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Jack of Hearts and 12 other galleries and businesses host our Magic of the Smokies fine art competition. PAGE 3 The working studios and galleries of the River Arts District Artists open to the public June 9-10 during the annual Studio Stroll. PAGE 9

PLUS INTERVIEWS WITH: Brian Lee Knopp, the man behind Naked Came the Leaf Peeper. PAGE 7 Sheri Kahn, Executive Director of the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas. PAGE 20 Alisa Lumbreras, instructor and artist at the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas. PAGE 21 Tim Arem, the creator of Asheville’s new Father’s Day Festival. PAGE 15


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investing in the souls of our city

Creatures Café Alcohol-Free Music Venue and Café

Waynesville Fly Shop PG.

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• Awesome Desserts • Delicious Snacks • 23 Bottled Sodas • Mocktails • Full Espresso Bar

Rapid River Magazine’s Top 10 Tuesday-Thursday 5:30pm-12am Friday & Saturday 5:30pm-3am

81 Patton Avenue Downtown Asheville 828-254-3636

• Live Entertainment • Amazing Desserts • Inspiring Art Gallery

www.creaturescafe.com 2 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

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Art Reception

June 16 ✮ 5-8:30pm • Vote for your favorite piece of art. • Silent Art Auction benefitting Friends of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. • Learn everything you ever wanted to know about fly fishing! Catering by Maria’s Mexican Pueblo

178 Waynesville Plaza Across from Fat Buddy’s Restaurant • 828-246-0306


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rapid river exhibits The NEW Taste of Opera – June 9

RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S ARTISTS RECEPTIONS

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Saturday, June 9 - Taste of Opera, Crowne Plaza Resort. Reception 5:30-9 p.m.

Friday, June 15 - Daniel McClendon Fine Art Gallery. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through June 27.

Saturday, June 16 - Waynesville Fly Shop. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through June 20.

Friday, June 22 - Jack of Hearts,

Weaverville. Reception 5-9 p.m. On display through July 10. (pg. 4)

Friday, June 29 - Creatures Cafe, Asheville. Reception 5:30-9 p.m. On display through July 5.

Friday, July 6 - Fine Arts League of the

Carolinas. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through July 17. (pg. 20)

Friday, July 13 - Gallery 262, Waynesville. Reception 6-9 p.m. On display through July 31.

Friday, July 20 - Riverside Studios, West

Asheville. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 7.

Friday, August 3 - Studio B, North

Asheville. Reception 5:30-8 p.m. On display through August 16. (pg. 30)

Friday, August 10 - VanDyke Gallery,

Asheville. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 28.

Friday, August 17 - Frame It To-a-T, South Asheville. Reception 5:30-8:30 p.m. On display through August 23.

Saturday, August 25 - Great Smokies

Creations, Waynesville. Reception 2-5 p.m. On display through September 4.

Thursday, September 6 - Neo Cantina

Awards Party, Biltmore Village. Reception 5:30-9:30 p.m. On display through September 17.

Daniel McClendon Art Gallery Hosts “Magic of the Smokies” June 15

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aniel McClendon is a local artist known for his paintings that defy a genre. His energetic meshing of illustration and painting, abstraction and realism, and color and texture showcase the process—specifically his own unique process—by focusing on areas of varying development. Paired with animal imagery his unique technique creates a dynamic and engaging aesthetic. Daniel and his wife have Daniel McClendon Fine Art Gallery renovated and just recently opened a new, 5,000 sq. ft. studio and gallery, The Lift Studios, in the heart Daniel’s work can be seen online at www.danielmcclendon.com of Asheville’s River Arts District. The The Lift Studios, 349 Depot Street converted 1907 Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. warehouse functions as his work-space as well as a gallery to display the work. It’s an intimate and IF unique experience YOU Reception from 5-8:30 GO p.m for the “Magic of the to step inside, see Smokies” art competition, the work in different Friday, June 15 at McClendon Fine stages of developArt Gallery, 349 Depot Street. On ment, and even talk display through June 27, 2012. to the artist himself. Daniel McClendon

sheville Lyric BY ADAM Z. BOWERS Opera continues its annual fundBohemian’s Red Stag Grill, raiser, Taste of Corner Kitchen, Cucina Opera, June 9, 24, Jack of Hearts, Jack of but with a new flair. The the Wood, Laughing Seed, event, which was previand more. Guests will be ously held at Pack Place given a scoring card so they and Diana Wortham can catalogue their favorite Theatre, is receiving a dishes for future dining makeover. Now held excursions. at the Crowne Plaza Headlining the concert Resort, guests will enter are tenor, Stephen Mark the 36,000 square footed Brown and soprano, Kathy Expo Center, surroundPyeatt. In opera, concerts ed by a beautiful veranda and recitals, Stephen Mark and lush golf greens, imAidan’s Walk by Patti Best Brown is emerging as one mersed in the exotic, yet of today’s leading tenors in local cuisine of a variety the French and Italian repertoire. His recent of restaurants. highlights include singing under the direcWhile dining on local bites, guests tion of Riccardo Muti for the opening night will taste wine and view a display of of La Scala. He made an auspicious debut visual art by some of Asheville’s best. with New York City Opera as Pinkerton in Following the food, a concert will comMadama Butterfly for which he was named mence, featuring music from ALO’s debut artist of the year. upcoming opera season, which will Mr. Brown made an internationally be unveiled throughout the evening. acclaimed European debut in the title role Restaurants include Posana, Lexington Avenue Brewery (LAB), The Grand

‘Opera’ continued on page 18

The Waynesville Fly Shop Hosts Art Reception – June 16

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he Waynesville Fly Shop will host the 2012 Rapid River Magazine’s Magic of the Smokies Art Reception. Come on out and enjoy some fabulous food, learn about fly-fishing, and vote for your favorite artist in the competition. This event will be catered by Maria’s Mexican Pueblo. Learn about flyfishing and locally guided fishing trips and tours. Experience the top entries of the Rapid River Magazine Magic of the Smokies Fine 2D Art contest. Cast a vote for your favorite artwork — help determine the people’s choice award in September, and also bid in the silent art auction. The silent auction will be held to benefit “Friends of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Here is a chance to own some wonderful art for fantastic values while also helping a good cause.

BY

RICK HILLS

Photos: Liza Becker

IF YOU Reception June 16 from 5-8:30 GO p.m for the “Magic of the Smokies”

art competition, at The Waynesville Fly Shop, 178 Waynesville Plaza (across from Fat Buddy’s Restaurant), Waynesville, NC. Phone (828) 246-0306 for details.

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 3


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fine art Fine Art Print Fair

Jack of Hearts Hosts Exhibit

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ack of Hearts is downtown Weaveron the weekends to see regional favorites ville’s neighborhood Pub & Restaurant. like “Sons of Ralph.â€? We have been very forWe’re excited to be in the old refurtunate to showcase some amazing live shows bished Firehouse and hope you’ll feel as such as “The Nighthawksâ€?, “Junior Brownâ€? at home here as and the spectacular we do. 74 year old MissisOur menu sippi Blueswoman features local bounty “Beverly Guitar and offers healthy, Watkinsâ€?. Check out high-quality, madeour monthly Music from-scratch pub fare & Events Calendar directly descended for a complete listing from the roots of of artists coming to Asheville’s own Jack Jack of Hearts in the of The Wood and near future. Laughing Seed CafĂŠ. We at Jack We offer a great selecof Hearts believe tion of draught beer, wholeheartedly in wines, whiskeys and supporting local cocktails to enjoy artists and musiwhile relaxing in our cians and are looking dining room & main forward to hosting bar, on our outdoor a reception for the deck, or catching a “Magic of the Smokgame on our side bar’s iesâ€? art competition big screen TV. on June 22nd. Stop by during Getting to Jack the week for a local of Hearts is a quick Bluegrass or Old drive from downPhoto: Liza Becker Time Jam session, or town Asheville, or

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 & SUNDAY, JUNE 24

Give your taste buds a treat at Jack of Hearts in downtown Weaverville.

points North like Marshall, Mars Hill or Burnsville. We are located at 10 South Main St. in beautiful downtown Weaverville and we have ample parking available, so come on out and give your taste buds a treat!

Jack of Hearts 10 S. Main Street, downtown Weaverville (828) 645-2700 www.jackofheartspub.com

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he Asheville Art Museum will host a premier Fine Art Print Fair on June 23 and 24, 2012. As the first event of its kind in Western North Carolina, the Asheville Art Museum Fine Art Print Fair will showcase dealers from around the United States and will appeal to both beginning collectors as well as more seasoned ones. The museum has assembled a group of highly respected dealers, who will offer visitors something for every taste or budget, from old master prints to contemporary photographs.

IF YOU Reception from 5-9 p.m. for GO the “Magic of the Smokies� art

competition, Friday, June 22, Jack of Hearts in Weaverville. On display through July 10, 2012.

Minna Citron (1896-1991), Squid Under Pier, 1948-49.

The Asheville Art Museum specializes in American Art beginning in the 20th century. Prints are an important part of the Museum’s collection and are featured prominently in our exhibitions. The museum also offers a wide array of educational programs for adult audiences including many on collecting. IF YOU Preview Reception: Friday, GO June 22, 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

1SF1BSUZt'PPE 8JOFBOE"SU$POUFTUQN 4IPXDBTF$PODFSUQNTQPOTPSFECZ 4 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

+VOF 

BU$SPXOF1MB[B3FTPSU For tickets call 828-257-4530

$35 Members; $45 nonMembers. To join us for this exclusive opportunity please call (828) 253-3227. Saturday, June 23, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free with membership or museum admission. Sunday, June 24, noon to 5 p.m. Free admission; open to the public. Asheville Art Museum, 2 South Pack Square. For more information call (828) 253-3227 or visit www. ashevilleart.org.


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we love this place Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch will launch its

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Fifteen, Number Ten

3Daniel Fine Art McClendon Art Gallery . . . .

JUNE 2012

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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Taste of Opera. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Waynesville Fly Shop . . . . . . . . 3 Jack of Hearts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Fine Art Print Fair. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Susannah Zucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Clay Day at the Folk Art Center . . . 8 River Arts District Artists . . . . . . . . . 9 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Barbara Frohmader . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Lynn Smith Stanley. . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Greg Vineyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Jeff Pittman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Janton Art Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Studio B Fine Art & Framing. . . . . 30

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Adam Z. Bowers, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Barbara Frohmader, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Rick Hills, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Amanda Leslie, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz.

6Swannanoa Performance Chamber Music Festival.. 7BrianInterviews Lee Knopp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St. Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, June 2012 Vol. 15 No. 10

13 Columns Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . .

James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. Ted Olson - Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Max Hammonds, MD - Health. . . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . .

13 14 18 16 17 23 23 33 37

24 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 28 Stage Preview Spring Awakening . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Saturday, June 30 – David Novak, preeminent teller and favorite of Asheville audience. Sherry Lovett will open at 10:30 a.m.

David Novak

Saturday, July 7 – Connie Regan Blake, a teller who has captured many of the “stories whispered by a Mountain Breeze.” Elena Diana Miller, teller extraordinaire, will open.

Saturday, July 14 – Pat Stone, spinner of Jack Tales. Teller VixiJill Glenn will open Saturday, July 21 – WNC favorite Michael Reno Harrell, with teller and Asheville Storytelling President Wallace Shealy.

The performances are free, held rain or shine. Stories begin at 10:30 a.m. at Pack Place in the Rhino Courtyard. Please enter through corridor off Biltmore Ave. at the Marble Slab Creamery. For more information visit www.packplace.org.

This I Believe – 5th Graders from Isaac Dickson Elementary School wrote and recorded sixty

essays as part of the Asheville Writers in Schools Project. Working with Janet Hurley of True Ink and Asheville Writers in the Schools, the children wrote essays on things they believe in – everything from recycling to Legos. WCQS is featuring a sampling of the essays Monday – Friday at 6:35 a.m. and again at 8:35 a.m. Audio files of all sixty essays can be found on the WCQS web site, www.wcqs.org. Additional information about Asheville Writers in the Schools, Writing to Change the World may be found at www.ashevillewritersintheschools.org.

Twilight Firefly Tour – A sure sign of summertime is the blinking of fireflies, or what some

7 Tim Arem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Sheri Kahn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Alisa Lumbreras. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

INFO

third season on June 30 with David Novak weaving his storytelling magic for the audience. This year’s theme is “Stories Whispered by a Mountain Breeze.” The gifted storytellers will be predominately sharing stories from our mountains as we celebrate the life and gifts of Ray Hicks, who is recognized as the premier mountain storyteller who did much to preserve the tradition. Hicks is honored by the National Storytelling Association with a statue in his memory in Jonesborough, Tennessee.

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call lightning bugs. On June 16 from 7:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. enjoy the magical evening forest and learn about the natural history of these fascinating insects. Park and meet at the Pink Beds Picnic Area on Hwy. 276, located next to the Cradle of Forestry. The firefly walk will be led by a naturalist from the Cradle of Forestry. The group will meet to discuss the life cycle and special features of fireflies and then take an easy, slow paced walk looking for them and exploring the surrounding forest. Please bring along a flashlight and your sense of wonder. Cost for this special evening program is $6 for adults and $3 for youth, and America the Beautiful Senior Pass holders. Rapid River Magazine is on Facebook!

“Like us” and win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Rapid River Magazine Follow us online for the latest events www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

34 What to Do Guide Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . .

Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

On the Cover: Sheri Kahn, Executive Director of the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas. Photo: Erica Mueller

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38 Shops Sanctuary of Stuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 5


THE FUTURE OF MONEY

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After writing four important books accurately forecasting the future of Gold, Oil, the Dollar and Inflation, this new CD presents Mr. Smith’s vision to prepare Americans for a global crisis never before seen in history. Call Swiss America today at 866-709-3643 for your FREE copy of our “THE FUTURE OF MONEY” CD and, as a bonus... Mr. Smith’s latest 40-page White Paper, “RE-MAKING MONEY: Ways to Restore America’s Optimistic Golden Age”

Call 866-709-3643

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performance

Preparing for a Global Currency Collapse

By PAT BOONE Our once great nation and economy are about to hit a wall!

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The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

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he Swannanoa Chamber MuPoulenc. Ooo la la! sic Festival, one of the longest After an evening in running chamber music France we travel to Italy festivals in the United States, for the fourth program. presents it’s 43rd season. We open with a delightful The five week festival will perform Quartet for Winds by Rosconcerts in Swannanoa in Kittredge sini followed by some short Theater on the Warren Wilson College string quartet pieces by campus on June 26, July 3, 10, 17 and Puccini. Next is the Suite 24, and at the Waynesville Performing from Pulcinella by StravinArts Center on June 24, July 1, 8, 15 sky arranged for woodwind and 22. All concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. quintet. What is a Russian composer For the first concert we welcome doing in an Italian program you may back the Cleveland Quartet Prize ask? The answer is that Stravinsky winning Jasper used melodies form String Quartet. The the Italian comJasper Quartet will poser Pergolesi to be joined by Inessa compose this ballet. Zaretsky on piano After a diva-like perand William Hoyt formance of the Soon horn. After whetnata by Donizetti by ting the audience’s our flutist, George appetite with a Pope accompanied delightful Haydn by Paul Nitsch on quartet we will hear piano, the Enso the World Premier Quartet will present of Pianist/Composer the rarely heard Inessa Zaretsky’s Quartet by Giuseppi Romance for Horn Verdi. Molto bene! and Piano followed For the final by the lovely Idyll program of the for Horn and String season we open with Quartet by Glazuthe Enso Quartet nov. The quartet performing the will then join Innesa rarely heard Quartet with the dynamic by Richard Strauss. Piano Quintet in F This is an early The Jasper Quartet minor by Brahms. work by Strauss and For the second concert we welhas an almost Mozart-like quality. come back flutist George Pope, oboist To compliment this work Ricardo Cynthia Watson, clarinetist David Bell Almeida will join William Hoyt with and bassoonist Lynn Hileman for a members of the Enso Quartet to wide variety of mixed chamber music. present a Mozart Divertimento for We open with a lovely baroque work Two Horns and Strings. The season by Telemann followed by the Quintet ends with the powerful and passionfor Piano and Winds by Beethoven. ate Dumky Trio by Dvorák featuring For the second half of the concert, Paul Nitsch on piano. the Jasper Quartet presents one of the We’re proud to present the finest greatest quartets written, Smetana’s in chamber music to the audiences in “From My Life.” Western North Carolina. The third concert will be an evening of French music. The Grammy winning Enso Quartet returns to offer to the audience the epitome of IF Single tickets $20; Season YOU tickets $75. For more French music, the Quartet in G minor GO by Debussy. Preceding the Debussy information call (828) the Swannanoa Chamber Players will 771-3050, e-mail chamber @warren-wilson.edu, or visit perform music by Erik Satie, Albert www.swannanoachambermusic.com. Roussel, Vincent D’Indy, and Francis

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine

Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design ~ Call (828) 646-0071 6 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

The Enso Quartet

2012 SCHEDULE Program 1 – Music of Haydn, Zaretsky, Glazunov, and Brahms. June 26-7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College June 24-7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center Program 2 – Music of Telemann, Beethoven, and Smetana, July 3-7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College July 1-7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center Program 3 – Music of Satie, Roussel, D’Indy, Poulenc, and Debussy, July 10-7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College July 8-7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center Program 4 – Music of Rossini, Puccini, Stravinsky, Donizetti, and Verdi. July 17-7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College July 15-7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center Program 5 – Music of Strauss, Mozart, and Dvorák. July 24-7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College July 22-7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center

Web Exclusives Find these articles online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Magic of the Smokies 2012 Contest Entries Erica Mueller Photo Gallery!


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noteworthy INTERVIEW WITH

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INTERVIEWED BY

Brian Lee Knopp

rian Lee Knopp spent more than a decade as a private investigator in western North Carolina, working for private clients as well as attorneys. He wrote the bestselling book Mayhem in Mayberry: Misadventures of a P.I. in Southern Appalachia, where he tells what the profession is really like on a day-to-day basis. This year he finished the serial collaborative novel, Naked Came the Leaf Peeper with 11 other authors based in or near Western North Carolina built upon a story arc brilliantly imagined in the first chapter by Knopp.

Rapid River Magazine: When did you first start writing stories? When did you know you wanted to spend your life writing?

