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DECEMBER 2009

WINTER

HOLIDAY DISCOUNT CARDS inside RARE DECEMBER 2009

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2010 UNCORKED This New Year’s Eve, the party’s in Austin at Seaholm Power Plant.

WOXY’s Shiv Car Stereo (Wars) and very special guests TBA For information and updates, and to purchase tickets for this historic event, visit and register at www.liveatseaholm.com


publisher

photographers

Taylor Perkins

Mark Herron Jake Holt Brian Mihealsick Annie Ray Jay B Sauceda Trevor Ray Thompson Tiffany Tso

editor Caitlin Ryan

art director Lindsey Eden Turner

director of sales & marketing Meredith Davis

director of events

accountant Arian Mobasser

account executives

design intern

Nicole Carbon Jessie Cibik Lizz Davis Darcie Duttweiler JB Hager Carly Kocurek Linsey Krauss Elaina J. Martin JJ McLaughlin Tiffany Tso Tom Vale Amy Wald Arden Ward Lauren Wolf

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Alex Petrowsky

content coordinator

writers

RARE DECEMBER 2009

We can all agree that winter has been slow to arrive after that apocalyptic summer, but I’m just thankful that it’s made a few brief appearances. I find that the most pleasurable parts of winter come in small packages: a nice sweater, some leather gloves, a crackling fire (alright, that one may be overkill).

illustrator

Jason Hicks

Lauren Caffey Paul Kimbiris Katie Lesnick Jamie Moore Brittany Oster Alex Winkelman

note from the editor

But in all seriousness, winter stands out as the season in which people most naturally rise up to cherish and help one another. Now, I don’t know why winter’s tightly knit counterparts (fall, spring, and summer) can’t conjure up the same kind of philanthropy, but just agree with me when I say, “I’ll take what I can get, here.”

Samantha Pitchel

Maren Jepsen

editorial interns Jessie Cibik Tara Pettinato

marketing intern Jordan Martin

cover art Matthew Genitempo, untitled, C-print photograph, 18 x 21 inches (uncropped)

With Hallmark commercials worthy of a box of Kleenex on the airwaves since Halloween, you may be cringing from premature yuletide and cheer. That’s why we’ve taken a different approach for this December’s issue. Rather than gifting you with a rash akin to the Ugly Christmas Sweater sort, I hope this issue produces a more introspective kind of effect. One that is more personal. Most of us can identify with what it’s like to travel great lengths to find some semblance of home. Most of us know how to appreciate a simple cup of coffee on a brisk day. And, while most of us may not know what it’s like to see someone near and dear fight a life-threatening battle, we all can admit to being inspired by a story of miraculous recovery. So, with that, I give you Rare’s take on winter. We hope you enjoy the closing of yet another year, and we’ll see you in 2010. Hopefully, at our New Year’s Eve party at Seaholm Power Plant.

Caitlin Ryan editor


12.09

Matthew Genitempo page Above: untitled, photograph, 6 x 7 inches

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06 06 08 10 13 14 20

up front

24 26 28 32

downtown

40 42 44

campus/hyde park

50 52 54

midtown

58 60 62

east side

68 70 72 74

south side

80 82 84

west side

88 90 92

north side

96 98 112

Rare Gives Back :: Capital Area Food Bank Maps/Index December Happenings

On The Cover :: Matthew Genitempo JB Rants Opinion :: Smooth Criminals Rare Donation Guide Holiday Party Etiquette Inspiration :: Jamie Schanbaum Gift Guide :: Techsessories Vertallee Letterpress Backstage :: Ballet Austin Gift Guide :: For the Home Backstage :: Austin Symphony Gift Guide :: Expanding the Mind Café Pacha Gift Guide :: Self Adornment Rare Winter Lookbook Gift Guide :: Avid Travel Austin Art Garage Kimber Modern Gift Guide :: Indulge Your Vices Backstage :: Austin Children’s Choir Republic of Barbecue Faraday’s Kitchen Store


ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

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UP FRONT

MATTHEW GENITEMPO Caitlin Ryan Photo by Jay B. Sauceda

For this year’s Winter issue, Matthew Genitempo tapped into the heart of an explorative, individual type of travel that so many relate to during this time of year. Serving as a graphic designer, photographer, and advocate of clean, simple art, his series of photos represent the understated beauty in the most quiet of moments. Tell us about the series of photographs that you submitted. The photos that I chose are images that have been taken over the past year, more or less. The photographs are discoveries of an America that I never knew existed, as well as an exploration of important moments in my relationships. I’m examining familiar people and places, hoping to reveal something new. You work at another company. Where? I am actually not a full-time photographer. I spend the majority of my day as a graphic designer at Public School, a new collective located in East Austin. How much does your design work influence your photography? I think I push a lot of my habits and principles in graphic design onto my photographs. As a designer, I am constantly breaking projects down in order to leave out anything that is unnecessary. I try to simplify all of my photographs the same way. For instance, if I see something in the frame that I don’t want, I’ll usually try to find a way to leave it out.

When did you tap into art? I have been drawing and sketching since I was a kid, but I started shooting in high school for a photography class. I never really took it that seriously, but I learned some basics. I put down my camera for a couple years. But after I started college for design, I was constantly around photography, because they were in the same department. So, I decided to give it another chance.

As a designer, I am constantly breaking projects down in order to leave out anything that is unnecessary. I try to simplify all of my photographs the same way.

Did you study photography or learn it on your own? Who is your photography idol? I didn’t study anything besides a few photography classes. Stephen Shore is one of my many idols, but there are a number of newer photographers that I have been influenced by. Tim Briner is one; his new work is really great.

Have you discovered a particularly inspiring place to shoot in Texas? What was it like? I was introduced to West Texas last year. I fell in love. That part of the state is so desolate and bizarre. I can’t really explain what it did for me; it’s just really airy and unscathed.

How would you describe your current photography? What would you like to be able to say about it in 20 years? I am just observing. I am trying to take in smaller, more quiet moments and learn why they are so important. Hopefully, in twenty years, I will still find the same sort of things significant.

Any future plans we should know about? Next year, I plan on taking a pretty long road trip with my twin brother. Hopefully, I can explore our relationship and take a few snaps on the way.

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RANTS

THE WHO STOLE NEW YEAR’S JB Hager Photo by Annie Ray

No one likes to admit that they are no fun, a buzz kill, or a party pooper, but I am that guy on New Years Eve. I am “The Grinch of New Year’s.” If Dr. Seuss were still alive, he would make an animated short about me.

I know there are more people like me than not. That front you put on every New Year’s Eve is not the real you. It can’t be. There’s no way everyone can be that fun, that happy, or that drunk by choice. I’m not a Debbie Downer, I promise. I just don’t buy into the Girls Gone Wild attitude that everyone seems to adopt on December 31st, every single year. Perhaps I’m jaded, but I think that there are a lot of people that pretend to enjoy things that are miserable. I don’t think Smart Car drivers enjoy their decision. I don’t think Segways are that fun. I think Ellen really hates that she has to open every show by dancing. And if it weren’t for the paycheck, Darius Rucker wouldn’t be a country star. That’s how I feel about New Year’s: It’s a front, an act. We would all rather be home spooning a body pillow. In general, I don’t enjoy any event where women call each other to see what they are wearing, where hats are handed out, or where Dick Clark or Ryan Seacrest is the moderator of my mood. Neither of them are fun nor entertaining, and watching an

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apple drop is mundane. Maybe that’s just me. It’s not that New Year’s is an evil thing. I just don’t care for the anticipation of fun. I like fun to be a surprise, sort of like Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. I know I’m coming across as Cameron, but I’ve really got more Ferris in me than you would think. I don’t like the obligation to live up to the hype. Great fun isn’t initiated by an Evite or Mylar balloons. I don’t like walking like an Egyptian, and “La Macarena” gives me symptoms often associated with the Plague. I understand that I’m sounding really negative. I’m not trying to kill your fun—it’s not you, it’s me. I don’t mind hanging out and watching others get nutty. Just don’t drag me on the dance floor. (If you try, it’ll look strikingly similar to a zoo-kept gorilla trying to pull a Japanese tourist through the cage by their camera strap.) I don’t like the amount of time between “smile” and


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That’s how I feel about New Year’s: It’s a front, an act. We all would rather be home spooning a body pillow. when the camera goes off, and I especially don’t like cover bands that bust out Afros for their second set. I hope I haven’t completely ruined your “this going to be off the hook” plans for New Year’s. That was not my intention. Truth be told, I would love to be right there in the midst of the fun. I wish I felt comfortable in the glittery top hat, dancing to Soulja Boy. I wish I enjoyed “Mony Mony.” I wish Champagne glasses didn’t look so stupid. Every year that I strive to jump in and be “fun guy,” I misjudge. I wait in the wings doing shots and drinking cocktails way out of my league. I do this because I lack the natural courage to act silly. Eventually, with enough Herradura and Jagermeister, I loose my inhibitions about New Year’s and attempt to dance to the Pointer Sisters. Within 30 seconds, my legs give out. I think there are exactly three minutes between me hating New Year’s and passing out. If you can find me during those 180 seconds, I’m quite fun and likely to end up in the society pages. But also, if you see me in this sweet spot of fun, please call a cab. It’s going to get ugly in a hurry. After all, I don’t like blowing on horns, and Old Lange Syne actually makes me sad. Enjoy your New Year’s. Hope it’s a good one. I really do.

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OPINION Interesting takes on our world

SMOOTH CRIMINALS: LOOKING BACK at 2009 Tom Vale Illustration by Alex Petrowsky

From silver balloons to the Great Gloved One and all points in between, we tackled 2009 and have been left with the nagging question: Just what is wrong with that guy? Consider yourself lucky if you stayed out of the news this year.

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I’ve been charged with the job of casting a look back at 2009, a job for which I have two handicaps. First, I have no television. So, although I saw something about a boy in a silver balloon while I was in the airport in October (how’d that turn out, anyway?), I haven’t exactly been tracking the 24-hour news cycle. Secondly, I have a three year-old son with whom I mostly discuss ice cream (relative merits of, whether or not it is required right now, and size of portion), Thomas the Train, and, for some reason, vacuum cleaners. These things probably did not

dominate your year to the extent that they dominated mine. I could call 2009 the Year of Thomas the Train, which it was to a particular demographic, but it doesn’t read this magazine. But then, maybe these aren’t handicaps at all; perhaps they are more like a good filtration system. You can be sure that if a news item was able to penetrate the toddler-centric, TV-free bubble in which I wander daily, it had to have been considered a Big Story.


