form.


D

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NORTH SIDE

Joseph Phillips Alpine Terrain, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 18 x 24 inches, 2008 Joseph Phillips 1.2 Acre private Island with Utilities, gouache ink and graphite on paper, 30 x 41 inches, 2008


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PERSPECTIVES

House flippers have always conjured up a specific and stereotypical image: Like graffiti artists, they leave their indelible modern signature on historic neighborhoods and disappear as quickly as they arrived. Austinites have become used to seeing once-rundown homes pulled off the market and reintroduced— greatly improved—to potential buyers. Mark Collins Photos by Brian Mihealsick

But what was once a rampant trend in Austin has become more of a public service as a more efficient home flipping industry has helped revitalize neighborhoods and provided the market with entry-level homes for first-time homebuyers. “These days flippers fulfill the role of a general contractor. A house in really bad shape is only going to get worse, and eventually be torn down, unless somebody steps up and fixes it. A flipper is just the person to raise their hand and volunteer to help,” explains Rick Villani, co-author of Amazon.com’s all-time bestselling real estate book FLIP: How to Find, Fix and Sell Houses for Profit. Villani has flipped more than 1,000 homes, many of them “disasters”— homes with a crumbling foundation or a caved-in roof—that end up being sold at a median price point, close to Austin’s 2009 average home value of $237,000. He points out that the upper price range of homes in Austin, from the $500-$900 thousands, offer a lot of opportunity for large returns, but come with a lot of risk.

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“Five years ago there were all these ‘Flip That House’ episodes where these morons were making money because the market was bailing them out,” he says. “Now, you’ve really got to exercise a lot of skill in assessing a property.” Neighborhoods that were white-hot before the real estate crash, like Travis Heights and Bouldin Creek, don’t appeal to Villani; he’s more interested in areas that are just starting to turn around. He predicts pockets of home flipping activity will blossom in South Austin between Slaughter Lane and Ben White Boulevard, and in North Austin between Anderson Lane and US 183. “You’ll always have your meat-andpotatoes neighborhoods with great schools where people have a lot of pride and ownership,” Villani says. “But Austin is stretching north and south and creating cool hip neighborhoods where people want to live.” Revitalization of these areas is made necessary by Austin’s increasing population and residents’ needs to be as close to downtown and the city’s core of activity as possible.

“Austinites don’t like the suburban feel: You’re looking for worn-in houses that have character,” says realtor Ari Guerrero. “The way Austin goes through redevelopment is different from any other city. Look at how South Congress was transformed into a funky hangout. In San Antonio or Dallas that part of town would have ended up as a strip mall and all the buildings would look identical. But we don’t do it like that here.” While the shift in neighborhood dynamics may seem like old news to seasoned Austinites, Guerrero is constantly explaining the city’s growth at Red Home Realty, a firm that caters to the younger crowd and has been dealing with Austin transplants “like crazy, more than ever before.” She says newcomers are arriving daily— from Vermont, Indiana, and Scandinavia just to name a few—and that nearly everyone wants to be close to Austin’s bustling downtown epicenter. “Austin’s hot neighborhoods are expanding. You have so many people that are trying to get in that anything central between MoPac and IH 35 is going to appreciate very quickly,” she explains. “People are coming whether we like it or not; we need to make the


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PERSPECTIVES

“Younger buyers who want to remain connected want to live central and closer-in, and they’re willing to sacrifice square footage for location,” he says. “Those folks will feel priced out of places like Clarksville and Tarrytown so they’re settling into the Braker Lane and Duval areas along Mopac.” Lately, Crossland has seen a spike in the number of mid-level price point homebuyers looking to take advantage of the federal government’s $8,000 tax credit. He says there was a lot of activity at the end of 2009, and again in the spring when the incentive was extended. “It’s just not natural,” he says of the way the tax incentive has affected typical Austin real estate cycles. “Frankly, I hope it wraps up and goes away.” Crossland is concerned the incentive doesn’t create new buyers as much as it simply encourages potential buyers to hurry up and sign the papers rather than wait, possibly creating a shortage of homebuyers in the future. Regardless, the incentive has undeniably helped the house flipping market by creating a crop of highly motivated shoppers looking to buy before the end of April. But just like Robin Hood, Villani isn’t looking to cash in: He’s in the business to improve the neighborhoods of the town he came to love as an undergraduate at the University of Texas.