Brian Lee Knopp: What? You don’t

know? Hell, I was the unofficial poet laureate of my elementary school; they actually made a song of my 2nd grade classic “The Bison” and made all the other grades sing it: “The Bison is tough\And very very rough/He lives on the prairie/And is hardly a fairy/One time he told me to Scram/And How I ran.” Ridiculous. The ‘60’s. You could get away something like that then. But I was always getting into trouble as a kid, anyway, and writing seemed the most creative, nonviolent way to do so and I just stuck with it.

RRM: What writers influenced you the most when you were young and who helped shape your voice? Has Elmore Leonard in anyway influenced you?

BLK: I was influenced by everybody

and everything I read. And I read everything, from Dr. Suess to Nikos Kazantzakis. I think back and wonder: who would let an impressionable 12 -year old read Zorba the Greek and eat Froot Loops at the same time? DSS should have intervened. Really, though, I think my voice was shaped mostly by listening, not by reading. I listened to people and animals and things and tried mimic them. And to the best of my recollection, I’ve never read a single Elmore Leonard work except for his chapter in Naked Came the Manatee.

RRM: When you write do you have the

story outlined completely in your head or does it unfold as you write?

DENNIS RAY

BLK: Both. I outline in my

head, I outline on paper—and yet damned if the story still doesn’t go where it wants to, anyway, heedless of my design. That’s probably why I prefer to write nonfiction, because the two processes play together better there. I get lost writing fiction; I’m the proverbial blind dog in a butcher shop; I just run amok, you know?

RRM: You are often referred

Brian Lee Knopp, the man who imagined Naked Came the Leaf Peeper, a writing project celebrating Malaprop’s 30th anniversary.

to as a southern writer. What does being a southern writer mean to you? And what does it mean now in 2012?

BLK: I am proud to be considered a

Southern writer. It is a badge of honor, and I don’t wear it lightly. I wasn’t born in the South but my consciousness was, and I’ve lived in the South since I was twelve. The South is my Muse, my Demon Lover and my Salvation—and the focus of all my favorite writings. Speaking strictly for myself, I think being a Southern writer means you identify strongly with the land and have empathy for all its creatures, human and nonhuman; it means you will take a stand on something, in defiance of all odds or consequences; it means you take your storytelling seriously, your writing even more seriously, and yourself not too seriously at all. I feel the stern corrective gaze of all great Southern writers bearing down upon me, living and dead, even as I try to answer this question. Feels like Poe’s Raven is gawking me. As for portends or possibilities of Southern writers in 2012, who could say? There are so many brilliant writers just in the WNC area alone! It’s exciting to be a part of it, and humbling, too, though when you consider your readers’ expectations are pegged to folks like Charles Frazier and Ron Rash.

RRM: What’s next in terms of your

writing? Are you working on a novel now?

BLK: Yes, I am working on a novel.

At this point all I’ll say is that Garnell Lee Ray, the little assassin/heroine of Naked Came the Leaf Peeper, will get into some more trouble. Not sure about the potato gun, though.

RRM: Tell us a little about your working habits; when do you write and for how long each day?

BLK: Uh-oh. I dread this question. I’m

pretty high-functioning ADHD, which means I write when I can, if I can, and when something doesn’t distract me. “Something” being anything—a fight between hawks and crows outside, the mystery of why goats have rectangular pupils, the smell of something baking a block away that I can’t figure out, a song from a cartoon that I heard when I was five and can’t recall all the lyrics, my dog’s interest in getting muddy somewhere. You get the idea. I’ve tried writing regimens like some folks try gym workouts. They never last. I write at this time and at this place for a month or two and I think “Look at me, I’m cookin’ with gas!” Then something comes up and then the time and place don’t work out anymore and I get demoralized because I don’t have that constancy and discipline of the better writers. So I don’t have any recognizable “habit” or “schedule” of writing. Thank God I’m a fast writer or I wouldn’t get anything done.

RRM: How did Naked Came the Leaf Peeper: A Serial Collaborative Novel come about, and what came first, the idea to do a serial collaborative novel, or the story itself?

BLK: In the spring of 2011, the owners

of Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café approached me about creating a writing project that would help celebrate the store’s upcoming 30th anniversary as well as showcase the talent of WNC writers and artists. A collaborative tourist guidebook of Asheville was mentioned, but quickly never mentioned again. Everyone realized the kind of trouble a former ‘Knopp’ continued on page 16

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 7


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fine art Ceramicist Susannah Zucker VISUAL REFLECTIONS ON TRAUMA, FORTITUDE AND RISING ABOVE

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strive to generate imagery that will circumvent automatic reaction, and draw the viewer toward a deeper sense of intensity with regards to the body. My work is anatomically driven and often involves layering of animalistic, medical and/or fetishistic overtones. This layering of elements reconfigures the bodies to signify something other than ordinary human conditions. In Life Support Support, a chapter of my recent work, the sculptures are intimate, private, and wild — they are captured moments expressive of desire for flight, power, magic and transformation.

Cycle 1 by Susannah Zucker.

The exhibition is comprised of a group of human figures and horses that appear to be disheveled carnival performers. There is evidence of both virtuosity and trauma in the bodies — bodies that tell stories of fallen angels, hospital rooms and hazy piano waltzes. The carnival, as a context for presenting imagery, has a captivating and multi-dimensional effect: it houses cultural underpinnings of virtue, conformity, disfigurement, seemliness and the haunting unknown. The sculptures in Life Support engage the viewer with this echoing multiplicity. This work incorporates an array of wing-like appendages made of bones and antlers from horse, cow, moose and elk remains. The bones hold the extensive and enigmatic histories of these giant animals; the unfathomable complexity of their lives and their deaths. The wings are a visual metaphor for how the body finds freedom, alchemy, resilience, pleasure, abandon, and release — but these decrepit bone wings also carry the ghostly implication of finding flight via death. When the bones are embedded into the figures, they offer a testament to the life of the animal, and to the more animal aspects of human nature: our instinctual desires and fascinations that often drive us in ways we cannot understand or perceive. Life Support is part of a body of personal research on the effects of trauma: how we transcend, survive and thrive when it breaks

us, and how we achieve meaning through this process. With this work, I am interested in speaking about the breaking apart. What do we learn from it? How do we learn from it? Details of Untiled by Susannah Zucker. What is generating the passions and profound strengths that so often occur when we surrender to it, and cleave to life? The sculptures, with their medical devices and boney accessories, are essentially an exploration of the idea that the trauma itself bestows the power to grow wings or cultivate liberation.

Gallery Talks Saturday, June 9 from 12 to 1:30 p.m., during the River Arts District Studio Stroll.

Thursday, June 28 at 3 p.m.

IF YOU Opening reception for Life GO Support, Saturday, June 2 from 6

to 9 p.m. at the Asheville Area Art Council’s Artery. On display through June 30, 2012. The Artery, 346 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Susannah Zucker www.susannahzucker.com Details of Cowbird by Susannah Zucker.

Clay Day at the Folk Art Center

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SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 10AM - 4PM

elebrate Clay Day at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center on June 2 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This free event features craft demonstrations and hands-on activities for children and adults. Clay Day has been a favorite happening at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center for over 20 years. Members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild demonstrate throw-

8 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

Untiled by Susannah Zucker.

Asheville Area Arts Council www.ashevillearts.com

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Crafts Department will also be participating on the potter’s wheel, hand ing – working with building, and surface design on clay, visitors at the potter’s among other techniques. wheel and demonA highlight of the day is the strating. “Make-and-Take” Raku Firing. While at the Folk Becky Lloyd demonstration. Buy a $10 pot, glaze it and watch Art Center, visitors as expert potters, Gary Clontz and Steven will have the opportunity to visit Allanstand Forbes-deSoule, raku fire it for you. SHCG Craft Shop, the Eastern National bookstore members Jan Morris and Sandra Rowland and Blue Ridge Parkway information desk, will host a children’s table where kids will as well as three exhibition galleries. Outside be invited to play with clay and make somethe Folk Art Center, there are hiking trails, thing to take home. picnic tables, and free parking. Among the new participants to Clay Day this weekend will be the artists of The IF Village Potters located in the River DisYOU The Folk Art Center is located GO at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge trict of Asheville. Sarah Rolland, Melanie Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 Robertson and Judi Harwood will share entrance in east Asheville, NC. a myriad of ceramic techniques and have information available about their curricuFor more information, including a list of lum at The Village Potters. Volunteers from participating craftspeople, call (828) 2987928 or visit www.craftguild.org. Haywood Community College Professional


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river arts district Come Visit the Area’s Biggest Daily Talent Show!

The River Arts District Artists Studio Stroll JUNE 9 & 10, 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M. community that features amazing art down every street, in every building. In addition to RADA’s two Studio StrollsTM on the second full weekends of June and November, the group also focuses on special events on “Second Saturdays” every month, where the general theme is “A Closer Look”.

Craven St.

The Grayline Trolley will provide free transportation around the River Arts District all weekend.

White Duck Taco Shop W. Haywood St.

Roots Studios

Hatchery Studios 97 Roberts

Cotton Mill Studios The Old Wood Co

Roberts St.

Riverside Studios

Roberts St.

The Wedge Wedge Brewing Co.

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12 Bones Lyman St.

Depot St.

Warehouse Studios approx.1/2 mile from 12 Bones to Riverview Station

Lyman St.

Riverview Station

North

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347 Depot The Lift Studios

Grey Eagle

Taqueria Con Cuida

Roberts St. Studios

Odyssey Center 1 Jonas Gerard T Fine Art Clingman Café

296 Depot Pink Dog Creative

North

Bartlett St.

362 Depot

South

Biltmore Village

Downtown Asheville

The Junction

Northlight Studios Studio 375 Depot

Asheville, NC

Patton Ave. TAP Haywood Rd.

Phil Mechanic Studios

Riverside Dr.

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CURVE studios

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ABOUT THE RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ artist member strong collective, who, along with dozens of Associate Members and Friends, provides a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art for any aspect of their lives. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing

BARBARA FROHMADER

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he working studios and galleries of the River Arts District Artists (RADA) are open to the public – many seven days a week – and reveal a staggering diversity of artists and their high-quality creations in all mediums. This nationally-known group comprises one of Asheville’s biggest daily showcases of accessible, affordable art, with working artist studios across twenty-two buildings in a designated historic zone along the French Broad River. RADA’s twice-annual Studio StrollsTM are an all-out spectacle, with all 165+ member artists all open together for the whole weekend. It’s a talented, fun, friendly community that is a big economic driver in Western North Carolina and beyond. With so many RADA Member Artists and Associate Businesses open to the public daily, with varied art and craft, and unique food and beverage choices throughout the area, the River Arts District is a great place to shop for home or gifts, take a class, bring visiting out-of-towners, catch an art opening or play, or even just pop down the hill for meal. The RADA Studio StrollsTM are not only a great way to shop for excellent handmade works for any aspect of one’s life, but they also help people get to know what is available down in “The District” every day! The Studio Stroll hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, June 9 and 10. The Grayline Trolley will provide free transport around the River Arts District all weekend, and there is plenty of parking throughout the area. This event is free and open to the public.

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372 Depot Glen Rock Depot Studio Entrances Free Parking MAP NOT TO SCALE

For more information, an on-line Studio Guide and a River Arts District map, visit www.riverartsdistrict.com or call (828) 280-7709.

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river arts district Jonas Gerard Paints Live

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oin us during the bi-annual studio stroll on Saturday and Sunday, starting at 2 p.m. each day, as artist Jonas Gerard paints live! Jonas’ spontaneous style of painting, based on abstract expressionism, infuses his paintings with life, movement, and color, reflecting his passionate outlook on life.

The Jonas Gerard gallery and studio.

With his Brazilian/Parisian ancestry and an extensive 50 years of experience behind him, he has developed a wide variety of mediums, allowing him to flow effortlessly with fresh ideas that emerge and inspire all. As part of a fun-filled event full of music, Jonas paints while the River Guerguerian Project performs. dancing, painting, and connecting, the gallery For more information, please visit will provide light refreshments, www.jonasgerard.com 1 wine, and non-alcoholic beverages throughout the day. Come witness this uplifting IF exchange of energy as Jonas brings YOU Jonas Gerard’s gallery and studio his canvas to life – right here in the GO are located at 240 Clingman heart of Asheville’s River Arts DisAvenue. Phone (828) 350-7711. The Stroll hours are from 10 a.m. to 6 trict. This amazing performance is p.m., Monday through Saturday, and 1 p.m. something everyone will enjoy! to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

SPRING NEW ART for

STUDIO STROLL Saturday & Sunday June 9 &10 10am– 6pm

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Open Every Day Check our calendar online!

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river arts district Barbara Frohmader

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Lynn Smith Stanley

ABBI’S BRUSH

SILVERPOEM STUDIO

arbara Frohmader two week trip to Sicily in and Lynn Smith May has provided her with Stanley have joined a treasure chest of new forces to create the memories and impressions. community’s first Barbara’s works are also at studio whose major focus is Marc Edwards Salon at the the art of watercolor. Grove Arcade. Lynn’s paintings are a Barbara and Lynn are fusion of Western impresmoving into a new space sionism and Asian brush in June. If you don’t find painting. Her work now them in the Roots Builddwells in a spectrum from ing during Studio Stroll, be traditional ink paintings on sure to visit them amidst Lynn Smith Stanley and rice paper to more complex the wonderful mix of artBarbara Frohmader. experiments in color and ists at 375 Depot Street. form. Her work has been shown in the last several National Juried Exin the Roots Building hibitions of the Sumi-e Society of America. 375 Depot Street Barbara loves to paint outdoors, and www.BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com Western North Carolina, Mexico and her 2 www.silverpoemstudio.com world travels all influence her subjects. A

Greg Vineyard

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reg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant based in Asheville, NC. His “Ceramics for Contemplation & Connectivity” include word tiles, out-of-round “Meditation Bowls” and interactive “Communication Animals,” as well as other decorative items, and are carried in the River Arts District at Constance Williams Gallery, 9 Riverside Drive. Greg is also an illustrator Happy Love Decision Maker: with works at LIFE by Greg Vineyard ZaPow Gallery in downtown Asheville. A selection of clay works are also available at Gallery 262 in Waynesville. www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net

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“YELLOW SPRING FLOWERS” 30”X40” OIL

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CANVAS

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT STUDIO BUILDINGS CLINGMAN AVENUE:

Jonas Gerard Fine Art Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts

LYMAN STREET:

Warehouse Studios Riverview Station

DEPOT STREET:

347 Depot 372 Depot Street The Lift Studios Northlight Studios Pink Dog Creative Studio 375 Depot

WEST HAYWOOD STREET: Riverside Studios Roots Studios

ROBERTS STREET:

97 Roberts Hatchery Studios Phil Mechanic Studios Roberts Street Studios The Wedge Studios

RIVERSIDE DRIVE:

Cotton Mill Studios The Old Wood Co. CURVE studios & garden Visit www.riverartsdistrict.com

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river arts

Jeff Pittman

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esiding in the beautiful mountains of Asheville North Carolina, Jeff Pittman is never short on inspiration for his colorful oil paintings. He is primarily known for his dramatic skies, panoramic mountain vistas, and small town street scenes of Western NC. Born in Greenville, NC, Jeff grew up observing his father paint rural scenes of eastern and coastal North Carolina. He has taken the artistic impressions he learned early on and applied them to his colorful landscapes, seascapes, and cityscapes. “I strive to capture the scene in bold, expressive colors that represent the different views of North Carolina as I see it and parDowntown Charlotte Street, oil painting by Jeff Pittman

ticularly enjoy the play of light against the downtown buildings, and the ever changing color in the skies and mountain ridges that surround us here. My goals is not to present my art as realistic, but rather to cast a unique light on my subject as I commit it to canvas to share with others.”

Red Barn Cane Creek, oil painting by Jeff Pittman

Jeff Pittman 140-D Roberts Street Studios www.jeffpittman.com (828) 242-8014

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tephen R. Janton grew up in Wilmington Delaware, where he was exposed to the Brandywine School and the artists Pyle, the entire Wyeth family, and his friend and guide George Weymouth. Portraiture and the human form have always been Janton’s main interest and he has developed a good sense of form during his many years studying and working as a physical therapist. His works in still life and landscapes tend to be more experimental with a sense of realism. “I attempt painting what is real to me... what I see. In doing a portrait, I enjoy finding the composition that best describes the individual’s personality and I include the person being painted in that process which makes for a more successful outcome.” “I frequently utilize the technique of a single light source in my portraits as it helps create greater depth. I rely primarily on the techniques of traditional oil painting but have tested my deepest level of patience by painting in egg tempera and ap12 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

preciate the quality of skin tones created by the unique process.” “Artwork should stand on its own merits — or fail on its own shortcomings if it does not succeed in registering favorably upon the viewer’s sensibilities. Quality is the central issue, as it must be where art is concerned. I am doing my best and enjoying the process in my attempts at creating quality in my artwork.” Janton Art Studio Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St., Studio #211, Asheville, NC 28801 www.jantonart.com

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sound experience

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Everybody Loves Jill Andrews

efore launching her solo career Jill Andrews attracted widespread attention co-fronting the Everybodyfields, a band that highlighted her love of Americana and traditional music. The Everybodyfields’ story began in 1999 when Andrews met fellow multi-instrumentalist Sam Quinn while both were working at a summer camp in Tennessee. Discovering a shared passion for the sorrowful sounds of classic country, Andrews and Quinn (who were both 19 at the time) began writing songs together, and while they briefly went their separate ways after camp season ended, the pair remained in touch. After returning to Johnson City, Quinn saw Andrews performing with Dobro player David Richey and asked to join the act. Andrews and Richey agreed, and they soon became first edition of the Everybodyfields. The group’s lineup would remain fluid over the next several years, with Andrews

and Quinn sometimes performing as a duo, sometimes as a trio with Richey, and sometimes with as many as five musicians on-stage. The group spent the better half of a decade touring in support of three albums, all of which featured a mix of folk, altcountry, bluegrass, and roots rock. But with both Quinn and Andrews wishing to focus on solo careers the band announced their breakup in June 2009. By the following October Andrews had already kicked off her solo career by releasing a self-titled EP and assembling a new band. Having become something of a local celebrity in eastern Tennessee, she filled her lineup with members of other local bands, including former Everybodyfields keyboardist Josh Oliver. The group toured the country in 2010, and Andrews used her downtime to record her first solo album, The Mirror, which came out in mid-2011.

