Page 1


MNOAB

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

BCDEFGHIJKM FGHIJKMNO

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC

NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC

BCDEFGHIJKM

BCDEFGHIJKM FGHIJKMNO

NO

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NO

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NO

FGHIJKMNO

NOABC

NO

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NO MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NO

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NO

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB

AB AB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

MNOAB MNOAB

NO

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

AB AB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

AB AB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC AB AB

NOABC

AB AB

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Annie Ray :: annieray.net Caroline Mowry :: carolinemowry.com Cory Ryan :: coryryan.com Chad Harlan :: lapistola.com Derris Lanier :: lostcreekphotography.com Jaime Ibarra :: ibarraphoto.com Jennifer Nichols :: jnicholsphoto.com Nick Enghardt :: nmephoto.com

MNOAB MNOAB

AB AB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

NOABC

WRITERS: Carly Kocurek Cynthia Houchin Darcie Duttweiler JB Hager Laura Hensley Linsey Krauss Nicole Carbon Tolly Moseley

AB AB

NOABC

Photo by Chad Harlan

MNOAB AB

STAFF: Matt Swinney, Publisher Carrie Crowe, Associate Publisher & Editor Justin Esquivel, Senior Art Director Kristen Hurd, Art Director Missi Jay, Illustrator Roxanne Wilson, Director of Sales Liz Farrar, Account Executive Analee Paz, Intern

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

4

NOABC

Matt Swinney Publisher matt@rareaustin.com

NOABC

So, faithful Rare readers, please have a safe, fun, joyous, stress-free holiday season. Be positive. Know that things in Austin are much better than they are in lots of other places. Turn the corner and always look on the bright side. We’ll see you again in 2009!

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

I’ve also been so proud to work on Austin Restaurant Week this year. The community of restaurant owners, chefs, GMs and staff in Austin is truly remarkable. Having the opportunity to work so closely with them, for what turned out to be an amazing event, was beyond what I expected. I thank them profusely for taking a chance that ultimately paid off. I also thank all of you for participating, and we can’t wait to bring it back to you again this spring.

MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

I also find myself thinking about our current economic climate. Like any small business, Rare has certainly seen its share of hiccups, but its been truly amazing to watch all of these strong-willed local business-owners pull themselves up by their bootstraps and, in the immortal words of Tim Gunn, “make it work.”

NOABC

This year, I find myself thinking about what I’ve been so proud to be a part of this year. On the personal side, our daughter is now almost 17 months and is an actual little person. It’s insanely fun to see her develop every day and to know that Kara and I have such of a beautiful opportunity to help mold her into anything she ultimately wants to be.

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

Every year when I write my holiday Publisher’s Letter, I honestly feel a little verklempt. Not in a bad way — in a way that just reminds me what I feel like during the holiday season. I guess I’m lucky — because I have to write this letter, I begin feeling that Christmas spirit before most people get to (the joy of early print deadlines…).

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

Things may be totally different by the time you’re actually reading this, but I’m writing this letter on a crisp October morning, thinking about what December has in store for us.

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

OABC

PUBLISHER

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB


MNOAB

FGHIJKMNO BCDEFGHIJKM FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

FGHIJKMNO BCDEFGHIJKM FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

BCDEFGHIJKM FGHIJKMNO

NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC

BCDEFGHIJKM

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NOABC

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NOABC

NOABC NOABC NOABC

FGHIJKMNO

NOABC

NOABC

NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC NOABC

FGHIJKMNOABCDEFGHIJKM

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

Perspective: Dean Fredrick

36

Radio City Rockettes

44

Perspective: Cathy McHorse

46

Cupcake Bar

50

Christmas Sing Along

54

Paper Place and Inviting Affairs

58

Perspective: Denise Silverman

62

Chef’s Holiday Recipes

68

Tips For Going Green

72

Perspective: Stephen Tatton

74

Treehouse Gift Shop

80

Lowbrow Emporium

84

New Year’s Hangover Remedies

88

Torchy’s Tacos

94

Perspective: Mark Murray

96

Austin Carolers

100

300 Austin

102

Perspective: Susan Parker

104

Longhorn Services

106

Rare Gives Back: Any Baby Can

108

Maps

MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

32

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

Capitol Tree Lighting

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

28

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

12 Days of Christmas

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

12

NOABC

NOABC

MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

JB Rants

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

8

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

On The Cover: Allison Gregory

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

6

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

NOABC MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB MNOAB

NOABC

MNOAB MNOAB

MNOAB

5


Each issue, Rare Magazine chooses a local Austin artist to feature on our cover and section introduction pages. This month’s feature artist is Allison Gregory. Make sure you check out her art scattered throughout the magazine.

ALLISON GREGORY’S

Creative Patterns

6


When I pull into Allison Gregory’s driveway, she’s painting in her garage. The space is (for the most part) orderly, but works are lined up against the walls, and the floor covering is blasted with splatters of bright color. Although Gregory works on her art full-time now, her post-college career got off to a rocky start. After graduating from the University of Redlands and struggling for a year, she went to Platt College to pursue a graduate degree in graphic design and illustration. The move seemed practical, but Gregory realized she was never going to be satisfied working nine to five. And so, she moved back to her parents’ house in San Antonio, a decision that turned out to be crucial to helping her transition into a career as an artist.

“Living in my mom’s house, I painted day and night. I did 15 paintings in three weeks, had my first show and sold six paintings,” Gregory says. Encouraged by the success of that show, Gregory threw herself full-time into her artwork, and completed over 200 paintings in her first year, working six and seven days a week.
 Gregory works in a range of styles, moving from abstract pieces to figurative works: “I’m not a landscape artist or an abstract artist,” Gregory says. “I do everything, and I wanted to do a bit of all the things that represent my work.” If anything about Gregory’s artwork is consistent, it’s her use of color. While she’ll dabble in styles and shif t from figurative works to abstraction, Gregory almost always sticks to the vivid palette, and she never, ever wastes a single inch of a canvas.

Taking cues not only from Haring but from Andy Warhol, and other pop artists, Gregory is deeply influenced by more readily accessible bits of culture, including the clean graphic appeal of the Rubik’s Cube and the bright twinkling pixelation of Lite Brite. She’s also fascinated by patterns, and many of her favorite contemporary artists (including Rex Roy and Beatriz Milhazes) work with pat terns inspired by textiles and graphic design. She’s also currently obsessing over the lowbrow art movement, which strikes a chord because of her love of illustration. Gregory’s unique mixing of styles owes in part to her influences and her bold use of color, but also to her method — she never plans works (unless they’re commissions) and she literally never uses paintbrushes.

 “I don’t use paintbrushes on any of my paintings,” Gregory says. “I use the backs and tips of pencils. There’s no brush made that would let me get the details I want.” 

 Those details can include dots so small they border on being invisible. Gregory also layers her works, and a single painting can have 15 layers on it, covering every inch of the canvas again and again. That level of repetition explains why Gregory can spend anywhere from two days to six months on a single work. Gregory may have gotten away from the overwhelming work pace that helped her get started, but she’ll likely never escape the attention to detail and willingness to work that got her where she is now — they’re visible in every completed piece. Carly Kocurek Photo by Jaime Ibarra allisongregoryfineart.com

“I think, most importantly, what I can say about my art is that I’m influenced by 1980s pop culture,” Gregory says. “The reason I started painting and drawing was Keith Haring.”

 7


When I was a kid, I would put deep concentration into exactly what I wanted for Christmas. I remember wanting things that would impress my friends — good, solid conversation pieces. It’s in guys’ blood to be competitive, braggadocios and just plain show-offs. My parents, bless their hearts, just sort of “missed the mark” as far as gifts went. I’ll admit, we were a family of modest means, but sometimes I wanted to show the other kids at elementary school that I had an “edge.” I recall some of those incidents when my parents not only missed the bull’s eye, but the dart missed the board entirely — putting yet another hole in the wood paneling that was my ego. This is the reason why I’ve started spoiling my child. I distinctly recall the first thing I ever REALLY wanted. A skateboard. A killer one.

All I Want for Christmas u want for “Honey, what do yo know what Christmas? I don’t n’t think to get you.” I do od answer I’ve ever had a go , since I to that question s old. I’m was about 12 year adult male, a deeply scared it rapidly but making up for through my and vicariously ain. child. I’ll expl

8

It was the mid 1970s and the boom of the first extreme sport. Skateboarding Magazine had just come out, and guys were shredding abandoned swimming pools and empty half pipes. I wanted so badly to be part of this culture. The technology of skateboards was booming at the time, but this was lost on my folks. That skateboard was the only thing I requested for Christmas that year. I would be ready to shred as soon as the snow melted in Kansas City the following spring. I remember opening that sadly wrapped skateboard, purchased at the local Ace Hardware store. It was a skinny board that said “Goofyfoot” on it. The thing had metal wheels! No lie. Do you remember the old metal skates that would strap around your shoes, probably popular in the 1950s? I had the skateboard version of that, barely a generation above a soapbox car. Not exactly the envy of the neighborhood kids. It was amazing the power of a TV commercial back then. Apparently, fans of “Gilligan’s Island,” “The Brady Bunch” and “The Beverly Hillbillies” were prime targets for slot car racing. I’ll never forget the commercials for TCR, Total Control Racing. This was slot car racing with the ability to change lanes and pass on one section of the track. I was enamored with it. I was certain that the TCR was going to be waiting for me under the tree. Instead, there was a racetrack that year, but not quite what I hoped for. It was, and I’m not making this up, a Hot Wheels set. Age appropriate for a kid fi ve years younger than me. The pieces of track were wonderful for abusing my sisters, but needed to be hidden when friends came over.


The next thing I remember wanting badly was an electronic football game. Coleco had come out with an amazing hand-held game called Electronic Quarterback. It was really the first generation of what has now evolved into things like Game Boy. Mobile coolness. It was pretty high tech for 1978. They had come out with the new version for two players at once called Head-to-Head Football. Tournaments were popular on my school bus rides home, so I needed to get better, quickly. I humbly put in my request that year. My mom, bless her heart, did her best, but got me Electric Football, which was a table sized football field. It was popular...about fi ve years prior. You set up all your players on the fi eld (a table), the opponent set up theirs (which were basically action fi gures) and then you turned on the machine, which was plugged in. The table would vibrate until your players fell down. It was ridiculous, and even harder to play on the bus without electricity. Needless to say, I didn’t make any new friends that year. The following year, I had high expectations once again. Jam boxes were huge that year. I don’t mean huge as in popular, I mean they were HUGE. The bigger the better. Junior high was in full swing and there was nothing cooler than showing up to a track meet with a monster radio. John Herrera was the most popular kid in our school because he always had the latest, greatest jam box. I recall one that included a record player! He was a shot putter on the track team, so hauling it around was not an issue. I simply put “Jam Box” on my wish list that year. I had distinctly different tastes in music from John and needed my own device. That year, I opened my Panasonic tape recorder. It in NO WAY resembled a jam box. I could have run the mile with it in my shorts. It would have come in handy if I was dictating legalese, but unfortunately on a 7th grade education, not necessary. Have you noticed the common thread? I’ve been chronically fi ve years behind the rest of the world my entire life. Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not complaining. I’m merely doing some soul searching as to why I’m overcompensating now. Do you think it’s a bit odd that I bought my daughter a computer when she was a fetus, have a car waiting for her in the driveway (and she’s just learning to read) and have already booked her on a commercial flight to the moon?

