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Asheville Lyric Opera presents La Traviata. PAGE 4

Southern Highland Craft Guild’s Heritage Weekend. PAGE 20

Asheville Area Piano Forum Benefit Concert. PAGE 6 ArtEtude Gallery.

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Weaverville’s Art in Autumn Festival. PAGE 10 Henderson County Early Fall Studio Tour. PAGE 10

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Shop Talk PAGE 26 Green Living PAGE 36 Outdoor Fun & Adventure PAGE 41

The Magnetic Theatre presents MILF: The Musical PAGE

Enter our 16th Annual

POETRY CONTEST PAGE

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Symphony in the Park Labor Day

September 3rd, 2012 7:00 PM Pack Square Park Special performance by the Asheville Buncombe Youth Orchestra 5:30 PM

2012-2013 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 15, 2012

OPENING NIGHT:

Symphonie fantastique Falla Ritual Fire Dance Glazunov Violin Concerto Chee-Yun, violin Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

FREE LAWN SEATING

Part of the CLAP! Asheville Weekend visit CLAPasheville.com for a full schedule

Reserved seating: $35 To order: Call 828-254-7046 or visit ashevillesymphony.org

828.254.7046 s www.ashevillesymphony.org 2 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

OCT. 13, 2012 Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE NOW

NOV.17, 2012 Rachmaninoff’s Paganini Variations

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org


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stage preview Magnetic Theatre’s Family-Friendly Musical: MILF

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n a few short years, The Magnetic BY CHALL GRAY Theatre has made a splash in the theatre world of the Southeast, having mounted numerous ambitious world premiere productions ranging from a verse-retelling of a biblical tale to a lewd, late-night rock and roll spectacle, but it has never presented a full-scale musical... until now. MILF: The Musical, A Family Friendly Tale of Inappropriate Love, with book and lyrics by Lucia Del Vecchio and music by Holiday Childress, is another big step forward for the The Magnetic Theatre presents MILF: The Musical. Lucia Del adventuresome, prolific Vecchio’s new comedy stars Tracey Johnston-Crum. company. Known for her razor sharp wit and urbia’s cookie-cutter houses and the folks acute sense of middle-class American suburwho live in them.” Award-winning local bia, Del Vecchio (familiar to local audiences musician and composer Holiday Childress as the author of the hits Shangri-La and The (known for his solo work and as lead singer Evolution of Woman) has made an exciting of the legendary band The Goodies) has foray into new theatrical territory. written catchy, lively numbers — including “The show is, at its core, a tale of misDel Vecchio’s ode to new mothers, “Breast placed love,” says the author. “The central Is Best” — that refresh the idea of what a character, Annie Flynn, begins to doubt her musical can be. Keyboardist Chuck Lichtenlove for her oblivious husband Greg, and at berger (of The Archrivals & StephaniesId) the same time is courted by the two teenage and master percussionist Matthew Richboys who live on either side of her — Hank, mond worked with Childress to record the the star quarterback, and Roland, the sensimemorable score. tive poet — all while being spied on by a trio Brilliantly written and handsomely of gossiping neighborhood ‘hover-moms,’ staged, MILF: The Musical, promises to Lynette, Jeanette and Bernadette, who are be the must-see show of Western North obsessed with breastfeeding.” Carolina’s fall season. MILF: The Musical. Book and lyrics by Lucia Del Vecchio. Award-winning local musician Music by Holiday Childress. Choreography by Kathleen Hahn. and composer Holiday Childress Directed by Steven Samuels. has written catchy, lively Set and prop design by Kehren numbers for MILF. Barbour. Lighting design by Ryan Madden. Sound design by Mary Zogzas. Costume design by Katie Directed by the Magnetic Theatre’s Anne Towner. Stage management by Justin artistic director Steven Samuels, MILF, The Evans. Produced by Chall Gray. Musical, stars Tracey Johnston-Crum (celebrated for her stellar performances in The Bernstein Family Christmas Spectaculars IF and The Witches’ Quorum, among others) YOU M.I.L.F. The Musical: Previews and an ensemble cast of the region’s stronGO September 13-14. Opening Night gest actors, including Dan Clancy, Elizabeth September 15. Performances Evans, James Thomas Meador, Sean David September 20-22, 27-29, October 4-6, 11Robinson, Jennifer Russ, and Alison Young. 13. Tickets $13/16 (Previews $8). For tickets Despite the implications of its title, please visit www.themagneticfield.com or MILF is a family-friendly musical, Del Vecstop by The Magnetic Field at 372 Depot chio notes. “It’s a gentle send-up of subStreet in Asheville’s River Arts District. Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 3


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performance Asheville Lyric Opera presents La Traviata

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featuring Metropolitan Opera Soprano Elizabeth Caballero

he Asheville Lyric BY ADAM Z. BOWERS opens its 14th season with Giuseppi ville. All performances Verdi’s tale of will be sung in Italian, desire, love, and rewith English supertitles. demption, La Traviata. No It’s 1850 in Paris, opera expresses the transforFrance. Amongst a lavish mative power of love more party filled with noble than La Traviata. born men and women we We experience Violetta, meet Violetta Valèry, the a courtesan living in Paris; most desirable courtesan transcend the haze of riches in the city. She develand excess by sacrificing ops an intense love for a herself for the one she loves. Soprano Elizabeth young nobleman, Alfredo. She teaches us that love Caballero. Photo: Kira Horvath Their love, although pascan evolve the soul beyond sionate, is destined to be societal constraints. extinguished. Pressure is mounting This new production features from Alfredo’s father Germont, played Metropolitan Opera Soprano Elizabeth by Mark Owen Davis, for Violetta to Caballero as Violetta and the triumbreak off their relationship in order phant return of Director Jon Truitt. the save the family’s reputation. The performances will take place on Violetta returns to Paris, slowly October 5 and 6 at 8 p.m., in the Diana deteriorating from tuberculoses. She Wortham Theatre in downtown Ashe-

4 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

sacrifices her love for Alfredo in order to save him from social destitution and the heart ache caused by watching a loved one fall to disease. Scenic designer Julie Ross returns to bring Truitt’s vision to life. Scott Schoonover, conductor of Union Avenue Opera of St. Louis, makes his ALO debut. Jayne Harnett-Hargrove, costume coordinator, and Tricia Zinke, hair and make-up coordinator, return to enrich the stage with color and life. IF YOU La Traviata, October 5 GO and 6 at 8 p.m. in the Diana

Wortham Theatre. Adult tickets range from $30-$53 with student tickets available from $17$35. Go to www.dwtheatre.com to purchase tickets online, or call the box office at (828) 257-4530. For more information call (828) 2360670 or go to www.ashevillelyric.org.


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we love this place 2 Days, 35 Farms

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number One

SEPTEMBER 2012 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Byron Belzak, Adam Z. Bowers, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Maggie Cramer, Amy Downs, Beth Gossett, Chall Gray, Jeff Greiner, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Amanda Leslie, Peter Loewer, Perry Magee, Marcianne Miller, Kay S. Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Pam Siekman, Jim Smythe, Chris Stack, David Craig Starkey, Greg Vineyard, David Voorhees, Bill Walz, Marissa Whitaker. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, September 2012, Vol. 16 No. 1

3 Stage Preview

Magnetic Theatre – MILF . . . . . . . . 3 NC Stage – R. Buckminster Fuller . 6

4 Performance

Asheville Lyric Opera – La Traviata 4 Asheville Area Piano Forum. . . . . . . 6 Asheville Lyric Opera’s 14th Season 7

8 Columns

Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. . 8 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 12 Ted Olson - Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 15 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 16 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 18 Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . 21 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 27 Michael Parker – Food & Wine . . . 32 Max Hammonds, MD - Health. . . 33

9 Fine Art

ArtEtude Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Art in Autumn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Henderson County Studio Tour . . 10 Annual Asheville Quilt Show. . . . . 19 Raise Your Hand Auction. . . . . . . . 19 Craft Guild Heritage Weekend . . . 20 Brennen McElhaney . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Susan Stanton Photography . . . . . . 25

15 Music

The Cheeksters at Biltmore Park. . 15 The Like Mind Trio . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Garrison Starr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

28 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 28

September 15, programs begin at 11 a.m.

and 2 p.m. Talk by Challenge Adventures, followed by a two-mile walk. Llamas carry your lunch or snacks. Take turns leading a llama. Iced tea provided. Learn about special adaptations llamas have for the trail. $5 for adults, under age 16 free; America the Beautiful and Golden Age senior passes honored. The Cradle of Forestry in America, Pisgah National Forest near Brevard. Phone (828) 877-3130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org for more information.

4th Annual West Asheville Garden Stroll On September 8, the Fourth Annual West Asheville Garden Stroll will showcase gardens adjacent to Haywood Road in East/West Asheville, an area bounded by Haywood Road, Michigan, Riverview, and State Street. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and kicks off at the Hall Fletcher Elementary School, located at 60 Ridgelawn Avenue, at 10:30 a.m. The West Asheville Garden Stroll is free and open to the public.

Asheville Lyric Opera’s 14th Season La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi, Lawrence Brownlee in recital, and Tosca by Giacomo Puccini

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Asheville Area Piano Forum 12th Annual Fall Benefit Concert.

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ArtEtude Gallery Contemporary Art on a Mission.

Art in Autumn Weaverville’s Juried Arts Festival.

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Early Fall Studio Tour Free self-guided tour of Henderson County arts and craft studios. PAGE 10

Interviews Elizabeth Lasley, fine artist. Mark Atkinson, Mountain View Appliance.

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Kelly Fain, French Broad Food Co-Op.

Southern Green Living Expo Three-days of green living seminars, plus the latest green products. PAGE 36

Zipline Canopy Adventures Jeff Greiner builds Asheville’s first fullscale treetop adventure facility. PAGE 41

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook – Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Southern Green Living Expo . . . . . 36 ™

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

stars in MILF: The Musical at the Magnetic Theatre. PAGE 3

Afternoon Tea with Llamas

fall in love

36 Green Living

38 What to Do Guide

On the Cover: Tracey Johnston-Crum

On September 22 and 23, the gates and barns of 35 area farms will open to the public for ASAP’s annual Farm Tour. The self-guided tour offers a chance to learn how food grows, taste farm-fresh products, interact with farm animals, and meet the community’s food producers. The tour runs 1-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tour guides are available from pass vendors and ASAP’s website and include a map and directions. More details at www.asapconnections.org.

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41 Outdoor Fun

Wildwater Outdoor Adventures . . 41

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 5


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noteworthy Asheville Area Piano Forum Benefit Concert

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oin eighteen extraordinary Music Series. Given This year, the organization Asheville Area Piano Forum access to the private will award $10,500 in Student (AAPF) pianists and guest artists Horowitz family Assistance Awards. It also for AAPF’s principal fundraiser papers, Dr. Martin educates area piano students by for Student Assistance Awards at will present more sponsoring an Annual CompetiDiana Wortham Theatre on Sunthan 60 unpublished tion, Master Classes and Student day, September 23 at 3 p.m. This 12th photographs from Recitals, as well as an exciting Fall Benefit Concert will be in loving the Horowitz family new program called Keys for memory of Paul Mark albums, excerpts from Kidz, group Thorpe, who was an unreleased recordings piano classes AAPF board memand interviews, and for children Vladimir Horowitz ber, friend and owner AAPF members will who could of Asheville Music perform the North not otherwise School. Carolina premiere of an unpublished afford lessons. The This collaboraHorowitz piano solo, Ballade, and a AAPF supports its tive effort is one of the soprano art song. adult members with area’s finest moments, The program is free and open to performance groups an afternoon of solo, the public. in homes, discustwo-piano, and ensions for teachers, semble music featuring and five outstanding To learn more about AAPF visit the Classics and Jazz, programs a year. www.ashevillepiano.com and showcasing the reThis year’s first proDr. Melanie Taylor at the 2010 Fall Benefit. Photo: Carrie Turner markable professional gram will be: “The musicians who live in Unknown HorowIF WNC. In support of itz: New Insights YOU September 8: The Unknown AAPF’s Benefit, the into the Man and GO Horowitz, presented by Dr. Asheville Chamber His Music.” Sherrill Martin at First Baptist Music Series will proIt will be preChurch, 5 Oak Street in Asheville. vide a Steinway piano sented on September Refreshments served at 9:30 a.m. for the concert. 8 by Dr. Sherrill followed by the meeting at 10 a.m. Celebrating it’s Martin, Professor Program from 10:30-12 noon. Free 20th year, the AAPF is of Musicology at and open to the public. a 501 ©(3) non-profit UNC Wilmington. September 23: The Asheville Area organization, comCommissioned Piano Forum’s 12th Fall Benefit posed of professional by Yale’s Gilmore Concert. Concert at 3 p.m. at Diana and amateur pianists Music Library, Dr. Wortham Theatre. Tickets: Adults and music appreciators, Martin is completing $28; Patrons $50; Students 13-21 $3, volunteering their time a book on Vladimir Children 12 and under free. Tickets: DWT Box Office (828) 257-4530. and talent in support of Horowitz, part of the Scott Camp and Brian Turner Visit www.ashevillepiano.com for AAPF’s charitable and prestigious Malcolm playing two piano jazz. more information. educational activities. Brown Russian Photo: Carrie Turner

R. Buckminster Fuller

THE HISTORY (AND MYSTERY) OF THE UNIVERSE

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C Stage is pleased to present the exuberant one-man play R. Buckminster Fuller: The History (and Mystery) of the Universe about the life of Buckminster Fuller, written by D.W. Jacobs and starring David Novak. Performances are September 12 through October 7 at NC Stage. R. Buckminster Fuller: The History (and Mystery) of The Universe is based on the life, work and writings of the famous Renaissance man who, among many accomplishments, invented the geodesic dome during his time at Black Mountain College. The play depicts Buckminster Fuller, affectionately called Bucky by his friends 6 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

BY

AMANDA LESLIE

and family, as the genius he was, and whose life exemplified American ingenuity. NC Stage is especially excited to present the play in conjunction with Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, which is presenting ReViewing Black Mountain College 4 September 28-30, 2012, a weekend gathering of scholars, practitioners and artists coming to Asheville to discuss, present and experience topics and workshops related to the for‘NC Stage’ continued on page 8

Photo: The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller.


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performance Asheville Lyric Opera’s 14th Season

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he Asheville Lyric Opera (ALO) is pleased to announce its 14th season for 20122013 which will feature three mainstage events and additional supporting programs throughout Western North Carolina.

PRODUCTIONS La Traviata

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DAVID CRAIG STARKEY

Sound of Music. As a vocal coach and accompanist for the ALO, Mr. Reese has a wealth of experience teaching, performing, and conducting.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMMUNITY On March 2, 2013, YMI Cultural Center will host a Lecture Master Class with Lawrence Brownlee followed by a private dinner. The lecture will be open to local area youth. For more information contact the opera office, (828)

October 5 & 6, 2012 – 8 p.m. La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi, an audience favorite, featuring the debut of Scott Schoonover, conducLawrence Brownlee tor for Union Avenue Opera of St. Louis. Jon Truitt, acclaimed director of last season’s 236-0670. Madame Butterfly Butterfly, returns to direct this ALO offers season subscriptions with powerful new production set in early 18th discounts. Subscriptions are currently on century Paris. This tale of love transcending sale through the opera office. In addition the constraints of social class speaks directly to providing discounts, subscriptions allow to the heart. patrons to choose their seats for the entire season with the option of renewing the folLawrence Brownlee lowing season. Individual ticket prices for La in Recital Traviata, Lawrence Brownlee in Recital and Tosca range from $30 – $53. (Preview dress March 3, 2013 – 4 p.m. rehearsal tickets are available for student and senior citizen groups for La Traviata and Lawrence Brownlee is one of the most Tosca.) Student rates are available for all consistently sought-after artists on the inproductions. ternational scene. He is lauded continually In addition to ALO’s three main stage for the beauty of his voice, his seemingly events, the ALO continues to sponsor and effortless technical agility, and his dynamic support the Metropolitan Opera Live in and engaging dramatic skills. We are honHD movie broadcasts, shown at the The ored to bring Mr. Brownlee to the Diana Carolina (Cinema) on Hendersonville Wortham Theatre stage. Road. Highlighting its season are the Met’s new productions of Donizetti’s L’Elisir Tosca d’Armore, Verdi’s Un Ballo in Maschera,, & Rigoletto, and Wagner’s Parsifal. April 12 & 13, 2012 – 8 p.m. For information on season subscripTosca by Giacomo Puccini, makes its ALO tions, dress rehearsal tickets, auditions, or debut at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Feato request a season brochure, call (828) tured singers include Stephen Mark Brown 236-0670 or visit www.ashevillelyric.org. and Kathy Pyeatt. Conductor Dan Alcott Single tickets are sold solely through Diana returns as maestro for this production. Wortham Theatre box office at (828) 257Long overdue, director David Carl Toulson 4530, or www.dwtheatre.com beginning returns to sculpt an intimate, yet imaginative September 6, 2012. take on this new production.

DEBUTS AND STAFF CHANGES The 2012-2013 season features the debut of conductor Scott Schoonover. Mr. Schoonover is best known for founding Union Avenue Opera in 1994. He has lead UAO to critical acclaim for the past 18 years in over 50 productions and 150 performances. Mr. Schoonover will conduct La Traviata. ALO also welcomes new Chorus Master, Vance Reese. Recently, Mr. Reese conducted the spring production of the

HISTORY Founded in 1999, the Asheville Lyric Opera is Asheville’s first opera company. It is recognized for its excellent artistic productions of operatic repertoire that entertain and inspire audiences, featuring world-class operatic talent performing fresh, new productions. The ALO has been recognized by the state of North Carolina for its educational programs through project grant support and

for regional touring of its shows. These programs strive to bring opera to thousands of school-aged children each year throughout Western North Carolina. The ALO is also a leading touring opera company throughout the eastern part of the United States, endeavoring to bring this fine art form to smaller communities in the Southeast. IF YOU For more information, or to GO purchase season tickets, call (828)

236-0670 or visit the website at www.ashevillelyric.org.

Spectra September 6-8 An evening of dance theatre featuring local female movement artPhoto: Arnold Wengrow ists spanning styles and generations.

IF YOU GO: Thursday through

Saturday, 7:30 p.m. at the Magnetic Field, 372 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Tickets $15. (828) 257-4003, www.magneticfield.com

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 7


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the curmudgeon

A Creekside Artists Retreat

Room and Studio Space For Rent • Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

National Trends

s Mrs. Storekeep sprinkled sawdust on the old wooden floors in preparation for the morning’s sweep-up, she inadvertently — it would seem — dropped a bit of dust on the polished shoes of the curmudgeon. At first he glanced up at the ceiling with a purely pained expression, then stared straight ahead at a cunning display of cat and dog food, and finally looked down on his shoe tips and said: “Why don’t you watch what you’re doing?” “Apologies,” she answered, “but I thought you had given up talking for the duration of this summer’s politicking?” “I did, but how long can a man fight history without giving in a little?” “Well, anyway, welcome back to the land of the living,” she said and continued on her morning dust patrol. The Curmudgeon then walked over to the coffee pot — it shared space with a paper plate piled high with sugar donuts — to engage in conversation with a local member of the ambulance corps, the shoe salesman from Atlanta, and the Storekeep himself. “You know when I made those remarks the other day about all the stuff on the web and the supermarket dailies that is incorrect and its relevance to national trends — especially elections — I just remembered a political trip to Raleigh our local lodge, The Peripatetic Whistlers, made some time ago.

‘NC Stage’ continued from page 6

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $650/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

ward-thinking ideas of Buckminster Fuller. Fuller’s daughter Allegra Fuller is the keynote speaker. Actor David Novak has appeared many times at NC Stage, in Mainstage and Catalyst productions, as well as a recent turn in Twelve Angry Men for Flat Rock Playhouse. He is perhaps best known locally as a master storyteller, with original material that captivates adults as well as children. “If the success or failure of this planet and of human beings depended on how I am and what I do, how would I be? What would I do?” were Fuller’s driving questions. Today his intellectual quest may be more vital than ever. Best known as the architect of the geodesic dome, he was above all an original and independent thinker, now regarded as way ahead of his time. Refusing to think in conventional ways, he was an innovator, a futurist, and one of the first true contemporary global philosophers. This compelling play skillfully weaves together pivotal moments from Fuller’s life with his important philosophical and design ideas. Director Charlie Flynn-McIver is working with Projections Designer Scott

8 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

BY

PETER LOEWER

“You know when driving on I-40 any trip seems to last Illustration by Peter Loewer forever, well the only thing that anyone had along to look at was one copy of The Enquirer that a previous passenger had left on the back seat. To make a long story shorter and to help in passing time, one of the members suggested that we all try to guess the headline of the story on the following page. “Now that kind of game is not easy when reading a front page story that boasts a headline: “My Wife Can Never Leave Home When the Moon Shines! Read the intimate story of a woman who is suffering with poison from the moon. “Or the great story on page 3, “Columbian Woman Gives Birth to Octuplets.” This followed by a two-page spread, “Fortune Teller Predicts that Cuba Will Invade Detroit. “Coming up was page 4, so who can guess the headline?” “Spider Saves Family of Five from Fire,” said Max. “From the Hollywood records, it’s reported that “Tyrone Power Once Married to Marjorie Maine,” said Frank.