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So, about 2009. Here’s the first thing I noticed: We inaugurated a new president. Maybe you heard. During the inauguration, I even went so far as to join people standing outside at Jo’s Coffee to watch it on television. There, I learned you can get to be a Chief Justice without being good in the clutch, and when you’re the Queen of Soul, you can wear whatever you want. There also seemed to be, at that time, some sort of trouble with the economy. I know, because people started adding the phrase “in this economy” to the end of every sentence like, “You have to be careful in this economy” and “Seriously, be careful, you’re now driving on the sidewalk in this economy!” and “I hope they won’t press charges in this economy.” After the boldface dramas of 2008, marked by that initial economy free-fall and a groundbreaking election, 2009 felt like the awkward beginning of something new; similar to staggering breathlessly from a car wreck we miraculously survived. (This may explain why, aside from its inherent drama, Captain Sully’s US Airways miracle resonated, as some of us* felt like passengers in a plane going down for about eight years.) All of this argues for a Dawn of New Era theme to 2009: a president unlike any we’ve ever had before, an economy staggering back to its feet, and a nation, to paraphrase Obama’s inaugural words, picking itself up and dusting itself off after a Gary Busey type of bender that we’d all rather forget. We’re now making lots of vows: eat right, hit the gym, reduce reliance on foreign oil, stop torturing people. That type of thing. But that was just January. Every time I peeked out from my toddler-bubble for the rest of the year, a different theme suggested itself: the Year of the Deeply Flawed Man. We put Bernie Madoff away. Ted Kennedy died,

and we all tried to draw up some moral math that balanced him out okay in the end. Unseemly things came to light about David Letterman. Roman Polanski’s past finally caught up with him. James Toback released his Tyson documentary, focusing on one of the most perplexing and troubled athletes of my generation. Andre Agassi’s memoir, Open, revealed that he used crystal meth and constructed a careful lie about doing so, all while on the professional tennis tour. But, of course, I’ve skipped over the main event. On June 25th of this year, we all heard about the death of the most deeply flawed and hugely

legislation, and “Billie Jean”? There is no real answer. You can’t, on principle, somehow un-enjoy Chinatown. I was all set to be even more snide about Michael Jackson, and then I heard “I Want You Back” in the grocery store. What can you say? It’s a great song. Hugely talented, successful people often have flaws commensurate with the size of their talents; the only lesson would be to never extrapolate from their talent some kind of angelic status. (The other question that lingers here is, what about Obama? Where is his glaring flaw? It’s

We’re now making lots of vows: eat right, hit the gym, reduce reliance on foreign oil, stop torturing people. That type of thing. successful entertainer since Elvis Presley: Michael Jackson. Barring some late-year shocker, this—along with the Obama inauguration—is one of the defining events of 2009. The news broke, websites crashed, and we all tried to fix in our minds an image of the 1983-MichaelJackson. Many of us tried to erase the gradually disintegrating versions that followed in the last twenty-five years. And that was tricky, for the man had flaws that made a lasting impression. He was a virtuoso of flaws, making more outlandish mistakes than anyone else in the public eye.

possible that, in the gap between writing and printing, Obama will get a large tattoo on his forehead and admit that he too was on meth during the entire primary campaign. But for now, I’m grateful that, during this year of the Flawed Man, the most important man’s flaw is… he smokes an occasional cigarette. Oh, and he’s “haughty.”) Of course, maybe this isn’t so much the theme of 2009, but rather a perennial theme. Maybe it’s always the Year of the Deeply Flawed Man. Maybe the powerful and successful behaving badly just makes good headlines, but I think this year stands out.

All of these men, with the exception of Bernie Madoff, who raises other questions entirely, bring you back to this: What do you do when the man doesn’t live up to the work? When heroic achievements are procured by people who turn out to be not just human, but truly disappointing …even immoral?

And maybe each recent story of weakness resonates more now than in previous years. We recently spent time seeing our country, which we’ve known as invincible, rich, and the Most Powerful in the World, showing its own deep flaws.

What do we do with Chinatown, Agassi’s return, Letterman’s transformation of comedy, Kennedy’s

Or am I reaching? Maybe. Maybe it’s just the Year of Thomas the Train, after all. *about 53% of us, apparently. RARE DECEMBER 2009

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GIVING

The Where’s, How’s, and What’s of Donating in Austin The holiday season can be dominated by flashy décor, elaborate light displays, and excessive gifts. At times, it’s a challenge to look past the shimmer and shine to reveal the more fulfilling side of the season. However, the holidays bring forth dozens of opportunities to share a bit of yourself with those in need. Whether it be through food, gifts, money, time, or services, lending a helping hand can unite the Austin community in an incredibly gratifying way. We’ve provided a list of just a few ways to connect and share with others this holiday season.

Jinglebell 5k benefiting MADD www.redlicoriceevents.com

Unity Center Canned Sunday www.unitycenteraustin.org

Caritas of Austin www.caritasofaustin.org

Lights of Love 5k benefiting Austin’s Ronald McDonald House www.rmhc-austin.org

Austin Smiles with the Capital Area Food Bank Food Drive capitalareafoodbank.org

Meals on Wheels and More www.mealsonwheelsandmore.org

Give a Pint, Get a Pint Holiday Drive www.inyourhands.org

Wheatsville Food Coop Food Drive www.wheatsville.coop

AIDS Services of Austin: Purchase an ASA Holiday Card www.asaustin.org

Embassy Suites Austin Arboretum Food Drive www.austinarboretum.embassysuites.com

Austin Ventures Entrepreneur Holiday Grant www.austincommunityfoundation. org

Capital Area Food Bank of Texas www.austinfoodbank.org

Project Holiday Help: Lifeworks Gift Card Drive www.lifeworksaustin.com

Hands on, Central Texas www.handsoncentraltexas.org Project Holiday Help: Sponsor a Holiday Party www.lifeworksaustin.org

Austin Children’s Shelter Holiday Gift Drive www.austinchildrenshelter.org Orange Santa www.utexas.edu/events/orangesanta Season for Caring presented by the Austin American Statesman www.statesman.com Holiday Giving Drive www.familyeldercare.org/holidaygivingdrive Project Holiday Help: Adopt a Youth or Family www.lifeworksaustin.org

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WINTER FEATURE

PARTY FAVORS

An Essential Guide to Avoiding Holiday Foul Play JJ McLaughlin Photos by Jay B. Sauceda / Styling by Masha Poloskova and Emily Hoover / Hair and Makeup by Martha Lynn Barnes / Shot at Uptown Modern

Ask anyone who’s gone through puberty: Maturity doesn’t happen all at once. You don’t wake up one day, broad-shouldered, square-jawed, and deep-voiced, free of adolescent awkwardness or misbehavior; it’s a process that’s hardly noticeable over time. But being the world’s best party guest is very noticeable, and if executed correctly, maturity can be achieved overnight with the right approach. Anyone with a shred of professionalism knows when to summon the stamina for a late night Vegas bender and when to pull in the reins and act accordingly in a more refined party atmosphere. When it comes to the holiday season, it can become easy to overlook proper party etiquette when the professional and formal arena spills over into the personal and casual one. That’s why we’ve outlined an essential guide guaranteed to make your charisma punch through the roof, all while making a lasting impression with your peers, colleagues, and relatives. After all, being noticed should never include getting sloshed at the office-party’s open bar, telling your boss how much you “really, really love” her, and then spending the night with a cubiclemate under your desk. It’s your reputation that’s on the line. Every party starts with an invitation. Sure, there are plenty of parties to choose from, but the worst thing you can do is appear to be holding out for a better opportunity. Give a clear answer as to whether or not you will be attending, and unless you want to immediately eliminate yourself in becoming the best party guest ever, don’t ask the host “Who else is coming?” It’s rude and arrogant, giving the impression that you are mildly lame and suffer from a crippling form of co-dependency.

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Under dress and feel the stress. Fashion is not supposed to be stressful, but if you want to indirectly say the wrong thing, wear a tuxedo t-shirt to a coat-and-tie party, and watch others’ reactions as they smugly smirk at you. But don’t overdress either. Know your crowd, and pay attention to the details in your attire. Subtlety is king when it comes to standing out. Bring a gift. A good idea: a nice bottle of red wine, Scotch Whisky, fancy chocolates, or any assortment of fine cheeses. A bad idea: Twister. Never show up early. Showing up too early works in every situation except for parties. An early arrival is typically rewarded with sideways stares from the party host, and will reduce the strength of your party entrance. Arrive 20 minutes late with a large smile and lots of energy to extend jovial invitations for mingling. Greet people appropriately. Refrain from using any anatomically impossible nicknames, especially if you’re greeting someone’s mom. Flying chest bumps and shoulder punches are entirely unacceptable. Saying “Hello” is always acceptable. Saying “Whadup, son!” is not; it’s a questionable term


Left to right: Chris in Levis:$55. Blue stripe shirt by Fred Perry: $98. Blue sweater by Modern Amusement: $135. Grey Jacket by Ben Sherman: $255. Black tie by Fred Perry: $62. Crocodile belt by Fullum and Holt: $495. All Service Menswear. Alex in vintage dress from Feathers: $158. Vintage rhinestone necklace from Feathers: $38. Feathers. Vintage

bakelite bracelet from Uptown modern: $195. Shoes: stylist’s own. Michelle in vintage Tadashi dress: $128. Bow necklace by Sari Warenoff: $68. Shoes: model's own. All Feathers. Damian Levis: $55. Black shirt by Fred Perry: $98. Black and grey tie by RevL: $55. Checkered jacket by Ben Sherman: $255. Black belt by Fullum & Holt: $95. Shoes by Generic RARE DECEMBER 2009 15 Surplus: $75. All Service Menswear.


Left to right: Alex in vintage velvet coat: $198. Vintage bracelet: $22. Cocktail ring: $32. All Feathers. Michelle in vintage green evening gown: $188. Vintage bracelet: $36. All Feathers. Chris in Levis: $55. Blue checkered shirt by Culturata: $138. Grey cardigan

16sweaterRARE DECEMBER by Hartford: $268. 2009 Belt by Fullum and Holt: $495. Glasses by

Moscot: $192. Shoes: Models own. All Service Menswear.


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of endearment that implies inferiority and perpetuates the patriarchal hierarchy of the party. Be aware of your surroundings. As soon as you make your entrance, take heed of the various groups of people, and make eye contact with everyone. Gauge the scene with a Terminator-like zeal, scanning and collecting data effortlessly without seeming robotic and/or creepy. Listen to the music playing. Groove and go with the flow. If the number of seated partygoers outnumbers the people standing, be aware that the gathering is more conservative and formal in nature. However, if the people seated are sleeping, be conscious of not only what you are drinking but also why.