JB Hager is half of the hit morning-show duo “JB and Sandy” on Mix 94.7. Photos by Chad Harlan 9

JB, Erin and Raleigh Hager


from: s o f S as Touch ass.com t

Linear Green Quartz & Citrine

s o u cho f

by Mabel Chong $125

Carnelian Toulouse Earrings by Sarah Briggs $80

Mixed Gem Pendant Necklace by Mabel Chong $485

12

Vertical Oval Green Agate

Pounded Band with Blue Topaz CZ

by Marcia Moran $125

by Kevia $145

Onyx Vertical Oval by Sheila Fajl $165


“Lilly” Peep Toe Bootie by Pour La Victoire $265

“Divine” Jewelled Paisley Flat by Tibi $360

“Isoka” Ostrich Platform by Donald Pliner $375

from: Fetisahu stin.com f e t i sh

13


from: Tylersu stin.com t yl e r s

a

Triple Eight Brainsaver Helmet $29.99

Sector “Rising” Skateboard

Brine Triumph 20 Kid’s Soccer Ball

$129.99

$12.99

Brine Lacross Stick/Head $49.99/$89.99

Nike T90 Strike Soccer Cleats $84.99

14


Jose Minguell Wood & Leather Chair $800 to $1,400 (custom options)

Stella Chair $799 (available in blue, black, white and brown)

Spencer Sofa $1900

Refuse Chair $250

Buttercup Rocker $849

from: IF 窶的 Dstin.com if dau

15


from: K orman om .c ll R u sse ormanjewlery r u s se l

Omega 007 James Bond Seamaster Watch

lk

$3,900

Breitling Chronomatic Watch $24,505

Pandora Customized Charm Bracelets (price determined by charms/beads)

Tag Heuer Lady’s Diamond Chronograph Watch $4,500

16


Adia Kibur Afro Ring

Anne Taintor Flask

$12

$25

Miss Me Couture Ginger Jacket $150

Anne Taintor Coin Purses

from: F l ir t a u s t i n . c o m  ir t i

n

$15

17


from: ke a TownmLal Shelteirmal s Ani .tx.u s/an ci.au s

t in

Adoption Fee $75 (includes spay/neuter, vaccinations, microchip, Austin pet registration fee and collar)

18


Reem Acra One-Of-A-Kind-Gown $6,998

Juan Carlos Silver One-Of-A-Kind Gown $2,198

Marc Bouwer Animal Gown $898

from: omas h St. Ttique ue.com q Bou b o ut i st t ho

m as

19


Gym membership

from: ym 窶的 Spa G m Mecca mandspa.co m ecca

$500 (initiation fee) $125 (per month)

gy

Diptyque Candles $60

60 Minute Facial $105 (non-members) $90 (members)

50 Minute Massage $95 (non-members) $80 (members)

Lippmann Collection Nail Polish $15

20


Fender “Joe Strummer” Relic Electric Guitar $899.95

Carter Double Neck Steel Guitar

Marshall “Jimi Hendrix” Super 100 JH Amplifi er $4,599.95

$2,700

from: makers com . c M u si a k e r s a u s t i n mu si

cm

21


from: er & Bliss .com Shimm db l i s s m e r an

Soy and Bamboo Body Wraps

sh i m

$65 and $85

Silk Scarves $40 to $125

22


Sterling Silver Semi-Precious Jewelry

Kayci Garline Belt and Buckle

by Mae Mae Stiles (prices vary)

$42

Austin Designed Leather Boots by Inca Boot Company $150 (short) $190 (tall)

Vinyl Samurai Wallet by JNA Designs $35

from: M ox i e mo

dth x i e an

ecom

p o un

d.c o m

23


24


Allison Gregory / Starry Night in Austin / Acrylic and Enamel on Canvas

25


28


Christmas

CONGRESS STYLE

LOOKING TO JOIN IN AN AUSTIN TRADITION THAT HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE 1995? HEAD ON OVER TO THE DOWNTOWN AUSTIN ALLIANCE’S CAPITAL TREE LIGHTING TO ENJOY THE LONG- STANDING TRADITION AND HOLIDAY LIGHTS.

The ceremony, which includes traditional carols and a downtown stroll along Congress Avenue into galleries, stores and restaurants, offers live music and family entertainment prior to and following the tree lighting. The Capitol Tree stands at the south (main) entrance to the State Capitol at Congress and 11th.

Partnering with Austin Music Foundation and working with Austin Art Alliance, the tree lighting ceremony draws about 10,000 people.

“We want the entire downtown area to come alive,” says Lacy LaBorde of the Downtown Austin Alliance. “Every year, we continue to make it bigger and better.”

For the past eight years, the Downtown Austin Alliance has provided the decorations and lights that line Congress Avenue. This year, they will be debuting new holiday lights that will be particularly special and unveiled during the night of the stroll. The new lights use the latest technology that will save 85 percent of the total amount of electricity from one traditional blub.

This year is no exception. This event has been a long standing Austin tradition that originally star ted out as t wo separate events: The Downtown Austin Alliance’s tree lighting at the Capitol (along with Congress decorations) and a KUT sponsored sing-along. Somewhere along the way, the two decided to join forces to create the Downtown Capitol Tree Lighting Ceremony that we know today. The event kicks of f on Saturday, December 6th, and the tree continues to stay lit though January 2nd.

“ We kick t hin gs of f ea r ly in D e c em b er to encourage people to start the holidays downtown, with the greater Austin community,” says Lacy.

“Along with the new lights, the night will feature entertainers up and down Congress for interactive family fun,” says Lacy. Linsey Krauss Photos by Nick Enghardt downtownaustin.com

THE DECEMBER 6TH SCHEDULE Hosted by John Aielli 6:00PM: FAMILY SING-ALONG 7:00PM: TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY 7:00PM – 9:00PM: CONGRESS STROLL

29


30


31


Dean Fredrick Jewelry Designer: Deanfredrick

32

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


Leave it to Dean to bring on the bling this holiday season! His colorful creations may be first on your wish list, but as the saying goes, when it comes time to unwrap, you’ll likely “save the best for last.” What does celebrating the holidays in Austin mean to you? I love shopping in all the local shops, and buying goofy local nick knacks for friends who live outside Austin. They always appreciate the crazy side of Austin.

What is your favorite part about the holidays?

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received? My first bike when I was about fi ve or six years old. It was blue and yellow, sparkle flaked paintjob, with a matching banana seat. It was awesome — and stolen about two weeks later.

What is the most unusual gift you’ve ever received?

I am usually finishing up last minute orders until Christmas Eve. So, when everything is completed (hopefully) I can finally relax and enjoy family and friends.

I was about 12 years old and my aunt gave me this long feathery looking thing, with a clip at the end. It was one of those elaborate roach clips from the 1970s. She had no idea what it was…but I did.

What are your family’s holiday traditions?

How do the holidays affect your business?

My nephew hates the movie E.T. and every year we wrap the same E.T. doll up and give it to him. It’s priceless seeing his face and we love it. We’ve done this for the past six or seven years now. It’s officially a tradition.

It gets really crazy. I’m usually delivering jewelry all the way up to Christmas Eve. A lot of my business includes custom orders, and I always get these guys coming in and asking for a custom ring five days before Christmas. Guys, if you want a custom piece of jewelry made for your lady, plan ahead…at least three weeks.

Any special holiday recipes? Rye Whiskey and Ginger Ale (Highball)

What is Christmas day like for your family? Usually, I’m getting awakened by the youngest in the family (at the crack of dawn) to unwrap presents. Then, our traditional family dinner, which usually takes place around 2 or 3pm (I don’t know why they call it dinner). Turkey, honey baked ham, mashed potatoes, casseroles, vegetables and wine. Then, we all take naps because we’re all so fat and tired.

Dean Fredrick, Deanfredrick, 902 E. 5th St., 512-493-0943, deanfredrick.com

How does your profession contribute during the holidays? It’s nice to know that pieces I make for clients are usually the “money shot” gifts. The big one. The one gift that is usually the last to be given.

Any big New Year’s Eve plans? Resolutions? I’m sure I’ll pop open a nice bottle of champagne with good friends to ring in the New Year. This year will mark my three-year anniversary for not smoking. That was the best resolution I ever made and kept. So, I’m sticking to that one.

33


WEEKLY WEEKLY REGISTER WEEKLY WEEKLY

EMAILS EMAILS EMAILS EMAILS

{answer: register for weekly emails} Subscribe today! rareaustin.com


THEIR WA Y IN T O

WHEN YOU THINK OF THE MACY MACY’ S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE PARADE, A FEW THINGS COME TO MIND: FLOATS EAR- MUFFED NEWSCASTERS. A GIANT INFLATABLE EAR GARFIELD. AND AND, MOST NOTABLY, DANCERS. THE HIGH-KICKS! THE SANTA SUITS! THIS YEAR, AMERICA’S HIGH ICONIC DANCE TROUPE IS COMING TO AUSTIN.

LA DIE S A N D G E N TLE M A N , M EET T H E

RAD IO C ITY ROC KET T ES.

36


With a history that reaches back to 1932, The Rockettes have long enjoyed a home base in New York City. This year, on their 76th anniversary, they are leaving their famous Radio City Music Hall to perform for 18 cities during the holiday season. Dubbed the “Radio City Christmas Spectacular,” it is quite literally the biggest Christmas production in the country.

“O UR

CHRISTMAS

S HOW

HAS

B EEN

“We love being in Austin — everyone is so nice and easy to talk to,” says Dezeeuw, who stopped by the Frank Erwin Center last September. “We want this show to be a really special thing for Austin, since not everyone has the chance to come to New York for the holidays.”

R E-IMAGINED

F OR

A R EN A S , A N D P E OP L E R E A L L Y CANNOT EV EN COMPR EH END H O W H U G E I T I S . T H E R E I S A FLYING SANTA CLAUSE. SNOW F A L L I N G FR OM T H E S K Y. FI R E W OR K S. WH AT Y OU’R E GETTING

During the show, fans can expect to see plenty of classic Rockette dance numbers, like their signature “Parade of Wooden Soldiers” and “New York at Christmas,” backed by an enormous LED screen designed to turn arenas all over the country into a virtual Times Square.

W I T H T H E S E T O U R S I S S O M ETHING EVEN LARGER THAN IF

“My vision for the Rockettes and the Christmas Spectacular has always been to explore, scale and take the precision dance form to new levels, whether in a theatrical venue or an arena space,” said Linda Haberman, director and choreographer of the Radio City Christmas Spectacular. “In my view, the mark of a true classic is that it is timeless, relevant and can be re-interpreted to push artistic boundaries.”

Y O U C A M E T O N E W Y OR K TO SEE US,” SAY S R OCK ETTE L A U R A H E N N I N G , A H OU S T ON NATIV E. Just how big is it? The tour involves a traveling army of 200 crew members, 38 buses, and — no joke — live donkeys, sheep and goats. “We do a Living Nativity Scene with live animals,” says Rockette Ashley Dezeeuw, now in her third year with the team. “It opens up with a mountain, and tells the story of the three kings. By the end, people are literally crying in the audience.”

Tolly Moseley Photo by Cory Ryan radiocitychristmas.com uterwincenter.com

Best known for their leggy kick lines, tap numbers and highprecision (think military) dance style, The Rockettes have defi ned family-friendly entertainment for generations. Their Christmas Spectacular is making a stop in Austin late December, with performances on December 30th and 31st at the Frank Erwin Center.

37


Have a Blue Christmas

Jewelry s Handbags s Gifts

5th & Lamar 512-478-SASS www.touchofsass.net


40


Allison Gregory / A Neon New Year’s / Acrylic on Canvas

41


Cathy McHorse Teacher: Austin ISD

44

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


Whether she’s volunteering with the Junior League of Austin, caroling down Turnabout Lane or spinning under the Zilker tree, Cathy always takes time to teach her children the true meaning of Christmas — giving back to the community. What does celebrating the holidays in Austin mean to you? Now that I’ve lived in Austin for 17 years, I can’t imagine celebrating anywhere else! It means shopping at A Christmas Affair, donating a gift at the Chuy’s Parade, fi nding a night to visit the Trail of Lights, caroling on Turnabout Lane, shopping for our Christmas tree while wearing shorts (which I could NEVER do growing up in Maryland!) and a little hope of a white Christmas. Plus, the opportunity to teach our children the meaning of the Christmas spirit — giving to community organizations in need such as the Christmas bureau, Angel Tree, Partnership for Children, etc.

What is your favorite part about the holidays? Lights! Christmas lights on houses, candles in church at the midnight service, spinning under the Zilker tree, stars on a cold winter night.