Furr of local company The Elumenati on an extremely unconventional set design that attempts to capture the wide-ranging brilliance of Fuller. Critics have been unanimous in their praise for the play by actor and playwright D.W. Jacobs. The Chicago Sun Times proclaimed the production “Magnificent! Fervent, funny, heart-wrenchingly poignant, and impeccably detailed…” The Los Angeles Times wrote: “physical, metaphysical, intellectual, eclectic, challenging and hugely entertaining.” The San Francisco Examiner described it as “startlingly funny, intellectually stimulating, and genuinely moving.” IF YOU R. Buckminster Fuller: The GO History (and Mystery) of The

Universe, September 12 – October 7. Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. Additional show Sunday, September 30 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $16-$28 based on day of the week, $10 Students (w/ID) and a Pay-What-YouCan Night Wednesday September 12. For more information on tickets and a full calendar of events, visit www.ncstage.org or call (828) 239-0263.

My Wife Can Never Leave Home When the Moon Shines! “Frankfurters Found to Shorten Life,” said Bill. “Entire Florida Orange Crop Eaten by Frogs,” quipped Curmudgeon then turned the page to read: ‘Russian Count Proves He’s 500 Years old.’ Guess we all missed on that one.” “So what was the end of the game?” they all asked together. “We continued,” said the Curmudgeon, “‘til we reached page 48, and everyone took one last chance at guessing. I don’t even remember the headline we were guessing about but I’ll never forget what the last page story said.” “What?” asked the Ambulance Corps member. “‘My Dog Was Buried Alive by an Armadillo’ is the headline that topped a picture of a small and grateful dog, lying on the edge of a shovel that in turn rested by the side of a newly dead armadillo. “We made the rest of the trip in silence… never played the game again.” Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

Asheville Playback Theatre Friday, September 7 Improvisational theater based on audience members’ personal stories. At a Playback show you will encounter real life rather than a scripted production. The actors and musicians improvise, guided and inspired by true life/personal stories provided by the audience. The spontaneous enactment of personal stories in Playback Theater builds connection between people by honoring the dignity, drama and universality of their stories. This is potent, poignant, and down right amazing fun. Come and just watch, or share a story.

IF YOU GO: Asheville Playback Theatre, tickets $10. Show begins at 8 p.m. at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. For more information visit www.ashevilleplaybacktheatre.org, and www.myaltamont.com.


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fine art ArtEtude Gallery

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CONTEMPORARY ART ON A MISSION

rtEtude Gallery Inc. is a contempoBY PERRY MAGEE rary fine art gallery located downtown at 89 Patton Ave. The gallery features compelling sculpture, painting and photographs from nationally and internationally recognized artists from around the country. Artetude Gallery came to being when the three principals, Russell Medford MD PHD, Margaret “Kenny” Offermann MD PHD, and myself met and shared a common goal of creating a gallery model founded on sound business principals. A gallery that would allow for the promotion of the artists asRussell Medford, Margaret “Kenny” Offermann, and sociated with the gallery and Perry Magee. Photos: Erica Mueller Photography also allow us a means to give back to the cultural, social and physical well being of Asheville and the On Sunday, September 9, surrounding Western North Carolina area. As a business philosophy, we believe we Marsha Hammel will be can do well and do good at the same time. unveiling new works. In keeping with this philosophy we have recently announced the program “Contemporary Art on a Mission” in association with the strength of the stories told through this The Mission Foundation. masterpiece. Being a part of a gallery came The artists we currently carry offer a a few years ago when I went to work in my wide array of styles from modernism, minifirst gallery in New Orleans. I am an engimalism, abstract expressionism and figuraneer by education and had been involved tive works. We are also currently evaluating in capital equipment sales most of my life. other artists to add to the gallery’s offerings. But, that first experience in a gallery surThe most misunderstood aspect of buyrounded by fabulous works of art and the ing art is that many people feel art collectengaging conversation with the clients gave ing is only for the rich and famous. We feel me a sense of fulfillment that is hard to however, that art can be enjoyed and shared explain. In a nutshell, I fell in love with the by everyone and while someone may not be business of art. a “collector”, he or she can still own a wonWe chose our location in the downtown derful work that touches them emotionally. area because we felt strongly that we would My first memories of viewing art and need our presence there to ensure our vishaving a deep connection to it goes all the ibility to not only the local art collectors, but way back to my childhood when seeing also, those that visit Asheville for convenphotos of the Sistine Chapel ceiling in my tions, vacations, etc. grandmother’s Bible. I was so amazed at You asked what makes good art? That

is such a broad question, but I will try and answer that as I see it. I believe good art is the ability of the artist to convey their vision, passion or philosophy into an object of their choosing utilizing the proper skills associated with a given medium. The piece should be done with archival practices so that the piece and the artist’s vision can stand the test of time. We have two major events coming up over the next two months. First on Sunday, September 9, Mar-

sha Hammel will be unveiling some new works and presenting a lecture titled “The Model as Muse.” This will be a fun event with wine and hors d’oeuvres. Secondly, we had a very “soft” opening on June 1, but we will be hosting a major “Fall Gala Show” on the 19th, 20th and 21st of October which will have our artists in attendance and be a wonderful time for all those who attend. The main show will be Saturday afternoon and evening with much libations and wonderfully heavy hors d’oeuvres. We invite everyone to visit ArtEtude Gallery at your convenience. You will find a relaxed friendly staff who believe the process of owning art should be as enjoyable as the art itself.

ArtEtude Gallery Inc 89 Patton Ave., Asheville, NC 28801 Perry Magee, Gallery Director (828) 252-1466

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 9


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festivals & tours Art in Autumn

DOWNTOWN WEAVERVILLE, NC – SEPTEMBER 15

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Upcycle: \ʼup-sī-kəl\: the environmentally driven process of converting discarded materials into useful products of better quality and value.

The place for upcycled goods. 92 Charlotte St, Asheville, NC 28801 828.255.2533 Free Parking Next to City Bakery

hades of rusty orange ing. The show opens at 10 and candy apple red and concludes at 5 p.m. coax their colors Prizes awarded to on the fading green artists are: $1,000 Best of of the maples in Show, $500 Second Place, wonderful Western North $250 Third Place and nuCarolina signaling a call merous Honorable Menfor another fall season. tions. This year’s judge, Art in Autumn, one of the Andrew Glasgow, makes premier juried art festivals his home in Asheville in the Southeast, prepares while serving as a Trustee Beth Gaudreau, for its 6th year. Visitors of the United States Artcloisonné enamel converge on Main Street, ists, an artist fellowship pearl pendant. Weaverville to enjoy not program based in L. A. In only the amazing creations his prior capacities as Assisof 110+ artists but the tant Curator of Decorative small town flavor of an Arts, Education Curator almost forgotten America. at the Southern Highland Many of the artists Craft Guild and Assistant are returning participants Director of Blue Spiral 1, but the continued sucAndrew refined his artistic cess of this event attracts eye. In 2007 and 2008 he new artists from around served as the Executive the country. Artists will be Director of the American staged on North and South Craft Council. Main Street with pedestrian The media categories only traffic from Church include basketry, clay, Street to Brown Street. A digital art, drawing, fiber, Larry Brown, floor walk on Main Street also glass, jewelry, leather, lamp with handmade mango paper shade. includes galleries, working metal, mixed media, studios, a variety of shops, painting, photography, a bakery and restaurants, live old-time printmaking, sculpture and wood. music and a bucket load of charm and The Weaverville Business Association friendliness. Free admission and parkis pleased to present the sixth annual

Art in Autumn arts and crafts festival. Building on the overwhelming success of the past five years, the 2012 festival promises to retain its culturally rich and vibrant atmosphere.

IF YOU Art in Autumn takes place GO in downtown Weaverville,

Saturday, September 15 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more details visit www.artinautumn.com.

Early Fall Studio Tour in Henderson County

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free self-guided tour of the studios of more than 40 painters, sculptors, potters, jewelers, weavers, woodworkers and glass artists who live and work in Henderson County, North Carolina will take place September 22-23. The Open Studio Tour is about creating

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digfoundry.com

Cindy Ricardelli, acrylic collage, oil pastel on canvas.

Baby Boomers

10 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

and an art raffle benefiting the community, a special Tour coupon will be available, at this event only, for a 10% discount connections with artists on any purchase of art during where they work to the Open Studio Tour. discover the process Organized by artists on of creating and what the Tour, under the auspices inspires each artist. of the Art League of HenderThe tour is free David Voorhees, son County, the Open Studio and everyone is welTurqoise Pouting Teapot Tour of Henderson County come. Artist studios is an annual early fall event. can be found in small Maps showing locations of the studios quaint towns of Flat Rock, Henderare on www.OpenStudioTourofHC. sonville, Horse Shoe, and Mills River, org, or visit the Henderson County up mountains and down country Travel & Tourism Office. roads in Henderson County, reached slowly by way of the Blue Ridge Parkway – or easily on I-26. IF Examples of work by artists on the YOU Open Studio Tour in Tour can be viewed at a free Preview GO Henderson County NC, Party to be held September 21, from Saturday and Sunday, 5-7 p.m., at the Hubba Hubba SmokeSeptember 22-23, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. house, behind Little Rainbow Row in both days. Blue Ridge Mountains of Flat Rock. In addition to the display of Henderson County, More details at art work, music, complimentary wine, www.OpenStudioTourofHC.org BY

DAVID VOORHEES


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

Elizabeth Lasley

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n a brick-walled room in Warehouse Studios, Elizabeth Lasley can be found painting her famous landscapes. Paintings hang from the walls of her current works and some of her previous mixed media artistry. Lasley’s work is currently on display at VanDyke Jewelry and Fine Craft in downtown Asheville. She took a moment with Rapid River Magazine to talk about life with her art.

INTERVIEWED BY

todd reed since 1992

MARISSA WHITAKER

“I want to give the feel of openness and space.�

Rapid River Magazine: How did you start painting?

Elizabeth Lasley: I come from

Fine Jewelry and Design Studio

a family of artists. My mother painted and took me to all of her exhibits, my brothers are sculptors. I was always really exposed to art at a younger age but I didn’t do a whole lot until later. Going to my mother’s exhibits got me into it. I went to the Fine Art League of the Carolina’s in 2006 for three years to learn traditional art. I’ve been doing my painting for two years now and I’m working professionally.

gold and silver jewelry with rough diamonds

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Oct. 18-21

RRM: How did you develop your style?

Elizabeth Lasley, Abstract #4

EL: I started out with mixed

media. If I had to say something about my art, I’d call it somewhat environmental. It led me to just painting sky and, land and, horizon line. I wanted to give the feel of openness and space. I wanted to present an appreciation of that, and call to attention that we’re losing that. It’s all straight acrylic paint. It dries quickly and I paint pretty fast. I scaled down my mixed media into peaceful landscapes.

RRM: Are the landscapes you paint actual depictions of places?

EL: No, I paint from — what you might

call — visual memory. It’s a combination of what I’ve seen mixed with what I want to see. I have a couple that show the energy of a tornado, one has rain, and I do a lot of water.

RRM: What awards have you won? EL: I won awards in 2010. I won “Paper-

works,� juried by the Curatorial Department of Painting for the Museum of Modern Art. Then I won first place at an exhibition called “Thumbprint.� I won Best in Show at the Elk River Arts Alliance in Minnesota, and First in the Thrivent Traveling Exhibition also in Minnesota. The prize for the Travel-

ing Exhibition was to have my art featured in their traveling show.

RRM: What are you trying to portray to your audience with your paintings?

EL: Openness, space, and peacefulness.

There’s no people, no buildings, there’s you and the environment.

RRM: Who would you say has inspired your art?

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC

EL: Probably, George Innes. In the late

1800s, he painted very realistically, but he had softness and feel to his work that I can relate to and that I love. Then overall, I’m inspired by the impressionists. I don’t want to give it all to the viewer but just show a suggestion of the scene. Elizabeth Lasley is on display at VanDyke Jewelry and Fine Craft. Located at 29 Biltmore Avenue in downtown Asheville. Call them at (828) 281-4044 or stop in from Monday thru Thursday 10 to 6, Friday and Saturday 10 to 8, or Sunday 1 to 5. Email info@vandykejewelry.com Visit www.vandykejewelry.com for more information.

Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm Admission: $8 Children under 12 free

John Geci Glass

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 11


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authors ~ books Spirituality is the New Psychology

TWO DIFFERENT VIEWS

Custom Designed Jewelry Local Arts & Crafts Jewelry Repair

Abstract #4 by Elizabeth Lasley

29 Biltmore Ave.

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building. PG.

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(828) 281-4044 www.vandykejewelry.com

O Nick’s absurdest view and deadpan wit combined with the soothing lull of his guitar, have distinguished his unique style of comedy. He has appeared on the Tonight Show eight times, and on each occasion, he won. Thick Noon, Nick’s debut album, was released in 2010 and was included in amazon.com’s “Best of 2010 Comedy Albums.”

He is still trying to learn about boundaries. Find out what you came back to learn... Available at booksellers everywhere. www.facebook.com/karenbergkabbalah

12 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

f the hundreds of audio books I’ve read in the past 30 years, I’ve listened to only two of them more than once. Both are spiritual books and both propose a new attitude toward spirituality based on principles the authors themselves discovered. It is they, living in the here and now, rather than ancient myth-shrouded men, who provide the spiritual authority for their teaching. The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle, now a world-wide bestseller, was first published in 1997. I was beckoned by its title, since at the time I was overwhelmed by trying to cope with a man with severe PTSD, who could not escape the horror of his memories of Vietnam 40 years ago. The impact of Tolle’s personal story of enlightenment (not dissimilar to Saul of Tarsus’ instant conversion on the Damascus road) were life-changing to me. Tolle’s focus on the present moment — the Now — transformed not only my attitude toward war and PTSD, but more importantly, the way I behaved toward the challenges life sent me in the present day. I played the book on cassette all day at home, enabling me to constantly catch snatches of its practical advice as I did my household tasks. The marriage did not survive, but with the guidance of The Power of Now I was able to maintain sanity. Another Ashevillean who was positively affected by Eckhart Tolle is author Trey Carland, who discovered The Power of Now Now, at age 31, in 2004, when his life was dramatically thrown askew by the sudden onset of epileptic grand mal seizures. Over the years, Carland had several “awakening experiences” that confirmed to him the truth of Tolle’s teachings. “One of the key teachings that has helped me the most,” says Carland, “is the true realization and recognition of what the present moment really is. Being at one with the

REVIEW BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

“A simple, accessible book, made enjoyable by Carland’s personal style…” Now is to be free of all judgments, mental stories, and in a state of peace.” Carland not only became a seeker of spiritual enlightenment, but he also shared his spiritual journey with others — through his website and blog writings and organizing spiritual groups, such as the Asheville Sangha online community (www.ashevillesangha.com) and twice monthly meetings of the Awakening Practice Group that studies the teachings of Eckhart Tolle and others. Carland has compiled several years of his blog writings to create his first book, A Seeker’s Guide to Inner Peace: Notes to Self. It’s a simple, accessible book, made enjoyable by Carland’s personal style and his recommendations of other spiritual teachers he has discovered.

“…, the form of therapy Dr. Stutz developed disdained the sometimes endless search for why people do things…” The second book I’ve listened to more than once — in fact I am now on my 6th re-listen — is The Tools: Transform Your Problems into Courage, Confidence and Creativity Creativity, by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels. I discovered The Tools from the grapevine reputation it had for being such a cure for writer’s block that several Hollywood scriptwriters attributed their million dollar fees to it. Instead of avoiding adversity, the writers learned to embrace it, thus turning what they feared into something that made them creative. The Tools is really a “new spirituality,” based on practical activities that access ‘Spirituality’ continued on page 13


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authors ~ books ~ readings ‘Spirituality’ continued from page 12

“higher powers” (or God, or Spirit or Universe). The tools, five of them, were recognized and then developed by psychologist Phil Stutz, using his own experience rather than religion, as his “spiritual authority.” In essence, the form of therapy Dr. Stutz developed disdained the sometimes endless search for why people do things, and instead focused on getting them to change their behavior — to take action, now, to embrace their personal demons instead of running away from them, to exchange love for resentment, and to act not only for their highest good, but for the best interests of everyone on the planet. Sounds like a heady order– and it is — but the book makes understandable what the higher powers are and how applying the tools can access them. But only by putting the principles into practice, by accessing the “higher powers,” will real change occur — and, as the authors explain, reading the book once and putting it aside won’t do it — that’s why I’ve re-read the book so many times, to force into my somewhat resistant consciousness the principles the book espouses. Because the principles actually work, I have accomplished a major shift in my life, including actively proving that there is life after divorce, something I did not think was possible four years ago. I attribute this shift to the insights and practical applications espoused in The Tools. Being able to re-listen to the book as often as I like has been an easy way to reinforce the tools and turn their principles into action.

Remember Me as a Time of Day WOMEN ON WORDS An anthology of poems compiled by Emoke B’Racz

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ne of the secrets to living a full and happy life,” my grandfather said many times so many years ago, “is to read a poem a day. You’ll learn to see things differently, to remember to feel and to love.” Writer Emoke B’Racz has compiled a stunning anthology of poems by 12 female poets titled “Remember Me as a Time of Day.” The poems capture the moments of each day; some hidden, some we really do not want to look at, and some we never want to let go of completely. Although the poems each bend toward a common nocturne theme of time, they transcend the way really good poetry does and tells us about who we are and what we’ve lost and gained throughout our lives, while reminding us to peer deeper into the world around us. This is certainly one of the better poetry anthologies I have read. A lot of

A Seeker’s Guide to Inner Peace: Notes to Self; written by Trey Carland; Whitney Press, 2011; paper 198 pp.; $12.95.

The Tools: Transform Your Problems into Courage, Confidence and Creativity; written and read by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels; Random House Audio, 2012; 7 hours; 6 CD set, $35. Trey Carland website www.treycarland.com

IF YOU Awakening Practice Group GO meeting, featuring the teachings

of Eckhart Tolle and others. Guided meditation and an Eckhart Tolle recording, followed by discussion on how to put Tolle’s words into action. 7 to 9 p.m. every 2nd and 4th Wednesday at Insight Counseling, 25 Orange Street in Asheville. Email trey@quedox.com or call (828) 670-8283. Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Drugs WRITTEN BY J.R. HELTON

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he context of J.R. Helton’s newest novel, “Drugs,” is as simple as it’s title. It’s a work of fiction about drugs, experiences with drugs, and how one man lives an average life on drugs. Although categorized as fiction, “Drugs” reads more like a memoir and has no central plot except that the life depicted in the story is centered on ample drug use. This main character, “Jake,” isn’t some kind of junky or anything. He’s depicted as a man who, on the surface, would just seem like a normal guy trying to get through his work day, get home to his wife, and sit down for a drink. With this “drink” come a couple of painkillers, some weed, nitrous oxide, MDMA, cocaine, or mushrooms. Practically every sentence in the book is filled with mentions of this drug or that drug, thoughts and feelings while under the influence, or the quest to obtain the desired effect, followed by

REVIEW BY

BETH GOSSETT

it has to with who the poets themselves are and how each one compliments without taking from the other. Although the roads each poet takes are different — some are pastoral using simple and idyllic words, while others are urban, frayed on the outer edges dusted with soot and grime from busy streets — the book works as a whole. It is a symphonic harmony of 12 voices that manage to blend effortlessly together, orchestrating toward a neverending cadence existing only to repeat. Da capo al fine. This is one of the better poetry anthologies I have read and reread. It’s well worth the $14.95 price tag. Autographed books available at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café in downtown Asheville. 55 Haywood St. For details call 1-800-441-9829, (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com

SEPTEMBER

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Friday, September 7 at 7 p.m. JANISSE RAY, The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food. Saturday, September 8 at 7 p.m. JAMES NAVE, Looking at the Light: Fighting Cancer with Poetry. Thursday, September 13 at 7 p.m. JIM MCGAVRAN, Time of Beauty, Time of Fear. Friday, September 14 at 7 p.m. GEORGE SINGLETON, new collection of dog stories, Stray Decorum. Saturday, September 15 at 7 p.m. DADA MAHESHVARANANDA, After Capitalism. Tuesday, September 18 at 7 p.m. EDWARD ARONOFF, Toxic Food/Healthy Food. Wednesday, September 19 at 7 p.m. WOODY DURHAM, the “Voice of the Tar Heels,” for the University of NC. Saturday, September 22 at 3 p.m. WORLD HOBBIT DAY – a costume contest. Tuesday, September 25 at 7 p.m. TAMASIN NOYES, Vegan Sandwiches Save the Day. DEBORAH LLOYD, improve your chakra energies! Wednesday, September 26 at 7 p.m. G.Y. BROWN, 7 Lives Remembered. HARVEY ARDEN, Travels in a Stone Canoe.