Since its release Andrews has continued to sharpen her skills as sole BY JAMES CASSARA band leader while assembling new songs and new ideas. With each show The album Andrews seems to gain showed an unexgreater confidence and pected poppy side to an ever more appreciative Andrews, a light and audience. It’s a rare thing charismatic sound to so intimately watch that owed as much an artist grow and even to The Bangles as it Jill Andrews better when they hold did Gillian Welch. the talents of a Jill Andrews. Don’t miss this The songs are filled with swirling keyboards, opportunity to see a founding member of a harmony vocals, and irresistible hooks and wonderful band grow gracefully into an aswhile the country sounds are still there, sured and intensely creative solo musician. most noticeably in the quiet shuffle of “Sinking Ship” or the gentle acoustics of “Blue Eyes,” they folded into a more cosIF mopolitan setting. And every time orchesYOU Jill Andrews (with opening act tration threatens to overpower the material GO Erick Baker) at The Grey Eagle on Andrews wisely pulls it back, allowing her Saturday, June 30. Doors open at 8 beautiful voice and strumming guitar to p.m., show time at 9 p.m. Tickets are $10 carry the day. in advance ant $12 the day of the show.

WNC Jazz Profiles: Jonathan Pearlman “JP is probably the most giving and humble musician I know. I’m actually surprised that he agreed to be featured in a news article since he shuns the spotlight like I shun mowing the lawn.”

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~ Keyboardist Chuck Lichtenberger

onathan Pearlman (JP) grew up ”way down south” in Valdosta, GA hearing light jazz and pop music. His first musical icons were Elvis Presley and Bobby Darin, and he was performing for audiences at age seven and playing guitar at age nine. “The first outfits I played in were country bands and that’s how I got my first recording session when I was about 15. I opened for some famous country artists like Bill Anderson, Charlie Pride, Ferlin Husky, etc.” Yet JP’s influences have been farreaching, absorbing Lennon/McCartney, Hendrix, Clapton, and Motown during the 60’s. Jazz-fusion bands like Mahavishnu Orchestra, Weather Report and Frank Zappa of the early 70’s were also influential. These all became JP’s earliest jazz-rock influences. Jonathan continually wrote, sang and played in bands throughout his college years, and he graduated from the University of Florida with a degree in Broadcasting in 1978. Fast forward the next 20 years or so and he’d become quite successful as a videographer and producer while also pursuing his music, plus recording albums and production music. During the 1990’s, JP began to

win songwriting competitions and adopted the pseudonym Alien Music Club - essentially an on-going studio project. “The idea of Club came from my desire to incorporate the talents of other musicians and friends into the creative process. The Alien concept comes from the wildly eclectic nature of the music which defies categorization. It’s really a musical melting pot.” says JP. His guitar heroes include George Harrison, Jeff Beck, John Scofield, Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass and Pat Martino. JP had a major breakthrough in 2001 as he began to rediscover his musical roots. He started to study and transcribe jazz standards by Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, Thelonious Monk, Chuck Mingus, John Coltrane and many others. Jonathan’s local roots go way back to the 60’s when he attended summer camp in Hendersonville and played bluegrass and folk music in Asheville festivals. He finally realized his lifelong dream of moving to Asheville in the early 80’s and has never looked back! He feels fortunate to be in the midst of a musical Renaissance currently taking place here. His closest musical colleagues are pianist Chuck Lichtenberger and vocalist Stephanie Morgan, along with Zack Page (bass) and Tim Haney (drums).

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JP is also part of The Archrivals, Crybaby, and Stephaniesid. “It’s all a great opportunity to meet and share musical ideas with some of the best players while at the same time mentoring young musicians new to jazz. I feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to play Jonathan Pearlman with some of the finest musicians on the planet, and for them to consider my playing worthy! Chuck really instigated the AMC Jazz Jam. We’d been doing it at Tressa’s for several years as the Chuck Lichtenberger Collective, and the opportunity arose to move it to Barley’s each Thursday night at 9 p.m. It was Chuck’s idea to put it under my moniker. The motivation was to keep playing this amazing music we all love, keep our chops, keep learning, keep sharing, just to keep it going.” Lichtenberger added, “JP and I have really connected over our love of combining rock and jazz.” 2012 has been a year of many milestones for JP. He took the stage in Atlanta with his son’s band The Shadowboxers in winter. He performed the first ever AMC Live Show in the summer. He then performed his original jazz compositions at The Altamont Theatre this past fall. “It was quite a humbling and fulfilling year!” Future music by JP and Alien Music Club will be more

EDDIE LESHURE

experimental and collaborative in nature, as the audience for his special brand of jazz-influenced fusion continues to expand. “The one thing I love about JP’s material is how tastefully and subtly he pays tribute to artists that he’s loved over the Photo: Frank Zipperer years. He really covers a very wide range of styles, from jazz to 70’s rock, to zany progressive stuff and everything in between, and he can almost convince you to like a certain artist that you may have not liked before – without even knowing it! Plus he has the best tone of any guitarist I’ve ever played with!”

~ Drummer Tim Haney www.alienmusicclub.com www.cdbaby.com/Artist/AlienMusicClub www.facebook.com/AlienMusicClub www.reverbnation.com/alienmusicclub

Share Eddie LeShure’s passion for jazz with Jazz Unlimited on MAIN FM each Wednesday 7-10 p.m., at 103.5 or MAIN-FM.org.

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Welcome back to another go around at sharing some of my favorite recent discs. Among this month’s offerings are new albums by familiar voices and a semi-forgotten effort by a comedic mastermind. As always be sure to legally purchase these albums from your local record store of choice. Without them Asheville would be a little less cool of a town.

Loudon Wainwright III Older Than My Old Man Now 2nd Story Sound Loudon Wainwright III has now officially lived longer than did his own father, who in 1988 died from colon cancer at the age of 63. Such bitter irony has clearly been weighing heavily on the younger Wainwright’s mind, and while he has never shied away from melancholic thoughts and ruminations of mortality neither has Loudon ever constructed an album so fully absorbed with them. Of course being who (and what) he is Wainwright does so with his familiar sense of crank, wise ass, and at times mean-spiritedness: He may be funny as all get out but I’d hate to ever land on his bad side. Having said that, Older than My Old Man Now, Now his first album since the career spanning boxed set Forty Odd Years,, is as much about family, and the unpredictable knots that bind us together, as it is about the death that finally tears us apart. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than on “The Here and Now” in which Wainwright is joined by all four of his children (Rufus being the most well known) along with ex-wife Suzzy Roche and current wife Ritamarie Kelly. Augmented by guitarist John Scofield, it’s as jazzy as Wainwright has ever sounded, and far and away the best track here. Elsewhere Wainwright evokes a series of spoken word recordings by his father (a well known columnist for LIFE Magazine) which is both touching and in some regards a bit morbid, making this collection the aural equivalent of a photo album. “All in a Family,” recorded with daughter Lucy, highlights just how important the linkage of relations is to him but Wainwright’s casual delivery almost undermines the vitality of his sentiments. That is an ongoing problem with the album: for all its lyrical and conceptual heft Older than My Old Man Now seems remarkably lightweight, as if Wainwright has accepted the inevitable softness of age. “If families didn’t break apart/I suppose there’d be no need for art,” he tells us. But at times it all seems a bit too forced and convenient. Like the unspoken disagreements that hover around the edges of any family gathering, the essence of what should be revealed never is. Which is a shame, as there are moments in which Older Than My Old Man Now comes *this* close to being the sort of later career masterpiece I’d like to think

Loudon Wainwright still has within him. As it is it comes across as an opportunity missed, a record undone by its own counterfeit bravado and casual assemblage. **1/2

Sam Phillips Solid State: Songs from the Long Play Little Box Records Sam Phillips’ obvious disdain with the larger labels that have consistently undercut her career is well noted. Leaving them behind – and as part and parcel former husband/producer T Bone Burnett – has re-energized the frighteningly talented Ms. Phillips. The forty odd songs she’s released since the break, available via online subscription as a series of download EPs, have been consistently groundbreaking, even as they’ve ultimately played to her core base. Solid State, a 13-song summary of that output, is the first physical record she’s released in half a decade. It’s also wonderful, a giddy romp through heartbreak, the insecurity of approaching middle age, and a blueprint for how one lurches into the world of digital dating and record making. From the less than a minute long opener “Tell Me” to the more thematically fleshed out “Magic for Everybody” and “Lever Pulled Down,” Phillips sounds nervously relaxed (not the oxymoron you might assume) while demonstrating with certainty her uncanny knack for feisty pop arrangements that bring substance to sheen. So while I love being one of the few on my block to marvel at the artistry of Sam Phillips I’d also love to see her gather just a portion of the acclaim and prosperity she deserves. Here’s hoping her re-entry into the world of hold-it-in-your-hands music (even though the CD sleeve for Solid State looks and feels el cheapo) is the first of many. A deluxe boxed set of her post big label years, along with a few of her early demos and stray efforts, would make a welcome addition to anyone’s record shelf. ****

Ernie Kovacs Percy Dovetonsils Thpeaks Omnivore Recordings In celebration of the deliriously weird humor of the great Ernie Kovacs, Omnivore Recordings, in conjunction with his estate, are assembling a series of releases and reissues that should go a long way towards reinstating Kovacs as one

of the great comedic geniuses of our time. The plan is to eventually make available everything from the Tony Award pairing of Kovacs and his wife, singer/entertainer Edie Adams. The two married in 1954 and remained together until his tragic death in a 1962 automobile accident. The first such release is the marvelous Percy Dovetonsils Thpeaks,, a previously unreleased comedy concept album (long before such things became fashionable) originally recorded a year before his passing. It features his best-known and beloved character, the martini swilling and lisp poet Dovetonsils whose mawkish poetry was a favorite of Kovacs’ television shows. The album was originally recorded for an independent record label before legal entanglements derailed the project. It was briefly given a vinyl issue some forty years ago and has remained out of print since. During that time the reel had been thought to be lost; it was only recently discovered by archivist and Kovacs scholar Ben Model. After hearing Kovacs discuss the record in a CBC Canada television interview, Model was able to reconstruct the project as Kovacs had intended. Of course the material is brilliant; politically incorrect by today’s standards (but in no way offensive or hurtful) and replete with the sort of verbal gymnastics that Kovacs could so readily muster. Contemporary comics should take note. It’s a perfect complement to the recently released 6-DVD box set, The Ernie Kovacs Collection,, and what is likely only the first of many more to come. The project will no doubt take time, as Model and others pour through thousands of hours of tape, but the Kovacs estate is invested for the long haul. Which is great news indeed; I never dreamt this material would see the light of day, and can only rejoice at its release. To quote from Kovacs’ own signature send off, “It’s been real.” *****

Bonnie Raitt Slipstream Redwing Records It’s hard to quibble with Bonnie Raitt’s well deserved status as a darling of the music press but a more critical observation reveals a career that has been wildly uneven. She’s often followed a string of sturdy releases with the over produced and lightweight efforts – which almost often sold better than the good ones – that have dogged her work, albums that found her perilously close to becoming a scarlet‘CD’s’ continued on page 15

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sound experience Asheville Father’s Day Festival The first Annual Asheville Father’s Day Festival kicks off this month as a special event designed to “celebrate all that is being a Father.”

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he brain child of local actor/filmmaker/artist Tim Arem, the day will feature a host of local performers as well as father/child centered games, BBQ demos, a Chili Cook-Off, Speed Stack Competition, Hands-on Science and Wood Projects, the “Man Cave”, Face Painting, and more. Among the live entertainment spread across two stages will be Jacob Johnson, Jim Taylor & Friends, Always Saturday, Rock Academy, David Novak and Tennessee Hollow, and the Big Nasty. Arem first conceived the event when he noticed a dearth of attention being paid to Father’s Day, as well as a lack of activities centered on the date. That recognition quickly “got the ball” rolling and the inaugural Father’s Day Festival was soon beyond the planning stages. In anticipation of the day Tim kindly took a few minutes to share his expectations.

flowers, but not so much for the fathers. I wanted to create an epic event that would honor the relationship between dad and the kids, a unique event to be experienced and remembered. The majority of the booths we have planned will create interactive experiences for the attendees. A great example of this is our Speed Stacking Competition: Dads and their kids will get the opportunity to learn this very cool activity and then get to compete in a tournament for prizes. I’m very excited this Colorado based company is coming to our festival to offer this activity.

James Cassara: Talk about the genesis

that I produce and host, I’ve been looking and listening to groups for the last year that I thought would be a good fit for the kids and dads. The styles of music vary from indy, rock, reggae, and old time jazz. I wanted to have twp stages of entertainment, with one for music and one for community performances. The diverse community of Asheville has gotten behind

of Father’s Fest. Did you notice a need for something different, or was it just a matter of wanting to do something for the dads?

Tim Arem: I’ve noticed that in our

society, and our Asheville community, moms are honored in many ways that are not done for dads; there’s a lot of attention paid to Mother’s Day Brunch, and

‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

haired feminine counterpart to Phil Collins. Thankfully Slipstream falls on the right side of that equation, one of those albums that remind us how, when the material is strong and production righteous, fine Raitt can be. Produced by the uber talented Joe Henry, whose touch seems to always elevate good to great, the album features among others a pair of Henry’s own songs, along with two delicious late era Dylan tunes (“Million Miles” and “Standing in Your Doorway”). And like Dylan, Raitt’s voice has become more seasoned and inimitable. She’s never been more in control of her lower range and while the high notes have lost some of their sweetness the bitter suits her just fine; she can still command a devastating fury coupled with real tenderness. On the musical side guitarist Bill Frisell

JC: For a first time event you’ve got a pretty impressive list. How did you go about enlisting the performers?

TA: Because I have a local radio program

appears on a trio of songs (both Dylan’s and “You Can’t Fail Me Now”, a terrific collaboration with Loudon Wainwright III). The back and forth between Frisell’s signature sound and Raitt’s own wicked nasty slide work is mesmerizing. Henry’s own go-to band of Patrick Warren, Jay Bellerose, and Greg Leisz have rarely sounded more alert, providing the deliberate, warm affluence that has become his production trademark. While she was working on this record, Raitt, in a fit of creative propulsion, recorded a counter album with her own backing band of guitarist George Marinelli, drummer Ricky Fataar, keyboardist Mike Finnigan, and bassist James Hutchinson. If the sound of her voice and the glowing choice of material here is any indication, that record should be nothing less than killer. In the meanwhile Slipstream is by no means a holding pattern, but rather the

BY JAMES

CASSARA

TA: Most definitely. My best memories as a child were when I participated in activities with my dad. I know in most families today both parents work, and Asheville has its share of single parent families. Dads may not have the opportunity for creating special experiences that I had with my pop growing up. I wanted to share an opportunity for them to spend a unique day with their kids. I spent a year asking dads what they would like to see in a festival crafted especially for them and their kids. The answers were sometimes humorous and offered many great ideas.

JC: So the obvious question: Do you have the festival, especially for the community stage. We have some cool surprises planned for that stage. I’m especially please that David Novak is our MC for the music stage. He is a gifted entertainer and story teller.

JC: Talk a bit about Highland Brewery.

How important have they been in putting the event together?

TA: Highland Brewery has been an awesome partner in this endeavor! We have maintained a dialogue for a year on the event. It’s the perfect family-friendly venue. I looked at several possible hosts for the festival and kept coming back to Highland Brewery as the place; great location, family-friendly and great beer!

JC: You have a lot of kid oriented activities

scheduled, which is great. Was it important for you to make this a true father/son type day?

tip of what promises to be a stunning and revelatory iceberg. ****

Lyle Lovett Release Me Curb Records For the past quarter century Lyle Lovett has been an integral part of Curb Records (as well as their partner label Lost Highway) and while the relationship has had its rough patches for the most part it has benefitted both parties involved. With that contract now winding down, and Lovett making no secret of his desire to become a truly independent artist, he delivers this subtly-as-a-flying-mallet titled effort. As if that weren’t enough, the cover, with the trussed up and hung to dry singer peering stoically into the camera, should

kids of your own?