What are your family’s holiday traditions? The holiday season usually kicks-off with a few traditional arguments among the children — which Christmas tree to purchase and whose turn it is to put the angel on the tree. This led me to the traditional “check on the computer” for last year’s still unprinted (but at least downloaded) Christmas photos for evidence! On Christmas Eve, my children still set out food for Santa’s reindeer and track Santa’s route around the world on the Norad website. They write letters to Santa that I’ve saved every year and re-read to see the amusing ways they grow and change in a year’s time. My in-laws have a huge Santa placed on their roof and the “theme” that surrounds Santa’s pose is a huge family discussion during Thanksgiving. When Lance Armstrong won his last Tour de France, Santa was on a bike. When a grandbaby is born in the family, Santa holds a baby.

Cathy McHorse, Austin ISD, austinisd.org

Any special holiday recipes? My mother-in-law always sprinkles crushed peppermints on grapefruit for Christmas morning…simple yet festive.

What is Christmas day like for your family? The past few years, my husband and I have thankfully been able to sleep past dawn as our children have entered their elementary and teen years. We try to enjoy a quiet cup of coffee before we venture to let the children come downstairs and discover the special Santa gifts that remain unwrapped. Our two oldest give a knowing wink to us when their little brother wonders how Santa got the gifts in the house. Each year, I seem to see all the more that my own children take joy in giving gifts as much, if not more, than receiving them. After our private hour or so, we drive less than a mile to my in-laws home and enjoy the Christmas chaos that comes with a house of eight grandchildren, ranging from age 13 to infant.

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received? I found out that I was pregnant with my oldest a few days before Christmas, and I surprised my husband with the news on Christmas morning.

How does your profession contribute during the holidays? I am a volunteer with the Junior League of Austin, and have had the pleasure of working with our Coats for Kids project. Each year, this program distributes thousands of coats to children in need in our community. Highland Park Elementar y, where I teach, not only contributes coats for this, but also engages in several other community service projects for children during the holidays and throughout the year. 45


WHILE VISIONS OF DANCED IN THEIR HEADS Once upon a time, cupcakes were just another accoutrement at kids’ birthday parties, next to cone hats and fruit punch. But like the cosmopolitan and Manola Blahniks, “Sex and the City” came along and helped rocket the humble cupcake to fame. As Miranda and Carrie bite into their fluffy pink treats from Magnolia Bakery in Manhattan, trading witty quips about — what else? — men and sex, thousands of fans took note. Cupcakes = hip and trendy! Now, the cupcake craze has hit Austin, and with a little help from The Cupcake Bar, you can get in on the sugar-laced fun.

46


Still in its very first year of operation, The Cupcake Bar offers something a little different from the standard cupcake outpost. That’s because the “bar” actually comes to you, like a catering service — which is exactly how it originated.

SO HOW EXACTLY DOES THE CUPCAKE BAR WORK? STEP 1: Customize. Meet with Schneider and Saldivar, who will walk you through cake options, flavors of filling and frostings and toppings. “People usually pick out 10 to 13 toppings, and we can do it all — Pop ro cks, c ot ton ca nd y, you na me it,” says Schneider. From there, you can doll up your event with beverages or ice cream.

“I was doing catering, plus menu research and development for a national restaurant chain,” says owner Lori Schneider, who has an AOS in Culinary Arts from the Texas Culinary Academy. “Then, at KL Lighting Studios’ Christmas party last year, I came up with the idea to do a customized cupcake bar. We brought cakes, filling, frosting and all kinds of toppings, and all the guests came up and designed their own cupcakes with their own “Cupcake Bartender.” Peoples’ faces completely lit up when they saw it.”

STEP 2: Entertain. When you approach the bar, you’ll pick out the cupcake flavor you want, a filling, your favorite icing and a slew of toppings. “Guys actually make the funniest cupcakes, because they just pile everything on. Sort of like making a Suicide at the soda fountain,” says Schneider.

From there, The Cupcake Bar was born, and today, it’s a thriving business. It’s not hard to see why, either: When party hosts enlist the Bar’s services, they get to sit back and relax during the event itself, while a cupcake “bartender” designs cakes for everyone. “The holidays can be so stressful, especially for anyone throwing a party,” says Schneider, who runs The Cupcake Bar operations with event designer Lisa Saldivar. “We actually come to your event, set everything up with a bar and linens, and provide fun enter tainment throughout the night. It’s completely family-friendly. We do everything from ‘cupcakes and cocktails’ events for adults, to baby showers, to kids’ birthday parties.”

STEP 3: Enjoy. The Cupcake Bar not only handles set-up and event entertainment, but cleans up after itself, too.

GENIUS HOLIDAY CUPCAKE IDEAS:

“We get a ton of people after their event say, ‘thank you so much! Those cupcakes were amazing!’” says Schneider. “But really, if you think about it, they should be thanking themselves. They created their own cupcake after all!” Tolly Moseley Photos by Jaime Ibarra

-Eggnog Frosting -Candy Cane Pieces -Christmas Marshmallows -Ginger Snaps -Edible Red and Green Glitter -Red Hots -Christmas Tree Sprinkles Lo

ri

Sc

hn

eid

er

The Cupcake Bar 512-903-0187 thecupcakebaraustin.com 47


S

i n g

A L o n g

Family Style WHAT WOULD CHRISTMAS BE WITHOUT A CHRISTMAS SING-ALONG? ARE YOU ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE WHO ENJOYS LISTENING TO CAROLS SO MUCH THAT YOU SECRETLY WISH EVERY DAY WAS CHRISTMAS? IF SO, YOU’LL UNDERSTAND WHY I WAS SO EXCITED TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO INTERVIEW THE TEAM BEHIND AUSTIN SYMPHONY’S “CHRISTMAS SING-ALONG.”

50


A holiday tradition for more than two decades, families gather to get into the spirit of the season by joyfully singing along with the Austin Symphony and chorus. It’s a free evening of fun for the entire family. The event houses a 90-piece orchestra set and a 100-piece choir with visuals on three screens. “I’ve been conducting for this event about fi ve years and have really enjoyed getting to lead the audience in song,” says Carlton Dillard the conductor for the Symphony’s “Christmas Sing-Along.” He worked with the manager of the Sing-Along in 2004 to revamp the show with more pop-driven, familiar holiday songs. With years of experience, Carlton’s introduction into the Sing-Along was a natural progression as his team of musicians consists of most of the symphony players he’s led years prior. Continuing to look for new and innovative ideas, the event includes traditional songs with some familiar tunes — “Rock n’ Roll Elvis,” 1950s version of “Christmas Tree” and “Feliz Navidad.” Before 2004, the Sing-Along was more contemporary with classic styles, and over the years, it has evolved to be more appealing to a laid-back family crowd.

Today, the event includes a surprise visit from Santa Claus, Rudolph and even a snow machine to create a more interactive env ir onm ent. In r e c ent yea r s, Ca r l ton has a d d e d one big percussion melody. This year, the event is inviting 20 exc ep t io na ll y t a lente d or c h es t r a l s tu d ent s a s t h e special guests. This is a free event, but tickets are required for entry and become available Monday, December 1st for the show on December 16th at Riverbend Centre. “Due to the great turnout, we talked about adding another night,” explains Dillard. “As part of the tradition, we don’t sell tickets. We want everyone to be able to enjoy the night.” Each year the event has drawn a full house with people waiting to get in, so reserve your tickets today, get in line early and enjoy a family filled evening! Linsey Krauss Photos by Gary Eanes

austinsymphony.org riverbendcentre.com

51


52


Allison Gregory / The Lighting of the Tree / Marbles, Glass and Acrylic on Pegboard

53


ON THE PAPER TRAIL For a wide arRay of paper goods and acCesSories, including custom made invitations and holiday cards, Austin has two unique stores worth exploring.

Paper Place has been locally owned and operated for the past thirty years. The store’s full-time in-house printer ensures custom jobs can have a speedy turnaround time, and the entire staff is trained to help customers create something from scratch or assist in directly ordering from their extensive card catalog collection. Holiday lines of cards available include William Arthur, Vera Wang, Checkerboard and Prentiss Douthit, to name just a few. “Our paper selection is the most outstanding in town, and the best part is — customers can buy as few as a couple sheets if that’s all they need, instead of having to purchase a full ream,” owner Molly Smith explains. New Year’s cards at Paper Place have become more popular than ever, perfect for frazzled shoppers who may be running a little late in wishing their friends and families holiday cheer.

Suzy Ranney and Molly Smith

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-6531 paperplaceaustin.com

54

“People are not just doing red and green anymore. They are trying out different and more creative color combinations,” says store designer Diana Uribe. Wedding invitations also account for a large part of Paper Place’s business, with cards running the full gamut of styles and budgets. From an elaborate four-day wedding with a selected color theme for each night’s events, to a simple marriage announcement card featuring a black and white photo of the happy couple kissing in Venice, Paper Place will customize to any taste.


A new alternative to the paper scene is Inviting Affairs stationery boutique, first established seven years ago and purchased last year by Michelle Esaias.

Those seeking personalized Christmas gifts should check out the store’s customizable stationery, stamps and stickers, which all make excellent stocking stuffers.

“I was a wedding coordinator before,” says Michelle. “We want our brides to be comfortable and we personalize their experience as much as possible. We really enjoy being part of their story, and many times we grow with them, seeing them back in here for baby announcements as they start their families.”

Cynthia Houchin Photos by Annie Ray

Inviting Affairs 2105 Justin Ln. 512-331-2133 invitingaffairs.com

Inviting Affairs consists of cards for any occasion, making stylish correspondence simple with exclusive stationery lines like Ashley Wedding, Tag & Co. and Simply Put. Michelle’s right hand lady is her manager, Lindsey Webb, who was also a designer for the prior owner. Michelle Esaias and Lindsey Webb

“We have also recently added a lot of merchandise, like bridesmaid gifts,” says Lindsey. In addition to the range of card lines picked up at New York stationer y shows, photo cards (popular with parents for Christmas like Sweet Pea Designs) are also available, and the store’s very own calligrapher can provide the perfect fi nishing touch by hand addressing it. Another option is computerized calligraphy, offered at just fi fty cents per envelope. 55


Denise Silverman Owner/Event Planner: SoirĂŠe

58

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


For Denise, the key to happiness is balance. Whether she’s planning a party for a client or a playdate with her son, she always manages to sneak in a little personal time. Probably explains why this gal is always the life of the party! What is your favorite part about the holidays?

Any holiday party suggestions that you can share?

Entertaining, of course! I host Christmas Eve at my house and focus on sp ecial treats for kids and adults alike. My dad dresses up as Santa with a pillow case full of toys for the kids. And later on, the kids get “Christmas Cocoa” with crushed peppermint on the rim of the mug and a candy cane garnish. And for the adults, I crack open the bible (“Mar tha Stewar t Hors D’oeur ves Handbook,” of course), and tr eat the big kids to an evening of fun finger food and festive cocktails.

There is nothing more fun than planning and hosting a holiday party. Decorating the house, planning the menu, devising some festive holiday cocktails, etc. And, there’s nothing less fun about hosting a party than being too stressed and busy to enjoy it. My advice: hire help! Hire someone with waiter and bar experience to do all the work during the party (you still get to do all the fun planning/preparations yourself!). They can keep the food coming out and “bus” the empty plates. They keep everyone’s drinks full and get your dishes loaded into the dishwasher. And the best par t…you’re a guest at your own party! All this for 100 bucks or so — a worthwhile investment!

What are your favorite family holiday traditions? Combining cultures. My husband is Jewish and I celebrate Christmas, so we have a Christmas tree decorated in blue lights (blue for Hanukkah) with a menorah right next to it. And, a sign in the doorway that reads, “Merry Hanumas!” It means a lot to me and my husband that our son will grow up seeing the new family traditions we’ve created.

Favorite holiday recipe? If I have to choose only one, then let’s make it a cocktail. Christmas Cranberry Cocktail: Skewer cranberries (with toothpicks or small skewers) and freeze in advance. Fill shaker with ice, add 1 oz. vodka, ¼ oz. Chambord, 2 oz Cran-Raspberry juice. Shake and strain into a martini glass. Garnish with frozen cranberry skewer.

