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JULY/AUGUST 2010 MOTION

TRUE GRIT

Scouting Texas Locations

FANTASTIC FEST

A Celebration of the Wonderfully Weird

STUNTMAN WOLF On Blowing Stuff Up

TUCKER MAX

From Book to Film

DIRECTOR ALEX KARPOVSKY Woodpeckers, Holes, and Improv + RARE GUIDE TO FILM FESTS

featuring art by

WILLIAM HUNDLEY

ANNOUNCING

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publisher’s note

July/August 2010 600 West 28th Street, Suite 203 Austin, TX 78705 p: 512.502.5041 // f: 512.502.5044 info@rareaustin.com

publisher

Taylor Perkins

editor

contributors

Caitlin M. Ryan

Steve Hopson Sam Marx Tucker Max Steve Miller Cassie Morien Romina Olson Laura Romer Daniel Sargaent Jon Shapley William Sparks

art director Lindsey Eden Turner

advertising, marketing, & events Taylor Perkins

content manager Samantha Pitchel

web & interactive director Josiah Spence

copy editor Emily Reynolds

cover art William Hundley, Granrojo, 2009

contents art William Hundley, Face, 2010 Model: Jessa Peters

intern Tarin Goodnight

advertising inquiries: advertising@rareaustin.com subscriptions: subscriptions@rareaustin.com back issues: backissues@rareaustin.com

The film industry has always held a special place in my heart in Austin. It adds an incredible element of coolness to the city, not unlike the live music scene. I get a kick out of going downtown for a meal and seeing the crew from Machete sitting just a table away or bumping into Robert Rodriguez having a hot dog at Frank. Austin is a city that most anyone can mesh with, and lately I’ve seen so many new faces in town that it’s apparent it’s growing exponentially. Some of the most iconic movies of our generation were filmed in Austin, so it’s no surprise the growth has spurred a resurgence of interest in movies being produced around Austin’s city limits. Keep your eye open for them; there are some great films coming out—be sure to catch True Grit. We’re excited to have had Tucker Max, author of the New York Times bestselling book, I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell, write for us for the first time in this issue. Read his article, “Handing Hell Over,” for an entertaining perspective piece about successfully turning a book into a screenplay. I hope you guys have had as much fun reading this issue as the staff had putting it together. Cheers,

Follow us: @rareaustin / Friend us: facebook.com/rareaustin Subscriptions are $38 per year. Sign up at www.rareaustin.com

Copyright © 2010 Rare Magazine. All rights reserved.

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Taylor Perkins publisher/ceo

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On The Cover :: William Hundley Guest Column :: Tucker Max Film Festival Index

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downtown

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campus

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midtown

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east

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south

64 66 70

west

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Fantastic Fest Austin Public Access Daniel Hill True Grit Location Scouting Bryan Poyser Austin Video Bee Alex Karpovsky Stuntman Wolf Balmorhea & Film Scores Independent Filmmaking Super 8mm Slacker Revisited

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Rare Gives Back :: The Cipher Maps/Index

The W Residences

The Austonian

Four Seasons

The Spring

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ON THE COVER This month’s featured local artist

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UP FRONT

THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO “HUH?” Caitlin Ryan Photo by Romina Olson

A striking duality exists within both William Hundley and his art. There’s who he is, and who we think he is; there’s what his art is, and what we think it says. He’s a guy who likes to rock the boat, but you wouldn’t necessarily know it. His art is wacky, weird, and confusing, but it invites you to stare. It’s whatever you want it to be. And so is he. Our interaction begins like most: each a little withheld, sitting an unnatural distance across a table from one another. We joke about how I Googled him—a verb now formally recognized by the Merriam Webster dictionary—in attempt to familiarize myself with his personality based on his online persona. William Hundley is eager to hear my thoughts.

prototypical all-American guy—pearly whites, baby blues, and all—than your stereotypical tortured artist.

puzzle I’ve ever had to put together, piece by piece... a beautiful, confusing enigma.”

Street art, the genre in which Hundley first found inspiration, generally carries with it a bag full of “anti” sentiments. Yet not one fiber in Hundley’s body seems to represent discontent, disagreement, or dissatisfaction. His foray into the art industry simply began by being flabbergasted that someone could earn a BFA in painting in college. Though he had no more than a habit of sketching during school classes, he decided to go for the degree. I asked, didn’t that giant leap scare him?

A few beers deep, inhibitions are down and informality up. More than anything, Hundley tells me, he wants his art to make people smile. He admits that his photographic series are not driven by skill and goes so far as to say that his eyes “start to glaze over” when the word “aperture” is brought into  conversation. His method of creation for Entoptic Phenomenon was so unconventional (consisting of a good background, good piece of fabric, and a good friend to jump repeatedly while swathed in said fabric), he’s been told by other photographers that “he doesn’t know what he’s doing.”

I couldn’t unearth anything personal about Hundley, truth be told. And for some reason,  this lack of information led me to conjure up an image of a reserved, scrawny, glasses-wearing blond, for whom the subject of his own art was painful to discuss. Accordingly, I’d arrived to the interview fully prepared to pull teeth with my probing, inquisitive tool kit.

“I wasn’t scared at all,” Hundley answers. “Art is whatever the fuck you want it to be.”

Come to find out, Hundley wields self-deprecating, deflective humor like a shield, and looks more like the

“[Art] wasn’t something that I could beat anybody in,” he continues of his initial attraction, “but it was the hardest

In Hundley’s opinion, however, what he is making can be defined as art because it’s driven by pure feelings and a fresh idea.

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UP FRONT

Inspired by absurd artists like Austria’s Erwin Wurm, Hundley’s own “guerrillastyle approach to art” catches people off-guard. Regardless of the medium— painting, sculpture, or photography— his art is so mechanically raw and conceptually imaginative that people are unable to append to it a nice, clean categorization. A prime example of this inability to define what Hundley does comes in the form of Charlotte Gainsbourg and Beck’s “Heaven Can Wait” music video in France. The unauthorized appearance of his Entoptic Phenomenon and w/cheeseburger series’ concepts in the video (a floating piece of fabric and skateboard resting on cheeseburgers are seen) sent Hundley’s Internet fandom into an uproar. Someone was ripping him off without giving due credit, and they were pissed. Hundley was taken aback, but didn’t pursue any legal action after receiving an apology from the director saying that he hadn’t realized what Hundley created was art rather than another Internet meme. Personally, Hundley is hesitant to let anyone know too much about him;

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he finds the mystery of trying to pin down his image much more alluring and would rather people get a kick and visual bang out of what he creates. He

face” during a fight (he was, indeed, a “nerdier” version of himself back then); he says “fuck” a lot, and quickly apologizes for saying “fuck” so much.

Art wasn’t something that I could beat anybody in, but it was the hardest puzzle I’ve ever had to put together, piece by piece... a beautiful, confusing enigma. william hundley wants his art to be what the viewer perceives it to be and shies away from delivering an artist’s statement. What’s most unique about Hundley is the duality he straddles. Not everyone knows about his artistic side, and not everyone knows about his professional side. The more we talk, the more there is that slips out: he’s a jokester who reveals he had considered sending a friend in his place for this interview; he used to direct music videos for Austin area DJs; he’s worked some fashion jobs; he’s no stranger to middle management; someone in college once told him to “get his scientific ass outta their

His connection as artist to the art is just as disarming as the art itself, but there’s something really refreshing about seeing its place of origin. The same sort of wacky positivity that his art exudes seeps right out of the guy’s skin. “If you think you can’t, you’re right,” Hundley paraphrases a famous Henry Ford quote as a source of inspiration. “I love that relieving, freeing sort of thing.” He pauses and laughs, “What am I, quote guy?” – www.williamhundley.com

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HANDING HELL OVER

MOVING A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER FROM PRINT TO SCREEN Tucker Max

When you write a book, especially a book that sells a lot of copies, Hollywood inevitably comes calling. There are a lot of different ways to adapt a book into a movie. You can sell the movie rights to a studio, cash the check and wash your hands of it, then sit back and watch the studio do anything they want with your book (usually screwing it up). You can persuade them to let you get the first shot at writing the screenplay, and then watch them bring in another screenwriter to re-write your script, and then make the movie they want anyway. Or you can go the independent route, and try to make the movie you want to make. I took that route when adapting my book to the screen; along with my writing partner Nils Parker, I wrote and produced the movie that was based on my book, I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell. You may think this will give you complete control over the end result. I know I thought that going in. I was completely wrong.  It’s taken me awhile to get enough distance from the movie to see the process

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with any sort of objectivity, but I think these are the three big lessons I learned in my first book-to-movie effort: 1. Different media are like different languages: It’s seductively easy to think that because something works as a book, it can work that exact way as a movie. I used to be one of those schmoes who thought that books and movies weren’t really that different, a movie was just the visual

representation of the events in a book. Any asshole should be able to make a book into a movie, the hard part is already done. I laugh at my naiveté now. Books are free form; if it works, it’s okay to do. You can change tense, jump time frames, mix characters—you can do anything you want. The only thing you ultimately have to worry about is, “Are people going to keep reading?” 

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Movies don’t work that way. Movies have a very specific and rigorous structure. Not because of arbitrary rules some crotchety troupe of elders enforces, but because of the limits of the medium: You have to tell a visual story in under two hours, and there are only so many ways to do that.  I had no problem writing my book; in fact, I ended up creating a new genre of literature by accident, because I

ignored all the rules and just wrote as if I were talking to my friends. That’s the beauty of books—if people like reading it, it’s right. I tried to the make the movie just a direct translation of the book. You should see that script. It’s fucking awful. Long, meandering, and indulgent—and it’s basically the same words that made up a book that sold a million copies and spent five years on the best seller list! 

How could that be? It’s because of the vast differences in the demands of each medium. I learned that lesson the hard way, by writing and rewriting my first script at least 30 times.  2. Audience expectations: Writing a book that develops a huge cult following is great for motivating Hollywood to make a movie out of it. The problem is that the more popular the book is, the more expectations the fans have.

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On the set of I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell

Tucker Max (left) with actor Matt Czuchry

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There are no less than 25 people that have a substantive creative impact on the translation of your script into what goes on the screen. It’s almost a wonder that great movies can get made at all. Tucker Max, Author of New York Times Bestseller

UP FRONT

The more ownership the fans feel for the work, the more emotionally attached to it they are, and thus they give it much less leeway to deviate from their image of what the book should be.  This became a big problem for I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell. My book had a devoted and rabid fanbase, but a lot of them saw the book in a very different way than I did. Now granted, I lived the book, so of course I know better than any of them what the stories should look like and what they’re about—but the reality of perception is that the fans don’t give

a shit about me. They care about the movie being the way they imagined the book to be, regardless of what the reality is. And as much as I would like to be pissed at them for “not getting it,” the fact is, once you finish a piece of art and send it out into the world, you don’t really own the perception of it anymore. Sometimes it grows beyond your intentions.  Not to mention the issues this growth can cause with marketing. If it’s a popular book, a lot of people will already have a perception of what the

book is, and they are going to impute that to the movie, regardless of whether that’s what the movie deserves.  3. It’s not your work anymore: This was by far the hardest thing for me to come to grips with. Writing is such a solitary, individualistic expression of creativity. You sit down, all alone, and you face that blank page by yourself. Out of that personal battle, you create something that is totally yours. You wrestle with each phrase, you repeatedly edit each sentence, you say your sentences out loud to yourself, but ultimately, you make every call. The finished product is yours, the result of a single creative vision. It’s hard to begin to explain how different it is with a movie. In the very simplest terms possible: A ton of other people come along and fuck your shit up. The director, actors, editors, cinematographers, set designers, costumers, etc, etc. There are no fewer than twenty-five people that have a substantive creative impact on the translation of your script into what goes on the screen. Twenty-five people! Can you imagine writing anything with twentyfive other people in the room with you, critiquing you and adding their input and, in some cases, being able to override you and do what they want with your book? That would be a shitstorm. It’s almost a wonder that great movies can get made at all.  I still think that’s the fundamental weakness of movies—that it’s very difficult to maintain continuity of creative vision through the process. You have to be constantly vigilant, less about creating something good than about keeping other people from fucking it up. It’s an entirely different type of creative process, and an exhausting one at that. 

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GUIDE

FILM FESTIVAL INDEX Samantha Pitchel

Austin Film Festival

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aGLIFF


Austin Asian American Film Festival (Cinemaasia) www.aaaff.org

One of Austin’s newer festivals, celebrating its 5th anniversary, the Asian/ Asian American Film Festival attracts both local and international filmmakers who highlight the complexity and vitality of Asian/Asian-American communities through cutting-edge narrative, documentary and experimental films. The four-day fest provides local catering alongside screenings, and even hosts its own awards competition.

Fantastic Fest

www.austinfilmfestival.com



www.agliff.org



www.fantasticfest.com

Held each October, the Austin Film Festival brings an impressive array of filmmakers, writers, actors, and industry-folk to town for a week of world premieres, special events, contests, and awards. This year, AFF honors David Simon, creator of The Wire and Treme, for Outstanding Television Writing and will be announcing the full lineup as the event approaches. Look forward to signature events, Q&As, recommended screenings and lots of opportunities to discover up-and-coming features.

