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The event of the year is ďŹ nally here! Austin’s fairest in the land are gathering for one special night to celebrate their favorite local businesses. Join us for a magical evening ďŹ lled with food, fashion, cocktails, live music, art performances and so much more.

wednesday, june 3rd  6-10pm  the long center rareaustin.com/rarestevent


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On The Cover: Linda Dumont

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JB Rants

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Staycations

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DOWNTOWN

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Austin Blog: Tolly Moseley

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Karen Kopicki

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Perspective: Lindsay Burns

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Mexi-Arte Museum

32

CAMPUS/HYDE PARK

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Austin Sports & Soical Club

38

Cap Metro

40

MIDTOWN

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Austin Cool House Tour

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Perspective: Michael Gaylord Wilson

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EAST

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Austin Blog: Rachel Youens

52

Austin Ridge Riders

56

Perspective: Richard J. deVarga

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SOUTH

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Lounge 22

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Ulraverte

68

Dorado Soapstone

72

WEST

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Austin Blog: Lyssa Myska Allen

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Austin Zoo

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Perspective: Lambert Labay

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NORTH

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Austin Blog: Tiffany Diane

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Root Design Company

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Perspective: Melissa LaMunyon & Amanda May

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Rare Gives Back: I Liver Here, I Give Here

Linda Dumont / Polo Player Takes Off / 24” x 30,” Pastels

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Index/Maps

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Each issue, Rare Magazine chooses a local Austin artist to feature on our cover and section introduction pages. This month’s feature artist is Linda Dumont. Make sure you check out her art scattered throughout the magazine.

LINDA DUMONT’S SHIFTING PERSPECTIVE

ON THE COVER: Linda Dumont, Central Austin – Sanchez Building

23” x 30, ” Oil on Canvas 6


AFTER WORKING FOR MANY YEARS IN AN ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST VEIN, LINDA DUMONT FOUND HERSELF OUTSIDE HER STUDIO IN DOWNTOWN AUSTIN ONE DAY, OVERWHELMED BY THE TEXAS CAPITOL BUILDING. IT WAS AT THAT MOMENT, NINE YEARS AGO, THAT DUMONT RETURNED TO HER STUDIO AND BEGAN WORK ON A CITYSCAPE — HER FIRST FIGURATIVE PIECE IN YEARS. Or, at least, that’s the short version of the story. Dumont, who attended the School of the Museum of Fine Ar ts in Boston, had trained in figurative work early in her career. “I had done all traditional work,” Dumont says. “I had very tight drawings, but it didn’t feed my soul, so I went totally in the nonobject direction.” After decades working in that non-object direction, Dumont found herself needing a change of pace, and that shuffling brought her back to drawing and representation. “I was ready to try something new and look at it from a different perspective,” Dumont says. Now, Dumont tends to blend her abstract and figurative works, working in playful, bright colors to illuminate scenes ranging from impressionist nudes to city scenes. Dumont’s current studio is filled with works in various stages of completion, including a series of pieces intended for the Texas Child Study

Center, a particularly significant project for an artist who works to share her work with the public. “I love the idea of sharing work with children and making art available and accessible to everybody,” Dumont, who has also contributed work to a range of community projects, says. When working on her cityscapes, Dumont begins by photographing the scene she intends to depict. Enlarging multiple images, she collages photographic panoramas, which often serve more as jumping off points than strict guides. In summarizing her approach to representing architectural landmarks, Dumont says, “My deal is about the shapes.” W ith tha t in mind, D umont focuses on buildings she believes are architecturally important — currently, she’s interested in the Dell Children’s Medical Center.

Dumont’s works often go in a deeply whimsical direction, playing with illustrative elements that distort expected views of their subject and demand a second look. In one painting, fish wander the city streets dressed for a night out. In another, Bevo roller skates across the University of Texas’s sidewalks looking positively giddy. The works make the familiar unfamiliar, and ask viewers to join the artist in seeking another perspective. Carly Kocurek Photo by Jennifer Nichols ldumont.homestead.com

“I start working and it’s like an actress on stage,” Dumont says. “You’re performing in front of it, and you don’t know where it will go.” 7


Q & Austin I grew up here. I’ve also worked here on the radio for the past 13 years, making me somewhat of an authority on our city. There are so many new people moving to our great city, and many don’t know a lot of facts about Austin. It’s easy to assume that everyone is as well-versed as we are, but that’s not necessarily the case. There are some recurring questions that I have fielded over the years about our fair city, and I think this is a fine time to address the most common ones.

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1. What are the Moon Towers? At one time, Austinites were obsessed with UFOs. In 1958 alone, the year that the Moon Towers were erected, Austin documented over 40 visits from the extra-terrestrial. The moon towers were built as a sort of “welcome wagon� for aliens, so they’d plan visits to Austin over Houston or Dallas. Austinites where known to gather at these towers for weeks at a time, especially when there were circulating rumors of an impending visit. Beginning in early 1963, the moon towers were shut of f because residents were disappearing in rapid numbers. The city counsel felt this would be bad for our “tax base� and voted unanimously to have many of the towers shut off, letting the alien visitors know that they were no longer welcome.

2. Why do so many Austin streets have two or more names? It’s true. Research Blvd. is also 183 or Ed Bluestein. 290 changes into Koenig, then 2222. Ben White is also referred to as 290 and 71 in various locations. This dates back to the Austin street wars of 1948. Just several years after the Lamar bridge was built over what we now call Lady Bird Lake, South Austinites began visiting North Austin and vise versa — all with dissimilar morals, political views and hairstyles. Street wars erupted on a regular basis in the downtown and Barton Springs area. Unable to come to terms, the two factions decided to no longer cross the river under city ordinance. Vandals and hoodlums would try to prove dominance

by sneaking into North or South Austin to change the street signs, thus leading to confusion over the street names. The blue reective signs that you see on Lamar Blvd., under the train tracks, marked the line that North and South Austinites were not to cross. This is why you will of ten hear the older generation use the expression “he/she’s so over the blueâ€? meaning: they couldn’t be more different than me.

3. What are the aquifer recharge zones? Have you noticed the “Recharge Zone� signs along the road? These are areas where it is not law, but it is “recommended� that you hold your breath for a minimum of 30 seconds. This is to avoid inhaling toxic gases that are slowly releasing from fractures in areas associated with the Balcones Fault. Calculations are based on driving the suggested speed limit. Fewer seconds if you are speeding, more if you are driving below the posted speed limit. Jogging in these areas is heavily discouraged.

4. Why did the bats settle under the Congress Bridge? The bats haven’t been here as long as most people think. They were brought in from Mexico by a horror ďŹ lmmaker, Hans Van Der Fickle, who wanted to shoot in Austin. He ordered one million Mexican Free-tailed bats. The City of Austin paid for the shipment and placement of the bats under the Congress Bridge in anticipation of the amount of

revenue it would generate during ďŹ lming and future ďŹ lm work. The day the ďŹ lming was set to begin in July 1972, Hans walked away from the project claiming that he was 44 bats short. The dispute has been tied up in courts ever since.

5. Why are the highways so bad in Austin? I know it’s bad. Going east and west is virtually impossible in Austin. Even 183, which actually takes you east and west, claims to run north and south! Did you know that there used to be a highway that ran directly east and west from MansďŹ eld Dam (on Lake Travis) all the way past Bergstrom AFB? It was called Highway 91, but most locals referred to it as The Waterloo Turnpike. It had yovers through most of downtown. The city ripped it out in 1981, declaring it unsafe. It was so straight that drivers would lose their focus and attention, thus leading to a nationwide record of collisions for any stretch of highway. It was completely removed by the end of 1982. Okay, so those of you that know me, know that I tend to fabricate the truth (just a tad). For the RE AL answer s to the se common questions, turn this page upside down and read below. JB Hager is half of the hit morning-show duo “JB and Sandyâ€? on Mix 94.7. Photo by Jennifer Nichols

1. Moon Towers were built in the late 1800s to reduce crime. There was a serial killer on the loose called the “Servant Girl Annihilator.â€? True story. 2. There are many street names because Travis Co. is very liberal and democrats LOVE to name things after each other.                    

         4. The design under the Congress Bridge was a perfect location for bats to roost. 5. Austinites used to have the attitude that if we DON’T build it, they won’t come. They were wrong. 9


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Ok, so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re probably not going to St. Barts for vaycay this year. But, economic downturn be damned: you, my friend, need a break. So weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to put the â&#x20AC;&#x153;recessâ&#x20AC;? back in â&#x20AC;&#x153;recession,â&#x20AC;? and tell you exactly how to get away â&#x20AC;&#x201D; by staying put.

Tolly Moseley, Photos by Cory Ryan

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Linda Dumont / Ghost Rider / 4' x 4,' Oil on Canvas

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Tolly Moseley: Austin Eavesdropper thataustingirl.blogspot.com

Tolly Moseley is a publicist and freelance writer in Austin. Her blog Austin Eavesdropper has been featured on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The JB and Sandy Morning Show,â&#x20AC;? About.com and G4TV, where Tolly provided on-camera SXSW commentary while sweating profusely. She covers music, fashion and art in Austin, as well as the hijinks of her highly entertaining fellow Austinites. Photo by Annie Ray 16


Can’t Talk Now, I’m Inhaling Ethiopian Food

Quacks 43rd Street Bakery and Coffee Shop

Built By Snow: A+ For Band Promotion

It appears that, once again, I am rendered (almost) speechless in the presence of Ethiopian food. It’s a little embarrassing — first Asther’s off I-35, and now Karibu, where R. and I went out for dinner last night. The dishes are simple – ingera bread, stewed vegetables and meat, all eaten with fingers rather than utensils – but to my taste buds, the food never, ever gets old. I’m not sure I can even pronounce the dish R. and I ate last night, I just remember it being a chickpea and red pepper-sauce laden affair. And that neither of us could converse. (We were too busy stuffing our faces.)

There’s a full-on coffee shop rivalry raging underneath my roof, and it’s between my roommate Caleb and I. We live in Hyde Park, mere footsteps away from my favorite coffee shop in the whole city (and perhaps the world): Quacks. Now, the coffee itself is alright, but that’s not really why I visit. It’s the clientele. I mean, where else in Austin do golden retrievers, dreadlocked bohemian couples, church ladies, mathematics majors and mumbling conspiracy theorists all converge together on Saturday morning for frothy cappuccinos? Answer me THAT, Caleb.

As a band, it’s tough to stand out in this town, precisely because it’s so sick with talent. But it helps if you know how to publicize effectively. Exhibit A: Built By Snow. They contacted me a while back, offering their then-new EP to review, along with a press kit. Now, if you’re soliciting press for your band, it helps if the product itself is really, really good (and fortunately in the case of Built By Snow, it is), but also, it does not hurt to have a kick@ss press kit. Theirs was made up in the style of a comic book, with press endorsements tucked inside superheroes’ talking bubbles. Band promotion WIN.