What are you most grateful for this holiday season? My husband, Mike and my son, Jesse. They are the reason I wake up in the morning, the reason I work my @ss off at the offi ce, and the reason I can’t wait to come home every day. I love them with every ounce of who I am, and I’m the luckiest person on earth to have them in my life.

Denise Silverman, Soirée, 507 Powell St., 512-450-1116, austinsoiree.com

Any New Year’s Resolutions? A mentor once taught me the importance of balance in life…having a balance not just between work and family, but also having something just for yourself. The more self-fulfilled you are, the better you’ll be as a parent, a spouse and in your career. Being a business owner, I control my schedule and am able to take a couple hours every Monday for some quality “one on one” time with my son. My husband and I schedule date nights as often as possible. And date nights don’t always need to involve a sitter. After our son goes to sleep, we order in sushi, drink wine, and play Guitar Hero into the wee hours. As for self-fulfi llment, I recently got into triathlons. It’s incredibly fulfilling and anyone can do it (even if you think you can’t!). Nothing compares to the feeling you get after completing your first one. In 2009, I plan to continue to work on the balance, but my resolution is to do it all while maintaining a clean house and a “blue ribbon” yard…yeah, right!

59


Holiday Kitchen Confidential It’s no secret that chefs are extremely protective of their recipe books and often guard them with several sharp, silver objects. As a special treat, we convinced a few of Austin’s finest chefs to share their favorite holiday recipe with our readers. Bon Appetite!

Recipe By: Executive Chef Alejandro Duran, Malaga

1/4 cup of pomegranate syrup 1/4 cup of water 2 pomegranates, seeds only 2 bay leaves 2 tbsp of fresh rosemary leaves 16 minced garlic cloves 1/2 tsp of crumbled Spanish saffron 2 medium yellow onions finely chopped

1/2 cup of Spanish dry white wine 2 lbs of pork loin, cut in 1/2 in. cubes 3 tsp of ground cumin 10 cups of chicken broth 16 tbsp of Spanish olive oil 3 cups of fi nely chopped watercress 6 cups of Spanish Valencia rice 8 tbsp of minced parsley kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a bowl, combine the pomegranate syrup, bay leaves, half of the rosemary, half of the parsley, the cumin, half of the minced garlic, salt and pepper (to taste) and the wine. Stir in pork, cover and marinate for 1 hour. Remove the meat from the marinade, dry on paper towels, sprinkle with salt. Combine the marinade in a large saucepan with the saffron and enough broth to make 12 cups. Keep hot over the lowest heat. Heat the olive oil in a paella pan. Sautee pork over high heat until lightly browned. Push to the outside of the pan. Add onions and remaining garlic and sauté until lightly softened. Stir in the watercress, remaining rosemary, parsley and cumin, and cook for a couple of minutes. Add rice and coat well with the pan mixture. Pour in all hot broth and bring to a boil, stirring and rotating the pan occasionally. Taste for salt, continue to boil for about 3 minutes, and then mix pork and boil 5 minutes, or until rice is no longer soupy, but sufficient liquid remains to continue cooking the rice. Continue cooking for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove to a warm spot, cover with foil and let it rest for 10 minutes, until the rice is cooked to taste. Serving Size: 15

62

malagatapasbar.com


Recipe By: Executive Chef Ethan R. Holmes, Taverna

In Italy, Christmas is marked by a traditional feast known as the “Feast of the Seven Fishes.� This dish is a variation on a classic Christmas-time tradition. It is very simple to prepare, light and delicious! TOMATO SAUCE 1/2 cup virgin olive oil 1 clove of garlic, sliced 1 medium onion, chopped 2 large vine ripened tomatoes, diced 1 cup red wine 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 4 cups canned tomato sauce

2 bay leaves 1 sprig, fresh thyme 1lb, fresh tagliolini pasta (you can substitute spaghetti)

In a large sauce pot over medium heat, place the onion and the garlic, cook until translucent. Add the wine and the vinegar, and let it reduce until 2/3 of the liquid has evaporated. Add the fresh tomatoes and the canned sauce, along with the herbs. Simmer this mixture for 15 minutes.

COD FISHBALLS 1 lb fresh cod, cleaned and cubed 5 oz, shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 whole egg

4 oz fresh crabmeat 1/4 cup white bread crumbs 2 tbsp basil, chiffonade 1 tbsp grated lemon zest salt and pepper to taste

In the bowl of a food processor, place the cod, the shrimp and the egg. Pulse the mixture to get it started. Then, let it go until it comes together in a paste. Scrape into a separate, chilled, stainless steel or glass bowl. Fold in the breadcrumbs, crabmeat, lemon zest and basil. Mix the fish paste and the breadcrumbs together until they come together. Slightly dampen your hands and begin to form the fish mixture into balls. You want each of them to be about one ounce. Place on a pan and put them in the fridge to firm up.

To fi nish the dish, cook your pasta in plenty of boiling water. Meanwhile, place the fishballs in the simmering tomato sauce and allow them to cook for approximately 6 minutes, until they are just cooked through. Divide the cooked pasta among four warm bowls, divide the fishballs among the bowls and ladle the sauce over them. Garnish with some more fresh basil and a touch of grated parmesan cheese. Bon Appetito! tavernabylombardi.com

63


Executive Chef Patrick Taylor, Crú A Wine Bar

PEAR, HONEY, ROBIOLA & ARUGULA TART 2 pears, cored and sliced 1/2 yellow onion, sliced 1/2 lb robiola cheese 3 cups arugula, sliced

1/2 cup honey 3 eggs 2 cups heavy cream salt and pepper

Sweat onion and pears until soft and caramelized, add arugula and cook until wilted, season with salt and pepper. Set aside to cool. In a mixing bowl, beat eggs, add cream and honey, season with salt and pepper. In a pre-baked pie shell, layer the bottom with slices of Robiola, then add the pear and arugula mixture, top with the custard. Bake at 300˚ until set and golden brown, 30 – 45 minutes. Yield: 1 tart BASIL CABERNET REDUCTION 1/4 cup shallots, minced 2 tsp garlic, minced 1 tsp whole black peppercorns 1 bay leaf

1 btl cabernet 1 tbsp unsalted butter salt and pepper

Sweat shallots and garlic until translucent. Deglaze with red wine, add peppercorns and bay leaf. Reduce until almost dry, strain. Add butter, season to taste with salt and pepper. Yield: 1 cup

64

SAGE BUTTER & BACON WRAPPED VEAL TENDERLOIN 1 veal tenderloin 2 bacon strips

1 tbsp sage butter salt and pepper

Rub veal tenderloin with the sage butter. Lay the two strips of bacon overlapping each other, lightly season the tenderloin and place in the center of the bacon. Wrap the bacon entirely around the tenderloin. In a hot sauté pan, sear the tenderloin (overlapped) side first to seal the bacon. Finish in a 400° oven until desired doneness is achieved. Yield: 1 lb

SAGE BUTTER 1 lb unsalted butter 1 cup fresh sage, chopped

TT salt and pepper

Let butter set at room temp for several hours to soften. Combine butter, sage and salt and pepper in large bowl. Mix until smooth and well incorporated. Yield: 1 lb cruawinebar.com


Recipe By: Co-Chefs Hector Zacatula & Ruben Ramirez, Manuel’s

WALNUT SAUCE 2 cups walnuts 1 cup sour cream

1/2 cup brandy 1 tsp cinnamon

Recipe By: Chefs Kent Rathbun & Aaron Staudenmaier, Abacus & Jasper’s

1/2 cup sugar 1 cup whole milk

Add walnuts, cinnamon, brandy, sugar, milk and sour cream to a blender and blend until the consistency of the mixture is fine. Add more milk if needed to achieve a consistency somewhat thick, but not runny. STUFFING 10 lb pork meat (pork butt) 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil pinch ground cloves pinch ground cumin pinch ground cinnamon 1/2 cup garlic minced 1 white onion, medium diced

10 roma tomatoes (2 lbs), roasted 1 cup almonds roasted, halved 1/2 lb raisins salt to taste

Get rid of the extra fat on the meat. Cut meat into 1-inch cubes. In a boiling pot, add 2 quarts of water, pork meat, bay leaves, onions, cumin, cloves and cinnamon. Cover with aluminum foil and cook for about 30 minutes at medium heat. Drain the pork picadillo. In a medium sauté pan, add the olive oil, diced onion and garlic. Cook for 5 minutes. Add the pork picadillo, roasted almonds halves, raisins, salt and roasted tomatoes previously puréed. Cook for 30 minutes. Select 10 medium poblano peppers and roast them in an open flame. Put peppers in a plastic bag. Remove after 5 minutes. This process makes the skin easy to pull off. Peel and de-vein. The

20 oz all purpose fl our, sifted 4 whole eggs 1/2 tsp kosher salt 1/3 cup water 20 oz turkey stock

2 oz butter, cubed 1/2 tbsp kosher salt 1 tbsp black peppercorns, cracked 1/2 tbsp sage, chopped

Place fl our directly on a counter top. Make a shallow “bowl” in the center of the fl our. Pour eggs and water in the “bowl” and work fl our into liquid with a fork, starting at the inside edges of the “bowl” and working out. Once dough starts to form, use your hands to knead. Knead for 10 minutes. Cut dough in half. Using a rolling pin, roll each half into sheets 1/8 inch thick. Transfer dough to a sheet pan and dry in a 350 degree oven for 4 minutes. Cut cooled noodles into strips about 1/8 inch thick. In a large sauce pot, bring chicken stock and butter to a boil. Add noodles and return to a boil. Boil until noodles are tender and stock thickens (roughly six minutes). Season with salt, cracked black pepper and sage. To serve, do not drain. Thickened stock should be served with the noodles. Notes: This is a great way to use up leftover bits of turkey during the holidays. Add the roasted turkey right before serving, just long enough to get it warm. Serving Size: 10 jaspers-restaurant.com

poblano peppers can be deveined before roasting to eliminate most of the spiciness.Stuff the peppers with pork picadillo and top them off with walnut sauce. Garnish with fresh pomegranate seeds. Serving Size: About 10 manuels.com

65


66


Allison Gregory / Santa Paws is Coming to Town / Acrylic on Canvas

67


Guys, let’s be real here. Santa would have a heart attack if he knew how many trees, megawatts of flashing lights and rolls of wrapping paper were gobbled up in the name of Christmas. All that waste, totally under mining his tra demar k generosity! So, let’s green our holidays up a bit:

Here are 5 ideas to get you started.

68


Did you know that all Christmas trees are actually mulch waiting to happen? The city hosts an annual Christmas tree drop-off at Zilker Park during the two weekends after Christmas. Don’t want to drive? The city will come pick up your used Christmas tree beginning on December 26th, if you’re a “Pay As You Throw” customer. Simply set your tree at the curb by 6:30am on your yard trimmings collection day, and wave goodbye as it’s hauled off to the mulch fairy. ci.austin.tx.us/parks/christmastree.htm

Did you know that it costs the average household $9 per day to light up a single Christmas tree during the holidays? With LED (light-emitting diodes) Christmas lights, it costs just $0.90 per day. Isn’t that crazy? Plus, they last a ridiculously long time: around 50,000 hours. Don’t be dumb — order those bad boys. holidayleds.com

No, don’t recycle your holiday sentimentality. Recycle the card itself, silly. St. Jude’s Ranch for Children has been running a Recycled Card Program for 30 years. Post-holiday, just send your holiday cards to them, and let them handle the rest. Also, why not buy recycled Christmas cards for your own holiday greetings? They do that too! stjudesranch.org

You could always shirk the real tree thing entirely. While artifi cial trees do consume signifi cant petroleum-based materials during their manufacture, one fake saves several future fi rs. (Bottom line: Pick your battles.) Visit Breed & Co. for a variety of options. breedandco.com

Passing on your old clothes isn’t just a charity effort, it’s a green effort too. According to the EPA Office of Solid Waste, Americans throw away more than 68 pounds of clothing and textiles per person per year — yikes — and a ton of that ends up in landfills. Stop doing that. Either hightail it to Goodwill or Salvation Army with your old duds, or round up your coats for the local “Coats for Kids” drive. Every year, Austin’s Junior League, Jack Brown Cleaners, KASE 101 and KVUE partner to redistribute Austinites’ used outerwear to kids and teenagers who need it. (It rounds up early December, so hop to it). That limited edition Clint Black denim jacket circa 1995? We’ve just found a home for it. jlaustin.org

y Toll

Mos

el e y

69


Stephen Tatton

Executive Director: SureFire Media + Promotion

72

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


Stephen’s deep respect for musicians and strong tie with the Austin music scene has made him a favorite among several up and coming artists including Alpha Rev and Mothers Anthem. That’s one HOT company Christmas card! What is your favorite part about the holidays?