The Austin Gay and Lesbian International Film Festival (aGLIFF) is celebrating its 23rd year, and is the largest festival of its kind in the Southwest. The festival hosts plenty of sponsored events throughout the year, culminating in a week of screenings in September. aGLIFF also hosts monthly shows at the Alamo and, along with partners Out Youth, holds a summer filmmaking workshop called Queer Youth Media Project.

Perhaps Austin’s most unusual presentation, Fantastic Fest is no longer just the largest offbeat genre festival in the U.S. It has added an independent gaming fest, Fantastic Arcade, which debuts alongside the screenings this year, and it is also host to some of the most innovative signature events and world, U.S., and regional premieres. This year, expect lots of surprises, from culinary treats to unannounced celebrity appearances, and plenty of late-night events (karaoke guaranteed).

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UP FRONT

SXSW

www.sxsw.com

The film segment of Austin’s biggest festival, SXSW Film draws thousands of fans to town for insanely awesome world premieres, panels and parties. Last year’s debuts included the Duplass Brother’s Cyrus and the blockbuster Kick Ass, and films screened to packed houses all week long. Independent films like Dogtooth gained so much word of mouth attention from their SXSW screenings that, months later, the films premiered to sold-out crowds, proving the power of the festival and the die-hard enthusiasm of its attendees.

Cine Las Americas

www.cinelasamericas.org
 The Cine Las Americas International Film Festival showcases contemporary narrative and documentary features and shorts from North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. The festival includes a youth film contest called Emergencia, as well as animation and shorts competitions. Cine Las Americas also hosts events year-round in conjunction with the Alamo and the Harry Ransom Center.

Austin Jewish Film Festival www.austinjff.org


The Austin Jewish Film Festival screens at a variety of theaters across the city, from Downtown to Georgetown. Entires range from narrative to documentary, all with a focus on entertaining and educating audiences about traditional and modern Jewish culture. The fest draws many Israeli filmmakers, as well as artists from across Europe and the US, and its involvement with local causes recently earned the AJFF the Jewish Community Association of Austin’s Community Service Award.

Screening Series We Love 11:11 Cinematheque

www.newmovementtheater.com/movies This pay-what-you-want, BYOB movie night kicks off at—you guessed it—11:11 every Thursday night, right after The New Movement’s Block Party open mic. The series features flicks presented by local comedians, and showcases everything from James Stewart’s Harvey to Cage’s Bad Lieutenant.

AFS’ Essential Cinema

www.austinfilm.org When it comes to discovering rare titles and new talents, who better to trust than the experts at Austin Film Society? This series highlights unique restorations, underexposed artists and will-be classics that you otherwise may have missed. This summer, they’ve teamed up with Milestone Films to present a run of restored 35mm prints from around the globe.

Austin Cinematheque

www.austincinematheque.com Presented in conjunction with the University of Texas and the University Co-op, the Cinematheque, held in the Texas Union Theater during the Fall and Spring semesters, presents 35mm prints, focusing primarily on mid-century European classics. The best place for cinephiles to catch original cuts of their favorite hard-to-find titles.

Paramount Summer Film Series

www.austintheatre.org Now in its 35th year, the Paramount’s oldest series offers over 80 films—often accompanied by signature events, like a Big Lebowski scavenger hunt—to help you beat the heat and have fun on the cheap this summer. From double features to pre-show cartoons, the Paramount’s got you completely covered, and they even offer season passes for film fanatics.

Terror Tuesday / Weird Wednesday

www.originalalamo.com Hands down the best place to get your freak fix. Alamo’s Terror Tuesday presents overlooked thrillers from the 70s and 80s, while Weird Wednesday offers up eclectic lost ‘classics’ that’ll satisfy your craving for over-the-top cheese. Both nights will run you $1 (but we recommend splurging on snacks).

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William Hundley Indigo Bunting, 2007

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FANTASTIC

FEST Walk-in freezer parties. Endless karaoke. Boxing. Bill Murray. And nonstop screenings of innovative, often delightfully gory, groundbreaking films— sounds incredible, right? For the sixth year, Austin’s Fantastic Fest will be putting on a week-long celebration of the wonderfully weird, accompanied by highly anticipated events and unexpected adventures. Samantha Pitchel

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PERSPECTIVES

antastic Fest, officially the largest genre film festival in the U.S., presents a lineup of eclectic titles from around the world with a focus on horror, fantasy, sci-fi, and action flicks. The festival has hosted the world premiere of box-office hits like There Will Be Blood, Zombieland, Apocalypto, and City of Ember—and postscreening parties are always packed with celebrity guests. Director and programmer Tim League, who is also CEO of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, founded the festival in 2005. The concept completely took off, drawing increasingly huge crowds to town each September and generating intense buzz for blockbuster hits and unknown independents alike. Now, the festival is earning accolades from industry insiders as well as cinephiles, and is branching out to include even more events, parties, screenings, and contests than ever. While it may be expanding,Fantastic Fest is certainly not losing sight of its genre-driven mission; in fact, it’s constantly striving to contribute to the growth of unique film movements. “We’re trying to be as international as possible,” explains League, “and looking for genre film directors to come out of areas where we’re not expecting them.” The festival has always been the perfect place for unknown artists to get their first big boost. “We did a premiere of the first Chilean martial arts movie at Fantastic Fest several years ago,” League recalls. “It’s interesting when you see a country like Chile that doesn’t really have a long tradition in making genre films, and you get young guys that are in their early 20s that, just because of the nature of media these days, they’re growing up with the same influences and they’re also merging in their life experiences from places like Chile... It’s interesting seeing talent like that emerge.” Fantastic Fest has a steady history of exposing new international communities. Pakistan’s first-known horror film, a zombie epic, premiered here several years ago. “This year we are going to be seeing the first

WE’RE TRYING TO BE AS INTERNATIONAL AS POSSIBLE AND LOOKING FOR GENRE FILM DIRECTORS TO COME OUT OF AREAS WHERE WE’RE NOT EXPECTING THEM. Tim League Moroccan horror film that we know of. We haven’t seen it yet but our curiosity is certainly piqued by what that means,” says League. Additionally, this year’s lineup includes a special tribute to Norwegian genre films, a series of screenings that highlights the best contemporary work in gore and fantasy.

2010 poster, designed by Mike Saputo

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This year we are going to be seeing the first Moroccan horror film that we know of... our curiosity is certainly piqued. Tim League

TOP 5 FANTASTIC MOMENTS

Top 5 World Premiere Surprises

1. Festival Director Tim League debates— then boxes—legendary German filmmaker Uwe Boll.

1. Paul Thomas Anderson surprise appearance with World Premiere of There Will Be Blood.

2. True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard vamps it up at FF 2009, throwing a party in a walk-in freezer. 3. Bill Pullman presides over a group of 50 FF badgeholders during a late night Presidential Suite shindig at the Driskill Hotel. 4. Antichrist’s “Chaos Reigns” tagline goes viral at FF 2009, kicking off an international frenzy for the dark Lars Von Trier film. 5. Nacho Vigalondo hosts an all-night karaoke party at FF 2007, beginning FF’s tradition of throwing kick-ass karaoke events both here in Austin and at international festivals like Cannes and Berlin.

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2. Robert Downey Jr. introduces the World Premiere of Irom Man 2, followed by a Jon Favreau DJ set at the Highball. 3. Mel Gibson unexpectedly arrives at the World Premiere of Apocalypto. 4. Bill Murray surprises festival-goers at the World Premiere of City of Ember. 5. Leonard Nimoy delivers cans, along with Ain’t It Cool News, for the World Premiere of Star Trek.

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League and his team of programmers— which includes Todd Brown, creator of twitchfilm.net—are constantly monitoring international film news to scout material for the festival. “We pare things down to about 70 feature films and 60 shorts, but we maintain this tracking database where we’re watching about six or seven hundred films from around the world,” League explains. “Some we end up not liking, some get delayed in production and they get put onto next year’s list, some are great but aren’t quite appropriate for Fantastic Fest.”

tic screening at this year’s SXSW. But of course, Fantastic Fest is also a huge party, taking over screening sites the Paramount, Alamo Ritz and Alamo South Lamar as well as many local hotspots (especially The Highball) throughout the week. The fest holds an astounding amount of signature events, and boasts an annual presentation of culinary treats. This year, look forward to Alamo Drafthouse executive chef John Bullington’s traditional Argentinian feast—an entire butterfly-butchered cow, slow roasted on an open fire for 18 hours.

At a festival famous for breaking boundaries and pushing limits, what wouldn’t work? League explains that, while Fantastic Fest has a well-deserved reputation for being the gotta-be-there party of the festival season, it’s also a serious business opportunity, and the lineup is carefully crafted to facilitate this. His team has several key goals in mind as they plan each year’s activities. “The first and possibly the most important one is the audience: The badge holders, the ticket holders and general public that come in and are fans of movies, making sure they have a good time at the event.”

Additionally, this year Fantastic Fest introduces a new offshoot: Fantastic Arcade, an independent gaming showcase that will run concurrently with the first four days of the film festival (September 23-26). The Arcade will provide a forum for both major and independent game developers to debut and discuss upcoming releases, alongside panels, guest speakers, big-screen demos and events like a machinima film screening and competition, art installations, a Datapop 4.0 show—even a lightsaber dance party.

times we go down to Luling to City Market—the old guard Texas barbecue places.” Southern hospitality fused with a genuine passion for fantastic contemporary cinema seems to be a winning combination for League and his crew, and we can’t wait to be a part of the guaranteed craziness. Fantastic Fest goes down September 23-30, and badges are available now at www.fantasticfest.com.

All of this could only happen in the Keep-It-Weird capital. “I’m really proud to be in Texas, Austin in particular, and I would not live anywhere else,” League states. The Texan is sure to show visiting filmmakers a good time, and tries to be as authentic as possible when entertaining guests during the festival.

“The next goal is to connect filmmakers with industry and connect industry with filmmakers. In the earlier years, the industry was more lured by the fact that it’s Austin and there was going to be a really awesome fun time, but then films started to sell out of the festival, “We started with sort of embracing Texas and since that started happening the stereotypes of what people wanted to curiosity of the buyers for video and the see, and taking people out to Western theatrical release was aroused. Not wear shops to get cowboy hats and only sales deals but also potential alliances for future projects [are formed], things like that,” he explains. “And all manner of guns—there’s several shootall of those things are happening ing trips throughout the week where mainly through the interacting of those people can go skeet-shooting and to two camps.” traditional firing ranges. We do two or three different barbecue trips—I’m Some notable acquisitions emerging pretty picky about my barbecue. We from Fantastic Fest include 2007’s take them to Louie Mueller’s in Taylor, Timecrimes, 2009’s Down Terrace and and Smitty’s in Lockhart, and some2010’s Monsters, which was a SXFantas-

2010 HIGHLIGHTS Fantastic Fest’s first batch of films this year includes bloody revenge from Korea and Australia, South African and German zombies, Swedish musical terrorists, a renaissance of action heroes from Hong Kong, disturbing images from Serbia, aging Yakuza from Japan, and a psychokinetic automobile tire from France. Top to bottom: stills from Rammbock, The Dead, and Sound of Noise, all 2010 releases.