The Wonder That is Aaron Behrens’ Pelvis

Morgan Freeman Saves the Day at Beauty Bar (sort of)

Austin and the Social Media Revolution

One band I never tire of seeing is Ghostland Observatory. Yeah yeah, they’ve blown up, they’re big and famous, WHATEVER. No one, and I mean no one, busts a move like Aaron Behrens on stage. The man’s hips are out of control. The very first time I saw them perform was at a tiny little club in San Francisco. Before the show, here comes this Greenpeace-looking dude striding onto the stage in jeans, with John Lennon glasses and two long braids. I didn’t know what to think, until he brought the microphone to his lips, jutted out his jaw, and cocked his pelvis to the right. After that — it was all over.

Everything in life seems to be a little bit gentler if Morgan Freeman narrates it. Yesterday, I was at a Car Stereo (Wars) show at Beauty Bar, dancing like a maniac, when some girl in stiletto heels stepped on my damn foot. But instead of crying out in extreme pain, I jus t ima g in e d M o r ga n Fr e ema n chuckling, saying something like: “Well, Tolly girl, there comes a point in life when another woman’s gonna go and step on yo’ foot. Chin up. Walk it off, girl.” And you know, that’s exactly what I did.

Lately, I’m beginning to wonder (hope?) if Austin is about to become a little hotbed of social media. I mean, we’ve got a passionate blogging community, D o 51 2 , c o n f e r e n c e s l i k e S X S W Interactive and the (more recent) Interactive Austin, not to mention a fiercely loyal band of local Yelpers. It’s funny to think how just a few years ago, I thought websites like Friendster and MySpace were so fringe and bizarre – like, communities for “fake” friends – and now, I’m downright evangelical about social media.

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an eye for detail KAREN KOPICKI HAS A SOPHISTICATED STYLE THAT’S ANYTHING BUT STUFFY. THE INTERIOR DESIGNER AND SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER AT DICK CLARK ARCHITECTURE HAS BEEN PUTTING HER SIGNATURE ON SOME WELL-KNOWN PROJECTS AROUND AUSTIN. AND IT HASN’T BEEN BY FOLLOWING THE RULES.

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Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512-472-4980 dcarch.com

Whether it’s the interior space of downtown’s Spring Condominiums or the Austin residence of John Paul DeJoria, Karen Kopicki’s style can be seen all around town. The interior designer, who has been working with Dick Clark Architecture for the past four years, describes her style as classic but contemporary.

Her classic but contemporary aesthetic also incorporates local materials and green products whenever possible. “I use local woods and materials,” states Kopicki. “If I use Texas limestone in a space, it can help create the palette for the project. I also like to use other natural products, like quartz countertops.”

“I like simple, clean lines and layers of texture,” says Kopicki. “For me, it’s about streamlined furniture and a monochromatic palette with a splash of color.” But this successful designer also has a rebellious side. Well, when it comes to style at least.

In addition to being inspired by natural materials, this talented designer also looks to fashion trends, art and graphic design as inspiration for her work. “I love using one bold, large-scale piece of artwork in a space,” says Kopicki. Working with a variety of budgets, however, doesn’t always allow for an original piece of art. Karen offers a simple solution. “Not everyone can afford to invest in great pieces of art right now. But there’s so much you can do. You can blow up an image and make it a mural,” suggests Kopicki. “The easiest way to transform a space on a budget can also be through the use of paint and fabrics.”

“I like to add one humorous, quirky piece in ever space that I design,” shares Kopicki. “It could be a lamp that you wouldn’t expect, but that adds just the right amount of fun to a room. I’ve always liked to break the rules when it comes to design.” Kopicki is also passionate about lighting a space properly. She believes that lighting should go beyond the utilitarian, which so many people seem to overlook when putting together their space. “Lighting sets the tone,” Kopicki says. “I like to layer lighting in a room. If there’s overhead lighting, I put it on a dimmer. I like adding task lighting and lighting that can move as you need it. It just completely transforms a space and adds dimension to a room.”

The most important aspect of Karen Kopicki’s designs? “I have to believe in it,” she says. “Everything I do… I can break the rules of traditional style as long as I believe in it.” With Kopicki’s success, it seems that everyone believes in her style, skills and ideas. And as Austin continues to grow and evolve, we expect to see Kopicki’s touch in more and more spaces. Kathy Farley Photos by Annie Ray & Paul Bardagjy 19


Lindsay Burns Owner, O wner, Threshold Furniture & Design Studio

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Photo P hoto byy JJennifer enn en niife fer Ni N Nichols cho ch ols ols


Lindsay Burns lives, works and plays in Austin’s urban core, so it seems only natural that her business, Threshold, reflect a style that’s imaginative, livable, workable and inspiring to us all. What does “living in Austin” mean to you? Walking to Zilker Park or Lady Bird Lake with a “soundtrack” of live music on my ipod.

Describe “a typical Austinite” to someone that has never been to Austin. Half hippie and half redneck, but always creative, unique and outgoing.

What’s special about Austin? Austin is such a creative and artistic city. I love the size of the city — it’s the perfect mix of small town friendliness and big city enthusiasm.

What areas of town do you frequent most and why? Downtown, Second Street, South Congress. I love the mix of shopping, art and food. There’s so many wonderful and locally-owned businesses.

Describe how your business revolves around “living” in Austin. I like to help people visually express themselves through their home. Austinites are so interesting to work with. Everyone is so unique.

What makes your business unique? I went out on a limb to bring unique, forward-thinking design to Austin. I want to create a great mix of truly unique lines sourced both internationally and right here in Austin. We have so many amazing local artists and craftsmen.

What changes should Austinites start making to improve their overall quality of life? What I learned from my husband is the excitement and ease of living, working and playing in the urban core. It is refreshing and keeps me off the road. (I’m a terrible driver.)

Favorite places to eat/shop? I love a summer afternoon, sipping margaritas at Hula Hut. The new and improved Paggi House is fabulous. I love to shop at Estilo and By George.

Due to the current economy, what changes are you seeing in your industry?

What’s the best-kept secret about Austin? DK’s Karaoke Night on South 1st!

Retail spending is at a low. However, many people are finding the value in investing in home furnishings and design. High quality furniture can be a lifetime investment and right now, it’s a lot safer than the stock market.

What do you love most/least about owning your business?

What improvements do you hope to see in the next 10 years?

Most: I love the creative freedom and being able to have an intense passion for what I do. Least: There is so much responsibility and that can be scary. Investing so much time and energy. Ultimately, it is very rewarding though.

I would like to see improvements in local transportation. I’d love to see Austin embrace, appreciate and foster our local artists like we have our musicians. We have a lot of talented people that need more exposure and recognition in order to grow.

Lindsay Burns, Threshold Furniture & Design Studio, 801 W. 5th St., 512-476-0014, thresholdinteriors.com

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25 years after opening the doors of Mexic-Arte Museum, Executive Director Sylvia Orozco reflects on the role of Latino art in Austin. From the museum’s celebration of Dia de los Muertos to exhibits featuring local Latino artists as well as classic and contemporary works from Mexico, Mexic-Arte and Orozco haven’t just enriched the Austin community — They’ve helped shape it. I arrive at Mexic-Arte a bit early, giving myself a chance to tour the space and its current exhibits. The museum is simple, understated. There are no gilded frames or grand architectural details. The work speaks for itself. This is where I first meet Sylvia Orozco. She is soft-spoken, reserved and inherently elegant. She is also clearly passionate about art. “25 years ago, there wasn’t a place like Mexic-Arte,” explains Orozco. “We started it really just to have a place for us to exhibit.” But over the course of a quarter century, Mexic-Arte has grown into so much more. The museum’s mission is to enrich the community through outreach education programs and exhibitions about traditional and contemporar y Mexican, Latino and Latin American art and culture. They’re success can be measured partly by what Orozco says is the “integration of Latino culture into the mainstream of Austin.” “You see thousands of people celebrating Dia de los Muertos all over Austin,” says Orozco. “It’s reflective of our population now.” Having a relationship with The University of Texas has also helped the museum flourish. Mexic -Ar te has been able to bor row from the univer sit y’s collections and also utilize their research tools. In fact, MexicAr te’s upcoming Aztec and Maya Revival exhibit will feature artifacts on loan from the university.

“As a museum, we have matured. We have become a more respected institution,” says Orozco. “We now not only have the ability to showcase local artists, but to bring in historical works or contemporary, higherprofile Latino artists from the university and from Mexico.” Through an agreement with Mexico’s National Council on Arts and Culture, Mexic-Arte Museum has expanded the breadth of work shown and created more established exhibitions. “After signing the agreement in 2003, we were able to bring in works from pre-Columbian, as well as contemporary artists to Austin,” recalls Orozco. “The same year, we were designated as the Official Mexican and Mexican American Fine Art Museum of Texas.” After celebrating Mexic-Arte’s 25 years of success at Gala de Plata, Sylvia Orozco has already set her sights on the future. The artist and museum’s executive director is looking forward to her 2010 exhibitions. “This is our 14th year doing a Young Latino Artists exhibit,” shares Orozco. “We have an exciting retrospective planned for the show’s 15th Anniversary in 2010.” Mexic-Arte’s 25th Anniversary Permanent Exhibition, A Legacy of Change, will be featured at the museum through August 2nd. Its works are organized around five themes: Death/Rebirth, Mestizaje/Connections, Conflict/Struggle, Identity/Consciousness and History/Memory. Free Family Sundays and Guided Tours are available. You’ll find the exhibit, like the museum, is a masterpiece. Mexic-Arte Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512-480-9373 mexic-artemuseum.org 27


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Linda Dumont / Central Austin â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sanchez Building Abstract / 23" x 30," Oil on Canvas

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%ULQJLQ·5HFHVV%DFN Remember back to your childhood, when recess was your favorite school subject? You ran free, played hard and didn’t worry about paying bills or making meetings on time? Since 2005, Austin Sports and Social Club has been turning adult Austinites into little kids again with its coed games — dodgeball, wiffleball, kickball and more. 34


Founder Marc Tucci helped run a similar coed spor ts team in Baltimore, but he saw the tremendous potential a sports club could have on a new city, so he set his sights on Austin. “Austin was the perfect match,” he says. “It has the perfect climate and a fitnessoriented, young demographic.” While Tucci is athletic himself and enjoys sports, he decided that he wanted the club to be more carefree and fun than a traditional sports league. That’s where the recess sports came into play. While the club does offer so-called real sports, such as flag football, volleyball, bowling (hey, it’s a sport), soccer and softball, Tucci says that he spices things up a bit by adding two things every middle school boy fantasized about: booze and babes. “It’s a socially- based environment without the typical hardcore, aggressive competitiveness,” he says. “Everything we do is coed, which makes it more relaxed. And then we have happy hours after every game. It makes it more inviting and welcoming.”

Since the success of Austin Sports and Social Club, Tucci has expanded his coed recreational league to San Antonio and Dallas, but he says Austin is still the perfect place to take advantage of such a club because you can play sports from as far north as Pflugerville all the way to Dripping Springs. Be on the lookout later this year for the addition of tennis and ultimate Frisbee to the club’s repertoire. You can also participate in Austin Sports and Social Club’s boot camp for a fun workout outdoors. “N o ma t ter w ha t you’re into – sp or t s, r unnin g, get tin g into shape – we’re your one stop shop,” Tucci says. “And, you’ll have fun and meet new people.” Darcie Duttweiler Photo by Shannon Cunningham

And much like when you were a kid, you merely sign up and pay the fees for the sport of your choice. That’s right, no monthly fees for things you’re not going to use. And you can even pay to just participate in the social events, which include party barge trips during the summer. Austin Sports and Social club is ideal for meeting new people — you don’t have to sign up with a team to join. “It’s perfect if you’re new to town,” Tucci says.

