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Dinner & Live Music at the

Classic Wineseller

Give the Gift of Theatre Holiday Shopping

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30-31 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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12-15 • What to Do Guide™

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Fine Art by Nancy Hilliard Joyce

Local Dining Guide

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Hand-Blown Glass Custom Lighting Fine Art Gallery

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Wishing you the Joy of Family, the Happiness of Friends, and the Wonder of the Holiday Season. From all of us at

Rapid River Magazine www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

2 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4


pg. 21

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Weaverville Eye Associates

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue - Downtown Asheville

pg. 36

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NC Stage Winter Line-Up

Looking for some live entertainment to spice up these long winter months? North Carolina Stage Company is ready to welcome you with few great plays you do not want to miss! This holiday, be sure to see All Is Calm (December 9-27), a dramatic re-telling of the poignant moment in history when Allied and German soldiers laid down their arms to celebrate the holiday together. NC Stage is pleased to partner with Cantaria, the Gay Men’s Chorus of Asheville, for this production. In 2016, Charlie Flynn-McIver, Scott Treadway, and Michael MacCauley join forces for Jeeves Intervenes (January 27 - Feb. 21, 2016), a comedy complete with high-society playboys, an ever-faithful manservant, and a tall order of deception and disguise, derived from the stories of P.G. Wodehouse. April brings Edward Albee’s classic drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (April 6- May 1, 2016), presented in partnership with Immediate Theatre Project, NC Stage’s partner company in residence. Finally our season ends with a single

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ALLISON WILSON

Manhattan mother who has found herself back home in Texas with a teenage daughter, several hundred pairs of shoes, and cash linked to the Romanian mob in the comedy Bad Dates (May 11- June 5, 2016). Producing Director and CoFounder Angie Flynn-McIver states, “I’m excited about the whole line-up. Charlie and I put the season together so that there’s something for everyone, but it also takes the devoted audience member, the folks who see everything, on a journey. You’ll be different at the end of the season!” North Carolina Stage Company is Asheville’s only professional theatre celebrating its 14th year producing plays for the Asheville community. Founded by Charlie and Angie Flynn-McIver, the theatre has been voted the best in local theatre nine times in the last ten years by the Mountain Xpress Best of WNC Poll.

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever

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Holiday mayhem erupts at Asheville Community Theatre with the opening of The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, a comedy that’s both hilarious and sweet.

BY JENNY

BUNN

From a dress rehearsal that ends with the arrival of the fire department to a Wise Man who decides that a canned ham is a better gift than perfumed oils, The Best Christmas Pageant Ever is not the typical nativity story. The Best Christmas Pageant Ever opens Friday, December 4 and runs through Sunday, December 20. Tickets are available online, over the phone, or in person at the Asheville Community Theatre Box Office. ACT’s production stars Katie Purnell (as Gladys), “We produced The Best Christmas Rohan Myers (Ralph), Nora Flynn-McIver (Imogene), Will Cowan (Leroy), Alex Gast (Claude), Pageant Ever two years ago, and it was and Sam Collett (Ollie). Photo: Studio Misha. one of our most popular shows ever,” said Susan Harper, Executive Director of Asheville Community Theatre. the Herdman kids, six delinquent siblings who “Though this is the same script, it’s a are the terror of their town. When they end up brand new production, so even if you saw as the leads in the annual Christmas pageant, the show in 2013, we know you’ll enjoy their interesting interpretation of the story seeing it again. And if you didn’t see it, (which they have never heard before) helps evnow’s your chance!” IF eryone rediscover the meaning of the holiday. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 YOU In The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, The Best Christmas Pageant Ever is a terrific GO Stage Lane in Asheville. For tickets and a couple struggling to put on a church show for the entire family. show times call (828) 239-0263 or visit Christmas pageant are faced with casting “Though it certainly has much to do with www.ncstage.org. the Christmas holiday, we also love this show because of its very realistic portrayal of the power of arts participation for children,” said Harper. “The Herdmans have never been expected to amount to much of anything. Even the adults in town completely write them off. But when they are cast in a play, they begin to Diana Wortham Theatre really think about their roles, and it ends up BY KATE JUSTUS that these rough and unruly kids have a capacis pleased to announce ity for thoughtfulness, generosity, and joy.” the highly anticipated The Best Christmas Pageant Ever was writmovements in scenes of sword return of New York- and ten by Barbara Robinson, and is based on her fights and confrontation. Taking London-based Aquila book by the same name. Asheville Community from the performance style that Theatre’s production of The Best Christmas Theatre Company. Shakespeare and his players would Pageant Ever is directed by Lori Hilliard and normally have adopted for the stage, The Mainstage Series stars a cast of community members, many Sanchez and the crew behind this favorite, will present a reof whom are making their ACT debut! This production have reincorporated imagined and invigorating truly is a family show; the cast includes a the physically challenging elements staging of William Shakegrandfather/granddaughter pair (both making that often get subdued in modern speare’s Romeo and Juliet, their ACT debuts), a husband and wife duo, Shakespearean shows, the energy Saturday, February 6, 2016 at This telling of Romeo and Juliet by Aquila Theatre is not to be missed. a pair of sisters, a dad with his two kids, and a that would be used to rile up the 8 p.m. mother/son team. crowds from the balconies to the While the classic tale of Starring a cast of 31 including Tara Theostanding room by the stage. between Juliet’s mother and father, Sanchez is two star-crossed lovers is arguably one of the dossis, William Ehrsam, Perry Berlin, Cas Students and adults alike may have seen bold enough to eliminate the paternal Capulet most familiar of all of the Bard’s plays, Aquila’s Cusic, Nora Flynn-McIver, Rohan Myers, and versions of Romeo and Juliet in the past, but character altogether, allowing Lady Capulet to striking and moving adaption of Romeo and Elyse Bassett. never like this telling by Aquila Theatre – a speak her husband’s lines as well, including the Juliet takes the viewer’s breath away with a few production not to be missed. infamously intense altercation between parent special twists, thanks to the innovative direcand child that ultimately comes to blows. tion of artistic director, Desiree Sanchez. IF YOU The Best Christmas Pageant Ever , Symbolizing the mother-daughter connecThe timeless words and the story remain GO December 4-20, 2015. Performances tion, a 30-foot-long gown links the two ladies the same, but instead of focusing purely on the IF Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 The Aquila Theatre company presents as they navigate the treacherous waters of relationship of Juliet and her Romeo, Sanchez YOU p.m., Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: O William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet G arranged marriages, teenage rebellion, and all has altered the play with miniscule tweaks $22 Adults, $19 Seniors/Students, $12 Children Saturday, February 6, 2016 at 8 p.m. that befalls this famous household. designed to highlight the interactions and nuAsheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut at the Diana Wortham Theatre. To obtain A highly physical performance, the comances between Lady Capulet and her rebellious Street, downtown Asheville. To purchase tickets, more information or to purchase tickets, call the pany utilizes costumes that seem more fit for daughter. or for more information, call (828) 254-1320 or theatre’s box office at (828) 257-4530 or visit a ballet than a play, enabling quick, precise Rather than let the parental role be split visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. www.dwtheatre.com

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Aquila Theatre’s Romeo and Juliet

4 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4


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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Four

DECEMBER 2015 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Short Stories: Kathleen Colburn Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sandi Anton, Hannah Barry, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Reba Brinkman, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, KaChina Davine, Amy Downs, Max Hammonds, MD, Steve Hargadon, Phil Hawkins, Bob Hayward, Taryn Jackson, Amy Jessee, Phil Juliano, Kate Justus, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Kathleen Colburn, Dari Layne, Steve Loew, Peter Loewer, Joseph Malki, Kay S. Miller, Wendy H. Outland, Lisa Potts, Dennis Ray, Steve Saucier, Erin Scholze, Glenn Shaw, Jeannie Shuckstes, Patty Smyers, Lindsey Solomon, Lori Theriault, Ashley Van Matre, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, David Whitehill, Allison Wilson, and J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, December 2015, Vol. 19 No. 4

On the Cover:

Water and Wine, painting by Nancy Hilliard Joyce. PAGE 37

4 Music & Performance NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Diana Wortham Theatre. . . . . . . . . . 4 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Simply Sinatra Christmas. . . . . . . . . 7 A Tribute to Muscle Shoals . . . . . 29 stephaniesid & Jon Stickley Trio . . 38

8 Special Events Festival of Lights & Luminaires . . . . 8 The Santaland Diaries at ACT. . . . . 9 Christmas at Connemara . . . . . . . . 10 Hadaya Toys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

11 Local Food

New stories are added each month!

ONLY ONLINE

Hiking the PCT Miles, Smiles, Beauty, Beasts,

Dare to Fly Trapeze

The Mysterious Disappearance of Phyllis Rivers, Part Five, The End,

Flying on the trapeze isn’t just for those performing in a circus. Christine Aiken and Dari Layne offer classes in Asheville.

The Last Days of Edward Neese,

The Undisclosed Squeeze

written by John Swart

Life in Attica - It Was a Riot! Part One, written by Eddie LeShure

written by RF Wilson

Times were exceedingly bad (going to worse) in the Old Home State. The Curmudgeon by Peter Loewer.

written by Porter Staples

Do We Need a New Story?

The Green Room Café . . . . . . . . . 11 The Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . 30

written by Phil Okrend

Finding Avery,

written by Caroline Taylor

12 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

16 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 26 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 28 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

French Broad Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Southern Highland Craft Guild . . 18 Lexington Glassworks . . . . . . . . . . 19 t.e. siewert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 20 Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League 24 Black Mtn. Center for the Arts . . . 25 Nancy Hilliard Joyce, Fine Artist . 37 ™

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

Flash Fiction Contest Winners

Burmese Tea Shops,

See page 27 for the list of winners. Read the winning stories on our website.

written by Jonathan Look

Short Story guidelines are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Kathleen Colburn is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

SPECIAL SECTIONS

17 Fine Art

34 What to Do Guide

SHORT STORIES

Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-23 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 24

Velvet & Lace

This monthly event showcases craft cocktails made by the talented females of Asheville’s vibrant bar scene, with a focus on smoke, fire, herbs, elixirs and tinctures. Held on the first Thursday of each month at Buxton Hall Barbecue.

The Winter Solstice

At 11:48 p.m. on Monday, December 21 the sun will be at its most southern point in the sky for the year, marking the beginning of winter. www.rapidrivermagazine.com

COPYEDITING &

PROOFREADING SERVICES

39 Adventure Hearn’s Bike Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

rrshortstories@gmail.com

828-581-9031

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 5


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performance AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

Latininfluenced music for flute and piano

Flute Fandango

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AmiciMusic presents top quality chamber music in intimate venues and non-traditional spaces. Flutist Lea Kibler is the featured performer for December, offering with a fun program of latin-influenced music for flute and piano including music by Piazzolla, Villa-lobos, Ravel, and more. Pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser will collaborate on the piano. Ms. Kibler has been hailed by critics as “bewitching and unforgettable” and a “top drawer flutist.” She was a member of the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra and the Florida Grand Opera orchestra and has toured as Principal Flutist of the Moscow Chamber Orchestra. She has appeared at the Spoleto Festival, the American Dance Festival, the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival and the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival. A native of Charlotte, NC, she now makes her home in Asheville and serves on the faculty of Clemson University.

CONCERT SCHEDULE Friday, December 4 at 7 p.m. Isis Restaurant

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6 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

and Music Hall at 743 Haywood Rd in West Asheville. Concert is only $15 and great dinner and drinks are available in intimate cabaret setting upstairs. Seating is limited. Reserve for concert only online at www.isisasheville.com or call Isis for dinner reservations at (828) 575-2737.

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Saturday, December 5

at 2 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain. Seats are $20 at door or $15 in advance. Reserve online at www.whitehorseblackmountain.com or by calling (828) 669-0816. Flutist Lea Kibler

Saturday, December 5 at 7:30 p.m. AmiciMusic

makes its debut at The Nightingale Loft (formerly The Asheville Loft) at 52 Broadway St. next to Mellow Mushroom. Cost is $25, which includes light food and wine in a fantastic downtown loft setting with high beamed ceilings, beautiful wood floors, and exposed brick walls. Seating is limited. This venue is handicapped accessible with an elevator. Buy seats online at www.amicimusic.org and at www.nightingaleloft.com.

Sunday, December 6 at 2 p.m. First Congrega-

tional Church in Asheville at 20 Oak Street. Seats are $20 at door or $15 for Church members. Purchase tickets in advance and save. Visit www. amicimusic.org.

Musical Holiday Cheer

The Asheville Choral Society will entertain guests at a special preview of the Winter Lights, a three-acre nightly walking tour of the North Carolina Arboretum. This exhibit lets patrons stroll through lighted landscapes and animated displays in the Arboretum’s nationally known gardens. The Winter Lights event is open nightly to the public from 6-10 p.m. through January 2, 2016. The Asheville Choral Society has launched a new tradition. Yuletide Candlelight will feature familiar songs and carols for all to sing and will include a brass consort and organ on the gorgeous and festive The Dream Isaiah Saw by Glenn Rudolph. Excerpts from Handel’s beloved Messiah will bring a familiar tone to the evening. The jubilant Vaughan Williams’ Hodie (This Day) features Asheville’s Celebration Singers along with three guest soloists: tenor, Shane Bloemetjie; baritone, Jacob Kato; and soprano, Simone Vigilante. The Yuletide Candlelight concert takes place at Trinity Episcopal on December 4 and 5. The Choral Society will also perform traditional

festive caroling at area retirement homes and hospitals throughout the month of December. The Asheville Choral Society has garnered a reputation as one of Asheville’s premiere music organizations, praised for the versatility, originality, and challenging nature of its programming. Made up of some 100 volunteer, auditioned singers ranging in age from 18 to 80, the Asheville Choral Society is in its 39th season. The group was founded in 1977 by Dr. Robert P. Keener, Music Director Emeritus, who led the group for its first 23 seasons. IF YOU GO

Purchase tickets for Winter Lights at www.ncarboretum.org. Yuletide Candlelight with the Asheville Choral Society, Friday, December 4 at 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, December 5 at 4 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Church Street in downtown Asheville. Advance tickets are $20 for adults ($25 at the door) and $10 for students. Purchase tickets by calling (828) 232-2060 or visit www.ashevillechoralsociety.org.


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captivating performances Simply Sinatra Christmas

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Celebrate the Season with the Asheville Symphony.

the United States and Canada. In addition to Asheville, Lippia’s 2015-16 season includes World-renowned Frank Sinatra appearances with the Buffalo interpreter Steve Lippia joins the Philharmonic, Charlotte and Asheville Symphony at 8 p.m. on Detroit symphonies, and the Friday, December 11, for “Simply Cleveland Pops. Sinatra Christmas,” an enchantHe has also headlined coning evening filled with Sinatra’s certs at the legendary Birdland classic holiday songs and the legJazz Club in New York City, endary crooner’s signature works performed in a highly successat Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in ful European Jazz Festival Tour downtown Asheville. that resulted in a nationally Maestro James Fellenbaum, televised special on Finnish the resident conductor of the Steve Lippia, vocalist TV2, and has made television Knoxville Symphony, will appearances on “Extra,” Fox’s “Good Day conduct the concert, which falls on the 100th New York,” CNN’s “Showbiz Today,” ABC, anniversary of Sinatra’s birth. and the BBC. The program for Simply Sinatra Christmas Maestro James Fellenbaum is celebrating includes Let it Snow, Santa Claus is Coming his ninth season with the Knoxville Symphony to Town, White Christmas, The Christmas Orchestra (KSO). In recent years, he has made Song, Ave Maria, Winter Wonderland, and his Masterwork and Chamber Classics conMoonlight in Vermont. Other Sinatra standucting debuts with the KSO, while continudards on the program include Come Fly with ing to serve as an assistant for all other concerts Me, I’ve Got You Under My Skin, The Lady is in those series. He conducts Outreach, Pops, a Tramp, and My Way. and Educational concerts, the latter of which Steve Lippia is considered one of the include the KSO’s annual Young People’s world’s finest interpreters of timeless standards Concerts. Fellenbaum is also Director of Orand traditional pop music. He has headlined chestras at the University of Tennessee. successful, extended engagements in Las Vegas The Asheville Symphony Orchestra and Atlantic City, and has performed with performs and promotes symphonic music for nearly one hundred symphony orchestras in

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Woodsong Clarinet Choir

The Woodsong Clarinet Choir of Western North Carolina hopes to start a new holiday tradition that will unite musicians from across the region in a celebration of music and community. Clarinet Holiday: A Festival of Pipes invites all clarinetists, young or old, professional or amateur, to dust off their instruments and join the Choir for a “clarinet-along” of two Christmas tunes to welcome the season: Silent Night and We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Clarinet Holiday is modeled on TubaChristmas, an annual event marked by gatherings of tuba players around the world. Since its founding in Indiana in 1974, TubaChristmas has grown exponentially: this year, players will gather in 151 cities across the US and Switzerland to perform songs from their standard repertoire, Carols for a Merry TubaChristmas. Although he’ll be kicking things off with just two participatory carols this year, Woodsong director Steve Loew envisions similar success for Clarinet Holiday. “I see this growing and continuing throughout the US and world,” he says. But it will start right here in Western North Carolina, with gatherings on December 17 at Isis

Music Hall, and December 20 at White Horse Black Mountain. Loew hopes to set a Guinness World Record for the most clarinetists ever to perform together; in recognition of the attempt, White Horse Black Mountain will be serving up Guinness stout to help players wet their reeds. Clarinet Holiday promises to be an exuberant celebration of the tremendous appeal and variety of the clarinet, with information about

Auto, Residential & Commercial

BY

DAVID WHITEHILL

the benefit, enjoyment and education of the people of Western North Carolina. The ASO presents concerts in the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in Asheville’s U.S. Cellular Center. IF YOU Simply Sinatra Christmas, Friday, GO December 11 at 8 p.m. Thomas Wolfe

Auditorium in Downtown Asheville. Tickets are $22-$74 depending on seating; reduced youth pricing is available. Single tickets and season ticket packages can be purchased at www.ashevillesymphony.org, by calling (828) 254-7046, or in person at the U.S. Cellular Center box office at 87 Haywood Street.

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BIG, BEAUTIFUL, BOOKS! Splurge on a beautifully photographed book this holiday season. Sinatra: The Photographs, written by Andrew Howick, offers up hours of pleasure, capturing Frank Sinatra’s ineffable sense of style, as well as his aura of vulnerability, intensity, sexuality, and charm. Visit Malaprop’s bookstore for oversized and collectible books, 55 Haywood St., Asheville.

BY

STEVE LOEW

the origins of clarinet choirs, performances on the rare contra alto and contra bass clarinets, and opportunities to mix and mingle with players from across the region. In addition to the clarinet-along, the event will feature energetic (if eclectic) performances of klezmer music and selections from the Nutcracker Suite by Woodsong Clarinet Choir, and The Asheville Clarinet Quartet, a professional clarinet ensemble. Clarinet lovers of all shapes, sizes, and abilities are enthusiastically encouraged to join Loew and his ensembles in this joyful convocation. Come sing, play, listen, and celebrate in a quintessentially WNC gathering that aspires to become a worldwide holiday tradition! IF YOU Clarinet Holiday: A Festival of Pipes. GO Thursday, December 17 at 7:30 p.m. at

The Woodsong Clarinet Choir.

ASHEVILLE LOCKSMITH NOW

Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., West Asheville, www.isisasheville.com. Saturday, December 20 at 3 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain, 105 Montreat Rd, Black Mountain. www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. Children admitted free; must be accompanied by an adult. Music for the clarinet-along will be provided digitally; email steveloew@mris.com to request a copy.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 7


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celebrate the season 32nd Annual Festival of Lights & Luminaires

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The streets and historic buildings of Dillsboro, NC will shine and sparkle with the glow of thousands of white lights and luminaries. Dillsboro will be all aglow on Friday and Saturday, December 4 & 5, and December 11 & 12, from 5-9 p.m. The merchants of Dillsboro look forward every year to the holidays where young and old, shop owners and the community alike, experience the charm of Christmas in their mountain town. Inviting aromas slip from the open shops where you are provided free refreshments acconpanined by music and voices raised in song. Lavishing in the warm glow of the holiday evening, you can experience old-fashioned horse and buggy rides, and the real reason for the season in the middle of town with a live nativity scene at Jarrett Memorial Baptist Church. The church will open the Nativity at 6:30 p.m.; drop by the Fellowship Hall for refreshments. Children will love the Christmas atmosphere, complete with Rudolph and Santa’s elves strolling along the streets passing out candy canes. The former Bradley’s building will be open for entertainment, and the Haywood Smokehouse will provide warm drinks for folks to enjoy and warm up while listening to local musicians and singers. At Riverbend Frozen Delights, “Dills,” the talking bear, will entertain while festival goers enjoy winter ice cream. And at Nancy Tut’s

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LISA pOTTS

Christmas Shop, Carmela Brooks will entertain shoppers with song and guitar. Dogwood Crafters will have live music each night, plus lots of cookies! Inside the Dillsboro Chocolate Factory a bluegrass group will be performing favorite Christmas tunes. The C.J. Harris Parlor at Riverwood Shops will be also be open. This year Bob and Susan Leveille will present a Scots-Irish theme with activities for children young and old. Hostesses will offer refreshments and hot cider, the reading of stories, decorating the live tree, and other fun surprises. Across from Oaks Gallery, Karen Barnes at Riverwood Pottery invites you to stop by and visit. On Friday, December 4 Western Carolina University’s Pride of the Mountains “Purple Thunder” premier winter drum line will kick off the festival at 6 p.m. The Southwestern Community College Spanish club will be caroling throughout the town in Spanish and English. On Friday, December 11 church groups are invited to sing Christmas Carols. Please contact Lisa Potts at (828) 586-5391, or drop by in person at Venturo’s Bakery. The Smoky Mountain Ensemble Band will be playing in front of the Dillsboro Chocolate Factory on Friday, December 11 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Soloist Tammy Drinnon will entertain at the old Bradley’s General Store.

Lights aglow at the Enloe House. Photo: Amy Ammons Garza

Free parking and shuttle transportation for the event will be available at Monteith Park each night of the festival. Come on out, bring your sweetheart, bring the family, stroll among the lights illuminating this mountain town and stock your holiday full of good cheer. Sing along with carolers, take the children to see Santa Claus at Santa’s Workshop at Dillsboro’s Town Hall, and have some hot chocolate or hot cider. All the restaurants will be open, so come for an early family meal and then join in the festivities! IF YOU Festival of Lights & Luminaries, GO Friday and Saturday, December 4 &

5, and December 11 & 12, from 5-9 p.m. Dillsboro is located in WNC at the intersection of US Hwys. 19/74 and 441, about 45 minutes west of Asheville. For more information, call the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce at 1-800-962-1911 or visit www.mountainlovers.com.

Christmas Crèches from Around the World

On display December 11-13 at the First Baptist Church of Asheville. A crèche, often called a Nativity scene, is an artistic representation of the birth of Jesus Christ. While focusing on the central figures of the mother Mary and Christ Child, crèche artists often telescope time and place to bring together a host of earthly and heavenly participants—shepherds, animals, wise men, angels, and commoners. For centuries, the crèche as an art form has spanned the globe, flourishing in homes and churches worldwide. Whether the crèche contains 19th century Italian villagers dressed in silks and jewels, or contemporary African animal herders made of clay, each representation reflects the unique time and culture of the artist. This exhibit is an ecumenical effort to highlight the cultural diversity of each crèche on display, while honoring and celebrating the common theme that runs throughout—the birth of Jesus. Last year’s inaugural event included par-

8 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

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Nativity - Mexico

ticipation from seven different Asheville area churches, and displayed 128 unique Nativity sets from 53 countries around the world. More than 600 people attended the exhibit. Guest comments included, “Took my breath away.” “Beautiful. Peaceful. Joyous.” “Impressive and Beautifully done.” Participating churches include The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, First Baptist Church of Asheville, First Congregational United Church of Christ, First Presbyterian Church - Asheville, St. Eugene Catholic

STEVE HARgADON

Church, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, and Saints Joseph and Andrew Eastern Orthodox Mission Church. As a part of the exhibit, special musical performances will be held at the top of each hour. In addition, the Rev. Dr. Jerry Beavers, a crèche collector and educator will present “Creche: The Nativity Scene as Art”, an illustrated lecture on the history and use of the Nativity scene in art, on Friday, December 11, at 7 p.m. and on Saturday the 12, at 7 p.m. Admission to the lecture is free. IF YOU Christmas Crèches from Around the GO World. On display December 11-13 at

the First Baptist Church of Asheville. Hours: Friday from 4 to 8 p.m.; Saturday noon to 8 p.m.; Sunday noon to 6 p.m. Admission is free. Group tours can be arranged by calling 916223-3285. The First Baptist Church of Asheville is located at 5 Oak Street in Asheville. For more information visit www.ashevillenativity.org.


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celebrate the season

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The Santaland Diaries

Asheville’s non-traditional tradition returns to Asheville Community Theatre!

BY JENNY

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This year’s production of The Santaland Diaries once again stars local favorite Bradshaw Call, who stepped into the candy-cane striped stockings for the first time in 2013. The show will be presented in its original Asheville location, the intimate 35below theatre. The Santaland Diaries is a dark comedy that follows an out-of-work slacker who takes a job as an elf in Macy’s Santaland. His observations of the shoppers and employees are Bravely observant and bitterly sarcastic. much more naughty than nice. In Asheville, the play has transformed from a quirky ticket to a bona fide holiday available online, over the phone, or in person tradition – and last year’s performances were at the Asheville Community Theatre Box Ofcompletely sold out. Continuing the tradition, fice. All tickets are $15. director Betsy Puckett reunites with star BradBradshaw Call is fresh off his stint as Dr. shaw Call for the third time in as many years. Frank-N-Furter in last month’s The Rocky “Much like last year, we’ve decided to Horror Show. Bradshaw’s local credits also keep the setting and theatrical accouterments include The Addams Family, Spamalot, Live simple so as to really highlight the story,” said From WVL Radio Theatre: It’s a Wonderful Puckett. “Sedaris has such a brilliant sarcastic Life, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spellwit that it’s easy to forget the story happened ing Bee, Greater Tuna, and Guys and Dolls. to a real person during a difficult time in their For more information about The Santaland life. I think that is why The Santaland Diaries Diaries or about Asheville Community Theatre, has been so universally successful. please visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. “Everyone knows what it’s like to feel down and downright hateful during what is supposed to be the most magical time of year, IF but few of us are brave enough to admit it and YOU The Santaland Diaries, December then dare to make light of the glorious awful GO 10-19, 2015. Performances Thursday that can preside over much of the festivities. evenings at 7:30 p.m.; Friday and How lucky we are that David Sedaris is one of Saturday evenings at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. the bravely observant and is bitterly, sarcastiTickets: $15. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown cally honest about it all.” Asheville. To purchase tickets, or for more The Santaland Diaries opens Thursday, information, please call (828) 254-1320 or visit December 10 and runs through Saturday, Dewww.ashevilletheatre.org cember 19, 2015. Tickets are limited, and are

Uniqueness Unwrapped

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA 100 Cherry Street • Black Mountain, NC 28711 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

pg. 32

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10 Things to Do Over the Holidays

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For locals and tourists alike, Asheville is a wonderful place to spend the holidays!

2. Tour studios in the River Arts District 3. Christmas at the Biltmore 4. LaZoom Bus Tours

5. Gingerbread display at the The Wall Street Journal Omni Grove Park Inn called Asheville “One of America’s oldest holiday towns.” 6. Thomas Wolfe Memorial There are always fun things to Jingle Bell Trolley Rides on 7. Winter Lights at the NC do and great places to see. The the Craggy Mountain Line. Arboretum following list is really just the tip of the iceberg. Check out our local stores, 8. ACDT’s Nutcracker & the Mouse King eateries and breweries that have come to make 9. Asheville Downtown Gallery Art Walk Asheville such a fantastic place. 10. Craggy Mountain Line Train Rides 1. Performances at NC Stage and Asheville Community Theatre

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Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 9


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HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock Christmas at Connemara

Now Accepting Reservations for Your Holiday Party Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

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536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

Enjoy a guided tour of Carl Sandburg’s home, visit www.nps.gov/carl

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Cool Vibes

A HOLIDAY TRADITION

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site will host Christmas at Connemara on Saturday, December 19 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Each year during the holidays visitors are invited to experience the holidays in the festive spirit of the Sandburg family. This year visitors will have a new opportunity to enjoy music and events inside the home. While the Sandburg furnishings were packed away this fall, it left plenty of room to move the holiday event inside to fill the rooms. Dulcimer and harp music will fill the house from the living room while visitors can take a seat to enjoy it or spend time on their own exploring the home. They might find craft tables in the dining room or more music in a bedroom. To complete the festivities the Christmas tree and traditional greenery will still adorn the mantles and corners of the home. Favorite storytellers will present in the garage adjacent to the home where warm cider and cookies will be served. On Saturday, December 19, Steve and Jean Smith will provide dulcimer

and harp music while visitors make crafts inside the home from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. More music begins in the house garage at 10:30 a.m. with John Perkins performing holiday-inspired folk songs on guitar. At 11:30 a.m., professional storyteller Becky Stone will share traditional African-American holiday stories and songs accompanied by guitar. Ms. Stone is a member of ‘Tell it in the Mountains’ and has performed at numerous festivals across the state. Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site is located three miles south of Hendersonville off U.S. 225 on Little River Road. IF YOU Christmas at Connemara, Saturday, GO December 19 from 10 a.m. to 1

p.m. The park is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s day. For further information, please call (828) 693-4178, or visit www.nps.gov/carl.

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Celebrating The Modern Jazz Quartet, a benefit concert for the Arts Council of Henderson County. A performance of the music of America’s most famous jazz quartet, interpreted by four great musicians on Sunday, December 6 at 4:30 p.m. at Freeburg Pianos Master Works Theatre in Hendersonville. The quartet will feature Dick Sisto, vibraphone artist, Shannon Hoover on Dick Sisto, bass, Michael vibraphone artist. Jefry Stevens on piano, and Justin Watt on drums. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis. Tickets ($45) include refreshments during intermission. Proceeds from this event will benefit the many programs and services of the Arts Council of Henderson County. IF YOU Cool Vibes, Sunday, December GO 6 at 4:30 p.m. at Freeburg Pianos

Master Works Theatre, 2314 Asheville Hwy. (Hwy. 25), Suite D, in Hendersonville NC. Reservations are $45 per person, and can be made through the Arts Council by calling (828) 693-8504, or by emailing acofhc@bellsouth.net.

Holiday Specials

pg. 11

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Enjoy the New Season at Champa $10 Gift Certificate with purchase of $30 or more. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Good through 12/31/2015.

The Green Room Café & Coffeehouse December 31: New Years Eve with Mark Lynch. Live dinner music 5:30-7:30 p.m.

530 N. MAIN STREET, HENDERSONVILLE pg. 11

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(828) 697-1300 • O PEN M ON-S AT 11AM-6PM

10 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

Subscribe to our Free eNewsletter

Get the latest special offers and local events. Go to www.rapidrivermagazine.com


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HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock The Green Room Café & Coffeehouse

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The Green Room Café specializes in artisan crafted delicious food made fresh from local ingredients.

Carolina Mountain Artists Guild 444 N. Main Street • Hendersonville, NC

The Green Room’s comfortable dining room.

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HENDERSONVILLE - 28792 AV E

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432 N. Main Street • Hendersonville, NC

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Friday, December 18 – Lutheran Church of the Good

A freewill offering will be requested at the final two concerts.

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Church, Hendersonville, 7 p.m.

Sunday, December 20 – Hendersonville Presbyterian

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Friday, December 11 – Immaculate Conception

Church, 4 p.m.

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Tuesday, December 8 – Transylvania County Public Library, Brevard, noon.

IF YOU GO

Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda had a Piece of Cheesecake...

536 North Main St., Hendersonville, NC 28792 HE

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Blue Ridge Ringers Holiday Concerts

The Blue Ridge Ringers, a community handbell ensemble in Hendersonville NC, will present five free holiday concerts.

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F L E M M IN G S T

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Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

····· - Fantastic ···· - Pretty darn good ··· - Has some good points ·· - The previews lied · - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Brooklyn 

Short Take: The story of a young Irish woman who moves to America in the early 1950’s.

REEL TAKE: To describe John Crowley’s Brooklyn as a masterpiece makes it sound very grandiose, when in fact it is this film’s smallness that makes it so utterly charming. That it doesn’t pretend to be anything more than it is also makes it classically so. The premise is as simple as it gets – a young Irish woman immigrates to America. Perhaps it’s the story’s

Saoirse Ronan and Emory Cohen find love in Brooklyn.

THE MONTHLY REEL

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’Tis the Season … The Force Awakens

’Tis the season, dear readers. With the holidays upon us, Hollywood is in full swing. As we put this issue to bed, the final installment of The Hunger Games, Mockingjay – Part 2 is trouncing the box office and the world is anxiously awaiting Star Wars – The Force Awakens. It’s also time for the movie studios to march out their Oscar bait in hopes of snagging award season gold. So, whether you are looking for family fare, action packed thrills or a more meaningful trip to your local cinema, you are in luck. For mainstream titles this month we review the 24th James Bond film, Spectre and The Hungergames: Mockingjay Part 2. Both films are solid, crowd pleasing pieces of entertainment, but it’s the award season fodder that really played to our movie geek, film critic sensibilities. Spotlight may be the first ‘must see’ movie this year. It tells the story of the Boston Globe news team that exposed the massive cover up of sexual abuse within the Boston Archdiocese. It’s the best ensemble piece of the year and it’ll certainly be in the running for best picture. Bryan Cranston will no doubt receive a Best Actor nod for his portrayal of blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo. Trumbo is a fantastic piece of

simplicity that allows it to genuinely tug on the heartstrings and hit all the right notes. With no prospects for meaningful work in her native land, Eilis (pronounced EE-lish; played by Saoirse (pronounced SER-sha) Ronan) is sent to America to build a better life for herself. There she suffers the crushing despair of loneliness and homesickness, but gets a job in a department store, starts taking night classes, and falls in love with a good Italian-American boy named Tony (Emory Cohen). But just as Eilis is getting a foothold on life in the states, a family situation sends her back to Ireland.

BY

MICHELLE KEENAN

DVD pick for the month. I decided we needed to do something to mark the holiday season. With filmmaking whose story the recent passing is unfortunately still eerily Now a modern day holiday classic, of Maureen O’Hara relevant today. SuffragLove Actually is one of the Asheville it seemed fitting to ette, a period piece that Film Society’s features this month. select the 1947 classic received mixed reviews Miracle on 34th Street. from critics, gets a warm The Hendersonreception from the Good ville Film Society is Professor Kaufmann. And taking the month off last, but certainly not least, and will return with a there is Brooklyn. This full docket of features quietly charming little selected and hosted film is an almost perfect by Chip Kaufmann in film. It is hands down one January. The Asheof the best movies of the ville Film Society has year. an array of Tuesday Films like Spectre night features – all and Mockingjay must be The Force Awakens December 15. tied the Holiday seen on the big screen. season in some way You may be tempted to wait to see Spotlight, shape or form – two of which are delightful Trumbo and Brooklyn until they are available titles from British director Richard Curtis, on DVD, but we urge you to see these films Love Actually and About Time. AFS is on the big screen. They are worthy of your also running its Thursday Horror Picture support and, particularly in the case of BrookShow through December. See Tuesday and lyn and Trumbo, which are both mid-century Thursday night listings on page 15. period pieces, they play beautifully on the big We’ll return in January with our Top screen. Ten lists and our votes for the ‘Best of Inspired by Trumbo, the good Professor 2015.’ Until then, enjoy the show and Kaufmann selected Dalton Trumbo’s only Happy Holidays! directional foray, Johnny Got His Gun, as his

12 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

Before she leaves she secretly marries Tony and expects to return to Brooklyn in several weeks, but back in Ireland she is presented with professional opportunities and a life with a well off local boy (Domhnall Gleeson). The prospective life in her native homeland seems much better suited for Eilis, but the life she’s built in New York is the life she has built. Sadly, no matter which life she chooses, there will be sadness and hearts will be broken. While the story itself is quite simple and straight forward, its characters are not. The quiet layers of Eilis’ emotions draw us in. Tony’s heart-on-his-sleeve vulnerability makes us care. The major and the minor characters all have a substantive realness to them. Saoirse Ronan is all grown up and shines brilliantly as the Eilis. Emory Cohen brings a heart to Tony’s character and to the film that is undeniably appealing. Supporting cast members Fiona Glascott, Jane Brennan, Jim Broadbent, Domhnall Gleeson, Julie Walters and Jessica Pare are as much a joy to watch and are as integral to the proceedings as Ronan and Cohen. Everything about Brooklyn rings true, its story, its actors, its locations, and its tone. It’s a period piece that is a time capsule, but that somehow manages to not feel like a period piece; it’s just feels real. My astute colleague Chip Kaufmann made an observation that corroborates this aspect, “Trumbo is great but it feels like a well costumed period piece while Brooklyn feels almost timeless even though it takes place during the same era.” I’ve waxed euphoric about this film’s simplicity, and in doing so I don’t mean to undermine its achievements - its elegance and, ironically, its nuanced complexity. Brooklyn stayed with me long after I’d left the theatre. There is something very dear about this film and it’s really quite magical in its own way. At press time, we know it is scheduled to play at The Fine Arts Theatre in downtown Asheville and at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Whatever you want to call Brooklyn – a ‘classic,’ a ‘masterpiece,’ etc., it’s one of the best pictures of the year. See it. Rated PG-13 for a scene of sexuality and brief strong language. Review by Michelle Keenan Movies continued on page 13


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film reviews for the twist ending which, having not read the book, I was totally unprepared for. I give Mockingjay - Part 2 high marks for that. I also The Hunger Games: give high marks to the many fine performances Mockingjay - Part 2 1/2 including Woody Harrelson, Julianne Moore, Short Take: The final installment of The Philip Seymour Hoffman who died with one Hunger Games franchise is a remarkably week of shooting to go, and of course Donald grim affair with a hard-to-follow plot but as Sutherland still going strong at 80. finales go, it’s an above average effort. I was surprised by how grim this final installment turned out to be with a lot more major character carnage than I was expecting but then the same could be said of Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows where several major characters bite the dust. The ending also bore a strong resemblance to the one in Deathly Hallows and that’s all I’ll say about it. To be fair, after watching several high quality smaller scale films (check out the other reviews this month Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and her rebel squad minus Spectre), I really was plot their next move in the series finale, The Hunger Games: not much in the mood for Mockingjay – Part 2. MJ 2 and what I have to say about it certainly won’t REEL TAKE: While fans of The Hunger affect how it does at the box office. It may, Games will be sad that the series has ended, however, give those readers unfamiliar with I’m not so much glad as relieved that I won’t the series enough background to see if they have to sit through another one. I’m sure Jenwant to check it out for themselves. nifer Lawrence is relieved as well even though this has made her rich and helped her to win Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence the Entertainer of the Year Award for 2015. and action and for thematic material. I had no intention of revisiting the previReview by Chip Kaufmann ous entries before seeing Part 2 but I should have revisited Part 1 just to keep track of Spectre 1/2 what’s going on. Like the last Harry Potter Short Take: Bond is back and he’s getting film this story could easily have been streama back story. lined into one feature which would have simplified matters and would have reduced REEL TAKE: Daniel Craig reprises his role the continually excessive battle sequences but of James Bond for the 4th time for the 24th then it would have deprived Lionsgate of an installment of the franchise. Spectre is slick, additional $500 million. action-packed, beautifully filmed and wellThe fact is that I have become too old for acted, but it’s also a bit of a mess. Bloated this kind of movie. It’s not the material but the budget and running times aside, it just doesn’t presentation that gets to me. Hyperactive vidknow exactly which kind of Bond film it wants eogame based visuals with over-the-top music to be. Goofy, gadgetry Bond? Misogynistic and sound effects keep me from getting into it Bond? Uber cool and aloof Bond or a burned as much as I should. With Mockingjay - Part out Bond that wants to quit his job, chuck the 2 this was a real shame because if you can get gun and run away with the girl? past the 3-D/IMAX effects there are the interThat’s not to say the movie isn’t fun. It esting social observations and the characters is. And Craig delivers another wonderfully that we have grown to love/hate. rugged yet somewhat tender performance as If you haven’t seen any of the other films the British super spy. I think perhaps director in the series, this is definitely not the place Sam Mendes, out of deference and respect to to start as you’re expected to know what the franchise, tried to make this Bond film too happened before so that you can follow what many things for too many people and in doing happens here. I’ll do my best to streamline the so, undermines it. Star Wars like plot. Recovering from injuries Spectre picks up about a year and half sustained in Part 1, Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer after where Skyfall ends. Bond has once Lawrence) leads the rebel forces in an all out again gone rogue in order to follow the trail assault against the Capitol in order to get her of bread crumbs to Spectre and arch villain nemesis President Snow (Donald Sutherland). Franz Oberhauser (Christoph Waltz). The She perseveres but not before discovering that first time we see Oberhauser we think, this is things aren’t what they seem to be. going to be good, really good. This is the arch That’s a gross oversimplification but it tells villain who has been the mastermind behind what you need to know (and keeps the review everything we’ve seen in the Craig chapters of to a manageable length). It also sets you up Movies continued from page 12

nalists from the Boston Globe who expose the massive cover up of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church may not exactly sound like a fun night at the movies. But believe me, you will want to see this film. Spotlight is one of the must-see movies of 2015. A month or so ago I reviewed Truth, the story of the 60 Minutes team whose story on President George W. Bush’s military record dismantled the careers of CBS anchor Dan Rather, his producer Mary Mapes and Daniel Craig is back as James Bond in Spectre. others. While the ideals of that film were good and the story well-intended, it wanes in comparison to the newsroom drama that the franchise. I was ready for Christoph Waltz unfolds in Spotlight. to sink his teeth into his evil character. The The film centers around four investigaonly problem was there wasn’t much for him tive journalists who produce the “Spotlight” to sink his teeth into. This is Christoph Waltz, section of the Boston Globe. Michael Keaton people! If you get Waltz to be your bad guy, plays Robby Robinson, the editor of the “Spotyou don’t squander the opportunity! light” team. Mark Ruffalo as Mike Rezendes, While we’re talking about wasting opportuRachel McAdams as Sacha Pfeiffer and Brian nities, let’s address this chapter’s primary love D’Arcy James as Matt Carroll round out his interest, Dr. Madeleine Swann (Lea Seydoux). team, with John Slattery as Boston Globe While there’s nothing really wrong with her, publisher Ben Bradlee, Jr. When new editor, she just didn’t have the necessary presence to Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) comes to the be a Bond girl, especially one who’s going to Globe by way of the New York Times and the have an actual relationship with him. MakMiami Herald, everyone anticipates a shakeup. ing matters worse, she and Craig didn’t seem When Baron assigns the Spotlight crew a to have a lot of chemistry either, which then piece about a priest suspected of pedophilia makes one of the plot points hard to believe. they have their doubts (they are all lapsed or (Earlier in the film Monica Bellucci, who is non-practicing Catholics) and they have their now 50, makes a short but passionate appearconcerns; 53% of the Globes readership was ance and it sizzles.) Catholic and the church held (and holds) In a curious sub plot it seems that M’s much power in Beantown. But as the investi(Ralph Fiennes) new boss C (Andrew Scott) gation unfolds it unearths a much bigger story seems to be phasing out MI6 as we know it - not just one priest but dozens and dozens. and replacing people with unmanned technolThe magnitude of the investigation is lost on ogy. M gets to have some fun with Q (Ben no one. Wishaw) in that arena and that’s just plain fun. I guess in the end, it wasn’t that this Bond couldn’t do with a little levity, it’s just that you have to strike the right balance. With Craig we’ve been given a serious Bond with some heart wrenching story lines (the deaths of Vesper and Judi Dench’s M) and to undermine it with something so much less substantive is just wrong. Even with the more serious tone of the preceding three films there was still levity (they An all-star cast shines in Spotlight. are James Bond films after all), but with a new balance; Bond for Watching journalists research and document a 21st century audience. their story is not typically riveting stuff, but That said, Spectre sets us up for the next here it’s fascinating. The Catholic Church’s sex film. James Bond will return and I’ll be lookabuse scandal is a tough subject to palate, but ing forward to it. here we can; the film handles a heinous situaRated PG-13 for intense sequences of action tion with beautiful humanity. We know how and violence, some disturbing images, the story ends, but somehow it’s still suspensesensuality and language. ful. Ultimately Spotlight pulls off everything Review by Michelle Keenan it sets out to do and somehow keeps it deeply moving entertainment throughout. Spotlight  Director Tom McCarthy (Win Win, The Visitor) strikes all the right notes here. The Short Take: The story of the Boston Globe script is stunning. The pacing is perfect. The journalists who exposed the Catholic acting is amazing. There are no false steps, Church’s massive cover up of sexual no weak links, and all of it feels so very real. abuse. Attention to details and subtle nuance give this REEL TAKE: A movie about a group of jourMovies continued on page 14

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film great life. It works on all levels. Even the hue of the film somehow feels like newspaper; don’t ask me to explain it, it just does. In many ways Spotlight resembles All The President’s Men; a few tenacious print media reporters going up against a Goliath. It’s a brand of dogged journalism and integrity that is found in few places these days. Ironically, if there was a newsroom drama that was going to be called ‘Truth’ this year, it should have been this one. Spotlight isn’t a message movie. It’s never preachy, but it effectively shines a spotlight on the societal importance of long format journalism and the search for truth. Rated R for some language including sexual references. Review by Michelle Keenan

Suffragette 

Short Take: Story of the suffragette movement in England around the time of World War I is vivid and concise with stellar performances from Carey Mulligan and Helena Bonham Carter.

REEL TAKE: Unfortunately, as is often

the case, this movie will have left Asheville theaters by the time this issue hits the streets. However, it is not one of those movies that

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

The Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

right to vote is especially for women whose right to vote in this country is less than 100 years old. Only since 1920 have they had this right (1918 in England). Most people hear the term suffragette without really knowing what it means and how difficult life was for the women who advocated it. Suffragette tackles this lack of knowledge straight on by telling the story of a fictional character who interacts with the real life leader of the suffragette movement. Carey MulInnocent bystander Maud Adams (Carey Mulligan) is ligan plays Maud Watts, a young arrested and on her way to becoming a member of the woman working under Dickensian women’s rights movement in Suffragette. conditions in a laundry with several other working class women. She began working there as a child and now has needs a big screen to get its point across as it one of her own. Her husband George (Adam concerns story, history, and ideals rather than Michael Dodd) works there as well. non-stop action to make an impact. While out making a delivery, she becomes In this era of less than 50% voter turnout, accidentally involved in an act of civil disobediit is necessary to revisit how important the

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Johnny Got His Gun”

December DVD Picks

Johnny Got His Gun (1971)

I first saw Johnny Got His Gun when I was a freshman in college. It came out at the height of the Vietnam War and quite simply blew me away. It was the only film to be directed by legendary blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo (see my review of the new movie about him also in this issue) and was based on an anti-war novel set during World War I that he had written back in 1939. There were plenty of other anti-war movies at the time as well as such WWI classics as All Quiet on the Western Front and Grand Illusion but none of them made the impact that Johnny Got His Gun did. While realistically depicting war, most of the movie concerns itself with an American soldier (Timothy Bottoms) who is reduced to a faceless, armless, legless torso by a shell explosion and who is kept alive by military doctors for study purposes who don’t realize that his mind is still intact. Lying in his hospital bed, he relives his brief life before the incident and has several remarkable dream sequences involving his father (Jason Robards) and a long haired, bearded figure (Donald Sutherland) who is meant to be Jesus. Loaded with haunting imagery and still as powerful today as it was back in 1971, Johnny is not a film for everyone because of its subject matter but nevertheless. I recommend it as a one-of-a-kind cinematic experience that showcases Trumbo’s strength as a writer and as a movie that has something important to say.

14 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

Miracle on 34th Street (1947)

In selecting my DVD for the month, I wanted to pay tribute to recently departed screen legend Maureen O’Hara. I was tempted to select The Quiet Man as a tie in to my review of Brooklyn (which takes place in 1952 and references the film), but as we prepare to go to press, news outlets are anticipating the largest crowd ever for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. And with that there was no other choice; the parade was immortalized in the beloved holiday classic Miracle on 34th Street, starring Maureen O’Hara. It’s unlikely that anyone that reads this section hasn’t seen this iconic Oscar winning film, but maybe it’s been a while. Maybe it’s time to revisit it or introduce it to younger generations, who not have experienced its magic. Miracle on 34th Street tells the story of Kris Kringle (Edmund Gwenn), a kindly old man and lovable department store Santa Claus. When Kris claims to be the real deal, he is institutionalized for insanity until a young attorney (John Payne) comes to his defense. Edmund Gwenn plays Kris so brilliantly

ence as activists throw bricks through high end shop windows. In the melee that follows she is arrested along with the perpetrators and taken to jail. There she meets a sympathetic but by the book inspector (Brendan Gleeson) who is charged with dealing with the lawbreakers. After her treatment in jail and her husband’s reaction, Maud joins the cause which is locally led by Edith Ellyn (Helena Bonham Carter), a neighborhood pharmacist with a sympathetic husband who must legally own and run their drugstore. After a rally attended by suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst (Meryl Streep), Maud and the small band of women due whatever is necessary to gain attention even to placing bombs in letterboxes. What makes Suffragette so compelling is being able to witness what working conditions were like for these women and how brutally they were treated by their employers, the authorities, and sadly, by their husbands. One example drives this point home quite effectiveMovies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Miracle on 34th Street” you wonder if in fact he really is the real deal. Maureen O’Hara plays the Macy’s manager and coordinator of the annual parade. She’s a pragmatic single mother whose skeptical ways have rubbed off on her young daughter Susan, played by eightyear-old Natalie Wood. Kris doesn’t seem to care what anyone seems to think of him so long as he can convince this one little girl to believe in him. Rounding out the core cast is John Payne as the handsome young attorney who defends Kris and who also happens to be in love with Susan’s mother. On a side note Miracle on 34th Street marks Thelma Ritter’s film debut as a harried mother and Christmas shopper. One of the things I always found interesting about Miracle on 34th Street is its edge, a real world bitterness and skepticism. Looking back, the film may have actually been ahead of its time. We often think of old films as being representative of a more innocent and wholesome bygone era, but this 1947 movie touches on the harsher realities of life that many other films of its time did not. It also has a decidedly anticonsumeristic message. As much as we’d all like to think otherwise, commercialism is nothing new to Christmas. Miracle on 34th Street is smartly written and directed. The cast, from the young to the old, is pitch perfect. Best of all the film stands the test of time and is still relevant today. Ultimately the real miracle is in all of us – when humanity dwells in kindness and love. Sixty-eight years later it’s a message that still rings true.


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ly. While on a hunger strike in prison, Maud and other women are forcibly tube fed as the British government wanted no martyrs. All of the performances are top notch but it is Carey Mulligan, carrying the bulk of the story as the Everywoman character, who really stands out. Helena Bonham Carter, as the local activist/pharmacist, does her best work in years while Meryl Streep makes the most of her 10 minute cameo. There are some who seem to find Suffragette a little too staid and tidy and while it is not nearly as ugly and brutal as what really happened, it must be taken into consideration that is a film designed to reach a mainstream audience in order to draw their attention to something they probably don’t know. Viewed from that perspective, it makes a powerful impression. Watch for it either on DVD or by streaming video. Rated PG-13 for violence, thematic material, strong language, and brief nudity Review by Chip Kaufmann

Trumbo 

Short Take: A remarkable biopic about a shameful episode in Hollywood history features a superb central performance from Bryan Cranston and excellent period recreation.

REEL TAKE: Anyone who has studied or is

somewhat aware of Hollywood history knows or has heard of “the Hollywood 10”. They were a group of left leaning (the word liberal wasn’t in use then) writers, performers, and directors who had been involved with the American Communist Party at one time or another. The unofficial spokesman for this group was screenwriter Dalton Trumbo. Trumbo had a very successful career during the World War II years but when the mood of the coun-

Hollywood columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) lords it over blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo in the remarkable biopic Trumbo.

try changed after the war, his career and the careers of others like him became casualties of the Cold War paranoia and anti-Communist hysteria that seemed to spring up overnight. Trumbo and 9 others were cited for contempt of Congress for refusing to testify in a prescribed manner and were jailed for almost a year. When released they were unofficially blacklisted and wound up working under pseudonyms or using others as “fronts” who took credit for them (remember The Front with Woody Allen from 1976?). This all came to a head when Trumbo, writing under the mane of Robert Rich, won an Oscar for the screenplay of The Brave One, a 1956 film about a Mexican boy and his bull. The word was out and arch-conservatives like columnist Hedda Hopper went on the warpath trying to make sure the studios wouldn’t rescind the blacklist and employ anyone who had “Communist sympathies”. That’s the history depicted in Trumbo which is accurate although some key players who named names like Edward Dmytryk (director of The Caine Mutiny and the only one of the 10 to recant) are overlooked. This is unfortunate but understandable as they lack the profile of Edward G. Robinson who is

portrayed. I’m not sure if low budget producer Frank King played as big a role as John Goodman does but he brings a good dose of humor to the proceedings. What we do have, appropriate considering the subject and the material, is a Hollywood version of a Hollywood story which could be suitably ironic although I don’t think that that’s what director Jay Roach had in mind. However, as a movie trying to reach as many people as possible in order to recreate a neglected part of history (and now strangely relevant once again), this was the way to go. The ensemble cast performances of key Hollywood figures from that time is truly extraordinary. While they don’t physically resemble their real life counterparts (John Wayne & Edward G. Robinson for example), they more than embody them which is far more important. Helen Mirren is a wonderfully cruel and vicious Hedda Hopper while Dean O’Gorman’s Kirk Douglas (who is still alive at 98 and gave the film his stamp of approval) is spot on. The movie, not surprisingly, belongs to Bryan Cranston as the titular character. He owns Dalton Trumbo and he needs to for Trumbo is the catalyst for everything that happens in the film not to mention having the most screen time. He gives a memorable performance far removed from Breaking Bad that allows us to see Trumbo warts and all and there were definitely warts. I’ve already mentioned Helen Mirren but kudos should also go to Diane Lane as Trumbo’s long suffering wife Cleo who has to keep their large family together and to Louis C.K. as fellow blacklisted screenwriter Arlen Hird. They are the heart and soul of the film and help to raise Trumbo from interesting biopic to rewarding cinematic experience. Rated R for language including sexual references. Review by Chip Kaufmann

THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW The Asheville Film Society presents free horror movies every Thursday night at 8 p.m., in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. December 3:

Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (1965) Aboard a British train, mysterious fortune teller Dr. Schreck, uses Tarot cards to read the future of five fellow passengers. Stars Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee and Roy Castle. Directed by Freddie Francis.

December 10:

The Invisible Man (1933) A scientist finds a way of becoming invisible, but in doing so, he becomes murderously insane. Stars Claude Rains, Gloria Stuart, William Harrigan. Directed by James Whale. December 17:

Black Christmas

(1974) A sorority house is terrorized by a stranger who makes frightening phone calls and then murders the sorority sisters during Christmas break. Directed by Bob Clark.

December 24: Christmas Eve No show. December 31: Voodoo Man (1944) A doctor uses a combination of voodoo rite and hypnotic suggestion to attempt to revivify his beautiful, but long-dead wife, by transferring the life essences of several hapless young girls he has kidnapped and imprisoned in the dungeon beneath his mansion. Stars Bela Lugosi, John Carrdine and George Zucco. Directed by William Beaudine

IF YOU GO: Carolina Cinemas, 1640

Hendersonville Rd. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety, or call (828) 274-9500.

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the Society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special Members Only events and screenings. December 1:

About A Boy

(2002) Nick Hornsby’s story of a cynical, immature young man is taught how to act like a grown-up by a little boy. Stars Hugh Grant, Nicholas Hoult and Toni Collette. Directed by Chris and Paul Weitz. December 8: Remember The Night (1940) Written by Preston Sturges, a woman is caught shoplifting, just before Christmas. When her trial is postponed because it’s difficult to get a conviction at Christmas time she inadvertently falls in love with her prosecutor. Stars Barbara Stanwyck, Fred McMurray and Beaulah Bondi. Directed by Mitchell Leisen. December 15: Love Actually (2003) Set during the frantic month before Christmas in London, Love Actually follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales. Stars Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Bill Nighy and slew of wonderful Brit actors. Directed by Richard Curtis. December 22: Tokyo Godfathers (2003) On Christmas Eve, three homeless people living on the streets of Tokyo find a newborn baby among the trash and set out to find its parents. Stars Toru Emori, Yoshiaki Umegaki and Aya Okamoto. Directed by Satoshi Kon. December 29:

About Time

(2013) At the age of 21, Tim discovers he can travel in time and change what happens and has happened in his own life. His decision to make his world a better place by getting a girlfriend turns out not to be as easy as you might think. Directed by Richard Curtis. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 15


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fine art Resolution Time

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WHAT IS MY PERSONAL CLARITY OF PURPOSE?

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What do you wish to become to yourself and to others?

Well, another calendar year is wrapping-up – it seems like just yesterday I was standing in line to see the first Star Wars movie, and now so much time has passed that both Han Solo and I have AARP cards. As time – in any universe real or imagined – marches on, we’ve hit that collective zone of pondering what a fresh year may hold for each of us. Of course, the term “resolution” has several different meanings, depending on whom you ask. In addition to our annual societal exercise about wishes, dreams, reality and denial, for graphic artists and printers this word evokes viewing and reproduction efficiency of files at various sizes for varying final uses. Raw files, pixels, lines-per-inch, dots-per-inch and more. For arbitrators, it’s about bringing a discussion to a final agreement between parties. And then it can also be about accepting the terms, whether or not everything went their way. And, after hauling out the ginormous Webster’s one more time this year, one can add that there are also definitions related to legislative voting, music, optics and medicine. Whew! But, then again, it is the heaviest dictionary in the world because it contains so many words. (For example, under “lifting weights”, all one sees is … a picture of this very dictionary.) Mostly, though, the general populace associ-

ates “resolution” with personal resolve as we greet each New Year. In my world, I am determined to See, Hear, Feel, Explore and Create more. And this is not just in my art world. Thinking about these topics and how I am living within them also helps in my personal and working life areas, too. Even an office spreadsheet can be a masterpiece – or at the very least a document one is super-satisfied with – if I keep in mind its purpose and usefulness. If it’s for internal project tracking, it doesn’t need to be pretty. If customers are going to see it, it must transform their lives. OK, kidding – but it does need to instill confidence on multiple fronts. Some questions one can ask in relation to seeking one’s personal clarity of purpose: What percentage of what I’m doing today do I LIKE to do? Do I know WHY I like certain things? Do I have meaningful activities in my life that both balance-against and inform other areas of my life? What are a couple key topics that might fit this concept? What are some well-supported, consistent themes about which I feel a gut-level solidity? Am I engaged with these topics, or are they currently just on a To Do List?

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Balance, 2015. Illustration by Greg Vineyard

Do I adapt and learn as the world and my personal situations change? What could I be more open to? These are just initial prompts – most folks have their own variations of these types of questions to help with some serious personal musing. And there’s lots of coaching out there for folks who want professional questions to help them drill-down some more. It took me years to fully realize how much I enjoy business and teams, even though it has been a large part of my working career since the very first internship. I think folks can learn core things about themselves much earlier than I have, as there

are more tools available now than ever for selfreflection and self-improvement. While many opt to not actively write down resolutions in a formal way, the related exercise of goal-setting can be a useful activity anytime throughout the year. What do you hope to do in your art and working life? What do you wish to become to yourself and to others before this topic officially rolls around again at this time next year? Many of the definitions of “resolution” conceptually overlap a bit, outlining our opportunities for clarity on several levels, This results in not only more aesthetic pursuits, but also more efficiency everywhere, thanks to developing a precision of intention a bit more tailored to our individual journeys. Wishing everyone a Happy New Year – and a clear, smooth resolution process all year! Greg Vineyard is a marketingcommunications professional, and an artist & writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Strategies for the Holidays

The winter holidays will soon be upon us and lots of folks enjoy gifting artwork. Are you ready? Early December is prime time to get the word out about your open studio event, or the local art market, or any special opportunities where the public can connect with you. Remember that it’s always a good idea to offer a range of price points (though not too many) and variety of sizes and/or colors. Give the public too many choices and often they will burn out, unable to make a decision. If this happens to you, give them incentive to come back! For example, a potential buyer struggling to decide on a selection might say, “We’re going to lunch and will come back later.” To which you could respond, “Excellent! I’ll offer you 15% off any one piece when you return later today.” As you say this, present a small

16 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

handmade coupon and remind them to hang on to it if they’d like to cash in on the savings. Who doesn’t love a sale? So don’t be shy about making your pitch! Another way to entice buyers is to advertise that you will provide gift wrapping, which saves your customers time and expense. This can be an incentive that makes a big difference in your sales receipts at the end of the day. Plain brown paper bags with handles can be purchased online. Then all you need are a few packages of red tissue paper and some green ribbon. Loosely fold the tissue paper around the purchased item, tie the ribbon to the handle and you’re done!

Give potential customers an incentive to come back!

BY

WENDY H. OUTLAND

Be sure to keep a handsome guest book close by with a pen attached, and ask visitors to sign in with their email or street address to receive invitations to special events. An example can be as simple as offering repeat visitors a “pre-public opportunity” to acquire your newest work. Allowing them special access one hour prior to everyone else is enough to motivate eager buyers.

Contact visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland by email to imwhoknowsart@ gmail.com. WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. www.whoknowsart.biz


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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

FINE ART STUDIO IN THE

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

Featuring works by French Broad Artists Sahar Fakhoury, Sandra Brugh Moore and Virginia Pendergrass. “Small Jewels, Paintings 12 x 12 in. or Smaller” will be on display throughout December. Just a Bite, 8" x 8" oil The reception for by Sahar Fakhoury the show will be held Saturday, December 12 from 4-8 p.m. at their studio in Riverview Station #216 in the River Arts District. Fakhoury says, “Although I prefer to paint on large canvases, every now and then small size paintings look attractive to me. Sometimes I like to do them for a change, at other times they solve problems.” Plein air painting is a case in point. Because it is difficult to paint large paintings in one session outdoors, Monet returned again and again to the same outdoor scenes to produce large paintings of haystacks and cathedrals. However, Fakhoury comments, “This summer I began painting en plein air with The Asheville Urban Landscape Project. Artists in the group go to an outdoor location with their gear and paint- bugs, onlookers, weather and all. It is easier to carry small canvases, and faster to finish before the light starts to change.” Morning Ride, 8" x 10" oil by Sahar Fakhoury

Lake Lure Flowering Bridge, 8 x 10 oil by Sahar Fakhoury www.sahar-art.com

Join us at a Reception for

Small Jewels - Paintings 12 x 12 in. or Less Saturday, December 12 from 4-8 pm

RV

at the French Broad Artists studio

Red, White and Blue. Prints Available!

Riverview Station #216, South Entrance

OPEN STUDIO 4-8PM

191 Lyman St • Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 NorthLight Studios

pg. 17

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357 Depot Street in the River Arts District

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Works by Cheryl Keefer Available at: Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville Seven Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain . 22 Mahogany House Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville WU Up Against the Wall Gallery, 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

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828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com Rg

ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

RICHARD C. BAKER

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Fine Ar t and Por traiture

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Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

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More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 17


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celebrate the season Susan Marie Designs HANDMADE CREATIONS

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Susan welcomes you to visit her working design studio and gallery in downtown Asheville to see her handmade elegant jewelry with a contemporary style. As an award-winning designer/goldsmith she only uses the finest gemstones, diamonds and pearls for her creations. Inspired by the beauty of the stones, she draws on 34 years of experience to create each special piece for you to choose from in her gallery. Nothing says “I love you” more than giving a handmade creation from Susan Marie Designs.

Susan uses only the finest gemstones.

Susan Marie Designs 4 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 277-1272 www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Bonus content for our digital subscribers! Subscribe to our FREE eNewsletter for the latest local events. Go to www. rapidrivermagazine.com

For the Sports Fan on Your Gift List

Start the Season with Handcrafted Specials

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An opportunity to purchase handmade for the holidays has returned to the Folk Art Center, with shopping deals for all customers. Each year artists of the Southern Highland Craft Guild liquidate overstocks and annual inventory at the Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale. Occurring two Saturdays in December, the 5th and 12th, members will be on hand in the center’s auditorium selling select work 10-50% off retail from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The sale provides artists a market in which they can cycle out remaining 2015 product to begin the new year with a fresh start. This allows many creatives to try out new techniques, and begin their annual production process. For the customer, the sale means great deals for holiday shopping and a chance to connect with the craftsperson. It also provides an exciting, festive alternative to mall and big box import shopping. Choose from a variety of gift items including ceramics, jewelry, fiber, paper, glass and wood. Buying from artists supports the local economy and promotes the mission of the Guild which is bringing together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. Nearly 70 artists will be participating over the course of the two sales, with a different group of artists each weekend – so plan on coming to both for best selection! Visit www.craftguild. org for a complete list of exhibitors. While at the Folk Art Center, don’t miss the Focus Gallery show, “Image Works” and the Main Gallery exhibition, “Solid Roots.” Visitors will also want to shop at Allanstand Craft Shop, the nation’s oldest craft gallery, where they will find premier gifts for everyone on their list, and a variety of handmade holiday decorations from Christmas tree ornaments to wreaths and table arrangements. IF YOU Annual Guild Artist Holiday Sale at the Folk Art Center, GO December 5 & 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Folk Art

Center is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville, just north of the Hwy 70. For more information, call 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! WE HAVE IT ALL! Signed and Unsigned Helmets, Footballs, Jerseys, Basketballs, Baseballs and more!

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF 1-770-757-6814

emkkom@hotmail.com

Mon-Sat 11-8

18 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

Sunday 12:30-6

HANNAH BARRY

Blown glass ornaments by local Asheville artist, Jeff McKinley.

Necklace by Linda Azar of Waynesville, NC.

Ceramic orbs thrown by potter York Haverkamp of Norris, TN.

Town Hardware & General Store

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Come on in and find the perfect gift for your child or grandchild.

HUGE SELECTION! All Styles of Hats

140 Airport Road, Arden, NC 1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway

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We carry Radio Flyers and hula hoops, two great gift ideas for kids who need to get rid of a little energy. We have several sizes of hoops and a great selection of Radio Flyer products – wagons, wheel barrows, and even tricycles. We also have a colorful selection of sleds. For those who prefer to spend the days inside, we have games, books, or items you might need for that long delayed indoor project. Need help coping with mother nature? We carry snow shovels, ice melt, and heaters too. We have a great selection of toys and games!

Enjoy the season!

Town Hardware & General Store 103 W. State Street, Black Mountain, NC 28711

pg. 36

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828-669-7723, www.townhardware.com


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celebrate the season Lexington Glassworks

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Lexington Glassworks, located on S. Lexington Avenue in Asheville, is the area’s premier glassblowing studio and gallery. Lexington Glassworks is a 5,000 sq. ft. high-end, contemporary glassblowing studio and gallery. Lexington Glassworks features high quality custom lighting, handmade glass, and a taproom highlighting local beers served in hand-blown

Quality custom lighting and hand-blown glass.

Riverview Station Holiday Market

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More than 20 open studios featuring more than 40 artists. There will be a food truck on premises, a roving Santa Claus, and bountiful collect door prize entry forms at each studio, with a drawing at River Oaks Studio, Suite 160, at 6:30 p.m. Santa Photos with Santa add to Claus will the joy and excitement. be available for pictures at The Village Potters for the first and last hour of the event, and will roam the building for additional photos and holiday joy from 5-7 p.m. IF YOU Saturday, December 12 from 4 GO to 8 p.m. at Riverview Station,

191 Lyman Street. For more information, contact the Village Potters, (828) 253-2424, thevillagepotters.com

glass. The owners at Lexington Glassworks pride themselves on their open door culture. We invite you to watch the artists at work, as well as peruse the gallery for the perfect accent piece for your home, office or unique gift for a special occasion. As we move into the holiday season, Lexington Glassworks will be featuring a wide array of handblown glass gift items that will fit any budget. Each piece in the gallery is individually handcrafted using century old techniques and locally sourced material. The high-quality craftsmanship of the artists at the Lexington Glassworks is reflected in the timeless and elegant designs of each piece. We invite you to come in from the cold, warm yourself by the heat of the furnaces and enjoy as you watch the artists at work. Celebrate the Holiday Season with us at the Lexington Glassworks! This year Lexington Glassworks will be starting a new tradition of giving with “12 Days of Charitable Giving.” This event, which began November 28, will run through December 9. This

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Timeless and elegant designs.

year, 5% of proceeds will be donated to the Irene Wortham Center. Visit our website for more information on upcoming events such as the Annual Year-End Sample Sale, Seconds and One-Off Sale.

Lexington Glassworks 81 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville Open seven days a week. www.lexingtonglassworks.com

Grovewood Gallery’s Holiday Sip & Shop

’Tis the season to give the gift of handmade!

BY

ASHLEY VAN MATRE

and painting of a bonsai Grovewood Gallery tree. Tess, known for in Asheville is hosting her series of contempoa Holiday Sip & Shop rary landscapes, often event, December 11 reflects on the interac& 12 and again on tions of humans with December 18 & 19, nature and believes featuring work by local Jack Frost doll bonsai trees can be by Charlie Patricolo. makers as well as many symbolic of how our skilled artisans from ever-growing human around the country. population dictates earth’s environment. Everything in the gallery will be Charlie Patricolo Demonstrates 10% off (excluding demonstrators’ merchandise) and, in addition to the Doll-Making sale, holiday shoppers can also enjoy December 12 (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) North artist demonstrations, complimentary Carolina-based artist Charlie Patricolo wine, warm cider, and gingerbread has been sparking imaginations and cookies. making whimsical cloth dolls for nearly 50 years. Watch as she works on dolls in various stages of completion and DEMONSTRATION SCHEDULE transforms them into delightful creations Tess Darling Demonstrates full of life. Attendees will also have the Still Life Drawing & Painting opportunity to enter a drawing for one of December 11 & 12 (11 a.m. to 4 her signature Jack Frost dolls. p.m.) Watch Asheville artist Tess continued on page 25 Darling work on a still life drawing

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 19


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t.e. siewert encaustic landscapes

TOYS

OPENING RECEPTION Friday, December 4 • 5-8PM

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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

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Featured Artist for December

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Asheville Gallery of Art • 16 College St. tesiewert.com

ELINOR BOWMAN ASHEVILLE, NC

siewert (using her initials and small caps as an homage to e.e. cummings, a favorite poet), spent 27 years as a Registered Nurse. Yet, it wasn’t until a fateful trip to Asheville’s River Arts District that she was truly led to devote all her time and energy to being an artist. Seeing the encaustic medium and touching its surface was life-changing. She tells everyone, “It likes to be loved!,” gently polishing

“Raggedy Ann” by Virginia Pendergrass

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT: Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District

pg. 21

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Last Frost by t.e. siewert

New Day by t.e. siewert

the surface with her fingers and then holding it to her cheek. This kinetic ability, the layering and depth, the translucent light effects, and the color contrasts, all add up to an art experience unlike any other media. Her newest artworks utilize a multi-media approach to encaustic landscapes with an ethereal vision. Moving to the western NC mountains in 2011 inspired the artist and she began to find unique ways to honor the natural mountainscapes she found herself continued on page 37

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www.elinorbowman.com

“Train” by Virginia Pendergrass

ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART PRESENTS

BY

SANDI ANTON

Toys

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Featuring works by Virginia Pendergrass.

Look for us at our NEW Location in January 2016:

82 Patton Avenue Downtown Asheville

ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 16 College Street

Downtown Asheville www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

828.251.5796

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Artist t.e. siewert always remembers her need to express an inner vision through art.

Works by Virginia Pendergrass

Sun. 1-4pm

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Encaustic Mountainscapes

On Display December 1-30, 2015

Mon. - Sat. 10-5pm

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Give the Gift of a Bike

pg. 21

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We Have All The Gear You Need!

New & Used Bikes • Accessories • Free Parking Probably the Oldest in the U.S. (828) 253-4800

pg. 21

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20 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

“When I heard that I was to be featured artist at the Asheville Gallery in December, a child-like voice in my mind shouted Toys!” Rubber Duck by says Virginia Pendergrass. The Virginia Pendergrass result of her enchantment with toys will be on display at the Asheville Gallery of Art from December 1-30, 2015. Painting toys was an adventure of discovery for Pendergrass. She first envisioned treating toys as still life subjects, but she found that when you have toys, and add imagination, even grown-ups play. “My Teddy Bear shared a chair with Goldilocks, and they decided that the chair was JUST right for both of them together. A tousled head of a youngster is seen in the mirror above the bathroom vanity where his rubber ducky and towel sit. But wait, that vanity has some rather adult products on it – is Daddy playing with the rubber ducky, too?,” says Pendergrass. Although she felt like a child painting toys, she realized that her continued on page 37


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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Asheville Gallery of Art on the Move

The Asheville Art Museum

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The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack.

Asheville’s longest established gallery will move to 82 Patton Avenue in downtown Asheville in January. While it’s almost directly across the street from their old location at 16 College Street, the move is a big step for the now 28-member co-operative of local artists. Founded in 1988, the gallery will expand to 30 members for the move. The new gallery space will have more room, high ceilings, and increased lighting. But the quality of art presented will remain at the same high level for which AGA has always been known. After 27 years at 16

23

v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com

29 Biltmore Ave.

That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

continued on page 37

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

15 N. Lexington Ave.

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PACK SQUARE

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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Walnut St.

Patton Ave.

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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Studio Now Open at the Mahogany House Art Gallery and Studios

Veterinary Hospital

Pottery, Beginner Wheel Throwing Classes, Demonstrations

• • • • • • •

Wellness Care Laser Therapy Digital Dental X-Ray Surgery Pain Management Boarding for Cats and Dogs Day Camp with Supervised Group Play for Dogs • Grooming

Burr Studio

Gallery of American Art & Craft

pg. 22

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coldcove@gmail.com

240 Depot Street • Frog Level • Waynesville, NC WR

Dr. Brian H. Birthright, DVM

828-456-7400

136 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC

www.mapletreevet.com

1855 Russ Ave., Waynesville

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WAYNESVILLE

McLAIN POTTERY Maple Tree

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pg. 36

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Featuring Local Sunburst Trout

Open Monday - Saturday • 828-452-5211

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FROG LEVEL WP WA WF

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

128 N. Main Street

WH

Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00 pg. 22 pg. 36

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

22 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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WILD ABOUT

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Call for Artists

In June 2016 the Haywood County Arts Council will host the Haywood County Master Gardeners’ Exhibit.