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William Hundley Chameleon Series, 2010

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AUSTIN PUBLIC ACCESS FROM THE CONVENTIONAL TO THE ABSURD Daniel Sargaent Photos by Sam Marx

On one station, you find “Austin City Lights”—a program that features a woman, with a lot of hair and a more than passing appreciation for sequins, improvising lyrics to a synthesizer, while her twin brothers (dressed as Elvis) dance across the soundstage. On another, you find Perry Logan, which may or may not be his real name, performing a satirical ballet in front of a bookshelf, dressed as a Frenchman, and offering semicoherent political critiques. On a third, a turbaned woman reads callers’ tarot cards, in front of a backdrop that dissolves into acid-drenched animations. This is a typical night of channelAustin programming. Austin’s public access network was founded in 1973, following in the footsteps of New York’s Manhattan Neighborhood Network, which offers locals all-hours access to studios and gear. channelAustin’s first broadcast was aired by University of Texas students atop Mount Bonnell, but the network has been in its current building on the East Side since the early 90s. In 2005, ACTV became Public Access Community Television (PACT) and began broadcasting under the name channelAustin. With three broadcasting channels, channelAustin offers political, religious, and community programs during the day. These programs come from a number of backgrounds: the ACLU, Hillcrest Baptist Church, Ruta Maya Coffee, and individually hosted programs like Cooking with Marie and ATX Street Dancing. channelAustin’s belief is that “freedom of expression should be available to all members of the Austin community re-

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gardless of disability or ability, on a fair and equitable basis that is non-discriminatory, non-commercial, non-exclusive, and content neutral.” The station also serves as host to an array of unconventional programming, relying on a wealth of talent that is uniquely Austin: Local comedy troupes from Coldtowne, the Hideout, and The New Movement have all appeared live on the air; Robert Rodriguez cut El Mariachi in one of the booths at channelAustin’s East Side facility; Bill Hicks’ last recorded interview took place in one of their studios. Until 2006, channelAustin’s studios were available for live programming 24/7, and latenight programming would often veer into the risqué; live productions went as far as actors appearing drunk on the air and at least one striptease has met the airwaves. Everything in Heaven Is TV is a channelAustin program that engages in

and comments on the nature of public access. Everything in Heaven began broadcasting in a half-hour, segmentbased format in late 2008. In a typical segment, producers Amanda Joy and Juan Cisneros would have a character adlib while playing with a series of visual ideas, using their own collection of analog effects relics from the 80s to create a surreal version of vintage public access style. “When we experienced public access, it was when we were teenagers living with our parents who had cable, late at night, not knowing what we were going to get, but finding just extremely strange, entertaining stuff,” says Juan. “So we tried to produce things that maybe couldn’t be explained, that seemed very non-sequitur to find on television but were completely compelling to young, strange, impressionable minds.” Sol Waters began working with channelAustin in 2002. Though he

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When we experienced public access, it was when we were teenagers living with our parents who had cable, late at night, not knowing what we were going to get, but finding just extremely strange, entertaining stuff. juan cisneros, producer initially came to the station in order to access equipment, he soon became interested in producing for the station. He has produced his own show, Sacrebleu.TV, for three years, which now boasts over 100 episodes. “I wanted to do something light-hearted and fun that brought in a lot of different elements: brought in comedy, brought in improv, brought in multicultural and world-cultural elements, music, brought in some French new-wave or even older avant-garde stuff,” he says of producing Sacrebleu TV. “[The show] would give me a chance to explore this music and film and stuff that I hadn’t actually gone into, so in preparation

for my show every week I would go and explore something I didn’t know about and bring it on and present it as something the audience might enjoy.” Aside from pure unadulterated entertainment, channelAustin also serves as a vital resource for beginning and professional filmmakers in the Austin area. The station offers courses in filming and editing, and locals are encouraged to exploit the station’s state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. In fact, channelAustin has miraculously thrived in an era more commonly associated with YouTube and Vimeo broadcasting services owing to the compounding of those hard assets (Sony HD cameras,

editing rigs, audio recording studios available), with community collaboration and the unique brand of Austinborn creativity—a potent mix that has allowed freedom to be supported by legitimate production for nearly four decades and counting. – ChannelAustin is broadcast on channels 10, 11, and 16 on Time Warner and Grande cable services and is available in over 500,000 homes. The station also recently began streaming content on its website. For more information on channelAustin’s resources and programming, visit channelaustin.org.

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SEEING A SONG

VIDEOGRAPHER DANIEL HILL Jon Shapley Photo by Jon Shapley

Clutching flashlights and standing outside of Beerland, the assembled crowd eagerly anticipated what promised to be a unique performance from local garage-rock heroes, The Strange Boys. On this particular evening, the band commissioned photographer and videographer Daniel Hill to bring band member Ryan Sambol’s concept of an “ethereal, diaphanous documentation of a live performance” to fruition. Just before midnight, The Strange Boys took the stage and Hill began his assignment. When the lights went out, the audience raised their flashlights, illuminating the stage and band in a kinetic flurry. Hill darted through the shadowed crowd, capturing the resulting flashes of light on 8mm film and quickly reloading cartridges of film into his Super 8 camera. The audience, silent in the dark, had everything they needed to experience the show: Though they could only see the stage for moments at a time, the music rang clear. Such a dark—and relatively chaotic— scene would be deemed less than ideal in terms of creating a consistent image, but it’s this sense of playful freedom and experimentation that has come to characterize Hill’s music videos. Working with other local lo-fi rockers such as Harlem, Cowabunga Babes, and Woven Bones, Hill has developed an aesthetic that melds the tangible with the conceptual, mixing experimental techniques with oversaturated images of bands performing in their natural element. Influences from Cassavetes to Jarmusch and Kerouac,— coupled with a passion for Super 8 and

VHS—have helped Hill create clips that add a dreamy, rather nostalgic, twist to reality. “I want to play around with reality, the way [we’re] seeing,” Hill explains, “in a way that isn’t necessarily realism, but is inspired by realism.” His videos sincerely capture the tone of the tunes that inspire them. Woven Bones’ “Your Way With My Life,” directed by frontman Andy Burr, was initially shot on VHS, then replayed and recaptured on a television screen, giving it a burned-out look that justly personifies the band’s distorted style. Aesthetically and conceptually divergent, Cowabunga Babes’ “Hot Babez,” codirected by Cassandra Lee Hamilton, documents a summer afternoon spent eating pizza in a bounce-castle, carefree and fun, evocative of the band’s stage show. Currently, Hill is working on a video for rockers Ringo Deathstarr, whose eclectic style lends itself well to artistic interpretation.

Top and middle: Harlem, “Witch Greens,” directed by Daniel Hill Bottom: The Strange Boys, “Woe is you and me,” directed by Daniel Hill with assistance from Winston Calloway To see more of Hill’s work, visit www.youtube.com/danieljacobhill www.myspace.com/walkandtalkpictures

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Shot In Texas How blockbuster “True Grit” was lured to Texas Daniel Sargaent Photos provided by the Texas Film Commission

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Established in the mid-late 1800s, Granger, TX is a “main street” town NE of Austin that was of particular interest to the Coens for True Grit because it is comparable in size to 1880s Fort Smith, Arkansas (where the movie is set). The filmmakers gave the town a movie makeover, removing power lines, and laying dirt on top of the city streets. Because of Austin’s proximity, they could tap into Austin’s local talent available for hire on the crew. It was an extensive process getting approval to shoot at the State Capitol of Texas.

had to construct and rebuild the businesses along the Granger’s main drag in order to replicate the old West’s feel. “A lot of those buildings on the main street were already empty,” says Ashley of the drag’s refurbishing process. “They pretty much worked on all the facades for every building along that strip—it was neat to see a little town that’s sparsely populated pop into life.”

Earlier this year, Granger—a 1,300 resident town about fifty miles north of Austin—was transformed into a nineteenth-century Arkansas town in order to serve as one of the primary locations of the Coen brothers’ remake of True Grit. How Granger was selected as an ideal location for True Grit, and how that selection offers our state a lot of benefits and accolades, has most to do with the esteemed Texas Film Commission.

The TFC has been around since 1971, when Governor Preston Smith created the Commission via executive order, wishing to “encourage the orderly development of the film, television, and multi-media production industry in Texas in order to utilize the state’s vast array of natural, human, and economic resources which are uniquely suitable for that industry.” Since then, the TFC has worked to create relationships that attract productions to Texas. To lure films to Texas, the TFC employs a number of tools. What many film crews define as the most outstanding is an array of tax incentives, including reimbursements and discounts on various expenses, from lodging to retail expenses. “It is money that a local economy wouldn’t otherwise see,” says Lindsey Ashley, a Location Scout for the TFC. “You have to think about all of the goods and services [film crews] spend money on, whether it’s hotels, catering; they’ll get tires for their trucks, ice, and then really expensive things, like when they rebuild structures.” For example, the producers of True Grit

Expensive construction projects like this—projects that literally improve the community and remain in place after the production leaves—are another reason the TFC works so intently to have films made in Texas. Beyond simply spending money on goods and services, film and television productions also employ a tremendous number of people. “For True Grit, [there were] hundreds of jobs that were created,” says Ashley. These employees are typically found locally, with productions employing more general workers from construction and transportation industries as well as more film-specific fields. The TFC maintains a directory for productions on its website, where basic services can be found throughout Texas. The TFC also maintains a list of cast and crew calls for productions that are taking place in Texas— one main attraction the state has for productions is its wealth of experienced and professional film crew workers. As a location scout, Ashley’s role seems a rather glamorous one— traveling throughout Texas to gather

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The filmmakers were very interested in securing the Capitol as a filming location because of the way that it was able to suit the needs of their story. Nothing felt quite as right as the State Capitol of Texas for the scene.

For True Grit, [there were] hundreds of jobs that were created...people don’t realize the economic impact that a film has. lindsey ashley, tfc location scout data and photographs on possible filming locations. One main feature Texas has particularly in its favor is geographical diversity. “So many different parts of Texas look different,” she says proudly of the state. “That’s why a lot of producers often think…we usually have what they need.” The Coen brothers were looking for a specific set of features to closely match their “hero location”—Fort Smith, Arkansas, circa the late 1800s. True Grit producers became interested in filming in either Oklahoma, New Mexico, or Texas, and the states’ film commissions began a bidding war. Locations scouts work closest with films in the preproduction stages; thus, Ashley began courting first the production designer and then the film’s producers and directors with trips to Granger on behalf of TFC. After securing the primary filming locations, TFC’s role becomes more relaxed and, among other things, the organization will scout additional loca-

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tions should they become needed. One relatively small shot in the film was to take place in a train station, and while Texas has no shortage of historically preserved locations, the production was unable to find an ideal spot close enough to Austin (union-related expenses jump if a production has to travel too far from its home location). Thus, TCF determined the most fitting location within the city limits that fit the film’s criteria was also one of the city’s most prominent: The state Capitol. In this well-preserved and period-appropriate building, an East hallway stood out as the aesthetically perfect location. After a few months of wrangling and preparing, about fifty extras in perioddress gathered in the Capitol’s East hallway one day in March, and the rest is history. “It’s a really short scene, but an important location, and they were running out of options,” and the TFC was integral in keeping the production running smoothly.

“Essentially [the location True Grit’s production] landed on for their [train station] set is surrounded by the offices of the upper echelons of the Texas Senate,” Ashley says of the short, but extremely high profile, shot. On a grander scale, the TFC interacts with just about every film festival in Texas, including SXSW, Dallas International Film Festival, Lone Star Film Festival, and Marfa Film Festival in order to promote the Commision’s work. Scouts are even occasionally sent to Los Angeles to pitch Texas as a film location. But more than anything, the TFC operates as a resource, working for Texas to help create jobs and boost the economy, sometimes with big names like “Coen.” “A lot of times, people will think of movies as something frivolous, but people don’t realize the economic impact that a film has,” Ashley explains. “It could be a small independent film, [but] they still need people, goods, and services. That’s a big part of what we help to do.”

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PILLOW TALK WITH BRYAN POYSER FILM CIRCUIT HEAVY-HITTER TALKS YOUTUBE, NEWBIE MISTAKES, AND GAINFUL UNEMPLOYMENT Samantha Pitchel Photos by Sam Marx

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ustininite Bryan Poyser has been creating award-winning features since he was studying film at the University of Texas, where he co-founded the Cinematexas International Short Film Festival. Dear Pillow, which he wrote and directed in 2004, earned accolades from many of the 30 festivals at which it played, including the Independent Spirit Awards. Poyser is currently Director of Artistic Services for the Austin Film Society. He recently wrote, directed, and edited the feature Lovers of Hate, which was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Poyser sat down with Rare to discuss his filmmaking adventures, and the unique interplay between his roles on set and in the office.

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Your latest release, Lovers of Hate, has been getting a lot of attention, earning accolades at SXSW and Sundance. What’s next for the film? I have indeed been very busy with festivals and such with Lovers. I went out of town five weekends in a row in April and May, hitting Boston, Corpus Christi, Dallas, Rochester, NY. It also screened in San Francisco and New York and next up is Chicago. In September I’ll be going to South Korea of all places! That’s one of the best things about making a tiny indie film—getting a chance to follow it to new places. IFC released Lovers of Hate on its cable feature Video On Demand alongside the SXSW debut—what are your thoughts on new forms of distribution as a tool for promoting and extending the reach of independent films? We definitely live in interesting times in terms of indie film. It’s never been easier to make a no-budget film and it’s never been harder to get one seen by a wide audience. Or at least a wide paying audience. We’re all getting used to being able to see whatever we want when we want it, thanks to YouTube, Netflix Watch Instantly and Hulu, and we usually don’t want to pay for it. It’s especially hard to get people to pay to see no-budget films with no stars at the theater outside of film festivals. So, what IFC has been doing is pretty smart—using the festivals, where those films get the most attention, to launch them. But, the pool of people who pay attention to what films are playing at Sundance or SXSW is still pretty small. You shot your first narrative film in Austin in over six years ago—what sort of changes in the film community have you noticed in just that short time? Since I shot Dear Pillow in 2003, the amount of acclaim and attention the Austin film scene gets has definitely grown. Now, it’s pretty much a given that every year someone from Austin

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or Texas will be getting a film into Sundance or getting an Independent Spirit Award nomination. And, the profile of our homegrown festivals has really grown, too—with big name directors and writers coming to the Austin Film Festival every year and SXSW basically becoming the number two film festival

Poster for Lovers of Hate

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in America, behind Sundance, in terms of a place where tiny indie films get bought or launched critically. It’s pretty incredible. The obstacles are still the same though—impossible to find money, impossible to make much of a living doing it here. But, we all persevere. Describe the experience of shooting a feature on a low budget, while also trying to support yourself. I was actually blessedly unemployed when I shot Dear Pillow, which allowed me to focus on it 100%. Also, when I produced and co-wrote the Burnt Orange feature The Cassidy Kids, both myself and the director Jacob Vaughan

to learn from the successes (and mistakes) of hundreds and hundreds of filmmakers who embark on this mostridiculous endeavor of making indie films. One of the main things I took away, which I tried to rigorously apply with Lovers, was to not be too ambitious. Sometimes filmmakers try to do something literally impossible—like make a convincing action movie with about $500 and no experience. The film turns out looking silly, they get discouraged and then they don’t make another film.

not gonna get their film off the ground if they can’t convince their friends to let them borrow equipment for free, or hold a boom for free or edit for six months for breakfast tacos. We all have to work together to get anything made because there’s so little money floating around.

