Page 1

BIOFUELERY


Pratt Institute GAUD Designer: Brett Rappaport Faculty: Alex Barker, Mor Segal

In the studio “Urban Infrastructure in the Anthropocene: Aqua-Culture Shed” we investigate the ‘man-made natural’ and anamorphic illusion, proposing to rejuvenate the Red Hook Brooklyn Grain Terminal with a synergistic program of local food production and storage, brewing and baking, as well as oyster and algae aquaculture.


Oysters used to be prevalent in the New York Harbor and are incredible for their ability to filter and clean water by absorbing harmful metals and chemicals.


On this EPA brownfield site, assisting the regrowth of the oyster population through carefully monitored stages of aquaculture will significantly improve the health of the surrounding area.


Rendered View of the West Side


Model View of the East Side


Silos are re-originated and repurposed by cutting, pushing, and pulling to create circulation paths, planter space, and platforms for viewing, brewing, and baking. Visitors experience a vast hall filled with cut silos and subnature, overgrown with greenery both cultivated and wild.


Brewing flows with the help of gravity, beginning at the top with a refurbished grain elevator and served to patrons near ground level. The spent wet grain from brewing is still rich in protein, fiber, and nutrients, and is used for baking and fertilizer. The public can contribute to the compost pile and the heat it generates is used in the brewing process.


Profile for Brett Rappaport

Biofuelery  

Proposal to rejuvenate the Red Hook Brooklyn Grain Terminal with a synergistic program of local food production and storage, brewing and bak...

Biofuelery  

Proposal to rejuvenate the Red Hook Brooklyn Grain Terminal with a synergistic program of local food production and storage, brewing and bak...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded