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Folkmoot USA World Music & Dance PAGE

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Bowl by Steve Noggle

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands PAGE

41st Annual Biltmore Village Art & Craft Fair PG 29

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Celebrate Art in the “DAAD”! PAGE

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Work by Roger Ricco

PLUS Interviews with Portrait Artist Lorelle Bacon

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Terri Karlsson co-owner of The Tree and Vine

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Fine Artist Teresa Pennington PG 31

Before Midnight • The East • The End is Near • Man of Steel • Much Ado About Nothing • What Maisie Knew

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performance Asheville Lyric Opera debuts Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel

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Asheville Lyric Opera expands into year round programming this summer with a staged concert of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s beloved musical Carousel on July 19 and 20. This award-winning work was the legendary duo’s favorite in their entire repertory that includes The Sound of Music, The King and II, and Oklahoma! In addition to the themes of love and redemption, Carousel

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ADAM Z. BOWERS

includes the unforgettable songs “You’ll Never Walk Alone” and “If I Loved You.” The musical tells the story of two young lovers in a small American coastal town. Quiet mill worker Julie Jordan attracts ‘Opera’ continued on page 7

North Carolina’s International Festival

July 18-21

July 17-28, 2013

Sponsors SMOKY MOUNTAIN INN

With Dancers and Musicians from: Thailand, Mexico, Paraguay, Japan, Slovakia, Canada, Martinique and France. Featuring special performances from Appalachian and Cherokee cultures.* Tickets & Information: 877.FolkUSA | www.folkmootusa.org *subject to change

200 Juried Artists Craft Demonstrations Live Regional Music

Susan Marie Phipps

Presenting Sponsor

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 3


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FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

Sterling silver, 14k gold with iolite & peridot designed by Paula Dawkins

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

PG. 36

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we love this place Anything That Floats Parade

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Eleven

JULY 2013

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Adam Z. Bowers, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Beth Gossett, Chall Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Lauren Kriel, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Brittany Martin, Marcianne Miller, Lindsey Mudge, April Nance, Carol Pearce, Dennis Ray, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Ana Woodall. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, July 2013, Vol. 16 No. 11

3 Performance

Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Magnetic Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

7 Fairs & Festivals

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival 7 Folkmoot World Music & Dance . . 8 Southern Highlands Craft Fair . . . 19 Village Art & Craft Fair . . . . . . . . . 29 Art in Autumn 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

9 Fine Art

375 Depot, Studio 107 . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Asheville Area Arts Council . . . . . 11 Downtown Asheville Art District . 12 Handmade in America . . . . . . . . . . 13 Lorelle Bacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 ZaPow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Waynesville’s Art After Dark . . . . . 30 Teresa Pennington . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

13 Columns

Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . .

13 14 15 16 18 23 28 28 33

17 Music

Jimmy LaFave at the Grey Eagle . . 17 Yonder Mountain String Band . . . 18

24 Movie Reviews

Mermaids, Pirates, and River Spirits... Oh My! Calling all artists and ’out of the boat’ thinkers! We want you to gather your crew and join us on the French Broad River on Saturday, August 10 for the wildest and most fun-tastic event of the summer! Be prepared for a day of wacky, tacky, kitschy, kooky, freaky, cheeky, show boats. Creating a raft, float or flotilla with your free spirited friends is a unique chance to have a blast while showcasing your mindblowing artistry. So, gather your crew and ’raft it up a notch’ by creating and building your one-of-a kind, handcrafted, floatable boat. Helping save and protect the French Broad River has never been more fun! Register to participate by visiting this site: http://riverfestavl.brownpapertickets.com

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District. . . . . . . . . PGS 9-11 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 20-21 Biltmore Village . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 29 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 30-31 Weaverville + Northside . . . . PG 32 Find It Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 36

Riverfest 2013 The Anything That Floats Parade is part of Riverfest 2013, held Saturday, August 10 in the French Broad River Park in Asheville from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. The festival has an exciting line-up of music, dancing, hooping and juggling, along with food, beer, crafts and kid’s activities. Admission is free.

There’s a New, Fiery Redhead in Town Meet the lovely Earlene Hooch, from Lick Holler, just outside of Asheville. She lives in a trailer park with her four crazy kids. Sadly, she is single at the present. Her ex-husband, Cletus ran off with a Waffle House waitress. Like all good Appalachian women, Earlene loves her kids and her mama. God help the poor soul that ever tries to mess with either! She is spunky, a natural redhead, and always quick with a smile and a joke. And yes... she is a redneck... but she is the classiest redneck you’ll ever meet! This is a tour you don’t want to miss! Get on the Bus – Asheville’s wildest ride provides hilarious and historic comedy bus tours.

Lazoom Tours, 1 ½ Battery Park Avenue,

Asheville. Call (828) 225-6932 for details or visit www.lazoomtours.com

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 24

29 Local Favorites

The Tree and Vine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 The Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . 38

On the Cover:

2013 Village Art and Craft Fair artwork by Sharon Vintson. PAGE 29

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . .

35 35 35 35

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 5


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captivating performances HART PRESENTS TWO MUSICAL CLASSICS

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Side by Side by Sondheim, and Brigadoon

The Haywood Arts Regional Theater, one of the areas most active companies, will feature a double line up for July. The theater will open the cabaret musical review “Side by Side by Sondheim” on June 28 for a run that will continue through August 3. On July 12 the theatre will open its spectacular production of “Brigadoon,” which will run weekends through August 4. HART is bringing in four guest artists for the leads in “Brigadoon,” Nick DeVito, Samantha Alicandri, Jordana McMahon and Joshua Farrar, and is using the opportunity to showcase the actor/singer/dancers in the Sondheim production which will also feature HART veterans Lyn Donley and Cord Scott.

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM

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“Side by Side” was created in the early 1980’s as a salute to Broadway’s most celebrated living composer. The show includes nearly two dozen songs taken from “West Side Story,” “Gypsy,” “Follies,” “Company,” “A Little Night Music,” and more. It is smart, sassy, and will feature top notch talent. “Brigadoon” by Lerner and Lowe is one of those grand majestic Musical Classics. It tells the story of an enchanted village that only appears once every one hundred years. Of course two travelers from modern day stumble upon it on the fateful day and the adventure ensues. The show will feature elaborate sets, costumes, a huge cast and full orchestra. HART’s productions are being directed by Steve Lloyd, Music Directed by Dr.

Bradley Martin with additional staging and choreography by Cord Scott. IF YOU “Side By Side” will have GO performances June 28 & 29, and

July 5 & 6 at 7:30 p.m., July 7 at 3 p.m., and August 3 at 2 p.m. “Brigadoon” will run Thursdays through Sundays from July 13 through August 4. Tickets: $24 for adults; $22 for seniors; students/teachers $12. Special $8 discount tickets for students and teachers for Sundays. Box Office Hours: MondaySaturday 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville.

New York City’s Anonymous Ensemble at NC Stage

North Carolina Stage Company presents a Catalyst Series production of I Land, an original and ever-evolving multimedia performance event from Anonymous Ensemble. Described as “a choose-your-own-adventure of sorts for brainy adults who love film and theater” by CT.com, Anonymous Ensemble invites the audience to spend an evening on an island far from their daily lives, yet mysteriously inhabited by their inner lives. Beginning with a conversation with the audience, this meticulously crafted performance event investigates the evolution of our imaginations as Anonymous Ensemble leads us on odyssey into an uncharted terrain of commonplace fantasies and wildly improbable realities. New York City based Anonymous Ensemble strives to engender a new form of audience experience that encompasses the immediacy of live performance, the fluidity of film, and is profoundly interactive. “We ask how the live audience can be co-creators of each performance event. We value creating community wherever we go and giving voice and agency to our audiences in our explorations of the human condition, our collective storytelling, and our commitment to the limitless possibilities of imagination,” says Eamonn Farrell, a member of Anonymous Ensemble. The I Land ensemble is composed of Eamonn Farrell, Liz Davito, Jessica Wein-

6 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

BY

LAUREN KRIEL

stein, and Lucy Smith. Anonymous Ensemble first became known as creators of the episodic, multimedia, rock spectacle called The Best, inspired by the Greek Theban plays, which performed in NYC, Australia and Berlin from 2003 to 2008. Anonymous Ensemble achieved further international acclaim with their wildly inThis meticulously crafted teractive “dance party” performance event investigates the called Wanderlust, which evolution of our imaginations. premiered in New York in 2007, followed by an award nominated run in Factory Festival at the New Ohio Theater the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and a critiin July of 2013, and premiere at Incubator cally acclaimed U.K. tour. Arts in NYC in January of 2014. In 2010 and 2011, Anonymous Ensemble went to Greece to develop their live, bilingual “Rebetiko/Rock Doc” called IF The Return, and The Turing Opera, an YOU I Land runs July 5-21, with original opera told through the mind GO Thursday-Saturday performances of a computer, which premiered with at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. All performances are at North the National Opera of Greece. In 2012, Carolina Stage Company’s theatre at Anonymous Ensemble developed Liebe 15 Stage Lane, just off Walnut Street in Love Amour! a “live film” love affair with downtown Asheville. an audience which premiered at the New Ohio Theater in NYC and is currently Tickets are $20, with $15 tickets available touring in the United States. to those under 30 and over 60, and are available at www.ncstage.org, or by calling I Land is Anonymous Ensemble’s latest (828) 239-0263. ever-evolving piece and will close the Ice


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The Swannanoa Chamber music Festival is in full swing during the month of July. One of the longest running chamber music festivals in the U.S., the Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival has been bringing high quality chamber music to Western North Carolina for over forty summers. Concerts take place on Tuesday evenings, July 2, 9, 16, and 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kittredge Theatre on the campus of Warren Wilson College, and Sunday evenings, June

30, July 7, 14, 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center in Waynesville. This festival is unique in that it has a core of musicians, a string quartet, a woodwind quintet, and a piano, which perform in many different musical combinations as well as in the standard ensembles. Featured performers at the festival during the month of July are the Cleveland Quartet Prize winning Jasper Quartet, pianists Inessa Zaretsky and Paul Nitsch, flutist George Pope, oboist Cynthia Watson, clarinetist David Bell, bassoonist Lynn Hileman, and hornist Bill Hoyt. There will be music from the “great” composers such as Beethoven, Mozart, Bartók, and Dvorák as well as interesting music that is rarely heard by such composers as Cambini, Webern, and Dohnányi. The final concert will be a wind extravaganza with guest artists oboist Reid Messich, clarinetis Rose Sperrazza, bassoonist Saxton Rose, and hornist David Kappy featuring the great C minor Serenade by Mozart.

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Community Supported Art Now Selling Shares! 6 artists have been chosen. Each share will receive one unique piece from each artist. A share will include: a ceramic mug, a leather journal book, a handblown pint glass, a wooden cutting board, an embossed metal medallion, and a woven basket.

$200 a share Shares are limited!

Please contact Megan at 202.549.8277 or visit handmadeinamerica.org to purchase a share today! . 36 Website: HandMadeinAmerica.org LA Phone: 828. 252. 0121 Address: 125 S. Lexington Ave, Suite 101, Asheville, NC 28801 PG

*Find out more about the benefits of being a HandMade in America Member IF YOU Swannanoa Chamber Music GO Festival: July 2, 9, 16, and 23 at

The prize winning Jasper Quartet

‘Opera’ continued from page 3

the eye of Billy Bigelow, a town newcomer who operates the popular carousel. Their pairing creates a stir in the small town, even causing both to lose their jobs. Despite their difficulties, the two marry and in a twist of fate, Julie learns she is pregnant. Billy’s crime history resurfaces as he struggles for a way to support his child, compounding the couple’s hardships as new parents. The story also follows the love affair of outspoken Carrie Newcomer and her quiet, beloved fisherman, Mr. Snow. Carousel paints an idyllic, yet unabashedly honest look at the lives of the townspeople. This staged concert will feature local talent in both supporting and starring roles. In addition, local artists will present visual elements of this semi-staged production. With its pure acoustical singing and live orchestra, The Asheville Lyric Opera offers a

7:30 p.m. at Kittredge Theatre on the campus of Warren Wilson College; Sunday evenings, June 30, July 7, 14, 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center in Waynesville. $20 for individual tickets and $75 for a series ticket. For more information, visit www.swannanoachambermusic.com. If you would like to contact us in Swannanoa, phone (828) 771-3050 or e-mail chamber@ warren-wilson.edu.

distinctive musical style and premium stage experience. Carousel is anxiously awaited by local fans that have come to expect high quality productions from ALO. Newcomers and visitors to Asheville, even those who have never attended an opera before, will find the story, style, and even several songs familiar and relatable. A family favorite, Carousel will delight audience members of all ages.

IF YOU The Asheville Lyric Opera GO preesents Carousel. Performances

begin at 8 p.m. on both Friday, July 19 and Saturday, July 20, with an additional performance on Saturday, July 20 at 3 p.m., in the Diana Wortham Theater in Asheville. Tickets are available at the theatre box office: (828) 257-4530. For more information visit www.ashevillelyric.org. Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 7


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summer festivals Celebrate 30 Years of Folkmoot World Music & Dance

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What global organization has hosted 8,000 people from countries all over the world and has pumped 120 million tourism dollars into the local economy over the past 30 years? There are many wonderful events throughout the western part of North Carolina, but none can compare to Folkmoot USA’s impact on the communities in this region. Citizens and visitors count on the Folkmoot Festival to provide entertainment, education, and those important tourism dollars, each year.

Dancers from Slovakia

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Folkmoot USA’s Board of Directors, staff and volunteers are planning this special 30th Anniversary Festival to take place July 17-28. Guest performers from Mexico, Thailand, Slovakia, Japan, Canada (Scottish Highland Dance), Martinique, Poland, France (Stilt-walkers), local clogging groups and musicians, and The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians official ambassadors— The Warriors of Anikituwah—will appear. Although most performances are centered in Haywood County, Folkmoot can be experienced in 12 cities, including Waynesville, Asheville, Hendersonville, Franklin, Burnsville and Hickory. Come out and support local cultural favorites: Dixie Darlin’s,

Southern Appalachian Cloggers, Southern Mountain Fire, Green Valley Cloggers and J-Creek Cloggers. One or more of these groups will be appearing at seven Haywood County performances throughout the Festival. BearWaters Brewing Company, one of Haywood County’s award winning microbreweries, is now producing a Folkmoot 30th Anniversary beer that should be ready to tap before the Festival kicks off on July 17. To help prepare 15,000 nutritious meals during the 2-week Festival, Folkmoot will also be working with local growers, and the Buy Haywood Program, to provide the freshest local produce to help fuel the international performers. Everyone can celebrate and support Folkmoot’s 30th by becoming a member through the Friends of Folkmoot Program. Folks can join for as little as $35 per year. Anyone can also attend the Gala Preview Performance and Champagne Reception for Friends of Folkmoot members, donors and sponsors, which will be held at Maggie Valley’s

Stilt walkers perform from France

International Festival Day in Waynesville

On July 20, downtown Waynesville will be teeming with more than one hundred artists, craftsmen, and international guests selling a wide range of art and craft. Art lovers can browse booths filled with handcrafted items and even catch a demonstration or two by artisans including flame workers, potters, and woodworkers. From Russian nesting dolls and Vietnamese embroidery to Seagrove pottery and traditional Appalachian baskets, feativalgoers will find treasures at every stop. The international festivities also include food courts at each end of Main Street featuring a delicious variety of choices includ8 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

Stompin’ Ground on Thursday, July 18. This all group performance is filmed each year. DVDs will be offered for sale during the Festival. For a Friends of Folkmoot membership of $150, patrons receive two Gala tickets; 4 tickets for $250; 8 tickets for $500; or 8 tickets for $1,000 plus an invitation to a special private Folkmoot performance with hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. Go on line to www.FolkmootUSA.org to learn more about Friends of Folkmoot.

FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS* Friday, July 19 at 7:30 p.m. Grand Opening at the Stompin Grounds, featuring the Dixie Darlin’s.

Saturday July 20 at 7:30 p.m. All Groups at Haywood Community College, featuring the Southern Appalachian Cloggers.

CELEBRATE WORLD CULTURES ON JULY 20

International Festival Day, presented by the Haywood County Arts Council, is the highlight of regional performances by international folk dancers and musicians from Folkmoot USA.

Performer from Japan

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BRITTANY MARTIN

ing Greek gyros, Asian spring rolls, French crepes, beignets, Caribbean Shawarmas, Fajitas, and—a North Carolina staple—pulled pork barbeque. The Passport to the Arts children’s area issues “passports” for youngsters to countries like Austria, Togo, Ecuador, and Japan where they create crafts unique to the country. Scheduled entertainment takes place at staging areas near the old Courthouse and just beyond Town Hall at opposite ends of Main Street. IF YOU Haywood County Arts Council GO presents International Festival Day,

Saturday, July 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in downtown Waynesville. For more information visit www.haywoodarts.org or call the Arts Council at (828) 452-0593.

Sunday, July 21 at 3:30 p.m. World Friendship Day at Stuart Auditorium, featuring Southern Mountain Fire.

Thursday, July 25 at 7:30 p.m. Five Groups at Haywood Community College, featuring the Green Valley Cloggers and Southern Appalachian Cloggers.

Friday, July 26 at 7:30 p.m. All Groups at the Stompin Grounds, featuring the J-Creek Cloggers.

Saturday, July 27 at 7:30 p.m. All Groups at Haywood Community College, featuring Dixie Darlin’s.

Sunday, July 28 at 7 p.m. Closing Performance at Stuart Auditorium, features Southern Mountain Fire. * Dancers Subject to change. IF YOU Folkmoot USA’s special 30th GO Anniversary Festival takes place July

17-28. For more details call (828) 452-2997 or visit www.FolkmootUSA.org


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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

375 Depot • Studio 107

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Entering the newly restored Studio 107 in the 375 Depot Street building almost always elicits a “Wow!” at the bold features, natural light and energy that fill the space. It wasn’t always so. Early this year, four artists toured the building’s large L-shaped back room. Undaunted by dark walls, uneven floors and boarded windows, they saw elbow room and “good bones.”

Two months later it was cleaned, painted, light-filled from three tall windows and hung with works by the now five artists who create there. And a bonus:“ We love it when visitors stay and watch the trains pass by!”

MEET THE ARTISTS

Assemblage by Julie Bell

Julie Ann Bell ~ Stories and Whimsies ~

Dominique Harder Dominique Harder’s work is large, realistic charcoal pieces. She also dabbles in ceramics and painting. This series of images focuses on cosmetic surgery and the pressure for young girls to live up to this society’s standard of beauty. She used Barbie dolls as a symbol of someone who has had a lot of work done, and someone who’s conformed to this standard. The work focuses on the dismemberment that happens before beauty is achieved, and shows how unnatural cosmetic surgery is. This is not related to plastic surgery, which involves reconstructing a person’s face that is deformed due to an accident or a birth defect. Cosmetic surgery is taking a perfectly fine human body and face, and altering to fit some unrealistic idea of what attractiveness is.

The joys of living in this beautiful area with an artist started pulling at my desire to create. I discovered that playing with my photos, old letters, homemade paper, and found objects was a great release from the stress of graduate school and work. My goal is to combine stories (old books, rusty metal, cassette tape, frames, etc.) with joy and whimsy to create pieces that speak to me and hopefully to others. www.StoriesAndWhimsies.com

Painting by Michael Allen Campbell

Michael Allen Campbell

Asian brush painting by Lynn Stanley

Lynn Stanley ~ Silverpoem Studio ~

Charcoal drawing by Dominique Harder

I have loved painting for most of my life, but I also love the beauty of words. A study of Chinese poetry some years ago led me to Asian Brush painting, which allows me to combine the two, since Asian style paintings often include calligraphy poems. Inspired by Asian esthetics, I strive to express the essence of my subject with words and strokes of the brush that will bring it alive. My watercolors combine innovative methods with traditional materials such as ink and rice paper. I have studied with painters and calligraphers in the US and China, and my paintings have been exhibited in Washington DC, Florida and New York.

A colleague recently said to me that my still lifes were a contradiction in terms. I was complimented by that. My paintings are energetic and at the same time peaceful. As a young person in Mexico I was surrounded by outstanding bold use of color in buildings, art and clothing. Luis Barragan, the famous Mexican architect, designed huge water towers at the entrance of a subdivision in the northern part of Mexico City which loomed over me daily in their pink, orange, yellow and blue majesty. Bright colors! I can’t paint otherwise!

www.SilverPoemStudio.com

www.BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com

Painting by Barbara Frohmader

Barbara Frohmader ~ Abbi’s Brush

I am a self-taught painter who uses newer, non-conventional techniques. I paint with acrylics creating abstract forms with loose, fluid plays of color and texture. I’m always experimenting with the acrylic mediums and paints. My intention is to not let my thinking get in the way of what the paint wants to do. The resulting images are often happenstance — happy accidents.

Studio 107 A Working Artists’ Studio and Gallery in the 375 Depot Street building, River Arts District Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 12–5 p.m.

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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

“YELLOW SPRING FLOWERS” 30”X40” OIL

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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10 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

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* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios

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Asheville Area Arts Council Events

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RE:CREATE

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On Friday, July 5 “Buzz,” curated by visual from 7-9 p.m. join the artist and commercial designer, dancers and choreograPeter Parpan, is an art exhibit that phers of Motion Dance combines two of Asheville’s most Theatre for an evening ubiquitous pursuits: art making and of discussion about the craft brewing. Known as an arts creative process and the mecca in the south and recognized art of making dances. nationally as “Beer City USA,” What goes into making Asheville is the perfect place for an a piece of dance? How art show with a beer theme. Well, do the steps and phrases sort of... come together? What do Participating artists have crethey mean? ated works related to brewing and Motion Dance Theatre presents “Re:Create” Hear what inspires sipping beer. Artists will use beer these artists and be the coasters as a canvas. Participants first to see sections of the new works that are being cremay draw or paint on ated as part of Motion’s 2013 Summer Choreographic coasters, assemble coasters Residency Program. Motion is Asheville’s own profesinto sculpture or use them sional, contemporary ballet company; sourcing talent in any creative way imaginfrom across the country and presenting bold programable. “Buzz” will be on ming featuring all new work. display July 3-26. Join us Founder and Artistic Director, Nick Kepley, has for the opening reception, travelled far and wide to collect the knowledge and talent an evening of fine art and needed to provide Western North Carolina with the very craft beer, Friday, July 12 best that American dance has to offer. from 6-9 p.m. Dancers from Ballet Austin, Ballet West, Company C Contemporary Ballet, Kansas City Ballet, Nashville Ballet and Pennsylvania Ballet, will take the Diana Wortham The Asheville Area Arts Council Gallery Theatre stage by storm, displaying their unbelievable athleticism and aesthetic beauty. Performances take place July 346 Depot Street, in the River Arts District. 12-13, at 8 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre. For more For more details, call (828) 258-0710, or information visit www.motiondt.com. visit www.ashevillearts.com.

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Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 11


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fine art

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Celebrate Art in the “DAAD”!

The Asheville Downtown Gallery Association (ADGA) is hosting its fourth First Friday Art Walk of the season on July 5 from 5-8 p.m. The event, which is held on the first Friday of the month from April through December, takes place in a convenient and walkable half square mile of downtown dubbed the Downtown Asheville Art District or “DAAD”. Each month, the 25 member galleries and museums keep their doors open

after hours and celebrate the arts with special events, exhibitions, opening receptions and artist demonstrations. The mission of the ADGA is to foster community by advancing business, artistic and educational endeavors and partnerships such as the Downtown Asheville Arts District and First Fridays, to engage and inform about diverse art happenings in downtown Asheville, and to increase exposure for our area as an arts destination. Future plans of the ADGA include expanding membership to alternative art venues through associate memberships and engaging other downtown businesses in the celebration of First Fridays.

Some of the highlights of the July 5 Art Walk Appalachian Craft presents “Quilts by Mary Allen”,

an 89 year old quilter who has not lost the art of hand quilting.

Artetude Gallery hosts “Spirits”, an exhibition by the

sculptor Leonid Siveriver on display from July 17 through August 12. An opening reception will be held on July 20 from 5-8:30 p.m.

Work by Elizabeth Fritts, on display at Castell Photography

The Bender Gallery showcases new works in glass by nation-

Asheville Gallery of Art opens “Recent Works” by

Work by Roger Ricco, on display at Castell Photography.

Cheryl Keefer featuring vivid colors of reflected light in wet pavement, contrasted by rainy-day grays. Her loose painting style lends itself to capturing soft, atmospheric moods of rainy street scenes. The collection includes rural landscapes, many done on location en plein air. The opening reception will be held on July 5 during the Art Walk.

ally recognized emerging artists Matthew Cummings and Chad Holliday. In addition, the exhibition “Meditations: What Lies Beneath the Surface” featuring the sculptural work of Meris Barreto and William Zweifel continues through August 31.

Blue Spiral 1 features “Along the Trail”, an exhibition of

works by eight regional artists which runs through July 23. A percentage of sales benefit the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. Also through July 23, works by Mark Hewitt and Dana Brown.

Castell Photography presents “Figures & Space”, a group

exhibition featuring works from artists Roger Ricco and Lauren Semivan, as well as Eric Baden and Elizabeth Fritts, both showing at the gallery for the first time. The exhibition runs through July 27 and is about the ways in which these four image-makers choose to handle their subjects, their surrounding environments, and the resulting conversations that these relationships create.

Mountain Made offers live weekly art and craft demonstra-

tions every Saturday from 11-4 p.m. by one of their local artisans. The featured artist for the Art Walk is wood sculptor Brian Monteleone. The live art demo schedule features: July 6, metalwork artist Jim Beghtol; July 20, ceramic artist Sondra Hastings; and, July 27, ceramic artists Jean & Carl Saake.

Van Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft presents work in natural

dyes from Laura Sims, and new work from Diane Dean, Mark Henry, and Elizabeth Lasley. Music, hors d’oeuvres, and wine will be featured during the Art Walk.

ZaPow! is presenting a group show entitled “Postcards from

Asheville” which features art inspired by and about Asheville. The exhibition continues through July 27.

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12 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

2013 Gallery Guides are available at any of the participating venues or online at downtownashevilleartdistrict.org.


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fine art Personal Branding Thoughts

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DO WHAT YOU DO AND BE WHO YOU ARE

I recently noticed a car window sticker that expressed the following: “Music Isn’t What I Do, It’s What I AM.”

BY

GREG VINEYARD

me think of an old cattle ranch mark. Think “Flying W”. Representing both ownership and identity, a well-designed mark can become a I appreciate the ranch’s logo, and a sentiment about creative legendary descriptor. pursuits – and I also feel Today, branding is a that the whole statement much more complex helps us tackle our hapexercise, encompassing piness quotient as well as a broad set of paramour business planning, as eters, including constant both areas rely upon emmonitoring of topics bracing these distinctions such as perception in in addition to blending the marketplace and the them. A clear message Sharing About Oneself. media, and watching about what a person Pastel by Greg Vineyard our ratings on Google. does, or provides as a Like an insomniac cat running around service, is just as important as how one feels at 3:30 in the morning, it can all become a inside. It’s OK to merge who we intrinsically stampeding, furry beast, demanding blearyare with what we love to do. It can help us eyed, in-the-moment attention. The good brand ourselves. news is, small steps and a bit of work every Taken simply, the word “brand” makes

day can help keep things in-check. In my old Webster’s Ginormous Dictionary (which is old enough that it does not contain the word “ginormous” — but nowadays when you look it up, there’s a picture of MY back-breaking dictionary), I glean definitions about branding referencing “trademarking”, and “distinguishing characteristics.” Disney, Apple, Coke and Starbucks are good studies, from logo to product to design and advertising. They have thoroughlyplanned looks, attitudes, messages, and strategies. Even municipalities mind their brands: I pay attention to our local cultural entities’ activities, as what they do for Asheville has rippling effects on the rest of us. Most folks I know deal with this topic on a smaller level, within a local sphere of influence. Despite our global outreach via the web, sometimes the focus on the ground is as tight as a several-block shopping zone. Repetition of your image and message across multiple channels of distribution helps consumers connect the dots and deem you and your story – and what you have to offer — as relevant. That little group of words bundled into a “tagline”, describing what you proffer, buoying-up your logo or quintessential image, is a big part of individualized market-

HANDMADE IN AMERICA INTRODUCES NC’S FIRST

Community Supported Art Program

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Based on successful models elsewhere in the U.S., Handmade in America’s Community Supported Art program offers shareholders six pieces of special edition art by regional craft artists.

BY

LINDSEY MUDGE

region, we have the opportunity to help independent artists grow their customer base and gain production skills as they recreate a Susan Grier single design for a number of shareholders. Shareholders bring beautiful handmade objects into their lives at an affordable price. It’s a Community Supported Agriculture win-win situation.” (CSA) programs have become a popular The consumers are brought further way to receive fresh healthy food and supinto the lives of the artist by supporting port local farming. In the arts model, the these artist’s careers and our local vibrant objects have been crafted especially for the arts community. In addition, HIA will Handmade in America CSA program and extend an invitation to two pick-up events represent a variety of craft disciplines. this fall that will feature food and entertainThe Community Supported Art ment, as well as an opportunity to meet the program enables shareholders to make an CSA artists in person. investment in their local craft community Each share will comprise the followand receive reasonably priced, special edition ing: Christopher Perryman, serving board crafts in return. created from a mix of domestic hardwoods; “Community Supported Art is a Sue Grier, thrown and altered mugs with groundbreaking idea that’s a perfect fit for custom mixed glazes; Greg and Carla FilipWestern North Carolina,” says Greg Walkpelli, sculpting small, twined, open-weave er Wilson, HandMade’s Interim Executive garlic baskets; Suzanne Q Evon, 100% Director. “With the wealth of talent in the recycled, acid-etched metal pendant; Ben

Elliot, hand-blown pint glass; and Mary Carol Koester, leather-bound book with blind embossed covers. Each CSA Ben Elliott share is $200. This entitles a shareholder to six special edition pieces. Be the first of your friends to become part of North Carolina’s inaugural CSA program! Handmade in America (HIA) Community Supported Art (CSA) program shares can be purchased until the end of August. Orders can be placed by contacting our CSA Coordinator, Megan Kirby at (202) 5498277 or mkirby@handmadeinamerica.org. Be on the lookout for HandMade in America at the River Arts District Second Saturday Studio Strolls and the North Asheville Tailgate market this summer!

For more information about HandMade in America’s Community Supported Art program call (828) 252-0121 or visit www.handmadeinamerica.org.

Set yourself apart by identifying a true, driving passion. ing. As an illustrator, I have to differentiate myself from huge numbers of artists, so I maintain a consistent emphasis on my “Inspirational, Editorial and Children’s” topics. Each drawing I create must fit into at least one of these categories (and some fit all three), and I unswervingly promote this distinction in all my activities. One useful plan of attack to set oneself apart from the maddening crowd is to identify a true, driving passion. “Do what you love”, as the old saying goes. Asheville is full of entrepreneurs with genuine devotion who start new ventures based squarely on that Thing they’ve always wanted to do. For many, it’s a complete one-eighty from their past careers. For others, past and present dove-tail nicely, but it’s not a requirement. While branding is a much bigger (ginormous, I tell you!) topic than my little overview here, there are some simple questions one can ask to get started: 1) Who am I? 2) What do I want to DO? 3) How are No’s 1 and 2 above different and/or the same for me? 4) What’s unique about me and what I offer? 5) What’s one step I can take today to make this a reality? One suggestion is to jump into some business planning. Get your plans on paper. When that darn cat – metaphorically, or for real — wakes you up at 3:30 in the morning, work on your future for half an hour before falling back into bed. You want to be a rocket scientist? I say “Why not?” There would be no other rocket scientist out there exactly like you. In ten years, you’ll either look back being glad you did it, or look back having not even tried, realizing you could have become at least a rocket scientist’s apprentice by now. Though we are neither entirely defined by who we are, nor by what we do — and sometimes the overlap of these two concepts is indistinguishable — investigating how these areas relate to our branding can help us tell each other who we really, really are. Wishing you the best with all your endeavors! Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville carries his illustrations, giclees and cards (www.zapow.com). Find his clay works at Gallery 262 in Waynesville and at Taupe Gallery in North Wilkesboro. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 13


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books ~ poetry ~ readings

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The Poet’s Voice

Everything you need to know can be learned at a poetry reading. I was early to Word Fest’s opening event. I was also on the wrong floor of the Asheville Center for Tourism, which is where Lenoir-Rhyne, Asheville Campus is located. (In case you didn’t know. I didn’t.) I sat in a beautiful cove of chairs and photographs, and thought I’d read my book. I always have a book at hand, don’t you? Then I noticed Laura Hope-Gill’s poetic responses to photographs on the wall. I thought about Ekphrasis, the response of poetry to art. When I lived in St. Paul, I spent many winter mornings at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, staring and writing. Ekphrasis (below) is the poem I wrote at the LenoirRhyne gallery. Remember, all this happened BEFORE the reading began. Word Fest needed signs

EKPHRASIS: A conversation between word and image This poet, benched in a gallery, ponders the rising pine photograph, a sunny haze behind it. Dialogue begins. Why must word respond to image? I want to say, “leave it be. The image is enough,” but I’m wrong. My pen hums to capture in text the potential gray-blue threat behind the sun’s haze. I notice the tree is missing limbs. It rises from a steep hill, unattended, shelterless; helpless in the coming storm and I must do something!

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

and more publicity. Lenoir-Rhyne needs street front signage. I thought the event began at 4. It began at 5 – but actually began at 5:30.

FROM THE WISDOM OF WORD FEST POETS: Poetry articulates what we feel. Poetry can be language or conversation. Water finds its way. We receive gifts from the dead. Appalachia is sacred ground. Tell a story to the dead: You Won’t Believe What Happened After You Left. Ask for the words you need. What I do is not dangerous. Water has memory. Sound will bring you to your senses. There is a fusion of poetry and music. The night ended with the audience clapping and jiving as Keith Flynn, poet and blues singer, and Kelvin Bell, guitarist, sent us off on a high, burning between words and music. In response to this evening, and a request from a young woman with wonderous hair sitting in front of me, I’d like to begin a Rapid River Poet’s Voice event monthly. I would facilitate, and we’d write, write, write. We’d read our “seeds” of poems to one another, take them home, polish them, and bring the “product” to the next meeting. It would be fun to bring in favorite poems to share. Let me know if you are interested in getting together. Contact me at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com. As Samuel Beckett said, “All we have is words.”

WORD FEST

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month

a room full of poets listening (blonde, hat-less, hair-less, dreads, white hair; dyed) waits for the reading to begin, stilled by expectation of the rapture to come the hour is upon us. A young reader in cowboy shirt, jeans; glasses, glares his guilt in poem’s flight. A woman waits through night for home. Her moon’s “golden light cajoles” us all.

~ Carol Pearce Bjorlie

In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

14 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

Smoky Mountain Elk

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A HOMECOMING STORY

“When people think of elk these days, they typically think of big-antlered majestic animals roaming free in the big parks and high mountains of the western United States.” So opens Rose Houk’s “Smoky Mountain Elk: Return of the Native,” the newest offering from Great Smoky Mountains Association. Thanks in large part to the scientific efforts of Great Smoky Mountains National Park biologists and the financial support of both GSMA and Friends of the Smokies, this mental image has again taken corporeal form in the East. The elk, once native to the Southeast, have come home, Houk writes.

BY LISA

DUFF

book,” said Kent Cave, one of the editors. “Rose does an excellent job of revealing the amazing story of how elk were reintroduced to the Smokies, how they survive here, their dramatic courtship rituals, and how calves and cows struggle to elude predators.” “Smoky Mountain Elk” is published by Great Smoky Mountains Association, a non-profit organization that supports Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Softcover copies are available for $9.95 at www.SmokiesInformation.org. Select local bookstores, as well as all National Park stores, also carry the title. GSMA’s publications, An amazing story of how elk were including this selection, are dereintroduced to the Smokies. signed to enhance greater public understanding, enjoyment and “Because Park Service policy supports appreciation of the national park. A national reintroduction of native animals when park partner, GSMA has provided more than feasible, and because elk reintroductions $30 million to support the park’s educationhad been successful elsewhere, support for al, scientific and historical programs since its an attempt here in the Smokies began to inception 60 years ago. take hold in the 1990s,” Houk said. But the Support for the association is achieved process and any hope for success would not primarily from sales of educational publicabe “as simple as just turning a few loose and tions and from annual membership dues. watching what happens.” Those who wish to enrich their national “Smoky Mountain Elk” traces the years park experience are encouraged to become of study and research that led to a February GSMA members. 2001 release of “Manitoban” elk — believed For more information about GSMA’s to be the closest genetically to the eastern elk membership and volunteer opportunities, — making them “the first elk to set foot in call 888-898-9102, ext. 222 or 254, or visit the Great Smoky Mountains in nearly two www.SmokiesInformation.org. centuries.” Following her book’s introduction, Houk explains how overhunting and private land ownership, complete with its fences, brought about the extinction of the elk in the East. The last known elk east of the Mississippi was killed in 1865, she says. From The release of “Smoky Mountain this point in history, only those traveling in Elk” comes just in time for visitors the West could hope to view these animals. to Great Smoky Mountains National In 72 pages, Houk’s book details the Park to also enjoy two ranger-led biology that makes elk, well, elk; the deciguided hikes with elk as the focus. The sion-makers who brought them home to the hikes takes visitors to the elk acclimaSmokies; and the project’s success that today tion pen, where they will learn about has resulted in a herd some 140 animals how, when and why the elk were strong and has been declared a permanent returned to the Smokies. reintroduction. “An Elk Year” is a particularIF YOU GO: “Return of the Elk,” ly intriguing chapter that takes readers from a 1.5-hour-long program, leaves the October rut (mating season) to June, from the Rough Fork trailhead in when “a calf can be born almost every day Cataloochee Valley on Tuesday, July 9, somewhere in the Great Smokies.” and Tuesday, July 23. The hikes begin “Readers who are interested in the elk at 6 p.m., are of moderate difficulty, will especially enjoy the gorgeous photoand cover slightly less than a mile in graphs and informative text in this brand new distance.

Two Ranger-Led Guided Hikes


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authors ~ books ~ readings Summer of Information

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While summer may be the time to pile up all your beach fiction and read until you’re washed out to sea, for me, it’s the season to read as many “information” books as I can. No agenda or required reading. Just topics that strike my fancy. Here are some of the best books I found on the shelves at the East Asheville library. Enjoy!

EATING TRADITIONS The Breakfast Book Book, by Andrew Dalby, Reaktion Books. 2013, 232 pp. This exceptional little book, beautifully illustrated with paintings of breakfast scenes from throughout history, comprehensively exams an aspect of my everyday life, and the lives of others around the world, that frankly, I never thought about. The development of the meal that breaks the fast from the night before is fascinating reading, as if you’re looking at cultural histories through a narrow peephole of early morning dining. Recipes included.

GEOGRAPHY Don’t Know Much About Geography: Everything You Need to Know About the World But Never Learned, by Kenneth C. Davis. Several narrators. Random House Audio, 2013, 13 hours, 10 compact discs. Pundits complain that American citizens are the most geography-challenged society on the planet. We barely know the capitals of the states in the U.S., much less the difference between widely separated countries with similar names such as Mali, the Maldives, or Malaysia. In a world made increasingly small by technology, knowledge of geography is one skill that forward-thinking entrepreneurs and politicians need to know. This audio version of the book is an excellent choice for a long road trip, teen to adult.

GUN CONTROL Living With Guns: A Liberal’s Case for the Second Amendment Amendment, by Craig R. Whitney, Public Affairs, 2012, 284 pp. I love guns. I come from a long line of expert Ohio marksmen from whom I got my bull’s-eye DNA. I pick up a gun, any

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

gun, point it, pull the trigger, and it hits the target smack in the middle. I never talk about my love of guns with my liberal friends—they’re just as polarized as my friends on the right —and both of them presuppose they know my opinion on gun control issues. They don’t. Veteran New York Times reporter Craig R. Whitney has written a superb perspective on the relationship between Americans and their guns. It’s solid but accessible and I wish everybody who blithely argues about gun control would read it.

MENTAL HEALTH You Need Help! A Step-by-Step Plan to Convince a Loved One to Get Counseling, by Mark S. Koming rad, M.D, Hazelden Foundation, 2012, 264 pp. Boy, where was this book when I needed it—about ten times over the past as many years. As a writer, and an escapee from Hollywood, I am a firm believer in the benefits of psychological counseling—but getting a loved one to seek help is often an impossible task. The most important step—getting your loved one to agree to make that first crucial appointment with a counselor—is so difficult for some people that it never happens. This book breaks down the kinds of methods you can use—from simple persuasion to the more radical intervention techniques.

NATURAL FOOD Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat, by Ellen Zachos, Storey Publishing, 2013, 239 pp. I’ve always had the fantasy that someday I will magically learn how to wander through the neighborhood and find wonderful wild plants to eat. Of course I’m never going to do any such ting, except pick wild berries or buy local honey. If you’re like me, you will thoroughly enjoy the experience of armchair harvesting with this wellorganized, beautifully photographed look at 65 plants. It’s a thrill just to know that

Some of the best books can be found on the shelves of the East Asheville library. so many familiar plants can be eaten safely, even if I have a harvest only big enough to garnish a salad. Highly recommended.

SPIRITUALITY Faith and Will: Weathering the Storms in Our Spiritual Lives, by Julia Cameron, Jeremy P. Tarcher, 2010, 221 pp. What happens when one of the world’s greatest creativity teachers, whose philosophy is based on a firm faith in God, no longer can find God? In Faith and Will, Julia Cameron takes an unapologetic journey through her “dark night of the soul.” It’s a sobering reminder that even being on the right path is not always enough to see you to the end. Although Cameron’s The Artist’s Way has sold over 2 million copies and inspired thousands of devotees like me, Ms. Cameron herself, sadly, has never achieved as much success in her own creative work, as she has in encouraging the work of others. How does this disappointment co-exist with her desire to put all her trust in God? As always Cameron writes with a sure voice, one of sympathy and great humanity, helping others learn from her particular and extraordinary journey.

WRITING Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction. Stories and Advice from a Lifetime of Writing and Editing Editing, by Tracy Kidder and Richard Todd, Random House, 2013, 195 pp. Tracy Kidder is a prolific literary journalist who won the Pulitzer Prize for his second book, The Soul of a Machine (1982). Guiding him in both his extensive magazine work as well as his books is his long-time editor Richard Todd. The two have joined forces in this book, demonstrating the inside workings of the peculiar and productive relationship between editor and writer. It’s an insightful, informative book, that all readers—and writers—of nonfiction will enjoy.

JULY

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, July 1 at 7 p.m. SARAH KENNEDY, The Altarpiece, R.T. SMITH, Sherburne. Friday, July 5 at 7 p.m. CECIL BOTHWELL, She Walks on Water. Saturday, July 6 at 7 p.m. MARY ALICE MONROE, The Summer Girls. Thursday, July 11 at 7 p.m. DEBRA MOFFITT leads Garden of Bliss: Cultivating the Inner Landscape for Self-Discovery. Friday July 12, at 7 p.m. ALEX BLEDSOE, The Sword Edged Blonde. Saturday July 13, at 7 p.m. D. B. JACKSON, Thieves’ Quarry. Sunday, July 14 at 3 p.m. Summer Doodle Extravaganza! Get creative! Tuesday, July 16 at 7 p.m. MARK KURLANSKY, Ready for a Brand New Beat. Saturday, July 20 from 12-2 p.m. JOE COBB CRAWFORD, Mountain Shadow Memories. Saturday, July 20 at 7 p.m. KENT WASCOM, The Blood of Heaven. Sunday, July 21 at 3 p.m. CHARLES PRICE, Season of Terror: The Espinosas in Central Colorado March-October 1863. Monday, July 22 at 7 p.m. JOSEPH MAIOLO, Saint Matthew in Appalachia. Tuesday, July 23 at 7 p.m. Presentation by Integrative Health Coach SAM POLLACK Wednesday, July 24 at 7 p.m. SUSAN TEKULVE, In the Garden of Stone, ANGELA KELLY, Voodoo for the Other Woman. Saturday, July 27 from 7-8 p.m. CD Release Party with JONAH MICHEA JUDY Monday, July 29 at 7 p.m. KEVIN WEST, Saving the Season: A Cook’s Guide to Home Canning, Pickling, and Preserving.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 15


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Back again with an unusually broad sampling of new sounds, spanning the continents and hopping from genre to genre. As always, Rapid River Magazine readers are encouraged to support our local music shops. They are an integral part of Asheville’s vibrant music scene.

When Saints Go Machine Infinity Pool !K7 Records Buoyed by the positive reviews for their second album, Konkylie, the pop art ensemble, When Saints Go Machine, might justifiably chose to repeat the pattern, further excavating similar structures and tone. But that would defy the very essence of the bands’ creative instincts and seemingly endless desire for reinvention. Thus, the marvelous Infinity Pool goes in other directions, stretching the bands’ inventive pulse while retaining what makes them such an interesting collective. Infinity Pool manages to be at once both expansive and streamlined; the opener “Love and Respect” (featuring an appearance by rapper Killer Mike) is more hard edged than you might expect, while the clinically precise “Yard Heads” is more analytical than some might wish. Nikolaj Manuel Vonsild continues to be one of the more dexterous vocalists of our time, and whereas the overtly electronic slant of Pool occasionally seems at odds with his R&B influenced delivery, it merely demonstrates the fluidity of the band. When Saints Go Machine display a remarkable knack for blending absurdly matched sounds and textures — witness the over the top theatrics of “Mental Shopping Spree” — but they somehow make it work in ways that suggest this Copenhagen based quartet has plenty of tricks up their sleeves, and a very bright future in which to explore them. ****

James McCartney Me Burnside/ECR Music Group While being born into Beatle royalty is hardly something to pity, it is an undeniably mixed blessing. Julian and Sean Ono launched their careers at a time when the world was deeply mourning the loss of John — which may in part explain the initial success they had — while Dhani Harrison is cursed with sounding and looking way too much like George. On the other hand, Zach Starkey has carved out a very comfortable career as the longtime drummer for The Who. While everyone should know whose son he is, does anyone really pay attention to the drummer? Enter into the picture James McCart16 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

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ney, who has taken a decidedly different route. At age 37 he’s only now launching his career into full orbit (although he’s released a handful of internet-only tunes) with his first full effort. He’s not entirely avoided the limelight — he’s played guitar on a few of his dad’s albums — and like his mom, he’s branched into the visual arts, primarily as a photographer and printmaker. But his has been a calculated approach. Me is a carefully constructed, beautifully made, but at times somewhat stilted effort. It’s heavy on ballads and introspective middle tempo pop, and while he doesn’t have Paul’s unerring knack for melody (and let’s face it, no one does,) he’s no slouch in the engaging hooks department. Certainly there’s a Beatle like sound to some of the songs, but that’s true of hundreds of bands and solo artists. In fact he’s just as likely to be influenced by The Cure or Nirvana, bands that resonate more fully with his generation. What’s refreshing about James, and the album he’s made, is how he willingly acknowledges these similarities while refusing to be defined by them. The haunting “Wisteria” is a model of old school craftsmanship, while the bouncy “Thinking about Rock and Roll” should make you want to get up and shout a few yea, yea, yeas. On the whole, the melodies are direct, the playing and singing are warmly assuring, and his band sympathetic to the tone. Sir Paul is on hand for a bit of assistance, but this is James’ record. He’s learned more than a few things about song craft from his father, and, while anyone hoping to get a taste of Beatle light may be disappointed, taken on its own modest terms, James McCartney’s debut stands quite nicely on its own. ***1/2

Patty Griffin American Kid New West Records It’s been six years, one of the longest stretches of her career, since Patty Griffin has released an album of primarily new material. American Kid comes at a crossroads for her, a time in which she seems ready to reassess both her art and her life. Written during a period just before and after her father’s death, the songs are less about his life (that might have been the predictable response), and more focused on his absence, as Griffin reflects on a future bereft of his guiding force. Accompanied by longtime collaborator Doug Lancio on guitar, along with Cody

and Luther Dickinson, the album is largely acoustic, intentionally stripped down with an emphasis on Griffin’s reflective lyrics and taut arrangements. Robert Plant, who seems to have reinvented himself as a genuine roots artist, is on hand for a trio of songs, giving them a certain cache they might otherwise have missed. Recorded in Memphis and Brooklyn, American Kid is steeped in the music Griffin grew up singing; early blues, rousing gospel, country, and American folk weave their way through every moment. Luther’s National Steel guitar gives “Go Wherever You Wanna Go” an almost transcendent lift, with Griffin’s otherworldly vocals swaying between a whisper and a wail. The Memphis blues of the ethereal “Don’t Let Me Die in Florida” is similarly stunning, while “Ohio,” a duet with Plant, would have fit nicely on any of his recent country influenced outings. There are plenty of other highlights — her interpretation of Lefty Frizzell’s “Mom & Dad’s Waltz being among them — that it seems futile to mention them all. On American Kid (and if ever an album were aptly named this is it), Griffin shows just how handily she has mastered idioms ranging from sultry pop to Delta blues. It’s amongst her strongest albums from an already stellar career, and one which, no doubt, would have made daddy proud. ****1/2

Camera Obscura Desire Lines 4AD Music The Scottish indie-pop band Camera Obscura has never hid their aversion to rapid change. While some bands revel in genre hopping and stylistic swerving, CO has preferred to take a measured route, staying in familiar territory and re-exploring the same themes time and again. Not many bands could build a devoted following by following such a singular niche, but not many bands have a singer like Tracyanne Campbell, whose distinctive and stunningly beautiful voice is enough to carry the day. Her style is rarely matched, a delivery that pauses, swoons, explodes, and penetrates deeply into your psyche, often in the same song, or even verse. It does lean towards the saccharine, but the band’s songwriting — a collective approach in which all members are listed as equal partners — has a ‘CD’s’ continued on page 17


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dark enough side to balance out the sweet. As such, Desire Lines doesn’t attempt to expand the band’s trademark sound but rather to refine it; a continuing exploration towards some goal only they fully understand. For some bands that might be a dilemma, but it’s hard to complain when you’re enraptured by such infectious melodies as the deliriously joyful “I Missed Your Party,” or the magnificent balladry of “Cri De Coeur.” Guests, Neko Case and Jim James, add some lovely but hardly needed vocal harmonies to several tracks, while the subtle stroke of Kenny McKeeve’s guitar livens things up a bit. Most of the songs revolve around the classic questions of heartache, wrong choices, and the messes we get ourselves into, and while the lyrics can be a bit murky, there’s also a poetic nature to them. When Campbell sings about wanting to “write something of value,” you get the sense she’s doing a bit of self reflection. It’s hard to imagine Desire Lines broadening the bands fan base — Camera Obscura are a group you either get or you don’t — but for my money, they remain one of the most invigorating low-key pop bands out there. At some point their deliberately narrow focus might wear thin, but that time seems more than a few albums away. ***1/2

Slaid Cleaves Still Fighting the War Music Road Records Mention songs about boarded up factories, repossessed farms, hard luck ex-cons, and other down on their luck types, and most people will think of Bruce Springsteen, John Mellencamp, and perhaps James McMurtry. But Slaid Cleaves has been mining that same turf for two decades, and he’s done so with a clarity and empathy that few songwriters can match, let alone surpass. Shamefully underrated, the New England born and Austin-based Cleaves is among our most articulate and concise observers of the human condition. His best songs are populated with characters so well developed, and scenarios so richly detailed, you would think they stepped directly out of a Raymond Carver tale. Still Fighting the War is ample evidence of this. The title track, which also opens the album, is a penetrating account of one vet’s struggles. When Cleaves sings how “men go off to war for a hundred reasons, but they all come home with the same demons,” he speaks as if he’d been there. In “Go for the Gold” (previously released as a live track),

Jimmy LaFave at the Grey Eagle

BY JAMES

CASSARA

While singer/songwriter/guitarist Jimmy LaFave is highly respected among his Austin-based peers — no less than Robert Earl Keen and Steve Earle have been quick to sing his praises — among the more general music listening public LaFave remains a largely underreported figure, one who gets far less attention than artists of slighter talent and far less interesting stories.