Instead, I tried with this film and with pretty much everything I’ve done, to come up with something doable—

Oh, absolutely. One of the best parts of my job is that I get to travel around the state in the spring and do workshops

Conversely, Austin gets a lot of attention as a film hub, but Dallas and Houston also have growing scenes. Have you noticed any developing relationship between Texan film communities?

We definitely live in interesting times in terms of indie film. It’s never been easier to make a no-budget film and it’s never been harder to get one seen by a wide audience. bryan poyser were getting paid to make it—an amazing experience—our first professional gig! But, Lovers I had to make for the most part on vacation time, and on nights and weekends. The folks at the Austin Film Society have been incredibly helpful and generous with letting me go off and do my thing when I need to and the stability of having a full-time job has definitely made it possible for me to make films and eat. Plus, it’s an organization I really believe in. Before I starting working there, they gave me two grants to make Dear Pillow and the film wouldn’t have existed without their support. How has your role at Austin Film Society, working with filmmakers throughout the pre- and post-production processes, informed and influenced your own approach to shooting? I’ve been working in a “support role” to other filmmakers for most of my adult life… I’ve been incredibly privileged

based around locations, actors, resources that I would have a reasonable chance of getting—and then to focus on the things that, to me, really matter above all—the acting and the writing. The production value really doesn’t matter as much, especially when you don’t have the dollars to produce much in the way of production value. If you have a well-told story with good actors, even if they’re not famous, people will notice. Austin’s known for its ever-growing stock of local talent, both in front of and behind the camera—what do you think makes this city in particular such a popular destination for filmmakers? I think, in a way, one of the things that makes this place so supportive of filmmakers is also one of the things that makes it really difficult to live here—no one is getting rich making these films. So, the competitiveness is relatively low and the spirit of collaboration is unusually high. Everyone knows that they’re

on how to apply to our Texas Filmmakers’ Production Fund in most major Texas cities—Dallas, Houston, Fort Worth, San Antonio, El Paso, Corpus Christi, even smaller places like McAllen, Marfa, and Denton. And every place I go, I see incredibly eager filmmakers doing pretty incredible stuff. Still, the majority of projects we get for TFPF come from Austin, but we do have a top-flight film school here that pumps out hundreds of students a year, many of which stick around. And, Dallas has a lot of commercial production that keeps crews working. I personally have forged friendships and collaborations with a close-knit group of awesome filmmakers from the Dallas area, folks like David Lowery (St. Nick), James Johnston (Receive Bacon, Knife), Clay Liford (Earthling, My Mom Smokes Weed) and Yen Tan (Ciao). – www.poboy.livejournal.com www.loversofhatethemovie.com

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QUEENS OF THE HIVE Cassie Morien Photo by Cassie Morien

If that still leaves you scratching your head, don’t worry. In more elaborate terms, Austin Video Bee is a group of highly creative and talented young women altering the definition of art in our area, using video and multimedia as a medium. “We walk a fine line between a few different communities of people, and that can be an interesting balance to strike,” founding member Kate Watson says. “There really isn’t anything else like us… I think it’s an interesting challenge to try to brand a group that does a lot of different things—which is great. That’s how it should be. We should be challenging a community.” The collective, whose membership is comprised of new and old members, currently consists of Watson, Sally Bergom, Leigh Brodie, Elana Farley, Amanda Joy, Lee Webster, Michelle Devereux, and Matti Sloman. Watson and Webster helped found the eccentric video group in the summer of 2007. All members have varied backgrounds in art, video, multimedia, and graphic design. “[AVB] came out of a lot of conversations that we were both having with other—particularly female—artists in the community who were interested in supporting each other and making

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Austin Video Bee’s bright white website is speckled with performance art flyers, hilarious production stills, and a homemade video of a pizza-shaped plate swimming in slow motion. The uncluttered web space is stimulating and confusing, and the group’s two-sentence bio is equally ambiguous. AVB—and all girl multimedia video collective striving to be “and integral part of the vital Austin arts community”—knows that they aren’t easy to describe.

[video] work,” Watson says of her initial conversations regarding the concept with Webster. While Austin Video Bee does not abide by an “all women” policy (they’ve had a male member in the past), the members do primarily focus on promoting and showcasing artistic women. “I think that [video/multimedia] is traditionally something that women are pushed away from doing,” Watson says of the industry stereotype AVB has inadvertently come to stand against. As a collective, AVB maintains a unique balance between fueling individual projects and crafting fresh community-wide events. For the past two years, the group has hosted “Exquisite Bee,” an opportunity for interested locals to create their own video. Registered groups are provided props, characters, costumes, space, and sets, courtesy of AVB and the United States Art Authority. Farley explains that the participants in groups of up to seven people serve as the videographers, actors, and directors. The “Exquisite Bee” event is based on the “exquisite corpse” game, in which a collection of words is assembled and players celebrate the fact that the outcome is unpredictable.

“You don’t have any idea what you’re going to get,” Farley stresses. “The end of one group’s cinematic invention will be the jumping off place for the next set of auteurs.” Additionally, the motion art professionals of AVB recently collaborated with local musicians and produced an event called “AVB Jamz” in January, where they created individualized concert projections for four different bands, adding a more visual component to the live shows. Between these largely successful yearly events, AVB keeps the community’s interest high by regularly posting and publicizing through the collective’s website. The women hope that AVB will continue to contribute to Austin’s art network well into the future. “In 20 years, it seems like Austin Video Bee could really still be thriving, and I would maybe have no idea what it would even be like,” Joy says. “Because of how flexible and mobile [AVB] is as a project, it really could work,” Watson predicts. “I think it has worked.” – Austin Video Bee recently released its third DVD compilation, “Compound Fantasy.” www.austinvideobee.blogspot.com

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I think that [video/multimedia] is traditionally something that women are pushed away from doing. kate watson, founding member, austin video bee RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

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Letting It All Go Inspiration In Improv Samantha Pitchel

Alex Karpovsky loves playing guys you can’t help but hate. The former Austinite has perfected the art of portraying hyper-aware, highly neurotic young men, a character type definitive of an emerging genre that eschews glossy production in favor of low budgets, strong personal narratives, and organic performance interaction. Karpovsky appeared in several of the past year’s most highly-anticipated independent films: Andrew Bujalski’s Beeswax, Bob Byington’s Harmony and Me, and Lena Dunham’s SXSW breakout Tiny Furniture, in addition to starring in local director Bryan

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Poyser’s Sundance hit Lovers of Hate, cementing his role as a key player in the tightly-knit community of emerging DIY filmmakers. Karpovsky has also spent time behind the camera. He wrote, directed and

(locally) produced 2005’s The Hole Story and 2008’s Woodpecker. His recent release, Trust Us, This Is All Made Up, explores the performance style of well-known improv comedy duo TJ Jagodowski and Dave Pasquesi. The documentary format is a break from

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On TJ and Dave from Alex Karpovsky’s Trust Us, This Is All Made Up by Megaphone Comedy co-founder Tami Nelson, one half of local improv duo Chris and Tami

Karpovsky’s past narrative work and was unexpectedly inspired by TJ and Dave’s ability to create complex scenes out of thin air during a New York performance. “[It was an] incredible, spectacular, mindblowing experience that made me really fascinated not only by what they did but what their relationships are to each other,” he says of the duo’s performance. TJ (best known as Sonic’s sassy spokesperson—a role that’s completely improvised) and Dave (a writer and actor who’s worked on a slew of comedies over the past two decades, including the offbeat Exit 57) are a Chicago-based troupe specializing in long form improv. Fans of shows like “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” may have the misconception that improv comedy is all about games, prop play and over-the-top characters, but long form is a much more subtle art. It is, essentially, a set of carefully crafted scenes, made up on the spot, that build relationships between char-

acters, exploring their reactions to each other and the scenarios they create. While directing and producing Trust Us, This Is All Made Up, which contains a full-length TJ and Dave stage show, Karpovsky learned that, while dramatically different by design, both improv and film acting rely on the same basic skill sets. “In talking to [TJ and Dave], I was really reminded about the importance of paying attention,” he recalls. “It sounds very trivial and simple, but a lot of the acting that I do anyways is improv-heavy, it’s improv in a very structured environment. Like, we know what this movie is about and we probably know what this scene is about, but to put it in our own words, to see how different things could be massaged, we do improv a lot. And I think the thing that is most helpful for me to remember before I begin is: Listen and react, listen and react. Pay attention to the other person.

One night when we were still in improv classes, Chris (who had just returned from Chicago) cornered me backstage and with all the seriousness of a dude inspired said, “I want to do a two-person show with you. I saw TJ & Dave and I want to do a show like that with you.” He described how they don’t take a suggestion, they just come out on stage, check in with the audience and say “Trust us, this is all made up.” Totally goose-bump city for me. Chris told me how they play multiple characters and discover real, living worlds and themes, and it sounded beautiful and complicated and like something I wanted to try. So, we emulated that style. Our two person show is five years-old now and has gone through many phases, but what has been consistent is its inspiration. To me the movie feels very personal. TJ and Dave are the most respected folks who do the strange art form of improv to which we’ve devoted our lives. The opportunity to accompany them on their pre show rituals and be privy to their post-show discussions feels very familiar but completely privileged.

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“And I think that’s something that TJ and Dave, in addition to many other things, do extraordinarily well. They can really focus on what the other person is doing, and when you have that level of focus, all the other things which may get in the way of maximizing this opportunity to improvise go away, and they talk about this in the film,” Karpovsky says. This focus on the other actor is key in creating successful improv scenes. Comedians cannot ignore the other person on stage and create one-sided jokes; it is the rich relationship between characters that draws the audience in. It’s all about having your fellow performer’s back, no matter what direction the scene takes. “If there’s focus, if there’s trust (which is part of focus), if there’s faith (which is part of focus), then all the other things like fear, hesitation, even fore-thinking, will go away. They’re simply not there;

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they don’t exist; there’s no room for them to exist.” While trust is crucial between performers relying so heavily on each other, it also enhances the relationship between actors working from scripts. Things are more comfortable when you know that your scene partner is able to identify the focus of the interaction, to reach beyond the confines of his or her own character and explore connections. This intimacy is particularly relevant in Karpovsky’s work, which tends to focus on interpersonal relationships and their growth through trying times. Karpovsky’s contributions to local, independently-produced films have helped establish Austin’s reputation as a hub for innovative new talent. Look for him in Bryan Poyser’s Lovers of Hate, out now, and in local filmmaker Sean Gallagher’s upcoming Home.

A lot of the acting that I do is improv in a very structured environment. And the thing that is most helpful for me to remember before I begin is: Listen and react. Pay attention to the other person. alex karpovsky

– www.woodpeckerfilm.com www.theholestoryfilm.com www.trustusfilm.com www.alexkarpovsky.com

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Steve Wolf’s crew created a large fireball for an Army training video. Actors were transferred into the video via chroma key (or greenscreen technology) (inset)

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FIRE IN THE HOLE: AsTUNTMAN PERFECT SCIENCE WOLF REFLECTS ON BLOWING STUFF UP Laura Romer

A dozen people clad in safety goggles scream and yell in delight and surprise as they witness a pyrotechnic effect going off yards in front of them. A few run to the scene of the excitement and put out any stray flames with fire extinguishers provided by Stunt Ranch. Steve Wolf looks on at the happy Stunt Camp participants and is reminded of the thousands of similar explosions he’s created over the course of his career. After working with special effects and stunts for over two decades and now owning both Stunt Ranch and Special Effects International, Wolf has made a career out of making things go “boom,” and making sure they do so safely. Wolf’s interest in science and special effects began when he was five and never wavered, even when met by the worried glances of family and friends. “I was the kid who blew up my train sets, climbed out the window, spent

more time hanging outside my house than inside,” Wolf reminisces. “I always loved hanging in harnesses, climbing, and lighting things on fire.” With a degree from Columbia University in Writing and Literature, Wolf began his film career as a set medic, either patching people up or driving them to the hospital. Other past jobs included working as an instructor for scuba diving, firearms and stunt driving, and even building rock climbing walls for the city of New York.