TA: No, but I’ve spent my adult life

providing unique educational experiences for families through creation of entertainment, health and fitness activities. By the way, I hope to see mothers at the festival; of course they too are welcome. We have lots of special activities, competitions, and live musical performances lined up for what I think will be a very special day. IF YOU The First Annual Father’s Day GO Festival on Saturday, June 16,

at The Highland Brewery. The event begins at noon, with tickets priced at just $20 per family. Tickets are available at Highland Brewery and online at www.ashevillefathersday.com. Tickets will also be available at the door, but only if online sales do not sell out.

drive home the point. In many ways it sums up Lovett’s career. The one time quirky country star has spent his post Julia Roberts years (you do remember they were once married, right?) as an amiable roots artist; not nearly so exciting as he once was but at least an artist you could bank on. Until now. With scant few originals and a selection of uninspired cover tunes, Release Me smacks of contractual debt, a kiss off to the label he’ll soon leave behind. I could have easily lived without another version of that stellar date rape ‘classic’ “Baby It’s Cold Outside” while Lovett’s reimagining of Chuck Berry’s “Brown Eyed Handsome Man” lacks entirely the sexual propulsion of the original. And while it’s good to see the range of Lovett’s musical influences (he’s always been equally adept singing differing styles) but here the lack of creative arrangements make ‘CD’s’ continued on page 16

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 15


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poetry & poets

The Oxford Book of American Poetry

‘CD’s’ continued from page 15

everything sound evenly dull. The only bright light is “Night’s Lullaby”, a nicely done campfire moment made even better by the graceful harmonies of Sean and Sara Watkins. I could go on, but I won’t. Lovett is too fine an artist to excoriate, even as Release Me bores us to tears. Here’s hoping that once he becomes the truly independent voice he longs to be, Lyle Lovett will again remind us that he’s one of the few unique voices of his era. If this stilted mess serves no other purpose than to give him a much needed kick in the rear then I’m okay with that. *1/2

Lynne Taylor Barfly Good Dirt Records Sometimes staying away from the thing you love (even if it loves you back) can be good for you. Such is the case with Nashville-based Americana artist Lynn Taylor, former singer with the ragtag string band Felix Wiley who has spent the past decade “raising a family, starting a business, and doing the everyday things of life.” The time away has served Taylor well, as his 2009 return to live performing has resulted in Barfly, a listener friendly, mostly live in the studio album of his newest batch of songs. With nearly every track recorded in one or two takes there’s an undeniable sense of spontaneity and deliberate casualness. There are a few miscues, misleads, and even some sound bleed that are all part of the charm. Barfly is a low fidelity effort in the truest sense of the word, although a few dollars sprung on a more attractive sleeve cover would have been wisely spent. As to the songs themselves, such modest homespun delights as the travelogue “Beef Boy Jack & Mississippi John” or the family oriented “She Had a Laugh” reminds me a lot of early John Prine with a touch of Guy Clark with his East Tennessee by way of Louisiana twang suiting the material well. Taylor, the son of a preacher (there are more than a few biblical allusions found herein) spent a number of years opening for artists ranging from John Hartford to the Drive-By Truckers. It’s obvious he learned a thing or two about life by hanging with these guys (not to mention a stint with Ralph Stanley), which adds up to a modest dozen song collection that reminds us of the virtues of keeping it simple.***

I

THE DIFFICULTY OF ANTHOLOGIZING AMERICAN POETRY

n 2006 I purchased the then brand-new Oxford Book of American Poetry Poetry, a rather massive anthology published by the Oxford University Press and edited by New York City-based poet and critic David Lehman. It was interesting to learn what Lehman considered to be the most significant poems in the history of American literature. (I had previously read a number of other historically comprehensive American poetry anthologies, including one edited by Dana Gioia, another accomplished poetcritic of Lehman’s generation.) Compiling a major anthology is a logistical challenge, as an anthologist must contend with such factors as copyright restrictions, budgetary limitations, and the vagaries of individual aesthetics. By most accounts, Lehman did a commendable job representing this nation’s poetic traditions. I certainly welcomed being introduced to some lesser-known poets (such as Wisconsin’s underappreciated modernist master Lorine Niedecker) and to lesser-known poems by established poets, and I appreciated the book’s interpretive head-notes, which were intended to provide the reader with background information on a given poet, but which also established for the reader an appropriate mood for appreciating that poet’s work. Yet Lehman’s anthology, perhaps inevitably, is not without flaws. One could certainly maintain that Lehman occasionally panders to generational tastes—the book, for instance, incorporates as a poem Bob Dylan’s lyrics to his major mid-1960s song Desolation Row Row. I’m an avowed fan of Dylan’s

ASHEVILLE POETRY REVIEW – MATTHEWS POETRY PRIZE READINGS Friday, June 29, 7 p.m. Poet Keith Flynn will host this Asheville Poetry Review event honoring the recipients of the William Matthews Poetry Prize for 2012. Join us for readings featuring Becky Gould Gibson from Winston-Salem, NC (first prize); Catherine Carter of Cullowhee, NC (second prize); and Angela Kelly of Spartanburg, SC (third prize).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore/

Cafe, 55 Haywood St. in Asheville. Phone (828) 254-6734 or visit www. malaprops.com.

16 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

BY TED

OLSON

work, but those lyrics seem particularly desolate without the Great Nasal One’s mesmerizing voice and without that particular track’s intense instrumental accompaniment. Yet for me, a more serious shortcoming in The Oxford Book of American Poetry was the fact that—while limiting the book to poets born before 1950—Lehman primarily featured poetry by poets with northern and, to a considerable degree, urban affiliations; the book generally neglects Southern and Appalachian poets. There are no poems in the volume, for example, by such significant poets from the southeastern U.S. as James Dickey, Wendell Berry, Fred Chappell, Robert Morgan, Jeff Daniel Marion, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Thomas Rain Crowe, and David Bottoms, among others—poets who by virtue of their indisputable achievements and the longevity of their impact deserved to be represented alongside their fellow Americans. The American literary establishment, long based in the urban North, historically marginalized the cultural life of the South (for evidence of this attitude one might read H. L. Mencken’s famous 1920 essay “The Sahara of the Bozart,” in which Mencken characterizes the American South of that era as a cultural wasteland). One would expect a contemporary culture leader like Lehman to look beyond old and tired stereotypes about Southern culture and acknowledge the breadth and depth of cultural life in the South over the past century or so.

‘Knopp’ continued from page 7

P.I. would get into while supposedly crafting a “tourist guide.” The idea of an anthology was tossed around and eventually dropped. And then I remembered the collaborative serial novel Naked Came the Manatee that came out in the mid-‘90’s. I read it and thought hey, that’s the way to go. A collaborative, serial project was just an insane literary relay race. You know, the perfect vehicle for a certain ADHD writer who wanted to

Don’t Miss Next Month’s Issue when we interview

Linda and Emoke

of Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe Photo: Erica Mueller

I read Lehman’s anthology for about a year. When in early 2008 I left for Spain to teach a semester in Barcelona, I took that book with me, and it served as a solid, dependable textbook for students in the American poetry class I taught there. All of the students who borrowed the book from me—mostly students from Spain, with a few from other European Union nations—discovered some American poems they found intriguing, even inspiring. The book proved so popular among the students that, when the semester drew to a close, I (rather than lug the book around airports) donated my copy of The Oxford Book of American Poetry to that particular school’s small library of American literary texts. I don’t regret giving away that book, but I’m glad I read it. Ted Olson is the author of such books as Breathing in Darkness: Poems (Wind Publications, 2006) and Blue Ridge Folklife (University Press of Mississippi, 1998) and he is the editor of numerous books, including The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). His experiences as a poet and musician are discussed on www.windpub. com/books/breathingindarkness.htm

Poets who would like for their poetry to be considered for a future column may send their books and manuscripts to Ted Olson, ETSU, Box 70400, Johnson City, TN 37614. Please include contact information and a SASE with submissions.

have fun writing a parody novel RIGHT NOW but didn’t want to wait four years or whatever to complete it by himself. So I enlisted the best writers I could find who were up to the challenge of writing in the same distracted jack-rabbit mode in which I normally write. Then for Chapter One I dreamed up some characters, threw in a raven and a beagle, killed a dude with a potato gun—and away it went, on down the line of eleven other writers. It was the most fun I’ve ever had with a writing project.

Malaprop’s Celebrating 30 Years of Independent Bookselling!


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authors ~ books ~ readings Faery Tale: One Woman’s Search for Enchantment in a Modern World A MEMOIR BY SIGNE PIKE

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ith language precise and economical, the title of Charleston author Signe Pike’s first book tells what to expect: Faery Tale: One Woman’s Search for Enchantment in a Modern World. The Who: a woman by herself. What: search for enchantment, specifically creatures known as fairies. When: not an investigation of scholarly or historic sources but a search that takes place today. Pike lets her book reveal the How: a journey through several countries, and the Why: to bring enchantment to her life so she can recover from the death of her father. She chooses to define enchantment, not as magic spells or haunted castles, but as fairies — those shape-shifting creatures from ancient legends who exist on a different plane from humans, and occasionally reveal themselves to us, for good or ill. Logic asks: if you believe in angels, why not believe in fairies? Why not indeed? Isn’t it human arrogance to assume that all the creatures God made are just like us? The three threads of her book — travel, memoir, and seeker — are too thin to stand on their own, but combined, they make a hefty and fascinating story. As

Jeaniene Frost Launches New Series Tuesday, June 26 at 7 p.m. Jeaniene Frost, author of the bestselling Cat and Bones books, will visit Malaprop’s for the release of Once Burned, launching a brand new series. This time the Night Prince, Vlad Tepesh, takes on evil, helped by a beautiful mortal with her own terrifying powers. A booksigning will follow the reading.

If you believe in angels, why not believe in fairies?

JUNE

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS

REVIEW BY

MARCIANNE MILLER a young, single woman usually Signe Pike traveling alone, Pike has the freedom to accept adventures that other travelers might not have. In her clear, breezy, observant style, she makes readers imagine they are her companions, sharing her frustrations with travel logistics, as well as her awe at the beauty of foreign lands and the strange wonders she encounters. As many people discover when they travel, Pike’s antennae for unusual experiences are heightened. Her psychic perception is keyed up, she may be having flashes of past lives, she’s sensitive to all kinds of atypical phenomenon, such as omens and spirits. She finds she has a “voice” that comes to her in surprisingly unpredictable ways. There’s a robin that appears to her so many times, it can’t possibly be coincidence. The voice says to her, “I’m not really a bird, you know.” Was it a fairy, shape-shifting into a bird? Another time she is overlooking a vast Irish ruin and the voice says, “I was king of all you see here.” Another fairy? Or is Pike tuning into to the remnants of an ancient ruler who still walks his domain? In the Yucatan in Mexico, Pike meets a dark, scary creature known to locals as an Alux—but cuts short more contact with this Mayan sprite. She moves on to traditional fairy territory, the lands of the Celts (England, Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, not Wales, alas). She goes to the usual magical places — Glastonbury in England (where she is enthralled by a swarm of flashing orbs of lights) and Findhorrn at the northern tip of Scotland (whose abundant gardens grow with the help of plant devas). An unfamiliar but very important stop is the Isle of Man

MICHAEL HOPPING AND PHILIP GERARD READING & BOOKSIGNING Saturday, June 23 at 7 p.m. Michael Hopping (pictured), will read from his new short story collection, MacTiernan’s Bottle, and Philip Gerard will read from his book of narrative essays, The Patron Saint of Dreams. A booksigning will follow the reading. Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

with its magical glens and coves. Unfortunately, Pike didn’t include the U.S. in her journey, a disappointment, I’m sure, to the fairy lovers in Asheville. With pre-planning, Pike is able to meet and interview a few leaders in the fairy world, such as fantasy illustrator Brian Froud, whose images of fairies have influenced believers around the world (www.worldoffroud.com). But to find other sources of information on fairies, Pike ends up relying on luck, or synchronicity, as the more experienced seekers call it. As if by magic, she ends up meeting the people she needs to talk to. Finally — around the next bend, the hidden magical spot she’s been seeking turns up. Everywhere it seems, “strange” things happen — and no amount of rational thinking can explain them. Sometimes it’s long after an event occurs that Pike realizes its significance. All along her journey, black crow feathers appear. At first she marvels at the coincidence, then she sees them as magical messages, signs to her that fairies communicate in their way, not ours. She realizes that she has received gifts in one location, such as sea shells from the ocean, only to be guided to leave them as offerings in another location, such as a forest, as if she is a servant linking the two magical places. Most eerily, she sees a white haired man, with piercing blue eyes, walk a black dog toward her on a meadow. The man seems to have come out of nowhere and walks past her without speaking. Only later does Pike wonder if the stranger could have been the fairy advocate she had been promised would help her in her search.

Monday, June 4, 7 p.m. – Reading and signing of Freeman by LEONARD PITTS, JR. Wednesday, June 6, 7 p.m. – RUSS KICK presents The Graphic Canon. Thursday, June 7, 7 p.m. – DOUGLAS VEENHOF, author of White Lama. Friday, June 8, 7 p.m. – Novelist OSAMA WAZAN and The Last Moderate Muslim. Saturday, June 9, 7 p.m. – Goliath: by southern novelist SUSAN WOODRING. Sunday, June 10, 3 – Activist SANDER HICKS, Slingshot to The Juggernaut. Tuesday, June 12, 7 p.m. – Chinese Medicine Health Series with Kath Bartlett. Wednesday, June 13, 7 p.m. – Cuban Missile Crisis signing with Joseph Maiolo. Thursday, June 14, 7 p.m. – Open Heart, Open Mind, by author TSOKNYI RINPOCHE. Saturday, June 16, 7 p.m. – Anthropologist & Novelist JOHN COLMAN WOOD. Friday, June 22, 7 p.m. – Pitchapalooza! Twenty writers will be selected at random to pitch their books. Presented by ARIELLE ECKSTUT and DAVID HENRY STERRY coauthors of The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published: How To Write It, Sell It, and Market It Successfully. Wednesday, June 27, 7 p.m. – Stand Up That Mountain by JAY ERSKIN LEUTZE. Thursday, June 28, 7 p.m. – How Churches Are Working To Protect Earth’s Climate with MALLORY MCDUFF & Guests. Friday, June 29, 7 p.m. – Asheville Poetry Review Matthews Poetry Prize Readings. Saturday, June 30, 7 to 9 – Celebrate Malaprop’s 30th Anniversary! Delicious food, great music, and a cash bar.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

BOTTOM LINE: An enjoyable primer on fairy hunting.

Faery Tale: One Woman’s Search for Enchantment in a Modern World, by Signe Pike; Perigee (2011 paperback); 298 pp. Visit www.signepike.com Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer.

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 17


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the curmudgeon Designer Secrets

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ote: It should be remembered by those who have been following the exploits of The Curmudgeon, that before the transformation into his present character—and after a two-year sojourn in the US Army—he completed a degree in liberal arts, then worked around Atlanta for many years, first as an installer of quality drapery, next as a salesman for a major appliance outlet, followed by a stint (after taking elocution lessons) as an announcer and DJ for a small radio station (with a quasi-liberal bent that was located a few miles south of the city limits of that great metropolitan area), until, after choking on a Moon Pie (don’t ask), his voice developed a high-pitched tremor which led him to the US Post Office, then spending his final working years teaching in a local community college, where he excelled as a shop steward resulting in students producing some fine wood working and some rather odd metal sculpture. “Rain again,” said Mrs. Storekeep as she mopped up some water at the store’s entrance, and just parking his truck we see The Curmudgeon mounting the store steps. With flinty eyes flashing and cheeks tinged with a purplish hue, Curmudgeon stormed into the General Store, his dampened hat making speed lines like a character in an old cartoon and dripping remnants of rain, went back to his mail box, twirled the letter combination, opened the box and removed some bills, a circular for subscription rebate for The Wall Street Journal, and a large and colorful magazine.

‘Opera’ continued from page 3

of Don Carlo with the opera companies of Nice and Lyon. He made his Paris Opera debut as the Duke in Rigoletto. Kathy Pyeatt has sung with leading regional opera and orchestra companies throughout the United States, where critics have described her singing as possessing a “richness and elegance…attuned to every harmonic and emotional nuance” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel). Recently Kathy made her role and company debut as Tosca with the Springfield Symphony Orchestra (MO) in a joint production with the Springfield Regional Opera Stephen Mark Brown, tenor. which the 18 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

BY

PETER LOEWER

Then silence reigned with only the sound of Mrs. Storekeep’s Illustration by Peter Loewer mopping and the rustle of flipping pages as Curmudgeon devoured the magazine’s contents. The front door opened and Gasman (this month wearing his Ingle’s cap) and Cityfella entered then apologized for walking through the mop-up area and went over to the coffee urn for their morning dose of caffeine. Spotting an audience, Curmudgeon let out with: “If these magazine people don’t beat all. I get this decorator magazine to keep up with what’s new in interior design but this issue is just too much! It’s called “Designer Secrets” and consists of one line hints at redoing house and home.” “Like what?” asked Cityfella. “A bench at the foot of a bed should be no less than two inches shorter than the width of the mattress.” “So . . .” mused Gasman. “Well, there’s no way I’m going to buy a new bench or a new bed if one is an inch too short.” “Guess it has to do with tripping?” asked Mrs. Storekeep. Ignoring her comment Curmudgeon followed with: “Dining Room chandeliers should hang sixty to sixty-six inches above the floor. Imagine, that’s five and a-half feet

Courier-Journal named as one of the most memorable shows in Springfield during the 2011 season. ALO introduces its new chorus master for the upcoming season at Taste of Opera as well. Dr. Vance Reese, this season’s conducKathy Pyeatt, soprano. tor of The Sound of Music will take on this new role with the opera company. He will lead the ALO Opera Chorus with two elaborate ensemble numbers from the upcoming season. Pianist, Daniel Weiser will provide accompaniment throughout the concert. Additionally, the concert will feature area students who have participated in ALO educational programs and are now pursuing professional training in the vocal arts.

Imagine caring about the hue of scissors! off whatever passes for a floor. Why you’d have to be eating on the rug to manage that.” “I think,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “they mean above the dining table so that the light doesn’t interfere with dining.” “Well, here’s another: Do not use colored sheers in your home—particularly those that are pea green. Imagine caring about the hue of scissors!” “I think,” said the Gasman, showing more intelligence that he was ever given credit for, “they mean sheer curtains. I can’t imagine anybody working with trendy color who would ever think of using anything colored pea-green, even Heinz—chuckle, chuckle.” Curmudgeon was cooling just a bit. “Well how about making sure you display everything in your collection together?” “My heavens,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “with your collection of Disney characters now numbering in the high hundreds, you would never pull that one off.” “Not to mention all those PEZ Dispensers in the basement,” added Cityfella. “I should have realized,” said Curmudgeon as he headed for the door, “that around here, high society fashion ends the other side of Statesville!”

Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

Taste of Opera, Saturday, June 9, Crowne Plaza Resort. There are three ticket prices. At the highest tier, for $125, guests receive preparty reception on the veranda, food, wine, reserved table seating for the concert and priority parking. At the $75 level, guests receive food, wine, reserved seating for the concert and reserved parking. For $50, guests receive food, wine, general seating for the concert and free parking. IF YOU Tast of Opera, June 9. The preGO party reception begins at 5:30 p.m.

Food and wine tasting begin at 6 p.m. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased through the Diana Wortham Theatre’s box office, (828) 257-4530. For more information, visit www.ashevillelyric.org


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Exclusive Parking in the Rear

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www.mountainbrushworks.com • 828-734-9304 Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 19


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INTERVIEW WITH

Sheri Kahn

Executive Director of the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas

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heri Kahn is the Executive Director of the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas. She was born in New York City living in the Bronx as a child and moved to Greensboro, NC in the late 1960s. She holds a Master’s Degree in History and has taught at East Tennessee State University and Northeast State Community College prior to moving to Asheville full-time in 2009. Kahn brings with her to the Fine Arts League a background in academic administration and instruction. Her desire is to grow the school while maintaining the integrity of its mission, dedicated to teaching art in the tradition of the Old Masters.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about The Fine Arts League of the Carolinas and what it offers the Asheville area.

Sheri Kahn: The Fine Arts League of the

Carolinas is a Classical Art School. We believe we that as a school, we can be the primary anchor for classical art programs in our very rich and varied art community. We serve all Asheville residents through our Master’s Apprentice Program, our Youth Summer Camps, After School Programs, our Professional Enrichment Workshops in August, as well as our community at large through our 3-day workshops and 1-week workshops taught by our faculty. Currently our School Director, Christopher Holt is TAPAS trained and working in the Asheville and Buncombe County school systems, and we will be sending Alisa Lumbreras, to the TAPAS program this year as well.

RRM: Talk a little about your Renaissance Fresco Program.