REVIEWED BY

MARISSA WHITAKER small asides detailing sex and careers. “Drugs” doesn’t try to find a deeper meaning in life and it doesn’t try to shock or impress the reader. All J.R. Helton does is describe the ins and outs of someone in the culture of drugs. Someone who isn’t afraid to alter his conscious despite the crazy or mundane situations that follow. Jake goes from complaining that his doctors won’t help him obtain the “right” painkillers to passing out from too many mushrooms and too much weed and ruining the evening with his wife. Helton’s “Drugs” might not glue you to the edge of your seat, but it is a unique and telling insight into the life of a person who has experiences with substances not many of us would be comfortable trying. He depicts the reactions with intense detail and doesn’t let any sort of “deeper meaning” get in the way of his stories.

Thursday, September 27 at 7 p.m. SARAH-ANN SMITH, Trang Sen. BARBARA CLAYPOLE WHITE, The Unfinished Garden. Friday, September 28 at 7 p.m. KRISTEN IVERSEN, Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats. Saturday, September 29 at 7 p.m. TERRY ROBERTS, A Short Time to Stay Here, set in Hot Springs, NC.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 40 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 13


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authors ~ poetry ~ books

Word-Weaving in Tennessee

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THE NATIONAL STORYTELLING FESTIVAL

ppalachia is a storied land. Every place within the region has its own story, and virtually every person who has spent a significant amount of time in a specific Appalachian place has been affected by—indeed, has become part of—that story. The region's artists have learned to interpret those stories through their preferred creative medium— whether visual art, music, craft, writing, or the spoken word. This section of Appalachia—Asheville and many nearby communities in the North Carolina Blue Ridge—is a hotbed of art and artists, and each art-form is showcased hereabouts in specialized venues. Visual art can be seen in galleries and museums; music can be heard in clubs, concert halls, and music festivals; crafts can be witnessed at fairs and stores, among other sites; and the written word—as literature—can be savored in bookstores and lecture halls. The spoken word—in the form of storytelling—is one of the more difficult art-forms to present in formal settings. Historically across Appalachia, people savored storytelling by the fireside or on the front porch. Today, in the wake of the storytelling revival, stories can be heard at a range of organized events, and certainly at the National Storytelling Festival, which has been held every October since 1973 just across the border mountains from Asheville in Tennessee’s oldest town: Jonesborough. Several Appalachian masters of the spoken word will be in Jonesborough on October 5-7 to headline the 40th Anniversary offering of the Festival. People who can be there that weekend will be privileged to hear the magical word-weaving of several Appalachia-based storytellers, including Donald Davis, Connie Regan-Blake, Bil

BY TED

OLSON

Lepp, Hannah Harvey, and John McCutcheon. And it is anything but the case that if you hear one you will have heard them all—these five storytellers have had different experiences living in Appalachia and have developed markedly different storytelling performance styles. Davis, one of the most revered storytellers in the U.S., bases his repertoire on his formative years in Haywood County, North Carolina. Asheville-based Regan-Blake, long one of the more active shapers of the storytelling revival, tells a range of stories—some funny, some serious, all unforgettable. Lepp, a West Virginian, is perhaps the leading practitioner of the type of exaggerated story popularly known as the tall tale (which emerged in Appalachia during the early 19th century as “Old Southwestern humor”). East Tennessean Harvey is a performance ethnographer who transforms the oral narratives of Appalachian people into heart-warming solo storytelling performances. To most people, McCutcheon needs no introduction, but for the uninitiated he is a musician-storyteller with strong ties to Appalachia, and his stirring performances combine musical virtuosity with songs and banter that project a deep social conscience. Appalachia will be further represented in Jonesborough through some special events held just before or during the Festival. On Wednesday, October 3, Davis will present a special pre-Festival evening performance, sharing stories about his father. The next evening (Thursday, October 4) will bring another pre-Festival event—this one to feature humorist Jeanne

Asheville Flyer Takes Off

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hile there is no shortage of free publications in our area (with Rapid River Magazine being our own favorite) artist/entrepreneur Tim Arem noticed a decided lack of activities and publications aimed specifically at children. In response to this void, Arens, who was the driving force behind this summer’s successful Fathers Day Festival, is launching The Asheville Flyer for Kids. A free monthly newspaper, The Asheville Flyer will feature announce-

ments of upcoming events, links to web sites, puzzles, safety tips, and other articles relevant to kids. According to Arem the package will be “chock full of games, jokes, and activities, strictly for kids, all with a sense of humor. Our motto is “Puzzles & pictures & stuff to read, while your parents do something completely boring.”

14 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

Donald Davis

Photo: Fresh Air Photo

Bil Lepp

Robertson, who hails from the small town of Graham, located in Alamance County, North Carolina (just east of the Blue Ridge foothills). At 10:30 p.m. on the Friday night of the Festival, Asheville’s own David Holt (with his band The Lightning Bolts) will present a “Midnight Cabaret” performance of storytelling and song. Joining all these Appalachia-based acts at the Festival will be major storytellers from other parts of the U.S., including such popular tellers as Jay O’Callahan, Laura Simms, and Judith Black. And audience members who will be attending the Festival for the first time should not miss performances by Carmen Deedy, Andy Offutt Irwin, and Kevin Kling. Deedy’s stories are fascinatingly multicultural (as a child in Cuba during the 1960s she witnessed the Cuban Revolution), and she smartly maintains a delicate balance between entertainment and education (she is an award-winning children’s book author). Irwin, one of the more idiosyncratic storytellers on the national scene today, combines high-energy comedy with tender stories relating the experiences and perspectives of his aged but spirited “aunt Marguerite.” As subtle as Irwin is over-the-top, Kling’s stories bring meaning to the kinds of quietly profound experiences that most people overlook. Each year the National Storytelling Festival seeks to represent stories from a range of cultural traditions, and this year is no ex-

BY JAMES

Carmen Deedy

Kevin Kling

ception. For instance, Festival attendees may see and hear performances by Kevin Locke (a traditional teller and dancer from the Lakota tribe), Alton Chung (whose stories draw from the diverse cultural heritage of his native Hawaii), Michael Harvey (a British storyteller who specializes in narratives from the Celtic tradition), as well as two acts—Rex Ellis, and duo Kim and Reggie Harris—whose stories and music memorably relate the African American experience. If you do attend the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough this October, be prepared to enjoy stories regardless of the weather. And be prepared to be both charmed and, in some sort of quiet way, transformed. IF YOU 40th annual National Storytelling GO Festival, October 5-7, 2012 in

historic Jonesborough, Tennessee. More details are available online; visit www.storytellingcenter.net/festival Ted Olson is the author of such books as Breathing in Darkness: Poems (Wind Publications, 2006) and Blue Ridge Folklife (University Press of Mississippi, 1998). He is the editor of numerous books, including The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). Olson’s newest collection of poetry, Revelations: Poems, will be available in October 2012. His experiences as a poet and musician are discussed on www. windpub.com/books/breathingindarkness.htm

CASSARA

IF YOU GO: The fun starts with a September 30 kick-off at The Hop Ice Cream Store on Merrimon Ave. The free event begins at 4 p.m. with games, music from 23 Skidoo, and (of course!) plenty of ice cream. For more information on The Asheville Flyer for Kids visit www.cheesygraphics.com/afk.

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

16th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline January 26, 2013. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2012 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems. For more information please call (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716


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sound experience Under the Stars: The Cheeksters at Biltmore Park

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ocal Brit Pop favorites The Cheeksters bring their own brand of effervescent strum-along music to the Biltmore Park outdoor music series with a September 15th show. With a backlog of tunes from their own solid catalog – including last year’s The Golden Birds – the band has been working in some new material along with a few cover tunes. Fronted by the husband and wife combo of Mark and Shannon Casson, the band is known for pulling out all stops and tossing in a surprise or two. Their music reflects the breadth of their influences, ranging from David Bowie regal pop to Memphis soul.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

The Summer Concert series offers some of Asheville’s best bands in an absolutely free lovely outdoor setting. The shows are always well attended, so the wise listener among us is encouraged to get there early, take advantage of one of the nearby restaurants, and enjoy the music. IF YOU The Cheeksters at GO Biltmore Park on Saturday,

Mark and Shannon Casson of The Cheeksters.

September 15 from 7-9 p.m. There is no charge and all shows are intentionally child friendly. Come see what you may have been missing!

Una Noche de Flamenco: Guitar, Song and Dance Experience the excitement and storytelling of classic flamenco as gifted cantaora and instrumentalist Dori Chitayat leads dancer Molly McGuire in an exhilarating exploration of flamenco’s passion and playfulness.

IF YOU GO: Saturday, September 28 at 7

p.m. at the BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., downtown Asheville. Tickets are $25. Seating is limited, call (828) 254-2621.

WNC Jazz Profiles: The Like Mind Trio

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Like a lot of good things in life, the Like Mind Trio happened almost completely by accident.

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n April, 2008, percussionist Matthew Richmond had an engagement to fill for a performance at an Asheville Symphony fund-raiser and called Mike Holstein to play bass. The drummer they had in mind was unavailable so Mike recommended Justin Watt, who had just moved to town two months prior. They got together for a rehearsal to run down some of the material and the rapport was immediately apparent. The group built upon that initial meeting, developing a unique style of ensemble driven, interactive improvisation. The group presents opportunities for each member to introduce musical ideas and compositions, principally by Matthew and Mike, which change over time and constantly evolve. The group aesthetic is intelligent, yet accessible and always exciting. “The Like Minds Trio has the rare ability to play challenging, complex and adventuresome music while being accessible.”

~ Bassist Jack Page The LMT’s style of music is very eclectic and includes elements of straight ahead swinging jazz, ballads, funk and fusion; including odd time signature grooves, world music and even rock, always with a strong emphasis on improvisation. On any given gig, a composition can take a different turn and go somewhere it’s not previously gone.

co-hosts the Asheville Original Music Series, a weekly session held at the Altamont Theatre that features a regional composer and their music. Justin is also teaching percussion at the Asheville Music School, and is an adjunct Percussion instructor at UNCA.

The group’s music can also move towards more experimental and avant-garde avenues without losing its overall accessibility. In the near future, the group hopes to record a full length album.

“The Like Mind Trio is exactly that — a collective ensemble of three of Asheville’s finest musicians. Their virtuosic prowess aside, the trio’s compositions are an eclectic fusion of all genres that provide for the best show you will see in Asheville. These guys are my Grateful Dead – I try to never miss a concert!”

“These guys really create a cool atmosphere in a room and really play to the strengths of all three players.”

~ Pianist Chuck Lichtenberger Performing vibraphone in this group, Matthew Richmond is a composer, educator and all-around percussionist based in Asheville, performing frequently with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra and the pop-noir group stephaniesid. He has performed with a long list of ensembles and soloists in classical, jazz, rock, theater, drum corps, and world music. He currently teaches percussion, composition, and music theory at UNCA. Bassist/composer Mike Holstein has become one of the most sought after bassists in the Southeast. Playing guitar, violin, piano and drums as a youth, he discovered the bass while attending Western Carolina University. Since 2004, Mike has been a member of the band Cotangent, a New York based group led by pianist/composer Bill Gerhardt. He’s performed with Joe Locke, Ingrid Jensen, Randy Brecker, Frank Kimbrough, Kendra Shank, Ron Horton, Marc Mommaas and Tim Horner among others. Justin Watt received music degrees in Percussion Performance from two esteemed universities. After college, he enjoyed a

EDDIE LESHURE

~ Jason Decristofaro

Up-coming Gigs: 9:30 p.m. Thursday, September 6 at Smiley’s Acoustic Café in Greenville, SC. The Like Mind Trio Photo: Jennifer Callahan

two-year stint as the drummer for the Glenn Miller Orchestra where he toured throughout the United States, Japan and Canada. He has also performed with Jim McNeely, Michael Burritt, comedian Jack Carter, Larry O’Brian, David Morgan, The Four Aces, Dolores Parker Morgan, Julia Rich, the Guy Lombardo Orchestra, Paul McGhee, Joey De Francesco, Nick Hilscher, Bobby Shew, Kent Englehardt and Jimmy Heath. In addition to the Like Mind Trio, Justin is the drummer for the Asheville Jazz Orchestra, Bill Gerhardt Trio, Shane Perlowin Trio, Greenville Jazz Collective and numerous other jazz/creative music groups. Along with Mike Holstein, Justin

7:30 p.m. Sunday, September 9 at Barley’s Taproom in Asheville. 5 p.m. Sunday, September 16 at the Southern Appalachian Brewery in Hendersonville. www.likemindtrio.com www.facebook.com/likemindtrio

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently off-the-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 15


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Spirit in the Room Island Records

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While not the “where the heck did this record come from?” revelation that was Praise and Blame (Jones’ stunning 2010 comeback) Spirit in the Room is no less a marvel, a testimony to any artist whose dedication to reinvention has marked his extraordinary career from the get go. It’s another solid set of stripped-down interpretations (again produced once again by Ethan Johns) done as only Jones can. The difference this time is a reliance on more contemporary songwriters, including such amigos as Paul McCartney, Richard Thompson, Leonard Cohen, and Paul Simon. Toss in a song by newcomers The Low Anthem and what’s not to love? Jones is one of the few vocalists who seem to “get” Cohen – his take on “Tower of Song” gets right to the core of that dark masterpiece – and he’s just as comfortable tackling Tom Waits’ pensive “Bad as Me” or Joe Henry’s off-kilter “All Blues Hail Mary.” Taken as a whole, Spirit in the Room easily matches its predecessor track for track. It may be a bit less unified than Praise and Blame but it’s no less an exhilarating an experience. What else might one ask of a 72 year old icon? Not a darn thing. ****

Los Lobos Kiko/Kiko Live CD/DVD Shout! Factory Shout! Factory records have again pulled out all the stops and gifted us with the lavish re-release of a record deemed worthy. Los Lobos’ 1992 Kiko might seem an unlikely candidate (its’ too recent for some tastes) but much of the thrill of this collection – available in three different versions depending on how large a loan you can secure – is an opportunity to go back and revisit the past. The original album was an anomaly at the time of its release, not just because it showed that the already well-respected Los Lobos were more than just a really good roots rock band, but because it so successfully broadened their artistic vision, lyrically and musically, with production (courtesy of Mitchell Froom) that expanded on their es16 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

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As summer winds down I am going to tackle a few discs that have, due largely to the flood of music sent my way, been skipped over. With so many interesting artists out there it is increasingly difficult to keep up; it’s a happy problem! I again remind you to be sure to legally purchase these albums from your local record store of choice. Without them Asheville would be a little less cool of a town.

Tom Jones

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tablished Chicano/American/folk/soul/ rock elements with experimental textures only previously hinted at. Two decades later it remains the highlight in Los Lobos’ remarkably consistent catalog and a terrific, even revelatory listen. This newly remastered studio edition includes 5 additional tracks – 3 of them live from 1992 – terrific liner notes with lyrics, full credits, and rare photos. It’s the place to start, even if you already own it. But the concert recording and DVD that recreates the album in order, captured at a February 2006 gig (and unreleased until now) demonstrates how smoothly the band translates the studio creations to the stage. A series of short yet captivating interview segments provides detail on the songs and the project’s sonic construction: Needless to say the deluxe edition is the one to go for but any version of this contemporary rock classic is worth having. Yet again Shout! Factory has set the standard for deluxe releases. *****

Bonnie “Prince” Billy Now Here’s My Plan Drag City Records At the risk of incurring the wrath of the multitudes of his followers – whose devotion to the man often borders on the compulsive (meant in a good way!) – I’ll admit to never quite understanding the allure of the artist known alternately as Bonnie “Prince” Billy and Will Oldham. I admire to no end his work ethic – the man is a music making machine – and devotion to creative expansion, but at the heart of things the product simply doesn’t touch that resonant chord necessary for an artist/listener link. As such this six song EP, offering reinterpretations of hand picked previously released material, seems intended for those of us still not in the fold. Revisiting older material is not a new direction for Oldham. In 2004 the prolific songwriter released a collection of decidedly country & western reconstructions of earlier material. Now Here’s My Plan is similar, but not quite to what has gone before. It gathers the same band that backed Oldham on his 2011 live dates into the studio to see what sparks might fly. Some songs lean into even more gentle spaces than their original incarnations, as on the droning “Three Questions,” but more appealing are the rowdy, drunken

honky-tonk versions of songs like “I Don’t Belong to Anyone” and the once-heartbreaking “I See a Darkness.” The jubilant feel, discordant piano, and almost breathtaking pace of the versions here completely recast them. When compared to the original, “I See a Darkness” is light years away from the 1999 version. Taken solely as a collection of songs, the EP is as enjoyable and confusing as much of Oldham’s work, and will annoy as many listeners as it delights with its confounding takes on fan favorites. I still wish Oldham would imbue his arrangements with greater swings in tempo, as the steady rhythm of his songs can tend to drag, so while I am far from being a convert, Now Here’s My Plan has at least forced me to reconsider my initial impressions. Independent of its musical merits, in that regards it’s a smashing success. ****

The Silver Jews Early Times Drag City Records A collection of the original “Dime Map of the Reef” single and The Arizona Record EP, Early Times collects a handful of nascent indie-strum tracks dating from two decades ago by Steve Malkmus and Bob Nastonovitch (along with college chum David Berman) in the days just following the demise of Pavement. As such it is an historical and at times fascinating peek at how a band transforms itself, and a teaser of what might have been. This collection of leftovers and oddities is as glorious a low-fidelity mishmash as one might hope (or dread) to hear, and while it is nice to unearth these songs in their most rudimentary form it is also a case of buyer beware, an understanding that these tracks were never meant for commercial release. Think early Ramones (in terms of sonic quality, not style) and you’ll better appreciate the charms found herein. It’s junky garage rock at its finest. Coming through the incessant static hiss like a phantom, Berman’s voice sounds even more detached than usual. His Lou Reed-like bored, cool-kid drone cuts through slipshod guitar and drums that suddenly veer off into all sorts of awkward directions. ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience House Party with Garrison Starr

‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

The fuzz tone overdubs of “Jackson Nightz” howl and moan before Berman screams “That’s IT!” and abruptly switches off the mike: It’s those types of nuances that keep things loose as a goose. The quality being as shoddy as it is, usually one element in a song prevails over the rest; it’s hard to ignore the lazy, rusty guitar on “SVM F.T. TROOPS” that takes a ‘70s pre-punk attitude and meanders for five minutes over a muffled, simplistic drumbeat. In other places “Welcome to the House of the Bats” might well be the stand out track, as Berman repeats the strangely humorous greeting again and again. But for all its virtues Early Times is still the most primitive of demos. It will certainly please the hardcore Pavement devotees but outside of that ever dwindling circle it’s hard to imagine who else might want to pick this up. But as one of those who loved the band I found this scrap of a record to be equal parts evocative and bittersweet. ***

Family Band Grace & Lies NOQ Music Take equal parts visual artist and metal guitar, mix them together in ways that compliment the other while expanding upon each, and what you might get is the glorious concoction that is Family Band. The Brooklyn based husband/wife duo of Kim Krans and Johnny Ollsin merge dreamy folk tales with gothic nuanced pop and what they create sounds unlike anything else out there. Grace & Lies, their debut album, wraps ever shifting loops of crunch with silhouettes of bleak, icy vocals. Bassist/lap steel guitarist Scott Hirsch fleshes out the pair’s haunted unease, but the power of Family Band lies in the empty spaces that occupy the album’s nine tunes.

One of the most satisfying and unexpected delights of the summer season. Nowhere is this better evidenced than in “Night Song,” a seemingly straightforward excursion that opens with the whirring sound of film snaking through a projector but quickly explodes into a clattering of percussion, plucky guitar, and tinkering piano that rumbles with simmering authority. It all sounds like the soundtrack to an existential film festival, and when Krans’ downcast monotone begins reciting “This house is dark/ nothing moves inside,”

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Singer/songwriter Garrison Starr proudly proclaims that she’s “an individualist with a streak of passion.”