What is the most unusual gift you’ve ever received?

Getting to see all of my family and extended family for once during the year. And, once is usually enough! But, it always grounds you and reminds you where you come from. So, that’s comforting.

That would have to be a pair of frogs from the Louisiana swamp that were taxidermied onto a board. Very strange. I never could fi gure out what to do with them, and ended up throwing them out when I moved one year.

What are your family’s holiday traditions? Some of the most conventional around, I’m afraid. Christmas we usually spend back at home in Refugio, Texas with the rest of the extended family. We exchange gifts, usually have a couple of way oversized meals and generally catch up on the past year.

Any special holiday recipes? My granddad was from England, so we have a couple of different recipes that come from over there. My mom makes these things called plum puddings that you have to make at or around Thanksgiving. They sit in a container on top of the refrigerator, aging until Christmas. It sounds weird, but it’s an old recipe from an English cookbook, and it’s great. Another English recipe is Yorkshire pudding, with a giant rack of roast beef.

What are you most grateful for this holiday season? I’m most grateful for my good friends, who remind me ever y day of the power of trust, honesty and loyalty. I’m also extremely grateful to ever yone that we work with here on a regular basis. Without them, we’d be unable to do half of what we do, and for that, I am extremely grateful.

How do the holidays affect your industry? Generally speaking, with the exception of our special Christmas shows that we do with Alpha Rev, we usually expect lower than average turnout for most December and earlier January shows. Folks are out of town, or they’re Christmas shopping — too much going on that month to really go out and see live music.

How does your company contribute during the holidays? We’re putting on a tour with Alpha Rev and friends from Dallas to Houston to Austin. We make tickets only $1, with the donation of a toy that goes to the Partnerships for Children Rainbow Room. Those toys go to abused and neglected children. It’s a small way to give back and also to celebrate a small piece of Christmas musically. Casey of Alpha Rev is very committed to it, and so am I.

Any big New Year’s Eve plans? Resolutions? To try to remember more of New Year’s Eve! Actually, I have no big plans, other than to try to take some time off for a change. That extends to my resolutions —keep up with my running a little better and keep off the cigarettes. Generally, try to do everything that I did this year a little better next year.

Stephen Tatton, SureFire Media + Promotion, 512 E. 11th St., 512-535-1801, myspace.com/thesurefireeffect

73


hidden treasures

74

Treehouse Gift Shop 4900 Mueller Blvd. 512-324-0147 dellchildrens.net/gift_shop


A child pushing a tiny IV pole opens the special kid-sized front door that welcomes the smallest customers to the Treehouse Gift Shop. After a few sheepish glances around the sunny hospital gift store, the child’s eyes light up when she spots a fluffy stuffed frog that is as big as she is. She wraps her arms around the green frog and for just a moment, her illness, all those doctors, the poking and prodding and yucky medical tests disappear, and she is not sick. She is just a kid. This small shop, located in the main lobby of Dell Children’s Medical Center, caters to its young patients and their families, as well as hospital staff. But this secret shopping spot, which is stuffed with unique toys, books, candy and other goodies, is too good to be kept secret for long. The roomy and bright shop is decorated with faux trees (it is the Treehouse, remember) and stocked with hard-to-find toys like Paddywhack Lane dolls, Fashion Angels and Calico Critters. They also carry Playmobil, Hello Kitty and the always popular, Webkinz. Other touches that set this hospital gift shop apart include a Jelly Belly jellybean wall, popcorn machine and an ice cream freezer. “We try to make it more of a boutique shopping experience and not just a quick place to pick up a cheap $5 gift,” says Katie Stedman, retail services manager. “We really love for people to come in and enjoy their shopping experience. This is a fun place and we are always upbeat. It can really change a person’s day.” In addition to its boutique-like gift selection, customers can shop with a good conscience at Treehouse. The shop is run by a group of about 30 volunteers who operate the cash register and help customers. And since the staff is unpaid, net proceeds from the shop go back to benefit the hospital. Treehouse Gift Shop donated $204,000 to Dell Children’s hospital in 2007 — its first year in existence. That money will be put toward a $1 million pledge from hospital volunteers to help fund an integrated operating room suite and a $500,000 nursing scholarship. It’s one more reason for the community to come and browse at Treehouse.

“Everyone wants to be involved in a community project,” Stedman says. “What’s easier than to come in and make a purchase, knowing that money goes immediately to funding a children’s hospital?” Laura Hensley Photo by Caroline Mowry 75


76


Allison Gregory / Christmas in the Capital City / Mixed Media-Acylic, Pen/Ink, Marker, Collage, Stickers and Enamel on Canvas

77


Truly Brow Raising Lowbrow Emporium 2708 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-462-3739 lowbrowemporium.com

80


“We’re sort of adults in arrested development. We never really grew up. We have toys and skateboards around the house,” says Heather Roach who owns Lowbrow Emporium with her husband Patrick. Heather, a Texas Rollergirl, met her husband Patrick, a band member of Porn Collection, in California. Heather was working for Big Brother, a skateboard magazine, and Patrick (a South Austin native) found his way to California via his brother. The pair ran in the same circles, had a ton in common and possessed a mutual entrepreneurial spirit. They knew they wanted to start a business, and moving back to South Austin was Heather’s idea. The pair bounced around different business ideas and decided to stay true to their passions, which is reflected by the sign in the window that reads toys, books, art, skate. The name Lowbrow Emporium was chosen for its opposing characteristics of being highbrow, but also for the term’s true meaning. Lowbrow is a name for an ar t movement that originated in Southern California in the late 1970s. This art movement has origins in the underground comic world, punk music and other subcultures. Humor is often implied within lowbrow art. The name really does say it all and it is apparent within the store’s child-friendly and playful atmosphere.

Once a former stone and tile store, Heather and Patrick decided to keep the building’s original fountain. The cascading water falling from stones provides a tranquil sound. Around it, they built a welcoming seating area in the front half of the store. This area provides a place to rest, relax and browse through the numerous and carefully hand-selected children’s and art books. I made myself comfortable as I scanned the store’s offerings. I immediately homed in on my favorite childhood book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” and behind me in the store’s window, I spotted a plushy doll monster from the book. I confess that I am not the most child-friendly being and children’s things do not interest me in the least, but somehow I felt ver y comfortable in my surroundings — plushy dolls, piggy banks and puzzles. This is not Toys“R”Us, far from it. Heather and Patrick hand-select all of their merchandise and want to give their customers an experience by providing items that have a purpose.

The second half of the store boasts a collection of the finest in lowbrow art from local artists and the city’s best collection of longboards and their accessories. Locally made soaps and lotions by South Austin People (So.A.P.) can be found as well as Oilcloth retro-designed bibs, table cloths and placemats. Every few months, Lowbrow Emporium (with the sponsorship of Lone Star Beer) hosts art openings out back. Lowbrow serves as a creative outlet for locals and friends to sell their goods. Heather taps into this outlet herself with her very own collection of furry handbags that she can barely keep on the shelves. She showed me an example of a bag, which she called the Spotted Bunny Duck. Other handbag designs include the Winged Spotted Frog and the Pink Cat.

Lowbrow Emporium has just celebrated its second anniversary. I think I’ll add this place to my list of shopping destinations for my nieces’ birthday gifts, as well as for my next anniversary. Service, selection and surroundings feel anything but lowbrow, and don’t tell the Roachs, but with the personal attention I received while shopping there, I would almost call it highbrow. Nicole Carbon Photos by Jennifer Nichols Lowbrow Emporium 2708 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-462-3739 lowbrowemporium.com

81


Austin Diner 84


Has the nog left you in the fog? Let’s face it. After so much good cheer, so much family time and so much “Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer” playing on a loop over virtually every radio station for one week solid, there’s only one thing you want for Christmas — to get wasted. The question then is not how, as we’re sure you can find your own spiked eggnog recipe, but where to go the next morning when you are inevitably hungover. Austinites, never fear. We’ve got you covered with this season’s hottest hangover cures.

Let’s start with the basics: you’re going to need something mushy, something that doesn’t require a lot of chewing and you’re probably going to also want something greasy. You know how people always say that greasy foods help slow the absorption of alcohol into the blood stream, or whatever? We don’t know if that’s actually true, but what we do know is that our shame-faced, hungover selves sure do feel better after a stack of pancakes. To that end, head straight to Austin Diner, home of both the delectable banana nut pancakes as well as classic but termilk pancakes (short stack $5.29, large stack $6.99). Better yet, try the gingered variety — nature’s proven tummy tamer. Unlike many Austin eateries, which pride themselves on pancakes made of buckwheat/spelt/someother-virtuous-grain, the stacks at Austin Diner don’t claim to be healthy, and thus the perfect hangover cure. If it’s Southern comfort you crave, consider Hoover’s your BFF. There are two locations, making it that much easier to justify drunkenness in any part of town. Hoover Alexander is a fifth generation Texan, and one thing he does exceptionally well is grits. We like both the cheddar garlic variety ($3.99 for a side) as well as the decadent shrimp n’ grits — grits smothered with shrimp etouffee ($6.99).

Speaking of Texans, many of us have a tendency to drown our hangover sorrows in plates of Mexican food, don’t we? Friends, I have a suggestion: Taqueria Arandas, where for less than $5, you can have a huge plate of huevos rancheros ($2.69!) AND a breakfast taco ($1-$2). After a night of lushy excess, there’s no better way to restore your own sense of grown-up responsibility than with an economical breakfast. And what’s more, they have amazing salsa (which is free). We had to include at least one place on the list where you’re expected to class things up a bit, in case you’re in the awkward position of being both hungover and hosting family. If that’s the case, may we recommend weekend brunch at Taverna? Here, “hangover fare” is slightly on the sophisticated side, so be careful not to drool on the orange french toast ($8) or the belgian waffl e with berries and whipped cream ($10), both delicious. In between the glorious hours of 9am and 2pm, all bellinis and mimosas are just $1 — good information to have, in case you have the kind of family that makes you want to keep drinking. Tolly Moseley Photos by Cory Ryan

Hoover’s

Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512-467-9552 Hoover’s 2002 Manor Rd. 512-479-5006 hooverscooking.com Taqueria Arandas 3518 E. 7th St. 512-389-3834 2038 W. Stassney Ln. 512-448-4771 6534 Burnet Rd. 512-452-9886 834 Rundberg Ln. 512-835-4369 2448 S. 1st St. 512-707-0887 Taverna 258 W. 2nd St. 512-477-1001 tavernabylombardi.com Taverna Taqueria Arandas

85


If you ask Austinites who has the best taco in town, I’d be willing to bet that at least over half of those polled would declare Torchy’s Tacos, hands down. When I speak of the taco trailer, people either scream from the rooftops how much they too love Torchy’s, or they just haven’t discovered the place…yet. Well, hopefully for Mike Rypka, executive chef and president, and his business partner Bob Gentry that is about to change with their newest location on S. 1st St. (at Elizabeth St.).

Torchy’s Tacos 1311 S. 1st St. 512-366-0537 2809 S. 1st St. 512-444-0300 2801 Guadalupe St. 512-494-8226 88

torchystacos.com


Torchy’s Tacos was born only two years ago when Gentry, who had been the corporate chef for Chuy’s and opened Lucy’s Boatyard, was approached by his original partner with the idea of opening a taco trailer. “I thought he was nuts,” Rypka laughs. “But then, I started to get inspired. There weren’t many food trailers on this side of town, and we thought we could introduce a taco stand to the west side.” He started Torchy’s in a little trailer where the current sit-down location on S. 1st St. stands and then began experimenting. “We only put stuff on the menu that inspired us,” he says. “We do a lot of unique tacos. It’s stepped up a bit since we opened, but we wanted to do something exciting and new with some flair.” Torchy’s is nothing without its flair. Boasting “damn good tacos,” the menu offers fried avocado tacos, dir ty sanchez tacos (eggs, guacamole and fried poblano chili), the trailer park (which is recommended to make “trashy” by topping the fried chicken), poblano ranch and green chilies with queso. Other glorious tacos include my (and Rypka’s) personal favorite: the green chili pork tacos. Yum.