SK: The Renaissance changed forever the

way we look at art. Our Da Vinci Head Logo, epitomizes what we do within the walls of our school. Da Vinci and Michelangelo are probably the two most famous fresco masters of the Renaissance period. Their techniques inherently required the use of scientific principals as they completed their fresco paintings. At The Fine Arts League of the Carolinas, we follow in the footsteps of the old Renaissance masters. Our Founder Ben Long, IV worked as an apprentice to Pietro Annigoni. Long learned the many processes that it takes to create a Fresco in the style of the Renaissance Masters. He is the artist and

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Scholarship Fund we will be able to serve more deserving students in the future.

creator of North Carolina’s Fresco Trail. Long’s apprentices are our core faculty. RRM: The Fine Arts League of the To be a true Renaissance Fresco artist, it Carolinas is moving downtown takes years of dedication, drawing, paintthis summer. Tell us a little about ing, sculpting, and then working in the wet the new space and what it brings plaster. to the school. Our school, located here in Asheville, SK: This is very cool! We simply is the only school in the world, that we are grew out of the space on Depot St. aware of, that teaches a fresco program. It Mountain Housing Opportunitake 3 years as a full time student, before ties has been a wonderful partner one can become an apprentice. There are in our growth and development. I workshops on Fresco in the country and wish we could have worked with Florence, Italy. But only Asheville has an in them further. But by being Downdepth program of study to create these timetown, we feel we have found a less masterpieces. good fit for both exposure and It should be noted, that because of the growth. Our new school space has masterful efforts by Ben Long, North CaroSheri Kahn, Executive Director of the Fine Arts League doubled and with it we have the lina has the most frescos of any state in the of the Carolinas. Photo: Erica Mueller ability to move forward in enrollUnited States. Charlotte has the most, with ment and programs to meet the its most prominent in the Bank of America first introduced by Masaccio, called Systemeducational needs of incoming students as Building on Tryon St. The Municipal buildatic Linear Perspective, as well as utilizing a well as the needs of the community. ing also has a very remarkable fresco dedigeometrical grid system to enlarge original cated to the men RRM: The Fine Arts small pieces into large paintings. One can and women of the League of the Carolinas We incorporate science simply come by our school and see that Charlotte police helps students work happen. into the creation and force. If one goes with both sides of their We are anatomists. One of our most there, please look development of our art. brain. Please explain popular classes is our Anatomy class. In our at the name tag of what this means. Anatomy class, our students are introduced the officer in the to the skeleton, muscles, tendons, articulaSK: As I mentioned above, we are a classipainting. I believe you will see a reference to tions of each, in motion and stationary. It is cal art school. Many folks may not know our Renaissance heritage. a required class to all our students no matter what that really entails. Da Vinci was both their development. RRM: Does The Fine Arts League of the a brilliant artist and an inventor. He used Our third year students take the class Carolinas offer any scholarships or work scientific principals to create his art and along with our first year students. So, programs? propose innovative ideas. Only now in the inherent in the technique of our teaching modern age do we understand his genius. SK: Yes. The Fine Arts League offers a methods, we incorporate applied scientific We at the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas scholarship, through the Vadim Bora principals. As Randy Pausch would say, “It’s incorporate science into the creation and Scholarship Fund, to full-time students who a great headfake.” Students believe they are development of our art. We are chemists, in meet our financial requirements. Vadim learning how to make art, but they are also that we make our own ink, brushes, glue, was a dear instructor at our school. And learning how to think about making art. and pigments. thanks to the scholarship, in his name, his We teach our students how to stretch a memory will live on. We also have workRRM: What classes are taught here and what canvas and prepare the surface of the panel study programs for our full-time students as level of art experience does one need to of canvas for the pigments and oils they wish well. Both the scholarships and workstudy begin taking classes. to use for the piece. We are mathematicians, programs are limited, but we are hoping in that we utilize the Renaissance technique, that with more donations to the Vadim Bora ‘Kahn’ continued on next page

Summer 2012 Master/Apprentice

Fall 2012 Master/Apprentice

Youth After-School Programs

July 9 - August 10, 2012. Five-week intensive summer session. Full-time $1800; part-time $1000. Registration deadline: June 29, 2012.

September 17 - December 7, 2012. Fall session full-time $2500; part-time $700 per class. Register by August 17, 2012 to receive a 5% discount on tuition, full and part-time. Registration deadline: September 14, 2012.

Five-week sessions meet once a week for two hours: September - October, November - December 2012; January February, March - April 2013. Five week session $150.

Adult Summer Workshops

Spring 2013 Master/Apprentice

Open Drawing Sessions

January 21 - April 19, 2013. Spring session full-time $2500; part-time $700 per class. Register by November 16, 2012 to receive a 5% discount on tuition.

7-9 p.m. Monday and Thursday evenings. $7, non-FALC student; $5 for FALC students, per session.

1 week, full day (M-F), $1,100/session. Sculpture with Brett Garling. Figure painting with Zhoaming Wu. Plein air painting with Kasey Sealey.

Fine Arts League of the Carolinas ❖ Phone (828) 252-5050 or visit www.FineArtsLeague.org

20 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10


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the fine arts league of the carolinas INTERVIEW WITH

Alisa Lumbreras

R

INTERVIEWED BY

RRM: You are also teaching at the Fine

DENNIS RAY

apid River Magazine: Tell us a

had the rare opportunity to learn from an amazing group of dedicated artists. I had searched for a school like this for a long time.

Alisa Lumbreras: Before moving

RRM: Do you feel that having

Arts League of the Carolinas. Tell us a little about your classes.

AL: I am currently working with youth in

to Asheville, I enjoyed 17 years in the Major Motion Film Industry as a Charge Scenic Artist. In this position, I created paint magic to make the sets come alive and appear real on the big screen.

been a Scenic Artist for the movies has helped shape your art style in painting in any way?

the fundamentals of drawing and sculpture. Together we have explored still life, landscape, self portraits and sculpture. The youth afterschool program is an introduction to a new way of seeing and expressing in many different mediums; including pencil, charcoal, pen and ink, etching, pastel and sculpture, working both from life and imagination.

AL: I was exposed to many

RRM: What brought you to Asheville? AL: Asheville has always amazed me with its

different tools and techniques that assist in my creative process by working in the movie business.

RRM: What artists most influenced you

little about the work you did prior to moving here to Asheville.

surrounding natural beauty and vibrant art scene. I knew this was the place for me to slow down and focus completely on creating my own art.

RRM: How has the Fine Arts League benefited you as an artist?

AL: The Fine Arts League has given me

the tools and ability to express what I see working from life. The curriculum I studied included anatomy, oil painting of still life, landscape and portrait, etching and sculpting from life, and beginning fresco. I have

with your art style? Alisa Lumbreras, fine artist and instructor.

RRM: What can you tell us about your

upcoming show at the Grove Arcade Gallery this June?

AL: “Transformative Focus” is a representa-

tion of the amazing artistic journey I have undertaken the last 3 years. Most of the work has been produced this last year. My shift in focus as an artist has transformed me creatively. This new body of work includes oil paintings of still life, stormy landscapes, etchings, sculpture and drawings.

Photo: Erica Mueller

RRM: Tell us a little about your painting process and how you find your subject matter?

AL: I view the world with a child-like won-

derment. There is a sweet moment when you are captivated by a scene, no matter how small or how grand. This is when I use paint to express that feeling to draw the viewer into the moment. I usually start with a monochromatic under painting to set my value range, followed by color and last but not least, the kiss of light.

AL: The artists who have influenced me

most are Van Gogh and Andrew Wyeth. IF YOU Alisa Lumbreras, GO Transformative Focus Art Show.

Opening: Friday, June 1, 2012, 5-9 p.m., Fine Arts League Gallery, 115 O’Henry Street, inside the Grove Arcade, Asheville. For more details visit www.fineartsleague.org.

SUMMER YOUTH CLASSES Fundamental Drawing

‘Kahn’ continued from page 20

RRM: Tell us a little about some of the teach-

RRM: What are some of the changes happen-

SK: No experience is necessary, only the

SK: Our core faculty: John Dempsey,

SK: Our school was and remains dedicated

passion for creating art and the willingness to learn in the classical tradition is required. Our curriculum is designed to help students begin and work with students who already have some experience. If one applies to our program, our faculty does prefer to meet with them to get to know each student’s interest and level of accomplishment. Even if that accomplishment is at it’s most basic. We have a 5-week intensive summer program, a fall session, and a spring session. We offer: Anatomy, Materials, Fundamental Drawing, Fundamental Painting, Landscape Drawing, Landscape Painting, Cast Drawing, Portrait Drawing, Portrait Painting, Long Pose Figure Painting, Etching, Sculpture, and Fresco. In the spring we also offer Pen and Ink, Pastels, and Charcoal.

ers here and what experience they bring.

Christopher Holt, and Rebecca King were all apprentices of Ben Long, IV. They have all worked with Ben on frescos in North Carolina. Roger Nelson has and Michael Smith have worked with Ben on frescos as well. They, along with John Mac Kah, bring to the school formal classical training with Roger and Michael having worked with Ben on the frescos here in North Carolina as well. J.P Sullivan works out of Ben’s studio and is a master at the Materials class. All our faculty bios and CV are on our website.

RRM: What are the ages of the students here?

SK: The ages of our students are

varied. Our full-time students are college age. Our part-time students range from college age to retirement age. Our after school and summer camp classes serve fifth grade through high school.

Studio at the Fine Arts League.

Photo: Erica Mueller

ing with the school due to the new location?

to teaching the skills needed to become an independent working artist. In today’s world we also know that what we do, will help any student who enjoys creating art grow in their skill level, as well as, emotionally, and cognitatively. We are now able to open ourselves up to bring in new students who wish to build their portfolios so they may be better able to present themselves to a four year institution. We have the ability to serve the growing gap year population of students to better prepare them for college, simply through our program which helps them learn to focus, and think, before they act. Our focus on drawing can help the student who wishes to go into architecture, web design, clothing design, furniture design, etc., to build the skills they need to fulfill their goals. As faculty and staff, we are re-dedicating ourselves to being better teachers, focusing on the students more heavily, and providing an enriching environment to learn and grow. The only technology we use in the classroom is our brain. To that end, we will continue to help our students connect their thoughts, ideas, and hand to create their own masterpieces.

June 18-22, mornings, 9-noon.

Basic Mosaics June 18-22, afternoons, 1:15-4:15

Fine Arts League of the Carolinas. Call (828) 252-5050 or send an e-mail to Holt@fineartsleague.org.

Committed to teaching the realist traditions of the old masters.

Fine Arts League of the Carolinas 14 Pack Square Place, downtown Asheville (828) 252-5050

www.FineArtsLeague.org

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 21


Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

sweet summer blooms

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Featuring Jewelry by Molly Dingledine

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22 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

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artful living Exhaling Into Emptiness “Calmness of mind is beyond the end of your exhalation, so if you exhale smoothly, without trying to exhale, you are entering into the complete perfect calmness of your mind… Instead of trying to feel yourself as you inhale, fade into emptiness as you exhale…we feel free to express ourselves because we are ready to fade into emptiness. When we are trying to be active and special and to accomplish something, we cannot express ourselves. Small self will be expressed, but big self will not appear from the emptiness. From the emptiness only great self appears.”

~ Shunryu Suzuki

Z

en asks: Who are you? This is the great meditation, and we meditate to discover the answer to this question. In meditation, we sit quietly in complete relaxation while vibrantly alert. We sit with our posture reflecting the paradox that is our totality meeting the moment, looking into the interface of the Universe with this experience we have come to know as “me.” We are instructed to bring awareness to our breathing, to hold awareness on breathing as best we are able, and to watch and learn. And, oh, there is so much to be learned. One insight to be learned is that “Calmness of mind is beyond the end of your exhalation.” While this may sound absurd, it is not. As with everything in Zen, don’t believe it upon being told. You must experience it for yourself. If you follow the instructions for Zen meditation (zazen) you will discover, as your awareness becomes subtler and subtler, profoundly different states of mind come with inhalation and exhalation. With exhalation, comes relaxation, a natural release of the tensions that hold together your sense of personal self (ego). “Fade into emptiness as you exhale.” This puzzlement points to the

release of ego-self into non-conceptual awareness that Buddhism means by emptiness. With birth comes our first inhalation and the long, long process of creating our ego-self through experience and social/psychological learning. With death, comes our last exhalation and the release of this ego-self. At the beginning and at the end, and at every moment between, is the one unchanging constant of our existence: awareness. Awareness experiences this rhythm and all the rhythms of our life. “Fade into emptiness as you exhale.” Master Suzuki taught this pointer towards the realization of our essential self as of extreme importance. With the next inhalation comes a returning into form, only now, having touched emptiness, having touched, in a sense, our ego’s death, comes the realization that we have form, yet are more than form. We have a body and a mind. We have life circumstances and relationships, yet we are more than all these. All these occur within the witnessing awareness that sits watching the rhythm of

BY

our breath and the rhythms of our life. The realization begins to dawn: I am the awareness within which all experience occurs. We believe we have good times and bad times, and we do. Yet we are more than our good times and bad times. If we weren’t, our bad times would destroy us, but they don’t (unless we make up and live in a story that we are destroyed). Our “great self” is larger than all the bad times. It is bigger than all the good times too. Our great self does not exist in times at all. Our great self, our unshakeable awareness, exists only in the present moment that is also eternity. But no, we don’t live this way. We live on the inhalation grasping at everything, rushing to get to the next moment. Pay attention and notice – when we want or expect something, we inhale sharply. The exhalation is overlooked. And this is no way to live. This is not life at all. We can’t only inhale. Life is here, and we are always trying to get to there! To inhale is good, but as Master Suzuki said, “In each inhalation and each exhalation there are countless instants of time. Your intention is to live each instant…Inhaling without effort you naturally come back to yourself with some color or form. Exhaling, you gradually fade into emptiness.. The important point is your exhalation. Instead of trying to feel yourself as you inhale, fade into emptiness as you exhale. Breathing every moment, aware that you are breathing every moment, without regard to the difference between life and death, you

Aspirin, the 100-Year-Old Medicine

D

r. Ron Atchison, internist, waited outside his patient’s room while the current group of medical students and residents filed out behind him. He motioned them to follow him down the hall to a small conference room. When they had all crowded in, he spoke. “This is just for the medical students. The rest of you hold your peace,” he said. His chief resident and the first year resident smiled at each other and settled in the corner chairs. “Okay, any one, what did you see in there, just now?” Dr. Atchison leaned against the wall, eyeing the medical students. Mary Hall, a fourth year student spoke up. “A 67-year-old female with episodes of non-cardiac chest pain, probably esophagitis

based on her rapid response to antacids and repeat negative cardiac enzymes, hypertension, high cholesterol and triglycerides, border-line high blood sugar and mildly obese . . . and . . .” Mary paused, knowing there was something more she should say. “Very good, Dr. Hall. Very well summarized.” Dr. Atchison paused. “But there is one more significant piece to her story.” He looked around. “Dr. Martin.” He spotted the tall, shy third year student behind the others near the door. “Dr. Martin, this is the patient you worked up, I believe. Tell us what the final piece is, please.” “Yes, sir.” Dr. Martin flipped open the patient’s chart, referring to his notes. “Her father, brother and uncle

BILL WALZ

BY

touch the eternal. Master Suzuki tells us, When you practice this in your last moment, you will have nothing to be afraid of. You are actually aiming at emptiness. You become one with everything after you completely exhale with this feeling. If you are still alive, naturally you will inhale again… Discovering yourself “still alive,” the world sparkles, life exhilarates in all its brilliant ordinariness. Body and mind are within the moment that is life. The space of the moment, the space of your awareness, is alive, and you realize you are in the space of the moment. This is enlightenment. This is the answer to the great meditation. A great realm of peace and wisdom has opened. Then you live your life in all its ordinariness, yet there is never again boredom, never again restlessness, never again useless anger or fear. Exhaling into emptiness is to discover the fullness of every moment of life. Inhaling again, we discover the adventure of every breeze, of every flower, of every squirrel and bird, and of every person we encounter Inhale deeply. This is life. Exhale fully. This is death. They are one and the same in the Great Self. Spiritual teachings emphasize you must die into life to be fully alive. Each breath, a new moment. Born again! This is Zen. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, or by e-mail to healing@billwalz.com. Visit www.billwalz.com

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

all died of coronary heart disease and her mother died of colon cancer.” “Very good. The positive family history. This is a patient to be watched closely. Why is that, Dr. Hall?” Dr. Atchison eyed his favorite fourth-year student. “Because her chest pain might one day actually be a cardiac episode. Cardiac disease in females is so frequently missed. Females present with different symptoms.” Dr. Mary Hall paused. “We somehow seem to think that heart attacks happen only in men.” “Very good. Excellent.” Dr. Atchison nodded his approval as he reached for the patient’s chart to sign the orders written by the attending nurse. Continued on page 31

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 23


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The Avengers ∑∑∑∑1/2

fice heights this film has attained.

Short Take: The soon to be all time box office champ is one movie that is actually worth all the hype although it’s about 30 minutes too long.

Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action throughout.

together of several superheroes into a group known as ‘The Avengers’ to meet the threat. In addition to Thor there’s Steve Rogers / Captain America (Chris Evans), Bruce Banner / The Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow (Scarlett JohansREEL TAKE: If you haven’t gotten around son), and Tony Stark / Iron Man (Robert to seeing The Avengers yet, don’t worry. Downey, Jr). They are all brought together It isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. By by the one-eyed Nick Fury played by Samuthe time all is said and done, The Avengers el L. Jackson with his typical intensity. will be the number one box office attraction It takes the first hour of the film to of all time. Bigger than Avatar, bigger than get everything and everyone into place. Titanic, and (despite Once that happens, what certain fanboys things move along want to believe) rather rapidly. While even bigger that the everyone gets to have upcoming Batman their say, writer-difinale, The Dark rector Joss Whedon Knight Rises. gives the best lines to There’s certainly Robert Downey Jr’s been no lack of proIron Man character motion on Marvel’s and to Tom Hidand Disney’s part dleston who seems to regarding Marvel’s be having the time of The Avengers (to give his life as the villainChris Evans & Robert Downey Jr as Captain the movie its full title ous Loki. America & Iron Man in the Disney megahit and to avoid any conAfter a meaningThe Avengers. fusion overseas with ful second hour in that other Avengers, which the various superhero egos, manipuyou know the British one) and for Disney it lated by Loki, clash with each other before couldn’t have come at a better time after the finally coming together to form a united box office fiasco of John Carter (trivia buffs front against the alien assault, we get to the take note that Disney had the biggest box assault itself. It starts off well enough, but office success and biggest box office failure before long it turns into a “let’s see if we can both in the same year). top a Transformers destruction sequence”. For those of you unfamiliar with the Whereas the first two hours depended comics and who need a storyline, here it is. on colorful characters and a solid script, the The god Loki (Tom Hiddleston), having finale is just an unending series of explobeen defeated by his half-brother Thor sions and CGI mayhem until the defeated (Chris Hemsworth), winds up on Earth and Loki gets to deliver his punch line. I know plans to subjugate the planet by means of an that’s why many people have come to see alien invasion. This necessitates the banding the film especially the 3-D and IMAX crowd but I’m not one of them and it cost the film a 5 star rating. I’m sure that Marvel / Disney is already Web Exclusives planning a series of sequels to cash in on Find these schedules online at the success of The Avengers but it’s going www.rapidrivermagazine.com to be an extremely hard act to follow. Joss Weedon comes from a family of scriptwritAsheville Fim Society ers, and it is his screenplay not the spectacle Screenings that is bringing in the repeat business. Without a good screenplay there’s no way a Hendersonville Film sequel can even hope to soar to the box ofSociety Screenings 24 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: When a group of British retirees (played by the who’s who of Britain’s acting royalty in the 60+ age bracket) decide to ‘outsource’ their retirement to a budget friendly but promising hotel in Jaipur, the hotel doesn’t quite live up the advertisements, but their lives are forever changed.

REEL TAKE: The Best Exotic Marigold

Judy Dench and Celia Imrie arrive at The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the elderly and beautiful.

Hotel is one of the most refreshing treats I’ve had the good fortune to enjoy in quite some time. While I am not part of the film’s AARP card carrying target audience, the story of a group of British pensioners who outsource their retirement to a hotel in India, has a much broader appeal than one might think. John Madden, who directed Shakespeare in Love, Mrs. Brown and The Debt Debt, strikes all the right chords yet again in this big screen adaptation of Deborah Moggach’s novel. It probably helps that Moggach herself wrote the screenplay. (Moggach previously earned accolades for her winning screen adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice.) Moggach sets up the story by introducing each of the characters, giving us a glimpse into their personality, life experience and current challenges. Among them is a recent widow left with her husband’s debt (Judi Dench), a judge desperate to hang up his socks (or wig as the case may be) played by Tom Wilkinson, an interminably married couple who can’t afford retirement (Bill Nighy and Penelope Whilton), a takenfor-granted granny in search of a wealthy husband (Celia Imrie), a horny old goat who’s still got it and is keen for someone to let him show them he’s still got it (Ronald Pickup), and last but not least a racist, sharptongued old bitty in need of a quickie hip replacement (Maggie Smith). Each of them is attracted by an advertisement for ‘The

Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the elderly and beautiful’ in Jaipur, India. Upon their arrival it’s clear that The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is such in name only. With the exception of Wilkinson’s characters, they all have chosen to outsource their retirement to India for financial reasons of one kind or another. Ironically, the exuberant young manager of the hotel, Sonny Kapoor (Dev Patel) is also having financial difficulties. Wilkinson’s character, Lord Dashwood, is also the only one among them with any familiarity with India beyond outsourced call centers. Very quickly we see who is going to have a grand adventure and who is not. This is part of the film’s predictability, something for which it has received some criticism (when did predictability become the death knell for a movie?) Sure, the overall arc of the story is fairly predictable, but in no way does the story or the film suffer any disservice for it. Perhaps the few surprises that are unveiled are made even more pleasant (and profound) because they are elegantly sewn into the warm and familiar structure of the story. The film has a beautiful humanity to it, a warm spirit, and is at times truly touching, and not in a Hallmark Channel kind of way. A stellar ensemble, director and screen writer mesh together perfectly to truly bring The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel to life. Rated PG-13 for sexual content and language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN ‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 24

Dark Shadows ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Tim Burton’s stylish retake on the classic old TV series is much better than the trailers indicate with a wonderful performance from Johnny Depp.

REEL TAKE: Not since Disney’s Snow

Dogs has a movie had such a misleading preview. From the trailer you would think that this was nothing more than a not too subtle, rather lame send-up of the old TV series. It’s not. It’s a lot more than that thanks to the creative imagination of Tim Burton and Johnny Depp’s refusal to play the character of Barnabas Collins false.

Summer Movie Guide

With The Avengers, Men In Black 3 and other big budget CGI fests already mopping up the cinemuck at the cineplexes, the summer block buster season is upon us. Here’s a sneak peek at some of the big titles coming soon to a theatre near you.

June 1 – Snow White and the Huntsman In a twist to the fairy tale, the Huntsman ordered to take Snow White into the woods to be killed winds up becoming her protector and mentor in a quest to vanquish the Evil Queen. Stars Charlize Theron, Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth.

June 8 – Prometheus A team of explorers discover a clue to the origins of mankind on Earth, leading them on a journey to the darkest corners of the universe. There, they must fight a terrifying battle to save the future of the human race. Stars Michael Fassbender Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp) makes a point in Tim Burton's makeover of the cult TV show Dark Shadows.

The original soap opera ended in 1971 after a five year run and 1,225 episodes. There were also two feature films, House of Dark Shadows (1970) and Night of Dark Shadows (1971). Burton sets his movie in 1972. This allows him to not only recreate the era but to poke gentle fun at it as well (Barnabas is fascinated by lava lamps and troll dolls). The screenplay by Seth GrahameSmith begins as a Gothic romance before the supernatural elements are introduced. In 1772 Barnabas Collins plans to marry Josette DuPres (Bella Heathcote) having spurned Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green). She turns out to be a witch who kills Josette, turns Barnabas into a vampire, and imprisons him in a coffin. 200 years later he is accidentally released and must adjust to the world of 1972. The descendants of his once proud family have become classic wealthy American basket cases. Matriarch Elizabeth (Michelle Pfeiffer) does macramé to relieve her boredom. Husband Roger (Jonny Lee Miller) is a philanderer. Children Carolyn (Chloe Grace Moretz) and David (Gulliver McGrath) have serious parental issues and family psychiatrist Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham-Carter) is an alcoholic. Passed off as an eccentric English cousin, Barnabas sets out to restore the family’s fortunes. Unfortunately Angelique is still very much alive and she wants Barnabas and

June 14 – Rock of Ages A small town girl and a city boy meet on the Sunset Strip, while pursuing their Hollywood dreams. The buzz is big for this all-star musical which includes Tom Cruise, Alec Baldwin, Catherine Zeta Jones, Paul Giamatti and many others.

his family to suffer forever. Problem is that she’s still in love with Barnabas but he’s in love with new governess Victoria Winters (also Bella Heathcote) who is the spitting image of his lost love. Burton injects his standard theme of the outsider trying to fit in with some droll social satire about the 1970s as well as several nods to a number of well known horror films. He even references his own films Beetlejuice (1988), Edward Scissorhands (1990), and Sleepy Hollow (1999). What really makes Dark Shadows work is the obvious love Burton has for the material and the gorgeous look he has given the film. The Gothic scenes are 18th century Romantic with deep blues and swirling fog while the 1972 scenes capture the “heavy” aura and downright tackiness of the era. The cast is uniformly fine and the pace is never too leisurely. The one problem I had with the film is that the last half hour is not in keeping with the rest of the movie. Elements out of left field are introduced and discarded while the final confrontation between Barnabas and Angelique is way too drawn out. The actual

June 22 – Abraham Lincoln – Vampire Hunter Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, discovers vampires are planning to take over the United States. He makes it his mission to eliminate them.

June 22 – Brave Set in Scotland in a rugged and mythical time, “Brave” features Merida, an aspiring archer and impetuous daughter of royalty. Merida makes a reckless choice that unleashes unintended peril and forces her to spring into action to set things right. Granted one wish, Merida must rely on her bravery and her archery skills to undo a beastly curse. The animated feature stars Kelly McDonald, Billy Connolly and Emma Thompson.

July 3 – The Amazing Spiderman Peter Parker finds a clue that might help him understand why his parents disappeared when he was young. His path puts him on a collision course with Dr. Curt Connors, his father’s former partner. It’s a new spidey generation, starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone.

July 20 – The Dark Knight Rises Chrisopher Nolan is at the helm of Gotham City again. Eight years after Batman took the fall for Two Face’s crimes, a new terrorist leader, Bane, overwhelms Gotham’s finest, and the Dark Knight resurfaces to protect a city that has branded him an enemy. Stars Christian Bale, Joseph Gordon Levitt and Gary Oldman.

August 3 – The Bourne Legacy Tony Gilroy has written a new chapter for the wildly popular Bourne franchise. This one centers on a new CIA operative in the universe based on Robert Ludlum’s novels, starring Jeremy Renner, Rachel Weiz and Edward Norton.

ending though is extremely memorable and hints at a sequel. Don’t be put off by the trailers or by the negative reviews. If you remember the old TV show, and lived through the 1970s then you owe it to yourselves to see Dark Shadows. If you were born in the 1980s or later, there’s always the Burton-Depp combination to make it worth your while. Rated PG-13 for comic horror violence some sexual situations, language, and drug use.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

The Dictator ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Sacha Baron Cohen returns to the big screen with his latest alter ego, Admiral General Aladeen supreme ruler and dictator of the fictitious North African country of Widiya.

REEL TAKE: With his past efforts, people

were apt to either love or hate Sacha Baron Cohen’s comedy. Ali G, Borat, Borat Bruno and others were unscripted works, essentially elaborate practical jokes and con games played out hilariously and often offensively on unsuspecting dupes. In its best moments,

Sacha Baron Cohen's latest alter ego is Admiral General Aladeen in The Dictator.

Cohen’s comedy holds a satirical mirror up to the world, poking fun at pervasive stupidity. In its worst moments, Cohen’s comedy is nothing short of cringe inducing. The Dictator stays true to those traits even though it is a scripted work. It will be curious to see if Borat and Bruno fans will gravitate to the new work. However, I think folks who have not particularly cared for Cohens previous shock and awe comedy will find The Dictator far more palatable. ‘Movies’ continued on page 26

Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 25


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In The Dictator Sacha Baron Cohen plays General Omar Aladeen, ruling dictator and tyrant over the fictitious North African country of Widiya. Aladeen heads to the Big Apple to make a speech to the United Nations. Once there, his uncle/chief of staff (Ben Kingsley) tries to have him assassinated. After a hilarious torture sequence featuring the talents of John C. Reilly, Aladeen finds himself beardless and unrecognizable on the streets of New York, while an idiotic body double stands in for him (also played by Cohen). While he strategizes to oust the dunce, ax his uncle and reclaim his role as ruling despot, he ends up working at an earthy crunchy, Birkenstock type food co-op in Brooklyn, and falls in love with a radical left wing activist and feminist (Anna Faris). Every plot set up mentioned so far offers great fodder for Cohen and his team of writers, and they don’t miss any opportunity to mock, poke fun at and exploit everyone along the way, including Aladeen. The character of Admiral General Aladeen is mish mosh of several contemporary dictators. By making Aladeen look the fool, they succeed brilliantly in setting the film’s satirical tone. One of the things that sets The Dicta-

Theatre Directory

tor apart from Cohen’s earlier work is that they somehow make Aladeen far more likeable than Borat and Bruno. To be sure he is crass and cringe-worthy at times, but mostly he’s just funny at his own expense and the expense of others. Add in the fact that Aladeen isn’t nearly the fearsome tyrant he fancies himself, and Cohen is hitting all the right notes. The ultimate punch line for the film comes when Aladeen is finally addressing the UN and speaking out against democracy and in favor of dictatorially ruled nations, citing perks for the 1%, deregulated banking, etc – all current facets of contemporary America. Why be democracy when you can have all that? The ironic hilarity drew belly laughs from the audience. There’s a bit of messiness in the goings on that I think could be attributed to the fact that Cohen had long-time collaborator Larry Charles (Borat, Borat Bruno) direct this outing. Borat, I’m guessing that directing a scripted movie versus an improvised one is very different, and maybe not Charles’ strength. Still there is enough fun to transcend inconsistencies. Rated R for strong crude and sexual content, brief male nudity, language and some violent images.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Monsieur Lazhar ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: An Algerian refugee in Montreal becomes substitute teacher to a grief stricken 6th grade class in the wake of their teacher’s suicide.

Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Mohamed Fellag gives a flawless performance as a schoolteacher in Monsieur Lazhar.

REEL TAKE: The French Canadian film

Monsieur Lazhar is a brilliant example of how much can be done with so little. This small, independent film is powerfully moving and was very deserving of its Academy Award nomination earlier this year for Best Foreign film. Few will see it, and it may even be gone from cinemas by the time this month’s issue hits newsstands, but I hope this review will entice some to seek this film out, be it at the theatre or via rental. Monsieur Lazhar tells the story of an Algerian refugee in Montreal who becomes a substitute teacher to a group of 6th graders in the wake of their teacher’s suicide. It doesn’t sound terribly appealing, but rest assured it is a wonderfully layered story. Never once does it succumb to the contriv-

26 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

ances of many a classroom drama movie. At the start of the film a teacher has apparently hung herself in her classroom while the children were at recess. Two of the children, Simon and Alice (Emilien Neron and Sophie Nelisse, actually see the lifeless body of their beloved teacher, and both are subsequently traumatized. After reading the news of the teacher’s death, and badly in need of work, newly immigrated Bachir Lazhar (Mohamed Fellag), talks his way into being the substitute teacher for the class. While the school runs through a course of psychological counseling for the children (an institutional response that speaks more to the adult’s trauma than the children’s), Bachir gets straight to work in the classroom. Cultural differences are felt immediately, and the student-teacher relationship is bit rocky at the get go. Bachir insists on a more formal structure in the classroom, something the previous teacher did not do. During the first assignment he also hits these pre-teens with Balzac. This is a little much for 11 and 12 year olds, so while he insists on desks in tidy rows (not a circle for sharing), he brings the curriculum back down to a level they can grasp. In the subsequent weeks, Bachir and the children connect, reaching new levels of empathy, understanding and even forgiveness. As they become familiar with one another, he draws them out, which in turn draws criticism from faculty and parents. All the while, no one suspects that Bachir is dealing with his own tragedy, loss and possible deportation. Monsieur Lazhar is sad and reflective, but not without hope. The story unfolds in its own time, but never bogs down. Written and directed with great economy by Philippe Falardreau, the film is subtle yet emotionally wrenching. Fellag turns in a flawless, heartfelt performance. The two children that play Simon and Alice are astounding as well. At this time of year, when the onslaught of summer blockbusters begins its assault on the box office and our senses, it’s nice to know that you can still find those little films that stay with you long after you’ve left the theatre. Monsieur Lazhar is that kind of film. At press time it was playing at The Fine Arts Theatre in downtown Asheville. See it if you can. Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material, a disturbing image and brief language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Raven ∑∑∑ ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Atmospheric take on Edgar Allan Poe’s last days suffers from a weak female lead and unnecessary gore in some scenes.

REEL TAKE: I’ve been a fan of Edgar Allan

Poe since before I was in high school. Some of this was because of Roger Corman’s

John Cusack as Edgar Allan Poe in the so-so mystery thriller The Raven.

series of Poe based films with Vincent Price that were made in the 1960s. Most of it though was because my parents had a 10 volume set of the complete published works of Poe, including all his essays and literary criticism, which I had read and reread by the time I went to college. Unfortunately the set disappeared while I was in college and was never seen again (a mystery worthy of Poe himself). While Poe has popped up as a character in numerous films and TV shows over the years (starting in 1909 with a silent version of The Raven directed by D. W. Griffith), his most significant appearances were in the 1964 Italian film Danse Macabre (Castle of Blood in the U.S.) and in the unfortunately titled Torture Garden, a 1967 British anthology film where his soul is part of an ultimate collection of Poe memorabilia. This version fully puts him center stage by having him confront a serial killer who uses his stories as a blueprint for murder. John Cusack is perfect as the acerbic, alcohol soaked writer who is drawn into a web of intrigue and grisly murder in order to save his socialite sweetheart (Alice Eve). He joins forces with a young police inspector (Luke Evans) to try and track down the murderer but not before several people are killed. Director James McTeigue (V for Vendetta) has crafted a beautifully atmospheric movie that recalls four earlier films (A Study in Terror, Hands of the Ripper, Murder by Decree, From Hell Hell) all of which deal with Jack the Ripper. This has to be intentional as the killer closely resembles the Ripper, he just uses Poe’s stories as the basis for his murderous spree. Unfortunately atmosphere isn’t everything and The Raven suffers from some weak performances. Alice Eve is particularly unsatisfying as the love interest although to be fair the script does her no favors. Luke Evans portrays the police inspector as if he were a young Clint Eastwood complete with gritted teeth and monotone delivery. This really bothered me after awhile. A movie about a serial killer is certainly going to have its gory moments (as did the earlier films I mentioned) but watching someone slowly cut in half ala Pit and ‘Movies’ continued on page 27


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from pg. 26

the Pendulum serves no real purpose and is simply sadistic. The other murders are handled with more discretion but I would have still toned down a couple of them. In the end I’m glad I saw The Raven and would probably see it again for Cusack and the always reliable Brendan Gleeson (as the girl’s father) but I will always view it as a vehicle of missed opportunities. It was good but it could have been really good with a little tweaking here and there, including giving Poe his customary mustache instead of Cusack’s goatee.

in Safe is higher than any Jason Stathan film I’ve ever seen before and I’ve seen most of them. Bruce Lee would have had a hard time keeping up. One sequence inside a gambling parlor recalls a classic set piece in Michael Cimino’s crime melodrama Year of the Dragon (1985) where a young Mickey Rourke takes on the Chinese Triad inside a restaurant. Of course we all know how it’s going to work out in the end after all that’s the whole point of a Jason Stathan picture. It’s a tradition that goes all the way back to the silent era when William S. Hart, the movies’ first good “bad guy,” kicked some seri-

Rated R for bloody violence and grisly images.

ous butt before riding off into the sunset. While Safe didn’t hang around long on its initial run in Asheville, it’s tailor made for the second run houses like Cinebarre or the Asheville Pizza Company. So watch the local theater listings and when Safe is back in town, be sure to see it. Also be sure to have a pizza and a beer and enjoy the show. I can think of worse ways to spend a couple of hours. Rated R for strong violence throughout and for pervasive language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN Catherine Chan seeks protection from Jason Stathan in the high octane urban actioner Safe.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Safe ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Above average Jason Stathan action flick pits him and a brilliant young Chinese girl against the world. Guess who wins?