Five years ago there were all these ‘Flip That House’ episodes where these morons were making money because the market was bailing them out. Now, you’ve really got to exercise a lot of skill in assessing a property. rick villani, co-author, flip: how to find, fix, and sell houses for profit best use of the neighborhoods we have or else where are these people going to live?”

Austin realtor Steve Crossland has been helping people figure out where they’re going to live for the past 17 years, and he believes factors that determine hot neighborhoods depend on the buyer.

“Almost every house I’ve flipped, I’ve gotten a thank you note from the seller,” he says. “If you operate with integrity you are truly in the business of solving problems.” – Ari Guerrero and Steve Crossland Red Home Realty www.redhomerealty.com Rick Villani, Co-author, FLIP: How to Find, Fix, and Sell Houses for Profit www.millionairesystems.com/msys/FLIP.html

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M O T H E R ’ S

D A Y

W E E K E N D

Ballet’s Greatest Comedy

Choreography: Arthur Saint-Léon Music: Léo Delibes Musical Accompaniment by The Austin Symphony

May 7, 8 // 8pm May 9 // 3pm THE LONG CENTER Mistaken identity and a beautiful mechanical doll, Coppélia leaves young and old alike bemused by the antics of our two confused lovers. Be whisked away to a doll maker’s workshop on MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND.

For Tickets:

Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512.476.2163


D

downtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3

24 Diner 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5400 www.24diner.com Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

4

Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

5

The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

6

Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreeksidelounge.com

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

82

219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com

29

J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.433.6954 www.jblacks.com

30

Jeffrey’s 1204 West Lynn 512.477.5584 www.jeffreysofaustin.com

31

Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

32

La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondesaaustin.com

33

Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

42

Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

43

Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarintexas.com

AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

44

Wahoo’s 509 Rio Grande St. 512.476.3474 www.wahoos.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org

45

Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltons-florist.com

Mexic-Arte Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artemuseum.org

46

Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

SHOPPING

Malverde 400-B W. 2nd St. 512.705.0666 www.malverdeaustin.com

34

Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

35

Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

36

47

Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Avant Salon 507 Pressler St., #800 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

48

Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

49

Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

24

37

El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylalunaaustin.com

Mulberry 360 Nueces St. 512.320.0297 www.mulberryaustin.com

Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com

25

Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfield-drug.com

38

Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors com

Frank & Angie’s Pizzeria 508 West Ave. 512.472.3534 www.hutsfrankandangies.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankandangies.com RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

26 27 28

The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com

39

The Ranch 710 W. 6th St. 512.465.2016 www.theranchaustin.com

40

Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com

41

HEALTH & BEAUTY

By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

El Arroyo 1616 West 5th Street 512.478.2577 www.ditch.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com

ARTS & LEISURE

Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

LIVING 50 51

Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512.472.4980 www.dcarch.com

Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

52

Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

Gables Park Plaza 115 Sandra Muraida Way 512.477.7275 www.gables.com/parkplaza

53

Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com


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23 2nd

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

83


C

campus | hyde park

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2 3

Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/tripptshirts

Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com

Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

15

Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

25

Wish 2322 Guadalupe St. 512.391.9009 www.ishopaac.com

6

Food Heads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com

11

23

24

Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com

10

Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com

Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com

5

9

13

22

14

El Greco 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.474.7335 www.elgrecoaustin.com

8

Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991

Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com

4

7

84

Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com

12

Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com Judges’ Hill Restaurant 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

16 17

Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystacos.com Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING 18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

21

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservicevintage.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

27

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

29

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30 31

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstoneaesthetics.com

LIVING 32

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

33

M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

34

Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com


5

16

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DEANde KEan ETOke Neton

10

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24 2 25

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UNIVERSTY OF TEXAS

27

university of texas

mlk, jr.

MLaKv, JR e . AVE .

30 28 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

85


M

midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9

86

34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com Apothecary Café & Wine Bar 4800 Burnet Rd. Ste. 450 512.377.9621 www.apothecaryaustin.com Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552 Blue Star Cafeteria 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.7827 www.bluestarcafeteria.com

10 11 12

Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon 5434 Burnet Rd. 512.458.1813 www.ginnyslittlelonghorn.com Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

Phil’s Ice House 5620 Burnet Rd. 512.524.1212 www.philsicehouse.com Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaiosrestaurant.com