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t’s an assessment few would argue with. Having spent her life growing up in the South, her music mixes up Nashville country twang with a solid dose of Tom Petty-like rock appeal. While her friends were making life plans after high school, Starr’s determined ambition was to become a singer on her own terms, a goal she has pursued with relentless zeal. Within weeks after her graduation she issued the homemade cassette Pinwheels and began keeping a steady routine of coffeehouse gigs. Before leaving for the University of Mississippi in the fall of 1993, she had already played more than 100 shows. But Starr’s college stint was short-lived. After three semesters she packed her bags and began playing music full time. Her 1996 EP, Stupid Girl, reflected upon her time spent in school. A year later, Starr issued her proper mainstream debut, Eighteen Over Me, a full throttle collection that exuded a new confidence and fresh musical direction. The songs were sultry, yet abrasive as she came into her own as an artist and an individual. Such a change didn’t last long, though, for Starr was a bit disenchanted with her life choices and faced self-doubts in her early twenties. After a move from Nashville to Los Angeles, Starr and her longtime friend Clay Jones – who had supported her

you’re suddenly confronted with one of the most unsettling tracks in recent memory. Wisely, the pair knows when to pull back. Such inky black sentiments are balanced by the illuminative ballad “Moonbeams” in which Krans goes for raw emotion over sonic tremble. Her voice is stark and strong, but the uncertainty of her sentiment is cast in solemn yearning. The distance between the guitar lines at the opening of “Ride” further let Krans’ voice shine, as if we can see the frost escaping along with her rich, well-deep vocals. The empirically loose bass rumbles are masterfully tense, and the splashes of cymbals as the song grows in intensity fill the early spaces. Nothing is as it seems but neither does Grace & Lies ever become the unhinged assemblage it might have been. As it is what remains is a record that resonates long after the experience is over, and one of the most satisfying and unexpected delights of the summer season. ****1/2

album. She’s instead focused on performing, maintaining a during an extended steady schedule period of self doubt both here and – began writing overseas. songs together. Starr Part of took her time with that schedule the new material, includes house creating a post-alterconcerts, a grownative and country ing market that twist collections of allows the artist tunes that eventually to take creative became 2002’s Songs chances in front From Take-Off to of smaller and Landing. more appreciaStarr made her tive audiences. Vanguard debut in Such a show 2004 with Airbrings her to streams & Satellite. Asheville for a The record received September 30 glowing reviews but performance. Starr had become Joined by her disenchanted with Garrison Starr friend Maia Los Angeles and soon Sharp, Garrison will likely play both old decided to return to Nashville. She and her favorites and new offerings. longtime collaborator, guitarist Neilson Hubbard, joined bassist/engineer Brad Jones for the production of Starr’s fifth album. IF The Sound of You and Me, released in YOU House Party with Garrison GO Starr and Maia Sharp on Sunday, March 2006, was the most honest and emoSeptember 30. The Creekside tional album of her career to date, though it House Concert starts at 6 p.m. with was her next record, 2007’s The Girl That tickets priced at $20. Killed September, that the singer still considers her own favorite. She’s yet to record Email lynmcfarland@gmail.com for its follow up, even though she has accumureservations and directions to this all ages performance. lated more than enough material for a new

HERE WE GO MAGIC

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here are lots of reasons to pay attention to Here We Go Magic. They befriended and enlisted Nigel Godrich (Radiohead) to produce their critically acclaimed and fantastic new album A Different Ship. They picked up director John Waters hitchhiking across country while on tour this spring. They’ve spent most of the summer touring and playing major festivals including Bonnaroo, and they recorded one of the most charming music videos of the year with “How Do I Know.” “One of America’s most unique rock bands.” ~ Time Out Chicago “The band knowingly and creatively extends the systematic art-rock heritage of New York bands like Talking Heads

and the Velvet Underground and their European cousins in Stereolab, Can, and Radiohead.” ~ New York Times “Onstage, each song by Brooklyn’s Here We Go Magic is a genuine journey.” ~ Spin Magazine

IF YOU GO: Here We Go Magic, with

Andrew Bird. October 1 at the Orange Peel, 8 p.m. $28-30, ages 18+.

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 17


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southern comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

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Speaking of Luck

everal years ago, I found out about Bud Cobb in Drexel, North Carolina, a man with a good story to tell. Cobb learned about how faith and luck sometimes create life experiences that are different and often unbelievable unless we see it at the time it happens. This happened to Bud Cobb when he was 19. He remembered it just like it happened yesterday. I interviewed him on his front porch one hot summer’s day in the ‘90s. Cobb was 71. Cobb was a member of the 25th Division, 27th Regiment, Company G, US Army, Infantry forces in Luzon, Philippines, where American troops were fighting the Japanese in World War II. He was as young as any new high school graduate, but he was mature enough to know it when he was hit by an enemy bullet on the battlefield in 1945. He was in the middle of a recon patrol that day searching the area. He told me

that he and fellow infantry men were just looking around when they came up on hill and heard some foreign chatter. The men thought it was cows making noises nearby. It was not cows and all, it was a troop of Japanese infantry men looking straight at them and coming fast with rifles firing, Cobb recalled. “When I stuck my head up to see how many were coming at us, that is when I took a bullet in the left side of my body right over my heart,” Cobb recalled that day. In those days in rural America, strong bonds were cherished between brothers and sisters and many were closer than two peas in a pod. He had a small Bible in his shirt pocket given to him by his sister while he was over there fighting. The bullet tore through the shirt and right into the middle of the bible. It saved his life that day. He had carried the bible ever since he received it in the mail from his sister who

Award-Winning Documentary on Sexual Trauma in the Military

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eteran Mary Joan Dickson is hosting a screening of the new, award-winning documentary The Invisible War at The Fine Arts Theatre 36 Biltmore Avenue in Asheville on September 6 and September 8. A groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of our country’s most shameful and best-kept secrets, The Invisible War reveals the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military. Today, a female soldier in Iraq or Afghanistan is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire. A staggering 20,000 soldiers are estimated to have been assaulted in 2009 alone. And the number of military sexual assaults in the last decade is believed to be in the hundreds of thousands. Tracing the powerfully emotional stories of several young veterans, the film reveals the systemic cover-up of the crimes they have suffered and follows their struggles to rebuild their lives and careers. Featuring hard-hitting interviews with high-ranking military officials and members of Congress, The Invisible War urges us all, civilian and solider alike, to fight for 18 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

a system that no longer forces our military to choose between speaking up and serving our country. The screening at the Fine Arts Theatre is part of The Invisible War’s campaign to tell survivors of military sexual trauma that they are not invisible and to urge civilians, veterans, and active-duty military across the country, to hold the U.S. military to account for creating responsible, comprehensive and just policies for preventing and prosecuting rape and sexual violence among soldiers. As a veteran Mary Joan Dickson recognizes the importance of supporting survivors of military sexual trauma. She too is a survivor, “Thrivor,” of military sexual trauma and was interviewed for this documentary. The proceeds from this film will go to the female homeless veterans shelter, the Steadfast House, here in Asheville NC. IF YOU The Invisible War, Thursday, GO September 6 at 7 p.m.; Saturday,

September 8 at 10 a.m. Admission/ Suggested Donation: $8 per person. Screening takes place at The Fine Arts Theatre, 36 Biltmore Avenue in Asheville.

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

lived in Morganton. He handed the black bible to me to hold and look at where the rifle bullet went directly into the Bible I held in my hand. It was a strange feeling, as he reached to me with something so special that had saved his life. Amazingly, the Bible was made with steel plates on the front and back covers and I assume the steel plates in the Bible cut the force of the bullet. Cobb and his sister, the late Margaret Lane of Morganton used to go to former Spatt’s Pharmacy after school when they were kids, he said. But after they grew into adults and he was in war, she had bought the Bible there with her brother in mind. Although he was not killed, he was stunned and had a severe burn on this chest where the bullet had torn through the steel with uncanny precision. After the incident occurred on the battlefield that day, after mending, he went back to the battlefield until the war was over in August of 1945. Cobb was awarded the Purple Heart. He, like many service members in those days, came home to Morganton and other towns in America. He married his childhood sweetheart and had children. Cobb never left North Carolina and worked for years at Estes Plumbing Company. Although he and his wife lost their only son, Cobb says the lucky Bible that has been kept beside his bed will be left to his daughters. Such was the luck of Bud Cobb during World War II.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

HOUSE FOR SALE 2 bedroom, 2 bath town home close to town, university, Greenlife (Whole Foods), Lexington and Merrimon Avenues. Large screened porch and screened entrance. Home of writer. Special laminated floors, some carpet, all appliances. Complete garage underneath home. Call (828) 253-3655 for more details.


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fine art Asheville Quilt Guild presents the

30th Annual Asheville Quilt Show

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t has become a bit As the quilt show of a cliche around has grown, additional town that these attractions have been mountains are added including quiltso chock full of ing skills demonstraartistic talent you can’t tions by members of hardly walk down the the Guild, many of road without running whom are nationally into a world class artist. known. A schedule of The same is true the demonstrations in the local quiltis listed on the Guild ing community. This website and on the Opportunity Quilt. year’s Asheville Quilt Asheville Quilt Show Show, coming up Facebook page. September 28 through 30 at the WNC Ag More than 20 vendors will be on hand, Center’s Expo Building, will provide an as well as a Guild Gift Shop with arts and opportunity to view a wide variety of local crafts made by Guild members. New this quilts as well as entries from all over the year is a Gallery of member’s quilts for sale. country. The theme this year is “Color The show runs from Friday, SeptemYour Life…with Quilts!” ber 28 through Sunday, September 30; 9-5 The quilt show, which started 30 years Friday and Saturday, and 10-5 on Sunday. ago as a part of Bele Chere, has grown Admission is $6 per person. Parking is free from 35 quilts to a well-respected show of and the facility is handicap accessible. over 200 quilts. This year’s over $7000 in prize money will go to winners of Best of IF Show, Outstanding Hand Workmanship, YOU For additional information, GO contact show chairs Katie & Roger Outstanding Machine Workmanship, Best Winchell at (828) 298-2560 or via Theme Quilt, Best First Quilt, and Viewer’s email at katie@winchell.us. Or check our Choice. This year’s judges are internationwebsite at www.ashevillequiltguild.org/ ally acclaimed quilt artist and author, Frieda show.html. “Like” the Asheville Quilt Show Anderson, and Scott Murkin, M.D., NQA on Facebook for last minute updates! certified quilt judge.

WNCAP’s Raise Your Hand Auction

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estern North BY PAM SIEKMAN Carolina AIDS Project collection of Lonas’ (WNCAP) work can be seen selecting a at Blue Spiral 1 Signature Piece of art to Contemporary Art be the cornerstone of the Gallery in Asheville. agency’s annual “Raise “Each year this Your Hand” auction. auction rallies the Artists from across the people of Asheville region submitted work to to Raise their Hands compete for the honor. and join us in the onAflight by Mitchell Lonas. The 2012 Signature going fight against Piece winner is Mitchell AIDS” states Pam Siekman, WNCAP Board Lonas, for his incised painted aluminum President. The gala event will include both titled “Aflight.” Lonas, a longtime supsilent and live auctions featuring fine art porter and donor to WNCAP’s auction from across Western North Carolina, vacaoften gains inspiration from nature. His tion packages, fine wines, and antiques. inspiration for this winning piece came from neighbor and close friend Annie Lalley. When Lalley gave him a Downy Hawk feather from her yard, Lonas proceeded to IF use his skillful sgraffito technique. YOU WNCAP’s auction will be held at GO the Doubletree by Hilton, Asheville To Lonas, the feather represents peace. – Biltmore on Saturday, September Lonas states that “for anyone living with 29. Learn more about WNCAP, visit HIV /AIDS, I wish them a feeling of peace, www.wncap.org or call (828) 253-7489. peace as represented by a floating feather.” A

PG. 40

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Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 19


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fine art A Celebration of Southern Appalachian Culture...

32nd Annual Heritage Weekend

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30th Annual

he 32nd Annual BY APRIL NANCE Heritage Weekend will be held Septemagainst the notches, causing ber 15-16 at the the propeller to spin either Blue Ridge Parkgee (to the right) or haw way’s Folk Art Center. This (to the left). free festival sponsored by the During the World Southern Highland Craft Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Guild features traditional Competition contestants music, dancing and heritage are judged on the number craft demonstrations. of rotations between gee A highlight of the and haw they can comweekend is the 32nd Annual plete during a given time. World Gee Haw Whimmy They may also have to Diddle Competition on Satswitch hands during the urday, 2-3 p.m. Joe “Colonel competition or whimmy Buncombe” Bly will emcee diddle behind their backs. the competition. A whimmy Dana Hatheway There are three divisions diddle is an Appalachian demonstrates furniture making. of competition: children’s, mountain toy traditionally Photo: Diana Gates adults and professional. made from two sticks of Sign up throughout the rhododendron. Notches are day to compete. Winners receive a trophy, carved into one stick and a propeller is atHeritage Weekend poster designed by tached to the end. The other stick is rubbed Hand-Cranked Letterpress, t-shirt, a Moon Pie, and bragging rights. During Heritage Weekend, learn from area experts about beekeeping, rifle making, coopering, heritage toy making, natural dyeAsheville Quilt Show ing, spinning, quilting, weaving, whittling, print making and furniture making. Handson activities related to traditional crafts will be provided for children. Other highlights include sheep shearing demonstrations throughout the day on Saturday, and border collie demonstrations on Sunday.

Color your Life… with Quilts! * * * *

Demonstrations Silent Auction Gift Shop, Quilts for Sale Opportunity Quilt

Sun 10-5

The Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center is the ideal place for Heritage Weekend with free parking, access to hiking trails and grassy areas for a picnic. Spend an early autumn weekend in WNC honoring and learning about crafts of yesteryear while enjoying the beauty of the region.

ENTERTAINMENT Saturday, September 15

10:00 Southern Crescent Bluegrass 11:00 Apple Chill Cloggers with Firefly 11:30 Split Rail 1:00

Firefly

1:30

Apple Chill Cloggers with Firefly

2:00

32nd Annual World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition

3:00

J Creek Cloggers and the Ross Brothers

12:00 Level Ground Gospel 12:30 Carol Rifkin and Paul’s Creek

September 28, 29, 30

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Photo: Diana Gates

Sunday, September 16

More Than 200 Quilts From All Over The U.S.

Fri & Sat 9-5

Mary Nichols demonstrates weaving.

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Admission $6

WNC Agriculture Center Expo Building

20 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

Cole Mountain Cloggers with Paul’s Creek

2:00

Moore Brothers Band

3:00

Buncombe Turnpike

IF The 32nd Annual Heritage YOU GO Weekend will be held September

Just off I-26 across from Asheville Regional Airport. Free Parking. Handicap Accessible. Lunch Available. Multi-day pass, Group discounts. Sponsored by the Asheville Quilt Guild. For more information: Katie & Roger Winchell, Show Chairs (828) 298-2560

www.ashevillequiltguild.org

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Led by two brothers from Hickory, NC, The Moore Brothers Band will perform Sunday, September 16 at 2 p.m. Photo: Diana Gates

15-16. Hours: Saturday 10-4; Sunday 12-5. Folk Art Center, Milepost 382, Blue Ridge Parkway, Asheville NC. For more details, including a list of participating craftspeople and musicians, visit www.craftguild.org or call (828) 298-7928.


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RIVER ARTS DISTRICT Good Works For Good Causes

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THE SPIRIT OF GIVING CAN BE COLLABORATIVE

’ve written from time BY GREG VINEYARD to time about “the art of charitable giving” A visual artist in her because our area’s own right, including exabundant creative perience with interiors, talent dovetails well with antiques, horticulture our many community and more in addition to causes. Donating art to her functional ceramics, charities allows me to she gets it: quality preparticipate with the assets sentation of art is critical. I have as an artist, paying Jennifer came up it forward in the best way with more than one that I can. color combination that For my illustration worked. Each supported donation to Western the illustration, yet also North Carolina AIDS Jennifer Moore “divining” left room for the wise Project’s (WNCAP) anand designing. notion that a mat and nual “Raise Your Hand” frame that blends well auction, I needed help Quality with a variety of home with matting and framing, decor styles is best for an artistic area that isn’t presentation whomever wins this one of my strong suits. is critical. piece at auction time. Framing one’s own work And here’s the can be a bit like attemptkicker — she has donated the cost of the ing to wrangle one’s artist statement: it supplies as well as her consulting services can be harder to do if you’re too close to this project! Charitable events create to the subject. A fresh set of eyes can a trickle-sideways giving effect, where capture that word or turn of phrase or, in everyone has a chance to contribute time, this case, color combination, that is just talent, skills and products — whatever right, rather than merely OK. we each can do, really. I’m grateful to So, fellow creative — and color Jennifer, not only for her framing design expert — Jennifer Moore to the rescue! expertise, but also for her donation to We recently met up at a local frame shop WNCAP. And my illustration is now so she could pull the right look together. ready for a night on the town! Jennifer instructed me to bring over the It’s good to give, and great to share rack of colorful, pre-cut mat corners, and the load with a friend. Jennifer’s attenshe set to work. tion to detail and her color expertise This particular illustration contains are reflections of our lives as artists: we about fifteen colors, including a hibiscus concentrate on the beauty, and then there tea wash in the background that dried to we are, creating more of it. a really Star-Trekky (there it is!) shade of blue-gray on the rag paper. With the main influences being that blue-gray, some blue-greens and orange-reds, I For custom framing design contact Jennifer viewed framing this as quite the chalMoore at jennifer.moore29@gmail.com lenge, but Jennifer calmly started pulling various mat corners and floating them IF YOU GO: WNCAP’s “Raise Your over the drawing, seeing which ones Hand Auction” is September 29, 2012. related to the array of colors before her. Visit www.wncap.org for details. She then suggested that a doublemat would be cool, and then started creating dual color-combinations. It was Greg Vineyard is an like tenth-level matting! (Don’t try this artist, writer and at home unsupervised, kids!) creative consultant It really hit me that Jennifer looked in Asheville, NC. Find his clay works at like she was dowsing for water as she Constance Williams skillfully navigated the surface, connectGallery in Asheville’s ing relationships amongst the hues like River Arts District & at Gallery 262 in magic; moving and pausing, rearrangWaynesville. His illustrations are at ing mats, switching colors, until one ZaPow Gallery in downtown Asheville. bubbled up to the surface as the best www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net. look for this work.

For more information on the River Arts District call (828) 2807709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT STUDIOS Clingman Avenue

Jonas Gerard Fine Art Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts Lyman Street

Warehouse Studios Riverview Station Depot Street

347 Depot & 372 Depot Street The Lift Studios Northlight Studios Pink Dog Creative Studio 375 Depot West Haywood Street

Riverside Studios Roots Studios Roberts Street

97 Roberts Hatchery Studios Phil Mechanic Studios Roberts Street Studios The Wedge Studios Riverside Drive

Cotton Mill Studios The Old Wood Co. CURVE Studios & Garden

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 21


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The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ artist member strong collective, who, along with dozens of Associate Members and Friends, provides a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art for any aspect of their lives. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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Tangerine Ball

stablished in 1952 as the Beaux Arts Ball, this fundraiser is a major source of revenue for the Asheville Area Arts Council. 800 art supporters dressed in their finest theme colored regalia will fill the Orange Peel on September 15 for Asheville’s most talked-about party of the year. In 2012, the Tangerine Ball brings back the tradition of the multi party extravaganza that the ball once was, with fashion, performance and more at a variety of venues, all for one ticket price. In the spirit of prohibition, and the fun had despite it, Troy & Son’s Distillers will be providing its fabulous moonshine crafted into five signature cocktails designed by local Asheville mixologists. Enjoy one at each party! The evening will begin at 5 Walnut Wine Bar with a free Fashion Show & Stylist Competition outside on Walnut Street at 6:30 p.m. Please join The Hotel Indigo at 151 Haywood Street, and Jess McCuan for a party on the 10th floor that has an Avant-garde flapper feel for a high-art evening for Ashevillians who want to step This original painting will into the world of 1920s-era bobe up for auction at the hemians, Heels, Hemlines and Tangerine Ball. High Spirits. Arty, provocative or couture, as well as retro or modern attire will be at its finest for the evening. continued on page 23

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EVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTRICT October Picante: Jonas Gerard’s Savory New Landscape Series

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ctober”, the heart of autumn, the season when the eye is keenly drawn to the end-of-year beauty of the land… “Picante”, hot, spicy, colorful, a full torrent of sensation… These two disparate words combined create a powerful description of the unique new landscape paintings by the Asheville River Arts District’s mystical abstractionist, Jonas Gerard. Painted with a zen-like mindset, these works distill the pure, im-

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CHRIS STACK

mediate allure of the land. By discarding preconceptions, expectations and distractions, Jonas was able to channel the full, abundant charm of the Improv Landscape #27; acrylic and sand natural world into a new series on canvas by Jonas Gerard. of paintings that blend a simple sense of wonder with a highvoltage dash of spice. your-face assault, but rather a series An important aspect of this apof portraits displaying the indescribproach is painting able push and pull of the natural quickly, spontaneworld. Hot and cool, simplicity and ously translating complexity, fire and water, sea and inspiration to canvas sky, all balanced as fleeting moments and eliminating any captured on canvas. opportunities for second thoughts or IF regrets. This results YOU October Picante starts with GO a zesty opening reception in powerful brush October 18 at 6 p.m. strokes, bold color at Jonas Gerard Fine Art, 240 choices and insightClingman Ave. in Asehville’s River ful compositions Arts district. The exhibit will be on that shine an artist’s display through November 12, 2012. light on nature’s secret places. The For more information visit final impact though www.jonasgerard.com Jonas Gerard in the studio. is not simply an in-

‘Tangerine Ball’ continued from page 22

The French Broad Chocolate Factory & Tasting Room located at 21 Buxton Street, less than three blocks from the Orange Peel, will have French Broad Speakeasy: An Evening of Chocolate & Moonshine beginning at 6:30 p.m. Polish off the night in style at the ‘Peel with fantastic burlesque, swing, jazz and fun dance tunes. It’s a voyeur’s delight as the Dr. Sketchy’s crew brings out the odalisques for you to paint and appreciate at the Peel, or just enjoy our live painters as they capture the beauty. Our original and signature 60”x30” Zelda Fitzgerald portrait, by local artists Heather Shirin and Kitty Love, will be available for silent auction bids, or purchase prints! Proceeds from the Color Ball directly support AAAC’s year-round programming, newly re-vitalized to enhance the capacity and impact of the local creative sector.