“It was a cool idea,” Rypka says. “It represents the fun and funky aspect of Austin. It was perfect timing with all the condos going up. It preserves that cool, quirky side of Austin.” In addition to the live music space, the burger and taco trailers and game room (located at the trailer park), Rypka plans to add a dessert trailer in the near future, making this locale a destination for friends and families. “It’s defi nitely something you cannot fi nd in other cities,” he says. “If you’re new in town, this would be a great place to check out.” Couldn’t have said it better myself. Now, where’s my taco? Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Jaime Ibarra

Besides residing in a trailer and using queso and ranch dressing, there is little about Torchy’s that is trashy. After closing the Little Woodrow’s trailer this summer, Rypka and his crew consolidated trailers onto their newest site at the South Austin Trailer Park & Eater y, where they have added Shug gies, a 1950s-style hamburger and shake stand. The lot may look decidedly less than fancy with its dirt parking lot, picnic benches, open warehouse and multiple trailers, but this location defi nitely exudes the Austin vibe. It’s cool without trying hard, and it’s all about good food and music, which will be played onsite. Mik

eR

ypk

a

89


90


Allison Gregory / Silver Bells / Marbles, Glass and Acrylic on Pegboard

91


Mark Murray Chief Meteorologist: KVUE

94

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


If there’s one person you’d like to have on speed dial as you’re packing for the holidays, it’s this man. Mark has been bringing Austinites the weather since 1990, and this year, he hopes to bring coats to 30,000 kids. What does celebrating the holidays in Austin mean to you? A frosty night at the Trail of Lights, spinning under the Zilker tree, seeing “A Tuna Christmas,” hearing some great blues at Antone’s, laughing with the holiday shows at Esther’s Follies, enjoying a Thanksgiving meal at Green Pastures…that’s just a small sampling of what I love about being home for the holidays in Austin!

What is your favorite part about the holidays? That’s an easy one. Coats for Kids! This will be my 19th year as a part of this wonderful project. What could be better than to make sure every child in our area has a nice, warm coat for the winter? It’s really become an annual Austin holiday tradition!

What are your family’s holiday traditions? We bake Christmas cookies at my mom’s house in Georgetown. She oversees the entire operation. Her husband is in charge of the oven, my brother and sister roll out the cookie dough and my wife Crystal cuts the dough into a variety of holiday shapes. My specialty is decorating the cookies after they come out of the oven!

What are you most grateful for this holiday season? I’m grateful that so many people have made donating to Coats for Kids such a big part of their family’s holiday tradition. Year after year, I see many of the same, wonderful people showing up at KVUE with coats or checks in hand!

What do you want for the holidays this year? 30,000 coats for Coats for Kids! And, maybe a little snow on Christmas morning! But, not too much...

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received? Many years ago, I predicted that it would snow in Austin fi ve days ahead of time. And, it actually snowed! Believe me...THAT was a gift!

How do the holidays affect your profession? With so many people traveling over the holidays, the forecast is very important. And, this time of year, the weather can change so much from day to day. It makes for a fun and challenging forecast!

What is Christmas day like for your family?

How does your company contribute during the holidays?

In years past, Christmas Day often found us on the road to see our families up in Colorado. But, now that my mother and my sister have recently moved to the Austin area, we’re spending much more of the holiday season here at home.

Coats for Kids is the biggest single public service project KVUE takes on during the entire year. Along with our partners, Jack Brown Cleaners, the Junior League of Austin and KASE 101, I feel like we really make a difference in the lives of so many people here in Central Texas.

Mark Murray, KVUE, 3201 Steck Ave., 512-459-2049, kvue.com, kvue.com/community/coatsforkids

95


THE AUSTIN CAROLERS, which consistsof Mady Kaye, Libby Hart Barnes, Paul Spikes and Art Kidd, invited me to their ďŹ rst practice of the season (during one incredibly warm night, making Christmas feel even further away), and welcomed me like four grandparents would. They fussed over me, asking me questions about myself and demanding sweetly that I eat some chocolate cookies. Only unlike my grandparents, they then sang me carols while dressed in Charles Dickens-esque caroling costumes.

TH E A US T I N C A ROL E R S 5 1 2 - 4 5 8 - 9 9 0 0 M A D Y K A Y E . C O M /C A R O L E R S

96


he Austin Carolers has been an Austin tradition for 18 years, regularly singing at Central Market, Christmas parties and tree-lighting ceremonies. While the quartet had performed with each other in some capacity prior to forming Austin Carolers, some since the 1970s, the idea for the group sprung from a mutual respect and love for one another. “We wanted to work together and do something different,” Spikes says. “We had been working together for years, and together we were perfect,” Kaye chimes in. Spikes also admits that as a musician, “it was getting harder to book holiday par ties, and this would be a lot of fun. We were more interested in the personalities than perfect singers.” Their personalities (and incredible voices) definitely d o s hin e. A s t h e d e n m ot h e r, K a y e is li v el y and spunky. Barnes is shy and sweet, while the men are more mischievous and quick to crack jokes. Each of them expresses their deep love of working in the quartet and singing holiday songs, both traditional and not. Although they do dress in traditional caroling garb with long skirts, hats, gloves and coattails, the group loves to mix and match the songs in their repertoire and infuse a bit of Austin in some of them.

“Here in town, it’s a-frostin’, which is rare cause it’s Austin,” Kaye, with her beautiful soprano voice, gives an example of their Austin-centric lyrics. Austin Carolers is different from most carolers because they arrange their songs so that they sing four-person parts instead of a four-person melody, enabling them to harmonize and improvise, which gives their tunes a jazzy, poppy feel. And although they have 50 songs in their repertoire, the group says that kids always ask for the “big four” — “Frosty the Snowman,” “Santa Claus is Coming to Town,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and “Jingle Bells.” These songs, while not the most challenging for their lovely voices, are always fun to sing because “singing for kids gives us the most joy,” according to Kaye. When asked what is their favorite song, Spikes immediately answers “Lo How a Rose e’er blooming,” which he says, “is an old song that has some surprisingly modern features.” Kaye adds: “When everyone is singing perfectly in harmony, the sum is bigger than the parts.” Sounds just like the Austin Carolers themselves. Catch the troupe at their regular Chez Zee gig this holiday season Dec. 23rd at 7pm and Dec. 24th at 11:30am. See what Spikes means when h e sa y s, “o u r m u si c ev o ke s joy and generosity in the spirit of Christmas.” Darcie Duttweiler Photos by Cory Ryan Photo Caption Pg. 96: Mady Kaye, Art Kidd, Paul Spikes and Libby Hart Barnes

97


98


Allison Gregory / Champagne Taste / Acrylic on Canvas 99


A New Spin on an Old Tradition

300 Austin takes the smoky, beat-up “alley” association out of bowling, with an upscale, modern approach that outshines the traditional bowling venues of the past. Open since July 2006 and located just south of Braker Ln. off I-35, the center promotes family-friendly fun by day and a nightclub vibe by night. The 55,000 square foot facility includes 52 lanes, big screen TVs continuously playing hit music videos and dramatic lighting that dances across the open floor. While there is no league play at 300, the popular Monday Bowl Out features unlimited bowling from 7pm to 11pm at just $16 per person. Birthday parties for children and adults, sweet sixteen parties, corporate events, holiday parties and even the occasional wedding rehearsal dinner are big hits. The birthday celebration package includes one of 300’s signature black birthday bowling pins for the birthday boy or girl, which is often signed by guests.

“Most people that come in are not trying to bowl the perfect game,” Austin’s general manager, Aaron Hancock, admits. “Often, they are here to have dinner, have fun and celebrate good times together with friends and family.” The winter months bring the busiest time of the year for the bowling industry. Corporate holiday parties are a new trend for bowling, but that was all part of 300’s plan. “The concept of the brand was to appeal to a new audience of bowlers,” explains Paul Barkley, senior vice president of new center development. “We started off by looking at some of our most successful centers, like our flagship location in Manhattan, which has been operating for

100

almost ten years with a heavy emphasis on corporate group sales and a high-touch customer-ser vice model. Then, we layered in some amenities…such as a more varied food and beverage menu.”

“We recently updated our menu selections, including making more martinis available,” says Aaron. With catering, grill and bar menus, 300 even has an executive chef on staff. Catering provides a variety of buffet styles for various group sizes, while the grill menu offers more individual sized portions with appetizers like crab cakes to full meals like blackened lamb chops. And, there’s no paper plates or plastic silverware here. Diners and partygoers can expect real dishes and silverware. Even better, the extensive bar menu is sure to help wet your whistle after picking up that spare. Once customers pick out their shoes and select their bowling ball, their assigned Lane Captain will key names into the group’s computer (with automatic bumpers coming up for those who want them) as well as serve as both their waiter and cashier. In addition to bowling, 300 also offers other types of entertainment. The extra amenities include a pub-like sports bar area with seating for up to 200, complete with dartboards, plasma screen TVs and several large projection screens. With two private meeting rooms for parties or corporate team building and even several billiards tables, there’s plenty to amuse and entertain. Cynthia Houchin Photo by Jennifer Nichols


101


Susan Parker Owner: Personally Yours

102

Photo by Jaime Ibarra


For 30 years, Susan has been helping Austinites get personal. With a store that boasts unique gifts for every occasion, it’s easy to see why every day feels like a holiday. What is your favorite part about the holidays?

What’s the best gift you’ve ever received?

Decorating our house from top to bottom. This usually takes several intense days to complete. Then, it is time to celebrate with the first party of the season with our wonderful friends.

A proposal from my steady who I have now been married to for 32 years. My second favorite gift was a DVR that my husband gave me last year!

What are your family’s holiday traditions?

What is the most unusual gift you’ve ever received?

We love starting Christmas Eve at my brother’s house, with lots of margaritas and tapas. We end the evening with our version of the White Elephant Game. The trick is to get very creative and only spend $10. Sometimes midnight mass follows, but many times it is church in the morning. We have started some new traditions this year in our family since both of our parents have recently passed away. I am now the matriarch of the family, so we are gathering at our house for Christmas.

It was from my twin sisters. They knew I was lusting over a pair of expensive shoes. They found a decorative shoe form and stuffed it with 150 $1 bills. I got some unusual looks at the store when I paid with the wadded up money. I love the shoes and think about my sisters every time I wear them.

Any special holiday recipes? Our favorite holiday recipe is our mother’s Lady Finger Chocolate Ice Box Cake. YUM! Lots of whip cream…I can’t remember a Christmas without it. It is our favorite part of the meal. I have made it myself a couple of times and family and friends are impressed!

What are you most grateful for this holiday season? This year, as always, I am so grateful for my family and friends. This is a special year for my business. We are celebrating 30 years of Personally Yours, and are so thankful for that.

Susan Parker, Personally Yours, 5416 Parkcrest Dr., 512-454-7534, pyaustin.com

How does the holiday season affect your business? Because of all of our wonderful customers and the fun atmosphere in the store, I feel like we are celebrating the holiday season all year long. We are always doing an invitation for someone’s party, working with a bride on her wedding, graduating seniors, sending children to camp, gifting and announcing births of babies. Always a celebration going on!

How does your business contribute during the holidays? We contribute to many organizations throughout the year. We start the season off with the American Cancer Card and continue with Helping Hand Home, Jr. League, High Schools and Elementary Schools in our area.