13

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com

14

Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com

19 20

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

16

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

17

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

18

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera.com

21

Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com

22

Second Time Around 5100 Burnet Rd. 512.451.6845 www.secondtimaroundatx.com

23

Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

24

Strut 3500 Guadalupe St. 512.374.1667 www.shopstrut.com

SHOPPING 15

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531

ARTS & LEISURE 25

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

26

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 27

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com

28

Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com

29

Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 30

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com


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austin state hospital

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30 24 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

87


E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Justine’s Brasserie 4710 E. 5th St. 512.385.2900 www.justines1937.com

14

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

The Liberty 1618 1/2 E. 6th St. 512.600.4791

15

3

Buenos Aires Café 1201 E. 6th St. 512.382.1189 www.buenosairescafe.com

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainey St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearlaustin.com

16

4

Cheer Up Charlie’s 1104 E. 6th St. 512.431.2133 www.cheerupcharlies. blogspot.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

17

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

5

Clive Bar 609 Davis St. 512.494.4120 www.clivebaraustin.com

18

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

6

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

19

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

7

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastsideshowroom.com

8

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

9

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

2

10 11 12

88

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

13

G’raj Mahal Café 91 Red River St. 512.480.2255 www.grajmahalcafe.com Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

20 21

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

22

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

23

Thunderbird Coffee 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.thunderbirdcoffee.com

24

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorkedtastingroom.com

25

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING

38

26

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

39

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

27

Blue Genie Art Industries 916 Springdale Rd. 512.444.6655 www.bluegenieart.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

28

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

29

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

41

30

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com

42

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

31

East Side Pedal Pushers 1100 E. 6th St. 512.826.3414 www.eastsidepedal pushers.com

43

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

44

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

32

Goods East 1601 E. Cesar Chavez 512.476.3287 www.goodseast.com

33

Snake Eyes Vinyl 1211 E. 7th St. 512.220.7019 www.snakeeyesvinyl.com

34

Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy.com

40

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

36

BiRDHOUSE Gallery 1304 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.birdhousegallery.com

37

Mone’ Musel Fine Art 208 San Marcos St. 512.300.7790 www.monemusel.com

Esty Skin Studio 1210 Rosewood Ave. 512.903.8225 www.estyaustin.com

LIVING 45

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

46

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

47

Urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

ARTS & LEISURE 35

Bird’s Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com


east 38 1/2

dean keaton

39

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33

7 31 9 17 4 20 40 3 46 47 29 16 37 19 38 36 30 26 45

east 7th

42

14

east 6th

28

34 43 32

10 5

ey

french legation

ll

24

east 11th

va

15

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sa

ea

red river

18 pl

ta

aso

con

nav

chi

44

east 5th

21

cesa

r ch

avez

12

13

35

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

89


S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

3

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

4

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

5

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com

6

Highball 1142 S Lamar Blvd. 512.383.8309 www.thehighball.com

7

Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com

8

Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com

9 10

90

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com

11

Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

12

Matt’s El Rancho 2613 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.462.9333 www.mattselrancho.com

13

Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Olivia 2043 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.804.2700 www.olivia-austin.com Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com Polvos Mexicana & Bar 2004 S. 1st St. 512.441.5446 www.polvosaustin.com Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

27

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

28

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace. com/31622902

29

30

Prototype Vintage Design 1700 1/2 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.7686 www.prototypevintage design.com

39

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

40

Bird’s Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

41

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituationaustin.com

42

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

Service Menswear 1400 South Congress Ave. 512.447.7600 www.servicemenswear.com

43

Massage Envy 9600 Escarpment Blvd., Ste. 860 512.288.3689 www.massageenvy.com

32

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

44

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

33

Spectacle Sunglasses 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.382.6197

45

34

The Waxing Studio 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.284.6000 www.thewaxingstudio.com

Stag 1423 S. Congress Ave. 512.373.7824 www.stagaustin.com

46

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

31

SHOPPING 22

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/austingoodietwoshoes

HEALTH & BEAUTY

ARTS & LEISURE

LIVING

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com

35

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

47

The Black Sheep 1115 S. Congress Ave. 512.914.4771 www.blacksheepaustin.com

36

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com

48

Blackmail 1202 S. Congress Ave. 512.326.7670 www.blackmailboutique.com

37

Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

49

25

Austin Lyric Opera 901 Barton Springs Rd. 512.472.5927 www.austinlyricopera.org

Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbowsplusarrows.com

38

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

26

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

23 24


gs

1

3

20

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35 6 eliz

abet

h

mo pac

mon

roe

milt

46

on

4

ann

ie

27 45 14 33 40 mar

live

5o

ry

22 17

oak

48 44

20 9

manch

aca

south

2

360

18

ltorf

1st

south 5th

12

11

28 21 30 41

ress

la

36

29 10 23 24 1 8 16 31 7 49 26 34

t ma

south

h

ut

so

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lady bird /to wn riv lak er s e ide

cong

barton sprin

25 15 32 38 37

90 hwy 2

/ ben

white

290

42 19

43 13

47

39 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

91


W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3 4 5

Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

14 15 16

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961 Fabi and Rosi 509 Hearn St. 512.236.0642 www.fabiandrosi.com