Now, his credits include Cast Away with Tom Hanks, The Firm with Tom Cruise, Hustle & Flow with Terrence Howard, and America’s Most Wanted with John Walsh. With one eye focused on safety and the other on chemistry, Wolf has— fortunately—never encountered any problems or accidents. “With our work on movie sets, you can’t really be a daredevil. You have to be a scientist,” Wolf emphasizes. “The

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story with effects, but very often what we see now are poor scripts with very little storyline, where the effects become the story, and I don’t think that’s what they’re supposed to do,” Wolf says. While in New York City, Wolf used to own his own medic-provided ambulance and would rent it out to Law & Order quite frequently, even appearing on the drama as one of the paramedics. Wolf served as the Stunt and Special Effects Coordinator for the MTV series Call to Greatness. In every episode, cast members would attempt to break (or make) a new world record, such as the most explosives fired on a person’s body. The stunt involved hooking up 180 squibs (micro explosives that create the look of someone being shot) to a firing box that can sequentially fire them on cue. Other calls to duty have included late night talk show host David Letterman’s request to ignite his old set furniture in the middle of Manhattan’s 52nd Street. “But the secret behind-the-scenes funniness of that is that none of the furniture that we blew up was actually his furniture,” Wolf says. Instead of launching a two hundred pound wooden desk into a populated area, Wolf had all of the furniture replicated in balsa wood and painted it to match the original identically. “The actual desk that we blew up was light enough that you could hold it up with one finger,” he reveals.

You really have to trust yourself a lot. There’s some faith involved, but it’s a faith in science. steve wolf difference between them is daredevils do dangerous things and they don’t know how it’s going to turn out, and stunt/special effects people do things that look dangerous, but we’ve actually done all that can be done to make it safe. And the results are predictable.”

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These results could be setting houses on fire, rigging actors and stunt people above stomach-turning heights, car stunts, bullet shots, and even firing up machines that can produce 3,000 gallons of snow in a mere ten minutes. “I love helping the script enhance the

Wolf even worked on Whitney Houston’s “I’m Your Baby Tonight” music video, which required an effect where Houston put her hand through a mirror and retracted it. For safety (and beauty) reasons, Wolf’s very own properlygloved hand doubled for Houston’s as he punched through a tabletop holding a thin later of liquid mercury in its center. After living in Memphis for eight years where he was the Special Effects Coordinator for the John Grisham films

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Top: Steve Wolf and crew created this explosion onboard the U.S.S. North Carolina for James Cameron’s “Expedition: Bismarck” Bottom: Fireworks for a wedding at the Bob Bullock Museum

Top: Special Effects International created a truck explosion for the upcoming film Doonby without injuring the truck, cast, or crew. Bottom left: They also created a moving rain rig for a scene in the movie. Bottom right: Students on a field trip to Stunt Ranch learn first hand how movie fireballs are created

and spending time on the road teaching science to kids, Wolf found his way to Austin in 2000 and bought Stunt Ranch in 2005. Involving himself with the local Austin film scene, Wolf worked on Richard Linklater’s Fast Food Nation with Greg Kinnear, which required gobs of fake blood for the meat processing plant scenes. “That movie finished me getting off of red meat,” he laughingly recalls.

“I haven’t eaten beef since I saw that movie.” Right now, Wolf is reviewing a horror script to be shot in Austin, while working on developing a television series about a behind-the-scenes look at special effects as well as a series that teaches science using stunts as examples. Working in the realm of stunts and special effects takes more than just brains. “You really have to trust yourself a lot.

You have to trust that you’ve done your homework,” Wolf said. “There’s some faith involved, but it’s a faith in science.” A wide-eyed camper eagerly says, “Tomorrow, we’re going to learn how to catch our hand on fire.” Is he scared? “No. We have protective shield.” And the knowledge and experience of Steve Wolf’s team standing right by him. – Wolf Stuntworks www.weaddexcitement.com

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William Hundley Chute: Dragon, 2010

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Wallpaper and Filler Material: Balmorhea and Film Steve Miller Photos by Michael Muller

Anyone who’s ever been swept away by Balmorhea’s wistful walls of sound has also probably caught herself thinking, This should be in a movie. You’re right, it should. And it is. After four studio releases— each followed by a heaping dose of critical praise— Balmorhea is hurtling beyond the West Texas landscapes conjured up by their post-rock sound and are heading even further West. To Hollywood.

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Balmorhea co-founders Rob Lowe and Michael Muller have gained steady work in the film industry over the past couple of years by scoring everything from award-winning independent films to children’s video games. They hope this is only the beginning, however, with their sights set on bigger projects and bigger screens. In a sit down with Lowe, he explains the different tactics Balmorhea has taken in creating scores for films. Much has been made of Balmorhea’s ‘cinematic’ sound, so soundtracks seem to be a natural progression for you guys. What was the first film that the band scored? Talk a little about that experience.   Working with filmmakers was always something that we were interested in doing.  When we first started out, we had no idea how to pursue this side of music making, and honestly, I still don’t know exactly how to pursue work with film. The first project we worked on was the French film Dog Pound directed by Kim Chapiron and produced by Partizan in Paris. It was one of those things where you wake up in the morning and there is an email in your inbox from

someone in France who wants to work with you. Totally out of the blue.    Did that project open up other doors for you guys to work on other film endeavors? What projects have you worked on since?   Well, I don’t know if the Dog Pound work directly opened any doors, but it definitely boosted our confidence and taught us a lot about how to work with music for films. We have worked on a number of projects since then, including a short film called Guest Room produced by One Spark Films out of Austin. We have also done a number of other commercial projects with One Spark.  We also did music to a computer-based children’s video game called The Land of Me with a group from London.    Directors and producers are notoriously picky and specific about having their ducks in a row. How is recording a studio album different than scoring a film?   A studio album is an expression of an individual or a group in which you are saying exactly what you want to say, expressing exactly what you want to express. Working in film, you are

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creating something that is only a part of a whole. They are two completely different processes and take a different kind of work process and energy.  A studio album, for us anyways, usually develops over a long period of time (a year or more) and requires a lot more personal energy and imagination. Film music, while taxing in a different way, usually develops over a shorter period of time and involves a lot more of a collaborative process with a wide variety of people involved with the production.    Do you take the film into the studio with you and score to the film or is it more of a give-and-take with the director to hit your cues? In other words, how precise do you have to be with scoring?   Each project has been different.  It was a challenge with Dog Pound because the movie had already been edited and we had to compose to the final cut.  On the opposite end of the spectrum, working on Guest Room was a pleasure because we were allowed a fair amount of leeway to compose something that we thought fit, and the film was then cut to the music.   What’s the greatest challenge in writing music for film?   Trying to express something that you have not been a part of since conception.   What are some films that have influenced your style? What film from the past year had a standout soundtrack?   I think that the music we do is largely our own and in response to the project itself.  We like the music that Nick Cave and Warren Ellis have done together for film. They did The Road this year and we liked that a good amount.  One of my favorite scores in the past few years was Johnny Greenwood’s score to There Will be Blood.

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We have to find a way to understand at a very basic level what the director is trying to say and then do our best to help them say that. rob lowe, balmorhea Which composers do you look up to?   That’s hard.  I’m not that in love with very many strictly film composers.  I guess for film composers I like the work of James Newton Howard.  Obviously Philip Glass has some amazing work in films, but I don’t think of him as a film composer.    What movie would you like to go back and score yourself ?   Noi Albinoi or Dead Man.    Igor Stravinsky once famously said, “Film music is no more than wallpaper,

filler material.” He then later went on to score Disney’s Fantasia. How do you feel about that perspective of film music as wallpaper?   Well I don’t know about wallpaper, but it is usually not the main event. I guess I agree with the sentiment.  Although I think that “wallpaper” can be a very important part of a project. In fact, it can make or break it. To his credit, I think that all the music in Fantasia was written before the film was created. It’s hard for me to argue with Stravinsky! – www.balmorheamusic.com

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OCTOBER 14TH | 6–9PM

AMOA–LAGUNA GLORIA

TICKETS ONLINE at AMOA.ORG/LADOLCEVITA or call 512.295.9224, ext. 223 Experience the decadence of a night in “the sweet life” at the 21st Annual La Dolce Vita Food & Wine Festival. Savor bites from more than 50 of Austin’s most prestigious chefs. Sip the finest wines and liquors from Twin Liquors, Texas wineries and spirits. Visit the Scotch and Cigar Lounge with your friends while enjoying the majestic views of the Laguna Gloria grounds. RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

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The Ugly Stepchildren of the Cinematic World: the perspective of the independent filmmaker

William Sparks Photo by Sam Marx

Everywhere, people are talking about their involvement in some film. We live in a city of film students and film makers. Austin produces a remarkable quantity of independent films, a special category attractive to many who, like myself, regard popular cinema as a pure object of consumption. Precisely because the so-called “strong model” of American film presupposes a fixed and passive audience, we feel compelled to enter revolutionary impulses into the media discourse. 70

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Remember that most discourse on media is not covered by the media. Still, that discourse surrounds us all. I hear about a public spectacle, whether concerning the activities of Britney Spears, Quentin Tarantino, or Banksy, and I seek it out. I look it over, without buying anything. This important aspect of media discourse is hardly talked about. What defines independent film is that essence that really means the zero degree of ticket-holding audience. The theater exists, but for all intents and purposes, it’s empty. I never know who might fill the theater, or for whom I am making a film. I only know that I must dangle some sort of special lure to draw my audience in. The door is open to slippery tactics. Regarding original property, the law of the pirate rules. Obviously our independent projects won’t match up against the productions of the big

studios. Distribution alone precludes that possibility. We independent filmmakers are the ugly stepchildren in the world of cinema, and we proceed under a banner that reads, “If a film is independent, it is so in a purely aesthetic sense.” The genre, with all of its limitations and quirks—and hypocrisies even—presents the perfect arena to test the premise that independent is not an economic value. Low budget does not equal independent. For us, an independent film must take an essential point of departure from popular cinema: ‘independent’ film is a technique of action. Writer, producer, director, production designer, etc., meet on the ground as equals. Categories of expertise blur and blend, according to the demands of a given scene. Conditions force us to mobilize the general genius. The set is existential, and the actors are thrown together at incalcu-

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Limits of time and money demand a high degree of discipline on the part of everyone involved, but authority in independent film is plural, shared, and also extremely delicate in the most elegant sense of the word.

lably close quarters in their attempts to solve problems in real time, in the moments before, during, and after the camera is rolling. Similarly sets are discovered, not built. And these discoveries evolve because the participants—cast and crew alike— are tasked to hold themselves in a state of alert, on the lookout for locations, props, costumes, etc., that accentuate the general atmosphere of the film. Limits of time and money demand a high degree of discipline on the part of everyone involved, but authority in independent film is plural, shared, and also extremely delicate in the most elegant sense of the word. Thus the human story inevitably slips back into the narrative. We get to hear the characters speak as private persons

who you or I might know. Ordinary impulses, daily occasions, family history, local legend, are projected over hyperkinetic scenes of violence, pornography, racism, and class war, which seem to so obsess Hollywood. This foregrounding is not political, but more concerned with anchoring a work in relation to the era in which it’s made. Exposed to the constant rallying calls for common feeling (and isn’t that what the seasonal blockbuster is really about?), perhaps we as a culture are losing touch with the practice of listening and directing attention to the life that surrounds us. Few films these days manage to overwhelm us. The big studios seem incapable of reproducing the social relevance they achieved two and three decades ago; it’s a common complaint. Independent film is very well suited to

radical impositions and can execute what the “strong model” would never attempt. Thanks to recent developments in camera technology, the means are within the reach of practically anyone who wants to make a film. Thus the frame is truly blank once again. Above all else—and this is what’s most important—in the making of an independent film, the course is set for fun. Yes, fun, which is the crystallizing agent that simultaneously opens up the language you see on the screen (as well as the dialogue that goes on behind it), while at the same time providing a kind of dispensation from the blockages that belong to our society as a whole. I’d say that’s reason enough to continue pursuing the medium.

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William Hundley Red Bud, 2007

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The Aesthetics of Analog: Super 8 Film in a Digital Age Lindsey Eden Turner

As a beginning film student my first year in college, I would stay up late in a dimly-lit, chemically-scented room, manually cutting and splicing tiny pieces of film together in an attempt to create an experimental masterpiece. The end results were admittedly pretty awful, but even with my meager skills, one thing was clear—this 8mm film stuff looked sweet. Grainy, ethereal, nostalgic—even the most mundane of shots looked purposeful. I remember thinking: Who would ever want to go digital? Super 8 was developed in 1965, when Kodak modified standard 8mm film into a cartridge format. The cartridges, which hold a 50-foot reel (a little over three minutes of film at 18 frames per second), reduced loading time to mere seconds, and Super 8 cameras became the weapon of choice for amateur filmmakers and home movie enthusiasts. Super 8 has since become a professional production medium, and is still used throughout the film community as an inexpensive alternative to high-definition video. Phil Vigeant, Owner of Pro88mm in Los Angeles, credits Super 8 as is the original high-definition medium, with a warm, organic feel that can’t be replicated by even the most advanced digital cameras. Plus, at about $30 a roll for the film and processing, it’s an affordable medium. Uniquely, Super 8 film isn’t subjected to the hardcore tech-refresh that feeds filmmakers’ constant need to upgrade. If it looked great in the 70s, and looks great today, it will probably look just as great 30 years from now. Super 8 film is archival, classic, and lasts forever. There’s a human element to Super 8—it lends a quality of immediacy that makes the person behind the camera feel

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connected with the actions in front of it. People who take a more DIY approach to filmmaking, like documentary filmmaker Ashley Mawer, and often make use of archival footage and old home movie reels in their work still find the analog medium just as relevant as the digital. While there may not be a lot of cutting and splicing these days, Super 8 film still has a valid place in the film community. Kodak is still making the cartridges, old cameras are still in great working order, and there are numerous resources for filmmakers to get 8mm film into their digital projects.