LET’S PARTY! The Tangerine Ball takes place Saturday September 15. A variety of fun, a tribute to Zelda Fitzgerald and Art Deco Asheville, and four 1920’s themed parties! Buy Tickets at www. theorangepeel.net/events/the-tangerine-ball

6:30 to 9 p.m. 5 Walnut Wine Bar 6:30 to 8 p.m. The Hotel Indigo 10th floor suites

6:30 to 8 p.m. French Broad Chocolate Factory & Tasting Room on Buxton

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Tangerine Ball will be at the Orange Peel where we will dance the night away!

TICKETS Big Wheel: $100 heavy hors d’oeuvres

and 4 free cocktails, enjoy all 4 parties!

City Slicker: $75 heavy hors d’oeuvres

and 2 free cocktails, choose 1 pre party and the Orange Peel.

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Bohemian: $30 heavy hors d’oeuvres

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and 1 free cocktail at the Orange Peel finale party, The Tangerine Ball!

Learn more about our programs at www.ashevillearts.com

IF YOU The Tangerine Ball takes GO place Saturday September

15. Purchase tickets online at www.theorangepeel.net/events/ the-tangerine-ball.

For more information on the River Arts District please call (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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Piercing the Mundane

he Haywood County BY KAY S. MILLER Arts Council’s Gallery 86 will host A conservative estimate “Piercing the Munof their combined years dane: the Women of working in the art and craft NoHa” beginning Wednesindustry totals 170. An day, August 29 through Satimpressive number of years urday, September 22, 2012. spent exploring what the A wine and cheese artists Kim Thompson, sterling silver natural and the man-made reception will take place on and stone jewelry. world have to offer and putFriday evening, September ting each artist’s individual 7 from 6-9 p.m. in conjunctwist on the resulting artwork. tion with Waynesville Gallery Association’s Kim Thompson, jewelry artist, perhaps Art After Dark. Come and meet the artists says it best: “I am continually paring down and hear their stories. initial concepts. The best designs reveal On Saturday, September 8 Gallery 86 themselves on their own when I, and my will be open for the “Saturday Stroll” from hands, are simply tools through which the 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Artists will also be in the process unfolds.” gallery to meet and greet during the stroll. Six women artists, all of whom reside in the northern half of Haywood County, have www.facebook.com/TheWomenofNoHa banded together and dubbed themselves, “the Women of NoHa” (North Haywood). The artists are: Suzanne Gernandt, texIF tiles; Kaaren Stoner, clay; Susan LivenYOU Haywood County Arts Council GO presents “Piercing the Mundane: good, mixed media; Caryl Brt, wood; Kim The Women of NoHa”(North Thompson, sterling silver and stone; and, Haywood County). On display through Sheree White Sorrells, textiles. Saturday, September 22, 2012 at Haywood In March the group met and conceived County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, 86 N. of a gallery show dealing with the sources Main Street, Waynesville, NC. of their inspiration, the issues that conFor more information please visit the cern them, and the natural materials that Haywood County Arts Council’s website at often show up in their work. The result is www.haywoodarts.org or facebook page at — piercing the mundane – an attempt to www.facebook.com/haywoodarts. bring to light that which is often overlooked.

Artist Open House

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ome take in amazing local art and natural beauty at The Matt & Molly Team’s Artist Open House on Friday, September 28 from 4:30-7:30 at 23 Chestnut Forest Rd. This 3400 square foot home offers amazing views, gorgeous finishes and a heated 2200 square foot shop and artist studio. You have to see it to believe it. The Matt & Molly Team will be serving wine, cheese and light hors d’ouvres! Peruse a fantastic selection of local art for sale while you tour this unique and gorgeous property! Decide to purchase the house and The Matt & Molly Team will buy you your favorite piece from the show! 24 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

IF YOU For more information on the GO home, the event or to have your

art featured, contact The Matt & Molly Team by e-mailing us anytime at info@TheMattAndMollyTeam.com or by calling (828) 210-1697.


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fine art Susan Stanton Photography

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usan Stanton has spent years traveling and photographing the beauty and rustic charm that is known as the Southern Appalachians. A vast array of images depicting scenes along the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Pisgah National Forest, Western North Carolina, Eastern Tennessee, and upstate South Carolina can be found in her online pictorial gallery. Twenty-five years ago she took photography while in school because her classes were advanced and she needed a break from the heavy curriculum. Little did she realize how this simple decision would someday change her life. It was through this class Stanton learned the conceptual elements of design — line, shape, value, color, space, texture and composition — before capturing her first image on film. At first Stanton chose a career in business. Years later while on vacation with her husband she rediscovered photography. “Every once in a while

BY

DENNIS RAY

you experience one of those clarifying moments that changes everything,” Stanton says. “I saw the world for the first time — really saw it. I contemplated how I had worked my way through life and lost sight of what really mattered – living.” She knew she had to be a full time photographer. Stanton shoots her subjects in carefully selected lighting conditions to emphasize their natural textures and colors. Her images have been described by Marshall Gordon of Bold Life Magazine as “a wide variety of beautifully composed, hauntingly original nature scenes saturated with deep, textured colors...exposures so painterly, that many of her clients insist that’s exactly what they are.”

Susan Stanton Photography, LLC (828) 808-1414 www.susanstanton.com

“Through my photography,” she says, “I hope to not just share pretty imagery, but communicate a sense of peace and underAutumn in the Country standing. The viewer Photos by Susan Stanton may never physically stand in the spot I stood, but just maybe the serenity of the scene will transcend the printed canvas and enable the viewer to take a moment and simply ... exhale. I now spend my days chasing waterfalls — both physically and metaphorically.” Stanton’s work is on display at Woolworth Walk (AsheSummer Rains Smoky Mountain ville), Hand in Hand Stream Gallery (Flat Rock), Cherry Street Gallery (Black Mt), 32 Broad St. Gallery (Brevard), Earthworks (Waynesville).

Exhibit of Paintings by Brennen McElhaney

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Morning Mist Down Mills Gap by Brennen McElhaney.

Studio B Custom Framing & Fine Art was established in 1981 by Patti Bell in downtown Lancaster, Ohio after 10 years of employment as a custom framer in Columbus. Her clients include museums, artists, galleries and private collectors from Connecticut to California. She moved her business to Asheville in October of 2006 and continues to offer the exceptional custom picture framing. Artist, Brennen McElhaney was born and raised in Santa Barbara, California. He graduated from Rhode Island School of Design in 1990 with a degree in illustration. In 2005, Brennen and his family, relocated from California to Asheville, North Caro-

lina. Brennen is a signature member of the Western North Carolina Plein Air Painters group and a strong advocate of the local arts community. Mr. McElhaney is creator and curator of the website AVLarts.com which promotes the visual arts in the Asheville area by listing local art events, artists, galleries and art resources. Brennen works as a freelance illustrator and art director, his main client being Oodles World, an Asheville based, family entertainment company. Brennen is represented in North Carolina by Gallery at Studio B and Alta Vista Gallery.

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To learn more about the artist and his work, visit www.BMcElhaney.com.

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IF YOU Opening reception GO Thursday, October 4 from

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Gallery at Studio B, 171 Weaverville Hwy, Asheville NC. For more information visit www.galleryatstudiob.com or call (828) 225-5200.

A Sneak Peak

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The Gallery at Studio B Presents

sheville Artist Brennen McElhaney will exhibit a collection of landscape paintings at The Gallery at Studio B, in a one-man show, entitled, “Along the Way” — Southeastern Landscape Paintings, which will be on display October 4 through November 10, 2012. An opening reception will be held Thursday, October 4 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., and is open to the public. The collection of landscapes is in part a visual journal highlighting places the artist has been. In addition to the Asheville area (where the artist makes his home) the landscapes include views from Saluda, Valle Crucis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Wilmington, and Hilton Head. This will be Mr. McElhaney’s first solo show in North Carolina. The Gallery At Studio B features original work by regional, national and international artists. Exhibits rotate throughout the year showcasing original work ranging from oil and acrylic paintings, pastel drawings and ceramics to jewelry, sculpture and woodworking.

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Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 25


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shop talk Chocolate Fetish Wins Gold and Bronze Top Chocolate Bar Awards

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t’s not just Olympians winning medals for outstanding achievements. The Chocolate Fetish® in Asheville, North Carolina emerged victorious for feats of flavor in the first annual Luxury Chocolate Salon Competition 2012 Top Chocolate Bar of the Year Awards. Presented by The International Chocolate Salon, TasteTV, and Chocolate Television, the 2012 Top Chocolate Bar of the Year Awards gathered gourmet chocolate bars from across America to be tasted by discerning palates. Judges from national and regional magazines and newspapers, plus blog editors, topic experts, chefs, and food and lifestyle gurus participated. The Chocolate Fetish was awarded a Gold for Top Chocolate Bar and two Bronze for Best Taste and Best Texture for their Ultimate Crunch Bar, a tantalizing mix of almonds, apricots, cranberries, hazelnuts, krispies, and pistachios in a proprietary blend of fine European chocolates. “The Ultimate Crunch Bar is a fetish we can all get behind,” stated one judge while another judge pro-

claimed it a personal favorite. “Receiving these awards is quite an honor,” states Bill Foley, Co-owner of The Chocolate Fetish. “We work hard to create unique, delectable chocolate confections that people will not just taste, but experience and remember. Knowing that our chocolate stood out in this National competition to win Gold and Bronze awards is truly an achievement.” The Chocolate Fetish is renowned for premium American and European style handmade chocolates that discriminating chocolate lovers have been enjoying since 1986. To experience all of the delicious chocolates that The Chocolate Fetish has to offer, visit www.chocolatefetish.com or stop by the downtown Asheville store.

The Chocolate Fetish Inc. 36 Haywood Street, Asheville (828) 258-2353 www.chocolatefetish.com

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Best

Appalachia in Oils

A Break in the Clouds

INTERVIEW WITH

Mark Atkinson

Giclee Prints Commissions Accepted

Morning Glory

www.mountainbrushworks.com • 828-734-9304 26 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

MARISSA WHITAKER

Mountain View Appliance

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ountain View Appliance Service, partnered by Mark Atkinson and Elva Woody and fairly new to the Clyde area, specializes in parts and repair on larger home appliances. Mark Atkinson talks to Rapid River Magazine about his business in fixing up broken machines and lifting spirits at his church next door.

Rapid River Magazine: How did you get started in the appliance business?

Mark Atkinson: I worked for Century Ap-

pliance for about eight and a half years and that’s how a lot of people came to know me, so we just decided to go ahead and open up our own business. We opened about the middle of October 2011.

RRM: Tell me about the church next door? I see you’re the pastor.

MA: I used to pastor Camp Branch for

about six and a half years, then I went down to another church and helped them for just a few months and everyone said, “Let’s just open up our own.” So we turned the Laundromat next door into a church in three days. I’ve been preaching for a total of twenty-four years. The church is only three weeks old; we’ve got a following of about fifty, thirtyfive official members. We just bought a piano and a drum set last week. I play the guitar, the bass, I sing, and I’m taking piano lessons right now. We’re hoping within a year, year and a half, we can buy ourselves a church. Some of the customers started coming to the church once they find out it’s there.

RRM: So when did you start learning how to fix appliances (before Century and MVA)?

MA: I used to own my

Original Oil Paintings

INTERVIEWED BY

own automotive shop. I worked on cars, painted them, and restored old cars. I still do that just on the side right now. I was told that if I was good at fixing up cars, I’d be great at appliances so I closed my shop down. Six months later I was out on my own with appliances.

RRM: What do you like best about your job? MA: I get to meet a whole lot of great people and got to keep some of the old customers I had. I have customers right now who won’t call anyone else. I had a woman who’s dryer was broken and she calls up Century asking for me. She was looking for me and two

Mark Akinson Photos: Marissa Whitaker

days later she finds me. Stuff like that says a lot. When people wait to find me, that’s impressive. I have a very loyal customer base, not even a year into it.

RRM: So, when someone needs help, what are the steps?

MA: I do five counties, Haywood, Jackson, Swaine, Buncombe, and Henderson. Sometimes I’ll go out to Transylvania. For the “main” counties, Haywood, Jackson Swain, and Buncombe, my service rate is $50. Then around Henderson, Transylvania, Jackson area, I go up $15. Labor is $25 for the first hour. If it goes into the second hour and I’m still working rates go up to $30, plus the price of parts on that. Average cost when I fix something ends up around $75 plus the parts. If I go out and don’t fix, just the service call fee is required. RRM: Do you deal with used appliances? MA: Yes, I’ll buy used appliances and fix

them up for resale. I’m a bit low right now, but once we had a full house and it was gone in a matter of days. I just take my chances and try to figure out what’s wrong. If I can’t, I’ll just take out the parts and use those when I can. I also sell the parts. Mark Atkinson, owner of Mountain View Appliance Service and pastor of the non-denominational church right next door, is here to help. Whether it’s a fridge or a heart, Mark’s an all-around guy. He even keeps up a 24-hour emergency line.

Mountain View Appliance Service 93 Jones Cove Road, Clyde, NC 28721 mntviewappl@hotmail.com (828) 565-0371 Emergency: (828) 646-7422 Open from 8 a.m. Monday through Friday and closes when the work is done.


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artful living The Necessity of Kindness “I believe that every human being has an innate desire for happiness and does not want to suffer. I also believe that the very purpose of life is to experience this happiness… Sometimes we look at the negative side of things and then feel hopeless. This, I think, is a wrong view… However, through training our minds, with constant effort, we can change our mental perception or mental attitudes. This can make a real difference in our lives. If we have a positive mental attitude, then even when surrounded by hostility, we shall not lack inner peace.”

~ the Dalai Lama

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he Dalai Lama is right. We all want happiness. Even the surliest curmudgeon wants happiness. Even the vilest psychopath wants happiness. Every child wants happiness. Every rich person, every poor person wants happiness. I want it, you want it, people of every race, nationality and religion want it. Everyone wants happiness. We all want happiness, yet very few know how to achieve it in any lasting, reliable way, and so we keep falling back into unhappiness. As we fall into unhappiness, we become more and more desperate about regaining happiness and we come up with some very delusional, sometimes even destructive, tactics for achieving what we think will bring us happiness. This observation is the very basis for Buddhism, and as Buddhism notes, the frustration of unfulfilled grasping after happiness is what brings about what Buddhists refer to as “suffering.” It is a great truth that there are many very “wrong views” in this world about how happiness is to be achieved, and these wrong views inevitably lead to suffering. Mostly we believe we will have happiness by making more of “me,” and there are about as many different views of how to go about making more of “me” as there are people on this planet. It is in the definition of “me” that we get fouled up, for the curmudgeon wants more things to be cranky about, the psychopath wants more victims, the rich person wants more riches, as does the poor person. There are infinite variations of the way to experience “me” with whatever turns “me” on, and infinite, usually ultimately ineffective, ways to pursue it. In this culture, great emphasis is placed on happiness through material/social success, possessions, and relationships, but it is pretty usually true that there is never enough success or possessions, and it is also usually true that relationships often bring hurt and disappointment as well as satisfaction and happiness, and so happiness is a phantom that keeps slipping away. The Dalai Lama, when once asked to

describe his religion, replied, “My religion is kindness,” and for all its seeming simplicity, this is a deeply multi-layered and profound answer. Upon reflection, we all have a sense that the purpose, the reason for the world’s religions, is to bring about more kindness, compassion and love, less violence and hatred in the world, yet religions seem to have failed in this regard. Driven by strong negative emotions and motivations in the pursuit of happiness, humanity continues to manifest horrifying levels of violence, greed, selfishness and indifference. If we, however, look at religion as the deepest truth of our existence, and as our search for what will fulfill this truth, the Dalai Lama’s response, while simple, is infinitely wise and true. If happiness is our core desire and motivation, the deepest truth ought to be about how we fulfill this need, and the Dalai Lama is telling us that if you want to be happy, you must be kind, and if humanity wants to be happy, it must learn to be kinder. We must deepen our understanding and capacities for compassion, tolerance, generosity, appreciation and love, in other words, for kindness. What an astonishing and simple truth! To be happy, be kind. From our usual selfcenteredness, we know we are happy when others are kind to us, but how astonishing that most people haven’t noticed that an even greater happiness is experienced when we are kind to others, and when we have a kind attitude toward all that happens in the world – when we are tolerant, forgiving and appreciative toward all that happens, great and small. That we fail to make this connection is a sign of how deep the conditioning is that happiness comes from getting rather than giving. This is where the “training our minds” comes in. This may seem like an unusual connection, to look to the training of the mind to find happiness, but not so. First, of course, it must be realized that happiness is a state of mind. While we act as if happy is

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BILL WALZ

something we get get,, it is, in fact, something we are or are not.. It is a state of mind that is only relatively dependent on our conditions – “If we have a positive mental attitude, then even when surrounded by hostility, we shall not lack inner peace.” Since there is a limit to how much we can get, then it is true that the happiness that comes from getting is really quite limited, and since all things that can be acquired can also be lost, getting is a poor strategy to happiness. There is no limit, however, to how much kindness we can give or how much kindness we can bring into our view of the world, and therefore our potential for happiness derived from a mind that has trained itself to be kind and appreciative is unlimited.

just the idea of kindness to see and experience through meditation how the mind is trapped in unvirtuous directions and how we can shape and train it in “a more virtuous direction,” a kinder and happier direction. It is both a simple and a sophisticated concept, and a great challenge, but it can be done, and meditation is the means, “through training our minds, with constant effort.” Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, individual personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 2583241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Visit www.billwalz.com

“Meditation is the process whereby we gain control over the mind and guide it in a more virtuous direction. Meditation may be thought of as a technique by which we diminish the force of old thought habits and develop new ones.”

~ the Dalai Lama

In Tibetan Buddhism, the word “meditation” means to train the mind, and “virtuous” describes what brings about happiness and lessens suffering. So what the Dalai Lama is saying is that when we train our minds to be free of the old habits of thought and emotion that lead to unhappiness, and open it through insightful meditation to deeper understanding of the connection between happiness with kindness, compassion, appreciativeness, generosity, tolerance and patience, we will find what we all have been searching for in our misguided self-centered aggressive ways but keeps eluding us. Contrary to our social conditioning, it turns out that more of “me” leads to less happiness, while less of “me” leads to greater happiness, and through meditation, this paradox becomes completely clear. We must become “nobody” to be completely happy. This is the great secret and power of Buddhism. As the Dalai Lama suggests, make a religion out of selfless kindness and you will find happiness. You must, of course, realize this means also not allowing others to be unkind to you, or receiving and personalizing their unkindness. We also have to go beyond Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 27


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The Bourne Legacy ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: There was never just one.

REEL TAKE: The tag line for The Bourne

Legacy is “There was never just one.” This is a fitting line to lure Bourne fans (like myself) to the theatre. Written and directed by Bourne architect Tony Gilroy, The Bourne Legacy opens with the silhouetted image of a man floating in the water and the assassination of a prominent British journalist about to blow the whistle on the program that designed super spies such as Bourne. Both are images that tie back to the last film; the references give the viewer both high hopes and an immediate afrenaline rush.

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Rachel Weisz and Jeremy Renner star in The Bourne Legacy.