Don’t ask the host “Who else is coming?” It’s rude and arrogant, giving the impression that you are mildly lame and suffer from a crippling form of co-dependency. Now you know. Whether you know a little or nothing about any topic of conversation, the first safest way to introduce yourself into it is by making a fleeting compliment to someone in the group without letting them respond. Then take a perfectly cogent thought that was just mentioned and reword it into a question, i.e. “The Internet can’t break, but what happens to all that downtime at work if it does?” Ask with genuine curiosity. Become familiar with soft sarcasm and blanket it with a dry, quick wit. If this isn’t possible, relate it to pop culture. Everything can be related to Saved By the Bell. Exit strategy in conversation. Respectfully leaving conversation is difficult, so excuse yourself from one only after someone finishes a story. You can easily escape under the guise of being a social savant by introducing him or her to someone else. Never leave and directly shift to the next group of people. Pretend you need to get a drink, and ask if they need one too. When polite methods fail, there’s always the old standby: the bathroom. Hanging on to your words. Always look for an opportunity to spark conversation that everyone finds joy in. Avoid polarizing subject matters like

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Michelle in vintage polkadot dress: $88. Vintage black earrings: $20. Vintage bracelet $36. Shoes: model's own. All Feathers. Damian in Levis $55. Shirt by Fred Perry: $98. Grey Jacket by Ben Sherman $255. Shoes by Generic Surplus: $75. All Service Menswear.

death, religion, and politics. Using pace and detail, tell a brief story, but make sure that it’s entertaining. Unicorns and wizards should be used sparingly. Hi, I’m Frank (the Tank?). Okay. It’s a formal party, and you don’t know anyone. That’s fine. Just don’t lubricate the social situation with nine shots of Tequila. Composure is key, so don’t drink more than you can handle. Anything less would be uncivilized. Instead, drink sparkling water, Champ. Even the thought of slurred speech should make any distinguished party guest hurl with appalling disappointment. While others are getting wasted, it’s important to remain responsible.

Avoid polarizing subject matter like death, religion, and politics. Unicorns and wizards should be used sparingly. Offer timely help. Being a gracious guest doesn’t mean that you need to be a hero. Leave that to Enrique Iglesias circa 2000. But if you notice your host running in and out of the kitchen holding plates of food, consider it an obligation to help. Then offer to clean the dishes, for a nice touch. Never appear idle. A true Life of the Party is never the quiet, potentially psychotic person in the corner of the room staring blankly at the rest of the company. Never resort to asking for the TV remote, making DJ requests, or asking to use the Internet. Don’t actually make yourself at home. Your job is to be a gregarious magnet to eliminate the need for any other mediums of communication. Don’t smoke. You’ll smell like smoke upon returning, effectively making your magnetism less captivating. Time to go. When the alcohol is depleted, people are yawning and pointing at their watches, or the sun is rising, grab your coat, thank the host, smile, and leave. But before you leave, write a small thank you note, and leave it on the table.

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INSPIRATION Stories of Extraordinary Austinites

JAMIE SCHANBAUM Nicholas Schanbaum Photo by Trevor Ray Thompson

Ed. note: We received this submission from Nick Schanbaum, brother to Jamie. Her story is an inspiring one, and the familial love exhibited is all too powerful not to share with the Austin community. The publishing of this submission is the least we can do in the fight for meningococcal immunization awareness.

Jamie Schanbaum, 21, is a fighter and my inspiration. After graduating from St. Michael’s Catholic Academy in 2007, she enrolled at UTSan Antonio. Jamie’s sole focus was transferring to UT-Austin, where she had hoped to enroll for years. Overcoming dyslexia along the way, Jamie excelled in San Antonio and moved to Austin in the fall of 2008 as a pre-pharmacy sophomore at UT-Austin. With just three years until she started applying to graduate school, Jamie had begun to live the life she’d always striven for: She rode her bicycle to school, stayed up late at the co-op, and danced to her favorite musicians at local Austin hot spots. Jamie was Austin personified. Then, on the morning of November 13, 2008, the life Jamie had fought to create was thrown off course by what she thought was a severe asthma attack. But with her hands and feet cold and getting colder, Jamie knew that she was suffering from more than an asthma attack. In fact, Jamie was exhibiting the first symptoms of meningococcal septicaemia, a violent strain of meningitis that poisons its victim’s blood stream. Only a few hours had passed by the time Jamie

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arrived at Seton Hospital, but the disease had already begun wrecking its havoc. Jamie’s organs had begun to fail on her, and her kidneys stopped working all together. Just two days after arriving to the hospital, Jamie’s doctors faced no other option than to place her into a coma and onto a ventilator. Her family and her doctors simply had to hope for a miracle. But deep in her coma, Jamie fought all odds and her body miraculously began to fight. Unexpectedly, Jamie’s kidneys kicked back on, and her heart and lungs worked fluid out of their systems. Even so, when Jamie awoke from the coma, her fight had just started. The meningitis bacteria had caused damage to the blood vessels in her hands and legs that could not be undone. Despite undergoing months of arduous sessions in a hyperbaric chamber, Jamie’s fingers and legs needed to be removed in order to save her life. This would extinguish the light within many other people, but Jamie grew stronger.

During the year since she fell ill, Jamie honed in on her inner strength while rebuilding her physical body. Determined to get back to undergraduate classes, Jamie pushed through months of painful physical therapy, and began to embrace the loss of her hair, fingers, and lower legs. She retrained her body to eat, then learned to feed herself again. She had to fight in order to raise her arms again, and then to sit up straight. She struggled to move herself around in her bed and broke a sweat wheeling herself down hospital hallways. Ultimately, thanks to the therapists at St. David’s, Jamie learned to stand and, finally, to walk. After months of working wonders for herself, Jamie realized that she had an opportunity to raise awareness in the community about meningitis. Despite the danger posed by the disease, meningitis is still relatively unknown in the community at large. Even though a vaccine exists that could have immunized her from the meningitis bacteria, Jamie had not been required to receive the shot. This astounding lack of awareness about the disease and the gravity of its consequences compelled her to take action. Jamie realized that, just by sharing her experience, she could help increase awareness about this illness. With her help, April 25th was proclaimed as


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Texas Meningitis Day, and that summer she led a wave of support for legislation that will help to protect other Texan college students from contracting meningitis. The Jamie Schanbaum Act, as signed into law by Governor Rick Perry, will require future first-year and transferring college students to be immunized from meningitis. It is known that college students, as a demographic, are extremely susceptible to contracting meningitis. And now Jamie is back where she wanted to be all along: attending classes at UT-Austin. Although her extracurricular activities involve fittings for prosthetics and hours of therapy, she still boasts a healthy sense of humor and thirst for music. Along with her family, she has helped form The J.A.M.I.E. Group—Joint Advocacy for Meningococcal Immunization and Education. The J.A.M.I.E. Group is a non-profit organization geared towards educating the community about the dangers posed by meningitis and the available methods for preventing the disease. In typical fashion, Jamie seems determined to use her experiences to help others in any way she can. Instead of majoring in pre-pharmacy, Jamie now wants to become a physical therapist so that she can be an inspiration to all patients. But until then, she will just have to settle for being my inspiration and my hero. Every step that Jamie takes—literally and figuratively—is a demonstration that nothing is impossible. www.thejamiegroup.org

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FOR INTEGRATED ECLECTICS

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thresholdfurniture.com

current listing: The South 5th

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512 457 8884 real estate for urban lifestyles


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Nine-function Cycle Computer Pedal Pushers $75

UNIVERSAL SMART PHONE POUCH Nuo Tech :: www.shopnuo.com $24.99

MUSIC MIXER Heart of Texas Music $349.99

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Gadgets, and widgets, and toys, oh my! FLORAL LAPTOP SLEEVE Nuo Tech :: www.shopnuo.com $44.99

LARGE robot Domy Books $80

WOODEN iPOD DOCK Spartan $179

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IN WITH THE ON WITH THE

OLD NEW Lizz Davis Photos by Jake Holt

Vertallee Letterpress operates from a small space tucked away in a quiet East Austin residential neighborhood. Located in a renovated warehouse, the workshop’s melancholy relics loom. Seemingly ancient machinery snores, churns, and spits out... paper. Like iron gargoyles, the letterpress machines cast striking shadows across an open loft space, where a classic method of printing is finessed by modern design.

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Brad and Kat Murph moved to Austin and founded Vertallee in 2006, after several years of working in the printing business in Chicago where they first took a class together on letterpress. Brad, Master Printer, suggested Austin as the home base for Vertallee. A University of Texas alum, he was familiar with Austin, and it seemed a smart choice for new small business owners.

Very carefully.

The process of creating Vertallee’s unique cards is best described as a high maintenance labor of love. There are two types of letterpress printing machinery used by Vertallee: the Heidelberg Windmill and the Challenge Proof Press. The Heidelberg is dark and angry; iron, levers, and apparatuses crash together, apart, up, and down in a chaotic, mechanic order. Brad must carefully captain the Heidelberg as it churns.

Bang, bang, bang.

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He can’t even leave to make a sandwich in the kitchen. This machine uses gravity to create an impression by aggressively smashing together two square blocks, containing specially designed polymer plates.

No sandwiches while operating the smooth, shiny, retro green Challenge, either. Brad individually hand feeds each piece of paper into the mouth of the Challenge. The machines are responsible for the clear, crisp quality of the work, but Brad puppets every move.


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Just as Brad’s participation is vital to the process of printing, Kat’s artistic vision foreshadows the final creation. Kat, Creative Director, tailors much of Vertallee’s product to fit the personality and preference of each client. Some clients know exactly what they want from their invitations or announcements;

“So it does feel a bit strange to design things with snowflakes and mittens.” Rather, her atypical holiday cards are marked by bright, warm shades of yellow, red, and orange. One card features a cactus layered in a string of oversized holiday lights and reads,

The Heidelberg is dark and angry; iron, levers, and apparatuses crash together, apart, up, and down in a chaotic, mechanic order. others are more general about their vision, allowing Kat to design based on her own observation. In both circumstances, her designs compliment the individuality of the message each card delivers. Kat’s creative vision is inspired by experience. The Murphs met in Chicago; Kat is from Delaware. For most of her life, Kat enjoyed the archetypal cold, white, sparkly winter holiday that populates American fantasy. Brad laughs, “Kat had a hard time adapting to the weather.” And so, Kat began designing warm weather holiday cards. “I feel like this time of year should be all about sweaters, but it never is in Austin,” Kat muses.

“Happy Holidays from the South.” Another lone card nostalgically reads in silver ink, “I wish you snow.” In the same way that Kat fosters a connection between her previous life and current situation, Vertallee Letterpress weaves together a product based upon a classic printing method married with new digital design. Here in this modern space, machine relics hum, paralyzing time with ink and paper. Thoughts become words, ideas move to print, and old evolves into new.

– Brad and Kat Murph Vertallee Letterpress www.vertallee.com

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Backstage The Making of The Nutcracker Arden Ward Photos by Mark Herron

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This December, audiences will fill the Long Center to experience a magical tale of Clara and her special Christmas gift. Told through exquisite choreography, the ballet is set to Tchaikovsky’s musical score and accentuated by elaborate costumes and sets. What may appear to the naked eye as a natural, effortless performance takes months of preparation. From auditions to rehearsals and costume fittings, the making of The Nutcracker is a journey all its own. Enter the dancers. Before we see the first hint of fall, hundreds of dancers crowd into studios for the most important audition of the season. The Nutcracker seeks out a talented cast with a knowledgeable dance vocabulary, mastery of required skills, and devout dedication. For the

little ones, auditioning means the chance to dance on stage with seasoned performers, one not offered by most of Ballet Austin’s shows. For Level 8 ballerinas, ages 16-18, this audition could mean being cast in the iconic role of Clara.

The casting of Clara is essential to the ballet’s success. Director of Schools William Piner describes the ideal Clara not only as a technically strong dancer capable of performing with company members but also as a skilled actress who can connect with a broad audience.

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“She has to look like a Clara; you know it when you see it,” says Piner.

sitting atop a huge eight foot tall skirt to play the unforgettable character.

A part of Ballet Austin since 1991, Piner has watched many of his students climb the ranks of the ballet: they start off as angels at age eight, become bon-bons, eventually transform into memorable mice, and even Clara.

Once the performers are in place, the real work begins. Starting in early October, groups begin their rehearsals. For the Academy students, Saturday afternoons through December, a total of 75 hours, are dedicated to Ballet Austin and the upcoming performance. Piner, who is in charge of rehearsing the young dancers, first teaches choreography, followed by continual work on

Perhaps the most memorable role of the ballet requires no formal audition at all. The coveted

The casting of Clara is essential to the ballet’s success. Director of Schools William Piner describes the ideal Clara not only as a technically strong dancer capable of performing with company members, but also as a skilled actress who can connect with a broad audience. part of Mother Ginger is reserved for local celebrities chosen by a special committee. What began as a means of “spicing up” the performance has grown into a favorite tradition of audience members. “People always ask who’s going to be the Mother Ginger at my performance,’” says Lance Johnson of Ballet Austin. The larger-than-life role has been played by everyone from Ann Richards to Kinky Friedman, and it’s never a hard sell; local celebrities love

memorization and precision among his angels and bon-bons. For the more challenging roles, 75 hours might seem like a walk in the park. Many company members and Ballet Austin trainees are involved in intricate scenes that require much more than rehearsing only once a week. Dancers train tirelessly to perfect the classic Balanchine choreography under the artistic direction of Stephen Mills. While rehearsals take place in the studio, a behind-the-scenes team of wardrobe personnel

work to fit and prepare each of the handmade costumes for this year’s cast. Eugene Alvarez, Company Manager, describes the process as “almost as choreographed as the ballet itself.” With precision and efficiency, his team can fit a new cast of students in about six hours. Elaborately designed, the current costumes, which premiered in 1996, add spectacle and wonder to the performance. Everyone has a favorite, and some of the biggest showstoppers are the Snow Scene costumes and the Sugar Plum Fairy’s mesmerizing tutu. However, Alvarez notes that “even the Rat King’s head has created its own backstage drama at various times.” For the young girls in the show, it’s Clara’s costumes that steal their breath. Wardrobe Assistant Emily Cavasar recalls that “every year, the angels behold her costumes with wide-eyed wonder and whisper ‘Clara’ as we walk past.” On the week before opening night, the full cast takes the stage for final preparations. Tech and dress rehearsals solidify the finishing touches of lighting, detailed sets, and music performed by the Austin Symphony. Months of work culminate on the first Saturday of December when the Long Center fills with eager onlookers. The curtain rises, ushering a packed house into Clara’s magical holiday journey. – Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd Street www.balletaustin.org

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The 47th Annual Production of

The Nutcracker Austin’s holiday tradition

Choreography by: Stephen Mills Music by: Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky Musical Accompaniment by The Austin Symphony

7:30 PM | DEC 5, 11, 12, 18, 19, 21, 22 2 PM | DEC 6, 13, 19, 20, 23 THE LONG CENTER With the world’s most recognizable music, Tchaikovsky takes us to the land of the Sugar Plum Fairy. Come celebrate Texas’ longest running production of The Nutcracker.

For Tickets:

Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512.476.2163


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It is attention to detail and personal mementos that make a house a home. Several stores around the city are full of unique accessories that add warm, charming touches.

Apron & Oven Mitts Adelante $15

Antique Slides Blackmail $10 – $15 each

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Glass Top Hat Champagne Holder

Assorted Candles

Big Bertha’s $160

Emeralds $20

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Green Linen Chair

Candle Holders

Adelante $625

Adelante Clockwise from left: $37, $44, $26

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Backstage: Whenever You’re Near, I Hear a Symphony Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Mark Herron

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Rounding out its 98th year in existence, the Austin Symphony has been gearing up for its annual holiday performances since the ’09-’10 season was announced last spring. Although the musicians and conductors only participate in a handful of rehearsals before the productions, each performance has been perfected throughout the years to give Austin families enjoyable nights of holiday music. “When the season is first put together we start preparing for every performance,” Executive Director Anthony Corroa says. “It’s just a matter of a week or two before the performances of squaring everything up.” Since before Corroa’s tenure at the Symphony, the orchestra has performed in several Austin holiday traditions—from collaborating with the Austin Ballet on The Nutcracker to crafting their own performances, such as the seasonal Handel’s Messiah and the Christmas Sing-along, which is in well over its 25th year. Although Austinites have been enjoying these shows for years, the Symphony carefully plans them every season down to the last note. While guest conductors and choruses rotate throughout the years, the Symphony’s musicians don’t drastically change from season to season. “We have 83 musicians that have been selected through a series of auditions,” he explains. “They’re on contract and stay on our roster. They

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are offered the performances first, and then we go to our list of substitutes if they can’t play. There are no exceptions.” What can you look forward to this holiday season? First up is Handel’s Messiah performed with St. David’s Episcopal Choir, conducted by David Stevens. Messiah was initially conceived for secular theatre and first performed during Lent; however, it has become common practice to perform Messiah during the Christmas season. The entire work is quite lengthy, so the Symphony “takes the Christmas versions and a couple of the other

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selections, including some of the bigger production numbers,” according to Corroa. The program is divided into three parts which address specific events in the life of Jesus and their significance to Christianity. It is most famous for its “Hallelujah” chorus. “Most people think of the program in the same way as The Nutcracker,” Corroa says. “Austinites do it every year. It’s a more complete picture of the traditional Messiah, and it’s highly successful.” Then, on December 15th, families can enjoy the Christmas Sing-along, which is conducted by Riverbend Chorus Conductor Carlton Dillard.

“The sing-along is a variety of sacred and secular songs so that there is a little something for everyone,” says Don Hill, Director of Public Relations. Dillard adds, “Each year we try to add a new song or two to keep the program fresh. This year we are adding an exciting choral opening, ‘Let’s Have a Christmas Celebration,’ and a medley of well-known traditional songs.” Dillard also hints that you can expect appearances by Rudolf, Frosty, Elvis, and Santa and his elves, as well as a chance of snow that night.


There is nothing like the feeling of giving a downbeat and hearing such amazing sounds coming from the army of musicians on the stage. carlton dillard, riverbend chorus conductor Although the Sing-along is full of joy for young and old, Dillard says that, due to the tight rehearsal schedule, they can sometimes be intense, “given the amount of material [they] are trying to cover” in a short amount of time. And, while audiences thoroughly enjoy the Christmas songs, Dillard says that from the conductor’s stand, it can sometimes go by all too quickly. “From [my] perspective, the show seems like a blur with so many musical and technical details flying through my head,” he says. “Even though

the conductor rarely gets to hear the music from the audience’s perspective, there is nothing like the feeling of giving a downbeat and hearing such amazing sounds coming from the army of musicians on the stage. The experience is exhilarating and never gets old.” In addition to their two holiday performances this December, the Symphony also puts on their annual Pops Concert at the end of the month, which is conducted by resident overseer Peter Bay, with a special appearance by the Duke Ellington Orchestra.

“The [Pops] concert has little to do with the holidays other than the date. It’s New Year’s Eve, so it’s basically a big party atmosphere,” Corroa laughs. With the holiday performances nearing a close, Corroa has begun work on the centennial year’s programs and has enjoyed flipping through the Symphony’s rich history, looking forward to the years to come. “We have 100 years of history, so it’s amazing to see what types of performances we’ve done and the different types of guest artists who’ve participated,” he says.

– Austin Symphony 1101 Red River www.austinsymphony.org

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Austin School of Fashion Design

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NOVELTY NOTEPADS Emeralds $4.95 - $6.95

FASHION CLASS GIFT CARD Austin School of Fashion Design :: www.asfdesigns.com $45 - $285

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DESIGN REVOLUTION Domy Books $34.95


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Explore new territory and introduce unique extracurricular activities to your friends and family.

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HANDMADE NATION Domy Books $24.95

HOW TO BE A COWBOY Sweet Charity $19.99

READING GLASSES Adelante $34

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A Whole Lotta Latte Amy Wald Photos by Trevor Ray Thompson

With its strong blend of South American culture and commitment toward providing high-quality, organic foods and drinks, Café Pacha offers a refreshing alternative to the traditional coffeehouses people have come to expect.

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From the floral tiles on the walls to the bright, hand-painted tabletops, it doesn’t take long to realize that Café Pacha is not just another coffee shop. Though the café’s original owners, sisters Julie and Suzanne Schroeder, are no longer involved in the business, the South American roots that they planted are still an essential part of what makes Pacha a unique contender in the coffee shop arena. The establishment is decorated with various South American artworks and figurines, and the menu pairs standard coffee drinks with Bolivian favorites, such as empanadas and salteñas (a South American meat or vegetable potpie with peas, carrots, potatoes, green olives, and currants).