103


in “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” won’t have anything on your house this holiday season, that is, if you leave the decorating up to Longhorn Services. Don’t laugh, Stephen Petrik, president of Longhorn Services, can attest — people really do ask for the “Griswold effect.” He’s had clients say,

104


Longhorn Services has been providing landscape, irrigation and solar power services to Austin and surrounding areas since 1996. They have partnered with Christmas Decor, a national franchise, to provide holiday decorating. Longhorn Services’ first project included lighting a house in Westlake, and soon after, a snowball effect took place. The rest of the street wanted the same look, and so their success began. What makes them different is their quality and service. They are on a whole different level. Instead of having to store and worry about your own decorations, they do it all for you. It is a total turnkey process. They do this on a lease program — storing, maintaining and renewing all of the materials for you. A partnership with Christmas Decor allows them to use high quality materials that are not available to the general public. As a client, you can have the same fabulous effect year after year, or if you wish, you can choose a completely different look each year. Longhorn Services assume 100% responsibility for all materials, making decorating a much smoother process.

Environmentally conscious, Petrik and his crew use LED (light-emitting diode) lighting. This type of lighting uses just 10% of the power that a regular light bulb uses, and even if you are going for the Clark Griswold effect, these lights won’t overload your circuits.

Whether you are going for classic elegance, trying to impress the office by hosting the company Christmas party or just trying to one-up your neighbors with the most elaborate display on the block, let Longhorn Services do the decorating for you. Nicole Carbon Photos by Derris Lanier

“Every potential property we visit has its own unique characteristics. We try to make it fun, and get the client excited by keeping them very involved all the way through the bidding process. Seeing the Christmas Spirit rekindled in someone is something I never get tired of,” says Petrik. “Nobody does Christmas like us, we are the biggest in Central Texas and one of the biggest in the U.S.” Even though Longhorn Services does the work for you, there is no room for procrastination. Commercial as well as residential services are of fered. Each year they star t commercial installs by the beginning of September, and October is a great time to start thinking about residential decor for the Christmas season. Most of their business is repeat with some very high-end clients. Some of these clients are so exclusive that Longhorn Ser vices provides nondisclosure agreements.

105


Each month, Rare auctions off a donated item through our Weekend Pass email blast. Readers bid on the item, and the winner not only receives their prize but also determines which non-profit Rare will feature in our monthly Rare Gives Back editorial. This is your chance to promote your favorite non-profit! Visit rareaustin.com to register.

512-454-3743 | abcaus.org

This month’s auction winner chose to remain anonymous.

106

Also, special thanks to Grey Rock Golf Club for generously donating the auction item for this month.


The scope of services available through Any Baby Can Child and Family Resource Center can perhaps best be explained by the question, “What do spina bifida and family literacy have in common?” This is one of the questions that Ellen Balthazar, executive director of the non-profit, finds herself answering on a regular basis. Balthazar says that the link between the two is childhood ser vices, and, in par ticular, childhood services for the population that Any Baby Can has focused on — the youngest, sickest and poorest children in Austin and the surrounding community. “We focus on the earliest possible point of intervention,” says Balthazar. “The earlier you can start, the better the investment.” To reach the communities and clients that most need services, Any Baby Can focuses on home services, and currently offers a total of seven different home visitation programs. Working with families in their homes helps remove many barriers to services, including the difficulties that transportation can pose for low-income families (especially those with small children). “Because we are home-based, we are often able to reach hard-to-reach individuals,” says Balthazar. “We aren’t there to fix families, we

are there to work with them in their natural context. All of our home visitors are the ultimate social entrepreneurs.”

support from the community. Like most nonprofits, Any Baby Can can always use financial donations, but it also has some needs specific to the services it provides.

In 2009, Any Baby Can will be celebrating their 30th year of providing services in Austin, having grown from the 2001 merger of Any Baby Can and CEDEN (Center for Development, Education and Nutrition) to also include Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Foundation and (most recently) Children’s Hearing Aid Texas (CHAT).

“Most people would guess that we need diapers,” Balthazar says. “And that is true, but something that is like gold to our clients are children’s books. We can always find a good home for books. If you have old books lying around, please send them our way.”

Any Baby Can is also implementing a new program, the Nurse Family Par tnership (NFP), which will offer support to first-time mothers with registered nurses ser ving as home visitors, beginning with pre-natal care and continuing through the child’s second  bir thday.

Any Baby Can always needs cribs and is happy to send someone to pick up large items. And, for those who would prefer to donate their time, the organization can always use man power. At the moment, they’re particularly looking for someone interested in helping to organize social events for clients and someone willing to help coordinate an e-mail based donation list.

As Any Baby Can continues to expand its services and moves toward its anniversary programs, it continues to rely heavily on

Carly Kocurek Photo by Derris Lanier

107


SHOPPING Lofty Dog

Hem Jeans

Underwear

Touch of Sass

403 W. 2nd St. 512-476-5050

908 W. 12th St. 512-478-5326

916 W. 12th St. 512-478-1515

500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-478-7277

austinloftydog.com

hemjeans.com

fetishaustin.com

touchofsass.net

IF+D

Fetish

Sparks

Fit City Sports

208 Colorado St. 512-469-0870

1112 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-478-1515

1014 W. 6th St. 512-477-2757

301 W. 2nd St. 512-472-7463

ifdaustin.com

fetishaustin.com

sparksaustin.com

fitcitysports.com

Austin City Living

Red River Flats

1145 W. 5th St. 512-206-0959

901 Red River St. 866-988-7647

Gables 5th Street Commons

austincityliving.com

greystarredriverflats.com

Minx 408 W. 2nd St. 512-476-6469 minxaustin.com

food & drink

living

gables.com/5thstreetcommons

Taverna

Cru

Delish

219 West

258 W. 2nd St. 512-477-1001

238 W. 2nd St. 512-472-9463

209 W. 3rd St. 512-539-7502

219 W. 4th St. 512-474-2194

tavernabylombardi.com

cruawinebar.com

delish-cupcakes.com

219west.com

Manuel’s

Imperia

Cuba Libre

Speakeasy

310 Congress Ave. 512-472-7555

310 Colorado St. 512-472-6770

409 Colorado St. 512-472-2822

412 Congress Ave. 512-476-8017

manuels.com

imperia-austin.com

cubalibreaustin.com

speakeasyaustin.com

J. Black’s

Malaga

Mean Eyed Cat

710 W. 6th St. 512-296-2101

440 W. 2nd St. 512-236-8020

1621 W. 5th St. 512-472-6326

jblacks.com

malagatapasbar.com

themeaneyedcat.com

health & beauty

108

1611 W. 5th St. 512-474-0900

arts & entertainment

Mecca Gym & Spa

Milk + Honey Spa

Studio 563

Paramount Theatre

524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-381-2680

204 Colorado St. 512-236-1115

202 Colorado St. 866-251-0677

713 Congress Ave. 512-472-5470

meccagymandspa.com

milkandhoneyspa.com

studio563.com

austintheatre.org

Joie de Vie

Avant Salon

Ballet Austin

713 E. 6th St. 512-542-9220

318 Colorado St. 512-472-6357

501 W. 3rd St. 512-476-2163

joiedeviesalon.com

avantsalon.com

balletaustin.org


SOU ESS

NGR

TH C O

ST ST .

TH 1

SOU

CES AR C HAV EZ 8TH

RED

ES

NECH

9TH

RIVER

TRIN ITY

JACIN TO

STAT EC

SAN

RESS BRAZ OS

LUPE LAVA CA

COLO RADO CON G

NUE CES SAN ANT ONIO

GUA DA

10T H

WES T AV ENU E RIO G RAN DE

LAM AR

WES T LYN N

ENF IELD / 15 TH

12T H

11TH

APIT AL

7TH

6TH

5TH

4TH

3RD

2ND

LAD YBIR D LA KE

109


SHOPPING Flirt

Tyler’s

Cream Vintage

Forbidden Fruit

2405 Nueces St. 512-472-4440

2338 Guadalupe St. 512-478-5500

2532 Guadalupe St. 512-474-8787

108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512-453-8090

flirtinaustin.com

tylersaustin.com

creamvintage.com

forbiddenfruit.com

Montage Clothings

Room Service Vintage

Toy Joy

Pangaea Trading Co.

508 E. 53rd St. 512-944-7523

107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512-451-1057

2900 Guadalupe St. 512-320-0090

2712 Guadalupe St. 512-472-3533

ecofashionmontage.com

roomservicevintage.com

toyjoy.com

Cuatro’s

Hyde Park Bar & Grill

Torchy’s Tacos

Asti

1004 W. 24th St. 512-243-6361

4206 Duval St. 512-458-3186

2801 Guadalupe St. 512-494-8226

408 E. 43rd St. 512-451-1218

cuatrosaustin.com

hydeparkbarandgrill.com

torchystacos.com

astiaustin.com

Kerbey Lane Café

Food Heads

Fino

Epoch Coffeehouse

2606 Guadalupe St. 512-477-5717

616 W. 34th St. 512-420-8400

2905 San Gabriel St. 512-474-3706

221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512-454-3762

kerbeylanecafe.com

foodheads.com

astiaustin.com

epochcoffee.com

Salvation Pizza

Taco Shack

Spider House

The Parlor

624 W. 34th St. 512-535-0076

2825 Guadalupe St. 512-320-8889

2908 Fruth St. 512-480-9562

100 E. North Loop Blvd. 512-454-8965

myspace: salvationpizza

tacoshack.com

spiderhousecafe.com

myspace: theparlor

Judges’ Hill Restaurant

Dog & Duck Pub

1900 Rio Grande St. 512-495-1800

406 W. 17th St. 512-479-0598

mansionatjudgeshill.com

dogandduckpub.com

food & drink

health & beauty

living

Mint Salon

Perfection Tattoo

4023 Guadalupe St. 512-302-9990

4205 Guadalupe St. 512-453-2089 perfectiontattoo.com

110

512 Realty

Venue on Guadalupe

600 W. 28th St. 512-322-0512

2815 Guadalupe St. 512-473-3706

512realty.com

venueonguadalupe.com


20

16

4

NO

RT H

LO O

6

P/

5

53

RD

51

ST ST R

EET

45

TH

ST RE

ET

15

7 25

ET

18 8

NUECES

RIO GRANDE

SAN GABRIEL

29TH STRE

13 3

9 1

24TH STREET

12

RED R

IVER

10

L

ST R

DUVA

RD

EET

LUP

17 14

STRE ET

43

E

T

GU

34TH

23

STRE E

ADA

LAM AR

24 38TH

19 26 11 DEAN KEETO TON N

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

2 21 MLK, JR.

AVE.

22

111


SHOPPING Inviting Affairs

Slate Men’s Apparel

Soigne Boutique

Paper Place

2105 Justin Ln. 512-331-2133

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-300-2727

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-300-2929

4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-6531

invitingaffairs.com

slateaustin.com

soigneaustin.com

paperplaceaustin.com

Blue Elephant

Santa Fe Optical

Verbena Floral Design

Architects & Heroes

4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-371-3259

1601 W. 38th St. 512-451-1213

1601 W. 38th St. 512-420-0720

4700 W. Guadalupe St. 512-467-9393

shopblueelephant.com

santafeoptical.com

verbena.com

shopheroes.com

Russell Korman

Precision Camera

Adelante

Atomic Cherry Boutique

3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-9295

3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-467-7676

1206 W. 38th St. 512-452-5322

5535 Burnet Rd. 512-258-2226

russellkormanjewelry.com

precision-camera.com

adelanteaustin.com

atomiccherryboutique.com

food & drink Blue Star Cafeteria

Sampaio’s

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-454-7827

4800 Burnet Rd. 512-469-9988

bluestarcafeteria.com

sampaiosrestaurant.com

caffeteo.com

34th Street Café

Santa Rita Tex-Mex Cantina

Taco Shack

Kerbey Lane Café

4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-467-0833

3704 Kerbey Ln. 512-451-1436

tacoshack.com

kerbeylanecafe.com

1005 W. 34th St. 512-371-3400 34thstreetcafe.com

1206 W. 38th St. 512-419-7482

Teo

Austin Diner

1206 W. 38th St. 512-451-9555

5408 Burnet Rd. 512-467-9552

santaritacantina.com

health & beauty

112

arts & entertainment

Rae Cosmetics

Urban Betty Salon

The Art Pad

1206 W. 38th St. 512-320-8732

1206 W. 38th St. 512-371-7663

4520 Burnet Rd. 512-323-0802

raecosmetics.com

urbanbetty.com

theartpadstudio.com

N Salon

Sirens Salon

3027 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-323-3600

4207 Medical Pkwy. 512-419-7789

nsalonaustin.com

sirens-salon.com

Bob Salon

Birds Barbershop

Triangle Residences

1815 W. 35th St. 512-454-4262

6800 Burnet Rd. 512-454-1200

4600 Guadalupe St. 512-450-1500

ilovebobsalon.com

birdsbarbershop.com

triangleaustin.com

living


LAM A

NET BURNET

JUSTIN LN. LN.