REEL TAKE: I was very surprised to see that

Safe, the latest Jason Stathan action vehicle, underperformed at the box office. It didn’t exactly tank as it wasn’t a big budget actioner but it failed to meet expectations. Considering that I found it to be one of his better films, its failure to do better is even more puzzling. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that Safe lacks the outrageousness of the Crank films, the name recognition of The Mechanic remake, or the testosterone charged cast list of The Expendables (the sequel is just around the corner). Whatever the reason, people who missed it on its first run missed a good one. Jason Stathan continues to portray Jason Stathan and makes no apologies for it nor should he. He continues to be the Charles Bronson of the 21st century (although somewhat more animated) making small but effective movies that don’t promise to be anything more than an exciting way to spend some time in the local cinder cinderma. The sheer professionalism of his movies recalls the films of Michael Winner and Don Siegel, entertaining no nonsense films that are in short supply today. The plot for Safe should have had more appeal than usual. Ex-cop and failed boxer Luke Wright (Stathan) becomes involved with Mai, a young Chinese girl (Catherine Chan) whose ability to remember complicated math equations has caused her to be brought to New York to work in the Chinese rackets. After his family is murdered by Russian mobsters for refusing to throw a fight, Luke and Mai go on the run together while he plans to get even. Once this plot point is taken care of, then the film becomes a non-stop parade of stylized mayhem where the Russians, the Chinese, and even the corrupt NYC cops get what is coming to them. The body count

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Mill & The Cross”

June DVD Picks

The Mill & The Cross (2011) WARNING: this movie from 2011 is not for everyone. It is about the 16th century Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel and one of his more celebrated paintings The Way to Calvary Calvary. If you’re not into Art and especially the work of the Renaissance painters then you’ll want to give this movie a wide berth but if you are, then you’ll be rewarded with one of the most stunningly beautiful films that I have ever seen. Director Lech Majewski has created a moving tapestry that literally begins with movement within the painting itself. We then see glimpses of peasant life which was the subject of so many Bruegel paintings. The recreation of the style, the colors and the clothing worn is remarkable. Rutger Hauer stars as Bruegel along with Michael York as his patron and Charlotte Rampling who plays the artist’s wife as well as the Virgin Mary in the painting. Seeing York at 70 and Hauer and Rampling in their mid 60s comes as something of a shock but it’s nice to see them still working. Some of the images are incredibly brutal, for the people of the Netherlands in the 16th century faced harsh reprisals under Spanish domination. These images work their way into Bruegel’s paintings along with whatever else he observed for he was the visual chronicler of the age. The movie is highly stylized for in addition to copying the look of the paintings, there is very little dialogue. In fact not a word is said for the first 30 minutes. As the film (and the painting) progress, there is more interaction between the characters. By the time the end is reached, with the picture finished, it could be a documentary.

If you’re in the mood for something different and aren’t opposed to Art with a capital A, then you should give The Mill & The Cross a try. It is available through Netflix and from some local video outlets. Once seen it is almost impossible to put out of your mind, and is worth seeing for that reason alone.

The Woman in Black (2011) The Woman in Black opened to good notices and modest crowds earlier this year. My co-reviewer Professor Kaufmann did a great review for it at the time, but I’m willing to wager many of you, dear readers, did not venture out to see this creepy tale. Ironically many filmgoers who would likely enjoy The Woman in Black did not see it, thinking it was a horror movie, while horror film fans flocked to the theatre, at least initially, only to realize they weren’t watching a slasher film but a gothic ghost story, complete with period costumes and English accents. My bet is it wasn’t their cup of tea. Newly released on DVD, I’m hoping I can persuade some folks who should have seen it to see it now. The Woman in Black Black,, produced by Hammer Films (something our regular readers will know a bit about thanks to Professor Kaufmann’s penchant for Hammer Films – Rapid River Magazine, October

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Woman in Black” 2010), stars Daniel Radcliffe as Arthur Kipps, a young lawyer struggling with work and life after the death of his wife. He is sent to a remote village to settle the estate of an eccentric old woman. Upon his arrival he is sternly and vehemently warned to leave. The locals are hiding something, but what? The only people in town to welcome him are the Dailys (Ciarin Hinds, Janet McTeer) a wealthy couple still grieving the loss of a child almost 20 years later. Mr. Daily does not subscribe to the local superstitions and assists Kipps in his quest. As Kipps digs in to his work, he begins to unravel the mystery of the ghost of a wronged woman. The spirit exacts her vengeance on the local children. The film is genuinely scary and packs several surprises that startle enough to quite possibly be detrimental to anyone with a heart condition. Director James Watkins creates a brilliantly atmospheric film and paces it methodically, building suspense and fear in the minds of the viewers. The cinematography is shot almost exclusively to tell the story from Kipps’ perspective which is a tremendously effective tool in telling this story. Radcliffe plays Kipps with perfect British reserve. Hinds is great addition to any cast and any movie at any time and provides a slight respite from the creep factor. McTeer is wonderful as the slightly disturbed, still grieving mother. The ending was a surprise, but I found it satisfying and a brave choice. The Woman in Black is not the cheesy (albeit utterly enjoyable) drive-in movie fare that Hammer used to churn out. Bottom line, you won’t find a better ghost story out there. It is a suspenseful nail biter. It’s well done and well worth the view.

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stage preview Spring Awakening

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ock Eblen likes to take chances. His company, Bioflyer Productions, is known for mounting everything from outlandish original creations to full scale Broadway musicals in some of Asheville’s best venues. Although most community theaters Taylor Loven and Daniel Hensley star in Rock have a huge staff and multiple sponsors, Eblen’s production of Spring Awakening. Eblen pretty much wears all the hats himself—from producing to directing its complete form in English for nearly to designing, and even acting in some of the 100 years. The show became famous bemajor roles. cause it was truly fresh, innovative, and So far he’s managed to pull off some a magnet for younger theater goers. pretty impressive spectacles, like last winter’s The rousing rock score celebrates Asheville Talent Slam which awarded over an unforgettable journey from youth $1000 to talented local performers in comto adulthood with power, poignancy, petition, while still raising money for his and passion. Eblen has even expanded family’s local organization: The Eblen Charhis production this year to cover two ities. Although he is not directly involved in full weekends at the historic Ashethe charity, he designates his theater work as ville Masonic Temple as a Benefit for personal contribution. Planned Parenthood. Returning as The risk involved is that Eblen usually music director will be Chuck Taft, who picks controversial shows that the average last year helmed the uproarious sound WNC theater crowd may not be familiar of Bioflyer’s Footloose also at Diana with. For instance, his company was the first Wortham Theater. local theater to take on the hotly debated rock musical RENT at Diana Wortham Theater in 2010. Despite the radical and More information is available by sexual nature of the material, the show was a visiting www.bioflyer.wordpress.com. big success and Eblen’s gamble paid off with excellent crowds and notices. Now Eblen is pushing the envelope even further by mounting another WNC IF premiere, the exciting rock musical Spring YOU Spring Awakening, GO performances are June 22-23 Awakening. First appearing on Broadway in at 7:30 p.m., June 24 matinee 2006, the show instantly became a sensation at 2:30 p.m., June 29-30 at 7:30 p.m., — winning eight Tony Awards including July 1 matinee at 2:30 p.m. Best Musical. The story takes its inspiration from one of literature’s most controverTickets are $15 in advance ($18 at sial masterpieces — a work so daring in its the door) thru www.Etix.com or at depiction of teenage self-discovery, it was Planned Parenthood, 603 Biltmore Ave. in Asheville. banned from the stage and not performed in

HART’s Marvelous Wonderettes

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he Haywood Arts Regional Theater in Waynesville gives audiences a chance to revisit high school, circa 1958 with it’s next production, “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” created by Roger Bean. It’s prom night and the featured group has had to cancel out, so the Wonderettes are finally getting their chance. The four girls, each running for Prom Queen are set to deliver the biggest hits of the era, complete with mirror ball and streamers and before it’s all over, someone gets elected.

In “The Marvelous Wonderettes” nearly thirty songs are featured including: Mr. Sandman, Lollipop, Sugartime, Allegheny Moon. Dream Lover, Goodnight Sweetheart, Goodnight, Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Heatwave, Respect, and Sincerely. If you know the music get ready to fall in love with it again, and if you don’t know it, you have a treat coming. It’s not an easy show. Those tight harmonies require trained vocalists and HART’s cast includes Tabitha Judy, Tierney Cody, Kelli Brown Mullinix, and Morgan St. Clair. They are under the direction of Mark Jones, assisted by Alexia Grant in production number staging. The music direction is by Jan Powell.

Great values & styles FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

28 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

IF YOU he Marvelous Wonderettes, June GO 1, 2, 8 & 9 at 7:30 and June 3 and

10 at 3 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available on line at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC 28786.

June Events at The Weinhaus Wednesday, June 13 The Weinhaus will join Cúrate for a wine dinner. There is no denying that the most talked about restaurant in Asheville is Cúrate. Their authentic Spanish tapas have generated a buzz, both in the press and among the citizenry. We are excited to pair wines with such focused fare and culinary attention to detail. Seating is limited, so please make your reservations early. Come experience Asheville’s connection to the famed El Bulli. Time: 7 p.m. at The Weinhaus Price: $70. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453. Friday, June 29 Friday Night Flights presents South African Wines. In the global wine trade, South Africa seems perennially emerging a significant producer of export wines. In reality, vineyards have been planted there since the late 1600’s. Many consider Paarl to be the most beautiful wine region on the planet. Come try wines such as Steen and Pinotage which are unique to this country. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at the Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave. Asheville.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453


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stage preview NC Stage Kicks Off Summer Series with Shakespeare and a Vampire

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orth Carolina Stage Company’s Mainstage season is winding down with the final weekends of In the Next Room, or The Vibrator Play (closing June 10), but the downtown theatre will not be dark this summer. In June, NC Stage offers a special oneweekend production of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, as well as a mini-festival of silent Tempest

BY

AMANDA LESLIE

films called “The Sounds of Silence,” featuring live musical accompaniment from local composer Nathan Shirley. In between its own productions, NC Stage hosts The Catalyst Series, an eclectic mix that in the past has featured original works, music, comedy, burlesque and dance. The Tempest Tempest, June 14-17, is presented by the students of NC Stage’s Professional Actor Training program, and directed by Michael MacCauley. Far more than a showcase, The Tempest is a fully produced play, featuring many of the professional designers who work on NC Stage’s Mainstage productions. One of Shakespeare’s latest and greatest of plays,, The Tempest is a wondrous journey, filled with love, ‘NC Stage’ continued on page 38

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Appalachian Pastel Society Non-Juried Show

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tudio B Custom Framing & Fine Arts will be hosting a member exhibit for the Appalachian Pastel Society (APS). APS was formed in 2006 to promote an understanding and appreciation of pastel painting in western North Carolina. Its mission includes fostering, encouraging, and developing general public appreciation for the pastel medium through sponsoring speakers, classes and exhibits, artists in-theschools, and publicity. Studio B features original work by regional, “Into The Night” by Deborah Squier national and international artists. Exhibits rotate throughout the year, creating a stimulating environment showcasing work ranging from oil, pastels, acrylic painting and ceramics, to jewelry, sculpture, and woodworking.

“Twins” by Karen Chambers

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IF YOU Opening reception Thursday, June 14 from 5:30 GO to 7:30 p.m. Studio B Custom Framing & Fine

Arts, 171 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville. On display through July 31, 2012. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information call Patti Bell at (828) 225-5200 or visit www.galleryatstudiob.com

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southern comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Never Give In to Discrimination!

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ow I love June, BY JUDY AUSLEY another birthday arrives, hot weather slips in, but much discontent is stirring in all of us this year. It has invaded my privacy and stirred old memories of the past in Florida in a day that I frankly thought was over and done. It has rocked my world in a very threatening way for the first time in many years. Haven’t we fought enough issue wars? I thought late Republican NC Senator Jesse Helms was dead. Think of how many years we went through horrible name calling and threats that this man spewed from his salvia-spitting lips. How this man continued to be elected to office dismayed me in those days. Those were bad years for many. As a writer, I can write about it and hope the right people read my words. I am just as much of an idealist as I was yesterday somewhere in the ‘60s when I started my career as a journalist. I do not know where the time went, but I find myself on the verge of 72 now and I often wonder how much time is left for me to do all the things I want to do before my demise from this earth. I was never accepted by my mother but I learned to surround myself with those who accepted my lifestyle and loved me. She was so bitter she took it with her to the coffin. Never saying she was sorry or reconciling with me her only daughter. I packed it away someplace and started my life of running, getting as far as I could get at the time. When she died of cancer in 2004, I had not seen her in 14 years. I could not deal with her anger towards me and as sorry as I was that she passed, I just could not take the humiliation any longer. I made a very special motto for my life that is very simple to remember: do not tread where anger lives. For many of us in that era we suffered discrimination because of our lifestyles. But we did not let words destroy us and we kept up the fight to stand strong for the right we have to live as we imagined with peace and love. We survived the Helms years and we will survive this year, only we will be stronger for it. For equality each of us must stand for what we are and continue until we have the same rights as any other person in the state of North Carolina. We are very lucky to live in Asheville, a place where most of us feel free and loved. But, I cannot say that about other nooks and crannies of the state. There are people who hate other people if think they don’t have their shirts buttoned the way they think it should be. Avoid those people and spend your time with like-minded people, because no matter what way things turn out, we cannot change the minds of some. I say re-group and fight to help the right people get to Raleigh to represent us and work to get more of us elected at Writer Judy the city and county Ausley has level: people who are been a willing to stand for reporter with what we believe. I newspapers will continue writing in NC for 40 as much as I can for years. She our rights as peace retired in 2005 and continues to loving and humane freelance at her home in Asheville. citizens of western She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. North Carolina. Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 33


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what to do guide Friday, June 1

June 8-10

Ruth Ilg’s Meditazioni

Asheville Percussion Festival

Opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. New paintEn Famille, 18" x 24" ings describacrylic on canvas ing a personal, meditative journey of color, form and texture. On display through June 30, 2012. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Friday & Saturday, June 1-2

La Fille Mal Gardée Ballet Conservatory of Asheville’s delightfully funny ballet, perfect for the family, features guest star Addul Manzano of North Carolina Dance Theatre. Friday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., at Diana Wortham Theatre. (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.org.

Magic of The Smokies Saturday, June 9 - Taste of

Opera, Crowne Plaza Resort. Reception 5:30-9 p.m. More details at www.ashevillelyric.org

Friday, June 15 - Daniel

McClendon Fine Art Gallery. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through June 27. More details at www.theliftstudios.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

June 1-17

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Music and lyrics by William Finn, Book by Rachel Sheinkin. Directed by Jeff Catanese with musical direction by Brad Curtioff. Performances Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m. Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, visit www. ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, June 2

Geoff Achison & Randall Bramblett in Concert Australian blues/roots guitarist Geoff Achison and Southern singer/songwriter Randall Bramblett in concert at Tryon Fine Arts Center at 8 p.m. Tickets: $15. Call Tryon Fine Arts (828) 859-8322 or visit www.tryonarts.org.

Saturday, June 2

At the Creative Technology and Art Center – Odyssey School in Asheville, NC. For more details call (828) 301-6605, visit www. ashevillepercussionfestival.com.

Saturday, June 9

A Place of Their Own The Young Men’s Institute and Black Social Uplift in Post-Civil War Asheville. Lecture by Darin Waters, UNC Asheville lecturer in History. Free and open to the public with suggested $5 donation. 2 p.m. at Simpson Hall on the campus of A-B Tech. Info: (828) 253-9231 or smh@wnchistory.org.

Saturday & Sunday, June 9-10

River Arts District Studio Stroll The River Arts District Artists (RADA) invite you to studio stroll from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 165 artists, great art, food, fun, and free! For more details visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Woven Together

Get on the bus with Baby Gramps

Marion Manufacturing and McDowell County. Historical exhibit at UNC Asheville. Free and open to the public through August 6. In Blowers Gallery in UNC Asheville’s Ramsey Library. For more details call (828) 251-6436.

Baby Gramps is a high energy humorously entertaining performer with an endless repertoire. This all music show departs from the Thirsty Monk at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Breaking at the Get Down with live entertainment from the Bad Penny Pleasuremakers. Tickets just $15. Tickets available at www. LazoomTours.com.

Opening reception from 5-8 p.m. for this exhibit celebrating the 50th anniversary of American studio glass. New works made expressly for the exhibition by more than 25 regional and national glass artists will be on display through August 31, 2012. The Bender Gallery, 12 S. Lexington Avenue in Asheville. For more details call (828) 505-8341 or visit www. thebendergallery.com.

Sunday, June 10

One Wild Ride! Two Magical Pianos The spectacular piano duo of David Troy Francis and Daniel Weiser create an exciting, jubilant journey exploring the rhythms and sounds of two piano music of Argentina, Brazil, Russia and the United States. Performance begins at 4 p.m

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Friday, June 15

Asheville Quilt Guild meets at 7 p.m., Folk Art Center. Minnesota quilter, Pat Speth, shows Nickle Quilts in “Five Inch is a Cinch” program. Visit www. ashevillequiltguild.org or call (828) 665-6786.

Red June CD Release Show Appalachian Rooted Americana. The Honey Dewdrops open the show. All ages show begins at 8 p.m. $12 advance, $15 at the door. Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. (828) 2748070, www. myaltamont.com

Sunday, June 17

Pan Harmonia’s 11th Annual Father’s Day Concert Chamber music in a glorious mountaintop chapel beginning at 4 p.m. Kate Steinbeck, flute; Barbara Weiss, harpsichord; Rosalind Buda, bassoon; Byron Hedgepeth on vibraphone and percussion. Free admission. Pretty Place Chapel, YMCA Camp Greenville, Cedar Mountain, NC. For directions: (864) 836-3291, www.campgreenville. org. Visit www.pan-harmonia.org.

Plein Air Exhibit

Soprano Sensation AmiciMusic presents Atlanta-based soprano Maria Clark. Programs will feature a variety of songs from the classical and musical theater repertoire with a special focus on George Gershwin.