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LaFave is in many ways a modern Dust Bowl troubadour, plying his trade through an endless number of small clubs, listening halls, and roadside honkytonks. Whether playing solo or with a band he brings an intensity and passion more closely associated with full bore rock-and-roll than the all inclusive category of folk to which he is typically assigned. LaFave grew up in Wills Point, east of Dallas, but at 17, his family moved to Stillwater, OK. While still in his teens, his mother, using the time honored payment method of Green Stamps, gave him his first guitar. At that time Stillwater, while in no way the musical epicenter it would one day become, did provide a rich musical heritage from which LaFave could draw. Woody Guthrie had traveled its roads; Chet Baker was born in neighboring Yale; and nearby Tulsa had given rise to J.J. Cale and Leon Russell. In short, it was a great place to live but not one in which he would long stay. In 1985 LaFave, seeking both a wider audience and an all important record deal, pulled up stakes and moved to Austin, where he’s lived ever since. His first and most important Austin haunt was the Chicago House, a legendary venue known as a training ground for virtually everyone who’d been through town. LaFave spent the next eight years there hosting open mikes, honing his presentation skills as a solo artist while “listening and learning from a whole bunch of great songwriters.” During that time he also worked with his band,

Cleaves’ interjects a bit of Woody Guthrielike portraiture of the everyman: a struggle that is at once both deeply personal and universal. “Rust Belt Fields” is another highlight, the sort of tale Springsteen can write with deft skill, but, given his enormous wealth and fame, perhaps not with the type of sincerity Cleaves so readily musters. Not all of Cleaves’ songs dissolve

Night Tribe, at other Austin clubs, preparing material for what would eventually become his 1993 debut album. Austin Skyline — a loving nod to Bob Dylan’s 1969 country flavored record — was released on the ultra tiny Bohemia Beat Records label and recorded live from the stage. LaFave had faith in his songs and his ability to play them for an audience, but by his own admission “knew nothing about making a record.” Within a year that had changed. 1994’s Highway Trance is a more polished effort (at times too much so), which showcases LaFave’s considerable skills as a guitarist, singer, and songwriter. By the time of Buffalo Return to the Plains (1995), LaFave felt confident enough in his own songwriting to feature nearly all his own material. Two years later its follow up, Road Novel, garnered LaFave his strongest reviews yet. With a focus on touring, LaFave didn’t release another album until 2001. And while Texoma was less warmly received than its predecessors, it may be an example of an album that suffers from doing too much. At sixteen songs it could certainly use a bit of trimming, but for my money his exquisite rendering of Jimmy Webb’s “The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress,” trumps any shortcomings the album might have. In 2005 LaFave signed with Red House Records, where he recorded Blue Nightfall (2005), and Cimarron Manifesto (2007). 2012’s Depending On the Distance showcased his influences; it featured three Bob Dylan songs (including a stunning interpretation of “Red River Shore”), and one by Bruce Springsteen. LaFave has never been one to shy away

into regret as he’s too smart a writer to not explore the full range of the human condition. “Hometown USA” has a surprisingly happy ending while “Texas Love Song” is a sardonic tip of the cowboy hat to his adopted state. Yet for all its strengths, Still Fighting the War comes up as less than the sum of its parts. Some of that lies in having three producers, resulting in a record that never

Singer/songwriter/guitarist Jimmy LaFave

from his influences, nor should he. The single connecting thread in all his music is his grassroots approach, the ways in which he combines country, blues, folk, and early rock & roll. Matched with his intense work ethic (not to mention a voice described by the Oklahoman City Gazette as “the most expressive this side of Belfast”), it all works to his advantage. His stage performances are known for their spontaneity and the sincere ways in which he connects with his audience, making his appearance at the Grey Eagle perhaps the “must see” concert of the mid summer season. IF YOU Jimmy LaFave (with opening GO band The Lennings) in concert

Thursday, August 1 at 7 p.m. Tickets are priced at $12 in advance and $15 day of for this all ages, seated show. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com

achieves a real identity. Much like his friend James McMurtry, Slaid Cleaves tends to write great songs while making somewhat indifferent albums. Having said that, there’s still plenty here to recommend: I’m still waiting on that “one great statement” I am certain Cleaves is capable of. Until that time Still Fighting the War will do just fine. ***1/2 continued on page 33

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 17


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sound experience Yonder Mountain String Band

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In anticipation of the upcoming release of a still untitled EP (due later this year), The Yonder Mountain String Band will appear at venues and music festivals across the

The Yonder Mountain String Band performs at Pisgah Brewing on Sunday, July 28.

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country, including a July 27 performances at Floyd Fest (just north of Greensboro), and at Pisgah Brewery in Black Mountain. On select festival performances the band will be joined by their friends Danny Barnes, Railroad Earth, and The Devil Makes Three. This is part of what has been a busy and productive year for the Colorado based quartet. The genesis of YMSB goes back to Urbana, IL, where college student and banjo player Dave Johnston met mandolin player, Jeff Austin. After graduation Austin settled in Nederland, Colorado, but the pair stayed in touch and Johnston eventually joined him there. Soon after, the two met bass player Ben Kaufmann and guitarist Adam Aijala at the Verve Club, a local watering hole known as a breeding ground for new bands. Right out of the gate the four landed a prestigious gig at the Fox Theatre in Boulder, casting their fate as a legitimate band. They quickly developed a following among

Frank Zipperer

“Frank has an unparalleled ability to photograph musicians doing what they do best - making music. His photographs are truly time capsules, accurate snapshots that candidly capture the moment as it‘s occurring. As an artist photographer, Frank is truly the best I’ve known.”

bluegrass fans, but were equally embraced by the then emerging “jam band” scene. Touring constantly, they worked their way up the bar and club circuit and eventually made plans to record. In the fall of 1999, they released their debut album, Elevation, on their own Frog Pad Records label. By the fall of 2000, they were playing in larger venues, including the fabled Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, and began attracting the attention of larger companies. But the band resisted, preferring to instead release an ongoing series of live albums (five so far), with the occasional studio effort, including Old Hands (2003) and The Show (2009). Like many independent minded groups, YMSB would rather control their careers. Nonstop touring, live albums punctuated by the occasional studio release, and a steady stream of merchandizing has proven to be both prudent and profitable. In mid-December, and for the second year in a row, YMSB will host “Strings & Sol” at the Now Sapphire Resort in Puerto Morelos, Mexico. Performing alongside them will be Railroad Earth, Leftover

WNC Jazz Profiles

in our house: Dorsey Brothers, Sammy Kay, Guy Lombardo, Benny Goodman, among others. In my teens I joined the Columbia Record Club’s Jazz section and among my early albums were “Round About ~ Percussionist Jason DeCristofaro Midnight” by Miles Davis and Erroll Garner’s “Most Happy Frank Zipperer If you go out to hear live jazz in the through each and Piano.” I was hooked!” Photo: Frank Zipperer Asheville area, odds are you’ll see Frank every shot. He consisFrank’s greatest influences Zipperer near the front, along with his tently captures the grace, intensity and on his photographic style were the works of state-of-the-art camera and long-time grit of any live performance as if it were Edward Weston, Paul Strand, John Sexton, partner Rick Wood. “I wouldn’t be going an easy task!” Clyde Butcher, Imogen Cunningham and to all those shows without Rick, plus he’s Georgia O’Keefe. ~ Vocalist Wendy Jones as big a jazz nut as I am!” “For over 25 years my artistic work was For many decades, the history of Born 1937 in Savannah, GA, Frank in fine art nature photography, and my great jazz has been accompanied by another grew up in Charleston, SC. After a twenty joy is sharing with others the experience I’ve great art form – photography! The great year career in the US Army with assignhad with the subject through the lens of my improvisational American jazz musiments in various U.S. posts, Vietnam and camera. My introduction to the Asheville cians of the mid-20th century inspired a Germany, he retired as a LTC. Frank was Jazz scene and photographing musicians generation of photographers to develop trained in communications, information was through our neighbor Sharon LaMotte, a looser, moodier style of visual exprestechnology and qualified as a rotary wing who presented a weekly jazz vocals show at sion. Through the work of Lee Tanner, aviator. Throughout all this, Frank mainTressa’s. That was about three years ago and Herman Leonard, Bob Willoughby, Milt tained a deep interest in photography and I’ve been shooting live music ever since.” Hinton, Bill Claxton, Gjon Mili, William became a member of the Professional PhoI asked Frank about his approach. “I look Gottlieb, Francis Wolff, Roy DeCarava tographers of America, the National Assofor the raw emotions coming from musicians and others you can almost hear the music ciation of Press Photographers, the National who are deep into their music and perforand feel the vibe – jazz’s great struggles, Association of Photoshop Professionals, the mance, especially the interaction between hustles, styles and creative visions. And Jazz Journalists Association, and a foundplayers. I photograph a lot of the same bands Frank Zipperer most ably carries that ing charter member of the North American and musicians and that helps me to predict torch right here in WNC. Nature Photographers Association. what might take place as far as movement and “In terms of jazz, I grew up in the Big energy. It’s a great honor to be able to work at “Frank’s passion for his subject Band Swing era and there was always music the intersection of two of my really big pasmatter is clearly demonstrated

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Salmon, Keller Williams with The Travelin’ McCourys, and Greensky Bluegrass. The upcoming gigs will showcase newly written material, slated for the EP, as well as material from their back catalog, and their extensive assortment of cover songs. Anyone who has attended a Yonder Mountain String Band show knows they are not your stereotypical jam band. They are consummate players who, while eager to stretch out and go with the groove, know that song structure and musicianship are first and foremost. It’s all about a great time but it’s also about superb craftsmanship and a desire to please not just the audience, although they certainly do so, but themselves. IF YOU Yonder Mountain String Band GO (with Devil Makes Three) at The

Pisgah Brewing Company in Black Mountain on Sunday, July 28. Gates open at 5 p.m. for this 6 p.m. show. Tickets are priced at $25 in advance, $30 day of show, and $55 for the “Hopster” VIP special. For more information go online to www.pisgahbrewing.com

BY

EDDIE LESHURE

sions...music and photography!” Frank has been featured in The Laurel of Asheville, Verve Magazine, Mountain Xpress, WNC Woman, The Scene, Bold Life, Rapid River magazine, and his photos are included on CD covers and websites of many musicians whom he shoots. Check out his black and white jazz gallery of prints currently at the new Green Room Bistro in Asheville. “Frank’s photography beautifully captures moments in time of the performing artists he pictures. The strong contrasts in many of his black and white photographs give depth and atmosphere to the two dimensional image. His color sense is spot on, and his use of ambient light and contrast sets off his subjects without using additional lighting. His love for the music is very evident in his work!”

~ Vocalist Harry Schulz www.ishootlivemusic.com.

Eddie produces “Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.


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fine arts & crafts The 66th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

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Nearly 200 juried artists of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be selling works of clay, metal, wood, jewelry, fiber, paper, natural materials, leather and mixed media.

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APRIL NANCE

tive deconstructed screenprinting on fabric. Beginning on Friday during each Craft Fair, mountain musicians perform live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of With styles rangPaula Marksbury the Craft Fair experience. ing from traditional to From old time to bluecontemporary, the Fairs grass, this tradition is kept alive today. showcase the rich talent, diversity and craft mastery of Guild members. The Craft Fairs have a proud tradition IF and history of excellence by representing the YOU Craft Fair of the Southern GO Highlands at the US Cellular Southern Highland Craft Guild, a non-profCenter, 87 Haywood St. in it organization formed in 1930. The Fairs downtown Asheville, July 18-21. Hours: began in 1948 as a way to provide a regional 10-6 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 10-5 p.m. market for the mountain craftspeople. Since Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, children that time, the under 12 free. Group discounts available. Craft Fairs have For more information call (828) 298-7928 set the standard or visit www.craftguild.org. for fine craft shows across the country. Each year in July and October craft collectors Craft demonstrations are a highlight at and gallery ownthe Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands. ers from across Watching and interacting with highly skilled the country come craftspeople as they create is entertaining to Asheville to and educational. Throughout the show, see the show. The Village Potters visitors will have the opportunity to observe They are joined works by over 200 members of the Southern by western North Carolina residents who Highland Craft Guild and to learn about appreciate the quality and history of the their inspiration and methods. There are show, knowing it is an ideal destination for also scheduled demonstrations to enhance shopping and inspiration. Nearly 20,000 the experience. visitors to the Fairs each year invest in the regional and local economies while supSCHEDULED DEMONSTRATIONS porting artists working in the Appalachian mountains, and by spending a summer or Sam Johnson – Bamboo Fly Rods. Sam fall weekend in beautiful Asheville, NC. Johnson of Dahlonega, GA, will lead Fair In addition to providing a retail market visitors through the process of creating for juried members, the Guild also hosts bamboo fly rods. craft demonstrations during the Fairs. A John Richards – Mixed Media Assemblage. strong part of the Guild’s mission is to eduFrom his vast supply of bottle caps, can lids, cate the public about the history of crafts in spark plugs, wood scraps, plastic toys, clay this region, various craft techniques, and an shards, used brushes and other found obappreciation for fine crafts. Visitors have the jects, John Richards of Burnsville, NC, will opportunity to see artists using traditional demonstrate his process of creating mixed methods of handmade craft like George media sculpture. McCollum weaving a white oak basket, Elaine Olinger – Fiber Demonstrations. beginning with splints he has harvested Elaine Olinger of Rogersville, TN, will from the tree, or seeing Sam Johnson make demonstrate dyeing yarns and fabric using bamboo fly rods, or Betsy Morrill’s innovanatural dyes and resist techniques. She will also be spinning wool and fiber blends with the spinning wheel. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete

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DEMONSTRATIONS & ENTERTAINMENT

list of scheduled craft demonstrations and performances.

Arts for Life – Children’s Activities. A

nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting children and young adults facing serious illnesses. They’ll provide handson craft activites for kids and adults.

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE Friday, July 19 11 a.m. – Chompin at the Bit String Band. A group of spirited young pickers continuing the strong music traditions of Brasstown, NC. 1 p.m. – Carol Rifkin and Paul’s Creek. Paul’s Creek plays original and traditional mountain music, their fine harmonies blending in an old timey style heavily influenced by the elders of the region, family, friends and diverse interests. 3 p.m. – Timberline Smooth folk harmonies characterize this band featuring guitarist Gene Holdway, a travelling bluegrass troubadour with 30 years experience.

Hot Duck Soup

3 p.m. – Moore Brothers Band. Led by a duo of young brothers from Hickory, NC, this band plays bluegrass and gospel.

Sunday, July 21 11 a.m. – Hot Duck Soup. Kazoos, slide whistles, banjos, guitars, ukes, an antique cornet, washtub bass, and the Cacophonium! Hot Duck Soup plays old tunes like you’ve never heard ‘em played.

11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass. Asheville area musicians, led by Tommy Thompson, specializing in traditional bluegrass standards.

1 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike. Featuring songwriter, playwright and longtime bandleader Tom Godleski, Buncombe Turnpike boasts original songs and the banjo picking of teenage sensation Seth Rhinehart.

1 p.m. – Split Rail. Split Rail provides a great continuity of sound that can only be achieved from years of playing together. Strong vocal harmony is their trademark.

3 p.m. – Whitetop Mountaineers. Martha Spencer and Jackson Cunningham perform the beautiful and unique sounds of traditional Southwest Virginia oldtime music.

Saturday, July 20

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Children of the World

Exhibition of Photographs by Mickey Buckwalter

Namaste, Nepal Photo by Mickey Buckwalter

Chifferobe Home and Garden will open a show of the brilliant photographs of world-traveler Mickey Buckwalter on July 12 from 5-7 p.m. Titled Children of the World, the show will actually hang starting July

1, and will stay up throughout the month of July. Refreshments will be served at the opening, and the public is invited free of charge. ‘Chifferobe’ continued on page 22

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INTERVIEW WITH PORTRAIT ARTIST

Lorelle Bacon

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Lorelle Bacon is a largely self-taught artist who, as a child, started out with drawing.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

When a car accident left her unable to continue her regular line of work, she focused full-time on her painting. Soon she started teaching art to children and then adults, which led her to being a full time artist and instructor. Her students have ranged from as young as 7 years to as old as 93.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about the classes you will be offering this summer.

Lorelle Bacon: I am teaching several classes at River's

Edge Studio in the River Arts District. Marvelous Mondays and Wonderful Weds.where students may learn or become more proficient any medium or subject. Twice a month all day watercolor classes and a 2 day workshop on “Backgrounds.” In addition I’m offering a three-day scratchboard workshop at OLLIE, two days at Florence Thomas Art School in South Jefferson, a mini workshop for Lake Toxaway Art Guild, and a Bali - The Offering, two-day workpainting by Lorelle Bacon shop in portrait drawing at Arrowhead Gallery in Old Fort. I also teach two open classes a week at the Red House Studios and Gallery in Black Mountain. These are all for beginners through advanced.

RRM: What is your philosophy on art? LB: I believe an artist should paint what touches their

heart, not what they think will sell. The finished piece will always be better. Next, not to try to copy how someone else paints but to develop their own style. Then you can truly call yourself an artist.

RRM: You can create a portrait for a client in oil,

graphite, watercolor, pastel, acrylics or scratchboard. Which media is your most requested?

LB: Many people request portraits in oils because they think it lasts longer, however if framed properly, any

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other medium will last just as long.

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RRM: Tell us a bit about your painting process.

LB: I enjoy meet-

ing the subject when possible, Pet portrait for Marion Esquival, however many painting by Lorelle Bacon. times the client has me do a portrait for a surprise gift, so I will then work from photos. This also allows me to do work for clients throughout the states and internationally. If from a photo, I sit with it and meditate to get a sense of the person before starting. If working in oils, I usually use many layers of glazing as it brings more realism to it. I also rely a lot on strong contrasts no matter the medium as it creates depth. The third thing I do before starting a preliminay sketch is to lay out the composition. Many clients have told me that the paintings look more real than the photos, or that I have captured the spirit of the subject. Nothing pleases me more!

RRM: You also do pet portraits. How did this came about?

LB: I actually started painting pet portraits first! I was

hesitant to attempt a portrait of a person.... Now I am known as a portrait painter! My first pet portrait was of a horse while I was attending a horse show and started to talking with a horse owner. Then I did paintings of several dogs and it just grew from there. Word of mouth has been very kind to me both from clients and students.

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LB: Currently I have two

scratchboard portraits that are in The International Society of Scratchboard Artist exhibit in Vancouver B.C. This is the 2nd year I have had work accepted and last year won an Award of Excellance. I also recently won second place with a scratchboard Aborigine, in Highlands, a Best of Show scratchboard portrait by Lorelle Bacon with one at Black Mountain Center for the Arts and a first place watercolor piece in an all watermedia exhibit at The Red House Studios and Gallery. It is nice to recieve accolades from my peers but I paint what makes me feel good.

Lorelle Bacon Fine Art (828) 595-6007 • www.lorellebacon.com

Homestyle Gastropub Fare 19 Beers on Tap Live Music Open 11-10 10-12 Bar Menu

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(828) 357-5656

207 West State Street Downtown Black Mountain www.thetrailheadrestaurant.com

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fine arts & crafts Rock and Roll Art Reception

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Abby Road Trip by David Gildersleeve

On Saturday, August 3, Rock and Roll will come alive at ZaPow with a reception celebrating the opening of the newest ZaPow member artist group show fittingly entitled “Rock and Roll.” Subjects of the show will range from contemporary indy bands, cult classics like Sid and Nancy to classic rock acts like Led Zeppelin and The Beatles. Participating ZaPow member artists include local as well as nationally known artists. Many ZaPow artists have experience working in and around the music industry, including Stuart Engel’s work as a stage manager at the Orange Peel, and Joshua Marc Levy as an illustrator for local bands The Broadcast, The Fritz, and Velvet Truckstop. Amy Kalyn Sims contributed a photo for Aerosmith’s Devil’s Got A New Dis-

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‘Chifferobe’ continued from page 20

CORRECTIONS Zansa’s CD Release Party is on Saturday, September 7 Asheville’s only Afropop band will release its first album Saturday, September 7 at Isis Restaurant & Music Hall. Five-piece ensemble, led by Ivorian djembe master Adama Dembele, performs West African rhythms blended with contemporary sounds and instruments.

EJ Horrocks (left), and Alex Manfred are hiking for Aurora Studio & Gallery. For more information please visit www.aurorastudio-gallery.com

Mickey has been traveling on foot with a backpack for years, wandering throughout over fifty countries, getting to know people, and taking photographs, capturing the lives of the people she has met. She says, “I learned that people everywhere want the same things: a decent home, enough food, education, and a better life for their children. I always felt safe, and I found people willing to help whenever I needed help.” Mickey has exhibited her photos in

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guise. David Gildersleeve’s paintings of the Beatles, Kiss, Led Zeppelin and other classic rock stars are prized by art collectors across the country. The show will be on display during the August 5 Downtown Art Walk. Don’t miss the opening reception on Saturday, August 3 from 7-9 p.m. Live Music by Deezil Speed, featuring members of The Fritz. Refreshments will be provided.

IF YOU Rock and Roll Art Reception, GO Saturday August 3 from 7 p.m. to

9 p.m. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. For more information visit ZaPow.com

local galleries and has shared her experiences through numerous slide show presentations. Come to the opening event and meet Mickey. Her photos are available for sale at Chifferobe. IF YOU Children of the World, GO photographs by Mickey

Buckwalter. Opening Reception Friday, July 12 from 5-7 p.m. Chifferobe, 118 D Cherry Street, Black Mountain. For more details call (828) 669-2743 or visit www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com.


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artful living

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The Biggest Little Word

Ask me if I’m happy, and my answer is ‘yes.’ Ask me if I’m sad, and my answer is ‘yes.’ Life is so thick with all possibilities that and when you enter into the moment in awareness, the reasons for when happiness and sadness are all present, and you realize the happiness moment just as it is, is enough, and when enough is enough, that’s enlightenment. Paraphrased from Ram Das in a video entitled “Ecstatic States” In the course of reading my articles, you may notice I often use the word “and” in places where more typically we would be accustomed to seeing the words “or” and “but.” It seems like a small thing, but I want to suggest that it is really a very big thing. When teaching, I refer to “and” as the most important little word in the English language, and, of course, as I do in my writing, I will quite deliberately use “and” and suggest that others use it where more typically the words “or” and “but” are employed. Buddhism makes a point of noting that human beings, in all of Nature, are the single species that has a brain that creates a consciousness of abstraction; separating experience out into “this or that,” and “yes, but.” Birds live within Nature and the flow of Life without questioning, complaining, and trying to change and control it, and for the birds, it’s enough. So, a typical response to this statement might be: “Yes, but, that’s what separates humans from beasts.” And, I would have to answer, with a twinkle in my eye, “Yes, exactly.” We question, complain, try to change and control, thinking we are improving our lives; and in the wondering, complaining, and changing, while we do improve our chances for physical comfort and survival, we create a world of psychological suffering the bird never experiences. Significantly, human-beings existing within primitive nature-based cultures likewise live with far less strife and stress and are happier than those in modern civilization. We are constantly caught imagining some situation, some circumstance other than the one we are within as better, so we want the alternative we imagine, the “or,” the “yes, but” that will make things better. The moment is very, very seldom “enough,” so complete and “thick” that we experience absolute well-being. And when there is no “enough,” this is the “unsatisfactoriness” that Buddhism refers to as the source of suffering in one of the more useful translations of “The Four Noble Truths.” We have difficulty realizing that whatever we are within is it, and it is rich. There are other circumstances possible, yes, and we may be able to find some increase in benefit of a particular kind in another choice. To hastily make that choice, however, may prevent us from truly knowing and explor-

ing the full potential and connectedness of the circumstance we are in. We don’t give consideration that this situation we are in is the one we are in for some reason, so this thing is the thing we need to deal with, to explore, to understand, perhaps even find the hidden riches within. It’s the big “and.” “Remember that the obstacles do not block the path, they are the path.” ~ Zen proverb The big “and” is the moment arising in awareness, containing everything. It is seeing the thickness that brings us both happiness and sadness, in other words, the complete experience of Life. To want “or” is to want something other than what-is, and this creates a very thin experience of Life, skipping about, never fully understanding and mastering anything. To even desire for something other than what-is diminishes our experience of what-is, and certainly diminishes our full understanding of what-is and perhaps why this the-way- it-is might be exactly the way it has to be. As a result, Life, psychologically, is a struggle for us in a way that it is not for a bird or an aboriginal human, and our relationship to Life-as-Nature continues to be increasingly problematic. It is really quite remarkable how by entering fully into a situation and seeing its components as the aggregate and infinite sum rather than limited separate parts to be picked and chosen from, our view and experience expands. We begin to realize that we are actually circles within circles of energy and interest that eventually encompass the entire Universe. We begin to realize that “this” is vast, and that the “here and now” are without limit and boundary. The entire experience of Life expands radically and unpredictably. We experience both linear and non-linear possibilities, discovering the true and paradoxical nature of the Cosmos. This is not to say we are to be passive and not use our capacities for discernment, choice, creativity and inventiveness

BY

BILL WALZ

to change our circumstance and the human and planetary condition in the immediate here and now and into the future for the better. It’s just that a richer life requires that we learn to be patient, to be curious, to be open to dimensions and possibilities not readily apparent. It means to question our assumptions about what “better” means. Better in the short-run may well be catastrophic in a larger frame. There is an immense qualitative difference to our experience if we see our situation as the inescapable “whatis” within the infinite “what-is.” No complaint. No fantasy. Just what-is – arising in awareness. Now, we can create a new what-is. It may look like we have chosen “or,” but that’s only from a limited perspective. We don’t need “or.” Sitting right alongside what-is, is more of what-is. “Or” is fantasy. “And” is reality. That’s non-duality using duality, and it can only truly and skillfully be employed when we realize that we are the moment arising in awareness, wherein the full thickness, the everything, is arising in that which is not a thing – awareness. Even if significant elements of the what-is are difficult, challenging, threatening to the form of us, we will, as we always do, handle it. Perhaps now, with a touch of magic, understanding interconnections and interdependencies better. We have entered the magic of yes and no, my perspective and your perspective, form and space, sound and silence, movement and stillness, thought and awareness, manifested and unmanifested, particle and wave. We have discovered the consciousness that connects the manifested and the unmanifested, this and that, and that, and that, and, and, and… to infinity, where there are no “that’s,” only “This.” “And-ness” is the key, the link between non-duality and duality. To live in the moment arising in awareness, just as it is, in the full thickness, is enlightenment. For awareness does not suffer, awareness does not react, awareness does not complain or wish for the “or,” the alternative to what is. Awareness is, and awareness is who we are. When you get that, and I don’t mean intellectually, I mean really know and are able to live it, this is what the journey of enlightenment is about. This is the “waking up” of Buddhism. This is how we begin to resolve the Gordian Knot of human dualistic thinking at every level of experience – from

our individual lives to our relationships, to our societies, to our planet. Living in, and as, awareness that holds the moment just as it is, and that knows what is needed next in the big “and” that is Life and Nature and the Universe, is the secret of Zen, and the end of suffering. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 23


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Before Midnight ∑∑∑∑

The East ∑∑∑∑

Short Take: The third chapter in the lives of Jesse and Celine in the Before Sunrise trilogy.

Short Take: Remarkably well made low budget topical thriller involving a young agent’s attempt to infiltrate an ecoterrorist group and what happens once she is on the inside.

REEL TAKE: For those of us of a cer-

tain age, the characters of Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julia Delpy) in Richard Linklater’s Before Sunrise, epitomized true love. Although the two do not end up together in the 1995 film, we know they’ve found that special someone in each other. In 2004 we watched the two meet again, their lives having taken them in separate directions. When they reconnect, that love is still there, but in order to be together Jesse will have Ethan Hawke and Julia Delpy reprise their beloved to leave his wife and young son. In a roles as Jesse and Celine in Before Midnight. ‘will he or won’t he’ ending, we were left wondering if Jesse would catch his in more than just performance. Celine flight home or stay in Paris. and Jesse seem so utterly real, as if we are Before Midnight opens nine years later eavesdropping on their lives. This go ‘round with Jesse seeing his [now teenage] son off both characters are still sharp witted (still at an airport in Greece. As he exits the terengaging in never-ending lively and flirty minal, we see Celine waiting for him with debate), still likeable (albeit vaguely pretentwo little curly haired blond moppets in tow. tious and self involved), but each now also Obviously, Jesse missed that flight home. possesses a new level of emotional instability Life has been good to him, but Jesse is and vulnerability. struggling with having left his son behind The gorgeous Greek countryside gives in order to build that life with Celine. This the proceedings a strangely befitting backis the catalyst for this chapter in their story. drop (in as classical sense) for battle of the While Jesse contemplates moving the family sexes to play out. The scenery also gives a from Paris to Chicago, Celine has been ofmuch needed respite from the heightening fered a great job and doesn’t want to leave. friction between Jesse and Celine. British Taking place all in one day, during a holiday cinematographer, Walter Lassally (Zorba ( in Greece, Before Midnight tells the story of the Greek Greek), plays a British novelist who is a another pivotal day in their relationship. mentor to Jesse and serves as their host. The If Before Sunrise and Before Sunset other houseguests, including Athina Rachel represent the more passionate and idealistic Tsangari, are all delightful. Personally I elements of love, Before Midnight is the wished for more time amidst their host and maturity of that love and its collision with fellow houseguests, but then it would have real life. Ergo, Before Midnight is far more been rather more like Enchanted April than melancholy than its predecessors. At times it Before Midnight Midnight. is terribly hard and even annoying to watch; It should be noted that it is not necesthe dialogue feels so raw and unscripted, sary to have seen the other two films for especially during heated arguments when this one to make sense, but it does give the rationale is lost and harsh words spoken. viewer greater context. If this is the last of As with its predecessors, Hawk and these films, Before Midnight is a satisfying Delpy share screenwriting credit with conclusion to a beautiful trilogy. Linklater. This collaborative creative effort Rated R for sexual content, nudity and language. part of what makes this trilogy of movies REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN special. Each actor owns their character

24 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

REEL TAKE: To call The East simply a

back to her superiors but must then stand by while the group poisons pharmaceutical executives with their own drug at a posh party. Her superior’s retort is simply “they’re not my clients”. This gets Sarah to not only question the group’s actions but those of her company as well. After a second payback results in unintended consequences, the group drifts apart while Sarah still reports on their actions. Having become romantically involved with Benji, she rejoins him for one last act of corporate terrorism. What makes The East so compelling is that despite the heavy plot outline I’ve described, it’s not hard to follow and works on the simple level of good, old fashioned entertainment keeping us glued to our seats to see what the outcome will be. The film was shot in Louisiana for 6 million dollars (it certainly doesn’t look it) and features several captivating performanc-

topical thriller is to sell the film short but it makes it easier to write about it for now I can tell you all the other aspects that the film brings to the table without having to further categorize it. It wears many hats and it wears them all well. On the surface it’s a thriller about an undercover agent’s successful attempt to infiltrate a small anarchist/eco-terrorist group who intend to payback certain large corporations for their environmental misdeeds. Then there are the corporate misdeeds themselves which makes the film a political statement. Finally it’s a love story of sorts not only of the infiltrator and the group’s leader but of all the group members for themselves. The film opens with shots of oil drenched seabirds as a result of some ecological disaster. The group, who call themselves “The East”, flood an oil executive’s home with oil gathered from a spill. Up and coming agent Jane Moss (Britt Marling who also co-wrote and co-produced), who works for a private intelligence agency run by a Ellen Page & Alexander Skarsgard as eco-terrorists in hard-as-nails boss (Patricia the compelling and provocative thriller The East. Clarkson), is sent to infiltrate the group and report back on es not only from the two leads but also from what she finds. Ellen Page and Patricia Clarkson. The group is very small and deliberately The East is also well scored and well leads an anti-establishment lifestyle. One edited and shows that, like the politiof the members (Tony Kebbel) is a former cal thrillers of the 1970s which it closely physician seriously impaired by a drug he resembles, it can hit hard and be engaging prescribed; another (Ellen Page) harbors a at the same time. This is the movie Matt deep hatred against a certain company. Our Damon’s Promised Land should have been first look at the group’s leader Benji (Alexbut with no big name stars and a limited ander Skarsgard) makes him look a lot like release company handling it, the people who Jesus but that quickly changes. need to see it won’t have a chance to. In the Although accepted by the group as a girl named Sarah, she continues to report ‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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long run that may be the biggest crime of all. Rated PG-13 for thematic elements, violence, sexual content, and partial nudity.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Man of Steel ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: The latest incarnation of Superman, upfitted for a 21st century audience.

Henry Cavil is the latest Man of Steel.

REEL TAKE: Why we endeavor to go where

Hollywood has gone many times before, I have no idea. With comic books at record popularity and their legions of fanboys opening their wallets, I guess yet another Superman was inevitable. At least this is what I surmised when I heard that Man of Steel was in the works with Zach Snyder (300) 300)) at the helm. But with Superman being 300 as American as apple pie, it was hard to not be curious and even a little excited by the time the film hit theatres in June. (Besides, if Russell Crowe throws his name into the ring, it can’t be all bad, right?) It’s not all bad, in fact it’s mostly good – some of it really good. The film has been criticized by some as being too dark and serious. It is more serious and melancholy than its predecessors, and I’d say that’s due in large part to its co-writer and co-producer Christopher Nolan (Dark Dark Knight Knight,, anyone?). However there is enough heart and levity in the mix that it never takes itself too seriously. Snyder takes the necessary time to reboot the franchise for a 21st century audience while still being reverential to its source material. Unfortunately he spends altogether too much time on the excessive destruction of Smallville and Metropolis, and showcases far too many skyscrapers crumbling in slow motion, but we’ll get to more of that in a bit.

The story starts on Krypton. Due to the depletion of its natural resources, the planet faces imminent self destruction. Krypton’s leading scientist, Jor-El (Russell Crowe), and his wife Lara Lor-Van (Ayelet Zurer) are no sooner overjoyed at the birth of their newborn son Kal-El, the first natural birth on the planet in a millennium, when Jor-El readies a small spaceship to take his child safely to a planet he has specifically selected for his son, with the DNA of their people cleverly stowed with the cargo. Flash forward 30 years or so; Kal-El is now Clark Kent (Henry Cavill), a handsome, do-gooding, quiet drifter in search of answers. His story, since arriving on Earth, unfolds in a series of well done interspersed flashbacks. Fortunately for the world, he finds out who he is just in time to fight off General Zod (Michael Shannon), Krypton’s highest military commander who has been searching the universe for Kal-El since the destruction of their mother planet. Plucky little Lois Lane (Amy Adams) has also found Clark Kent and wants to keep him a secret no more. British actor Henry Cavill (best known to Americans from the Showtime series The Tudors) is a fine Clark Kent / Superman/ Kal-El when given half the chance. The glimpses of personality we get are buried between pro-longed action sequences. The last third of the film is one non-stop sequence of mass destruction. However, even here, Snyder manages to dot it with moments of humanity, character development and levity, and for that I was thankful. Amy Adams as Lois Lane is initially quite annoying, but then again that’s the point; she grows on you as the story progresses. Russell Crowe and Kevin Costner, as Superman’s biological and adoptive fathers respectively, deliver extremely different but equally good performances; Costner’s part is smaller and more reserved, befitting Clark Kent’s father, and Crowe’s performance is powerhouse, befitting the father of Kal-El. Michael Shannon could have done with a little less wild-eyed villainy, and a little more of the introspection that makes his character and his sinister dedication to his cause interesting. The rest of the cast, including Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne and Ayelet Zurer keep perfect step with the proceedings. Ultimately Man of Steel sets the sequels to pick up with the Clark Kent and Lois Lane antics that we all know and love. I doubt they’ll ever imbue this Man of Steel with the campiness of the Christopher Reeve films, nor should they. This Superman is supposed to symbolize hope, and I’m hopeful for superhero and Superman fans everywhere. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence, action and destruction and for some language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Much Ado About Nothing ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: While Joss Whedon’s home movie version of Shakespeare’s play is far from an ideal adaptation, it has much to recommend it.