I knew Jason Bourne was not going to be this evolution of the Bourne franchise, but I thought The Bourne Legacy would pick up with the same heart-pumping pace of the original trilogy. This was a short lived hope to be sure. What followed was a two hour long set up to get us to buy in to this new Bourne franchise. I kept thinking, “We already drank the cool-aid – Bourne, Treadstone, Blackbriar, the whole thing – so don’t explain it to me, just keep it going!” Unfortunately the filmmakers seem to be taking our love for Bourne for granted. More time was taken up explaining the latest guinea pig soldiers covertly engineered by our government, than was ever spent in explaining Bourne. Bourne’s back story was integrated as the story unfolded, which worked far more effectively. Perhaps this new strategy is based on the fact that Gilroy no longer has Ludlum’s source material from which to adapt. Or maybe the producers really thought that this is what the audience needed in order to move forward. The new soldier gone rogue at the center of this story is Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner). If Jason Bourne was Treadstone 1.0, Cross is version 4.0. He is being chemically programmed and altered to be unbreakable. Unbeknownst to him, facing a leak that could expose far more than just Treadstone (which apparently was only the tip of the iceberg), the latest government heavies in Washington (Edward Norton and Stacy Keach) decide to shut the whole program down. This means eliminating any evidence of it – the soldiers themselves and the doctors reprogramming them.

28 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

Believed dead (after a systematic extermination), Cross seeks out the doctor behind his ‘chems’. Coincidentally Dr. Marta Schiering (Rachel Weisz) happens to be the only doctor to survive that extermination process as well. Together they are the run, but before they can really go off the grid, they have to finish the final stage of Cross’ genetic re-programming. The Bourne Legacy is not a bad movie. It is tedious at times and it doesn’t have the staying power of the original trilogy, but it’s actually quite smart, and the actors rise to the challenge. Renner certainly has the chops and the intensity for the role, and he and Weisz work well together. Had this film been an independent release from the Bourne franchise none of these trivial complaints would have mattered. On the other hand, with this elebarorate set up out of the way, Gilroy has now successfully paved the way and rebooted the series to hit the ground running with sequels to this one (how about “Bourne Again,” or “Bourne Yesterday,” or “Bourne to be Wild”?). Sequels to The Bourne Legacy will no doubt return to the heightened pace of its predecessors, and may even be more intense. It’s already clear that certain earlier subplots will come back to the fold. It’s also conceivable that Bourne himself could reappaear. Now that would be something to see.

(Terry Crewes) and Toll Road (Randy Couture) carried over from the first film but this time we get Billy the Kid (Liam Hemsworth fresh from The Hunger Games) and my personal favorite the bad guy Villain (pronounced Vill-LANE) in a wonderfully nasty turn from Jean-Claude Van Damme. The plot is simple enough, Sylvester Stallone & Co are recruited by Bruce Willis to retrieve a computer from a plane crash. The computer contains the secret location to a secret stash of plutonium. Once they obtain it, it’s stolen by Van Damme who kills Billy in the process. The others vow to get their revenge on him and the plutonium back as an afterthought. Before the plot proper gets underway the film opens with a totally outrageous action sequence that has the Expendables rescuing Hatch (Arnold Schwarzenegger) and a hostage from Chinese mercenaries. There are pyrotechnics aplenty and lots of CGI synthespians get wiped out (I lost count after the first couple of hundred).

Rated PG-13 for violence and action sequences.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Expendables 2 ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: This sequel to the 2010 original is way more over the top than its predecessor, but in the end it winds up being completely “expendable”.

REEL TAKE: I wanted to like Expendables

2. I really did. And I did like most of it, but what I didn’t like ultimately ruined my viewing experience. It’s a shame because this movie had the potential to be The Avengers of R rated action films but IMHO director Simon West (Lara Lara Croft: Tomb Raider Raider) let that potential slip through his fingers. The intentional humor is already built in with character names such as Hale Caesar

Sylvester Stallone leads his band of mercenaries into action one more time in Expendables 2.

Once they are on the track of Van Damme they come to a cold war training ground (designed to look like New York) where they encounter Chuck Norris, who saves them deus ex machina style but refuses to join them because “I work alone”. This time they only manage to kill about a hundred bad guys. That’s not counting the ones they maim. After becoming trapped in an underground mine where the plutonium was ‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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stored before being removed by Van Damme, they are once again rescued deus ex machina style. This time it’s by Arnold Schwarzenegger who declares “I’m back”. You get the idea. This leads to the film’s ultimate set piece, a shootout in an airport that deliberately recalls the end of John Woo’s Hard Boiled (1992) except that a few hundred more people die. There is a final martial arts Parents Cindy and Jim Green (Jennifer Garner and confrontation between Van Damme Joel Edgerton) love their garden grown son Timothy and Stallone. Guess who wins? (C.J. Adams) in The Odd Life of Timothy Green. Now we come to the part or parts tains it (book, movie, or music) out of hand. of the film that considerably lessened Today’s world belongs to Buster Keaton and my enjoyment. It involves not the number not to Charlie Chaplin. Cleverness and athof people killed (easily a thousand) but in leticism not beauty and grace are the order the way that they get killed. They are shot of the day. But as Chaplin showed, there’s up or exploded in video game fashion with nothing wrong with sentiment when it’s blood and guts splattering everywhere. At handled properly as it is here. least it’s not in slow motion. Not only does Timothy Green is the sort of movie it totally depersonalize and glamorize the that Frank Capra would have made in his violence but I , for one, resent having to pay prime. Small town setting, inherently decent big screen money for video game visuals. people overall, and a charming couple (JenIn the final analysis, as much as I ennifer Garner, Joel Edgerton) who dream of joyed watching the old guys go through their something more. That dream comes true in paces and saving the day in time honored the arrival of Timothy (C.J. Adams) who arfashion, I just couldn’t get past the look of the rives fully developed from their garden, the film. Too much of it is like the video games perfect embodiment of the child they wish you find in theater lobbies today not to menfor but can never biologically have. tion those found at home. One hesitates to It doesn’t take long for Timothy to draw a parallel between movies like this and have an impact on the community, whether what happened in Aurora, Colorado but then it’s cheerfully submitting to abuse from if, you think about it, it’s hard not to. the local bullies, to inspiring his parents to Rated R for strong, bloody violence throughout. create a new kind of pencil in order to save REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN their small town livelihood (a local pencil factory). He also makes a difference in the The Odd Life of Timothy Green life of a young tomboy (Odeya Rush), and in ∑∑∑∑ the town’s wealthy dowager (Dianne Wiest), who finally gets to see herself as she really is. Short Take: Charming and fragile fantasy to which the appellation “they don’t make Nothing against the films of Tim ‘em like that anymore” truly applies. Burton, but it seems today that unless a fantasy film is truly strange and, for lack of a REEL TAKE: It just goes to show that no better word, original, then it gets no respect. matter what the critics say (me included), Either that or it has to have “meaning” and you need to see a movie for yourself and be heavy in tone like The Curious Case of make up your own mind. If I had listened Benjamin Button, which the title of this film to the critics regarding The Odd Life of clearly resembles. That’s either an in joke or Timothy Green,, I’d have passed on it, and a marketing ploy. I’m not sure which, but that would have deprived me of one of the then this film is based on a story by Ahmet more enjoyable film experiences I’ve had in Zappa (son of Frank) so anything is possible. quite a while. Maybe it’s just that I’m getting older A noted critic for NPR said that if this or my last child is leaving home, but I really movie had been made 50 years ago it would had quite a response to this film as did the be hailed today as a classic but not now. three other people who were there. Since it’s Times have changed and an old fashioned, a Disney offering it’s likely to be around for whimsical fantasy is out of place in the 21st awhile so try and catch it. The Odd Life of century. I couldn’t disagree more. We could Timothy Green is a delicate, charming fanuse a lot more films like The Odd Life of tasy that can transport you to a world which Timothy Green especially when they are as exists only in the movies. It won’t stand up to well made as this film is but be warned, this close scrutiny like most whimsical films (refilm contains the “s” word…sentiment! member Harvey? Harvey?) but then it’s not meant to. Sentiment is decidedly out of fashion Rated PG for thematic elements and brief these days. Just the thought of it makes language. some critics and people I know roll their REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN eyes upward and to dismiss whatever con-

The Monthly Reel

A

s we put this issue to bed the summer blockbuster season is nearing its end. This season has delivered some crowd pleasing blockbusters including The Avengers, Christopher Nolan’s Batman Rises, and more recently The Expendables (see Chip’s take on page 28). However, in a summer chockablock full of big budget CGI fests, Chip and I have both been delighted and even pleasantly surprised by some of this season’s smaller cinematic offerings, including Moonlight Kingdom, Safety Not Guranteed and The Intouchables earlier this season. This month Chip was touched by Take this Waltz (see review on page 31) and he was completely smitten with The Odd Life of Timothy Green (see review on this page). Unfortunately, but the time you read this, Take This Waltz will likely have disappeared from the one theatre in our area where it was playing. Regardless, Chip thought it was worth including in this issue. Many critics ripped Timothy Green to shreds, but not our Professor Kaufmann. On the contrary, he takes umbrage with a world that just can’t enjoy good old fashioned sentiment and magic. He believes that audiences who do venture out to see The Odd Life of Timothy Green will like it far more than the snarky scribes of this industry. His convictions seem to be echoed on Rotten Tomatoes, wherein The Odd Life of Timothy Green currently holds a 38% fresh rating by critics and an 88% fresh rating by movie goers. Meanwhile I enjoyed Ruby Sparks

BY

MICHELLE KEENAN

and Sleepwalk with Me. I saw Ruby Sparks (see review on this page) at a press screening at 9 o’clock on a beautiful, sunny Saturday morning. To like a movie at a Saturday morning screening, it must be good. In fact, I’m probably at my critical, snarky and grouchiest best at that time. Sleepwalk with Me (see review on page 30) won’t open until September 7 here in Asheville, but I had the pleasure of attending a screening recently. Public radio fans of This American Life and Mike Birbiglia will flock to it and enjoy it. Moving back to more mainstream titles, Chip and I were both slightly disappointed with the highly anticipated Bourne Legacy (see review on page 28), but that could be a case of setting our expectations a little too high. Speaking of expectations, this fall’s releases include Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie and yet another (?!) chapter in the Resident Evil franchise. But rest assured there’s lots more coming down the pike, and there’s something for every palate. This fall the Asheville Film Society and the Hendersonville Film Society continue to offer some wonderful re-discoveries. Recently the Asheville Film Society showed My Man Godfrey and the Hendersonville Film Society screened The Eye of the Needle. The good Professor Kaufmann happened to attend both screenings and said it was absolutely wonderful to see audiences thoroughly enjoy and react to both films. Be sure to check the schedules for AFS and HFS each month in Reel Takes. Enjoy the Show!

Ruby Sparks ∑∑∑∑ Short Takes: When a young writer manifests the woman of his dreams, it gives new definition to the power of the pen.

REEL TAKE: The filmmakers

(Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris) behind Little Miss Sunshine may not have the sleeper hit with Ruby Sparks that they had with Sunshine, but they definitely have one of this year’s most refreshing efforts to date. Ruby Sparks is a whimsical, off beat romantic comedy that defies contrivance (this alone makes it refreshing) and delves deeper, just when you think it might slip off the tracks. The merits of this film can largely be attributed to writer Zoe

Paul Dano is an inspired writer whose muse comes to life in Ruby Sparks.

Kazan, who also stars as the titular character. Kazan’s story revolves around a young Salenger-esque writer named Calvin (Paul ‘Movies’ continued on page 26

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Dano). Calvin is the timid, self-doubting, bookish type. He had a commercial and critical debut novel when he was 19 and hasn’t been able to write much of anything since. When his therapist (Elliot Gould) gives him a writing assignment, he decides to write about the woman of his dreams (literally). He names the woman Ruby, and this character becomes his muse. With a new found voice and creative juices flowing, Calvin busts through his writer’s block and rapidly begins to crank out the pages of his second novel. About this time, Calvin starts finding ladies items scattered about his house. Puzzled, he thinks his dog must be bringing them home. He continues writing, inspired by his muse, until one day said muse is standing right in front of him. Calvin thinks he’s suffering from a kind of Harvey-esque delusion until he realizes other people can see her too. For some inexplicable reason (which wonderfully is never explained) Calvin has manifested the woman of his dreams right off the pages of his manuscript, and whatever he writes, Ruby does. Ruby is Calvin’s ideal woman and, at first, their relationship seems equally idyllic. Ironically however, even with the ability to control and change her every mood and whim, the dream is fraught with reality and reality isn’t such a dream. This is where the film both soars and fumbles, but over all manages to stay its own unique course. The guts of the story are nothing new; it’s how the story plays out that makes Ruby Sparks interesting. The film could easily have stayed comic and light (albeit slightly quirky) and still have been good, but there is more emotional heft to the story than one initially expects. Fortunately for us, said heft is delivered as organically as the rest of the story. For such a hipster, indie-style film, there is a distinct lack of pretense, and it never falls prey to being too impressed with itself. Its heartfelt performances keep it engaging for the viewer. Dano lets loose in this role more than in others and it suits him. Kazan wrote herself a lulu of a role and she shines throughout. The fact that Kazan and Dano are a real life couple lends itself well to Calvin and Ruby’s ups and downs. The supporting cast including Chris Messina as Calvin’s upwardly mobile brother, Annette Benning as his new agey mother, Antonio Banderas as his mother’s vivacious, dope-smoking lover, and Steve Coogan as his self aggrandizing literary agent, all turn in fine performances. Ruby Sparks won’t have mass appeal, but if what you’ve read here sounds at all interesting, you are likely its target audience, and you will likely enjoy it. Rated R for language, including some sexual references and for some drug use.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Sleepwalk with Me ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: This American Life contributor, Mike Birbiglia, takes his semi-autobiographical, one-man show about a struggling comedian with commitment issues and a sleepwalking disorder to the big screen.

REEL TAKE: Fans of This American Life

are likely familiar with Mike Birbiglia. This self-effacing stand-up comic / storyteller has been evoking laughs from public radio audiences for several years. He’s known for telling somewhat embarrassing, slightly peculiar stories culled from his own life experiences, with a believable boy-next-door kind of likeability.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Blue Bird”

This American Life contributor Mike Birbiglia stars in the semi-autobiographical Sleepwalk with Me.

September DVD Picks

The Blue Bird (1940) It’s always risky for a performer to go against type. Silent movie fans didn’t like it when Mary Pickford stepped out of her little girl roles. When Bill Murray played it straight in the remake of The Razor’s Edge (1984), it tanked big time. The same thing happened to the 1940 version of The Blue Bird when Shirley Temple, at the age of 12, played a selfish, mean spirited little girl. It was her first box office failure and marked the end of her career as a child star. That’s too bad because if you enjoy old school fantasy films then The Blue Bird has a lot to offer. Essentially the film is 20th Century Fox’s answer to The Wizard of Oz. Shirley Temple was to have originally played Dorothy but the deal fell through when Jean Harlow died so Fox dusted off the Maurice Maeterlinck fantasy which had been made into a celebrated silent film in 1918 (which is still the best version and also readily available). The story concerns two children, Mytyl and Tyltyl, who are sent on a quest to find the Blue Bird of Happiness. Along the way they visit the Land of Memory where they visit their dead grandparents (“We’re only dead when we’re forgotten” says the Grandmother), the Land of Luxury (where they have everything but are still unhappy), and the Kingdom of the Future (where they meet children who have yet to be born). They eventually find the Blue Bird but where they least expect it. The production design is sumptuous recalling the paintings of Arnold Bocklin and Maxfield Parrish and the supporting cast of Eddie Collins, Gale Sondergaard and Nigel Bruce is excep-

30 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

tional. The musical score by Alfred Newman is memorable as is the cinematography. It’s no Wizard of Oz but The Blue Bird doesn’t deserve its current obscurity. You can rent the DVD locally or from Netflix or see it on a big screen in Hendersonville on September 30 (see Hendersonville Film Society listings).

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2012) Salmon Fishing in Yemen was a delightful film out earlier this year. Everyone I know who saw it thoroughly enjoyed it, but with a title like that, I don’t think many people really went to see it. Now available on DVD, I’m making the oddly titled flick my pick of the month. This charming little film isn’t one of the best film’s of the year, but it is one of my personal favorite films of the year thus far. It also has a broader appeal than one may think. When it’s time to spawn, salmon perform the challenging feat of swimming upstream to do procreate. When mild mannered British fisheries expert Dr. Fred Jones (Ewan McGregor) receives a proposal from investment consultant, Harriet Chetwode-Talbot, (Emily Blunt) on behalf of a sheikh (Amr Waked) to bring salmon fishing to the Yemen, he finds the idea

With a successful track record as a stand up comic, radio contributor, and writer, Birbiglia is set to tackle the film industry with his semi-autobiographical, directorial debut Sleepwak with Me. As a comedianturned-writer/director, one can even imagine Birbiglia becoming a Woody Allen for a new generation. However, unlike Allen and many other slightly neurotic, self deprecating comedians and writers, Birbiglia’s comedy is not whiny. This may be part of his charm and appeal. In Sleepwalk with Me, he’s a mess, but he’s a likable mess. Birbiglia plays Matt, an aspiring comedian with a fear of commitment and ‘Movies’ continued on page 27

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” ludicrous and politely declines. However, when the Prime Minster’s press secretary (Kristin Scott Thomas) gets wind of the idea, she seizes the opportunity for a good will story, makes it a matter of state, and there is no turning back. The result is an upstream journey to make the impossible possible. Fred is the central figure and the narrative voice. Bonding over the love of fly fishing, Fred is charmed by the sheikh and won over by his faith in life and his belief in the impossible. As Fred, Harriet and the sheikh work together friendships are forged and it seems nothing will get in the way of making the sheikh’s dream come true. That is nothing except maybe civil unrest, terrorism and a war. There is an underbelly to Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, that is ever present and serves as a sad but true political commentary. While said belly is mostly played out in satire, it’s and odd but fitting tone. It’s a tone that I didn’t initially think they pulled off, but over time it has become less of an intrusion and more a part of the landscape of the film. Ewan McGregor gives one of us his best performances in years. Emily Blunt is perfect as Harriet, and she and McGregor play well off of one another. Amr Waked is lovely as the philosophical, fly fishing sheikh. But the scene stealer in this film is Kristin Scott Thomas. She plays the brash, over zealous press secretary with wicked abandon and is a horrid hoot to watch Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is a delight. If you didn’t get a chance to see it in the theatre, by all means rent it and enjoy.


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hazardous sleep walking disorder. As with Ruby Sparks, there’s nothing really new at the heart of the story, it’s how the story unfolds like makes it interesting. It’s also worth pointing out that he paints a great picture of what it’s like to be a working comedian. Birbiglia plays Matt Pandamiglio, an aspiring stand-up comedian with a longtime girlfriend, a fear of commitment, and a hazardous sleepwalking disorder. Matt and his girlfriend Abby (Lauren Ambrose) have been together eight years. Their relationship not contentious, but it has grown stale. Still they’ve been together so long there’s no avoiding the ‘when’s the big day’ question. As the inquiries mount in regards their marital status, Matt gets antsy, and he begins having bizarre episodes of sleepwalking. While all of this is going on, he is also struggling to find his comic voice. Ironically, when he does, he finds it via his afflictions (the REM disorder and his commitment phobia). Once he puts those out there, he finally connects with audience. As far as the other connections go, you’ll have to wait and see. Birbiglia, along with Sleepwalk cowriter and producer Ira Glass (creator and host of public radio’s This American Life), has already proven himself a adept writer, ever commenting on and questioning the so-called ‘normal’ hallmarks and expectations of life, while clumsily navigating his own. Now he has also proven himself an adept director and actor in film as well. Carol Kane and James Rebhorn play his parents, a couple together 40 years, but not exactly the example to the unmarried of ‘I got to get me some of that.’ Several other characters are played by fellow stand up comedians, and Ira Glass has a small cameo as well. The scene stealer however, is Sondra James as his booking agent, Colleen. Sleepwalk with Me has a built-in audience with fans of This American Life, but Birbiglia’s circle of fans is likely to grow sizably directorial debut. The film opens in Asheville on September 7. Rated R for language, including some sexual reference and for some drug use.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Take This Waltz ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Director Sarah Polley’s second feature film tells the bittersweet story of what happens when one partner in a marriage falls out of love with the other and the repercussions it has for both.

REEL TAKE: I have been a fan of Canadian

director Sarah Polley for quite some time. I first saw her as a child actress in Terry Gilliam’s The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) and then followed her from the paralyzed victim in Atom Egoyan’s The Sweet Hereafter (1997) to 2005’s Beowulf

Michelle Williams has come to the realization that she’s no longer happy in her marriage in Take this Waltz.