Waynesville is decorated for the holidays, and the chill in the air makes it a perfect time to explore our galleries, restaurants, and gift-shops. The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present its December edition of Art After Dark, happening Friday, December 4. Art After Dark transforms Downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center. Festive Art After Dark flags designate participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery. December offers a wonderful variety of artists and mediums to explore, and an opportunity to create art and watch demonstrations. Burr Studio will be featuring artist Lisa Hoffman, who will be engraving and etching her glass ornaments. Stop by to watch Lisa at work, and enjoy the festive night and refreshments! Cedar Hill Studio, across from the

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Art After Dark

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old courthouse, will be featuring a demo by Susan Lingg. Susan is a self taught artist, enjoying the process of painting in mixed media of water color, handmade paper and At left, New Sky by Susan Lingg. At right, glass ornament by acrylic. Come enjoy Kristen Munoz, available at Twigs & Leaves Gallery the demo along with wonderful music. year as they celebrate the holiday season Paul Malcolm with the North Carolina during Art After Dark Friday, December Symphony and wife Lisa will be playing violin 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests will be have the duet in Cedar Hill Studios backroom, and opportunity to make a greeting card to Steve Whiddon, an awesome one man band, be given to Meals on Wheels recipients. will be playing outside. They will be doing this again on Saturday, Gallery 86 will continue It’s a Small, Small December 12 during the “Night before Work during this months’ Art After Dark. The Christmas” event from 6 to 9 p.m. show provides a unique opportunity for budFriday evening, as you stroll through ding artists to exhibit their work, as well as the the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artopportunity for more seasoned artists to test ists, enjoy holiday piano music by Amy their boundaries. Community members also Shahparast and indulge in festive hors have a chance to purchase work from new and d’eurves. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, at 98 established artists at reasonable prices. North Main Street in Waynesville, is open Twigs and Leaves Gallery would like to Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. thank their loyal customers for a wonderful to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays from 1-4 p.m. (828) 456-1940, www.twigsandleaves.com. The Village Framer will feature members of Makers Foundry, a collective of graduates from Haywood Community College. Members will offer a wonderful selection of beautiful handmade scarves, pottery and house wares providing a great opportunity for special gifts. Providing you to shop at demonstrations and refreshments.

The annual exhibit marries fine gardens with fine art. The 2016 theme will be Pollinate, Propagate, Cultivate. Artists are asked to produce work inspired by local gardens and the pollinators (bees, butterflies, birds, bats, etc.) that help them thrive. Applications do not have to include finished work, but they should show work examples and ideas for show submissions. Interested artists are invited to submit an application by February 1, 2016. For an application and more information, visit www.HaywoodArts.org IF YOU The Haywood County Arts GO Council and Gallery & Gifts are

located at 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville. For details call (828) 4520593, email info@haywoodarts.org, or visit www.HaywoodArts.org.

Visit Burr Studio for Handmade Holiday Gifts

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During the holiday season we invite Burr Studio in Waynesville to find that special gift.

After more than fifteen years of doing business at our Main Street location, we are the destination for handmade and regional crafts. Everything is U.S. made by small artisans. Visit us soon for a great shopping experience.

Jean Wilkes

IF YOU Art After Dark, Friday, December GO 4, downtown Waynesville. For

Pegi Pike

more details, please visit the Waynesville Gallery Association at www. waynesvillegalleryassociation.com

Happy Holidays!

At The Strand Blue Ridge Big Band – Kick off the holiday season on Sunday, December 6 with a traditional-style 18-piece American big band performing classic, jazzy Christmas compositions.

Burr Studio 136 Main Street Waynesville (828) 456-7400

Kristen Munoz

Wishing You a Sparkling Holiday

Thank You for an Outstanding Year! Come Celebrate the Season With Us

Art After Dark, Friday, December 4

IF YOU A Big Band Christmas, Sunday, GO December 6 at 1:30 p.m. $10 adults;

$6 students. For tickets, plus movie showtimes and more, visit 38main.com. The Strand, 38 Main Street in Waynesville.

pg. 22

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A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

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Black Mountain Holiday Festivities December 3 - January 1: DECK THE TREES - 20 beautifully decorated Christmas trees inside the Monte Vista Hotel. Vote for your favorite. December 4: HOLLY JOLLY DOWNTOWN, 5-8pm. Shops open with refreshments. Santa & Mrs. Claus at Old Depot. Games, music, entertainment. Outdoor movie at The Junction. December 5: ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE at 4pm. CIRCLE OF LIGHTS at Lake Tomahawk Park after Parade. bonfi Santa. Luminaries, music, food, hayrides, bonfire, December 12 & 19: Participating SHOPS OPEN LATE 5-8pm. Outdoor movie at The Junction.

Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Exhibits

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FABULOUS FAKES

This is an opportunity to own original art in the style of Monet or Da Vinci. According to curator Susan Hanning, more than 90 works will be on display. At the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain now through January 6, 2016.

Most highly respected schools of Art require their students to copy masterworks to further learn color, tone, figure and interpretation of a subject, forcing the students to see what is before them. The Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League annually challenges its members to create masterful works of art which resemble or in some way duplicate a work by a famous artist. There will be watercolor, acrylic, and oil paintings, as well as sculpture or fabric renderings of famous works.

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com • (800) 669-2301

ARTIST’S CHOICE

Presented by the Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

Members of the SwanFabulous Fake painting nanoa Valley Fine Arts by Cheryl Keefer League have each been challenged to select two of their own works they would most like to share with visitors to the Red House Gallery in Black Mountain. Each artist writes a few words on what influenced them to create their work. These quotes, included along with their art, hang in the gallery, giving a brief glimpse into the creative process. The show includes both 2D and 3D works in metal, clay, fiber, glass, wax, pastel, ink, pencil, paint, photography, and mixed media.

Fun & Functional Holiday Gifts On the 6th day of Christmas, my true love gave to me… a honey-do list that wrapped around the tree. On the 7th day of Christmas, Town Hardware gave to me.. everything I needed to keep her hap happy!

IF YOU Fabulous Fakes, on display at the Monte Vista GO Hotel, runs through January 6, 2016. Artist’s

103 West State Street in Black Mountain

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Choice opens Friday, December 4 from 5-7 p.m. On dsiplay through February 1, 2016. Both events and parking are free. The Red House Gallery is located at 310 W. State Street in Black Mountain. Winter hours: Monday-Saturday, 11-3 p.m.; Sundays 12-4 p.m. For more information, visit www.svfalarts.org.

Corner of Hwy 9 & US 70 • 828-669-7723 MA

www.TownHardware.com

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

MA MV MS MC MR

Breakfast

craft gallery

in the Mountains

117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5

601 W. State Street

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107

in Black Mountain

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Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

24 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

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celebrate the season

Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

This Month at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts

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CLAY STUDIO EXHIBIT AND POTTERY MARKET

Starting Friday, December 4, in conjunction with Black Mountain’s townwide Holly Jolly holiday celebration, the Black Mountain Center for the Arts opens its upper floor for the annual Clay Studio Exhibit and Pottery Market. The event will be held from 5-8 p.m. The diverse Exhibit held in the Upper Gallery will feature the finest work of Clay Studio instructors and students and will be on display until February 29, 2016. In the adjacent room more than 10 resident potters will have smaller, more affordable work for sale.

REASONABLY PRICED BABIES COMEDY IMPROV RETURNS! The Reasonably Priced Babies are bringing their comedy improvisation to the Black Mountain Center for the Arts for two nights only on Friday & Saturday, December 18 & 19 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the shows are $15 with tax and can be purchased at www.BlackMountainArts. org or by calling (828) 669-0930.

‘Small Jewels’ cont’d. from pg. 17

This is the current American solution to the dilemma of catching wonderful light en plein air – paint a small canvas fast during a two-hour interval in the morning, and again in the afternoon. Larger studio pieces develop from this fresh experience. “Starting in the late fall, or on a rainy summer day,” adds Fakhoury, “I tend to do small still life paintings in the studio. I can set it up in the studio and control the light as I wish. Small sketches give an artist the opportunity to work out composition problems or experiment with

‘Grovewood Gallery’ cont’d. from pg. 19

Audrey Laine Sawyer Demonstrates Pierced Silhouettes

December 18 (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Metalsmith Audrey Laine Sawyer will demonstrate her process of piercing silhouette imagery and constructing hollow forms out of brass and sterling silver. Audrey is a 2010 graduate of Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program

Reasonably Priced Babies are Josh Batenhorst, Tom Chalmers, and married couple Mondy Carter and Karen Stobbe, and musician Aaron Price who will be providing music for the whole show. “We perform attention deficit entertainment,” says Mondy Carter. “It’s fast paced, fun and easy to dance to... wait – cut that last part. And the show is usually PG13 or higher, although most of the time not due to us but the suggestions from the audience.”

ONE-MAN DICKENS On Sunday, December 20 at 3 p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, actor and Dickensian scholar Jamieson Ridenhour will present a Victorian-style reading of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, performing each character as Dickens himself did. Charles Dickens was an inveterate performer of his own work, and toured throughout England and America during the 1850s and 60s. Ridenhour recreates the experience — bringing A Christmas Carol to life with a book and his voice. Ridenhour, a recent Black Mountain transplant from North Dakota, has been performing this piece for the past seven

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09 One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Jamieson Ridenhour in Victorian garb performs a dramatic reading of A Christmas Carol.

pg. 22

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IF YOU The Black Mountain Center for GO the Arts is located at 225 W. State

Street. For more information visit www.BlackMountainArts.org or call (828) 669-0930.

“superficially, the size of your hand, but, artistically, as a large as a continent.” The small jewels of Fakhoury and her studio partners make ideal gifts for the season.

who creates nature-inspired jewelry out of her North Asheville studio.

well known for their elegant, custom wedding rings, multi-metal earrings, and inventive jewelry.

December 18 & 19 (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.) Watch metalsmith Kathleen Doyle demonstrate enameling on copper and silver and learn about the lost wax casting process. Kathleen and her husband, Thomas Reardon, have been studio artists at Grovewood since 1995 and are

Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

years in Bismarck and is happy to offer it to his new community. The performance will last only 90 minutes. This special reading of A Christmas Carol is a gift to the community, donations will be appreciated.

color without the investment of time and materials on a large canvas. Some of these ‘small jewels’ turn out to be wonderful in themselves.” Fakhoury’s biggest challenge for small works is painting figures. “There is not a lot of room for my style of detail-oriented, realistic representations, “she says. “Human figures, especially in motion, are my favorite subject. A lot of my paintings are narrative, they tell the story of the moment. Sometimes it requires more than one figure on a small canvas. But the outcome, when I get it right, is always pleasing to me.” In the 1880s, one collector famously described Whistler’s small scale works as

Kathleen Doyle Demonstrates Enameling

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

pg. 36

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Fakhoury also exhibits her artwork at the Asheville Gallery of Art in downtown Asheville. Visit her website, www.sahar-art.com. IF YOU “Small Jewels, Paintings 12 x GO 12 in. or Smaller” on display

throughout December. Opening reception Saturday, December 12 from 4-8 p.m. at the French Broad Artists studio in Riverview Station, #216 in the River Arts District.

IF YOU Holiday Sip & Shop, December GO 11 & 12, 18 & 19 from 10 a.m. - 6

p.m. The gallery is housed in the historic weaving and woodworking complex of Biltmore Industries, located adjacent to the Omni Grove Park Inn. Free parking is available. To learn more, call (828) 253-7651 or visit grovewood.com.

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 25


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authors ~ poetry ~ books

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The Poet’s Voice PEACE

My husband and I celebrated our anniversary by spending a night at the Sourwood Inn. It’s way up a crazy high mountain. The driveway is precipitous. The visit was worth it. This is what I call sanctuary. No TVs. No Wi-Fi. Trails to walk, fireplaces in every room, a library with Mary Oliver’s and Wendell Berry’s words in residence. I took Mary’s book, The Leaf and The Cloud, a poem, back to our room and copied one of them for you.

Wendell has a say in this poem.

I rose this morning early as usual, and went to my desk. But it’s spring, and the thrush is in the woods, somewhere in the twirled branches, and he is singing. And so, now, I am standing by the open door. And now I am stepping down onto the grass. I am touching a few leaves. I am noticing the way the yellow butterflies move together, in a twinkling cloud, over the field. And I am thinking: maybe just looking and listening

Maybe the world, without us, is the real poem. ~ from the Book of Time by Mary Oliver

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Mary enters her world and tells about it. (She could have written this on the grounds of the Sourwood Inn.) Mary gives the reader instructions on how to enter the day. “Stand by the open door. Step down onto the grass. Touch a few leaves, notice, think, look, listen.” For most of us, doors do open. Gates stand ajar. Bridges invite. As T. S. Eliot wrote in his Four Quartets, “the end is where we start.” Endings happen. We graduate, divorce, die, marry, give birth, survive the empty nest, or chemo, retire. Thresholds challenge and change us. Imagine the refugee: beyond hunger, beyond our imagination of the word, cold. Doors are closed. Bridges? Closed. Gates? Locked. When my German and English ancestors came to this country, they moved in and started farming. My husband’s Norwegian ancestors took the name of their town to the New World. They found a place a lot like home (or at least as cold), Minnesota. My plans for this column went astray. I had an idea for this column. The world intervened. I should know by now that I am not in charge! In one of our bookcases there is a tiny book titled Peace Prayers. I had never seen it before. It is a collections of meditations, affirmations,

26 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

invocations, poems, and prayers for peace. I confess that poems caught my eye. I know that Mary Oliver believes all poems are prayers – she said so in a reading I attended. Jim Wallis writes: “Prayer is a necessity. Without it we see only our points of view, our own righteousness, and ignore the perspective of our enemies. Prayer breaks down those distinctions. Prayer makes enemies into friends. Fervent prayer for our enemies is a great obstacle to war and the feelings that lead to it.” Re-read this and substitute the word poetry for prayer.