The name Pacha comes from a Quechuan word meaning “earth” or “universe” and is tied to the Andian goddess Pachamama—­­­­a maternal divinity who represents natural growth, birth, and the power of the earth. And the concept of earthiness is very much inherent in the shop, from its wooden floors to the deep blues, reds, oranges, greens, and yellows flowing throughout the café. When new owners Marjorie Boulden and A. P. David took over in December 2008, marking their one-year anniversary this month, they further contributed to Pacha’s natural feel by incorporating their dedication to serving organic products. “I was excited about being involved in the cycle of life,” says David. “We were never going to do something that wasn’t organic, that wasn’t connected to local producers.”


The South American roots that they planted are still an essential part of what makes Pacha a unique contender in the coffee shop arena. All of Pacha’s coffees and teas are organic and fair trade, and Boulden and David frequent farmer’s markets to obtain high-quality produce, cheeses, meats, and poultry. “If I buy food for my children, I buy organic food,” explains Boulden. “This community and our baristas are like my extended family, and I don’t want to feed them things I wouldn’t want to feed my children.” In addition to its homemade apple pies, fresh quiches (ranging from tomato, feta, and parsley to spinach and mozzarella), and fruit-stuffed

pancakes (a made-to-order weekend treat), Pacha offers an assortment of delicacies from other local businesses around Austin, including Empanadas la Boca. And with the holidays rapidly approaching, Pacha will provide its share of cold-weather comfort food. “We’ll definitely do mulled wine and some sort of spiced cider,” says Boulden, who also plans on exciting customer’s taste buds with flavored whipped creams and gingerbread goodies. And of course, the Pacha latte, made from a super-secret recipe and served hot, iced, or in shake form, is available regardless of the season.

After nearly a decade of feeding java lovers’ addictions, Café Pacha continues to give coffee fanatics a South American home away from home.

– Café Pacha 4618 Burnet Road www.motherpacha.com

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GAIL CHOVAN BLACK NECKLACE Blackmail $45

SIKARA CUFF LINKS Capra & Cavelli $19.95 - $38.95

FEATHER HEADBANDS Blue Elephant $20 - $25

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Style packaged in small things. These gifts add personality and flare that truly customize a look. VIA CHRISTA SKULL NECKLACE Blackmail $200

MEN’S LODIS WALLETS Creatures $39- $62

HEART AND BOW EARRINGS

PEACOCK FEATHER BRACELETS

Big Bertha’s $14

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Rare’s Local Winter Lookbook As December encroaches upon us, fashion necessities and concerns are bound to arise. This month is not your typical month; there are weather conditions, events, and outings that must be factored in fashionably. Here at Rare, we would like to gift you with a concise winter go-to guide for holiday regalia.

Styling, Writing, and Photos :: Tiffany Diane Tso Models :: Cecilia Mireles and Taye Cannon of Mock Tigers Make Up :: Victoria-Helen Levy Photography and Styling Assistant :: Kathleen Tso Locations :: Prototype Home (South Congress) and Envy Clothing Store (South First)

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The New Year’s Eve Party Party-hopping on New Year’s Eve is a celebrated pastime for most. After all, midnight is when the magic happens: Kisses are exchanged, champagne is popped, and fireworks are set to the sky. Isn’t this the perfect opportunity to look your finest? This year, do New Year’s Eve boldly. Decorate yourself with feathers, sequins, and gold. For men, putting in a little more effort will set you apart from the flannel-clad crowd. (her) Madison Marcus feather dress, By George Vintage silver necklace, Prototype Vintage Melissa velvet bow wedges, By George Vintage beaded fringe purse, New Bohemia (him) Vintage leather jacket, New Brohemia White button-up, model’s own Vintage bow-tie, New Brohemia Jeans and boots, model’s own

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The Holiday Gala It is hard to reach the perfect balance between glamorous and modest. But a form-fitting mini-dress can be paired with tights and a blazer to maintain class and not overstep boundaries in formalwear. A holiday gala is the perfect time to wrap yourself up in something sexy but elegant. Don’t limit yourself to stuffy sweater dresses or typical charmeuse gowns—go vintage, go glam, or go home. Scout open back blouse jacket, Buy Definition Vintage jeweled body-con dress, Feathers Boutique Vintage bow slingbacks, Prototype Vintage Vintage patent leather clutch, Prototype Vintage

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The Family Dinner In order to please the family while appearing fashion-forward, we suggest 60s and 70s inspired garments: high-waisted skirts and capes for ladies, and cardigans and argyle for the fellows. These looks are bound to satisfy the folks, while keeping your bodies warm.

(her) Vintage cape, Prototype Vintage Tank top, model’s own Vintage high-waisted suede skirt, Prototype Vintage Vintage leather lace-up boots, Prototype Vintage (him) Vintage cardigan, New Brohemia Civil Society shirt, Envy Clothing Store RVCA navy corduroy pants, Service Menswear Vintage camel boots, Prototype Vintage

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The Coldest Winter Day Central Texas weather has proven to be temperamental; ice-cold days unexpectedly strike during the month of December. Be prepared for this year’s intermittent glacial weather with thick pea coats and scarves. However, just because it is cold doesn’t mean it has to be dreary. Cold weather clothing comes in vibrant hues, too. (her) Kai-aakmann drop-belted trench coat, Buy Definition Obesity and Speed studded denim jeans, Buy Definition Thigh-high boots, model’s own (him) Civil Society shirt, Envy Clothing Store Ben Sherman black zip pea coat, Service Menswear Jeans and boots, model’s own

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The Caroling Excursion Social and family-oriented wintertime activities, like attending the Trail of Lights or caroling, entail totally different attire. Creating a variety in your wardrobe with capes and ponchos keeps winter gear from becoming stale. Also, spicing up summer and spring wear with seasonally appropriate pieces allows you to utilize your entire wardrobe year around. Vintage cape, Feathers Boutique Vintage nightgown, New Bohemia Knee-high boots, New Bohemia

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TRAVEL wallet Spartan $70

v a r t 5 avid

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pocket game books Sweet Charity $7.99

TRAVEL TOTE Spartan $29

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Whether their goal is to stand out in the luggage line, pass time on the airplane, or be reminded of those at home, something can be found for every traveler’s wants and needs.

day tripper

TRAVEL journal

Sweet Charity $155

Book People $15.95

PHOTO ALBUM Emeralds $18

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Out of the Box Elaina J. Martin Photos by Annie Ray

This year, instead of re-gifting that lamp your mom gave you two years ago, here’s an out of the box idea: Give art.

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Jake Bryer and Joel Ganucheau


We present Austinites a chance to support artists within their own community, to develop together, and foster a unique thriving culture. jake bryer, co-founder, austin art garage

The holidays are upon us, and amongst the hustle and bustle, the parties, and mistletoekisses, is the seemingly endless quest to find the perfect gift. Unfortunately, a wool sweater, a pair of socks, or an “I-couldn’t-be-botheredwith-thinking-what-you-might-want” gift card will no longer cut it. Luckily, Austin is a town burgeoning with artists willing to share their trade with you and your loved ones. To find the perfect present for that special someone, head first to the Austin Art Garage (AAG) at 2200 South Lamar Boulevard. Opened in 2007, the mission of AAG is to offer accessible art and promote local emerging artists. “With a price range of $10 to $1500, there is something for everyone,” says co-founder Jake Bryer. “We present Austinites a chance to support artists within their own community, to develop together, and foster a unique thriving culture.” “There’s just something to be said about an original piece of art,” shares Joel Ganucheau, co-founder of AAG. “It’s nice to be able to give someone a gift that absolutely no one else has or ever will.” He adds, “I think that more people should shop for locally handmade items rather than buying manufactured items at major chain stores.” And artwork isn’t just for the wall. “There are

Austin Art Garage artists Don Madden and Julie Isaacson with their art

For a truly personal piece, fellow artist Don Madden suggests, “Commission an artist to come up with the present.”

AAG, Austin artists recommend checking out AustinHandmade.com, Haven Gallery, East Austin Studio tour, Blue Genie Art Bazaar, Women and their Work, Toy Joy, Whole Earth Provision Company, or museum shops at the Austin Museum of Art, the Wildflower Center, and the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum.

Got a chocoholic to buy for? Judy Paul, whose work is also available at AAG, has the answer in the form of a box of locally made chocolates featuring an art print on the lid of the box, which can be hung once empty.

In Austin, one of the most creative cities in the country, it isn’t hard to find a unique alternative to the stale presents of yesteryear. You want originality? Step out your front door. You want a great gift? Simply open your eyes.

Don’t let a tight budget get in your way; head to the Under $100 Holiday Gift Show at AAG. The official reception will be held on December 10th, but the AAG will be packed with locally made artwork under $100 for the entire month of December. If you can’t find the elusive gift at

– All artist mentioned, including owners Bryer and Ganucheau, have work available at the Austin Art Garage and will be a part of the Under $100 Gift Show. For more information, visit www.austinartgarage.com.

so many local artists in town that make original jewelry, purses, cards, pottery, and food items,” says artist Julie Isaacson.

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HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Not Your Grandma’s B&B Nicole Carbon Photos by Jake Holt

Ho! Ho! Ho! Oh No! Where to put the family for the holidays? No worries. Tucked away in a quiet neighborhood just one block off of bustling South Congress Avenue resides an über-hip bed and breakfast by the name of Kimber Modern. Kimber Modern, located in the ultra-cool Travis Heights neighborhood, just one block off South Congress Avenue, was built from the ground up by Kimber Cavendish, along with partner Vicki Faust, just over one year ago. While Liz Lambert has been the pioneer of hotels in the area south of Town Lake, Cavendish and Faust first had the vision to do something on the land twelve years ago when they bought the lot that is now home to the Kimber Modern—all well before SoCo was a happening destination. At the time, they did not know they’d be opening a B&B. But what they did know was that they loved the area and that the hospitality business was in Cavendish’s blood; her father owned motels in the gambling area of Reno, Nevada, and her mother ran a quaint B&B on the Oregon coast. It was on a trip to Palm Springs that Cavendish had her “a-ha moment.” She and Faust were seeking to buy a mid-century inn, but decided to build one in Austin rather than purchasing

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out West. After spending three years on design, construction finally began. Cavendish now describes the inn as a small European–style hotel, aesthetically channeling the Museum of Modern Art, complete with local art displayed in guest and common rooms. Attuned to the note of modernity, the Kimber Modern owners say they provide invisible service. “This is a new way to stay, a cool way of the future,” explains Cavendish. “We’re not beck and call, we’re virtual service. We have everything you need at your fingertips.” Described as the antithesis to the Four Seasons, the Kimber Modern is perfect for the urban or independent traveler, not to mention the incognito celebrity. If you send your holiday visitors here, they may rub elbows with those who grace the red carpet (it is said that Natalie Portman was once turned away due to full occupancy). There is no check-in desk; complimentary

off-street parking leads you to a door where you use a key code given to you via email with your booking confirmation. An outdoor private stairway leads you to a courtyard that adjoins five luxurious rooms and one suite connected by a common deck, outfitted with comfortable outdoor couches and inviting hammocks to sway in under huge, shading oaks. Step inside the common area and find your virtual concierge in the form of a Mac, equipped with free Wi–Fi, area brochures, magazines, a stack of coffee table books, and newspapers. A bowl of fresh fruit sits atop the counter, next to a state-of-the-art espresso machine. An afternoon happy hour treats guests to beer, wine, and mineral water, as well as a local snack. No uncomfortable community morning–time here. When you awake, an abundant breakfast of fresh, local, and organic selections are yours for the taking and are available for several hours.


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We’re not beck and call, we’re virtual service. We have everything you need at your fingertips. kimber cavendish

And once inside the guest rooms, no corners are cut. Platform beds are adorned in 500 thread count sheets. Glass enclosed showers with powerful water flow showerheads. The sink’s counters are outfitted with luxurious Malin+Goetz bath amenities, whose scents are appealing to both men and women. Just like home, Cavendish and Faust provide guests with an array of amenities: makeup remover, cotton balls, Q–tips, razors, hairdryers, toothpaste, and toothbrushes are provided for each guest. Now, retreat back outside and find yourself almost at the base of South Congress Avenue right behind Amy’s Ice Cream, Guero’s Taco Bar, Continental Club, and more—all of the institutions that have made the avenue famous. With the Kimber Modern’s help, your family will feel right at home for the holidays, even if not in yours. Heck! I think I may give up mine and check in myself.

– Kimber Modern 110 The Circle 512.912.1046 www.kimbermodern.com

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we put the La-La-La in enchiLada.

catering and carry-out for the hoLidays.

5 Locations in austin www.maudies.com


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E R A R FT I G 9 200 GUIDE e

g l u d n vices 06 iu yo r

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Finally, gift ideas for the person who has everything. Tap into the forbidden pleasures of your family and friends, and get them something unexpected.

GIFT CERTIFICATE Milk + Honey $545 - $270

DOORKNOB WINE TOPPER

GUN BELT BUCKLE

Sweet Charity $29.95 - $38.95

Big Bertha’s $50


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WINTER FEATURE

BROCADE WINE GLASSES Sweet Charity $19.95 each

CUPCAKES

ANN TAINTOR FLASKS

SNAKE BRACELET

Delish $2.75 each

Book People $20

Big Bertha’s $125

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WINTER FEATURE

Backstage: Austin Children’s Choir Jessie Cibik Photos by Mark Herron

In a small, stone chapel, adorned with candlelight and soft sounds of classical guitar and gentle song, an intimate holiday experience is brought to life. The modest ambience reveals the power of simplicity and the ever-present, inherent joy of the season. Now in their 24th season, the Austin Children’s Choir connects with the community through their serene presentation of holiday spirit. This year’s holiday performance, titled Candlelight Lessons and Carols, first requires a lengthy process of organizing and planning that is equally as impressive as the result. Kathleen Turner, the choir’s Artistic Director, typically starts preparing for their holiday performance in the spring of the previous year. She’s continuously searching for new, creative avenues to share the choir with the Austin community. This year, Candlelight Lessons and Carols will be held in the chapel at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, a venue with which Turner is quite familiar. “The chapel is the ideal setting for this performance,” Turner explains. “We are trying to recreate a very peaceful, homey respite for an hour during the hectic, holiday season.” She describes the chapel as simply beautiful, with stone on one side and glass on the

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other, surrounded by impressive oak trees and radiant light. But choosing the perfect venue is just the beginning of turning her intricate vision into a live performance. Each year, children ages seven to 18 audition to be a part of the choir. Turner looks for specific qualities when creating the group. “I like the children to have nice tone quality and to match pitch,” she says. “They should have a good sense of rhythm, a natural ability for ear training, and most of all, I need to get a feel that they love music.” Beginning at the end of August, the 40-member choir rehearses once a week for two hours at

St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church. The children are divided into specific age groups for weekly rehearsals, but perform as a whole in the show. By the end of October, they work exclusively on Candlelight Lessons and Carols. As the event begins to take shape, classical guitarist Tony Morris, and independent writer Michael Meigs, who will recite narratives during the performance, join the choir. With all components coming together, Turner begins to see her vision as a reality. She says that although these performances generally come together smoothly, unexpected obstacles are inevitable.


“Children are wonderful to work with, but there are always surprises,” she muses. But according to Turner, there is always a moment when the stars align and the real picture becomes clear. Once the venue and décor are solidified, and the rehearsals have adequately prepared the group, it’s time for the real show. Turner says the children’s excitement toward the performance sparks the deep creative juices of each and every one of them. Suddenly, the children realize their confidence. They know they are ready, and they are fearless. “They know when it’s time to shine, and they are excited to share what they’ve learned,” Turner says.

Children are wonderful to work with, but there are always surprises. kathleen turner, artistic director Candlelight Lessons and Carols consists of three identical performances rather than one large performance to accommodate the small capacity of the chapel. Turner anticipates a turn out of about 500. With performances that have attracted audiences in the thousands, the Austin Children’s Choir is clearly an integral part of the Austin community. Turner’s passion for the program is apparent from start to finish. She says the most exciting

part of her job is the process itself. “From the idea being born, to putting it in front of the kids, I love seeing how they mold it into it’s final presentation, and I love the collaboration with the community,” she says. – Kathleen Turner, Artistic Director Austin Children’s Choir www.austinchildrenschoir.com

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TO KNOW IS NOT ENOUGH. ONE MUST ALSO EXPERIENCE. Sushi Zushi brings authentic and original interpretations of Japanese cuisine to the American palate by offering an extensive menu designed to satisfy everyone from sushi purists to adventure diners. ALL DAY. EVERY DAY.

DINE IN

DELIVERY TAKE OUT

$3 22oz Draft Kirin Ichiban & Sapporo Premium

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MONDAY–FRIDAY | 3–7

$5 gl of Red Diamond Merlot & Colombia Crest Chardonnay $5 Specialty Cocktails $5 Select Saké specials $3 Wells

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WEEKEND PASS Get the hottest happenings, exclusive invitations, and a full weekend itinerary in your inbox. Subscribe at www.rareaustin.com


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When Grandma comes through and tastes her recipes, she can be kind of critical. bryan bracewell,

southside market


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CHRISTMAS UP IN SMOKE Holidays in the Republic of BBQ Carly Kocurek Photos by Brian Mihealsick

Forget the turkey—Austin-area barbecuers find Christmas is primetime for brisket and sausage. Few Texans live in ignorance of barbecue. In fact, there may be no surer way to start a fight in the Lone Star State than to declare the supremacy of some particular plate of brisket. When I joined a team of my colleagues in delving into the contentious topic of Texas barbecue culture, I knew we were signing on for something substantial. The topic of Texas barbecue could never be anything else. The research we did formed a body of interviews and a book, The Republic of Barbecue: Stories Beyond the Brisket. While we learned a lot about everything from the preferred wood for proper smoking to the manufacture and seasoning of pits, we also learned that the holiday season is often the most bustling. It’s fitting that Texans celebrate the holidays with barbecue sojourns. The road over the river and through the woods in Texas often goes right past a standout brisket joint. Barbecue professionals find themselves confronted with the hustle of the holidays on two levels: Not only do they face the same increase in family and community obligations that mark the season for many folks, they face the added intensity of the holiday business rush.

Marvin Dziuk, of Dziuk’s Meat Market in Castroville, said his business kicks into holiday overdrive, in part, because the festivities coincide with the hunting season, which brings a significant increase to his meat processing business, as well as a boom of walk-in customers grabbing food for the road. “You have your holiday buying, your Christmas, your Thanksgiving, your New Year’s,” Dziuk says. “All that holiday buying falls in the middle of hunting season. So, it’s quite a chaotic time of the year for us.” Out in Elgin, Bryan Bracewell, the third generation of his family to own and operate Southside Market, says his grandmother, who provided the original recipes for most of the restaurant’s side dishes, tends to pop in around the holidays to make sure her old recipes are being prepared up to her exacting standards. “When Grandma comes through and tastes her recipes, you know, she can be kind of critical,” Bracewell says. “She’s always real nice about it, but usually Thanksgiving dinners or Christmas dinners is when I hear, ‘Y’all putting enough salt in this or that?’ or, ‘How are y’all doing this?’

[Those are] the joys of the family business.” Just down the road from Southside Market, Gary Meyer of Meyer’s Elgin Smokehouse says December is often one of the busiest months for his family’s business, not only for the increase in mail-order but because of higher restaurant traffic owing to the popularity of cut-your-own tree farms. “You’d think summer is barbecue time,” Meyer says. “But, we have a lot of Christmas tree farms here in Elgin, and people are coming through here like crazy—out cutting their own trees.” Even when the embers are allowed to cool for a few days to allow time for family, the pit at House Park BBQ in Austin remains at the ready. Joe Sullivan cooks on a vintage pit that has been in use since 1943. That seasoned pit is part of what makes House Park distinctive, and Sullivan says the aroma lingers even when he closes up shop. “It builds up that magic I’m talking about, that smell. If we’re closed for [the] Christmas holiday for two weeks, you walk back there, you smell it,” Sullivan says. To read more about these and other barbecue traditions in the central Texas area, check out the book The Republic of Barbecue: Stories Beyond the Brisket available at local and online booksellers, or visit the project website at www.republicofbarbecue.com to listen to and read interviews. – The Republic of Barbecue: Stories Beyond the Brisket University of Texas Press www.republicofbarbecue.com

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Holidays at Faraday’s Lauren Wolf Photos by Brian Mihealsick

This recipe calls for dozens of eager bakers, three esteemed judges, and many hungry palettes of community patrons. Add four food categories, a dash of creativity, and one grand prize winner. Let all ingredients marinate on a Saturday in November, and you’re ready to dish out the annual Holiday Magic Baking Contest at Faraday’s Kitchen Store. 2009 marks just the third year of the contest, but this August people were already calling in to find out when this Central Texas holiday baking extravaganza would happen. Last year, the number of entries in the second annual contest had almost doubled in size. The popularity of the event is undoubtedly due to the mounting number of people who have become acquainted with Faraday’s, a local kitchen store “where everybody knows your name” after your first visit, à la Cheers. Faraday’s is quickly becoming a Hill Country gem for cooks, ranging from the novice to the professional.

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The baking contest is a favorite event of Store Manager Sharon O’Quinn’s. “This contest is my baby. I love doing this,” she says. “Half of the people who participate are regulars, and the others are people who have come to Faraday’s for the first time because of the baking contest.” The day of the event covers nearly every square inch of Faraday’s counter space with freshly baked goods. Dixie cups line the empty spaces in between and are filled with samples for tasting, so hungry patrons can taste the entries

and vote for the People’s Choice award. From simple cakes on holiday plates, to more decadent pies garnished with holly and decorative flair, the dishes are as much a treat for the eye as they are for the mouth. The contest has certainly evolved over time. The first year, 2007, was a cookies-only contest, won by Alison Campbell’s Chewy Chai Meringue Cookies. This year, the Holiday Baking Contest siphoned off entries into four different categories: cakes and cupcakes; pies, tarts, and torts; decorated specialties; and other.


Half of the people who participate are regulars, and the others are people who have come to Faraday’s for the first time because of the baking contest. sharon o’quinn, faraday’s store manager Since the first year, O’Quinn and Kelly Casey, Pastry Chef at nearby Hudson’s on the Bend, have judged the contest. There is also a guest judge; 2009 featured Virginia Wood, the Food Editor of the Austin Chronicle. There is a winner in each of the four categories, and one is chosen as the ultimate Grand Prize winner. That person receives a fantastic prize, which is generally one of the many products sold at Faraday’s. Last year it was a Viking Stand Mixer, which retails for $550. These folks mean business when it comes to celebrating their winners. The fun and welcoming atmosphere of the holiday baking contest is just a small slice of the community this local store has garnered. “We know our customers. We know when their daughter got married and we know the last thing they got when they came in shopping. They’ll even call for cooking tips!” says O’Quinn. Check out this year’s winning recipe, as well as a list of upcoming cooking classes, workshops and kids’ chef camp at faradayskitchenstore.com. – Faraday’s Kitchen Store 1501 RR 620, Suite A 512.266.5666 www.faradayskitchenstore.com

2008 winner

Fresh Pear Cake A recipe by Linda Adams, adapted from a Houston Junior League cookbook Combine, in a bowl: 4 cups pears, peeled and chopped 2 cups sugar 1 cup chopped pecans Stir often and let stand one hour. Sift: 3 cups flour 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. soda Add to pear mixture and stir to mix with a spoon.

1 tsp. vanilla Add this to pear mixture and stir to mix with a spoon. Pour pear mixture into a greased and floured bundt pan. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour and 15 minutes. If using a 9x12 pan, cook for a shorter time and check for doneness. Glaze: 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 cup buttermilk 1/4 cup butter Cook in a saucepan for 6-7 minutes. Drizzle over top of cake.

Next, in a bowl, whisk: 2 eggs 1 cup oil

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The Texas Maritime Museum Cordially invites you to the 14th Annual Belle Ball Fire & Ice Honoring WWII Veteran and Museum Volunteer

Hugh Jamieson Friday, December 4, 2009 7pm Cocktails & Auction 8pm Dinner & Dancing Rockport Country Club 101 Champions Drive Rockport, TX 78382

Fire&

$100 per ticket Black-Tie To purchase tickets please visit www.texasmaritimemuseum.org Or call (361) 729-1271 Net proceeds will benefit the Texas Maritime Museum’s Education Fund & Capital Campaign

ICE


Life. On top of the World. From the moment you arrive, your eyes are overwhelmed with the picturesque Texas Hill Country view, while the Tuscan inspired architecture enraptures your soul and beckons you to the stylish home interiors. Then you discover the extraordinary resident privileges such as an exclusive Sky Lounge, Yoga Studio, Tranquil Pools with Wi-Fi Hot Spots, Wii Game Lounge, Culinary Presentation Kitchen with ongoing cooking classes, 24-Hr Fitness Studio… and you realize this is an exceptional life destination. Alexan Vistas… An Address With Altitude. Toll-free: 866.372.9738 | 512.794.8439 7201 RR 2222 • Austin, TX 78730 www.AlexanVistas.com AlexanVistas@NewHome1.com

‘ tis the season for holiday greetings! .....get yours at inviting affairs....

VISTAS


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thank you

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A big thanks to our friends at Kerbey Lane Cafe for supporting local Austin non-profits. When you purchase Kerbey Lane Cafe gift cards through www.rareaustin.com, a portion of the proceeds will benefit this organization. RARE DECEMBER 2009


RARE GIVES BACK

Hunger: A 365 Day Issue Linsey Krauss Photos provided by Capital Area Food Bank

Spotlighting Austin’s Non-Profits

Over 20 years ago, a small group of concerned Austinites from several community organizations recognized the need for emergency feeding assistance and formed what is now known as the Capital Area Food Bank of Texas (CAFB). In CAFB’s first year, about 330,000 pounds of food were recovered from various companies and grocery stores. The food was then stored and distributed. And as greater need for assistance devastates Central Texas, the amount of food needed for distribution has grown substantially. In fact, more than 15 million pounds of food and grocery products are distributed each year. So, for this interview, I was excited to speak with CAFB President and CEO, David Davenport, who came to both Austin and the food bank in March 2008. Davenport was faced with several enormous challenges upon arrival; Austin took in thousands of Hurricane Ike evacuees from Houston and gas prices soared beyond four dollars a gallon. The dramatic changes in the city’s population, make-up, and economy caused a great deal of stress, compounding in such a way that Texas began to lead the nation for the highest rate of food insecurity for children.

You might be wondering, “Where are you going with this?” Well, to run these food banks, a great deal of time, money, and manpower are needed. Even so, Davenport believes that Austin is quite capable of accomplishing the work required. “Austin is an incredible community,” he says. “Many neighbors have helped through financial contributions, volunteer time, and have lent their voices to hunger issues.” But even with more than 13,000 volunteers last year dedicating over 77,000 hours, the job is never done. According to Davenport, the biggest misconception is the food bank’s size and reach. “Many folks might have a pantry in their neighborhood or church,” he explains. “What they don’t realize is that the food comes from the CAFB.”

He continues to reveal that the CAFB is quite large in size and scope. So large that the organization has a roughly 60,000 square foot facility that it has now outgrown, resulting in said expansion into satellite pantries. “The Food Bank is in new territory,” says Davenport. “For the last nine years, we’ve averaged 15 million pounds of food distributed a year. This year, we have distributed a record 22 million pounds of food. During this time of year, unbelievable tragedy often occurs and we always need help.” Join me and get involved: Visit www.hungerisunacceptable.com and learn more about how to embrace hunger in Austin.

– Capital Area Food Bank www.hungerisunacceptable.com

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D

downtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

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219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

11

Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankand angies.com

12

Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com

13

Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.296.2101 www.jblacks.com

14

Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

Blu 360 Nueces St. 512.904.5666 www.bluaustin.com Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreekside lounge.com

15

16

Key Bar 617 W. 6th St. 512.469.9610 www.keybaraustin.com La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondes aaustin.com

21

Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

32

Lofty Dog 403 W. 2nd St. 512.476.5050 www.austinloftydog.com

23

Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

33

Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com

24

The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

34

25

The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com

Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors.com

35

Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

36

Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

37

Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

26

Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarin texas.com

17

Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

18

Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

28

Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

Anthropologie 601 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.236.9301 www.anthropologie.com

29

By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

30

Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com

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19

20

Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfielddrug.com

Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

22

Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com

El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylaluna austin.com

31

27

Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltons-florist.com

41

42

Mexic-Art Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artmuseum.org Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

HEALTH & BEAUTY 43

Avant Salon 318 Colorado St. 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

44

Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

45

Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

46

Salon by Milk + Honey 237 W. 3rd St. 512.236.1112

LIVING

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE 38

39

40

46

Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com

47

AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512.472.4980 www.dcarch.com

48

Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org


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20

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2 30 31 36 12th

1

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23

7th

25 38

avez

lady bird/town lake

46 7 6 14 45

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17 32 16

h co

cesa

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40

5 3

6th

41 9 10 22 47 1 12 43

4

river

es

ity

jacin

nech

21 42

san

os br az 9th

trin

15 27

34 48

ress

39

13

11

cong

colo

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28

26

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alup guad

anto

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state capitol

sout

46

29 35

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18

37

sout h 1s

33

san

24

lama

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west

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aven u

10th

n

mop ac / l

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oop

1

11th

5th

8

44

4th

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MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

100

Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com Food Heads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com

8

Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

9

Mansion at Judges’ Hill 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

10

11

12 13

14

15

Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. #100 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991 Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

16

Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystaco.com

17

Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING

ARTS & LEISURE

18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

25

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

26

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

27

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservice vintage.com

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

21

22

23

24

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/ tripptshirts Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 29

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com

30

Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstone aesthetics.com

LIVING 31

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

32

M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

33

Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com


4

16

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21

P// 53 53rd RD

511s StT s StTrRe E

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45t

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34sTtH reSeTtR EE

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25

4433Rrd D Sst TRrEe 2 EeTt

32 10 7

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13 5

34th

11

DlAup LUeP E

38th 3 st8rTeH ST et REET

T

RErDedR r IVEivRer

lLaAm MaAr R

EE

DU dVuAval L

45 tr TH e SeTtR

28

15 30

NUECES

17 22 18 14 2929 thTH stST reRet EET 33 31 16 19

nueces

san ga SAbr iel

3

rio gr anGRA de NDE RIO

N GABRIEL

6

1

12

an DEAN KEde ETO N keeton

8

23 1

24th street 24TH

STREET

24 2 9

UNIVERSTY OF TEXAS

26

university of texas

mlk, jr.

a.vAe MLK, JR VE.

29

RARE DECEMBER 2009

27

101


M

midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

102

34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com

2

Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552

3

Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com

4

Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

5

Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

6

Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

7

Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaios restaurant.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

8

9

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

SHOPPING

15

16

17

Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera. com Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

10

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

11

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

18

12

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

19

13

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

14

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531

ARTS & LEISURE

HEALTH & BEAUTY 20

21

22

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 23

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com


justin ln.