17

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

7

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

18

8

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com

19

9

Magnolia Café 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com

11 12

Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com

24

Nu Age Café 2425 Exposition Blvd. 512.469.9390 www.nuagecafe.com

25

Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

SHOPPING

6

10

92

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

13

28

Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com

36

Massage Envy 3201 Bee Cave Rd., Suite 156 512.306.0777 www.massageenvy.com

37

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

38

Sanctuary 2600 Exposition Blvd. 512.478.8500 www.sanctuaryaustin.com

Yoga Vida 3620 Bee Cave Rd. 512.480.8489 www.yogavida.net

39

Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com Mad About Shoes 900 RR. 620 South, Ste. A-109 512.970.0466 www.madaboutshoes austin.com

29

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

Beehive 3300 Bee Cave Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

30

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

21

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

23

27

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

31

HEALTH & BEAUTY 35

Apricot Lane Boutique 12800 Hill Country Blvd., G-145 512.263.1176 www.apricotlaneusa.com

20

22

26

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

Valentine’s Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488 www.valentinestoo.com

ARTS & LEISURE 32

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

33

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

34

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

LIVING 40

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com


15 40

2222

31 12 16

westlake dr.

n co

es

mount bonnell

620

14 360

13 1 enfield 8 23 lak e a 11 ust in blv d. 5 10 3 4 9 27

hw

y6

20

21 17 37 7

bee

cav

22

er

oa

d

25 38

19

18

b ar ton

33

c re ek

36 20 29 2244 24 30

1 op 1

28

c / lo

6

mopa

26

exposition

34

35th street

32

cap

35

ita lo ft ex as h

wy

620

2 ba l

lake austin

39 RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

93


N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

SHOPPING

FOOD & DRINK 1

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com

12

Crú The Domain 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

13

3

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

14

Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

4

Jasper’s The Domain 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

15

Free People The Domain 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

5

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

6

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

17

Intermix The Domain 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

7

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com

18

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

8

Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com

19

Loft The Domain 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com

9

Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com

2

10 11

94

Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

16

20

21

Barney’s New York Co-op The Domain 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com Betsey Johnson The Domain 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobal artsgroup.com

Luxe Apothetique The Domain 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com

22

Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com

23

Tiffany & Co. The Domain 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

32

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

24

Uptown Modern 5453 Burnet Rd. 512.452.1200 www.uptownmodern austin.com

33

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

34

Zara The Domain 512.491.0920 www.zara.com

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

35

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

36

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

25 26

31

ARTS & LEISURE 27 28

Massage Envy 10515 N. Mopac, Ste. 210B 512.834.3689 www.massageenvy.com

LIVING

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com

37

Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

aloft Austin The Domain 512.491.0777 www.starwoodhotels.com

38

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

39

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 29

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com

30

Bird’s Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com


9

38

27 5 33

8

parmer

37 12 23 the domain 4 13 17 20 36 2 25 15 19

183

14

32 11

7

29

s

eat

gr

l hil

31

6

183 / research blvd

mesa

360

16

braker

mopac / loop 1

34

10

s

xa

e ft

30

o al t i p

1

spic

ewo

od s

prin

gs

26

28

1

n ln.

ander so

lamar

burnet

ca

35

22

39 far west

18

3 2222

21

northl

and / k

oenig

24

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

95


A

HAPPENINGS Of Montreal May 23 The Mohawk

APRIL/MAY ART First Saturday Free Public Tours May 1, 2 pm Austin Museum of Art www.amoa.org Ole Pecan Street Spring Arts Festival May 1 – 2 East Sixth Street www.oldpecanstreetfestival.com 4th Annual Texas Fiber Arts Exhibit Exhibit from May 1 Mexican American Cultural Center www.texasfiberarts.org