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Want to see 8mm in action? Look up the following: A Thorn in the Heart—Michel Gondry An intimate portrait of Gondry’s aunt. Central to the story is Gondry’s use of Super 8 clips from old family films, as a way to retrace his family roots. The 8mm clips connect the past and the present, memory and reality (above). Trigger Films—Austin-based boutique production company specializing in “capturing life’s moments” on Super 8 film. Peter and the Wolf—official music video for “Lightness,” directed and edited by Bill Baird of Sound Team

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SLACKER 20 YEARS LATER Daniel Sargaent Photo by Steve Hopson

Richard Linklater’s Slacker premiered at the Dobie in July of 1990. Twenty years later, the film stands as a cult phenomenon and iconic portrait of Austin. Owing to Slacker’s popularity, people who have never visited the city have this preconceived notion that Austin is a city littered with aimless twenty-somethings and harmless lunatics. Watching the film for the first time twenty years after its release (and six months after arriving in Austin) highlighted for me the disconnect between the city most people imagine Austin to be and the reality of the city in today. A portrait of a single day in late-80’s Austin, Slacker lacks traditional linear narrative—the camera wanders listlessly across the city, documenting snippets of conversation but never lingering long enough for the viewer to grow too invested in any one character’s fate. This structure allows Linklater to sketch the city primarily as a place where a few thousand people have simply opted to hang out for a while, a middle ground between college and adulthood proper that some choose never to leave. Before moving to Austin, I imagined a city similar to Linklater’s portrayal— lots of coffee, a relaxed approach to personal hygiene, an emphasis on creativity over productivity. That sketch of Austin is still valid, but it’s also incomplete. Austin will always attract and cultivate creativity, but it now embraces and promotes new and offbeat endeavors like Alamo Drafthouse in a professional and effective way.

Austin in 2010 is cleaner, more organized, safer, and more motivated. The 1989 Austin skyline—shown only once in the film—has little in common with downtown’s current silhouette. High-rises abound, and the campus area where much of the film was shot has been cleaned up and gentrified. While the film’s characters would probably wince at what Downtown and the Drag have become, the aesthetic and attitude of those characters still dominates in the East Side and can be found in scattered pockets throughout the city. In some ways, Slacker is partly responsible for attracting those elements that have “sanitized” the city; Austin has emerged as a popular destination for young people and business start-ups largely because the city is known as laid-back, open-minded, and authentic. They’re the features of the city that drew me here. Even though those adjectives might feel a little compromised now, Slacker irrevocably

attached them to Austin, and they still fit the bill. I can’t pretend that this is the city I expected to find, but I also can’t ignore the fact that the differences between what I expected and what I found are all positive. What the movie doesn’t show in 1989 is a version of Austinite who is willing and motivated to follow through on his or her ventures. Businesses, coops, and collectives are born and thrive here. Progressive corporations like BookPeople, Waterloo Records and Whole Foods have evolved and now flourish in a city that Slacker represents as directionless and adrift. Austin is now comprised by a host of projects as well as ideas, where curiosity and innovation find quarter unlike they would anywhere else. The city that hosts the rest of the country’s creative talent for one week in March every year does so for a reason: Linklater’s Austin is nothing if not very cool, and that’s one thing that hasn’t changed.

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A big thanks to our friends at CharityBash for supporting local Austin non-profits.

RARE GIVES BACK Spotlighting Austin’s Non-Profits

The Cipher: Austin’s Hip-Hop Project Shannon Sandrea, MS, LPC Photos provided by Cipher

While working for SafePlace as a School-based Counselor in 2004, I had the chance to meet many youth who wanted to be heard and needed an outlet. One youth was Chris “Gidon” Ockletree. He was part of a hiphop group called Public Offenders. He sold me their CD, and I listened closely to their lyrics and message. I heard how hungry they were to address the same issues that concerned me. Over several years, we had a really open dialogue and truly listened to each other. These young people guided me and helped me open myself to trying out new ideas. After seeing the 2007 documentary “The Hip-Hop Project” about a New York City nonprofit agency led by a formerly homeless youth who guided a large group of teens to write, produce, and release a hip-hop album, we were inspired to re-create the project in Austin. Together, we created The Cipher—Austin’s Hip-Hop Project—an awardwinning non-profit organization that engages youth (16 - 21 years old) to promote social change through their love of hip-hop culture. We formed a coalition of community partners including interdisciplinary theater artist Zell Miller III, the group’s current Artistic Director, and developed a teaching curriculum based on the tenets of oldschool hip-hop culture. Creative writing, spoken word, elements of hip-hop culture, performance, civil rights, and activism are some of the topics we address in our twice-weekly confidential meetings. Since its inception in 2007, The Cipher has been building a strong community of East Austin youth by helping them transform their life stories into powerful works of art.

Left: The Cipher youth perform in Austin

The Cipher puts respect for women front and center in their guiding philosophy. The creative expression and performances encouraged through

The Cipher create confident and engaged youth eager to work for social justice. Because The Cipher youth are so credible with their peers, they are an effective catalyst for social change. They are empowered, authentic, and connected to the local music, poetry, and communities. The Cipher youth perform all over Austin—they have performed everywhere, from major citywide music festivals and community events to to the awareness-raising events of other non-profit organizations. The Cipher serves as a blueprint for culturally relevant youth organizing and empowerment. The Cipher is committed to producing a new album this summer to replicate the success we created last year with our first album, “From Soldiers to Warriors.” Last year, The Cipher performed at 50 events, provided 106 meals and 240 bus passes, and met 110 times. The youth have become aware of what Austin has to offer and Austin has gotten the chance to listen to them. We thank CharityBash for putting the spotlight on our mission and on these young voices. – www.thecipheratx.org

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MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3

24 Diner 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5400 www.24diner.com Austin Land & Cattle Co. 1205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.1813 www.austinlandandcattle company.com

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Beauty Bar 617 E. 7th St. 512.391.1943 www.beautybar.com

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The Counter Café 626 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.708.8800

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Creekside Lounge 606 E. 7th St. 512.480.5988 www.thecreeksidelounge.com

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219 West 219 W. 4th St. 512.474.2194 www.219west.com

Crú 238 W. 2nd St. 512.472.9463 www.cruawinebar.com Delish 209 W. 3rd St. 512.739.2460 www.delish-cupcakes.com

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Imperia 310 Colorado St. 512.472.6770 www.imperia-austin.com J. Black’s 710 W. 6th St. 512.433.6954 www.jblacks.com

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Jeffrey’s 1204 West Lynn 512.477.5584 www.jeffreysofaustin.com

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Jo’s 246 W. 2nd St. 512.469.9003 www.joscoffee.com

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Key Bar 617 W. 6th St. 512.236.9389 www.keybaraustin.com

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La Condesa 400 A W. 2nd St. 512.499.0300 www.lacondesaaustin.com Malaga 440 W. 2nd St. 512.236.8020 www.malagatapasbar.com

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Malverde 400-B W. 2nd St. 512.705.0666 www.malverdeaustin.com

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Mean Eyed Cat 1621 W. 5th St. 512.472.6326 www.themeaneyedcat.com

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El Sol y La Luna 600 E. 6th St. 512.444.7770 www.elsolylalunaaustin.com

Moonshine 303 Red River St. 512.236.9599 www.moonshinegrill.com

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Mulberry 360 Nueces St. 512.320.0297 www.mulberryaustin.com

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Nau’s Enfield Drug 1115 West Lynn St. 512.476.1221 www.naus-enfield-drug.com

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Frank & Angie’s Pizzeria 508 West Ave. 512.472.3534 www.hutsfrankandangies.com Halcyon 218 W. 4th St. 512.472.9637 www.halcyonaustin.com Hut’s Hamburgers 807 W. 6th St. 512.472.0693 www.hutsfrankandangies.com RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

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The Parish 404 E. 6th St. 512.479.0474 www.theparishroom.com

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The Ranch 710 W. 6th St. 512.465.2016 www.theranchaustin.com

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Silhouette 718 Congress Ave. 512.478.8899 www.silhouette718.com

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Stubb’s 801 Red River St. 512.480.8341 www.stubbsaustin.com

Alamo Ritz 320 E. 6th St. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

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Tiniest Bar in Texas 817 W. 5th St. 512.391.6222 www.tiniestbarintexas.com

AMOA 823 Congress Ave. 512.495.9224 www.amoa.org

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Wahoo’s 509 Rio Grande St. 512.476.3474 www.wahoos.com

Ballet Austin 501 W. 3rd St. 512.476.2136 www.balletaustin.org

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Walton’s Fancy & Staple 609 W. 6th St. 512.542.3380 www.waltons-florist.com

Mexic-Arte Museum 419 Congress Ave. 512.480.9373 www.mexic-artemuseum.org

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Paramount Theatre 713 Congress Ave. 512.472.5470 www.austintheatre.org

SHOPPING

El Arroyo 1616 West 5th Street 512.478.2577 www.ditch.com

Frank 407 Colorado St. 512.494.6916 www.hotdogscoldbeer.com

ARTS & LEISURE

Speakeasy/Terrace 59 412 Congress Ave. 512.476.8017 www.speakeasyaustin.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

By George 524 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.472.5951 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

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Hem Jeans 908 W. 12th St. 512.478.5326 www.hemjeans.com

Avant Salon 507 Pressler St., #800 512.472.6357 www.avantsalon.com

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Kickpleat 918 W. 12th St. 512.445.4500 www.kickpleat.com

Joie de Vie 713 E. 6th St. 512.542.9220 www.joyoflifesalon.com

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Milk + Honey Spa 204 Colorado St. 512.236.1115 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

Nest 1009 W. 6th St. 512.637.0600 www.nestmodern.com Threshold Furniture & Design Studio 801 W. 5th St. 512.476.0014 www.thresholdinteriors com

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Austin City Living 1145 W. 5th St. 512.323.9006 www.austincityliving.com

Touch of Sass 500 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.478.7277 www.touchofsass.net

52

Underwear 916 W. 12th St. 512.478.1515 www.shop-underwear.com

Dick Clark Architecture 207 W. 4th St. 512.472.4980 www.dcarch.com

53

Waterloo Records 600 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.474.2500 www.waterloorecords.com

Gables Park Plaza 115 Sandra Muraida Way 512.477.7275 www.gables.com/parkplaza

54

Urbanspace Realtors 801 W. 5th St. 512.457.8884 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

17 1

enf

ield

26

/ 15

th

c/l oop

1

3 36 37 41

mop a

12th

e

es river

trin

ity

jacin

os

29 47

san

8th

53

red

colo

ress braz

a lavac

rado

9th

to

alup guad

anto

ces nue

nio

de gran rio

44

14 12 16 28 19 34 33 39 54

nech

23

32

cong

35 40

31

7th

27 43

25 11

ave

z

lady bird/town lake

h co

r ch

8 20 22 7 18 50

sout

cesa

21

ngr ess

45

6 4

6th

46

13 30 52 1 15 48

1st

51

state capitol

42 2

sout h

38

san

5

9

lama

r

wes

west

t lyn

n

10th

aven u

e

11th

5th

10

49

4th

3rd

24 2nd

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

85

C

campus | hyde park

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

2 3

Tripp T-Shirts 2405 Nueces St. 512.478.7477 www.myspace.com/tripptshirts

Cuatro’s 1004 W. 24th St. 512.243.6361 www.cuatrosaustin.com

Tyler’s 2338 Guadalupe St. 512.478.5500 www.tylersaustin.com

15

Thundercloud Subs 3200 Guadalupe St. 512.452.5010 www.thundercloud.com

25

Wish 2322 Guadalupe St. 512.391.9009 www.ishopaac.com

6

FoodHeads 616 W. 34th St. 512.420.8400 www.foodheads.com

11

23

24

Epoch Coffeehouse 221 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.454.3762 www.epochcoffee.com

10

Salvation Pizza 624 W. 34th St. 512.535.0076 www.myspace.com/ salvationpizza

Toy Joy 2900 Guadalupe St. 512.320.0090 www.toyjoy.com

Spider House 2908 Fruth St. 512.480.9562 www.spiderhousecafe.com

5

9

13

22

14

El Greco 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.474.7335 www.elgrecoaustin.com

8

Quack’s Bakery 1400 E. 38th 1/2 St. 512.538.1991

Asti 408 C E. 43rd St. 512.451.1218 www.astiaustin.com

4

7

86

Aster’s Ethiopian 2804 N. I 35 512.469.5966 www.asters ethiopian.com

12

Fino 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.474.2905 www.finoaustin.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4206 Duval St. 512.458.3168 www.hydeparkbarand grill.com Judges’ Hill Restaurant 1900 Rio Grande St. 512.495.1800 www.judgeshill.com Kerbey Lane Café 2603 Guadalupe St. 512.477.5717 www.kerbeylanecafe.com Mother’s Café and Garden 4215 Duval St. 512.451.3994 www.motherscafeaustin.com