“You haven’t played these games in so many years, so no one has any real competitive edge,” Tucci says. It puts everyone on the same level. Plus, it brings out the inner child. It’s fresh and fun.”

— Marc Tucci Founder, Austin Sports & Social Club austinssc.com

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WEEKLY WEEKLY REGISTER WEEKLY WEEKLY

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,NQRZ,ZDVQҋWWKHRQO\SHUVRQWRWULOOZLWKH[FLWHPHQWWKHÀUVWWLPH,VDZDFRPSOHWHGVWDWLRQIRUWKH &DS0HWUR0HWUR5DLO´:KDWҋVWKLV"µ,WKRXJKW´$XVWLQKDVDFRPPXWHUWUDLQ³),1$//<"µ It was a little ironic, especially since I’ve used the Cap Metro busses a total of once in the past year. “I just don’t see you being the public transportation...type,” my husband gently explained, as I whined about how long the bus took to get to work. A whole 30 minutes to commute, when my car can get me there in 15? As if. “You aren’t the only one who needs a little adjusting to public transportation,” laughs Cap Metro communications specialist Misty Whited, after I relate my experience. “After all, Austin has been a car-packed city for a really long time. But, now that there’s a lot of business and residential concentration in the city’s downtown core and people are more interested in green living, we are seeing a lot of enthusiasm for all of the services we offer.” First things first: while the MetroRail is still undergoing vigorous safety testing at press time, it will begin running in 2009. Services include 10 trips in the morning between the hours of 5:30am and 9:30am, with departures every 30 minutes, and 10 trips in the afternoon between the hours of 3:45pm and 7:45pm (departures also every 30 minutes).

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“At the Convention Center and MLK stops, we’re going to have rail connector routes, which can take you to UT, the State Capitol Complex and the downtown business district in a matter of minutes,” Whited says. “All other stops will have busses waiting to pick you up, in case your MetroRail stop isn’t within walking distance of your destination.” To make ticketing quick and easy, MetroRail offers 31-day passes that are good on both the train and the bus, so you don’t have to buy new tickets mid-route. With all of this commuter convenience, I ask Whited if MetroRail plans to expand its services as time goes on. “The first thing we want to do is start offering more trips on weekdays in the middle of the day, like around lunchtime for example,” she says. “Right now, we aren’t offering nighttime or weekend service, which is really a matter of trains and track — we need more of both! A lot of people don’t realize that these rails are used for freight, also. But if we had more track and trains to run on them, we could expand our commuter trip options.”


So until this glorious day of MetroRail comes, how can hesitant individuals like myself star t embra cing bus b bu us u s - he e sit sii ant a n in indiv div ivv idu i du al id als li pub public ublic tr ttransportation? an por ans o tat or t ion on? on ? “Well, “We ll,, we do ha a ve mo mor e than t han 3000 30 00 0 bus stops stt ops o p s in Au A sti tin,” n ,” n, have more Austin,” say ayy s W hited hit ed. says Whited.

Internet inside a moving vehicle? Three thousand stops? Oh Cap Metro busses — how I’ve underestimated you! “Ou Ourr buss Ou b usses uss e mov es mo ove eo ver 14 1 0 000 0,0 000 00 com commut muters mut ers a day day, a and with t the “Our busses move over 140,000 commuters MetroR Met roRail roR ail sy s ys sttem ste t m, m, we hop hope e iitt will will ill be be ma m ny mor ny re e,”” sa says ys s Whited W Whi hited e . MetroRail system, many more,” Whited. Con nsid sider er th thi s ccar-addicted ar-add aradd d ict icted ed d indivi ind div dua duall sign s ign neded-up. u up. Consider this individual signed-up.

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Tolly Tol ly y Mos M os osele ele ley Moseley P Pho tos os byy Mark M Ma ark k Her Herron He ron n Photos cap capmet p met metro. ro.org ro. ro org capmetro.org

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Linda Dumont / Waterloo Ice House / 30” x 33,” Pastel

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Keeping Austin Cool It’s a universally acknowledged fact that Austin is cool. With its natural resources, high quality of living and downright cool population, there’s no denying how amazing the city is. But what about its houses? Well, those are pretty cool too, and we don’t just mean hip, but literally cool. For the 13th year, the Texas Solar Energy Society is showcasing the city’s most energy efficient homes with its 2009 Austin Cool House Tour. On June 28, more than 3,500 Austinites will travel to about 15 homes to check out what fellow residents are doing in terms of energy ef f iciency, green building and recycled materials. On the tour, you will get the chance to speak with the owners, designers and builders of the houses, and ask questions about how they made these homes so cool. “Think of it as like getting a consult with the city’s top green builders for just the cost of a ticket,” says Natalie Marquis, executive director of Texas Solar Energy Society. “The tour gives those who are thinking of building, remodeling or even renting homes the most educational opportunities. It really expands social boundaries.” Partnered with Austin Energy, the Austin Cool H o u s e To u r p a i n s t a k i n g l y s e l e c t s i t s par ticipants to show of f multiple green techniques, from solar design features that combat global warming to homes that are adept to bringing the outdoors in. “The tour

is all about education, but the house has also got to be beautiful and livable,” Marquis says. “It has to make the family’s lives better. It’s not the Jetsons with all these gadgets. People are living here!” One Rollingwood home on the tour this year follows the livable and beautiful yet energy efficient model — it’s recycled from a previous home and designed to optimize its natural surroundings and light, but also to minimize its carbon footprint. The house has unique overhangs to cast out harsh Texas sun and all bedrooms are upstairs, which makes it easier to heat and cool with two separate energy units. In addition to showcasing homes that are decreasing their carbon footprints, the tour itself strives to cut back on waste. Last year it eliminated water bottles, and it encourages participants to utilize public transit. Marquis has also been working with the City of Austin to allow pedicabs to chauffer people from

house to house. “We want to be conservation minded and make people feel good about the tour,” she says. Marquis also hopes that the Austin Cool House Tour will inspire other cities to follow suit in displaying homes that are tr ying to make a difference, but she says that Austin is the perfect city for such an event. “Austinites want to be a part of a common solution, and we’re so far ahead of most cities in terms of renewable energ y and green building,” she says. “We want to protect our quality of life and want to protect it for our children. We all want to live in comfortable yet energy efficient homes.” Darcie Duttweiler Photo by Derris Lanier txses.org

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Michael Gaylord Wilson Studio S tudio Furniture Maker, Michael Wilson Designs

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Photo Ph hoto otto by JJennifer en nnife ferr Ni N Nichols ch hol olss


A craftsman with an eye for contemporary furniture, Michael Wilson has the ability to create something from nothing, and turn it into a beautiful and functional object. What does living in Austin mean to you? To me, living in Austin (or Wimberley, which is where I live) means, peace and living the life I’ve always dreamed of.

Describe “a typical Austinite” to someone that has never been to Austin. Someone who is immersed in the love of life, nature, music, friends and family.

What do you love most/least about owning your business? I love the flexibility and freedom it gives me. I love being able to create something from nothing, and turn it into a beautiful and functional object. I love being an artist. Business is never easy. I can make the most amazing piece of furniture or sculpture, but I still have to sell it. And then there is the paperwork…I think that is my least fave.

What makes your business unique? What’s special about Austin? Austin is a very authentic city. The people are down to earth, they seem to be very much themselves without trying to prove anything. This city is very into preserving true values in life and there is a pride to being an Austenite — I really like that.

What areas of town do you frequent the most and why. We are fairly new to Austin, but so far, we’ve enjoyed South Congress — the restaurants and shops seem to be ver y cool without being pretentious. I liked Nutty Brown Café and thoroughly enjoyed the Broken Spoke. Even my 3-year-old son had a blast listening and dancing to the live country music!

Describe how your profession revolves around “living” in Austin. Well my home and work studio is on four acres of one of the most beautiful spots I’ve ever come across. I am a craftsman who makes contemporary furniture, so the total peace and quiet and nature that I have surrounding me have elevated my work to the next level. Austin is such a diverse city, so my pieces work really well here, from the Austin lofts downtown to the new contemporary W Hotel to the 100year-old Texas ranch home. I am excited to see where my pieces will end up.

My pieces are one of a kind, handmade and when I make custom furniture for people who appreciate it, they call my pieces “art” and pass them down to their children. I build a strong relationship with my clients and my pieces ultimately are a blend of who I am and who they are. The process of my work is very intense both emotionally and physically, but I also get a huge amount of satisfaction and joy from what I do.

How has the furniture industry evolved over the past 10 years? At this point, the market has been saturated with mass production pieces. I think people are looking for special pieces, something that not everyone has, allowing them to own and decorate their home in a more personal way.

Due to the current economy, what changes are you seeing in your industry? People are holding on to their dollars. People are really thinking long and hard about their purchases. I think quality over quantity is really what is important now. There are still clients who want beautiful furniture and when they see it, they know it, and they just have to have it.

Michael Gaylord Wilson, Michael Wilson Designs, 213-200-5207, michaelwilsondesigns.com

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Linda Dumont / East Austin / 4’ x 4,’ Oil on Canvas

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http:/ htt p://au /austi stinst nstyle ylewat watch. ch.com com/bl /blog/ og/

Rachel Youens: Austin Style Watch austinstylewatch.com/blog

As the street fashion photography phenomenon began to be popularized around the world, Rachel Youens started Austin Style Watch to showcase the city’s alternative looks, and to prove to the world that Texas was more than denim and cowboy boots. Within a month of starting the site, she was contacted by Nylon Magazine for an interview, and she suddenly realized the hunger Austinites had for style that was not being represented in the city’s mainstream publications. Today, the site has expanded to include blog coverage of city culture and continues to challenge Rachel’s abilities as a multimedia journalist as she strives to include video and photo coverage of underrepresented Austin vogue. Photo by Annie Ray 50


Tulle and Chiffon

Going The Distance For Good Hair

Austin Through the Ages My mother lived in Austin as a young woman and I relish the similar experiences we share in different eras. I love wearing a black floor-length party dress she bought at the Bazaar on Riverside just after finding out she was pregnant with me. Every time I pass the Wooldridge Square Park gazebo where she got married, I smile.

My dream wedding would be 1950s and early 1960s themed, and walking into Amelia’s Retro -Vogue on South 1st Street was like walking through my fantasy. Inside the cottage, she has racks of fluffy, aging gowns and delicate, veiled fascinators. She tore through numerous hat boxes to pull out just the pieces I was describing and gave me an educated lesson in hat history.

Having red hair is hard work, it’s the most difficult color to maintain. Not every store carries a good selection of reds, and consequently, I know all the best spots around town for a good variet y. T he trick ? Hea d nor th to Pflugerville where the Paul Mitchell Academy is, and you can’t throw a rock without hitting a salon supply shop.