Old Fashioned Nickle Quilts

Saturday, June 23

Old Fashioned Fried Chicken and Ham Dinner From 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. $8 for adults. $4 for children. Eat-in, or take-out. Morris Bedsole of the Justus Center will prepare the fried chicken. The ham and all the fixings will be prepared by the members of St. Paul’s Episcopal. Take your pick from tables loaded down with desserts. Annual fundraiser at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1659 St. Paul’s Rd., Hendersonville, NC.

Sunday, June 24

Project Run Way “Fashion Revival” A fund raiser for the JCC here in Asheville. Several unique categories: Professionals’ Seeking Gig, Only in Asheville Couture, and a Drag Queen Division. Show begins at 10 a.m. at the Fine Arts Theater (limited to 200 seats). Tickets are $18 and include breakfast. 100% of every cent goes the Jewish Community Center Programs.

Thursday, June 28

Poetry & Movement Poets Katherine Soniat, Tracey Schmidt, and dancer Claire Elizabeth Barratt, will collaborate on this interdisciplinary evening of poetry and movement. Cost $7; $5 for BMCM+AC members and students w/ID. 7:30 p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street.

Thursday, June 28

Listen to This

Friday, June 29 at 7:30 p.m.

Stories in Performance will be hosted by Tom Chalmers in 35below at 7:30 p.m. Join Asheville’s number one comedian as he presents true stories told by local comedians, actors, and people just like you. Tickets $10. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St. in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 2541320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Saturday, June 30 at 7:30 p.m. at

Saturday, June 30

House concert in Biltmore Forest. $35 includes food and drink. Reservations required. Contact Dan Weiser at (828) 505-2903 or e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org. White Horse in Black Mountain. $15. Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sunday, July 1 at 3 p.m. at First

Baptist Church in Weaverville. $15 suggested donation. www.amicimusic.org

Run for Shindig on the Green A fundraising benefit for Shindig on the Green at Carrier Park . Fun Walk/ Run begins at 9 a.m. 5K race begins at 10 a.m. Register online at www.active. com. Fun Walk/Run $10; 5K registration $30. Visit www.folkheritage.org or call (828) 258-6101 x345.

JUNE EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

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at the Diana Wortham Theatre. (828) 257-4530, www.DWTheatre.com.

On display at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, located at 225 W. State Street. The exhibit will feature works painted during the 6th Annual Art in Bloom Garden Tour, held June 15-16. Area plein air painters will be painting in the gardens, then display their works on the Center’s main floor. For more details call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.blackmountainarts.org.

Monday, June 4

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Thinking Big

Sunday, June 10

Divergent Visions

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June 18-22

Samantha Ryan Chandler finds her way from humble beginnings to live and walk amongst presidents and the supremely rich, only to find her trust and faith betrayed by those she loved and trusted the most. Book signing event from 5-6:30 p.m. at Grateful Steps Publishing House & Bookshop, 159 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville.

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Saturday & Sunday, June 9-10 Exhibition features a collection of large paintings, ranging in style from expressionistic abstract to vivid landscape. Celebrating from 10-6 p.m. with an outdoor dance party on June 9 starting at 6 p.m. 310 ART at Riverview Station North, 191 Lyman Street #310, Asheville. On display June 2 through August 31. Call (828) 776-2716 for more details or visit www.310art.com.

A Love Story, How God Pursued Me and Found Me

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what to do guide Saturday, June 30

An Evening of Kirtan

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Smoky Mountain Brass Band Concerts

With Wayne Farris from 7 to 9 p.m. at Asheville Community Yoga, 8 Brookdale Rd., Asheville. A transformational evening of devotional yoga. $20 suggested donation. For more details visit www. ashevillecommunityyoga.com.

The thirty-member band and conductor John Entzi will perform a variety of musical styles, from Marches to Classical and Classic British Brass Band repertoire, to Jazz, Pops and Hymn tunes. Concerts are free to the public with a free will offering taken.

Saturday, June 30

Haywood Co. Courthouse in Waynesville.

Saturday, June 2 at 2 p.m. Picnic on the Lawn,

Butterflies Don’t Crawl and An Apple a Day Book signing from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. An Apple a Day is written by Sherrie Leslie and illustrated by Les Leslie. Butterflies Don’t Crawl is written by Angela and Suzie Tipton and illustrated by Wil Irvine. Face painting, balloons, coloring pages, and refreshments. At Grateful Steps Publishing House & Bookshop, 159 S. Lexington Ave.

Tuesday, June 26 at 7:30 p.m. Mars Hill College Auditorium.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

On Common Ground Saturday, June 2 From the Mountains to the Sea, 2012 Statewide Pastel Exhibition. Opening reception from 6-8:30 p.m.

Every Tuesday

Two for Tuesdays Two bands. Two bucks. Encouraging new bands to showcase their passion for music and live performance. All ages, free, 7-10 p.m. One Stop, 55 College Street, Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777, www.ashevillemusichall.com.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Summer Authors Speakers Series at UNC Asheville

Ron Rash Photo: Mark Haskett

Sundays 3-4:30 p.m. A quintet of great Southern writers speak at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center.

Tommy Hays, July 1; Charles Frazier, July 8; Wayne Caldwell, July 15; Ron Rash, July 22; Erica Abrams Locklear, July 29.

This exhibition represents an exciting new collaboration among the three pastel societies of North Carolina, the Appalachian Pastel Society (APS), Pastel Society Ethereal Journey by of North Carolina (PSNC), Beverly Kies (APS) and Piedmont Pastel Society (PPS). The Pastel Society of North Carolina in Raleigh, NC, will host the 2012 exhibit. Bev’s Fine Art, 7400 Six Forks Rd., Suite 19, Raleigh, NC. Contact Patricia Savage at (919) 438-6766 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Summer Music in Flat Rock Concerts are held on the first Saturday of the month through October. June 2, Joe Ebel and Annie Lalley Annie Lalley and Joe Ebel; July 7, Tom Fisch; August 4, Chuck Brodsky; September 1, Al Pettaway and Amy White; October 6, Bobby and The Blue Ridge Tradition.

The series is free and open to the public and takes place in the Manheimer Room at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. For more information call (828) 251-6140.

Atelier Gallery Moves to Lexington Ave. Atelier Gallery in downtown Asheville will be opening at 63 N. Lexington Ave. in July. Until then visit them at 68 College Street, or online at www.theateliergalleries.com.

For more information call (828) 551-6839 or visit www.smbrass.com

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

These free outdoor concerts are held in Flat Rock on Little Rainbow Row’s back deck (behind the colorful shops, corner of Greenville Highway and West Blue Ridge Road) from 6 to 8 p.m. For more details call Hand in Hand Gallery at (828) 697-7719 or visit www.flatrockonline.com.

Serendipity – Saturday, July 7 An International Exhibition of Wood Fired Sculptural Ceramics. Artist’s reception at 6 p.m. Exhibition features works from the United States, Australia, Denmark, Japan, and Poland. Curated by Asheville sculptor Eric Knoche, the exhibit will be held at the Crimson Laurel Gallery, 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC 28705. Phone (828) 688-3599 for more details.

Classes at River’s Edge Studio All skill levels welcomed! 191 Lyman Street, Studio #310 in the historic river arts district. For details and schedule call (828) 776-2716 or visit www.fletamonaghan.com. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 35


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find it here Alan Deutsch Photography alandeutschphotography.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Amici Music www.amicimusic.org

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Artery www.ashevillearts.com

Burgermeister’s www.burgermeisters.com

Asheville Lyric Opera www.ashevillelyric.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Beads and Beyond (828) 254-7927

Constance Williams Gallery constancewilliamsgallery.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

The Fine Arts League of the Carolinas www.fineartsleague.org Double Exposure Giclee Fine Art Printmaking www.doubleexposureart.com Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757 Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

La Carreta Mexican Restaurant (828) 225-4600

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

Studio B www.galleryatstudiob.com

Mangum Pottery www.mangumpottery.com

Susan Marie Designs (828) 277-1272

Maria's Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

Mr Frogs Soul & Creole Kitchen www.mrfrogs.com

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

Daniel McClendon Fine Art www.danielmc.com

Green Light Cafe (828) 250-3800

Low Weekly & Monthly Rates

VC VA

WNC Community Credit Union www.wncccu.org

NORTH ASHEVILLE

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

Guild Crafts www.craftguild.org

The New York Studio of Stage and Screen www.nys3.com

Jack of Hearts Pub & Restaurant www.jackofheartspub.com

HB

P.H. Best Fine Art www.mountainbrushworks.com

Jeff Pittman www.jeffpittman.com

NE

HENDERSONVILLE

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Janton Art Studio www.jantonart.com

NB

Riverside Studios www.riversidestudios-asheville.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com Jimmy John's www.jimmyjohnsrestaurant.com

Roots Building www.BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

Jonas Gerard www.jonasgerard.com

Sanctuary of Stuff www.sanctuaryofstuff.com

DA DB

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

DC

MERRIMON AVE.

WEAVERVILLE

Woolworth Walk www.woolworthwalk.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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36 June 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 10

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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fine art River Arts District Studio Stroll Returns June 9 and 10!

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IT’S A SYNERGY THING

ell, it’s that BY GREG VINEYARD time again. You know, that extra1) Commit! Decide special event to spend the day and known as STUDIO enjoy! If you are readSTROLL, hosted by the ing this after Studio River Arts District ArtStroll weekend, come ists (RADA). Over 165 on down anytime and artist members across enjoy it at a quieter pace 22 historic buildings - even on a Sunday, one are open together, all can find several buildweekend. ings open, great art and While many larger tasty food. venues are open six 2) Prepare! Go to and seven days a week, www.riverartsdistrict. allowing folks to find com, the official and art, working studios only website of RADA, and great food any day for maps and more. they choose to visit, the And of course, if you Hit the Road - and stroll the Studio Strolls are the are reading this column, River Arts District! result of a much larger, you hold in your hands synergistic effort that is well worth the trip the official Rapid River Studio Stroll pullout down the hill from downtown. section, which also has a map, as well as Nearly every activity taken on by information on artists and advertisers. individual members throughout the year 3) Stroll! Walking from building to to function as an organization, as well as to building is great exercise. But you can also put on Studio Stroll, represents the type of ... Ride! RADA’s synergistic friend, the steady volunteerism that has helped build Grayline Trolley, will be running a circuit the dream of a community where people throughout the District all day Saturday and can see, learn, meet and shop in a way that’s Sunday. fairly unique in the country. 4) Connect! Meet and learn about the I’ve been inspired to write about artists of your community, ask questions, Studio Stroll every June and November, observe demonstrations, and chat with the and Rapid River selflessly dedicates a whole strangers all around you who also love art. section of those months’ issues to the River Who knows? They could become an integral Arts District. And the River Arts District has part of your interactive, active Asheville life. garnered increasing regional and national at5) Support! RADA members apprecitention. Every member who makes a public ate visitors who are seeking to decorate their relations effort, whether through media lives with amazing hand-made creations. channels or simply by providing an excellent Your Studio Guide provides a member shopping experience for out of town visitors, listing, building by building, to help you contributes to the growing phenomenon. confirm that you are supporting an actual The River Arts District has shaken off dues-paying member. And please consider some old definitions from days gone by and supporting the businesses who support developed some new, cooler ones. People RADA through their trolley sponsorship and are attracted to the energy of this visually Studio Guide advertising. It’s part of that fascinating place, due to the art in the buildsynergy thing. ings, and because of the historic buildings See you at Studio Stroll! themselves. In addition to RADA’s events, there are other cooperative actions going on all around, contributing to that “working Greg Vineyard is an together” feeling. artist, writer and creative For example, the artists at Constance consultant in Asheville, Williams Gallery held an art show to benefit NC. Find his clay works the “Green the RAD” program by Asheville at Constance Williams Greenworks, an organization that enthusiasGallery in Asheville’s tically supports the District in many ways. River Arts District, and RADA’s home turf is a daily destination, his illustrations at ZaPow Gallery in and I encourage you to come on down and downtown Asheville. enjoy the flavor of it all. Here are some sugVisit www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net. gestions for your Studio Stroll experience:

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lll#BdcZi^oZNdjgK^h^dc#Xdb Vol. 15, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2012 37


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Sanctuary of Stuff

o quote our loyal customers “Sanctuary of Stuff is the best kept secret in Western North Carolina.” SOS is a unique artisan shopping experience, featuring the art and “stuff” from over 130 local artists and vendors. Housed in a 1940’s art deco two story building on Weaverville Hwy between Woodfin and Weaverville, SOS is an oasis for those seeking a unique gift, an accent piece to add to your décor, or just a piece of art for your soul. Sharie & Kim started this business in 2004, in a corner of Curbside Recycling’s building. The dream was to help support local artists by giving them a reasonably priced space to sell their “stuff” at a price that the public could afford. SOS has survived the recession by offering well priced, unique, locally made art. Even in a recession people like to have a little something to brighten up their days.

magic, and hilarity. Opening June 21 with eight performances over two weekends, “The Sounds of Silence” is NC Stage’s first foray in to presenting films. Local composer Nathan Shirley approached the theatre about creating an evening of silent film, presented as they were meant to be, with live musical accompaniment. The listing of films includes The General, featuring Buster Keaton, the classic vampire film Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror and the cult favorite Haxan: Witchcraft through the Ages. IF YOU The Tempest by William GO Shakespeare. June 14-17. Thursday

Sanctuary of Stuff is an oasis for those seeking a unique gift. Photos: Liza Becker

2009 found us moving to our current location on Weaverville Highway. The art deco building wonderfully showcases our vendors’ creativity, both in their booth display and in their products. Being right on Weaverville Highway also has given us great visibility and it is so easy to find! With a little more creativity the shop has done some upgrades and created more rental space to anticipate the current trend out of the recession. We are looking for a few more local artists to complete and complement the offerings of our current vendors. If you would like your work showcased in Sanctuary Of Stuff please submit a description and photos of your work to us at kim@sanctuaryofstuff.com. We will review your pictures and submit

‘NC Stage’ continued from page 29

them to our small jury. We love variety but do our best to not duplicate what our current vendors offer. We look for diversity, quality and price points that we feel our customers will support. The shop has many rental options beginning at $40 per month with the average booth rental being $80 per month. The shop ask for a three month commitment to start, that usually gives the customers a chance to come in and see the new artisan and the artist a fair chance to see if we are a good match. A copy of our contract can be found on our website www.sanctuaryofstuff.com. A very high percentage of our artist have been with us for years and have become a part of our always growing family. The shop has recently acquired a new vendor specializing in equine tack, anything from bar stools to headboards to saddles and clothing will be available here. A new booth specializing in our local authors has also been added. SOS is actively looking for the following artists: stained glass, glass blowers, wood turners and children/baby items. But the sky is the limit so show us what you have! We love being blown away by all of the creativity that is flowing through Western North Carolina.

Sanctuary of Stuff 440 Weaverille Highway, Asheville in the Woodfin Community (828) 484-8047 www.sanctuaryofstuff.com Hours: M-Sat 10-6; Sunday 1-5

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– Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets $15 adults, $10 students. The Sounds of Silence. A silent film mini-festival featuring music by Nathan Shirley. June 21 through July 1. Thursday – Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets $10, or $20 for a three-movie pass For tickets, call (828) 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org

‘Aspirin’ continued from page 23

“Sir, if you please, I have a question,” Mary Hall said, “about your orders.” “Yes?” Dr. Atchison’s eyebrows arched upward. “You didn’t order aspirin, sir. You gave her medicines for her high blood pressure and her high cholesterol. You ordered diabetic and weight control counseling. But you didn’t order a low dose aspirin. And I was wondering why.” Dr. Atchison slowly closed the chart. “Hmm. Our old friend, aspirin. Yes, we usually give a baby aspirin, 81 mg, to our heart patients.” He eyed her carefully. “Is she a heart patient?” “Yes, sir. She has a family history and several major risks factors for heart disease and for the possibility of stroke,” Dr. Hall concluded. “And aspirin prevents some cancers, yes?” “Dr. James.” The first year resident quickly roused from his slouched position. “Dr. James, in whom is aspirin proven to be effective?” “In those at high risk for heart disease,” Dr. James shot back. “Those who have had a heart attack, who have stents, or who have had a non-bleed stroke. In these patients aspirin has been proven to significantly prevent another episode.” “But what about those with major risk factors but not an actual heart attack or stroke. Do we give these patients aspirin?” “I know that aspirin is not appropriate for

HAL ACKERMAN READING AT NC STAGE Tuesday, June 26, 7 p.m. The seemingly trivial occurrence of a few pilfered honeybee colonies propels former hippie and merry prankster Harry Stein into the multitrillion-dollar world of the honeybee industry. This is the the second of the Harry Stein series of “soft-boiled” murder mysteries. Hal Ackerman, author of the series, will read from Stein, Stung at North Carolina Stage Company, an event co-hosted by Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café.

IF YOU GO: Doors open at 6 p.m.

and the reading begins at 7 p.m. For directions visit www.ncstage.org.

people with little or heart disease risk. It does not prevent heart disease in those at low risk and aspirin has significant side effects.” Dr. James looked puzzled. “But I’m not sure what it does for those at moderate risk.” “Dr. Stewart, what do you know about patients with risk factors but no actual heart attack, those at moderate risk?” The chief resident sat up straight. “A recent study demonstrated that low dose aspirin was helpful in only 20 % of the patients at moderate risk. But more than 30% of them got significant side-effects from the aspirin, mainly gastrointestinal bleeding. In the patient we just saw, the risks for bleeding are probably higher than the chance for benefit. Especially with her esophagitis, it’s too risky to give her aspirin.” “And what about the prevention of cancer, Dr. Stewart?” Dr. Atchison asked. “All we have are observational studies in aspirin and cancer, sir. There is no hard evidence yet that aspirin prevents any cancers. It is inappropriate at this time to be giving aspirin to prevent cancer, especially with all the side effects of aspirin, only one of which is bleeding.” “Thank you, Dr. Stewart. An excellent question, Dr. Hall. An excellent response from our residents. All in all, an excellent teaching day.” Dr. Atchison smiled and started for the door. “Oh, Dr. Hall.” He paused. “Come see me in my office this afternoon. I would like to talk with you about being one of our residents next year.”


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June 2012 issue  
June 2012 issue  

Fine Art - Daniel McClendon Art Gallery..p3, Taste of Opera..p3, The Waynesville Fly Shop..p3, Jack of Hearts..p4, Fine Art Print Fair..p4,...

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