REEL TAKE: It would be

too easy and very unoriginal to say that Much Ado About Nothing lives up to its title. It would also be dead wrong, since this Joss Whedon adaptation of the Shakespeare Alexis Denisof and Amy Acker are Benedick and Beatrice in play was shot in 12 days at Joss Whedon’s adaptation of Much Ado About Nothing. Whedon’s Santa Monica home with no big name millions he made on The Avengers and not stars. Hardly “Much Ado” but by today’s spending it here. We desperately need more standards (think Whedon’s The Avengers), small films from not just the independent certainly close to nothing. filmmakers, but from the big name proThis minimalist approach is both what ducers and directors like Whedon whose works and what doesn’t work in this proindustry credentials could get these films duction. After the glut of CGI blockbusters made more easily. in recent years, it’s refreshing to see a small By all means see Much Ado About movie based on 400 year old material that Nothing while it lasts. Even Joss Whedon’s has stood the test of time. I just wish that I name won’t keep it in movie houses for long liked it better than I did. and as for Shakespeare’s name… It’s great to There is a lot to like here. The performances by Amy Acker and Alexis Denisof ‘Movies’ continued on page 26 as Beatrice and Benedick are first rate and would work well in any setting be it classic or contemporary. The black & white photography helps to enhance the low budget, indie feel of the project with a number of memorable images including an evening Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company torchlight parade near the end of the film. Movieline (828) 254-1281 The use of some vintage-like fashions added www.ashevillepizza.com an amusing, retro look to the characters. Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) However I found a few things to take Movieline (828) 298-1234 issue with, starting with the film’s opening scenes. The pacing is slow and the mostly Biltmore Grande TV actors seem uncomfortable with the 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 Shakespearean dialogue which is, for the www.REGmovies.com most part, spoken word for word. Both the Carmike 10 (Asheville) pace and the performances pick up once Movieline (828) 298-4452 Beatrice & Benedick arrive on the scene www.carmike.com which to be fair is just like the play itself. The other thing that really bothered Carolina Cinemas me is how flat the lighting is during the (828) 274-9500 indoor scenes. As someone who loves old www.carolinacinemas.com movies and black & white photography in Cinebarre (Asheville) particular, I just wish that someone knew www.cinebarre.com how to light a set effectively. I had the same complaint with the Oscar winning The ArtThe Falls Theatre (Brevard) ist, so I’m not just picking on Whedon. Movieline (828) 883-2200 The four lovers and the Duke (after a Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) slow start) give very good performances as Movieline (828) 232-1536 do the servants. My biggest problem was www.fineartstheatre.com with Nathan Fillion as Dogberry, the local constable. I found his portrayal ineffective Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) and unfunny. His malapropisms which Movieline (828) 697-2463 should be a source of constant amusement www.flatrockcinema.com were painful to here. In fact I found the Four Seasons (Hendersonville) “police” scenes to be the film’s weakest. Movieline (828) 693-8989 In conclusion I offer a tip of the hat to Joss Whedon for banking the tens of Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Theatre Directory

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film reviews ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special membersonly events and screenings. July 2:

At Long Last Love (1975) An homage to the musical comedies of the 1930s, a millionaire named Michael Oliver Pritchard II and a singer named Kitty O’Kelly meet and fall in love. Stars Burt Reynolds, Cybill Shepherd and Madeline Kahn. Directed by Peter Bogdanovich July 9:

Hallelujah, I’m a Bum

(1933) A New York tramp falls in love with the mayor’s amnesiac girlfriend after rescuing her from a suicide attempt. Stars Al Jolson, Maude Evans and Frank Morgan. Directed by Lewis Milestone July 16:

Gold Diggers of 1935

(1935) In a luxury hotel, stage director Nicoleff stages a show to get the money to pay his bills. Mrs. Prentiss, who is backing the show wants her daughter to marry the millionaire T. Mosely Thorpe, but Ann falls in love with Dick Curtis, while Dick’s girl friend marries Ann’s brother, Humbolt. But the hotel secretary, Betty, knows a way to avoid difficulties with old Mrs. Prentiss. Stars Dick Powell, Adolph Menjou and Gloria Stuart Directed by Busby Berkeley July 23:

Call Me Madam (1953) Washington hostess Sally Adams becomes a Truman-era US ambassador to a European grand duchy. Stars Ethel Merman, Donald O’Connor and Vera-Ellen. Directed by Walter Lang July 30:

Popeye

(1980) The sailor man travels to a seaside town called Sweethaven, falls in love with Olive Oyl, adopts Swee’pea, and makes an enemy of Bluto. Stars Robin Williams, Shelley Duvall and Ray Walston. Directed by Robert Altman

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Danny McBride. It’s the perfect framework for a situational comedy with Hollywood’s (and Canada’s) edgy, young comedians of have a movie that engenders discussion on the day, ostensibly pitted together, to face its merits as well as its flaws. Too often these the end of days. days we watch a movie, leave the theater, go Our fearsome heroes immediately home, and that’s that. begin bickering about food, water, sleepRated PG-13 for some sexuality and brief ing arrangements and the one pornographic drug use. magazine on the premises. They have a lot REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN of fun mocking each others films as well as their public (and private) personas (Franco This is the End ∑∑∑1/2 and Hill good naturedly bearing the brunt Short Take: An apocalyptic comedy and of the laughs). They film a video confesbromance from the creative minds that sional a la 127 Hours and they make a sequel brought you Superbad. to The Pineapple Express. Eventually giant big horned and generously endowed demons arrive on the scene and its judgment time. The good will be beamed to heaven and the bad, well … they won’t. This is the End is definitely a crass, self indulgent vanity project. They originally did it as a short film in 2007. Some will say it should have been kept a short. Personally I found it funny and, in spite of its more crass elements, smartly done. Rogen James Franco, Jonah Hill, Chris Robinson, Seth Rogen, and Goldberg bring Jay Baruchel and Danny McBride face the devil in the bromance back like apocalyptic comedy, This is the End. J.T. brought sexy back. If you don’t what that means, This is the End probably isn’t for REEL TAKE: This is the End is an apocayou. Its target audience already knows who lyptic comedy that is not shy on laughs, they are: fans of TV’s Freaks and Geeks, Geeks fans mockery and even judgment. Friends since of previous Rogen/Goldberg collaborations childhood and Superbad collaborators Seth and fans of Judd Apatow movies will likely Rogen and Evan Goldberg must have had a enjoy it the most, though I doubt anyone great time dreaming up the premise of This had quite as much fun as the filmmakers is the End and had an even better time filmthemselves. ing it. Rogen and Goldberg enlisted the help of many celebs, a handful of who are close Rated R for crude and sexual content throughout, brief graphic nudity, pervasive language, drug use buddies. All are playing hilariously awful and some violence versions of themselves. The initial plot is quite simple; Jay REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN Baruchel flies to LA to hang with his old pal (and fellow Canadian) Seth Rogen. After What Maisie Knew ∑∑∑∑ ½ a relaxed day of gaming and getting stoned Short Take: Near perfect contemporary they head to James Franco’s house for a update of Henry James’ 1894 novel party. Unimpressed with Seth’s Hollywood about an acrimonious divorce as seen buddies, especially Franco and the seemfrom a child’s point of view. ingly ever affable Jonah Hill, Jay puts up REEL TAKE: Like Much Ado About Nothquite a fuss. The party is raging by the time ing, What Maisie Knew is a contemporary they get there and Jay continues to be unadaptation of classic literature. In this impressed; meanwhile the audience howls instance it’s Henry James’ 1894 novel about at some of the celebrity cameos including a an English couple’s acrimonious divorce cringe worthy, rather out character, coked and the effect it has on their daughter. The up Michael Cera. James book follows Maisie into her young When a Book of Revelations-style teenage years but the film stops while she is Apocalypse rocks the Hollywood Hills, the still a child. Now Shakespeare is adaptable to party thins out quite quickly, leaving us with almost every setting imaginable but modernthe aforementioned Rogen, Baruchel, Franizing Henry James is a much more difficult co and Hill as well as Craig Robinson, and task. In What Maisie Knew the filmmakers ‘Movies’ continued from page 25

26 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

Onata Aprile and Alexander Skarsgard share some quality time together in What Maisie Knew.

have more than risen to the challenge. Unlike Much Ado, Maisie has a greater number of seasoned performers. Julianne Moore’s remarkably unpleasant, self-absorbed mother is one of the more difficult parts she’s played in quite some time. As the wronged husband, Steve Coogan begins as the Steve Coogan we all know and love before revealing a darker and less endearing side. Caught in the middle is their 7 year old daughter Maisie who has to observe the back and forth and then try to process it all. Add to the mix 2 unlucky partners who are there to provide each spouse with an excuse to be granted child custody. They are winningly portrayed by Joanna Vanderham & Alexander Skarsgard (who also happens to be in The East which is reviewed this month). Both provide the film with the heart and soul we so desperately want it to have. The movie is well paced and the NYC locations are simply but effectively used. While they provide first class window dressing (the original setting is London), the movie is about self-centered people and how a young child is forced to deal with an unfortunate situation not of her making. Onata Aprile, as the title character, gives a charming, unaffected performance which allows the audience to easily bond with her. Although an updating of the Henry James novel, his observances on human emotions and their ability to console or condemn remains as fresh and pertinent as ever. Moore is a rock and roll singer, Coogan a well-to-do constantly travelling businessman. It clearly shows the consequences of a relationship once the physical attraction is over and both parents are stuck with a child that they love but don’t really want. Skarsgard & Vanderham portray a bartender and a nanny who wind up being thrown together because of Maisie. While the movie does resort to the old standby of working class poor people being happier and better off than self-centered rich people, here it seems natural and not a cliché. Finally I really want to congratulate directors Scott McGeehe & David Siegel, and screenwriters Nancy Doyne & Carroll ‘Movies’ continued on page 27


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 26

Cartwright for taking disturbing material like this and avoiding the temptation (too often yielded too in films) of wallowing in dysfunctionality through one ugly scene after another. But then this is Henry James and not Eugene O’Neill. Unfortunately the curse of the monthly has struck again and Maisie has already left town. Watch for its upcoming release on DVD and/or streaming availability and be sure to catch up with it. While it’s sometimes painful to watch, Maisie is ultimately a rewarding and uplifting experience. Rated R for some language

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Much Ado About Nothing”

DramaRama: Sing-a-long Movie Night

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Asheville Community Theatre will hold their annual fundraiser, DramaRama, an entire week of unique, affordable, fun events that benefit the downtown theatre. Seven events will take place from Sunday, July 7 through Saturday, July 13, and include a fashion show, a sing-a-long movie, and the return of BARK! The Musical. Tickets for the events range from $5 to $15. A popular part of DramaRama is the Sing-a-Long Movie Night. “Last year we showed Grease,” said Susan Harper. “People came in poodle skirts and letterman jackets! We all sang our hearts out. It was a blast!”

July DVD Picks

Much Ado About Nothing (1993) It’s always instructive (not to mention a lot of fun) to compare a new film adaptation to an earlier one. Sometimes, as in the case of The Great Gatsby, there is more than one major version out there. This often happens when the original source material is literary and quite often when you’re dealing with Shakespeare. In the case of Much Ado however, there is only the 1993 Kenneth Branagh film to compare to the recent Joss Whedon one (reviewed in this issue). Shakespeare’s tale of 2 pairs of star crossed but absolutely clueless lovers, the machinations of an evil Count, and the tireless devotion to duty by a local constable who says one thing but means another is brilliantly performed by a cast of mostly British actors and some surprising American ones. Director-star Branagh utilizes a beautiful Italian villa, flamboyant camerawork, stirring music from Patrick Doyle, and excellent costumes to bring this play vividly to life. There is also Emma Thompson as the absolute personification of Shakespeare’s misanthropic Beatrice and, in her first major role, Kate Beckinsale as one of the lovers. It is the height of irony that this film was made right before the breakup of Branagh and Thompson who were then the British stage’s version of Charles & Diana. Their exchanges as Benedick & Beatrice are funny, sad, poignant, and even a little melancholy reminding us that Much Ado About Nothing is really nothing more than an

early screwball comedy. Too bad it didn’t end that way in real life. If you never seen this film version of Shakespeare’s comedy, hold off until after you’ve seen the Whedon version if you can. Branagh’s Tuscan locations, striking visualizations, and pitch perfect delivery of the text even by such American choices as a young Denzel Washington, Keanu Reeves, and an absolutely hilarious Michael Keaton make this THE version of Much Ado About Nothing to see for a complete appreciation of the play.

Bull Durham (1988) Each of my reviews this month inspired various DVD picks – Before Sunrise or Before Sunset were befitting for Before Midnight. I was tempted re-visit The Pineapple night Express after watching This is the End. And of course with Man of Steel, one can’t help but remember the Christopher Reeve Superman films. Any and all of these are great suggestions for your viewing pleasure, but when I heard a special 25th anniversary edition of Bull Durham was being released, I had my pick, hands down. Besides, when the boys of

For this year’s Sing-a-long, Asheville Community Theatre will screen Mamma Mia! and is encouraging everyone to belt out the ABBA hits. People are welcome to come costumed as their favorite “dancing queen.” Champagne cocktails and popcorn will be available during the film.

IF YOU GO: Mamma Mia! will be shown

Friday, July 12 at 7:30 p.m. at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St. in downtown Asheville. Tickets are $10. A full schedule of DramaRama events can be found by visiting www.ashevilletheatre. org. Or, call (828) 254-1320 for more information.

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Bull Durham” summer are doing their thing, it’s a good time for a cold beer and a baseball movie. Shot in part in Asheville at the Tourist’s own McCormick field, Bull Durham tells the story of an aging ball player, Crash Davis (Kevin Costner) trying to make it back to the show but perennially mired in the minor league. When he is recruited by the Durham Bulls, he’s tasked with educating a talented but buffoonish pitcher, appropriately named “Nuke” Laloosh (Tim Robbins). Unbeknownst to Crash, someone else has decided to dedicate her poetic talents and sexy skills to the cause as well. Each season Annie Savoy (Susan Sarandon) picks a new player to bed down with and cultivate his big league potential. Annie understandably picks Nuke; he needs a lot of teaching whereas there doesn’t seem to be much Crash doesn’t already know about life, love and baseball. However, staying focused on Nuke proves challenging with Crash in the picture. Costner is pitch perfect and in his element. Sarandon has never been sexier. Robbins’ Nuke is dumber than a bag of hammers but oh so likeable. The three of them, combined with a sparkling script, a great soundtrack and minor league, sleepy southern town backdrop is recipe for greatness. Bull Durham is smartly written, fun to watch and sexy as hell. It seems a seasonally appropriate pick this month, but it’s a perfect date night pick any time of the year. A special 25th anniversary DVD, with new features and commentary is available now.

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. HFS is showing four movies this month including films from celebrated directors Robert Aldrich and Robert Altman, one of the best loved musicals of all time, and a clever whodunit with Michael Caine & Christopher Reeve.

Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte July 7:

(1964) Tennessee Williams meets Gaslight in this Gothic melodrama about an aging Southern Belle (Bette Davis) who may or may not have committed a murder in her youth. The film also stars Olivia de Havilland and Joseph Cotton. Directed by Robert Aldrich (Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? Jane?).

Singin’ In The Rain July 14:

(1952) For many people this is THE classic Hollywood musical. Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O’Connor star in this story of 3 people working in Hollywood at the beginning of the Sound Era. Directed by Stanley Donen (Charade). July 21:

Deathtrap

(1982) Sidney Lumet’s film version of Ira Levin’s long running Broadway play about a desperate mystery writer (Michael Caine), his seemingly loving wife (Dyan Cannon), and his former student (Christopher Reeve) who has written just the play he needs. Directed by Sidney Lumet (The The Verdict Verdict).

A Prairie Home Companion July 28:

(2006) Legendary director Robert Altman’ final film is an adaptation of Garrison Keillor’s long running public radio program featuring an all-star ensemble cast and infused with Altman’s unique perspective on life and death. In the cast are Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, Lilly Tomlin, Tommy Lee Jones, and of course, Garrison Keillor. Directed by Robert Altman (Gosford Gosford Park Park).

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Southern Comfort

the curmudgeon Storekeep, Mrs. Storekeep, Cityfella — who was beginning to spend more than his usual amount of time in the store, leading Mrs. Storekeep to suspect that problems were mounting on his homefront, especially because Mrs. Cityfella (her name was Irene) had not been in for a month or more — and Curmudgeon, were checking the headlines on the Asheville paper, headlines that dealt with the continuing defabrication of politics in Raleigh. “Boy,” said Curmudgeon, “the Democrats held power in the state for over 100 years and it took a combined effort of public ignorance, public distain, and the public deciding that they knew better — by staying at home for the last election — and now look!” “Don’t forget,” said Storekeep, “that Republican gerrymandering played a big part, too.” “Republicans are generally more consumed with self interest than the rest of the voters. They are a bit like crows circling the territory, looking for sparkling items to pick up and steal.” “Sparkling items?” asked Mrs. Storekeep. “Crows,” answered Curmudgeon, “because they simply love shining and sparkling things. They take them home to decorate their nests, much like people buy garage-sale portraits of Elvis Presley done in black velvet with stitched on sequins. “And don’t forget that crows are very well-known birds — not very popular but very well known, and that includes the number of times crows are mentioned in common words that we use every day. There’s the carpenters’ crow bar, to yellow crow-bells being a common name for daffodils, to our aging eyes being ringed with crow’s feet, to one used crow-quill — originally being the feathers of crows having a sharpened tip and used in penmanship, to the obsolete name of that wildflower, the soapwort — ” “Yes,” said Mrs. Storekeep — who was the leader of the local garden club, “I remember that bouncing bet or Saponaria, was once called the crowsoap plant — ” “ — to the flight,” continued Curmudgeon, “of a crow to the crow’s nest of whaling ships.” “I hate to jump in here,” said Storekeep, “but I always thought of crows as being great and noble birds.” “They are,” answered Curmudgeon, “I meant no respect to the species but merely pointed out their having a particular love of shiny things.” “In the name of polite responses could we talk a bit less about politics and a bit more about the birds?” asked Cityfella.