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

16 17

Torchy’s Tacos 2801 Guadalupe St. 512.494.8226 www.torchystacos.com Trudy’s 409 W. 30th St. 512.477.2935 www.trudys.com

SHOPPING 18

Buffalo Exchange 2904 Guadalupe St. 512.480.9922 www.buffalo exchange.com

19

Cream Vintage 2532 Guadalupe St. 512.474.8787 www.creamvintage.com

20

Forbidden Fruit 108 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.453.8090 www.forbiddenfruit.com

21

Room Service Vintage 107 E. North Loop Blvd. 512.451.1057 www.roomservicevintage.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Austin Children’s Theater 4001 Speedway 512.927.6633 www.austinchildrens theater.org

27

Bass Concert Hall 510 E. 23rd St. 512.471.2787 www.utpac.org

28

Elisabet Ney Museum 304 E. 44th St. 512.458.2255

29

Frank Erwin Center 1701 Red River Street 512.471.7744 www.uterwincenter.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 30 31

Alite Laser 504 W. 17th St. 512.328.1555 www.alitelaser.com Waterstone Aesthetics 3016 Guadalupe St. 512.373.7546 www.waterstoneaesthetics.com

LIVING 32

512 Realty 600 W. 28th St. 512.322.0512 www.512realty.com

33

M.J. Neal Architects 4220 Duval St. 512.320.0764 www.mjneal.com

34

Venue on Guadalupe 2815 Guadalupe St. 512.473.3706 www.venueonguadalupe.com

5

45

th

16

no

20

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IVER

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33 11 8

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26

l

13 6

st3r4eTH S et TREE T

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duval

stre38TH ST et REET

ada

34th

ET

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38th

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lam

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29

15

NUECES

19

nueces

RIO GRANDE

SAN GABRIEL

rio grande

3

san gabriel

7

31 4 17 22 18 14 29th 29 stre THet STREET 34 32 16

1

12

DEANde KEan ETOke Neton

10

23

24th 24 stre THet

1

STREET

24 2 25

9

UNIVERSTY OF TEXAS

27

university of texas

mlk, jr.

MLaKv, JR e . AVE .

30 28 RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

87

M

midtown

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9

88

34th Street Café 1005 W. 34th St. 512.371.3400 www.34thstreetcafe.com Apothecary Café & Wine Bar 4800 Burnet Rd. Ste. 450 512.377.9621 www.apothecaryaustin.com Austin Diner 5408 Burnet Rd. 512.467.9552 Blue Star Cafeteria 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.7827 www.bluestarcafeteria.com Fonda San Miguel 2330 W. North Loop Blvd. 512.459.4121 www.fondasanmiguel.com

10 11 12

New World Deli 4101 Guadalupe St. 512.451.7170 www.newworlddeli.com Phil’s Ice House 5620 Burnet Rd. 512.524.1212 www.philsicehouse.com Sampaio’s 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.469.9988 www.sampaiosrestaurant.com

13

Taco Shack 4002 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.8533 www.tacoshack.com

14

Teo 1206 W. 38th St. 512.451.9555 www.caffeteo.com

15

Flying Saucer 815 W. 47th St. 512.454.8200 www.beerknurd.com

Waterloo Ice House 1106 W. 38th St. 512.451.5245 www.waterlooicehouse.com

Ginny’s Little Longhorn Saloon 5434 Burnet Rd. 512.458.1813 www.ginnyslittlelonghorn.com

16

Kerbey Lane Café 3704 Kerbey Ln. 512.451.1436 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

Adelante 1206 W. 38th St. 512.452.5322 www.adelanteaustin.com

17

Atomic Cherry Boutique 5535 Burnet Rd. 512.258.2226 www.atomiccherry boutique.com

Maru Japanese Restaurant 4636 Burnet Rd. 512.458.6200 www.austinmaru.com

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

19 20 21

Back Home Furniture 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.452.7753 www.backhomefurniture.com

Paper Place 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.6531 Precision Camera 3810 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.467.7676 www.precision-camera.com

22

Russell Korman 3806 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.451.9295 www.russellkormanjewelry.com

23

Second Time Around 5100 Burnet Rd. 512.451.6845 www.secondtimaroundatx.com

24

Soigne Boutique 4800 Burnet Rd. 512.300.2929 www.soigneaustin.com

25

Strut 3500 Guadalupe St. 512.374.1667 www.shopstrut.com

SHOPPING

18

Blue Elephant 4001 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.371.3259 www.shopblueelephant.com

ARTS & LEISURE 26

Dart Bowl 5700 Grover Ave. 512.452.2518 www.dartbowl.com

27

The Art Pad 4520 Burnet Rd. 512.323.0802 www.theartpadstudio.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 28

Bob Salon 1815 W. 35th St. 512.454.4262 www.ilovebobsalon.com

29

Bodhi Yoga 2905 San Gabriel St. 512.478.2833 www.bodhiyoga.com

30

Rae Cosmetics 1206 W. 38th St. 512.320.8732 www.raecosmetics.com

LIVING 31

Avenel 3815 Guadalupe St. 512.699.9200 www.ownhydepark.com

justin ln.

5

hanc

ock

23

26 p

north loo

burnet

11 17 7 3

lam ar

2222

6

ee

burn

k

alupe

cr

med

et

tre

28

ical

ln. bey

ker

treet

hs

35th s

8

38t

jeff

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on

park w

ay

et

guad

ll

lama

bu

r

2 24 4 12 9 45th s treet 27

rs

on

je

e ff

34t

16 30 15 14

hs

13 18 19 20 22

21

austin state hospital

29

tre

et

10

1

38t

hs

tre

et

31 25 RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

89

E

east side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1

Justine’s Brasserie 4710 E. 5th St. 512.385.2900 www.justines1937.com

14

Boggy Creek Farm 3414 Lyons Rd. 512.926.4650 www.boggycreekfarm.com

The Liberty 1618 1/2 E. 6th St. 512.600.4791

15

3

Buenos Aires Café 1201 E. 6th St. 512.382.1189 www.buenosairescafe.com

Lustre Pearl 97 Rainey St. 512.469.0400 www.lustrepearlaustin.com

16

4

Cheer Up Charlie’s 1104 E. 6th St. 512.431.2133 www.cheerupcharlies. blogspot.com

Progress Coffee 500 San Marcos St. 512.493.0963 www.progresscoffee.com

17

Rio Rita 1308 E. 6th St. 512.524.0384 www.riorita.net

5

Clive Bar 609 Davis St. 512.494.4120 www.clivebaraustin.com

18

Sam’s Bar-B-Cue 2000 E. 12th St. 512.478.0378

6

East Side Café 2113 Manor Rd. 512.476.5858 www.eastsidecafeaustin.com

19

The Scoot Inn and Bier Garten 1303 E. 4th St. 512.478.6200 www.scoot-inn.com

7

East Side Show Room 1100 E. 6th St. 512.467.4280 www.eastsideshowroom.com

8

El Chile 1809 Manor Rd. 512.457.9900 www.elchilecafe.com

9

The Good Knight 1300 E. 6th St. 512.628.1250 www.myspace.com/ thegoodknightaustin.com

2

10

90

Blue Dahlia 1115 E. 11th St. 512.542.9542 www.bluedahliabistro.com

13

G’raj Mahal Café 91 Red River St. 512.480.2255 www.grajmahalcafe.com

11

Hoover’s Cooking 2002 Manor Rd. 512.479.5006 www.hooverscooking.com

12

Juan in a Million 2300 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.472.3872 www.juaninamillion.com

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

20 21

Shangri-La 1016 E 6th St 512.524.4291 www.shangrilaaustin.com Shuck Shack 1808 E Cesar Chavez St 512.472.4242 www.shuckshack.com

22

TC’s Lounge 1413 Webberville Rd. 512.926.2200 www.myspace.com/ tcswednesdays

23

Thunderbird Coffee 2200 Manor Rd. 512.472.9900 www.thunderbirdcoffee.com

24

Uncorked 900 E. 7th St. 512.524.2809 www.uncorkedtastingroom.com

25

Vivo 2015 Manor Rd. 512.482.0300 www.vivo-austin.com

SHOPPING

38

26

Big Red Sun 1102 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.480.0688 www.bigredsun.com

Okay Mountain Gallery 1312 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.okaymountain.com

39

Salvage Vanguard Theater 2803 Manor Rd. www.salvagevanguard.org

27

Blue Genie Art Industries 916 Springdale Rd. 512.444.6655 www.bluegenieart.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY

28

Break Away Records 1704 E. 5th St. 512.538.0174 www.breakawayrecs.com

29

Deanfredrick 902 E. 5th St. 512.493.0943 www.deanfredrick.com

41

30

Domy Books 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.476.3669 www.domystore.com

42

Kemestry Salon 2124nE. 6th St. 512.322.9293 www.kemestrysalon.com

31

East Side Pedal Pushers 1100 E. 6th St. 512.826.3414 www.eastsidepedal pushers.com

43

Method.Hair 1601 E. 5th St. 512.469.0044 www.methodhair.com

44

Vain Salon 1803 Chicon St. 512.524.1057 www.vainaustin.com

32

Goods East 1601 E. Cesar Chavez 512.476.3287 www.goodseast.com

33

Snake Eyes Vinyl 1211 E. 7th St. 512.220.7019 www.snakeeyesvinyl.com

34

Solid Gold 1601 E. 5th St. 512.473.2730 www.solidgoldacademy.com

40

Art Palace 2109 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.artpalacegallery.com

36

BiRDHOUSE Gallery 1304 E. Cesar Chavez St. www.birdhousegallery.com

37

Mone’ Musel Fine Art 208 San Marcos St. 512.300.7790 www.monemusel.com

Esty Skin Studio 1210 Rosewood Ave. 512.903.8225 www.estyaustin.com

LIVING 45

Good Life Team 1114 E. Cesar Chavez St. 512.892.9473 www.goodlifeteam.com

46

Urbanaxis Mortgage 900 E. 6th St. 512.473.2947 www.urbanaxismortgage.com

47

Urbanspace Realtors 900 E. 6th St. 512.476.0010 www.urbanspacerealtors.com

ARTS & LEISURE 35

Birds Barbershop 1107 E. 6th St. 512.457.0400 www.birdsbarbershop.com

east 38 1/2

dean keaton

39

11 23 8 6 25

rt

po

air

or man

22 east

, jr.

mlk

18 od

ewo

41

east 7th

les rna

2

27

pede

chicon

comal

ta navaso

33

ey

french legation

ll

24

east 11th

va

1

nt

sa

ea

ros

pl

red river

con

ta

aso

nav

chi

44

42 46 7 31 9 17 14 ea st 6th 47 4 20 40 3 28 29 16 east 5th 19 34 37 43 38 36 30 26 45 21 32 cesar ch 12

13

avez

10 5 15

35

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

91

S

south side

MAPS & INDEX

1 2

14

The Black Sheep Lodge 2108 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.707.2744 www.blacksheeplodge.com

Matt’s El Rancho 2613 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.462.9333 www.mattselrancho.com

15

Botticelli’s 1321 S. Congress Ave 512.916.1315 www.botticellissouth congress.com

3

Broken Spoke 3201 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.6189 www.brokenspoke austintx.com

4

Doc’s MotorWorks Bar & Grill 1123 S. Congress Ave. 512.448.9181 5207 Brodie Ln. Suite 100 512.892.5200 www.eatdrinkdocs.com

5

Ego’s 510 S. Congress Ave. 512.474.7091

6

Freddie’s Place 1703 S. 1st St. 512.445.9197 www.freddiesplace austin.com

7

8 9 10 11 12 13

92

FOOD & DRINK

Green Pastures Restaurant 811 West Live Oak St. 512.444.4747 www.greenpastures restaurant.com Highball 1142 S Lamar Blvd. 512.383.8309 www.thehighball.com Home Slice 1415 S. Congress 512.444.7437 www.homeslicepizza.com

27

Bows + Arrows 215 S Lamar Blvd # C 512.579.0301 www.shopbows plusarrows.com

Maudie’s Hacienda 9911 Brodie Ln. 512.280.8700 www.maudies.com

28

16

By George 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.8600 www.bygeorgeaustin.com

Olivia 2043 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.804.2700 www.olivia-austin.com

29

Downstairs Ste. E, 2110 S Lamar Blvd. 512.687.0489

17

Paggi House 200 Lee Barton Dr. 512.473.3700 www.paggihouse.com

30

18

Feathers Boutique 1700 S. Congress Ave. 512.912.9779 www.myspace. com/31622902

Perla’s Seafood and Oyster Bar 1400 S. Congress Ave. 512.291.7300 www.perlasaustin.com