Vintage Poster Weekend May 14 – 16 ART on 5th www.arton5th.com

Fatima Ronquillo Opening Reception May 1, 6 pm Wally Workman Gallery www.walyworkmangallery.com

Chris Jordan: Running the Numbers Exhibit from May 22 Austin Museum of Art www.amoa.org

Legacy of Change Exhibit from May 5, 7 pm Mexic-Arte Museum www.artemuseum.org

Matisse as Printmaker Exhibition from May 23 Blanton Museum of Art www.blantonmuseum.org

Stacked Waters by Teresita Fernandez May 5, 10 am Blanton Museum of Art www.blantonmuseum.org

96

Contemporary Art Weekend May 8 – 9 ART on 5th www.arton5th.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

ENTERTAINMENT Pioneer Farms Maypole Festival May 1 Pioneer Farms www.pioneerfarms.org STOMP May 4 – May 9, 7 pm The Paramount Theatre www.austintheatre.org Ballet Austin Presents Coppelia May 7 – July 9 The Long Center www.balletaustin.org Texas Observer Writers Festival May 8 Sholz Garten www.texasobserver.org Sight.Sound.Soul presents An Evening with Henry Butler May 11 Palm Door www.vsatx.org

Conan O’Brien May 14, 7 pm Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com Comedian Norm McDonald May 14 – 15 Cap City Comedy Club www.capcitycomedy.com Speakeasy Superstar Every Wednesday, 10 pm Speakeasy www.speakeasyaustin.com Austin Poetry Slam Every Wednesday, 8 pm The Independent www.austinindependent.com

WELLNESS Pioneer Farms Maypole Festival May 1


Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

Bomba Estéreo Pachanga Festival May 21 – 22 Photo by Leo Carreno

Van Morrison April 30, 7 pm Bass Concert Hall Dr. Dog, Deer Tick May 1, 9 pm Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Norah Jones May 1 – 2, 7 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com Love Collector May 1, 10 pm Beerland www.beerlandandtexas.com Gorilla Music Battle of the Bands May 2, 8 pm Momo’s www.momosclub.com The Tallest Man on Earth May 2, 10 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com Shearwater, Wye Oak May 7, 8 pm The Parish www.theparishaustin.com

Pioneer Farms www.pioneerfarms.org Lemonade Day Austin May 2, 9 am Texas Capitol www.austin.lemonadeday.org Body Awareness May 6, 8 pm Hyde Park Theatre www.hydeparktheatre.com CharityBash benefitting Austin Pets Alive May 12 The Belmont www.charitybash.org Renegade Craft Fair in Austin May 15 – 16, 11 pm – 7 pm The Palmer Events Center www.renegadecraft.com/austin Austin Farmers’ Market Every Saturday, 9 am Republic Square Park

Props to Peddlers: Bike Night Every Monday, 7 pm Pie Guys Pizzeria www.pieguyspizza.com Brazilian Street Dance Every Sunday, 12:45 pm Esquina Tango www.esquinatangoaustin.com ColdTowne Improv Every Saturday, 10 pm ColdTowne Theatre www.coltwonetheater.com

MUSIC Phoenix April 29, 7 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com The Dead Weather April 30, 7 pm

Ben Folds, Kate Miller-Heidke May 7, 7 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com The Bright Light Social Hour May 8 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com Blue October May 8, 7 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com The Album Leaf, Sea Wolf May 11, 8 pm The Parish www.theparishaustin.com The B-52’s May 15, 9 pm La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com ANA SIA May 15 Republic Live

Sarah Jaffe May 15, 8 pm The Parish www.theparishaustin.com All Leather, Yip-Yip May 16, 9 pm The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com Caribou, Asking Alexandria May 16 The Mohawk www.themohawkaustin.com Minus the Bear May 16, 8 pm La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com OK Go May 19, 8 pm The Parish www.theparishaustin.com L.A.X. May 20, 8 pm The Parish www.theparishaustin.com Drake May 21, 7 pm Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com Pachanga Festival May 21 – 22 Fiesta Gardens www.pachangafest.com Weird Al Yankovic May 22 Paramount Theatre www.austintheatre.org Of Montreal May 23, 9 pm The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com This Will Destroy You May 27, 10 pm The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com Indigo Girls May 29, 8 pm La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com Bassnectar May 29 Stubb’s www.stubbsaustin.com

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

97


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100

RARE APRIL/MAY 2010

Rare Magazine :: April/May 2010 :: Living  

Rare Magazine :: April/May 2010 :: Living

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