Eternally Christmas

Model Citizen

I’m scraping quarters from the floor of my car for the jukebox at La La’s in the Burnet Road area. I feel guilty I’ve adopted this bar as my own since it was introduced to me on a date with a member of a bigname Austin band as a place he went to be alone. The bar is perpetually decorated for Christmas, and the legend goes that the owner’s son died just before December 25th.

Just got a message from photographer Todd Wolfson, reminiscing about our old p hoto sho ot s. I’m g la d to b e alongside the runway and not on it nowadays, but I do miss working with some awesome designers and photographers. I still shoot abstract art photos with 2007 Texas Biennial winner Bill Hundley.

My boyfriend is trying to quit smoking. Who knew that Big Top Candy Shop stocked so many antismoking aides? I walked out of the store with four packs of candy smokes from their cigarette machine, three bubblegum cigars and a licorice pipe.

Art Machine

My Blog’s #1 Fan

Renaissance Man

I never walk around with $5 in change in my pocket, but I desperately want to buy a piece of art out of the vending machine at Mercury in the 2nd Street District. It’s an old cigarette machine with handmade curios behind the glass, and it absolutely suits the store’s mashup of high and low-end wonder.

I probably talk about my mom more than an adult woman should, but she’s my best friend and a loyal reader of my blog. It’s where she learned about Naughty Secretary Club and then made small talk with owner Jennifer Perkins at Maker Faire. As a redhead herself, Jen helped my mom pick out some amazing green earrings for my Christmas gift that look great with my hair.

J u s t s a w A d r e o n H e n r y ’s n e w incarnation as rapper Custodian, pushing a broom around stage and spitting rhymes about snot-nosed kids. It’s hard to believe he was the same man behind the band Single Frame, the window displays at Barneys Co-op and some of my favorite art. On my walls I have a commissioned portrait he made of my cat.

Trading Nicorette Gum for Candy Cigs

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As one of the most popular mountain biking areas in Austin, this park is host to hundreds of riders on a good weekend, says Judi Ronkartz, president of Austin Ridge Riders (AAR) Mountain Bike Club. It’s also where the Ridge Riders spend about 300 hours a year on trail and park maintenance.

“It’s really all about the trails. It wouldn’t be a sport without the trails,” she says. “Park departments don’t have a lot of room in their budgets for trail maintenance. We are one of the organizations that fill that gap. It’s one of the original reasons we formed.”

improvements spotted along these trails. One of their recent projects included placing signage along one of the Walnut Creek Park trails known as, “The Maze.” The signs are numbered to tell emergency responders exactly where a rider is if help is needed.

With about 150 miles of trails within a 30-mile radius, that’s a pretty big gap to fill. The Ridge Riders spend anywhere from 1800 to 2500 volunteer hours a year keeping Austin’s trails and parks in shape, and are constantly working on new trail projects throughout the city. Currently, their plans include adding 20 to 30 more miles of trails within the next two to three years.

A AR also provides resources for anyone interested in mountain biking, whether you’re a new rider looking to learn about the sport, want to get to know the Austin trails a bit better, or you’re just looking to meet new people. They offer weekly group rides for all levels, monthly club rides that include a camp out, youth mountain biking programs and activities, an annual mountain bike race and the “Ride Like a Girl” program that teaches women the basics of mountain biking — all for free.

Not only are the Ridge Riders responsible for building many of Austin’s existing trails, bu t they are also c r e d i te d w i t h many of the

It ’ s Th one e Pa sun of t h wa r k i s i s f i e f i r pla lkin a buz nally st w g a sc o y i n g t h e z w i o u t r m d , t i on res o a nd r do h ac a nd a ys zip mou f me , mo gs, c tivit Wal of th y h s n the ping ntai n an t no ildr . Pe ut C e ye n o e ple ree ar. n t re t h r bik d w tice k a om ou es g h es . en bly,

“[Mountain biking] is about overcoming obstacles, challenging yourself. It’s about the exhilaration of being outside in nature and overcoming fear with confidence. It just makes you happy! I don’t think I’ve ever met a cranky mountain biker,” Ronkartz says. Sarah Morgan Photos by Mark Herron

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Richard J. deVarga, AIA, ULI Architect-Developer, A rchitect-Developer, Mallet deVarga Architecture

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Photo Ph P Pho hot oto by by JJen Jennifer enni niifer fer Ni fe Nichol Nichols olls


Richard deVarga’s communities are low impact, green, affordable and sustainable — the perfect environment to hang your blank canvas. His projects are specifically geared toward the creative class, a group he knows well. What does “living in Austin” mean to you?

What makes your business model unique?

Living among lots of creative talent. I came to Austin from the Beaumont-Port Arthur area to go to the University of Texas Graduate School of Architecture in 1987. From day one, Austin has encouraged me to think outside the box. Austin has brought me my best friends and a continual dialogue of “what is next.” From architects to designers to chefs, for the past 22 years, we have been discussing and supporting each other’s ideas. The dialogue is current and evolving.

At my latest project, the Cobra Studios, we are developing an affordable, sustainable creative community. The design and material choices are more suited to an industrial complex. The buildings are strong and minimal. The impact is low and green. It is not for everyone, but for those that “get it,” the spaces are a big WOW! I try to keep my projects simple, unique and completely geared to the creative class. This is the market I understand. It is 100% personal.

Describe a typical Austinite.

How is your profession making living affordable and eco-friendly?

The reasons for being here are as varied as the individual. Most Austinites have atypical personalities with clear mission statements. They’re goal setters, people with big ideas. This city provides a nurturing environment to try a new concept. In Austin, there is the constant excitement and possibility that great ideas, even the radical, can be accepted and fruitful.

What’s Austin’s best-kept secret? That most of the slackers of the early 1990s had Master’s Degrees and are now entrepreneurs in the music, film, design and technology communities. We had the will and energy back then, but no one would listen. Many of the successful ideas today were hatched during the slacker days of the late 1980s and early 1990s recession.

How does your profession revolve around “living?” Lately, architecture has become more mainstream. People are more interested in their surroundings, their spaces and the impact their constr uc tions have on other s. Discussions a bout st yle and sustainability are common. Local architects are continually producing new works in new ways and forms. We are all participating in making Austin a great city.

The architecture community and our clients are re-thinking the live and work concept in inner city neighborhoods. At the Cobra, we are investigating and employing functions, forms and materials not normally associated with the traditional house. The design enables the construction to work more like a “machine for living.” The roofs collect water for later, the landscape is edible, the house is built of concrete and steel, there is space for employees and most importantly, the house is open like a pavilion.

Improvements you hope to see in the next 10 years? A continued effort towards developing and repopulating our interior city cores with high-density, mixed-use projects. Our countryside is precious and should be protected. And finally, high speed light rail. It would be fun if we could zip to San Antonio, Houston or Dallas on a train for the afternoon, then go to a museum, have lunch, stop by the zoo, and still get home in time to put the kids in bed.

Richard J. deVarga, AIA, ULI, Mallet deVarga Architecture, 1616 Westover Rd., 512-300-4011, cobrastudiosaustin.com

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Linda Dumont / SoCo II / 30" x 33," Pastel

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LOUNGE

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Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Jake Holt


Custom and rental furniture company Lounge 22 has only been in the Austin market for a single year, but in that short time and with the help of Austin Account Executive Maryleight Dejernett, it has furnished the Bass Concert Hall, The Blanton Museum gala and numerous SXSW parties.

AROUND Renting furniture for events used to mean you had your choice between three different white padded chairs; however, Lounge 22 is giving Texans a unique and modern spin on event furniture. “[Lounge 22 CEO and designer] Armen Gharabegian thinks of the people who are actually sitting on the furniture, where it is going to go, what its function is, and then, mixes that into his beautiful, contemporary design,” Dejernett says. At Lounge 22, you have the option of picking from its extensive inventory, or, as many clients do (including the Oscar’s with the company’s L.A. branch), you can get your furniture completely custom-made. “We make everything, from lighted bars to couches and chairs, and even outdoor furniture in all different fabrics,” Dejernett says. “It’s all hand-made in the U.S.” And while Lounge 22 didn’t set out to furnish weddings, the company has had a large influx of brides wanting that special look for their special day. “They know with Lounge 22 that they are going to get something clean, beautiful and perfect, and if they don’t, we’ll take it all back,” Dejernett says.

With the large success of Lounge 22 in the Texas market, Gharbegian decided to make Austin his trial run for Lounge 22’s first retail “gallery” on Second Street this spring. “He loves the idea of Second Street becoming this new Austin design district and wants to be near all the lof ts and designers,” Dejernett says. In lieu of a traditional retail store, the furniture company wants to “inspire a more immersive experience — one that will powerfully convey [their] design vision and articulate who they are,” according to Lounge 22 Marketing Director Michael Fargnoli. “A retail shop implies a strict one-way, commoditybased model,” he says. “It’s such a flat way of interacting with the consumer. There’s no connection, no appreciation for the exchange. We’re not just selling furniture. We are really making an honest attempt to have our collection spark a dialogue on design.” In keeping with the gallery format, Lounge 22 will rotate its feature collections, so returning customers will continually get inspired. You will be able to shop their full collection and create the custom piece of your dreams in a mere 30 days. As for the choice of Austin for Lounge 22’s first retail space, Fargnoli says, “the city and its residents embody a progressive, design-savvy ethos. Austin is known for i t s v i b r a n t c u l t u r e, m u s i c a n d arts scene, and we believe that our collection of designs provide a n opp or tunit y to f ur t her distinguish yourselves in your choice of furniture.” Lounge 22 233 W. 2nd St. 888-822-2011 lounge22.com

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Ultraverte 512-707-1960 ultraverte.com


For Lindsay Yeakley and Jeff McFadden of Ultraverte, the idea of “going green” is nothing new. It’s everyday life. Now, they’re taking their passion for all things natural and sustainable to the next level — right into mainstream Austin. Whether it’s building eco-friendly homes, updating existing spaces or providing eco-education, these partners are on a mission to show everyone that it’s actually easy being green. What’s your shade of green? That’s what Lindsay Yeakley and Jeff McFadden of Ultraverte want to know. Because when it comes to green living, they know there are many levels, or shades, of participation. “The biggest misconception is that going green is expensive,” says Lindsay Yeakley. “People think it’s all or nothing. But there’s so much in between a new eco-build and doing nothing.” Yeakley and McFadden have learned exactly what can be done by remodeling their own homes. With the start of DJL Proper ties & Design four years ago, their company and experience grew, but so did the scope of what they wanted to accomplish. And so DJL evolved into Ultraverte. “We realized it’s not just about green building,” recalls Jeff McFadden. “We want everyone to live a green life.” Ultraverte invites everyone to discover green living. For some, that may mean building a five-star energy efficient home. For others, it’s eco-remodeling to minimize wasted energy. But, it can also be as simple as turning off a faucet when brushing your teeth. Recycling. Using low-VOC paint. Or switching to compact fluorescent light bulbs. “We’re really involved in Home Depot’s Eco Options program,” says Yeakley. “We’ve spoken at events where we share eco habits. We’ve also partnered with Home Depot to create a DVD that shows how we restored the first historical home in Austin to be rated by Austin Energy Green Building.”