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COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

PETER LOEWER Illustration by Peter Loewer

“Of course,” answered Curmudeon. “For example, I just remembered that probably the most familiar of all American birds are the robins, and they are liked, too. Everybody knows about robin’s egg blue, and robins in the front yard pulling worms from the ground to feed their robin brood, but how many of you know that robins sometimes become intoxicated by fermented fruits and berries, causing them to behave in eccentric manners?” “I didn’t know that about the intoxication,” said Cityfella, “but I do know about their cheerful songs.” With that he reached in his coat pocket and withdrew his old battered copy of Peterson’s “A Field Guide to the Birds,” that he originally purchased for Dr. Shadle’s classes in ornithology, when attending the University of Buffalo, back in the 1960s. “Peterson describes the robin’s voice as a clear, whistled caroling, often long continued, made up of short phrases of two or three notes, while “The Audubon Society Master Guide to Birding” — I remember — describes the robin’s voice as a loud, rich caroling with short phrases that change pitch as ‘cheerily-cheery-cheerily-cherry,’ along with a number of call notes best descrbed as ‘Tut-tut-tut’ and a slurred ‘Tyeeep.’” “If I may interject,” said Curmudgeon, “the song of the robin has been described in a number of ways — I’ve heard that at daybreak the robin’s favorite song is often continued for minutes at a time. “So it’s obvious that only a wellknown bird could give rise to so many views of the sound of its song. I don’t know of a bird that hops about so distinctly, rapidly, and as well-known as the robin, all the time with its head up.” “That explains,” said Cityfella, “why robins are never compared to any political party.” “Why?” they asked in unison. “Because,” answered Curmudgeon, “most political parties never have their heads up, especially today with the continued infringement of the media. If they did they would walk out of their various ruts, but instead they continue to wander along, looking at the ground, and it’s the sameold, same-old, day after day.” “What does anybody know about the chickadee?” asked Storekeep. Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

28 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

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Good Friends are the Sunshine of Life

A Nigerian Proverb reads: “Hold a true friend with both your hands.” I must tell you about something that happened to me last week. I was online and checking several websites as I often do. I opened a site and in several minutes I came to a woman listed as living in Raleigh. I looked at the rather soulful and attractive woman. I went on to something else. Most of my friends know that I lived in Durham and worked in the RTP counties during my journalism career. It was home for me for a good amount of years. I had often thought, after I left Durham, if I would ever see or hear from my friends there again. It has been 23 years since I lived there and to be honest, I doubted I would have any contact. When I left Durham and turned 50, I gave up drinking and partying, like I did when I left Florida. One true thing you learn in self-help programs is that when you no longer are the “life of the party” most often you have to give up your circle of drinking buddies. I had many professional friends down east, too, that enhanced my life. I really hated to leave them, but back then we reporters went with the flow and changed newspapers often. Most likely we moved for more money and, sometimes, personal reasons. Back to my story about the woman on the Internet. Later, when I read my emails, I had a cordial hello from her. I looked at her photo again and I thought I know her from somewhere. We emailed for two or three days and the more she wrote I kept thinking this woman reminds me of a former friend in Durham who moved to San Francisco. I lost contact. She kept emailing, and finally she asked about my former housemate in those days, and that tied up the mystery with a big pink ribbon. It was my friend, and here we are, after 23 years, in contact again. Unbelievable! All these years later; and believe

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

me, 23 years of happenings and living is a long time in my world. I wrote back and she responded, “yes, I know you.” She was as blown away as much as I was. Later that evening I called her and it is as if the 23 years never happened. I forgot to tell you, her birthday is eight days after mine in June. We are both Gemini’s, are so much alike, and have so much in common.

Here we are, after 23 years, in contact again. Unbelievable! I have to think about things awhile before I start getting used to something. There are so many things to say about why our paths are crossing again in this time when the world has changed so much. Life is not as simple as it was when we knew each other in the 70’s. This is a real story for some astrologist to predict. What is next? She is 63 and I am 73, she is retired and I am retired. For both of us, friendship is at the top of our slightly practical forecast. Neither of us is looking for a marriage. What a way to ruin a great friendship by becoming “more than friends.” We both value our friendship far too much to have it any other way. Aristotle wrote in 4th c. B.C., “Friendship is a single soul dwelling in two bodies.”

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


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Village Art & Craft Fair – August 3 & 4

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New Morning Gallery and Bellagio sponsor the annual Village Art and Craft Fair on the grounds of the Cathedral of all Souls in Biltmore Village. In its 41st year, the Village Art and Craft Fair continues a long tradition of bringing high-quality crafts to Biltmore Village. The fair hosts 125 artists from 17 states, representing the full spectrum of craft media — jewelry, ceramic, wood, fiber, metals, two-dimensional art and more. The craft fair is a great opportunity to encounter new artists and to talk with crafters one-on-one. Most exhibitors are not represented at New Morning Gallery, so visitors are sure to find new treasures along with a few old favorites. Over the years, our reputation as

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one of the finest craft fairs in the area has spread (along with the ubiquitous cat posters and T-shirts). Thousands of shoppers from all over the southeast arrive to stroll through the fair, discovering unique gifts for friends, family and themselves! IF YOU The annual Village Art and GO Craft Fair on the grounds

of the Cathedral of all Souls in Biltmore Village. August 3 & 4. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. For more information, visit www.newmorningnc.com.

INTERVIEW WITH TERRI KARLSSON, CO-OWNER OF

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The Tree and Vine

The Olive Tree and the Grape Vine – are ancient symbols of peace, sustenance, and merriment. Their primary products are fine extra virgin olive oils and balsamic vinegars, fruits of the olive tree and the grape vine. Guests are invited to taste all of their olive oils and balsamic vinegars and after choosing their favorites, they hand bottle selections in an attractive bottle with a bar top cork and a wine-bottle type foil as a final seal.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about The Tree and Vine.

Terri Karlsson: We’re a totally indepen-

dent store featuring the freshest olive oils and very old balsamics, Mediterranean, and locally sourced foods. We have a wonderful selection of Mediterranean continued on page 39

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Every Friday & Saturday Evening

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Waynesville’s Art After Dark

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The season is in full swing, making this the perfect time to step out and enjoy a stroll through Waynesville’s working studios and galleries.

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Festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, Cedar Hill Studio, Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Main Street Artist’s Co-op, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, and the Village Framer. Visit www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com. Metal sculptor Grace Cathey announces the publication of Fire & Steel: The Sculpture of Grace Cathey Cathey. Cathey will be signing copies of her book at Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, 136 Depot St. (inside Walker Service), on Friday, July 5 from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and on Saturday, July 6 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Newly opened Cedar Hill Studio is a “must-visit.” This gorgeously renovated gallery features regional artists and antiques

Flag by Jason Cox

alike, in a spacious setting. Cedar Hill Studio is currently celebrating their grand-opening, so stop by to enjoy “Art, Antiques & Other Passions” at 196 N. Main Street in Waynesville. Twigs and Leaves will be exhibiting works by Jack Stern. Known for his incredible water and magnificent skies, Jack will be demonstrating his painting techniques on Friday, July 5 from 6 to 9 p.m., and again on Saturday July 6 from 11 to 4 p.m. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98

Painting by Jack Stern

North Main Street, Waynesville. The Village Framer presents an exhibit by Jason Cox, featuring photographs taken while assisting hurricane victims in Oklahoma. The exhibit will also be a fundraiser to raise money to benefit the hurricane victims. Stop by 56 N. Main Street in Waynesville, or call (828) 452-0823 for more information.

IF YOU The Waynesville Gallery GO Association presents Art

After Dark, from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 5.

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GREAT SHOPS • ART • FINE DINING

INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

Teresa Pennington

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Teresa Pennington has been INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY commissioned by the Biltmore Estate and has completed four series of drawings capturing the grandeur of the house and gardens. The newest Biltmore rendering is entitled “Golden Evening” and depicts the house with a large lighted Christmas tree on the front lawn. Other scenes she has captured include Grandfather Mountain, Cold Mountain, and Linville Falls, one of the most photographed features on the Blue Ridge Parkway. She records the large and small, with a tender regard for the details of chickadees and hummingbirds, as well as botanicals and wildlife.

Blue Ridge Parkway 75th Anniversary Commemorative Series, Grandfather Mountain Overlook. A colored pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington.

Saturday. I usually stay in my studio at home and draw on Wednesday and Thursday. Those are my favorite days. My studio is a half circle room that is all windows and looks out over a creek. It is good for my soul.

Rapid River Magazine: At what age did you know you wanted to be

an artist, and have you ever considered or pursued any other career?

Teresa Pennington: I was 23 and pregnant with my son. I had a rough

pregnancy and had to quit my job. I was home and bored and I started drawing. I began with watercolor and used that medium for two years. Then a friend of mine gave me a set of colored pencils and I fell in love and haven’t done anything else since. That was 30 years ago.

Linville Falls, a colored pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington.

TPennington Art Gallery 15 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786 (828) 452-9284 • teresa@tpennington.com

RRM: You are a self-taught artist. Do you feel this has allowed you

to gain a better understanding of who you are as an artist in terms of expression and growth than had you gone the traditional art-school route?

TP: I would never discourage anyone seeking a degree in fine art,

however, not having training allowed me to develop my own personal style. I doubt that I would be doing colored pencil now if I had formal training.

RRM: What does your daily work schedule look like? TP: Well, I do a lot of shows on weekends so I travel a lot. If I am not on the road I am in my gallery Monday, Tuesday, Friday and

Fences Along the Blue Ridge Parkway – Peaks of Otter, a colored pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington PG. 36

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Nature Inspired

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The Haywood County Arts BY ANA WOODALL Council’s Gallery 86 will host the exhibition, Nature Inspired, beginning Wednesday, July 3. Nature Inspired celebrates the form of mixed media used to express the influence of nature on its creator. The term “mixed media” refers to a visual art technique that uses various art mediums in one work. Mixed media can achieve many different effects to the viewer. Nature Inspired is an exhibit that expresses the artist’s influences from nature and the world around them. The exhibit features works by Norma B. Hendrix, Nina Howard, Dawn Behling, and Nancy Blevins. Although, the term “mixed media” has only been around since the early 20th Century, this form of art has been used since the 1400s with the application of gold leaf to paintings and other various art forms.

AHH by Nina Howard

Octoprint II Algae by Dawn Behling

IF YOU Nature Inspired, on display Wednesday, July GO 3 through Saturday, July 27. Artist’s reception

Friday, July 5 during Art After Dark from 6-9 p.m. Gallery 86, 86 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more details visit www.haywoodarts.org.

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Art in Autumn 2013

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You may know of the humble beginnings of Art in Autumn, Weaverville, NC, but in case you do not, I’d like to share our little story.

the third Saturday of September our fledgling festival was dressed up and ready for her debut. She has soared higher each and every year, and we will gratefully celebrate our 7th Red Moon, mixed media painting year, September by Sondra Dorn 21, 2013. Art in Autumn caters to the juried artists who vie for our 114 selected spaces. Our Weaverville community comes together on the 3rd Saturday of each September and extends a hearty welcome to both artists and visitors. The Weaverville Business Association is committed to provide an honest to goodness juried art event each and every year and we are rewarded with a roster of artists that showcase spectacular work with even a bit of flarified funkiness for good measure! The 6,000+ visitors who grace Main Street Weaverville’s Art in Autumn festival continue to exceed our early expectations. The art festival begins at 10 a.m. and extends until 6 p.m. This Blissful Village by Reiko Miyagi years’ judge, Mr.

In December 2006 several business owners had a dream to create an event that could promote downtown Weaverville, showcase our amazing shops and restaurants and provide an artist friendly venue. We dreamed of attracting large numbers of visitors who would in turn love our community almost as much as we do. With a minimalist type of budget, lofty plans and a zero tolerance for negativity of any sort, Art in Autumn was crafted into a workable plan. Nine months later on

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That Night in Osaka by Roger Parramore

Lee Davis, brings not only a wealth of artistic knowledge from his years of teaching pottery and sculpture but the most enviable status of being the first resident potter at the John C Campbell Folk School. A member of the prestigious Southern Highland Craft Guild since 1976, Mr. Davis spends most of his time at work in his private studio. Please consider yourself invited to share this day with us and enjoy a day of dazzling art, friendly folks, trendy shops and restaurants and blue grass music that was born in our mountain community. IF YOU Art in Autumn will be held Saturday, GO September 21 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Main

Street in downtown Weaverville. For more information visit www.artinautumn.com.

All Aboard! On Thursday, July 4 from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. The Craggy Mountain Line will run their first annual 4th of July trolley train ride. Tickets are $10 per person for this fun train ride to Riverside Park and back. Hot dogs, refreshments, and lots of fun for the whole family! Purchase tickets on the day of the event, or call (828) 808-4877. Trains will be running every hour. The Craggy Mountain Line also runs special charter trolley trains. With elegant and comfortable furnishings, we can’t wait to show you our fully restored rail cars!

IF YOU GO: The Craggy Mountain Line, 111 North Woodfin Ave., Asheville, NC 28804. Visit www. craggymountainline.com

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healthy lifestyles Should I Be Taking Calcium Supplements?

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“Dr. Jack, I was told that I should be taking calcium supplements because of my age. What do you think?” Nora, a 52 year old, small, thin, pale Caucasian stared intently at her doctor. “I was told that I had small bones and was probably osteoporotic. Should I be taking calcium and Vitamin D?” Dr. Jack Reynolds folded his hands and leaned back in his chair. “Well, Nora, I never like to generalize with patients. It all depends on who you are and what you are, doesn’t it?” He smiled. “Yes, you are small-boned and small-boned women are prone to fractures but that doesn’t necessarily mean you are osteoporotic or that you should be taking supplements. For example, when we say “thinning of the bones,” we don’t mean small bones like you have. Osteoporosis means your bones are losing their ability to maintain a strong, tight structure in the interior of the bone. This is brought on by your genetic makeup, your exposure to sunshine, your estrogen levels, your dietary intake of calcium, whether you smoke, whether you do weight-bearing exercise.” “Does that mean walking?” Nora questioned.

‘CD’s’ continued from page 17

Vondelpark Seabed R&S Records The UK based trio Vondelpark has had a career best described as nears hits and misses. In 2009 they emerged as leaders in the London based subset of theatrically gloomy pop, even as they were not yet twenty years of age. Within weeks they were the subject of wildly exaggerated press and a widely seen documentary detailing the pitfalls of being in an emerging rock group. But in a universe of rapidly changes tastes the band just as quickly fell out of fashion and seemingly disappeared from the scene. A few internet streamed songs showed up here and there but they were leftovers from previous sessions. For all purposes Vondelpark were kaput. So it’s with no small surprise that Seabed arrives. Still comprised of singer, multiinstrumentalist/producer Lewis Rainsbury, guitarist/bassist Alex Bailey, and keyboardist Matt Law, they’ve found

“Yes.” Dr. Jack shook his head. “Sorry for the slip into medical-ese. It means doing any active exercise that requires you to be upright, supporting the weight of your body as you move.” “But if my bone size is not an indication, how can I know?” Nora pressed. “Let’s start by seeing if you an elevated risk for osteoporosis. I already know that you are not over 65, that you don’t smoke, and that you have never had a long bone fracture. Am I right?” Nora smiled and shook her head.

The easiest way to find out is a Dexa-scan. “Do you have osteoporosis in your family?” She shrugged. “Are you taking medicines that would lower your body’s ability to absorb calcium or to utilize calcium – like antacids, drugs that lower the acid in your stomach, steroids, or antidepressants?” Again she shook her head. “Have you already started through menopause?” When she nodded, he said, “Okay, we can assume that your estrogen levels are falling. Now as to your Vitamin D levels,

a home on the Belgian based label R&S. It’s a label generally associated with electronica, so at first glimpse the pairing seems a bit odd, especially given the rhythm-andblues tinged, late night jazz feel of the album. Seabed is a languorous journey through subtle texture, laid back bass beats, and Rainsbury’s low key to the point of distraction vocals. It’s an interesting collection, but one that frequently leaves the listener in limbo. Rainsbury mumbles his way through the wraithlike opener “Quest,” while on the title track he repeatedly drones “I won’t say it, if you won’t say it ... You will realize,” to a synthesized funk laden beat. The rather toneless “Closer,” in which Rainsbury promises he’s “never getting off this rollercoaster,” threatens to fall off the rails but never quite

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

that’s something we can test for. Bone structure is a little harder to know.” He leaned forward. “But the easiest way to find out is a Dexa-scan – a low energy x-ray of your hip and spine to check your bone density. The test can be a little expensive – and is probably not necessary just yet at your age and with your low level of risk.” Nora frowned. “But I really want to know what I should do.” “Oh, that’s easy, Nora. Eat calcium rich foods, exercise outdoors at least twenty minutes each day, and decrease your salt intake – and don’t worry. Worry makes your bones thinner.” He grinned again. “I’ll check your Vitamin D level and have the nurse give you some information about calcium in foods. Using that information, you try modifying your eating habits as best you can. When your test comes back in three weeks, let’s talk about what you’re eating and what levels of calcium your body needs. But let’s not assume you need supplements until we know that you’re doing the all the life-style activities you can. How does that sound?” “That sounds fine, Doctor,” Nora said. “I’ll see you in three weeks.”

does, which pretty much sums up most of Seabed. It’s hard not to admire the band’s intent, and as mood music it’s more than adequate. But it’s a very difficult album to penetrate, and one that works best in short doses. I’d suggest streaming a few tracks to decide if this is an album to your liking. I found it more admirable than enjoyable, with Vondelpark remaining a band worth watching out for. ***

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Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 33


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what to do guide Sunday, June 30 and Monday, July 1

Auditions for “Dearly Departed” The Haywood Arts Regional Theatre will hold auditions at 6:30 p.m. for its production of the Southern comedy, directed by Judy Dybwad. The show has lead roles for adults of various ages. Anyone interested in working backstage should come sign up. Held in the Feichter Studio of the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

through July

America Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Members’ Exhibit on display at The Red House Studios & Gallery in Black Mountain. The show runs through Monday July 29. For more information visit www.svfalarts.org

Thursday, July 4

20th annual Firecracker 5K Weaverville, NC, at PNC Bank, Weaver Blvd. Entry fee: $25. Register online at www.active.com, e-mail Kiwanisfirecracker@yahoo.com, or call (828) 658-1914 for information. Sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of North Buncombe for student scholarships.