& Grendel with Gerard Butler. In 2006 she made her directorial debut with the critically acclaimed Away From Her which starred Julie Christie as a woman with Alzheimer’s. Take This Waltz is her second film as a director and as with her first film, she wrote the screenplay. The title is the name of a Leonard Cohen song which figures in a key montage scene late in the movie. On the surface the story is fairly pat. Married wife has an affair with a neighbor which has consequences for all involved. What takes it to a different level are the in depth look at the characters and how the various aspects of those consequences are examined. It reminded me of a Canadian version of Sex, Lies and Videotape. Margot (Michelle Williams) and Lou (Seth Rogen) are a happily married suburban Toronto couple of 5 years. One day Margot meets Daniel (Luke Kirby) and finds herself drawn to him. When it turns out that he lives in the same neighborhood, she slowly but surely becomes even more attracted to him and he to her and, despite loving her husband, she leaves Lou to be with Daniel. After “the bloom is off the rose”, she wonders if she did the right thing but then realizes there is no going back. Williams gives another one of her earnest independent film performances which is perfect for this material while Luke Kirby is all dark hair, good looks and easy charm making it easy to see why Margot would fall for him. The really pleasant surprise here is Seth Rogen. I’m not a big fan of his so for writer-director Polley to make me not only like his character but actually feel sorry for him is nothing short of a minor miracle. Sarah Silverman also resonates in the role of Rogen’s troubled sister Geraldine. The characters, the situations, and especially the dialogue seem so honest and true-to-life that it’s hard not to believe that a lot of what happens here is based on actual real life experience. According to imdb.com (the internet movie database) Sarah Polley divorced her first husband although they remain good friends. Hopefully she is happier with her second choice than Michelle Williams seems to be with hers. Polley is also clearly proud of her native Canada and

is happy to show off lesser known areas of Toronto, the city where she was born. Take This Waltz only played Asheville for a week which is positively criminal. I realize a movie about a failed marriage is not going to be a happy one, but lots of downbeat films play here and do fairly well which makes this movie’s reception even more puzzling. This film even had the added attraction of Michelle Williams & Seth Rogan. I think the title had something to do with it, giving people the wrong impression. I was deeply moved by Take This Waltz and when it comes out on DVD, you should give it a try. I think you’ll be moved by it too. Rated R for language, strong sexual content, and graphic nudity

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. A donation of $5 is requested. Coffe and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. September 2:

Monkey Business

The Marx Brothers’ first Hollywood film has them as stowaways on an ocean liner. Directed by Norman Z. MacLeod (1931) Bonus Short: The Music Box – Laurel & Hardy, a piano, and a long flight of stairs.

Under The Tuscan Sun September 9:

This warm romantic comedy tells the story of a San Francisco writer whose 10 day visit to Tuscany changes her life forever. Directed by Audrey Wells (2003) September 16:

Thirty two Short Films About Glenn Gould Canadian actor Colm Feore plays Glenn Gould. Directed by Francois Girard (1993) September 23:

Alfie

Michael Caine as a working class seducer in 1960s London. Shelley Winters costars. Directed by Lewis Gilbert (1966) September 30:

The Blue Bird

Shirley Temple plays a mean spirited girl searching for the “Blue Bird of Happiness.” Directed by Walter Lang (1940)

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY SCREENINGS The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. The screenings are free. Become an AFS member for just $10. Membership gets you into special members-only events and screenings. September 4:

Footlight Parade A stage producer seeks to break into the talkies and struggles against time, romance and a movie producer’s spy create spectacular live “prologues” for movie houses. Stars James Cagney and Joan Blondell. Directed by Leslie Bacon, Choreographed by Busby Berkeley (1933) September 11:

My Little Chickadee

Rightly suspected of illicit relations with the Masked Bandit, Flower Belle Lee is run out of Little Bend and pretends to marry a con man named Cuthbert J. Twillie for “respectability.” Directed by Edward Cline (1940)

The Smiling Lieutenant September 18:

When a young Austrian Lieutenant smiles at his girlfriend at a parade and the smile is intercepted by a princess of a visiting royal family, all hell breaks loose in this romantic comedy starring Maurice Chevalier and Claudette Colbert. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch (1931) September 25:

The Fourth Man

A man who has been having visions of an impending danger begins an affair with a woman who may lead him to his doom. Directed by Paul Verhoeven (1983)

SPECIAL ‘BUDGET BIG SCREEN SHOWING’ $5 for members, $7 general. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 19:

Charade

Romance and suspense in Paris, as a woman is pursued by several men who want a fortune her murdered husband stole. Stars Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn and Walter Mathau. Directed by Stanley Donen (1963)

Carolina Cinemas is located at 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 31


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restaurants & wine Sa-Dish-Tic!

September Events at The Weinhaus Tuesday, September 11 Vijay Shastri has long been one of the most talented and inventive chefs in Asheville. His years running the Flying Frog provided many foodies with evenings of culinary bliss. Vijay’s new endeavor on “The Block” in downtown Asheville is “Mr. Frog’s Soul & Creole Kitchen.” African inspired Southern soul food is offered in tandem with New Orleans style French Creole. However, we will mine the entirety of Vijay’s culinary experience to match his cuisine to a lineup of sumptuous wines for your pleasure. This will be an evening to remember. Time: 7 p.m. Place: The Weinhaus. Price: $65. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at 254-6453. Friday, September 28 Friday Night Flights presents the Tour de France. Even though the race has already ocurred, we will take advantage of the enthusiasm to inspire a tasting of all French wines. The possibilities are endless from the variety of growing regions and grapes associated with them. We will be sure to pick wines representative of the oenological treasure that is the nation of France. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:307:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave. Asheville.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

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- FORBIDDEN FOODS, AND MATCHING WINES

n a recent guest opinion printed in the Mountain Xpress, a local animal lover bemoans the local chefs who offer foie gras. He repeats the allegations of the cruelty behind its production and the resulting environmental devastation, and finishes with “Please join me in boycotting local restaurants that serve foie gras and urging City Council members to approve a citywide ban of this so-called delicacy.” Boycotting local restaurants. Nice. Getting local government involved. Brilliant. After punishing the restaurants’ employees, let’s create government jobs for the enforcers of the ban and go write them sah-tations! Let’s also ignore that this is a particularly small “problem” in the global food and restaurant industry. Of course there are abuses out there, and concerned civilized people are a good, ever-growing force for positive and beneficial changes. Still, foie gras should be the would-be local cause célèbre? For this we want to intimidate local restaurants and affect the incomes earned therein? This takes me back to, I think, 2006. Local activists, a husband and wife team, were mightily picketing and protesting foie gras right in front of one of downtown’s best. Holding high large gruesome photos of geese and ducks being force-fed, they stood in front of the restaurant’s plate glass windows, hovering over the front tables where loyal customers had to look the other way – not for guilt, foie gras was not on that particular restaurant’s menu that day. I confronted this couple and spoke on behalf of the customers seated by the front window. The lead protester replied, “They can sit in the back.” They eventually went on to demonstrate against the sale of regionally produced turkey at the food co-op, and were also

BY

MICHAEL PARKER

known for decrying the use of doves at a public event honoring Mahatma Gandhi. I must express some gratitude, were it not for this recent call for a pro-canard posse comitatus, I would struggle to find inspiration for this month’s column about food and wine. Let’s match it up!

Foie Gras –

It’s hard to go wrong for a match with the gorgeous texture and luxurious flavor of the liver of a goose fattened via gavage. Simply keep in mind the preparation. The traditional match is Sauternes, so there exist countless late-harvest white wines as alternatives. Sweet white is best when the preparation includes fruit. Infused or blended with black truffle and simply seared, the way I like it, opens the door for reds ranging from Cabernet Sauvignon to fuller-bodied red Rhone blends.

Ikizukuri – Translation: “prepared alive,”

and served that way, wigglin’ like Jell-o from a mold. It’s a fish (sometimes a cephalopod or crustacean), so of course just about any white wine will do. Since you have to fly to Japan for it, consider a local fruit-infused sake. Always support local when you can.

Ortalan Bunting – Known for a combi-

nation of flavors, the result of blinding the bird to trick it into feeding around the clock, the resulting fat, the drowning of the bird in Armagnac, roasting, and then eating whole

Great values & styles FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

32 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

while hiding from God under a napkin, a correct match here is important. The bones still crunch, and offer up a hazelnut-like flavor, add fig, brandy, the salty taste of your own blood (Eating the bones, remember? Don’t worry, it’s just a little prick.) The rest of the flavor will make you think a gamey version of foie gras. Bold red. I’m thinking Nebbiolo.

Shark fin soup – This simple recipe

of chicken stock, scallions, spices, and fin boiled until tender. However, pairing wines with soups is often tricky. In this case, I would go for a California or New Zealand Pinot Noir, or perhaps a Chenin Blanc. The impression of sweetness would enhance the taste of the meat.

Horse – Best described as a taste between

beef and venison, there is a sweet note to it. I say pair it with old vine Zinfandel or red Rhone blends. Served raw, as they do in Parma, Italy, a horse tartar called pesto di cavallo, the recommended wine is Barbera or estate-bottled Beaujolais.

Wild Beluga caviar – The visual leads

even the novice to the obvious match: Champagne. Bubbles love bubbles, but that is not the only reason for the pairing. Sparkling wine goes with salt, spices, and practically all textures. If the caviar is being served as a garnish, then the food it is set to enhance will have to determine the wine.

Girl Scout Cookies –

It’s the palm oil we have to deal with here, that is until the Girl Scouts put on their biggirl britches and choose to abandon this rainforest-depleting ingredient. Across the selection, and especially with the Do-Si-Dos, the choice is Port.


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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH

Kelly Fain

Marketing Manager of the French Broad Food Co-op

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ince 1975, the French Broad Food Co-op has been with the Asheville area. From its early beginnings as a buying club between families down by the French Broad River, to its current location on Broadway in downtown Asheville, the co-op is supplied as much as possible by local products and held together by the community. Kelly Fain, the marketing manager, sat down with Rapid River Magazine to tell us more about this unique store.

Rapid River Magazine: What exactly is the French Broad Food Co-op all about?

Kelly Fain: The French Broad Food

Co-op is a cooperative, which means we are owned by the community, by

INTERVIEWED BY

MARISSA WHITAKER people who work here, and shop here. You don’t have to be an owner to shop here, but we welcome people to join and become owners to help support us. Other than that, we’re like any other natural foods grocery store only very, very localized. We’re a member of a larger cooperative that is called the National Cooperative Grocers Association. This allows us to have a greater buying power, so that allows us to keep pricing really competitive. One thing that we focus on is our Triple Bottom Line. We have a fiscal responsibility to keep the co-op going, we strive to stay in business, and being profitable so we can share the profit back with our owners and then we balance this with an extreme concern for the community and environment.

RRM: What sort of programs allows FBFC to maintain these responsibilities?

KF: All of our utensils at the 100%

Organic Salad Bar are compostable.

Photo: Marissa Whitaker

We have a cooking-oil recycling program and the Asheville Recyclery is located in the basement under the store. It helps people get their bikes working for better transportation. We are also big proponents of the nonGMO movement. You’ll notice labels on certified non-GMO products. ‘Kelly Fain’ continued on page 35

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Let Us Cater Your Next Event! • Paninis • Salads • Soups • Desserts • Seasonal Drinks

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20 Church Street, Waynesville 828-452-6000

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local favorites October 2012

Artists & Artisans

‘Kelly Fain’ continued from page 33

Finally, one of our newer things is a company called Field Day. It’s only available to co-ops, it’s 65% sourced from the United States, 97% certified GMO-free, and very, very affordable. They make just about everything. It appeals to people on fixed incomes or don’t have a lot to spend but want to eat well. Field Day allows consumers to save money and not shell out $3 for a small can of something.

RRM: So, your supplies? How much is local, how would a shopper know what’s what?

KF: We definitely do as much local as we

possibly can. If you walk into our produce room, you can see that everything is marked local that is local. We have a big board that tells what just came in, what farm it’s from. We have a lot of local products throughout the store. For things we can’t source locally, we get from the National Cooperative.

RRM: What is

FBFC doing different from other co-ops or natural food stores?

KF: There’s a

couple ways we’re different, one ultimately being the localization. Another, is we’re the only cooperatively owned grocery downtown. We have the largest bulk herbs collection in the whole southeast. So if you’re cooking and you need one vanilla bean, you can come here and get one vanilla bean. Or you need one teaspoon of activated charcoal to give to your dog, we have that. The farmer’s market is in it’s 25th or 26th year now. It’s one of the longest running farmer’s markets in Asheville. This year the market features Pisgah View Peace Gardens and the Bountiful Cities Project.

RRM: What does it take to become an owner and what are some of the benefits?

KF: Most people pay $25 per year, and after

you’ve paid $250 you’re considered a lifetime owner and you never have to pay more. Being a lifetime owner allows you to vote in elections for our board members, and you get deals on 200 to 300 items that will mark prices down by 20% to 30%. When you are an owner on any level, you get discounts and a patronage rebate. The patronage rebate is a program that cuts owners a check for being a shopper here based on the profits from the products sold the previous year. When you’re an owner, you’re allowed to volunteer in the store and you get a discount for every hour you work. If you order a case of something, there’s

Profiles of Area Artists

Reserve Space Today! Call for Reduced Ad Rates Web Banners (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Photos: Marissa Whitaker

a discount. We have discount days. Five percent off on the fifth of every month, and every quarter we have a customer appreciation day with 10% off.

RRM: Describe your role at FBFC and how you started down the co-op path.

KF: Currently, I am the Marketing Manager.

I do our advertizing, our newsletter, website, facebook page, and twitter. But in this co-op, lots of different people wear lots of different hats, so, I could very easily be working the register one day. I also go to events and talk about what’s going on at FBFC. Part of my job is to go out and educate the community about what exactly a cooperative is and why it’s important to buy local. On Wednesdays, I help manage the farmer’s market in our parking lot. I started out working as an editor for a local newspaper, but I’ve always been a huge supporter of organic foods. I was a small-scale farmer/ grower, myself and just really got passionate about the co-op idea.

RRM: What would you say is your favorite thing about this job?

KF: Gosh, you know, I’ve worked for co-ops

for the past ten years and what I love is the business model. I really believe in it. It’s a way to have an active economic participation in my community, but in a way that’s not exploitive of anybody at all. Everything is fair trade or direct trade. It allows me to have a job in food – which I love – and I can really feel good about it. Because we are owned by the community, so much of the money we make goes right back into the community. It goes to our employees, the patronage rebate, the owners, and allows us to keep this area economically viable and keep our farmland, farmland. All that is really important. The French Broad Food Co-op is a lively place full of people who want to help the average, everyday person live healthy and happy. The members are passionate about what they do and come to know each other on a first-name basis.

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week Reach Kelly Fain at her email marketing@ frenchbroadfood.coop or call the store at (828) 255-7650. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays.

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50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 35


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green living The Evolution of a Great

i am choosing ...

green

www.southerngreenlivingexpo.com

September 14-16, 2012 U.S. Cellular Center 87 Haywood Street Asheville, NC /southerngreenliving Save $1.00 on admission with this ad

T

GREEN EXPO

he inaugural Southern Green Living Expo — to be held September 14, 15 and 16, 2012, at downtown Asheville’s civic center — promises to be a true evolution of a wellloved, highly attended, annual, sustainable living but now-defunct event, formerly known as the Southern Energy and Environment Expo, which was founded in 2001 by green advocate Ned Ryan Doyle. “After 10 years of doing the SEE Expo, it crossed my mind that I had to sit down, pour a stiff drink, and think about it for a year,” said Ned Doyle in an exclusive telephone interview with Rapid River Magazine’s contributing editor Byron Belzak. Doyle explained that SEE Expo’s attendance had leveled off to 8,000 each year. “We were pretty much just singing to the choir,” he said, referring to the fact that the vast majority of attendees already understood the message of green was good. “I knew we had to change,” continued Doyle, but confessed he wasn’t certain in what direction.

In the wake of closing SEE Expo in 2010, what occurred was a heavy dose of reality and unification between a charismatic green spokesman in Ned Doyle, who brought along his army of loyal exhibitors and expert lecturers, and a rising-star event organizer and promoter in Tim Alexander of Peak Productions, who brought his payroll, organization and expertise to bear. The union resulted in an all-new, sustainable living expo to educate and promote the latest in green technology and understanding. The new event is being held in a new location and is more focused on the message of green economics.

BY

BYRON BELZAK

dance of 12,000 to 15,000 is anticipated, he said, and as of late August 2012, new exhibitors are signing up at an increasingly fast rate. Doyle said upwards of 200 exhibitors are expected to complement the scores of informative seminars. “We had 80 groups wanting to conduct workshops at this green living expo, and we chose 48 of the best, the crème de la crème, to participate.” To reinforce the theme of “green for everyone,” Doyle explained that the Southern Green Living Expo is sponsoring a number of free events to be held outside the front door of the U.S. Cellular Center, formerly known as the Asheville Civic Center. He said this will include free cooking oil collection, a free electronics’ recycling center (although it will exclude old televisions), and free test-drives of the latest electric vehicles. Discounted tickets are now available online to reach the largest audience, said Doyle. By visiting the new expo’s website at www.southerngreenlivingexpo.com, the public can print a $1-off coupon. Furthermore, online ordering of discount tickets is also available: 10 tickets for $50, and 25 tickets for $100 allows the informed to afford in bringing their not-so-green friends.

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MOUNTAIN AREA INFORMATION NETWORK T h e C o m m u n i t y N e t w o r k o f We s t e r n N o r t h C a r o l i n a www.main.nc.us

36 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

“This new expo, the Southern Green Living Expo, is cast in an economic sense that everyone can understand,” said co-organizer Ned Ryan Doyle. “It is all about practical ways in which the general public can save money – and make money – by going green.” While he admits having mixed feelings and deep regrets about shutting down his brainchild and labor of love in 2010, he is pleased that the newly reconstituted green expo will be even more successful. Atten-

This All-New Southern Green Living Expo Offers Great Promise “This green event stands to be this year’s largest economic, energy and environment expo in the Southeast,” said Ned Doyle. “And without a doubt, it will house everyone who wants to attend or exhibit.” ‘Green Expo’ continued on page 37


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healthy lifestyles What Was My Doctor Thinking!?

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larice, good to see you again. Welcome back.” Dr. Wilson pulled up his roll-around stool to the edge of the exam table and patted Clarice’s hand. “What can I do for you today?” [How long since I saw this patient?] “Actually, I just needed a refill on my blood pressure prescription.” Clarice checked her watch. “But your nurse wouldn’t okay the refill ‘til I came in to see you.” “Well, I haven’t seen you in... how long were you in Vermont?” Dr. Wilson flipped through the medical record in his hand. “You’ve been gone four years. [Nurse’s note: BP=185/100. When did you get the diagnosis of hypertension? That’s not on my disease list.] How’d you know you have hypertension?” “Oh, I was having headaches after Cal died – and dizzy spells. A nurse in the mall took my blood pressure, said it was high. So I saw a local physician who said I needed medication for my high blood pressure.” She shrugged. “He never did anything for my headaches. Went away on their own, I guess.” [Wow! Potential stroke? Carotid artery problems? Cerebral aneurysm? Aortic valve disease? What else is hiding here?] “So you’ve been taking the medicine regularly?” he said, writing himself notes as to how he would find the answers to all the questions that were coming to his mind.

“Oh, yeah, whenever I remember.” She shrugged. “I always know when I haven’t been taking it – because the headaches come back.” She checked her watch again. “Can I just get the prescription?” “Of course.” Dr. Wilson looked into her face, smiling his empathy, hiding his anxiety about the unknown disasters lurking in the wings. He uncoiled his stethoscope from around his neck. “Tell me, what kind of tests did the doctor in Vermont do?” he asked as he listened to her heart, then listened over each carotid artery. [No murmurs in the aortic valve; no bruits over the carotid arteries.] “He listened to my heart, took my blood pressure, drew my blood – stuff that doctors always do.” She resisted slightly, then relaxed as Dr. Wilson palpated both of her wrists simultaneously for pulses, then raised her arms above her head and put them down again. “I don’t know. I never heard about any of the results.” [Pulses are equal in both arms; no water hammer pulses. Looking for cardiac stress enzymes? Possibly a pheo? Hyperthyroid? Did he do a stress echo?] Could I get you to sign a release so that I can send for your records?” “Oh, sure. I’ve got his address somewhere on a card.” She rummaged through her purse, then looked up. “Am I going to get my prescription today? The headaches are back and I really need it.”

‘Green Expo’ continued from page 36

Carolina and beyond. His and Tim Alexander’s great green new venture promises to be one of the nation’s most highly evolved sustainable living expos, and well worth adding to everyone’s green bucket list.