“It will have a five-star rating,” adds McFadden. And the transformation of the historical home at 500 E. Monroe Street is nothing short of extraordinary. Built in the 1920s, the home was in need of a major overhaul. But Yeakley and McFadden took on the challenge while staying within the strict parameters for a home deemed historic. “Everything we did had to maintain the original integrity of the home,” says McFadden. “There was no insulation, so we added foam insulation to seal the house up. We refurbished the original wood siding on the exterior. We refinished the original hardwood floors. We even made Energy Star replicas of the home’s original windows.” And although not everyone has the daunting task of bringing a 1920s home up to date, more people are looking to increase their home’s energy efficiency and improve their existing space. “For every project, whether it’s a new build, a remodel or a consultation, we look at energy efficiency, water conservation, eco landscaping, site selection, the ability to use renewable resources and air quality,” says Yeakley. It’s the complete eco picture. Which is the idea. Ultraverte offers the complete spectrum of green living. No matter your shade. Kathy Farley Photos by Ed Verosky

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Imagine your dream kitchen. Custom cabinets, a Sub-Zero refrigerator, professional grade gas range, maybe an island? But what about the countertops? Everyone has granite, these days. A dream kitchen deserves something a little more rare. Maybe what your ideal kitchen needs is Brazilian soapstone.

Dorado Soapstone | 2157 Woodward St. | 512-444-8600 | doradosoapstone.com

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“It’s pretty much the sweetest stone that exists,” says Bo Barkley, co-owner of Dorado Soapstone in Austin. “It’s timeless.”

“It’s a sanitary surface that is already bacteria free right out of the ground, without the use of chemicals,” she says.

Dorado Soapstone’s supplies come out of natural quarries in Brazil. Because granite quarries are more plentiful and can last for decades, granite is a much more plentiful resource than soapstone, says Barkley. That is one reason that soapstone is a more valued and rare commodity.

Synthetic substances aren’t required for sealing or polishing the stone. Wiping the stone with mineral oil is all that is needed to bring out soapstone’s luster and deepen the natural colors of the stone.

There’s yet another bonus to soapstone products — it is considered a green product, says Ashley Larrick, Dorado Soapstone’s other co-owner.

Also, it is one of the only stones that can get up to about 2000 degrees without fracturing or breaking. So, soapstone is also being used for one-of-a-kind ovens and cooking supplies. “We’ve done pizza ovens, and a company in Dallas made a large cooking conveyor belt with soapstone running all along the bottom,” Barkley says.

But, it’s not just the relative rarity that makes soapstone a superior product, Barkley says. Because it’s 25% to 30% more dense than granite or marble, soapstone naturally protects itself from staining and bacteria. “Lemon juice, orange juice, red wine or anything acidic can etch and stain other stones,” he says. But not soapstone.

“We also do some statue and ar t applications. You can carve soapstone pretty well and we can get large pieces for that,” Barkley says.

The stone is available in deep grays, blues, and emerald greens that complement any kitchen or bathroom color scheme. But soapstone is not just for countertops these days.

Though Dorado Soapstone has been in business here in Austin for only two years, soapstone is by no means the new kid on the block. Soapstone was actually one of the first and only stones used for countertops in turn-of-the-century homes. Now, as owners renovate these classic homes, they are turning once again to soapstone for a more authentic look and feel in their kitchens. Sarah Morgan Photos by Jake Holt

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A new concept in high-end styling & creative coloring, all in a modern atmosphere!

(512) 326-1153 6800 West Gate Blvd, Suite 134 Austin, TX 78745

Mention this ad & receive 20% off on your first visit.


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Linda Dumont / West Austin Switch Willow / 30"x 33," Oil on Canvas

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Lyssa Myska Allen: This Is Life In Austin n thisislifeinaustin.com

An Austin native and former magazine editor, freelance writer Lyssa Myska Allen writes for a number of local and regional magazines covering fashion, fitness and food. An avid athlete, she regularly runs with her dog Denali. She doesn’t need much inspiration for her blog about things to do in Austin — she just keeps a record of what she is or would like to be doing! Photo by Annie Ray 74


First Toobin’ Trip of the Summer!

Spotted: New Celeb Hangout

Sweet Caroline

The new Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf opens this month on South Lamar. It’s locally r un, d espite t he fa c t t ha t you’ve probably seen the signature purple straws in the pages of US Weekly, and I’m excited to try the place that started blended lattes, plus 40 varieties of coffee and tea and local goodies.

Hidden gem boutique alert! Next door to the original Kerbey Lane on, well, Kerbey Lane sits Caroline. Killing time during a Sunday morning brunch wait for a table, I discovered this fantastic new addition to the ‘hood, and promptly bought a dress, a tunic and a scarf. For cheap.

The gang’s primed to hit the Guadalupe for some camping, toobin’ and general debauchery. This year, we’re finally making a stop at White Water Rocks, the outdoor amphitheatre on the river, for Brandon Rhyder on June 18th.

Pease Volleyball

Awesome Austin Band: Achachay

Mmmm … Farmer’s Market

Alas, the cour ts at Zilker are still closed, so Pease Park’s three sand volleyball courts are the place to be. On the side of the road. Without hoses. And with a lot of people. BUT sand is sand, sun is sun, and we’ve gotta play some volleyball. Saturdays, 10am, Wednesdays, as soon as you can get out of work.

Even though I have to deal with a veggie oil short school bus in my driveway for his “touring,” I do actually enjoy my little brother’s band’s music. He’s the frontman of Achachay! and he has an incredible stage presence. Check out their regular gig at Latitude 30 (always $2 jager bombs and Luke the bartender!) or achachay.com.

Dairy is my fave milk ever and I love tricolored eggs from happy chickens. So I hit up the Farmer’s Market at the Triangle for the f irst time ever and wasn’t disappointed — where else can I get fresh food and pop into Embellish for a mani/pedi in the same visit?

I Found the 8-Grain Pasta!

Shhhh … Going to the Dogs

I (Heart) Guinness Milkshake

Awhile ago, I found an 8-grain pasta plus wheat grass made with whole wheat, bulgur, millet, r ye, kamut, quinoa and 2 other grains I can’t remember. I could never find it again until today! They changed their packaging, sneaky pastamakers. But I prevail! Thank Charles Butt for HEB.

There’s a secret dog park in Clarksville. It’s on 10th, and Clarksville residents guard the location closely because it’s such a good neighborhood spot. It gets crowded in the evenings, but then again, that’s sort of what you look for in a dog park. Denali loves the pups, but she’s scared of owners, so I say the more dogs the merrier!

My movie date is a huge Guinness fan. In a can, a bottle, off the tap, he loves it. I, on the other hand, generally only like car bombs and Guinness M ilks ha ke s. W ha t is a G u i n n e s s Milkshake? Heaven on Ea r t h, ser ved in a glass with chocola te covered vanilla beans while you’re W AT C H I N G A M OV I E a t A l a m o Drafthouse. Perfection.

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LIONS

TIGERS

AND AND WHISKERED

BEARS

OH MY! 76


It’s just a little south of town, in the hill country on 290 West. It started out in 1990 as Good Day Ranch, a place for goats to roam and feed. Nearly 20 years later, Austin Zoo and Animal Sanctuary is home to 300 animals from over 100 different species, from Galapagos tortoises to lions. Grade school classes, families and kids’ birthday parties visit Austin Zoo every day. Last year, the zoo welcomed over 200,000 visitors alone. And yet, many Austinites are surprised to know their city even has a zoo. “We’re still a little unknown to some,” says Sara King, head zookeeper at Austin Zoo. “But it’s so rewarding for visitors once they do visit. They get to be outside in beautiful surroundings, look at animals and even interact with some of the animals in our petting zoo. You see it on people’s faces how thrilling the whole experience is.”

Um. Tigers walking around in the city?

Open daily from 10:00am to 6:00pm, Austin Zoo tickets are a steal: just $5 admission for kids, and $8 for adults. And for volunteers, access is free.

Talk about a wild past. Animal escapee stories like these illustrate one of the biggest missions of Austin Zoo, which is to protect their four-legged (and winged, and scaled) creatures, providing a sanctuary for endangered species and non. One of the animals on the “least concerned” endangered list is the Binturong, a goofy-looking, whiskered mammal that looks like a cross between a cat and a bear cub. It makes a chuckling sound when happy. I tell Sara that I think we should all work hard to make sure this animal makes the leap from “least concerned” to “domestic,” so I can have one as a pet.

“Our volunteers get to see a lot of, eh, up-close-andpersonal stuff at the zoo,” says King, who started out five years ago as a volunteer herself. “The first month, they’re usually washing dishes and cleaning animal spaces, which helps us figure out quickly who’s serious and who’s not! But after a month, we let volunteers start working directly with the animals, like feeding small reptiles for example.” Speaking of working directly with animals, just how did Austin Zoo, a 501(c)(3) registered non-profit organization, acquire mammalian guests like lions and Bengal tigers — especially since it started out as a goat ranch? “Town Lake Animal Shelter actually called us about the tigers in the late 1990s, to see if we would like to take care of them,” explains King. “Apparently, some Austin locals had acquired tigers, under what were likely shady circumstances, and abandoned them here in the city.”

“That’s not all,” King laughs. “One of our lions, Molly, used to live with a drug lord in Dallas. When the police raided his house in a big drug bust, the lion escaped, and was walking around the streets of Dallas for a while.”

“One of our main messages is that exotic animals should not be kept as pets!” King reminds me. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t learn from them, and enjoy their company. At the zoo, we have monkeys, gorgeous birds, cougars, jaguars, a petting zoo with goats, sheep, deer and a llama, and much, much more. They’re all waiting to greet their future friends in the Austin community.” Tolly Moseley Photos by Ed Verosky Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512-288-1490 austinzoo.org 77


-JGF0OUPQPGUIF8PSME From the moment you arrive, your eyes are overwhelmed with the picturesque Texas Hill Country view, while the Tuscan inspired architecture enraptures your soul and beckons you to the stylish home interiors. Then you discover the extraordinary resident privileges such as an exclusive Sky Lounge, Yoga Studio, Tranquil Pools with Wi-Fi Hot Spots, Wii Game Lounge, Culinary Presentation Kitchen with ongoing cooking classes, 24-Hr Fitness Studioâ&#x20AC;Ś and you realize this is an exceptional life destination. Alexan Vistasâ&#x20AC;Ś An Address With Altitude. Toll-free: 866.372.9738 | 512.794.8439 Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x160;,,Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;/8Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;nĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ä www.AlexanVistas.com AlexanVistas@NewHome1.com VISTAS

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Lambert Labay, RPh. Owner, O wner, Pharmacist, Nauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EnďŹ eld Drug

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Nau’s Enf ield Drug has been Ausitn’s Neighborhood Drugstore since 1951. Owner Lambert Labay explains why his drugstore and soda fountain keep customers coming back year after year. What does “living in Austin” mean to you? The ability to live and work in a city that has wonderful weather, great people and a unique quality of life.

Describe a “typical Austinite.” The people that you will meet here are very friendly and casual. In Austin, you will be hard pressed to find someone that is actually born and raised here — we have individuals living here from all over the US and the world.

Describe how your business revolves around “life” in Austin. Nau’s and all of its employees are always willing to go above and beyond. Whether its helping a new customer find a physician in town, assisting in getting hard to find medications, delivering sundries and medicines to out of town guests in hotels or helping a customer who has gone on vacation and forgotten their medication, Nau’s will always deliver. We have on many occasions helped customers outside normal business hours.