2222

18

treet

19

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alupe

ee

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fe

f je

park way ical

ln.

med

bey

eet

20

str

treet

5

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35th s

38th

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guad

1

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r

ll

lama

bu

4

7 17 6

45th s

p

north loo

burnet

mopac / loop 1

ock

lam

3

2 hanc

ar

11

n so

34t

16

10 22 9

hs

15

austin state hospital

21

tre

et

12 13 14

8

1

38t

hs

tre

et

23

RARE DECEMBER 2009

103


E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

3

Clementine Coffee Bar 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.clementinec offeebar.com

4

5

6

7

8

104

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

9

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainy St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearl austin.com

17

10

Primizie Osteria 1000 E. 11th St. 512.236.0088 www.primizieaustin.com

18

11

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

19

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorked tastingroom.com

12

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

13

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastside showroom.com

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

14

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

15

Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com

16

Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

20

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING 21

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

22

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

23

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

24

25

26

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com Mode Apparel 1601 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.436.8924 www.myspace.com/ modeaustin Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy. com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Bird’s Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com

31

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

32

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

33

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

ARTS & LEISURE 27

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

28

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

29

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

LIVING 34

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

35

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

36

Urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com


east 38 1/2 dean keaton

7 3 6 4 20

air

or

man

rt po

29

17 east

. k, jr

ml

n sa

es rna l

1

pede

chicon

navaso ta

comal

east 7

th 30 35 36 12 18 31 5 east 6th 23 11 22 ea 14 26 st 5th 32 21 34 24 28 16 8 25 cesar ch27 a

y

15

le al

east 11th

tv

19

french legation

ea

2

od

ewo

ros

10 9

13 pl

red river

con

chi

33

vez

RARE DECEMBER 2009

105


S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2

11

Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

12

3

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

13

4

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com

14

Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com

5

6

7

8

9

106

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

10

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

15

16

17

18

Maudie’s Too 1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.440.8088 www.maudies.com

Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/ trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congres Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

SHOPPING 19

20

21

28

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com Back Home Furniture 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.327.7753 www.backhome furniture.com Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbowsplus arrows.com

22

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

23

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

24

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace.com/ 31622902

25

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/ austingoodietwoshoes

26

Off The Wall 1704 S. Congress Ave. 512.445.4701 www.offthewallaustin.com

27

The Black Sheep 1115 S. Congress Ave. 512.914.4771 www.blacksheep austin.com

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

36

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

37

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

ARTS & LEISURE 29

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

38

Pink Hair Salon 1204 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.2888 www.pinkaustin.com

30

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com

39

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

40

Yoga Yoga 1700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.326.3900 www.yogayoga.com

31

LIVING

HEALTH & BEAUTY 32

Ann Kelso Salon 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.467.2663 www.annkelsosalon.com

33

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

42

Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

34

Bird’s Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

43

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

35

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituation austin.com

41

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com


13 31

barton sprin

gs

1

lady bird /to wn riv lak er s e ide

/ lo op 1

17 21 29 28 eliz

abet

mon

40

milt

mo pac

12

h

roe

on

4

ann

ie

live

5o

19

oak

15

ltorf

42 37

south

2

20 8 39

manch

aca

360

ry

cong ress

23

south 5th

10

m

la

24 18 26 35

t ma

1st

h

ut

so

wes

ar

south

34

30

3 38 9 1 27 14 7 32 25 22 43 6

h

ite

en wh

0/b wy 29

290

36 16 11

33

41RARE DECEMBER 2009

107


W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

2

Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

3

108

10

11

12

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961

4

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

5

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

6

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com

7

Magnolia Cafe 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com

8

Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com

9

Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

13

Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

22

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

Beehive 3300 Bee Caves Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

23

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

24

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

25

Valentines Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488

Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

17

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

18

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com

19

Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

20

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

21

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

27

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

28

Mix 94.7 4301 Westbank Dr. 512.390.5947 www.mix947.com

29

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

31

32

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

LIVING 33

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com


12 33

2222

29

31

ba l

lake austin

25 10 13 westlake dr

n co

es

mount bonnell

35th street

26

cap

4

1

11 1 6 19 lak ea 9 u

5

c / lo

enfield

sti nb

hw

c re ek

16 23 2244 24 20

bee

cav

er

oa

d

14 15

lvd .

3 8 2 22 7

18 21

b ar ton

27

17 30

360

y6

20

mopa

620

op 1

exposition

620

ita lo ft ex as h

wy

.

28 32

RARE DECEMBER 2009

109


N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

1

2

3

4

110

FOOD & DRINK

9

300 Austin 9504 N. IH-35 512.834.7733 www.3hundred.com

10

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Crú The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

5

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

6

Jasper’s 11506 Century Oaks Ter, Ste 128 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

7

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

8

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

11

12

13

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com

17

Free People 11401 Century Oaks Terrace 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

25

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobalartsgroup.com

32

Birds Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com

Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com

18

Intermix 11600 Century Oaks # 116 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

26

Zara 3409 Esperanza Crossing 512.491.0920

33

Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com

19

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

27

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

34

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

20

Loft The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com

35

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

36

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

SHOPPING 14

15

16

Barney’s New York Co-op 11601 Century Oaks # 121 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com Betsey Johnson 11506 Centure Oaks Ter 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

21

22

23

24

Luxe Apothetique The Domain 11600 Century Oaks Ter. 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique

ARTS & LEISURE 28

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com

29

Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com Tiffany & Co. 11601 Century Oaks Ter 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

LIVING 37

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

38

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

31

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com


28

11

37 7

30 10

parmer

PARMER

14 24 the domain 6 15 18 21 36 4 26 17 20

183

33 13

9

BRAKER

31

s

eat

gr

25

braker

mopac / loop 1

16

34

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8

S

ILL

12 32

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prin

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2

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27

29 n ln.

ander so

LAMAR

35

23

38 .

ANDERSON LN

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FAR WEST

2222

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PIT

BURNET

MESA

183 / RESEARCH BLVD

burnet

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2222

NORTHL

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111


A

HAPPENINGS

DECEMBER The Nutcracker December 5 – 23 The Long Center for the Performing Arts Photo by Mark Herron

ART Arthouse Presents: Okay Mountain at Pulse Miami Contemporary Art Fair December 3 – 6 Arthouse at the Jones Center www.arthousetexas.org B Scene December 4, 6 – 11 pm Blanton Museum of Art www.blantonmuseum.org Opening Reception: Feast December 5, 6 – 8 pm Wally Workman Gallery www.wallyworkmangallery.com Leighelena Jewelry Showcase December 8, 5 pm Solid Gold www.solidgoldacademy.com

112

RARE DECEMBER 2009

Fine Food Art Night December 10, 6 – 8 pm Wally Workman Gallery www.wallyworkmangallery.com

December 17, 6 – 8 pm d berman gallery www.dbermangallery.com

Luminations: A Winter Celebration Saturday and Sunday, December 12 – 13, 6 pm Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center www.wildflower.org

ENTERTAINMENT

Trail of Lights and Zilker Christmas Tree Zilker Park www.ci.austin.tx.us/tol

Argentine Tango Classes Every Saturday, 1 pm Esquina Tango www.esquinatangoaustin.com

Opening Reception: Winter Group Show

Coldtowne Improv Every Saturday, 10 pm

Austin Poetry Slam Every Wednesday, 8 pm The Independent www.austinindependent.com

Coldtowne Theater www.coldtownetheater.com Community Night Every Wednesday, 5 pm Austin Children’s Museum www.austinkids.org Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz Every Wednesday, 8 pm Little Woodrow’s South Park Meadows www.littlewoodrows.com The 47th Annual Production of The Nutcracker December 5 – 23 The Long Center for the Performing Arts www.thelongcenter.org

The Austin Symphony presents Handel’s “Messiah” December 8 Riverbend Centre www.austinsymphony.org Armadillo Christmas Bazaar December 11 – 24 Austin Convention Center www.austinconventioncenter.com The Austin Symphony presents Christmas Sing-Along December 15 Riverbend Centre www.austinsymphony.org


Manor Farmer’s Market Every Wednesday, 5 pm www.manorfarmersmarket.org Tai Chi with Guy Forsyth & Angel Quesada Every Tuesday, 1 pm Ruta Maya www.rutamaya.net

Junior Brown December 5 Antone’s www.antones.net

Avant Salon Service-A-Thon benefiting the Miracle Foundation December 6 www.avantsalon.com

Davy Knowles & Back Door Slam December 6 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

MUSIC

Baroness, Earthless December 7 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Breathe Carolina December 1 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Willie Nelson December 15 at Austin Music Hall Image courtesy of Lost Highway

Austin Children’s Choir presents Candlelight Lessons and Carols December 20 St. Mark’s Episcopal Church www.austinchildrenschoir.com A Texas Christmas Carol December 30 – 31, 8 pm The Long Center www.thelongcenter.org Austin Symphony Orchestra presents Duke Ellington Orchestra with Freda Payne December 31, 8 pm Palmer Events Center www.palmereventscenter.com

First Night Austin 2010 December 31 www.firstnightaustin.org Live at Seaholm: 2010 Uncorked December 31 Seaholm Power Plant www.liveatseaholm.com

WELLNESS Austin Farmer’s Market Every Saturday, 8 am – 12 pm Every Wednesday, 4 pm – 8 pm www.austinfarmersmarket.org

Mothers Hips December 4 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Metric, Band of Skulls December 1 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com Benjy Davis Project December 3 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Aesop Rock, Rob Sonic, DJ Big Wiz December 4 The Mohawk www.mohawkaustin.com

Framing Strangers December 7 The Mohawk www.mohawk.com Alejandro Escovedo December 8 The Continental Club www.continentalclub.com Drew Holcomb December 8 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Bobby Long December 9 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Full Service December 4 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

Jay Reatard December 9 Emo’s www.emosaustin.com

Kiss December 4 Frank Erwin Center www.uterwincenter.com

Golden Arm Trio & Invincible Czars Christmas Show December 11 The Mohawk www.mohawk.com

The Rural Alberta Advantage and Adam Arcuragi, The Eastern Sea December 11 The Parish www.theparishroom.com The Dutchess and the Duke December 12 The Mohawk www.mohawk.com Willie Nelson December 15 Austin Music Hall www.austinmusichall.com Phoenix, White Denim, Hockey December 17 La Zona Rosa www.lazonarosa.com Rooney December 19 Emo’s www.emos.com Joe Purdy December 20 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com Bob Schneider December 21 Saxon Pub www.thesaxonpub.com Woody Allen and His New Orleans Jazz Band December 28 Paramount Theater www.austintheatre.org Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears December 31 Stubb’s BBQ www.stubbsaustin.com

RARE DECEMBER 2009

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RARE DECEMBER 2009

Rare Magazine :: December 2009 :: Winter  

Rare Magazine :: December 2009 :: Winter

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