Practical ways the general public can save money – and make money – by going green. He added, “The event is not political; it is focused on green economics, although we couldn’t deny The Green Party from setting up a table. After all, they do have the right name, and besides, we’ve rented the entire U.S. Cellular civic center in downtown Asheville, plus there’s plenty of parking right next door in the city’s civic center parking garage. So there’s no excuse not to come.” Truly. Kudos to Ned Doyle for finishing his stiff drink and continuing on his life’s mission of bringing a greener lifestyle to Western North

Copyright 2012 MediaBear

www.southerngreenlivingexpo.com

IF YOU The Southern Green Living GO Expo. The latest green

products and 48 new, onehour, green living seminars over the three-day expo produced by Peak Productions. September 14-16 at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville’s civic center. Tickets: Adults $9 at the door; discounted tickets available online, www.southerngreenlivingexpo.com

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Potential stroke? Carotid artery problems? Cerebral aneurysm? Aortic valve disease? “Yes, we’ll get your prescription today.” He smiled through his concern. “But I need to know why you have high blood pressure; what it might be doing to you. I would like my nurse to take your blood pressure every fifteen minutes – three more times before you go. Is that alright?” [Both arms.] “Okay, whatever.” She rolled her eyes. As Clarice left the waiting room with her daughter, she said, “He was hardly in the room five minutes. Just wanted to bill me for sending for my old records and for his nurse taking my blood pressure. Except for the money, I don’t think he even noticed me. I don’t know what he was thinking.”

TEDxAsheville NOVEMBER 4

Tickets for the 2012 TEDxAsheville Conference “The Edge” are on sale now for $37. This special price will only be available until October 4. After October 5 tickets will be $47. This year’s event will be held at the Diana Wortham Theater on November 4. The first three speakers have been selected. Grammy nominee Casey Driessen, an Asheville-based fiddle virtuoso, takes the audience to the edge of musical possibility, mixing traditional sounds with modern technology to create a new sound all his own. Interfaith minister and healer Anne Heck brings the audience to the edge of one woman’s body and soul with her personal story of healing, redemption, and transformation, after surviving a brutal assault that made national headlines. TIME Magazine science editor Jeffrey Kluger, returns to take us to the edge of human aspiration—and to the new edge of our species’ future—as he addresses space travel as the next step in human destiny. Attendees are encouraged to purchase tickets early as seats are limited and the event is expected to sell out. Visit www.tedxasheville.com for more information.

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what to do guide Monday, September 3

Free Labor Day Concert Members of the Asheville Symphony Orchestra will perform on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Stage in Pack Square Park. The 90 minute concert will be conducted by Daniel Meyer beginning at 7 p.m. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket. In case of rain the concert will be held in the U.S. Cellular Center’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Call (828) 254-7046 or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.

September 3 - October 7

Let Color Be Itself An installation by Rena Ruark Lindstrom. At the end of the exhibition, the panels will be distributed freely. On display September 3 through October 7 at West End Bakery, 757 Haywood Road Asheville, NC. (828) 606-7597.

The Blue Ridge Orchestra Chamber Players Two performances commemorating those who died on 9-11-2001 and honoring the survivors and rescuers. Free to the public.

Sunday, September 9 at 4 p.m., St. Giles Chapel, Deerfield.

Tuesday, September 11 at 7:30

p.m., Unitarian Universalist Church, Charlotte St., Asheville.

www.blueridgeorchestra.org (828) 230-1760 will be held from 6-9 p.m. at Gallery 86, 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville. For more information visit www. haywoodarts.org.

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Friday, September 7

Appalachian Pastel Society Meeting/ Workshop

Sahar Fakhoury – Journeys Opening reception 5:30 to 8 p.m. On display through Sunday, September 30, 2012. 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Friday, September 7

Piercing the Mundane “The Women of NoHa” on display through Saturday, September 22, attempts to bring to light that which is often overlooked. An artists reception

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Meeting from 10 to noon with a free demonstration of using pastels to Dairy Farmer create paintings of by Walter Stanford. landscapes, florals, animals, and fantasy by illustrator Walter Stanford. For more information visit www.appalachianpastelsociety. org or call Miriam Hughes at (610) 389-0058.

Saturday, September 8

5th Annual Apple Fest Fundraiser From 1-5 p.m. in the Hickory Nut Forest Eco-Community organic apple orchard on Rt. 74A in Gerton/Bat Cave, NC. $3 donation per car, $2 per bag of apples. Apple picking, apple bobbing, apple cider pressing and more. For details visit www.HickoryNutForest.com or www.LaughingWatersNC.com.

Saturday, September 8

The Unknown Horowitz AAPF presents The Unknown Horowitz: New Insights into the Man and His Music. First Baptist Church Vladimir Crocker Auditorium, 5 Horowitz Oak Street, Asheville. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Free and open to the public. www.ashevillepiano.org

Sunday, September 9

Great Performances Party Hosted by the Asheville Lyric Opera Guild from 4-6 p.m. at Posano Cafe, 1 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. Watch great opera. Cash bar, free hors d’oeuvres, $20. RSVP (828) 669-1139 or visit www.sprawls.org/aloguild

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Pan Harmonia: Trios with a Twist

Symphonie Fantastique

Wednesday, September 12

Horizons – Past and Present Exhibition of photographs by Jon Michael Riley. Reception from 5-6:30 p.m. On display through September 28, at Blowers Gallery in UNC Asheville’s Ramsey Library. Info: (828) 251-6436.

September 13-15

Stand-Up Comic Nick Thune Nick’s absurdest view and deadpan wit combined with the soothing lull of his guitar. Tickets $15. At the Altamont theatre, 18 Church St., downtown Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

Saturday, Friday, September 14

Kathy Mattea Grammy-winning singer Kathy Mattea and her band; CD release concert for Calling Me Home. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Call (828) 257-4530 or purchase at www.dwtheatre.com.

September 14-16

The Southern Green Living Expo The latest green products and 48 new, one-hour, green living seminars. At the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $9 at the door. Discounted tickets available at www. southerngreenlivingexpo.com.

September 14-15

Celebrating a Decade of Quilting 10th Annual Ashe County Piecemakers Quilt Guild Quilt Fair, ’Our Journey: Celebrating a Decade of Quilting’. Friday, 10-6; Saturday, 10-4. Judged Quilt display, Vendor Village, Small Quilt Silent Auction. Jefferson Station, 20 East Ashe Street, West Jefferson, NC. Visit www.ashequilters.org

September 14-16

Mountain Heritage Pow Wow Friday 8 to 8; Saturday 9 to 8; Sunday 10 to 5. Luck-of-the-Draw Dance Competitions; Registration $5. Admission: Adults $5; Children $2. At the new Mountain Heritage Expo Center, Micaville Loop, off 19E between Burnsville and Spruce Pine, NC. Visit www.blueridgepowwows.org

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Guitarist Amy Brucksch and flutist Kate Steinbeck perform with Scottish Amy Brucksch, bassoonist Rosalind Kate Steinbeck Buda. Tickets: $12 in advance, www.pan-harmonia.org; $15 at the door. 5 p.m. at the Altamont Theater, 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

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The Asheville Symphony Orchestra begins its 52nd season at 8 p.m., at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. The concert will be conducted by Daniel Meyer, and feature the world-renowned violinist Chee-Yun. Tickets are available at the US Cellular Center box office, and range in price from $58 to $20. Visit www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046 for more details.

Saturday, September 15

Anything Goes – Everything Shows Mail art exhibit opening reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Courtyard Gallery, in the Phil Mechanic Building, 109 Roberts St., Asheville. Visit www. ashevillecourtyard.com.

Saturday, September 15

Art in Autumn One of the premier juried art festivals in the Southeast. 110+ artists working in basketry, clay, digital Jen art, drawing, fiber, glass, Swearington jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and wood. Free admission and parking. The show opens at 10 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m. Downtown Weaverville, www. artinautumn.com

September 15-16

32nd Annual Heritage Weekend This free festival features traditional music, dancing and heritage craft demonstrations. Saturday 10-4, Sunday 12-5 at the Folk Art Center, Milepost 382 off the Blue Ridge Parkway, Asheville, NC.

September 15 - October 13

M.I.L.F. The Musical A Family Friendly Tale of Inappropriate Love. Tickets $13/16 available at The Magnetic Field, 372 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District, www. themagneticfield.com.

Sunday, September 16

Car Wash, Car Show, and Cookout Blue Ridge Rollergirls work to raise money for league travel and costs. From 11-3 p.m. at Green River Auto, 1935 Spartanburg Hwy., Hendersonville, NC. Donations accepted!

Tuesday, September 18

Junior Appalachian Musicians Old-time mountain music lessons for children in 4th grade and older. $90 for the school year. Student registration

from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at Canton Middle School, 60 Penland Street, Canton, NC. Contact Kay S. Miller at (828) 452-0593 or info@haywoodarts.org.

Tuesday, September 18

Asheville Quilt Guild Meeting Art Quilter Frieda Anderson talks about using “Fun Fast Fusing” as a technique in creating quilts,10 a.m. at the Folk Art Center, Blue Ridge Parkway, Milepost 382, www.ashevillequiltguild.org

Wednesday, September 19

Fundraiser for Learning Disabled Adults Open Hearts Arts Center Student Talent Show funds mobile art classes for learning disabled adults. From 6:30-10 p.m. at Highland Brewing Company, 12 Old Charlotte Hwy., Asheville, NC.

Friday, September 21

Asheville Chamber Music Series Cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han perform at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place at Charlotte Street. Tickets are $35, students admitted free of charge. To purchase tickets or for more information call Nathan Shirley at (828) 259-3626 or visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org.

September 22

Haywood’s Got Talent II The second annual showcase of area talent with a $1000 top prize. The finals take place at 7:30 p.m. The event is a fund raiser for HART. At the Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville, NC. Visit www.harttheatre.com

Saturday, September 22

The Jubilee! Summer Orchestra Echo Cooperative presents Grammy nominated members of the Baltimore Consort at 3 p.m. Mindy Rosenfeld, Flute; Ronn McFarlane, Lute. Jubilee Community, 46 Wall St. in Asheville. Visit www.fluteandlute.com

September 22-23

Henderson County Studio Tour A free self-guided tour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Explore more than 40 studios. Painters, sculptors, potters, jewelers, weavers, woodworkers, and glass artists in Henderson County. More details online, www.OpenStudioTourofHC.org

September 22-23

French Broad Fall Fest In Hot Springs where the French Broad River meets the Appalachian Trail. Features 12+ area breweries and music. $75 ticket includes a 5oz. souvenir glass, unlimited beer samplings, camping, and music. $60 for music and

SEPTEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1


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September 28-30 Scholars and artists present workshops related to the ideas of Buckminster Fuller.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

camping only (no beer sampling). Tickets at www.FrenchBroadFallFest.com

AAPF 12th Fall Benefit Concert

way experience wanted. Volunteer for the October 25 juried fashion show to be held at the Asheville Art Museum.

Artists Wanted – Artspace Fine Contemporary Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Color your Life... with Quilts! Juried show of over 200 quilts. $7,000+ in prize money. 20+ vendors. Demonstrations by nationally known quilters. Gift shop. WNC Ag Center. Info: katie@ winchell.us., call (828) 298-2560, or www.ashevillequiltguild.org/show.html.

Monday Evenings

Writing as Art & Editing Workshop

Design Science Day Dragin

by Michael Cole

Wayne Drumheller and Erika Nafziger offer writing workshops on Monday evenings. September 10, September 24, October 15, November 5, and November 12 at 5:30-7 p.m. Workshops are free and take place at Better Days Coffee Shop, 102 College Station Drive in Brevard, NC. Call (828) 877-5133 for details.

October 1

Two Exhibitions Open at Crimson Laurel Gallery

Saturday, September 29

Mountain Heritage Day

“Veil” features the work of Marshall, NC ceramic artist Matt Kelleher. “Stories by Hand” will feature the works of ceramic artist Jenny Mendes, Jenny Mendes and Marshall, NC ceramic artist Shoko Teruyama. Crimson Laurel Gallery, 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC 28705. (828) 688-3599.

Western Carolina University’s annual fall festival of traditional Appalachian folklife is held on the WCU campus in Cullowhee, NC. Over 100 fine arts and crafts booths, three stages of live music and dance, Cherokee stickball games, and shape-note singing. Details at www. mountainheritageday.com

Thursday, October 4

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Playwrights may submit their new full-length plays and musicals to SART’s 32nd annual playwrights’ competition through September 30. Submissions are only accepted through the U.S. Postal Service. Guidelines for submission at www. sartplays.org. Email scriptfest@ mhc.edu for more details. Do not email submissions!

Craft Exhibition. Deadline: October 4, 2012. Entry Fee: $25. Submit entries via www.callforentry.org. Only entries submitted through the website will be accepted. Artspace, 201 East Davie Street, Raleigh, NC 27601. HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville, NC. For more details on these events visit www.handmadeinamerica.org

Saturday, September 29

ScriptFEST

More details at www.blackmountaincollege.org.

Models Wanted – Professional models with run-

In memory of Paul Thorpe, and benefiting Piano Study for Local Students. 18 AAPF pianists play classics and jazz. 3 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. For tickets call the Box Office (828) 2574530. www.ashevillepiano.org

This all-ages event takes place on the UNC Asheville Quad and will feature an experiential program of activities inspired by Buckminster Fuller’s “Big Ideas.” Free and open to the public. Details at www.blackmountaincollege.org.

Buckminster Fuller at Black Mountain College, 1949. Photo: Kenneth Snelson

$15 for BMC Museum + Arts Center members and students w/ID. $50 for non-members. Free for UNCA students, faculty, and staff.

Artist Opportunites

Sunday, September 23

30th Annual Asheville Quilt Show

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Come take in amazing local art and natural beauty at 23 Chestnut Forest Rd. This 3400 square foot home offers amazing views, gorgeous finishes and a heated 2200 square foot shop and artist studio.

September 28-30

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For more information contact The Matt & Molly Team by e-mailing info@TheMattAndMollyTeam. com or by calling (828) 210-1697.

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Paintings by Brennen McElhaney Opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Gallery at Studio B, 171 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville. For more details visit www.galleryatstudiob.com or call (828) 225-5200.

October 5 & 6

La Traviata

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

Asheville Lyric Opera presents Giuseppi Verdi’s tale of love and redemption, starring Soprano Elizabeth Caballero. 8 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets at (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com. For more details call (828) 236-0670, or visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 39


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find it here ArtEtude Gallery www.ArtetudeGallery.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

R Bruce Brennan Fine Art RBruceBrennanFineArt.com

Asheville Area Arts Council www.ashevillearts.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

Sanctuary of Stuff www.sanctuaryofstuff.com

Asheville Art Supply (828) 231-3440

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Double Exposure Giclee Fine Art Printmaking www.doubleexposureart.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

Asheville Lyric Opera www.ashevillelyric.org

Broken Road Studio (828) 989-5464

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Beads and Beyond (828) 254-7927

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

Studio B www.galleryatstudiob.com

The Matt & Molly Team

www.themattandmollyteam.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmphippsdesigns.com

Michael Hofman www.livelifeartfully.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

Mountain View Appliance

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248 Foundry www.digfoundry.com Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery 86 www.haywoodarts.org Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Mr Frogs Soul & Creole Kitchen www.mrfrogs.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Henderson County Studio tour www.openstudiotourhc.com

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Jeff Pittman Art www.jeffpittman.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

P.H. Best Fine Art www.mountainbrushworks.com

Jonas Gerard www.jonasgerard.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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outdoor fun and adventure Wildwater Outdoor Adventures Family Offering Outdoor Adventures Brings the “Next Big Thing” to Asheville

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n 1971, when my family started Wildwater, the first whitewater rafting outfitter in the Southeast, little did we realize our company would be known as trendsetters in outdoor recreation. Not only did my parents start a company that would launch the whitewater industry in this part of the country (now with rafting on four rivers in three states), Wildwater went on to develop the first Raft & Rail attraction in the U.S. and the first yurt resort in the Southeast. With a history of setting trends and leading the Southeast into the “next big thing,” we also were one the first companies in the Southeast to offer commercial zipline canopy tours. Growing up around the family business, I too was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug. But instead of looking for more water, I started looking up at the trees and with my wife started Nantahala Gorge Canopy Tours. We now offer canopy tours at all four

of Wildwater’s rafting locations. We also built Asheville Zipline Canopy Adventures — the region’s first urban zipline course, offering vistas of the downtown Asheville skyline combined with flying through 150-year-old trees. While canopy tours have become one of the hottest trends in outdoor adventures in the U.S., we’re already working on the “next big thing”: the first full-scale treetop adventure facility in Asheville and North Carolina. Asheville Treetops Adventure Park, currently under construction and scheduled to open October 1, will be sort of like a jungle gym in the trees, with 50 challenge elements. This will be an outdoor adventure like none you’ve ever experienced before and we’re thrilled to bring it to the area. Our adventure park will provide yet another great way to enjoy the beauty and excitement of Asheville.

PG. 40

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BY JEFF

GREINER

Best Selection of Bikes & Accessories in Western North Carolina. Top-Notch Service Dept.

1378 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-274-2453 libertybikes.com WNC’s Favorite Bicycle Shop!

32 Years of Supporting and Promoting Bicycling in Western North Carolina! Jeff Greiner

Tune in next month to learn more! Jeff Greiner, of Asheville, has been in the outdoor adventure business since the age of 9 when he helped his parents with their whitewater rafting business, Wildwater, which now offers outdoor adventures at the Nantahala, Pigeon, Chattooga and Ocoee rivers with three generations active in the business serving tens of thousands of guests. Today he is Vice President with the company and also co-owns a sister business offering zipline canopy tours in five locations. He is a board member of America Outdoors Association. Reservations are required. Contact Wildwater at 1-866-3198870 or book your adventure online at www.wildwater.info

Guided Fly Fishing Trips

Beginners Welcome! All you need to do is show up. All gear is

provided. Our guides are excellent at casting instructions, relaying fishing techniques, and teaching basics or stream biology. If you have ever wanted to try fly fishing, this is where to start. Call for trip pricing.

Waynesville Fly Shop 178 Waynesville Plaza • 828-246-0306 PG. 40

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www.waynesvilleflyshop.com

Share the Road

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hat does it mean to “Share the Road,” from the driver’s perspective? First, realize you are driving a deadly or maiming vehicle if crashing with a pedestrian or bicyclist. Drivers must come to a complete stop at red lights before turning right and look carefully for pedestrians and bicyclists. Always look to your right before moving, as pedestrians and wrong way bicyclists come from the right. Always yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk whether it is painted on the roads or not, even if no sign tells you to do so. It is the law. Always yield to a bicyclist who is traveling straight when you are turning. They are a vehicle and have the same rights to use the road. When parking on the street, always look before opening your car door to avoid hitting a bicyclist. Lastly, avoid distractions. It only takes a moment for a situation to turn ugly.

Web Exclusive Visit our website for links to upcoming cycling events.

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 16, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2012 41


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shop talk Rescued Furniture at Artists’ Co-Op

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inda Twomey says that her work with rescued furniture “began when a charming piece that had seen better days asked her to revive it. A connection with the object developed into a relationship as she repaired the surfaces for transformation. She used her favorite methods and mediums to breathe new life into the former relic, and over the years, hobby turned into passion.” So Linda Twomey became Speak 2ME. She rarely uses the same decorative technique twice, but the viewer can find many of her favorite themes: quilt patterns, fabric-lined drawers, metallic accents, stencils, and mosaics, adorning the objects. You are invited to visit the Main Street Artists’ Co-Op to see 2Me’s selection of “artistically revived furniture” at 93 N. Main Street in downtown Waynesville, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

PG. 40

NE

The Finest Assortment of Chocolates. Over 30 Kinds of Truffles. Special Orders & Shipping Available.

“not your ordinary...confectionary”

170 North Main Street Waynesville, NC PG. 40

PA

42 September 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 1

PG. 40

WC

828.452.6844


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Henderson County Sat & Sun • Sept 22-23 10am-5pm Preview Party

Friday, Sept 21, 5-7 Hubba Hubba Smokehouse Little Rainbow Row, Flat Rock, NC Tour discount coupons • Examples of Tour Art • Free music & wine Food available • Benefit art raffle

STUDIO TOUR a self-guided tour featuring over 40 artists painters, sculptors, potters, jewelers, fiber artists & more Sponsored by The Art League of Henderson County

Guidebook with map available locally and at www.OpenStudioTourHC.com

September 2012 issue  
September 2012 issue  

Magnetic Theatre-MILF..p3; NC Stage-R. Buckminster Fuller..p6; Asheville Lyric Opera-La Traviata..p4; Asheville Area Piano Forum..p6; Ashevi...

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