What makes your pharmacy unique? We have an authentic soda fountain inside! Where else can you get your prescription filled, grab a burger and a shake, read a magazine while you wait, pick-up a piece of candy, and have the opportunity to “charge it” to your house account on your way out?!

How long have you been in business and what keeps your customers coming back? Nau’s was established in 1938. Our current location was built in 1951 to house our drugstore and soda fountain. Today, Nau’s is one of the few authentic 1950’s drugstores and soda fountains that exist and

can provide excellent customer service, pharmacists that know their patients by name and homemade food that customers love.

What changes should Austinites start making to improve their overall quality of life? We all need to be careful letting neighborhood groups dictate what we can do to our homes, businesses and land. Many so called “neighborhood planning organizations” are made up of renters and few actual homeowners or land owners. Some groups have become political sounding boards for an individual’s political career and they’ve forgotten about the financially negative impact that their restrictions place upon the actual homeowner. No homeowner in Austin should ignore the restrictions and unnecessary so called “historical overlays” that financially impact and devalue their property. Austinites need to get more involved in our community and neighborhood groups to preserve their ever shrinking rights.

Due to the current economy, what changes are you seeing in your industry? Insurance companies are dictating more and more how a doctor cares for their patients and cutting back sharply on their prescription re-imbursements to independent pharmacies.

Improvements you hope to see in the next 10 years? Hopefully, we will see the insurance companies and large drugstore chains split-up. Today many are owned by the same conglomerate and dictate were a patient can fill a prescription, and many times direct them to mail order. If this process is not curtailed, we will all see less independence in our health care decision making and more directions by the insurance companies on what the most cost effective way is to treat a patient.

Lambert Labay, RPh., Nau’s Enfield Drug, 1115 West Lynn St. , 512-476-1221, naus-enfield-drug.com

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Linda Dumont / The Domain / 30"x 33," Pastel 83


http:/ htt p://au /austi stinis nisbur burnin ning.c g.com om

Tiffany Diane: Austin Is Burning austinisburning.com

Tiffany Diane began her blog, Austin is Burning, in 2007 not knowing what she was getting herself into. A journalism student and frequent partier, Tiffany ventured into Austin nightlife thinking itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be a good idea to chronicle the variety of events going on during the cluttered Austin weekends, so Austin is Burning was born. Now, the site harbors information about the latest parties, fashion events, artist reviews and the ramblings of a girl living in the city. Photo by Annie Ray

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What Happened to Tuesday Night?

Hamburger Hunt

Records Galore

On my quest to find the per fect cheeseburger in Austin, I have come a cross a few contender s: Casino el Camino, Dan’s and Dirty Martin’s. The next few stops on my search are Top Notch, Bakehouse and Hut’s, which outrank the previous on multiple Internet searches I’ve conducted.

I usually buy my records at Half Price Books out of thriftiness, but once I have a disposable income, I know where I’m heading — End of an Ear off South 1st St. I am probably too easily swayed; any store that carries every Blonde Redhead album is heaven to me.

DJ Richard.Gear

Missed Connections

SSSH

There are so many DJs in Austin. I’m not quite learned when it comes to what’s good or bad, but I’ll tell you one thing: Richard Gear is the bomb. From his color-changing mohawk to the disco and funk he spins. You can always tell he’s having fun, which I respect.

Pretty much everybody I know checks A u s t in’s M is s e d C o n n e c t i o ns o n Craigslist. It’s a guilty pleasure of mine as well. I’ve never quite understood why the men who post always seem to be middle aged while the women are in their 20s.

I haven’t attended enough Second Sunday Sock Hops, but you only need to go to one to know that it is probably one of the most adorable events. Almost everybody dresses in their retro finest and dances to oldies. It’s exactly how I imagine 1950s juke joints.

Party Photos, Where They At?

New Era of Bloggers

Party Planners

It seems like there is a niche that Austin needs filled. Every other major city has their token nightlife photographers; Austin’s has always been Outwithme. Once Mitchell fizzles out of Austin, we are going to need somebody else to give outsiders insight into Austin culture. Who’s it going to be?

It seems to me that Austin has jumped on the blogging wagon full-force. Every day I’m finding new Austinite blogs, and I’ve got to say — I love it. There is something great about peeping into somebody else’s experience in this city. Also, Austin’s totally becoming this crazy network of bloggers galore.

Learning Secrets is by far my favorite. The bowing out of The Famousish confirmed this; the two were close competitors. Every time I go to an LS party, I know the night’s going to be legendar y. I think that’s something everybody can agree on.

I know I probably shouldn’t, but I get really restless in the middle of the week and just have to go out Tuesday nights. Various Tuesday weeklies have always been a viable option, but lately I find it much more fulfilling to go to Shangri La to just hang.

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Get Clean & Green this Spring!

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Creating Healthy Spaces

Subscribe today! rareaustin.com Local, Eco-Friendly Cleaning Since 2007 I\j`[\ek`Xc›:fdd\iZ`Xc› Cleaning Product Line Contact us at 512-351-1405 or visit nnn%Zc\XeÔ^%Zfd


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Root Design Company 504 Oakland Ave. 512-459-7665 rootdesigncompany.com

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Duke Cowden and Ben Dozier


Green living is nothing new for Ben Dozier, co-owner of Root Design Company. Along with his partner, Duke Cowden, Dozier has created an innovative firm that looks to the environment for design inspiration when it comes to landscape architecture, water shaping and more. As Austinites, we are blessed with a landscape that surely must make our neighbors across Texas jealous. The hills. The lakes. The greenbelts. The swimming holes. And the miles of hike and bike trails, gardens and incredible views that can be found throughout the city. Root Design was created on the principle of respecting this very environment. And as the company has grown and taken on projects across the nation, they’ve made sure to respect each and ever y work environment. And that begins with thoroughly understanding it — from the local water supply to native soils and plants to ideas on how to best capture the wind and take advantage of the sun and shade. Calling themselves stewards of environmental design, Dozier a nd C owd en p rove t ha t p ushin g t he a r c hite c tur al envelop e doesn’t mean sacrificing the natural surroundings. It means enhancing them. “We learn all we can about the environment we’re working in. We also spend thousands on continuing education for all of us,” says Dozier. “We want to be at the forefront, to incorporate best practices into our designs.” From creating expansive, classic gardens that feel European to contemporary pools that seem to defy gravity and engineering, innovation is key to Root Design. As is a passion for the projects they accept. “The greatest compliment we receive is hearing that no two projects of ours look alike,” says Dozier. “We’re not looking to do the same thing over and over. It’s about how much fun we’re going to have with a client. What new ideas we’re going to try.”

With a small staf f that includes landscape architects, horticulturalists and construction scientists, Root Design opened its doors in 2005. They have accepted projects ranging f r o m $10,0 0 0 i n t o t h e m i l l i o n s . A n d w i t h s p r e a d s in Architectural Digest, among other respected publications, Dozier and Cowden are able to pick and choose their projects carefully. “We’ve done the landscaping design for one of the oldest cabins in Colorado. And then, shifted gears and created an entirely new space where the client wanted 100% truly native plants and reclaimed green building materials,” Dozier recalls. “That particular project was for an architectural firm in San Antonio. And that building received five stars as a model for green design.” With such a variety of projects that are both beautiful and respectful of the environment, Root Design Company proves that it has a passion and an appreciation for green living. And their clients around the country clearly have an appreciation for their work. With several projects already in the works for 2009, there are no signs of business slowing down. “Our referrals come from word of mouth and from exploring the work on our site,” says Dozier. “We’ve loved every minute of watching our dreams turn into reality.” Kathy Farley Photo by Ed Verosky

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Melissa LaMunyon Director of Operations, The Purple Fig Cleaning Co.

Amanda May GBO, G BO, The Purple Fig Cleaning Co.

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The Purple Fig crew takes “going green” to a whole new level with three key ingtredients — baking soda, vinegar and tea tree oil. Say goodbye to hazardous commercial cleaning products and hello to safe alternatives. What’s special about Austin? MELISSA: URBAN CREEKS. Austin has an URBAN CREEK system. Where else in the world can you have a cup of locally roasted coffee, ten feet from a creek that’s just a five-minute walk from downtown? Also, I love the communities that form around all of the incredible coffee shops and cafes. I feel almost as at home at the Irie Bean and the Counter Café as I do in my living room.

What areas of town do you frequent the most? MELISSA: I am a South Austin addict…primarily because I live in the heart of South Austin and because of Vulcan Video. Yes, I have to blame Vulcan for starting the addiction, but the back patio and the kid friendly attitude of Irie Bean confirmed it. I love the neighborhoods, all of the parks, the restaurants (although I haven’t found any decent Chinese food) and the coffee shops. I am one of those people who haunt coffee shops with my laptop pretending to work. I love how every single day, I can go to a different, awesome locally-owned coffee shop and feel completely at home. And the fact that I can literally walk to a restaurant that has a playground is quite possibly the best thing of all.

How is Purple Fig keeping Austin “green?” MELISSA: The Purple Fig isn’t just keeping Austin green; we are making Austin MORE green. When we go in to clean a home or an office, we use baking soda, vinegar and tea tree oil. Our products are hand made with organic castile soap, borax and essential oils. Commercial cleaning products are responsible for not only polluting our water supply, but partially for the insane levels of indoor environmental toxicity. According to the EPA, the levels of indoor environmental toxins are 2 to 5 times higher than outside. Our goal at the Purple Fig is to educate people on how to make their home a healthy space for them

Melissa LaMunyon, The Purple Fig Cleaning Co., 512-351-1405, cleanfig.com

and their families. We feel that there are very few reasons to use dangerous, synthetically manufactured chemicals to clean your home when there are safe, simple alternatives available.

What do you love most/least about your industry? MELISSA: I really love meeting and interacting with all of our clients, especially the mothers. I am a working mother who is in school full time, so I love knowing that I am helping a family enjoy their time together (instead of mom or dad worrying that the bathrooms haven’t been scrubbed in three weeks). I also love the physical activity of cleaning. I have toned up and lost ten pounds since I started this job. My least favorite thing? When men tell me that I am “the hottest maid they’ve ever seen,” and ask me to clean for them. If that happens I send Bill, our awesome Green Home Specialist.

What makes Purple Fig unique? MELISSA: Amanda May. That’s it in two words. This woman has a vision of a green, fair, integral world and she is making it happen in her own way…one step at a time. She is serious about creating a fair and equitable workplace. She understands that a business cannot be truly successful if the employees aren’t being respected and treated fairly. She pays us almost twice the industry standard, provides health insurance and gives everyone extremely flexibly schedules. Basically — she treats her employees like people. I know, novel idea, right? Amanda’s vision also translates into quality work — we are extremely good at what we do — cleaning, making products and educating people about green cleaning.

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SPOTLIGHTING AUSTIN'S NONPROFITS Mackenzie Martin | I Live Here, I Give Here | ilivehereigivehere.org


Confronted with a study revealing that Austin ranked 48th out of the 50 largest cities in the United States in terms of per-capita donations to local non-profit organizations, many long-term locals were more than taken back — they were embarrassed. How could Austinites, a group known not only for their civic pride but their community engagement, look so stingy on paper?

I Live Here, I Give Here I Live Here, I Give Here grew out of research into that very question. A team of long-term locals began looking for solutions and found that much of the problem stemmed from a lack of awareness of how essential monetary donations are for non-profit organizations. While many Austinites are generous with their time, even the most dedicated volunteers can’t compensate for the funds necessary to maintain the infrastructure of nonprofit organizations and their programs. “People really wanted to give, but they didn’t know how, and they didn’t know what their money was buying,” says Mackenzie Martin, special projects coordinator for the campaign. Launched two years ago, I Live Here, I Give Here now oversees a range of programs focused on the necessity of providing financial support to Austin-based non-profits. I Live Here, I Give Here maintains a database of Austin non-profits organized by cause, which provides a one -stop shop for Austinites researching organizations in need of support.

Martin says the organization of the database resulted in part from the group’s research. “People care about issues,” Martin says. “We feel it’s easier for people to get involved with something they are passionate about.” In addition to maintaining the list of nonprofits, the organization also advocates for c ha r i t a ble g i v in g t hr ou g h t h eir Voic es Campaign, which provides businesses and organizations with volunteer speakers who can talk about the significance of local giving. Further community efforts include See Jane Give!, which brings together professionally and philanthropically accomplished women with other women (who are early in their careers) to discuss the value of personal philanthropy, and the Community Spotlight series, a monthly panel discussion of issues that affect Central Texans. Recent Community Spotlight events have focused on issues like disability ser vices, the environment and domestic violence and sexual assault.

A big thanks to our friends at Kerbey Lane Cafe for supporting local austin non-profits. When you purchase Kerbey Lane Cafe gift cards in June 2009 through RareAustin.com, a portion of the proceeds will benefit this organization.

As I Live Here, I Give Here continues to grow and develop, the or ganization remains committed to their central mission: increasing the amount that Austinites donate to local non-profits. Central to accomplishing this goal is reminding people that starting small is better than not starting at all. “It’s going to take a little sacrifice,” says Martin. “It’s going to hurt — especially if you’re young and starting out. Nonprofits need our help now more than ever; these people are your neighbors, and there is always a neighbor who is worse off than you.” I Live Here, I Give Here will be hosting a web-site relaunch celebration this September at Guero’s. Carly Kocurek Photo by Cory Ryan


SHOPPING Lofty Dog

Hem Jeans

Underwear

Wee

Lounge 22

403 W. 2nd St. 512-476-5050

908 W. 12th St. 512-478-5326

916 W. 12th St. 512-478-1515

417 1/2 W. 2nd St. 512-236-1338

233 W. 2nd St. 888-822-2011

austinloftydog.com

hemjeans.com

shop-underwear.com

shopwee.com

lounge22.com

Touch of Sass

By George

Waterloo Records

Nest

500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-478-7277

524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-472-5951

600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-474-2500

1009 W. 6th St. 512-637-0600

Threshold Furniture & Design Studio

touchofsass.net

bygeorgeaustin.com

waterloorecords.com

nestmodern.com

801 W. 5th St. 512-476-0014 thresholdinteriors.com

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Paramount Theatre

Ballet Austin

Mexic-Arte Museum

AMOA

713 Congress Ave. 512-472-5470

501 W. 3rd St. 512-476-2163

419 Congress Ave. 512-480-9373

823 Congress Ave. 512-495-9224

austintheatre.org

balletaustin.org

mexic-artemuseum.org

aoma.org

FOOD & DRINK Austin Land & Cattle Co.

Delish

Cru

Jo’s

219 West

1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-472-1813

209 W. 3rd St. 512-739-2460

238 W. 2nd St. 512-472-9463

242 W. 2nd St. 512-469-9003

219 W. 4th St. 512-474-2194

austinlandandcattlecompany.com

delish-cupcakes.com

cruawinebar.com

joscoffee.com

219west.com

Imperia

Third Base

Moonshine

Nau’s Enfield Drug

Speakeasy/Terrace 59

310 Colorado St. 512-472-6770

1717 W. 6th St. 512-476-2273

303 Red River St. 512-236-9599

1115 West Lynn St. 512-476-1221

412 Congress Ave. 512-476-8017

imperia-austin.com

thirdbaseaustin.com

moonshinegrill.com

naus-enfield-drug.com

speakeasyaustin.com

J. Black’s

The Ranch

Silhouette

Mean Eyed Cat

Hut’s Hamburgers

710 W. 6th St. 512-296-2101

710 W. 6th St. 512-465-2017

718 Congress Ave. 512-478-8899

1621 W. 5th St. 512-472-6326

807 W. 6th St. 512-472-0693

jblacks.com

theranchaustin.com

silhouette718.com

themeaneyedcat.com

hutsfrankandangies.com

Wink Restaurant

The Driskill Hotel

The Jackalope

Stubb’s

Pangaea

1014 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-482-8868

604 Brazos St. 512-474-5911

404 E. 6th St. 512-469-5801

801 Red River St. 512-480-8341

409 Colorado St. 512-472-8882

winkrestaurant.com

driskillhotel.com

jackalopeaustin.com

stubbsaustin.com

pangaea-austin.com

Key Bar

Eddie V’s

Målaga

617 W. 6th St. 512-469-9610

301 E. 5th St. 512-472-1860

440 W. 2nd St. 512-236-8020

keybaraustin.com

eddiev.com

malagatapasbar.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

LIVING

Salon by Milk + Honey

Milk + Honey Spa

Urbanspace Realtors

Dick Clark Architecture

237 W. 3rd St. 512-236-1112

204 Colorado St. 512-236-1115

801 W. 5th St. 512-457-8884

207 W. 4th St. 512-472-4980

milkandhoneysalon.com

milkandhoneyspa.com

urbanspacerealtors.com

dcarch.com

Avant Salon

Joie de Vie

Austin City Living

Red River Flats

318 Colorado St. 512-472-6357

713 E. 6th St. 512-542-9220

1145 W. 5th St. 512-323-9006

901 Red River St. 866-751-2124

avantsalon.com

joyoflifesalon.com

austincityliving.com

greystarredriverflats.com

Conder Insurance Agency

94

1601 W. 6th St. 512-480-5070


H CO

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95


SHOPPING Tripp T-shirts

Tyler’s

Cream Vintage

Forbidden Fruit

2405 Nueces St. 512-478-7477

2338 Guadalupe St. 512-478-5500

2532 Guadalupe St. 512-474-8787

108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512-453-8090

myspace.com/tripptshirts

tylersaustin.com

creamvintage.com

forbiddenfruit.com

Room Service Vintage

Toy Joy

107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512-451-1057

2900 Guadalupe St. 512-320-0090

roomservicevintage.com

toyjoy.com

FOOD & DRINK Mother’s Cafe and Garden

Cuatro’s

Hyde Park Bar & Grill

Torchy’s Tacos

4215 Duval St. 512-451-3994

1004 W. 24th St. 512-243-6361

4206 Duval St. 512-458-3168

2801 Guadalupe St. 512-494-8226

motherscafeaustin.com

cuatrosaustin.com

hydeparkbarandgrill.com

torchystacos.com

Trudy’s

Kerbey Lane Café

Food Heads

Fino

409 W. 30th St. 512-477-2935

2606 Guadalupe St. 512-477-5717

616 W. 34th St. 512-420-8400

2905 San Gabriel St. 512-474-2905

trudys.com

kerbeylanecafe.com

foodheads.com

finoaustin.com

Epoch Coffeehouse

Salvation Pizza

Spider House

Mansion at Judges’ Hill

221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512-454-3762

624 W. 34th St. 512-535-0076

2908 Fruth St. 512-480-9562

1900 Rio Grande St. 512-495-1800

epochcoffee.com

myspace.com/salvationpizza

spiderhousecafe.com

judgeshill.com

M.J. Neal Architects

512 Realty

Venue on Guadalupe

4220 Duval St. 512-320-0764

600 W. 28th St. 512-322-0512

2815 Guadalupe St. 512-473-3706

mjneal.com

512realty.com

venueonguadalupe.com

Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512-452-5010 thundercloud.com

LIVING

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

96

HEALTH & BEAUTY

KUT

The Blanton

Alite Laser

2504 Whitis St. 512-471-1631

200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. 512-471-7324

504 W. 17th St. 512-328-1555

kut.org

blantonmuseum.org

alitelaser.com


4 NO RT HL OO

16

6

P/

53

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MLLK, JR J .

S TEXAS S Y OF TEXA UNI UNIVERSITY

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CO ONGRESS S

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LUP ADA

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34TH

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97


SHOPPING Soigne Boutique

Paper Place

Blue Elephant

Verbena Floral Design

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-300-2929

4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-6531

4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-371-3259

1601 W. 38th St. 512-420-0720

shopblueelephant.com

verbena.com

soigneaustin.com

Russell Korman

Precision Camera

Adelante

Atomic Cherry Boutique

3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-9295

3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-467-7676

1206 W. 38th St. 512-452-5322

5535 Burnet Rd. 512-258-2226

russellkormanjewelry.com

precision-camera.com

adelanteaustin.com

atomiccherryboutique.com

Blue Star Cafeteria

Sampaio’s

Teo

Santa Rita Tex-Mex Cantina

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-454-7827

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-469-9988

1206 W. 38th St. 512-451-9555

1206 W. 38th St. 512-419-7482

bluestarcafeteria.com

sampaiosrestaurant.com

caffeteo.com

santaritacantina.com

Austin Diner

34th Street Café

Taco Shack

Kerbey Lane Café

5408 Burnet Rd. 512-467-9552

1005 W. 34th St. 512-371-3400

4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-467-8533

3704 Kerbey Ln. 512-451-1436

34thstreetcafe.com

tacoshack.com

kerbeylanecafe.com

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-452-7753 backhomefurniture.com

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

LIVING

The Art Pad

Dart Bowl

Avenel

Mallet deVarga Architecture

4520 Burnet Rd. 512-323-0802

5700 Grover Ave. 512-452-2518

3815 Guadalupe St. 512-699-9200

1616 Westover Rd. 512-300-4011

theartpadstudio.com

dartbowl.com

ownhydepark.com

cobrastudiosaustin.com

Embellish Nails & Boutique

Rae Cosmetics

Urban Betty Salon

Sirens Salon

4615 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-452-7465

1206 W. 38th St. 512-320-8732

1206 W. 38th St. 512-371-7663

4207 Medical Pkwy. 512-419-7789

embellishnails.com

raecosmetics.com

urbanbetty.com

sirens-salon.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512-454-4262 ilovebobsalon.com

98


LA

NET BURNET

JUSTIN LN JUSTIN N.

H LOOP RTTH NOR

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COC K

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OP 1 LOO C / LO PAC MOPA MOP

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35TH

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PARK WAY

LAMA R

45TH S TREET

38

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34

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99


SHOPPING Deanfredrick

Solid Gold

Tree House Gift Shop

Domy Books

902 E. 5th St. 512-493-0943

1601 E. 5th St. 512-473-2730

4900 Mueller Blvd. 512-324-0147

913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-476-3669

deanfredrick.com

solidgoldacademy.com

dellchildrens.net/gift_shop

domystore.com

Big Red Sun

Mode Apparel

1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-480-0688

1601 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-436-8924

bigredsun.com

myspace.com/modeaustin

FOOD & DRINK Blue Dahlia

Primizie Osteria

Uncorked

Juan in a Million

1115 E. 11th St. 512-542-9542

1000 E. 11th St. 512-236-0088

900 E. 7th St. 512-524-2809

2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-472-3872

bluedahliabistro.com

primizieaustin.com

uncorkedtastingroom.com

juaninamillion.com

Progress Coffee

Rio Rita

Bossa Nova

Stortini

500 San Marcos St. 512-493-0963

1308 E. 6th St. 512-524-0384

2121 E. 6th St. 512-478-8700

1917 Manor Rd. 512-391-9500

progresscoffee.com

riorita.net

bossanovaaustin.com

stortini-austin.com

El Chile

Vivo

Hoover’s Cooking

East Side Café

1809 Manor Rd. 512-457-9900

2015 Manor Rd. 512-482-0300

2002 Manor Rd. 512-479-5006

2113 Manor Rd. 512-476-5858

elchilecafe.com

vivo-austin.com

hooverscooking.com

eastsidecafeaustin.com

Casa Columbia

Longbranch Inn

The Music Gym

1614 E. 7th St. 512-495-9425

1133 E. 11th St. 512-472-5591

815 East 6th St. 512-939-2524

casa-columbia.com

eastinns.com

musicgym.com

LIVING

100

HEALTH & BEAUTY

Urbanspace Realtors

Urbanaxis Mortgage

Method.Hair

Vain Salon

900 E. 6th St. 512-476-0010

900 E. 6th St. 512-473-2947

1601 E. 5th St. 512-469-0044

1803 Chicon St. 512-524-1057

urbanspacerealtors.com

urbanaxismortgage.com

methodhair.com

vainaustin.com

The Ends on 6th

Good Life Team

Bird’s Barbershop

2608 E. 6th St. 512-663-8847

1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-892-9473

1107 E. 6th St. 512-457-0400

endson6th.com

goodlifeteam.com

birdsbarbershop.com


EAST 38 1/2 /

DEAN KEE TTO ON

RT PO

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MANOR

EAST 7TH

T

VA LL LE Y

ERN ALES

CHIC CON

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EA E AST S 11TH H

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P D LEA WOO SA E S RO N

NAVAS

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CON CHI

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101


SHOPPING Moxie Austin Designer Co-Op

Feathers Boutique

The Black Sheep

By George

2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-441-6699

1700 S. Congress Ave. 512-912-9779

1115 S. Congress Ave. 512-914-4771

1400 S. Congress Ave. 512-441-8600

moxieaustin.com

myspace.com/31622902

blacksheepaustin.com

bygeorgeaustin.com

Goodie Two Shoes

Austin Handmade

Off The Wall

Baby Bugaloo

1111 S. Congress Ave. 512-443-2468

507 W. Mary St. 512-383-9333

1704 S. Congress Ave. 512-445-4701

5700 W. Slaughter Ln. 512-301-3800

myspace.com/austingoodietwoshoes

austinhandmade.com

offthewallaustin.com

Back Home Furniture 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-327-7753 backhomefurniture.com

FOOD & DRINK Maudie’s Hacienda

Maudie’s Too

Home Slice

Hyde Park Bar & Grill

9911 Brodie Ln. 512-280-8700

1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-440-8088

1415 S. Congress 512-444-7437

4521 West Gate Blvd. 512-899-2700

maudies.com

maudies.com

homeslicepizza.com

hydeparkbarandgrill.com

Kerbey Lane Café

Freddie’s Place

Green Pastures Restaurant

Trudy’s

2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-445-4451

1703 S. 1st St. 512-445-9197

811 West Live Oak St. 512-444-4747

901 Little Texas Ln. 512-326-9899

kerbeylanecafe.com

freddiesplaceaustin.com

greenpasturesrestaurant.com

trudys.com

Broken Spoke

Uchi

Jo’s

Vespaio

3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-442-6189

801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-916-4808

1300 S. Congress Ave. 512-444-3800

1610 S. Congress Ave. 512-441-6100 austinvespaio.com

brokenspokeaustintx.com

uchiaustin.com

joscoffee.com

Gristmill Restaurant

Shady Grove

Paggi House

1287 Gruene Rd., New Braunfels 830-625-0684

1624 Barton Springs Rd. 512-474-9991

200 Lee Barton Dr. 512-473-3700

theshadygrove.com

paggihouse.com

gristmillrestaurant.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

LIVING

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-351-5934 austinartgarage.com

Bird’s Barbershop

J. Buccio Salon

Irons Austin

2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-442-8800

6800 West Gate Blvd. 512-326-1153

2607 Stacy Ln. 512-589-5795

birdsbarbershop.com

102

River Sports Tubes 12034 FM 306, Canyon Lake 830-964-2450

theironsaustin.com

riversportstubes.com

Gruene Hall

Yoga Yoga

Avant Salon

Dorado Soapstone

4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-358-1200

9600 S. IH-35 512-291-5000

2157 Woodward St. 512-444-8600

yogayoga.com

avantsalon.com

doradosoapstone.com

1281 Gruene Rd., New Braunfels 830-606-1281

Pink Hair Salon

Yoga Yoga

Park Lane Guest House

gruenehall.com

1204 S. Congress Ave. 512-447-2888

1700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-326-3900

221 Park Ln. 512-447-7460

pinkaustin.com

yogayoga.com

parklaneguesthouse.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512-457-5100 thelongcenter.org


BAR ART A RTTON RTO ON N SP SPR RIN ING IN GS S

RIV ERS IDE

ABE

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MON

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1

ITE EN WH 90 / B HWY 2

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103


SHOPPING Cupidz Clozet

Tyler’s

Dolce Baby

Santa Fe Optical

3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512-328-6446

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-327-9888

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-306-8882

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-327-1913

cupidzclozet.com

tylersaustin.com

Goodwill

Hutson Clothing Company

Tesori

Fab’rik

701 Newman Dr. 512-478-6711

3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512-732-0188

6507 Jester Blvd. 512-346-8100

12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512-263-1644

austingoodwill.org

hutsonclothing.com

tesoriaustin.com

fabrikaustin.com

RunTex

Fetch

The Hip Chick

Valentine’s Too

2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512-477-9464

3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512-306-9466

3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512-330-1701

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-347-9488

runtex.com

yourdogwilldigit.com

thehipchick.com

Maudie’s Milagro

Thistle Café

Maudie’s Café

Daily Juice

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-306-8080

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-347-1000

2608 W. 7th St. 512-473-3740

2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512-628-0782

maudies.com

thistlecafe.com

maudies.com

dailyjuice.org

Bistro 88

D’Vine Wine

Siena

2712 Bee Cave Rd. 512-328-8888

1501 RR 620 N., Lakeway 512-266-8040

6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-349-7667

bistro88austin.com

dvinewineofaustin.com

sienarestaurant.com

Milk + Honey Spa

Lakeway Resort and Spa

Yoga Yoga

Hill Country Galleria 512-236-1116

101 Lakeway Dr. 512-261-6600

2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-381-6464

milkandhoneyspa.com

dolce-lakeway-hotel.com

yogayoga.com

santafeoptical.com

FOOD & DRINK

HEALTH & BEAUTY

LIVING

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Alexan Vistas

Texas Sailing

7000 FM 2222 512-794-8439

103 Lakeway Dr. 512-261-6193

alexanvistas.com

texassailing.com

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512-458-8191 amoa.org

104

Mix 94.7

Austin Zoo

4301 Westbank Dr. 512-390-5947

10807 Rawhide Tr. 512-288-1490

mix947.com

austinzoo.org


WY

WESTLAK TLAKE E DR.

LC ON

ES

35TH

PIT AL

OF

TE

XA

SH

BA

Y6 20

OOP1 LLO

AC / MOP

EXPO POSITI

ON

CA

1

HW

ENFIELD

LAK

US TIN

BLV

D.

EC

AV E

RO AD

BAR TON

CRE EK

BE

EA

105


SHOPPING Round Rock Express

The Global Arts Group

Junior League Resale Shop

Inviting Affairs

Dell Diamond 512-255-2255

11100 Metric Blvd. 512-467-9400

6555 Burnet Rd. 512-459-4592

3742 Far West Blvd. 512-331-2133

roundrockexpress.com

theglobalartsgroup.com

jlaustin.org

invitingaffairs.com

Personally Yours

Bicycle Sport Shop

Petticoat Fair

Zinger Hardware

5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512-454-7534

10947 Research Blvd. 512-345-7460

7739 Northcross Dr. 512-454-2900

2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512-533-9001

pyaustin.com

bicyclesportshop.com

petticoatfair.com

zingerhardware.com

Loft

Bettysport

Luxe Apothetique

St. Thomas Boutique

The Domain 512-377-6857

The Domain 512-339-0011

The Domain 512-346-8202

The Domain 512-835-8300

lofthomedecor.com

bettysport.com

myspace.com/luxeapothetique

stthomasboutique.com

Cru

Eddie V’s

Thundercloud Subs

Truluck’s

The Domain 512-339-9463

9400 Arboretum Blvd. 512-342-2642

2500 W. Parmer Ln. 512-255-2013

10225 Research Blvd. 512-794-8300

cruawinebar.com

eddiev.com

thundercloud.com

trulucks.com

300 Austin

Maudie’s

Melting Pot

Manuel’s

9504 N. IH-35 512-834-7733

10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-832-0900

13343 Research Blvd. 512-401-2424

10201 Jollyville Rd. 512-345-1042

3hundred.com

maudies.com

meltingpot.com

manuels.com

Burger House

Kerbey Lane Café

Trudy’s

Chez Zee

4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512-346-7200

13435 N. Hwy 183 512-258-7757

8820 Burnet Rd. 512-454-1474

5406 Balcones Dr. 512-454-2666

burgerhouse.com

kerbeylanecafe.com

trudys.com

chez-zee.com

Pure Austin

Vanity Rocks

Aesthetica Hair & Skin

Avant Salon

4210 W. Braker Ln. 512-342-2200

9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512-258-0009

13359 N. Hwy. 183 512-336-2639

9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512-502-8268

pureaustin.com

vanityrocks.com

Yoga Yoga

Yoga Yoga

Birds Barbershop

12001 Burnet Rd. 512-490-1200

2167 Anderson Ln. 512-380-9800

6800 Burnet Rd. 512-454-1200

yogayoga.com

yogayoga.com

birdsbarbershop.com

FOOD & DRINK

HEALTH & BEAUTY

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 106

avantsalon.com

LIVING

Go Dance

Austin Karaoke

One Eleven Design

Alpha Granite

2525 W. Anderson Ln. 512-339-9391

6808 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-323-9822

1304 Berkshire Dr. 512-302-3732

915 W. Howard Ln. 512-834-8746

godancestudio.com

austinkaraoke1.com

joelmozersky.com

alphagraniteaustin.com


PA ARMER

BRAKER

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TH EA

S P I CE

WO

OD SPRINGS

LAMAR

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107


Rare Magazine :: June 2009 :: Living  

Rare Magazine :: June 2009 :: Living

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