Friday, July 5

Cheryl Keefer Recent Works Opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition features oil paintings with vivid colors of reflected light in wet pavement, contrasted by rainy-

1st Friday Gallery Walk Friday, July 5 & Friday, August 2 The Downtown Asheville Arts District hosts First Fridays from 5 to 8 p.m. every month through December. More than 25 galleries and museums in downtown Asheville will host receptions and exhibitions. Complimentary trolley service during the event. Park at the Asheville Visitors Center and hop on! www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Arts at Black Mountain College Opening reception from 2-4 p.m. in the Upper Gallery. The exhibit focuses on the school at nearby Lake Eden which influenced visual art, architecture, dance, music, clay, film, literature, poetry, and more. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. On display July 1-26, 2013. (828) 669-0930, www.blackmountainarts.org.

July 8 through August 1

Toy Boat Circus Arts Camp day grays. On display from July 1-31, 2013. The Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For more information, call (828) 251-5796, visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com, or visit www.CherylKeefer.com.

Circus artists introduce students to the trapeze, tightrope, and other activities designed to build balance and specific skills. Held at Claxton Elementary School on Merrimon Avenue. Toy Boat will also present a demonstration and workshop August 31 at 5:30 p.m., in Pritchard Park. Visit www.theLEAF. org for more information.

Tuesday, July 9

Masonic Temple Anniversary

July 5 & 6

Jack Stern Exhibit & Demonstrations The oil painter will be demonstrating July 5 from 6-9 p.m., and Saturday, July 6 from 11-4. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC. Call (828) 456-1940 or visit www.twigsandleaves.com.

July 6, 13, & 20

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine

Sunday, July 7

Waynesville’s First Summer Jazz Festival Consecutive Saturdays at 7 p.m. Each Saturday includes a lavish four-course dinner with concert Wendy Jones for $39.99 per person. Purchase two or more show dates and save $5 per ticket. To reserve your table call (828) 452-6000, or email info@classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited. The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street, Waynesville, NC.

July 6, 13, & 20

Shindig on the Green A joyously spontaneous Stoney Creek Boys celebration Photo: Tony Martin of traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers. Saturday evenings at Pack Square Park in downtown Asheville. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. For details call (828) 258-6101 x345 or visit www. folkheritage.org.

The Asheville Masonic Temple will hold a special ceremony celebrating the 100th anniversary of the building. The cornerstone was laid 100 years ago this July. Dewey Preslar, the Grand Master of Masons in NC, will preside at the dedication of the Centennial Stone at 4 p.m. The ceremony will be followed by a reception and tour of the building. 80 Broadway, downtown Asheville.

Thursday, July 11

See the Asheville Tourists A trip for seniors age 50 and above to see an Asheville Tourists baseball game. Departs from the Waynesville Recreation Center at 5:30 p.m., returns at 11 p.m. The cost is $12 per person, $10 for members of the Waynesville Recreation Center. Price includes transportation and a general admission ticket to the game. For more information or to register call the Waynesville Parks and Recreation Department at (828) 456-2030.

July 11

Awake! Awake! Deborah Set partly in Vincent’s Ear, and partly in hell. Asheville actors Trinity Smith, Derek Evans, Jack Parsons, Michael MacCauley, and Jake Bowden perform a free reading. 7:30 p.m. at the Apothecary in the historic YMI on Eagle Street in downtown Asheville.

July 12 through August 2

Lunchtime Literary & Music Series Jazz pianist and composer Michael Jefry Stevens and poet Tina Barr will present four sessions on Fridays at noon, on Jazz Poetry and Music. At the

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Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. Bring your own brown bag lunch. There is no charge, but donations are accepted. (828) 6690930 or www.blackmountainarts.org.

Friday, July 12

Expression & Impression Mixed media works by Lucy Folger and Suzie Rowland Suzie Rowland. Reception 6-8 p.m. On display July 8 through August 23 at MESH Gallery, 114-B West Union Street in Morganton, NC. Call (828) 437-1957, or visit www.meshgallery.com.

Friday, July 12

selling their works of clay, fiber, glass, leather, metal, mixed media, natural materials, paper, wood and jewelry. Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood Street, Asheville. (828) 298-7928.

Thursday, July 18

Oteil & Kofi Burbridge, Roosevelt Collier & Jeff Sipe Four friends and musical madmen host a never-before-seen super-jam. Tickets: $12 / $15. 9 p.m. at the Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www. thegreyeagle.com

On Hallowed Ground

Saturday, July 20

Doreyl Ammons Cain exhibits her original pastel sketch of the new historical Dillsboro mural, along with details from the progression of the mural. The project can be viewed July 1-31 at www.usaprojects.org. Opening reception during the Sylva Art Stroll, from 5-9 p.m. in The Rotunda Gallery at the Historic Jackson County Courthouse.

International Festival Day Features international cuisine, a juried international and regional art show, local and regional entertainment, and a children’s area for hands on crafts. Hosted by the Haywood County Arts Council, this free festival takes place on Main Street in downtown Waynesville, NC.

Saturday, July 20

Fine Art Mandala of Nature

Saturday, July 13

The Billy Sea CD Release Concert Billy Cardine on slide guitar, percussionist River Guerguerian, and bassist Jake Wolf. $12 advance / $15 door. 8:30 p.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 5752737, www.isisasheville.com.

Saturday, July 13

Toe River Storytelling Festival National Tellers: Carmen Deedy, Gwenda Ledbetter, Tim Lowry, and Donna Washington. Regional Tellers: Wallace Shealy, Pete Koschnick, Lona Bartlett, Sylvia Payne, and Sherry Lovett. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Bakersville Creek Walk, Bakersville, NC. Adults: $10. Children, 9 & under, free. For more details call (828) 467-9955, or visit www.toeriverstorytelling.org.

July 18-21

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands Fine traditional and contemporary crafts created by members Jim and Shirl of the Southern Parmentier Highland Craft Guild. More than 200 of the best craftspeople from the Appalachian region fill the two levels of the center,

Mandalas by Asheville photographer Taylor Johnson are created from a single, photograph of nature and printed on sheet metal. Opening reception from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. OM Sanctuary, 87 Richmond Hill Dr., Asheville.

Sunday, July 21

Amici Music Chamber music series begins at 4 p.m., $15. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. Details at (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Thursday, July 25

Claying Around for Kids Kids learn how to paint their favorite cartoon characters on pottery, 3:305:30 p.m. Ages 6-12, $32 per child. Snacks will be provided. Call (828) 277-0042 for reservations or more details. Reserve your spot at www. clayingaround.com. Paint your own pottery, hand-building with clay, and pottery wheel lessons. Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Rd., Asheville. (828) 277-0042.

Friday, July 26

Jazz Cabaret Dinner Concert “Straight From the Heart,” Rockell Scott, Bill Bares, Zack Page, Justin Watt. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, (828) 669-0816.

JULY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

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what to do guide DramaRama: July 7-13

Pan Harmonia Concerts

An entire week of unique, affordable, fun events that benefit the Asheville Community Theatre.

Sunday, July 14 – 2nd Sunday @ 5

Sunday, July 7 – BARK! The Musical

will be performed at 2:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. on the ACT Mainstage. $15.

Monday, July 8 – Costume Drama: A

Jamie Laval

series. Features Jamie Laval, violin, Barbara Weiss, harpsichord, and Amy Brucksch, guitar. 5 p.m. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. To purchase tickets visit www.myAltamont.com

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Chalmers hosts a Special Edition at 7:30 p.m., on the ACT Mainstage. $10.

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Sunday, July 28 – Collaboration with members

of the North Carolina Symphony. Dovid Friedlander, violin, Kate Steinbeck, flute, Tracy Golaszewski, horn, Hwa-Jin Kim, piano. 5 p.m. Groce Methodist Church, 945 Tunnel Rd., East Asheville. Visit www.graceumc.org Tickets for each concert: $12/advance online at www.pan-harmonia.org/shop; $15 at the door; $5 students.

Fashion Show will be held at 7:30 p.m. on the ACT Mainstage. Tickets are $10.

Tuesday, July 9 – Listen to This: Tom

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Songcatchers Music Series Sundays in July, 4-5:30 p.m. Showcases acoustic music with roots in the Southern Appalachians. Local musicians gather under the Cradle’s Moon Tree at 3 p.m. to jam before the concert.

July 7 – Chicken Train - old time string trio from Asheville.

July 14 – Hilary Dirlam and Rhonda

Gouge - old-time, bluegrass, western swing.

Best in Show

by Phil Juliano

Thursday, July 11 – Theatre Trivia Night

July 21 – Laura Boosinger - songstress and

multi-instrumentalist with a beautiful voice and a knack for humor.

July 28 – Cary Fridley with Trevor and

at Pack’s Tavern at 7:30 p.m. $5 to enter.

Travis Stewart - traditional ballads and fiddle tunes.

Saturday, July 13 – Asheville Night Live. ACT unveils their take on a late night variety show. ACT Mainstage at 7:30 p.m. $15 for adults, $12 for children.

Picnics are welcome. Admission is $6; $3 for youth 15 and under. Call (828) 8773130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org for more details.

For a full schedule call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St.

The Cradle of Forestry in America NC Highway 276, four miles south of the Blue Ridge Parkway at MP 412.

Sunday, July 28

English Country Dancing 3-5:30 p.m. Instruction included, $7. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Appalachian Summer Music Series Bluegrass, Celtic and old time music. The free concerts take place at 3 p.m. on Sunday afternoons at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center.

through July & August

Crimson Laurel Gallery “Strange Offerings: Beyond the Garden Gate,” features unique and collaborative work by jeweler Deb Karash and ceramic sculptor Deb Karash Deborah G. Rogers. “Alex Matisse: Work from the Tenth Firing at East Fork Pottery” features new pieces from the latest firing of Alex Matisse. 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC 28705. (828) 688-3599, www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com.

July 14 – Buncombe

Alice Gerrard

Turnpike, traditional and contemporary bluegrass, gospel and original tunes.

July 21 – The highly acclaimed Celtic group, Solas, performs.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

July 28 – Tom and Alice, a traditional old time duo, perform on banjo, fiddle, guitar, and mandolin. For more information call (828) 251-6140 or visit www.olliasheville.com.

Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller Live music, kitchen serves small plate fare at 5:30 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

Grassroots Arts Program Subgrants

Disc Golf Tournaments Saturday, August 3 – Western Carolina Juniors Disc Golf Championship. Two 18 hole rounds. Registration at 8 a.m. Players meeting at 9:30 a.m. The entry fee is $20 per person.

Sunday, August 4 – The first annual

Blind Hog Smokey Mountain Throw Down Disc Golf Tournament. Registration fee varies based on division. Waynesville Disc Golf Course, Vance Street Park in Waynesville. For more information please call (828) 456-2030 or visit www.townofwaynesville.org

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

The Arts Council of Henderson County and HandMade in America are accepting applications for NC Arts Council Grassroots Arts Program subgrants. Applications are available for nonprofit organizations whose purpose is to promote and develop diverse cultural arts programming. Projects must occur between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014. There will be a grant writing workshop on Thursday, July 18 at the Hendersonville Arts Council, 401 N. Main St., 3rd floor, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Please RSVP by calling Patty Smyers at (828) 693-8504, or email acofhc@bellsouth.net. Application forms and additional details are available at www.handmadeinamerica.org

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 35


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find it here AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Claymates www.claymatespottery.com

HandMade in America www.handmadeinamerica.org

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Arrowhead Gallery & Studios www.arrowheadarts.org

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

Miya Gallery www.miyagallery.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Lorelle Bacon Fine Art www.lorellebacon.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Biscuit Head Restaurant www.biscuitheads.com

Downtown Asheville Art District

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Mangum Pottery

Perez Art Studio www.perezartstudio.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Explore Black Mountain

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com

Isis Restaurant & Music Hall www.isisasheville.com

Mine & Yours Consignments

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Black Mtn. Iron Works www.BlackMountainIron.com

Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeil.com

Jeff Pittman Fine Art www.jeffpittman.com

Mountain Top Appliance

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Red Rocker Inn www.redrockerinn.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Folkmoot USA www.folkmootusa.org

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Fresh Wood-Fired Pizza www.freshwoodfiredpizza.com

Julia Fosson Fine Art www.juliafosson.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Just Ducky www.justduckyoriginals.com

Newbridge Cafe www.thenewbridgecafe.com

The Spice & Tea Exchange www.spiceandtea.com

Chifferobe

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Cheryl Keefer www.cherylkeefer.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

Karen Keil Brown www.karenkbrown.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

WEAVERVILLE +

HAYWOOD ROAD

www.mangumpottery.com www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

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www.SwannanoaChamberMusic.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com Trailhead Restaurant

www.thetrailheadrestaurant.com

Tree & Vine www.thetreeandvine.com Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com Updraft Fine Art Gallery www.updraftgallery.com Village Art & Craft Fair www.newmorningnc.com Zia Taqueria

www.ziatacom.com

Place Your Classified Ad Online Right Now! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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36 July 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 11

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Biscuit Head

The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premiere retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue, presents local, regional, and, on occasion, national talent every Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m. The Classic Wineseller kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. on weekend evenings, and serves freshly prepared small plate fare. On Friday nights there is a $10 per person minimum including food, drink, or retail purchases. On Saturday evenings, July 6, 13, and 20, the Classic Wineseller is hosting a Summer Jazz Festival. Enjoy the concert and a lavish four course dinner for $39.99 per person. Purchase two or more festival dates and receive $5 off per ticket. Reservations are Sonny Thornton required. Music begins at 7 p.m. July’s full music schedule includes: Friday, July 5, Jay Brown on guitar, harmonica, and vocals; Saturday, July 6, master drummer Sonny Thornton, Mike Holstein on bass, and Michael Jefry Stevens on piano; Friday, July 12, Joe Cruz, piano and vocals; Saturday, July 13, Byron Hedgepeth, vibraphone, and Michael Jefry Stevens, piano; Friday, July 19, Shantavaani performs Indian fusion on the outdoor bandstand; Saturday, July 20, jazz vocalist Wendy Jones with Michael Jefry Stevens on piano; Friday, July 26, Celtic Rock sensation, Uncle Hamish & the Hooligans, on the outdoor bandstand.

IF YOU GO: To make reservations or for more details call

(828) 452-6000 or email info@classicwineseller.com. For more information please visit www.classicwineseller.com.

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local favorites THE MAGNETIC THEATRE PRESENTS

A Comedy that Spills the Insides of Dining Out

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Asheville audiences haven’t seen The Magnetic Theatre in action since March. That doesn’t mean that the exciting company—Asheville’s only professional theatre dedicated to original works—hasn’t been busy. They’ve been looking at potential sites for their next home, as well as planning various shows and artistic ventures—the next of which will be the world premiere of Jim Julien’s The Caro Savanti Experience, at the Bebe Theatre. The Caro Savanti Experience stars Darren Marshall in the titular role as a mercurial and brilliant modern chef whose last restaurant closed under disastrous circumstances. Throw in two meathead investors trying to keep him under control, his voluptuous assistant trying to keep the investors at bay, his creepy sous chef who no one is quite sure about, unsuspecting diners who have no idea what they are in for, a smarmy reality TV producer who is filming a pilot

BY

CHALL GRAY

of the whole shebang, saute and mix—and you have one fascinating show about the troubled genius of modern cuisine: Caro Savanti! Directed by Katie Anne Towner, and starring Laura Tratnik, Art Moore, and Ryan Madden, among others, the show is sure to serve up some of the funniest and most palatable theatre of the summer. IF YOU The Caro Savanti Experience, at GO the Bebe Theatre, 20 Commerce

St. in downtown Asheville. July 11-13 and 18-20. Tickets $15; $12 for students and seniors with valid ID. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.themagnetictheatre.org.

JULY EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS

‘Tree and Vine’ continued from page 29

wines and wine accessories in our Asheville store as well as olive oil skin care products.

RRM: What are some of your most popular oils and vinegars?

TK: Our 18 year old traditional balsamic

is the most popular product. Our Aulente Sicilian oil is the most popular estate olive oil with Laconiko Greek Oil coming in a close second.

natural anti-inflammatory which is important because many diseases are the result of inflammation.

RRM: Not all olive oils and vinegars are

seasons?

created equal. Tell us a little about your selections.

TK: : All of our oils are extra virgin, but our

estate oils are the highest quality of extra virgin with very low acidity. We source each product individually, visiting many olive oil estates each year to select products. Our balsamics come from Italy, of course, with the exception of a couple of white balsamic style vinegars.

RRM: What are some of the health benefits in using olive oil in cooking or baking?

RRM: How do your products vary with the

Friday, July 26

Wine dinner with Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse. Ruth Fertel is often called the First Lady of American Restaurants. She purchased Chris’ Steakhouse in New Orleans in 1965. Please join us in historic Biltmore Village for a coursed meal with wines selected by the Weinhaus staff. Time: 7:30 p.m. Price: $75 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

Friday Night Flights presents The Grand Tour. Travel through the four major wine producing countries of Europe. We will sample a wine each from France, Italy, Germany, and Spain. The price is $10. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $6. Held at The Weinhaus from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

TK: This summer we are featuring a lemon

white balsamic which goes great on fruit or vegetable salads when something light and refreshing is needed. We have also just received a Greek seasoning olive oil which has lemon, chives, pepper and oregano that is perfect for chicken, fish or vegetables. We’ve had a very positive response from both of these new products. Our basil oil and aged traditional balsamic combination is always popular in the summer as our “caprese cocktail”.

TK: Numerous studies have been performed on the health benefits of olive oil showing a reduction in cholesterol and other cardiovascular benefits, including stroke prevention. A recent study with a very large sample size showed a very strong tie to health and the Mediterranean diet. Olive oil is a

Thursday, July 18

The Tree and Vine in Biltmore Village

22 Lodge St, Asheville, NC 28803 (828) 505-4049 www.thetreeandvine.com

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 16, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2013 39


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July 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
July 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: 41st Annual Biltmore Village Art & Craft Fair..p29; Inside: Asheville Lyric Opera..p3; HART..p6; NC Stage..p6; Magnetic Theate...

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