P

NORTH LOO

HAN

COC K

LC

L BU 35TH

STREE

T

E GUAD ALUP

ICAL MED

LN. KER BEY

JEFF

ERS

ON

PARK WAY

LAMA R

EK RE

45TH S TREET

38T HS TRE ET 34T

HS

TRE

ET

113


SHOPPING Deanfredrick

Solid Gold

Tree House Gift Shop

East Side Pedal Pushers

902 E. 5th St. 512-493-0943

1601 E. 5th St. 512-473-2730

4900 Mueller Blvd. 512-324-0147

1100 E. 6th St. 512-826-3414

deanfredrick.com

solidgoldacademy.com

dellchildrens.net/gift_shop

Big Red Sun

Mode Apparel

1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-480-0688

1601 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-436-8924

bigredsun.com

myspace: modeaustin

food & drink Blue Dahlia

Primizie Osteria

Uncorked

Juan in a Million

1115 E. 11th St. 512-542-9542

1000 E. 11th St. 512-236-0088

900 E. 7th St. 512-524-2809

2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-472-3872

bluedahliabistro.com

primizieaustin.com

uncorkedtastingroom.com

juaninamillion.com

Progress Coffee

Rio Rita

Bossa Nova

Stortini

500 San Marcos St. 512-493-0963

1308 E. 6th St. 512-524-0384

2121 E. 6th St. 512-478-8700

1917 Manor Rd. 512-391-9500

progresscoffee.com

riorita.net

bossanovaaustin.com

stortini-austin.com

El Chile

Vivo

Hoover’s Cooking

East Side CafĂŠ

1809 Manor Rd. 512-457-9900

2015 Manor Rd. 512-482-0300

2002 Manor Rd. 512-479-5006

2113 Manor Rd. 512-476-5858

elchilecafe.com

vivo-austin.com

hooverscooking.com

eastsidecafeaustin.com

Clementine Coffee

Longbranch Inn

Scoot Inn

2200 Manor Rd. 512-472-9900

1133 E. 11th St. 512-472-5591

1308 E. 4th St. 512-478-6200

clementinecoffeebar.com

eastinns.com

eastinns.com

living

114

health & beauty

Urbanspace Realtors

Urbanaxis Mortgage

900 E. 6th St. 512-476-0010

900 E. 6th St. 512-473-2947

urbanspacerealtors.com

urbanaxismortgage.com

The Ends on 6th

Good Life Team

2608 E. 6th St. 512-663-8847

1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512-892-9473

endson6th.com

goodlifeteam.com

Method.hair

Vain Salon

1601 E. 5th St. 512-469-0044

1803 Chicon St. 512-524-1057

methodhair.com

myspace: vainaustin


EAST 38 1/2

DEAN KEE TTO ON

RT PO AIR

MANOR

VA LL LE Y ERN A

PED

COMAL

EAST 7TH

CHICON

EAST 11TH

LES

P D LEA WOO SA E S RO NT NAVAS OTA

RED RIVER

CON CHI

. K, JR T ML EAS

EAST 6TH EAST 5TH

CESA R CH

AVEZ

115


SHOPPING Moxie and the Compound

Craft-O-Rama

The Black Sheep

Angelica de Biase

2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-441-6699

3100 S. Congress Ave. 512-707-2405

1115 S. Congress Ave. 512-914-4771

2900 S. Congress Ave. 512-366-3954

moxieandthecompound.com

austincraftorama.com

blacksheepaustin.com

angelicadebiase.com

Beyond Unique

Ornamental Things

Buy Definition

Fanny’s Fabrics

2900 S. Congress Ave. 512-709-5816

2900 S. Congress Ave. 512-462-2544

2900 S. Congress Ave. 512-670-7448

1150 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-442-8255

beyonduniqueaustin.com

ornamentalthings.com

buydefinition.com

Lowbrow Emporium

Austin Furniture Consignment

Goodwill

Music Makers

2800 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-442-8802

517 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-444-6686

austingoodwill.org

musicmakersaustin.com

Edgewick

Akoya

Greystar South Congress

1910 Wickshire Ln. 512-916-8438

2200 Dickson Dr. 512-799-3777

3809 S. Congress Ave. 866-414-5508

edgewick.com

akoyaaustin.com

greystarsouthcongress.com

Taqueria Arandas

Hyde Park Bar & Grill

WineStyles

Maudie’s Hacienda

2448 S. 1st St. 512-707-0887

4521 Westgate Blvd. 512-899-2700

4301 William Cannon Dr. 512-892-9463

9911 Brodie Ln. 512-280-8700

lucyindisguise.com

hydeparkbarandgrill.com

winestyles.net

maudies.com

Maudie’s Too

Doc’s Motorworks

Doc’s Backyard

Polvo’s

1212 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-440-8088

1123 S. Congress Ave. 512-448-9181

5207 Brodie Ln. 512-892-5200

2004 S. 1st St. 512-441-5446

maudies.com

docsaustin.com

docsaustin.com

polvos.ypguides.net

Cissi’s Market

South Austin Trailer Park & Eatery

Torchy’s Tacos

2708 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-462-3739 lowbrowemporium.com

3107 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-218-1888 austinfurniture.net

Mercury Men’s Fashion House 507 W. Mary St. 512-462-2066 mercuryfashionhouse.com

food & drink

1400 S. Congress Ave. 512-225-0521 cissismarket.com

living

1207 S. 1st St. 512-366-0537

2809 S. 1st St. 512-444-0300 torchystacos.com

torchystacos.com

arts & entertainment

health & beauty

116

Kneadcraft

Frenchy’s Beauty Parlor

Urban Groove Salon

Austin Art Garage

2900 S. Congress Ave. 512-592-9208

913 W. Mary St. 512-444-6000

4301 William Cannon Dr. 512-891-7070

2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512-351-5934

kneadcraft.com

frenchysbeautyparlor.com

spasalon.com/urbangroove

austinartgarage.com


RIV

ERS

ELIZ

ABE

MON

IDE

TH

ROE

MIL ILTO N ANN WES

AR AM HL UT O S

T MA

LIVE

IIEE

RY

OA K

OLLTTOR

FIRST

SOU

TH C ONG

RESS

SOUTH

SOUTH FIFTH

F

AN NO N

DIE

WI LLI AM C

E N WHIT

90 / BE

HWY 2

SLAU

BRO

MANCH ACA

MOPA C / LO OP 1

HWY 290

GHT

ER

117


SHOPPING Cupidz Clozet

Tyler’s

Dolce Baby

Santa Fe Optical

3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512-328-6446

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-327-9888

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-306-8882

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-327-1913

cupidzclozet.com

tylersaustin.com

Goodwill

Fetch

santafeoptical.com

Tesori

Fab’rik

3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512-306-9466

6507 Jester Blvd. 512-346-8100

12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512-263-1644

austingoodwill.org

yourdogwilldigit.com

tesoriaustin.com

fabrikaustin.com

RunTex

Hutson Clothing Company

The Hip Chick

Valentine’s Too

3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512-330-1701

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-347-9488

701 Newman Dr. 512-478-6711

2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512-477-9464 runtex.com

3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512-732-0188 hutsonclothing.com

thehipchick.com

Ven Shoe Salon 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-306-8200 venshoesalon.com

food & drink Hang Town Grill

Maudie’s Milagro

Thistle Café

Maudie’s Café

701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-347-1039

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-306-8080

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-347-1000

2608 W. 7th St. 512-473-3740

hangtowngrill.com

maudies.com

thistlecafe.com

maudies.com

Berryhill Baja Grill

Bistro 88

The Grove Wine Bar

Siena

3600 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-327-9033

2712 Bee Cave Rd. 512-328-8888

6317 Bee Cave Rd. 512-327-8822

6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy 512-349-7667

berryhillbajagrill.com

bistro88austin.com

grovewinebar.com

sienarestaurant.com

health & beauty

118

living

Milk + Honey Spa

Asolari Tanning

Alexan Vistas

Riverbend Center

Hill Country Galleria 512-236-1116

3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512-328-4444

7000 FM 2222 512-794-8439

4214 N. Capital of Texas Hwy. 512-327-9416

milkandhoneyspa.com

asolari.com

alexanvistas.com

riverbendcentre.com

Peach Body Boutique

Keith Kristofer Salon

1107 Westlake Dr. 512-347-7546

2785 Bee Cave Rd. 512-233-1910

peachaustin.com

keithkristofer.com


WY

WESTLAKE DR.

LC ON

ES

AL OF T

EX A

SH

BA

HW Y6 20

/ LOOP1

MOPAC

EXPOSITIO

N

1

ENFIELD

BAR TON CR

EEK

KE

BE

EC

AV E

AU S

TIN

BLV

D.

RO AD

119


SHOPPING Hewlett VW

Lights Fantastic

Bettysport

Luxe Apothetique

IH-35 at Westinghouse 888-796-7722

7532 Burnet Rd. 512-452-9511

The Domain 512-339-0011

The Domain 512-346-8211

hewlettvw.com

lightsfantastic.com

bettysport.com

myspace: luxeapothetique

Goodwill

Goodwill

Goodwill

Zinger Hardware

13096 Hwy 183 512-258-5898

8965 Research Blvd. 512-832-0004

5555 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-451-2306

2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512-533-9001

austingoodwill.org

austingoodwill.org

austingoodwill.org

zingerhardware.com

Loft

Junior League Resale Shop

Austin Furniture Consignment

St. Thomas Boutique

The Domain 512-377-6857 lofthomedecor.com

6555 Burnet Rd. 512-459-4592

7511 Burnet Rd. 512-467-1700

The Domain 512-835-8300 stthomasboutique.com

jlaustin.org

austinfurniture.net

The Steeping Room

Jaspers

Cru

Taqueria Arandas

The Domain 512-977-8337

The Domain 512-834-4111

The Domain 512-339-9463

6534 Burnet Rd. 512-452-9886

thesteepingroom.com

kentrathbun.com

cruawinebar.com

Grape Vine Market

WineStyles

Truluck’s

300 Austin

7936 Great Northern Blvd. 512-323-5900

115 Sundance Pkwy. 512-218-9463

10225 Research Blvd. 512-794-8300

9504 N. IH-35 512-834-7733

grapevinemarket.com

winestyles.net

trulucks.com

3hundred.com

Maudie’s

Hang Town Grill

Manuel’s

Burger House

10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512-832-0900

5800 Burnet Rd. 512-420-9430

10201 Jollyville Rd. 512-345-1042

4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512-346-7200

maudies.com

hangtowngrill.com

manuels.com

burgerhouse.com

Kerbey Lane Café

Iron Cactus

13435 N. Hwy 183 512-258-7757

10001 Stonelake Blvd. 512-794-8778

kerbeylanecafe.com

ironcactus.com

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512-454-7534 pyaustin.com

food & drink

health & beauty

120

Aesthetica Hair & Skin

Avant Salon

13359 N. Hwy. 183 512-336-2639

9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512-502-8268 avantsalon.com


PARME P ARMER R

BRAKER

S ILL

S P I CE

WO

OD SPRINGS

AR LAMAR

BURNET

MOPAC

TA PI CA

183 / RESEARCH BL BLVD VD

LOOP 1

MESA

LO

FT

EX AS

TH EA GR

. ANDERSON LN

FFAR AR WEST

NORTHL AND / K OENIG

121


Rare Magazine: December 2008 - The Holiday Issue  

Rare Magazine December 2008 The Holiday Issue Cover Art by Allison Gregory

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you