19

Polvos Mexicana & Bar 2004 S. 1st St. 512.441.5446 www.polvosaustin.com

20 21 22 23 24

Hotel San Jose 1316 S Congress Ave 512.852.2350 www.hotelsanjose.com Hyde Park Bar & Grill 4521 West Gate Blvd. 512.899.2700 www.hydeparkbarandgrill.com Jo’s 1300 S. Congress Ave. 512.444.3800 www.joscoffee.com Kerbey Lane Café 2700 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.445.4451 www.kerbeylanecafe.com RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

Trophy’s 2008 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.0969 www.myspace.com/trophystx Trudy’s 901 Little Texas Ln. 512.326.9899 www.trudys.com Uchi 801 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.916.4808 www.uchiaustin.com Vespaio 1610 S. Congress Ave. 512.441.6100 www.austinvespaio.com

25 26

Austin Handmade 2009 S. 1st St. 512.383.9333 www.austinhandmade.com Blackmail 1202 S. Congress Ave. 512.326.7670 www.blackmailboutique.com

The Long Center 701 W. Riverside Dr. 512.457.5100 www.thelongcenter.org

HEALTH & BEAUTY 41

Avant Salon 9600 S. IH-35 512.291.5000 www.avantsalon.com

42

Birds Barbershop 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.442.8800 www.birdsbarbershop.com

43

Hairy Situations Salon 1708 S. Congress Ave 512.442.6412 www.hairysituationaustin.com

31

Goodie Two Shoes 1111 S. Congress Ave. 512.443.2468 www.myspace.com/austingoodietwoshoes

44

32

Prototype Vintage Design 1700 1/2 S. Congress Ave. 512.447.7686 www.prototypevintage design.com

J. Buccio Salon 6800 West Gate Blvd. 512.326.1153

45

33

Service Menswear 1400 South Congress Ave. 512.447.7600 www.servicemenswear.com

Massage Envy 9600 Escarpment Blvd., Ste. 860 512.288.3689 www.massageenvy.com

46

34

Spartan 215 S Lamar Blvd 512.579.0303 www.spartan-shop.com

PATH Salon Ste. C, 3100 South Congress Ave 512.447.7284 www.pathsalon.com

47

35

Spectacle Sunglasses 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.382.6197

The Waxing Studio 2110 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.284.6000 www.thewaxingstudio.com

48

36

Stag 1423 S. Congress Ave. 512.373.7824 www.stagaustin.com

Yoga Yoga 4477 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.358.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Waterloo Ice House 9600 South IH 35 512.458.6544 www.waterlooicehouse.com

SHOPPING

40

LIVING 37 38 39

ARTS & LEISURE

49

Alamo Drafthouse 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.476.1320 www.drafthouse.com

Dorado Soapstone 2157 Woodward St. 512.444.8600 www.doradosoapstone.com

50

Irons Austin 2607 Stacy Ln. 512.589.5798 www.theironsaustin.com

Austin Art Garage 2200 S. Lamar Blvd. 512.351.5934 www.austinartgarage.com Austin Lyric Opera 901 Barton Springs Rd. 512.472.5927 www.austinlyricopera.org

51

Park Lane Guest House 221 Park Ln. 512.447.7460 www.parklaneguesthouse.com

gs

1

5

22

4 31 26 12 2 10 18 33 9 51 28 36

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37 8 eliz

abet

h

mo pac

mon

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milt

48

6

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29 47 16 1 35 42amar

t ma

7o

14

25 19

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50 46

manch

aca

south

3

360

20

1st

38

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ry

ress

l

south 5th

13

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south

h

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30 23 32 43

on

ann

lady bird /to wn riv lak ers e ide

cong

barton sprin

34 17 27 40 39

11

90 hwy 2

/ ben

white

290

44 21

45 15 4

49

41 24 RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

93

W

west side

MAPS & INDEX

FOOD & DRINK 1 2 3

Chez Zee 5406 Balcones Dr. 512.454.2666 www.chez-zee.com Daily Juice 2307 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.628.0782 www.dailyjuice.org

4

Deep Eddy Cabaret 2315 Lake Austin Blvd 512.472.0961

5

Fabi and Rosi 509 Hearn St. 512.236.0642 www.fabiandrosi.com

6

Fion Wine Pub 2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd. 512.266.3466 www.fionwinepub.com

7

Fion Wine Pub 11715 FM 2244 512.263.7988 www.fionwinepub.com

8 9 10 11 12

94

Abel’s on the Lake 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.904.0572

Hula Hut 3825 Lake Austin Blvd 512.476.4852 www.hulahut.com Iguana Grill 2900 N. Ranch Road 620 512.266.8439 www.iguanagrillaustin.com Magnolia Café 2304 Lake Austin Blvd 512.478.8645 www.cafemagnolia.com Mangia 2401 Lake Austin Blvd Austin 512.478.6600 www.mangiapizza.com Maudie’s Café 2608 W. 7th St. 512.473.3740 www.maudies.com

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

13

Maudie’s Milagro 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8080 www.maudies.com

25

Goodwill 701 Newman Dr. 512.478.6711 www.austingoodwill.org

14

Mozart’s Coffee Roasters 3826 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.2900 www.mozartscoffee.com

26

The Hip Chick 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.330.1701 www.thehipchick.com

15

Nu Age Café 2425 Exposition Blvd. 512.469.9390 www.nuagecafe.com

27

16

Hutson Clothing Company 3663 Bee Cave Rd. 512.732.0188 www.hutsonclothing.com

Siena 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.349.7667 www.sienarestaurant.com

28

17

Thistle Café 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.1000 www.thistlecafe.com

Mad About Shoes 900 RR. 620 South, Ste. A-109 512.970.0466 www.madaboutshoes austin.com

29

Waterloo Ice House 6203 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.418.9700 www.waterlooicehouse.com

RunTex 2201 Lake Austin Blvd. 512.477.9464 www.runtex.com

30

Sanctuary 2600 Exposition Blvd. 512.478.8500 www.sanctuaryaustin.com

31

Apricot Lane Boutique 12800 Hill Country Blvd., G-145 512.263.1176 www.apricotlaneusa.com

Santa Fe Optical 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.1913 www.santafeoptical.com

32

Beehive 3300 Bee Cave Rd. Suite 400 512.347.0800

Tyler’s 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.327.9888 www.tylersaustin.com

33

Valentine’s Too 3801 N. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.347.9488 www.valentinestoo.com

18

SHOPPING 19

20 21 22

Cupidz Closet 3345 Bee Cave Rd. 512.328.6446 www.cupidzcloset.com Dolce Baby 701 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.306.8882

23

Fab’rik 12801 Hill Country Blvd. 512.263.1644 www.fabrikaustin.com

24

Fetch 3636 Bee Cave Rd. 512.306.9466 www.yourdogwilldigit.com

34 ARTS & LEISURE 34

Austin Museum of Art: Laguna Gloria 3809 W. 35th St. 512.458.8191 www.amoa.org

35

Austin Zoo 10807 Rawhide Tr. 512.288.1490 www.austinzoo.org

36

Texas Sailing 103 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6193 www.texassailing.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 37

Lakeway Resort and Spa 101 Lakeway Dr. 512.261.6600 www.dolce-lakeway-hotel.com

38

Massage Envy 3201 Bee Cave Rd., Suite 156 512.306.0777 www.massageenvy.com

39

Milk + Honey Spa Hill Country Galleria 12700 Hill Country Blvd. 512.236.1116 www.milkandhoneyspa.com

40

Yoga Vida 3620 Bee Cave Rd. 512.480.8489 www.yogavida.net

41

Yoga Yoga 2501 S. Capital of TX Hwy. 512.381.6464 www.yogayoga.com

LIVING 42

Alexan Vistas 7000 FM 2222 512.794.8439 www.alexanvistas.com

16 18 42

2222

2 ba l

lake austin

9

33 13 17 westlake dr

620

s ne co

mount bonnell

ita

28

6

op 1 c / lo

620

360

enfield

y6

20

1

hw

14

bar ton cre e

k

38 22 31 2244 26 32

bee

cav

24

er

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41 RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

95

N

north side

MAPS & INDEX

1 2 3 4 5

12

23

Personally Yours 5416 Parkcrest Dr. 512.454.7534 www.pyaustin.com

33

Austin Catering 8530 Burnet Road 512.291.5180 www.austin-catering.com

Waterloo Ice House 8600 Burnet Road 512.458.6544 www.waterlooicehouse.com

Massage Envy 10515 N. Mopac, Ste. 210B 512.834.3689 www.massageenvy.com

13

Truluck’s 10225 Research Blvd. 512.794.8300 www.trulucks.com

24

Petticoat Fair 7739 Northcross Dr. 512.454.2900 www.petticoatfair.com

34

Pure Austin 4210 W. Braker Ln. 512.342.2200 www.pureaustin.com

25

Tiffany & Co. The Domain 512.835.7300 www.tiffany.com

35

Skye Salon & Boutique 13359 N. Hwy 183 512.336.2639

26

Uptown Modern 5453 Burnet Rd. 512.452.1200 www.uptownmodern austin.com

36

Vanity Rocks 9801 Anderson Mill Rd. 512.258.0009 www.vanityrocks.com

37

Yoga Yoga 2167 Anderson Ln. 512.380.9800 www.yogayoga.com

38

Yoga Yoga 12001 Burnet Rd. 512.490.1200 www.yogayoga.com

Burger House 4211 Spicewood Springs Rd. 512.346.7200 www.burgerhouse.com

SHOPPING

Crú The Domain 512.339.9463 www.cruwinebar.com

14

Hoover’s Inc. 5800 Airport Blvd. 512.374.4500 www.hoovers.com

Barney’s New York Co-op The Domain 512.719.3504 www.barneys.com

15

27

Jasper’s The Domain 512.834.4111 www.jaspers-restaurant.com

Betsey Johnson The Domain 512.833.6111 www.betseyjohnson.com

16

Bicycle Sport Shop 10947 Research Blvd. 512.345.7460

28

Free People The Domain 512.719.9909 www.freepeople.com

6

Kerbey Lane Café 13435 N. Hwy 183 512.258.7757 www.kerbeylanecafe.com

17

7

Maudie’s 10205 N. Lamar Blvd. 512.832.0900 www.maudies.com

18

8 9 10 11

96

FOOD & DRINK

Manuel’s 10201 Jollyville Rd. 512.345.1042 www.manuels.com Melting Pot 13343 Research Blvd. 512.401.2424 www.meltingpot.com Shandeez Grill 8863 Anderson Mill Rd 512.258.6464 www.shandeezaustin.com Trudy’s 8820 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1474 www.trudys.com

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

ARTS & LEISURE 29

19

Intermix The Domain 512.835.0110 www.intermixonline.com

30

20

Inviting Affairs 3742 Far West Blvd. 512.331.2133 www.invitingaffairs.com

21

Loft The Domain 512.377.6857 www.lofthomedecor.com Luxe Apothetique The Domain 512.346.8202 www.myspace.com/ luxeapothetique

Zinger Hardware 2438 W. Anderson Ln. 512.533.9001 www.zingerhardware.com

LIVING

The Global Arts Group 11100 Metric Blvd. 512.467.9400 www.theglobal artsgroup.com

22

Zara The Domain 512.491.0920 www.zara.com

Alamo Lake Creek 13729 Research Blvd. 512.219.8135 www.drafthouse.com Alamo Village 2700 W. Anderson Ln. 512.467.1320 www.drafthouse.com

HEALTH & BEAUTY 31 32

Avant Salon 9901 Capital of TX Hwy. 512.502.8268 www.avantsalon.com Bird’s Barbershop 6800 Burnet Rd. 512.454.1200 www.birdsbarbershop.com

39

aloft Austin The Domain 512.491.0777 www.starwoodhotels.com

40

Alpha Granite 915 W. Howard Ln. 512.834.8746 www.alphagraniteaustin.com

41

Give Realty 3420 Executive Center Dr. 512.338.4483 www.giverealtyaustin.com

10

40

29 6 35

9

parmer

39 14 25 the domain 5 15 19 22 38 3 27 17 21

183

16

34 13

8

31

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eat

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33

7

183 / research blvd

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360

18

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20

4 2222

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and / k

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26

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010

97

We Are Team LIVESTRONG WALK, RUN, RIDE OR TRI

We don’t compete in the same events. But we’re one team. We believe we can make a difference— in the fight against cancer and in our own lives. We are more than one.

Join us for: LIVESTRONG CHALLENGE AUSTIN OCT 23–24, 2010 5K Run/Walk or 10-, 20-, 45-, 65- or 90-Mile Ride LIVESTRONG AUSTIN MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON FEBRUARY 20, 2011 REGISTER AT TEAMLIVESTRONG.ORG

© 2010 LIVESTRONG, a registered trademark of the Lance Armstrong Foundation. The Lance Armstrong Foundation is a 501(c)(3) under federal tax guidelines. We are proud to announce that, due to the generous support of our corporate partners this year, 100% of participant and donor gifts to the LIVESTRONG Challenge Series will go directly to support our programs and initiatives in the fight against cancer.

100

RARE JULY/AUGUST 2010


RARE MAGAZINE :: July/August 2010 :: Motion