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is the real work.

BY

The Want of Peace All goes back to the earth, and so I do not desire pride of excess or power, but the contentments made by men who have had little: the fisherman’s silence receiving the river’s grace, the gardener’s musing on rows. I lack the peace of simple things I am never wholly in place. I find no peace or grace. We sell the world to buy fire, our way lighted by burning men, and that has bent my mind and made me think of darkness and wish for the dumb life of roots.

December is a month of celebrations. The Advent season is four weeks long, culminating in Christmas, or the coming of the Light. Hanukka, the eight day Jewish festival of the lights reaffirms one’s spiritual dedication to Earth work in the coming year. Bodhi Day, Rohatsu – the celebration of the Buddha’s enlightenment in the Zen tradition. Ta Chin is the Taoist festival of reflection and renewal. It’s all about light. December is a busy month. In our world, where will we find light? Here are three lightfilled poems. With all of mankind, towards the light. I shall raise the children High, high, laughing for joy to the sun. ~ Yan Lian The sunbeams stream forward, dawn boys, with shimmering shoes of yellow. ~ Mescalero Apache Song Waking up this morning, I smile, Twenty four brand new hours are before me. I vow to live fully in each moment and to look at all beings with eyes of compassion. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh does not say he will look at any one kind of being with eyes of compassion. He is specific. He says - look at ALL beings with eyes of compassion.

from Oscar Romero Peace is not the product of terror or fear. Peace is not the silence of cemeteries. Peace is not the silent result of violent repression. Peace is the generous, tranquil c ontribution of all to the good of all. Peace is dynamism. Peace is generosity. It is right and it is duty. This poem by William Stafford is as good as any prayer/poem can get. This is the field where the battle did not happen, where the unknown soldier did not die. This is the field where grass joined hands, where no monument stands, and the only heroic thing is the sky. Birds fly here without any sound, unfolding their wings across the open. No people killed – or were killed – on this ground hallowed by neglect and an air so tame that people celebrate it by forgetting its name. It is twenty-five degrees as I write. Winter is making herself known in Asheville. The next time I go downtown, I am going to take a cup of hot chocolate and give it to a homeless person. I am going to vote when the time comes. I will continue to take food and send money to Calvary Episcopal Church’s Food Pantry. I will donate socks and scarves. I will pray for peace. I will write poems for peace. Every small good thing makes a difference. Peace to You. I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

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Short Stories, a Web Exclusive Contribute to Rapid River Magazine’s online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works in more than 20 genres. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. For submission guidelines and special editing rates visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Please contact Kathleen Colburn with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings New Titles for a Cozy Winter

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Brave Enough WRITTEN BY

BY

CHERYL STRAYED

Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear

WRITTEN BY

WRITTEN BY ELIZABETH GILBERT

Two empowering and inspiring books by women I love who aim to help readers move through fear and doubt in order to live bravely, creatively, and more authentically. We have signed first editions of both books, making them extra special gifts for people you love who need support and encouragement.

Great Selection at Downtown Books & News

H

Happy Holidays!

LINDA-MARIE OF MALApROp’S

BY JULIAN

VORUS

Whether you are looking for something a little different and odd or traditional and family friendly, I bet we may be able to help you put smiles on your loved ones’ noggins. An interesting item which we have been consistently selling are the Portable ForPortable Fortitude titude playing cards. playing cards This is a high quality, 52 card deck, which describes itself as “suitable for Poker, Cartomancy, Mojo.” The illustrations are poignant and amusing, highlighting themes of protection. The royalty of each suit is represented by a cast of literary greats. The Portable Fortitude decks are made locally by Corinna Dross, and you can find them, if you so desire, at our front counter. If you’re going to come to Downtown Books & News you might as well check out the books, right? We have a cultivated collection of nigh on 30,000 books. Prices go from a dollar to as high as $4,500. Good beach reading to the most wingnut esoterica; modern fiction to classic dramatic works; erotica and kissy vampire books, to the Barry Moser edition of the Bible. We pride ourselves on our selection. Do we have everything ever written? Heck no. We’ve just got the good stuff. Downtown Books & News is open every day of the year and has been for nearly 28 years. We are your literary refuge, at least until closing time. Stop by and see for yourself. Safe holidays, friends!

MARIA SEMPLE

Hilariously described by those in the middle of the crisis, Semple’s epistolary novel chronicles a family meltdown. Few books leave me laughing out loud, but Semple easily succeeds in her black-humored account of a wealthy, eccentric family facing threats on multiple fronts and taking dramatic, often selfdestructive measures. The Malaprop’s WILD bookclub loved this novel, and I think you will, too. A perfect gift for someone who needs a laugh!

H is for Hawk WRITTEN BY

HELEN MACDONALD

H is for Hawk is magnificent, beautifully written with powerful imagery. Helen

Macdonald struggles to heal after her father’s death and decides to raise a goshawk. Through her processing of grief, often explored within her complicated relationship with her hawk, she discovers what she really needs to heal. The last part of H is for Hawk is revelatory and affirming. A perfect gift for fans of Eat, Pray, Love, and Wild.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing WRITTEN BY MARIE KONDO

I LOVE this book! Kondo’s approach makes great sense: she leads you through a category by category decluttering process at the end of which you are only surrounded by items that spark joy. I was so charmed by her life story, too. She’s been decluttering since she was a child, and has learned patience, compassion and grace when dealing with people (like her parents and siblings) who cling to things in a way she believes no longer serve them. I truly found this book life-changing and I personally know others who have, too. A wonderful gift for yourself or for someone you know who is ready to take on 2016 a little lighter.

Flash Fiction Contest Winners

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RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S FIRST EVER FLASH FICTION WRITING CONTEST

A huge thank you to our partners and generous prize contributors; the Asheville Symphony Orchestra and the Asheville Community Theatre. I had fun with Tom Chalmers and Waylon Wood as they reviewed and judged all the stories. Both are great writers and performers and lent their considerable experience and expertise to choosing our winners. Thank you to the many great writers who entered their work. It wasn’t easy, but we had to choose someone.

1ST PLACE

BY

KATHLEEN COLBURN

3RD PLACE

We also have fantastic stickers that you can display on your car, computer, or snowboard. Some are Malaprop’s specific, like our very popular “We Still Read” bumper stickers. Come in and check out our unique wares, only at Malaprop’s!

DECEMBER

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Friday, December 4 at 7 p.m. ELLEN MALPHRUS, Untying the Moon.

HONORABLE MENTIONS Mickey Hunt for Denying the Signs, Susan Damerville for The Last Tenants, and Tom Davis for The Truth About Santa and Sex.

December 6 at 3 p.m. POETRIO featuring Laurel Blossom, Vivee Francis, and Kathryn Kirkpatrick.

The Flash Fiction contest was curated by Rapid River Magazine Short Story editor Kathleen Colburn. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com.

“He’d pitched two good games but last night had been a disaster. Five runs in two innings. He knew he’d have been in this game earlier if it hadn’t have been for that fiasco. If things went south tonight, he might as well go back to Macon, work in his brother’s insurance office.” ~ from RF Wilson’s Life From Sixty Feet

Asheville Community Theatre is the oldest continuously operating theatre in Asheville and has been delighting audiences for over six decades with a wide range of high quality performances and programs.

2ND PLACE

We have original Malaprop’s items like long-sleeved t-shirts and mugs to help you stay cozy on long winter nights. Besides our eternally popular classic logo, our “Peace. Love. Books.” logo, and our “Eat. Sleep. Read.” design, we’ve recently added two new t-shirts with designs created by our fabulous owner, Emöke B’Racz.

Saturday, December 5 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Day of Signings featuring acclaimed local authors. 10-11 a.m. Cynthia Yancey; 11 a.m.-12 noon Laurie McKay & Constance Lombardo; 12-1 p.m. Diane Scott; 1-2 p.m. Tony Reevy; 2-3 p.m. Ariana Ayu; 3-4 p.m. Ken Abbott. Signed books make great gifts!

Gina Malone for Alvin Gets a Girl, with another prize from the Asheville Community Theatre of two tickets to any performance, plus two concession vouchers.

RF Wilson for Life From Sixty Feet, with a prize of two tickets to the Asheville Symphony holiday performance “Simply Sinatra Christmas.”

Joseph S. Sollazzo for Fog, with a prize of a “4 Flex Pass” plus two concession vouchers from the Asheville Community Theatre.

UNIQUE HOLIDAY GIFTS If gift-giving has you stumped this season, look no further than our special store offerings.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

pg. 21

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The Asheville Symphony Orchestra was established in 1960 and continues to perform and promote excellent symphonic music for the benefit, enjoyment and education of the people of Western North Carolina. Read more about Waylon Wood and Tom Chalmers, read the winning stories in their entirety, and explore our growing collection of short stories at www.RapidRiverMagazine.com.

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 27


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Don’t You Know Me? A Steve Goodman Songbook TWO E MUSIC

It’s hard to know if the high regard in which singer/songwriter Steve Goodman is held owes to his having died at such a young age or the off kilter nature of his songs. While still in college Goodman was diagnosed with leukemia — the disease which took his life at age 36. He penned songs exploring the American landscape at a time few artists were doing so; in short, he was Americana before Americana was cool. As a writer, Goodman peaked early, penning his most famous song, the iconic “City of New Orleans” when he was all of 22. While his reputation with general audiences has ebbed and flowed his standing amongst other musicians has not. Jazz-cabaret singer Elaine St. George becomes the latest to pay tribute to Goodman, doing so with fine intent but mixed results. The problem lies not in her delivery, which is consistently strong and passionate (often too much so, as she tends to over sing the material), but with the simple fact much of Goodman’s music doesn’t translate well to such lounge atmosphere settings. Over the course of 15-songs either written by or associated with Goodman (and it’s telling that the best track here was written by John Prine) St. George fails to recapture the austere sincerity that made Goodman so genuine. Naturally, some songs work better than others, but the real misses, especially a miscast “Chicken Cordon Blues” fall embarrassingly flat. To her credit St. George does “City of New Orleans” proud but for the most part Don’t You Know Me isn’t the sort of effort that would make anyone seek out the originals. However, if they really want to know who Steve Goodman was, they should do. ***

Shawn Mullins

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Keep up with Local Arts, Events, Performances, and Festivals. www.facebook.com/ rapidrivermagazine

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I kick off this month’s reviews with a pair of gents named Shawn, a debut EP, a welcome release by a long standing and underappreciated band, a tribute recording, and a just in time for the holidays boxed set that would gladden the heart of any music lover, you included.

Elaine St. George

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My Stupid Heart

ROUNDER/SUGAR HILL RECORDS

While the listener familiar only with his 1998 breakthrough hit “Lullaby” might peg Shawn Mullins as a one hit wonder Mullins has in fact-during the intervening decade and a half-released a substantial amount of music, records that have displayed an increasing level of depth and a strong bent towards melodic pop with a country-folk persuasion. It’s the sort of music which defiantly fits no specific niche, which makes Sugar Hill, a label renowned as a supportive grass roots home for the wayward, the ideal landing spot for his latest. Although he usually tours as a solo act (a move dictated by economics) My Stupid Heart

28 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

is a surprisingly lush effort, in which Mullins and his band glide through shimmering ballads and slow time blues with equal ease. And while the contemporary protest anthem “Ferguson” might get the most attention, Mullins’ is at his best singing about matters of the heart, be they his own “Never Gonna Let Her Go” or others “Gambler’s Heart”. At its best, My Stupid Heart draws from his vast grasp and appreciation of Americana, and while Mullins may never again experience the vast exposure afforded to him by “Lullaby” he seems perfectly content to continue turning out albums speaking to his heart and ours. ***1/2

From the deeply personal “Faith and Hope” to the more universal “Everything” there’s not a weak tune here and while his lyrics occasionally meander, I suspect that will change with experience. Feel free to sample this music via YouTube, but be certain to lookout for his physical records. You’ll want to be in on the ground floor of this fine talent. ***1/2

The Reverend Shawn Amos

In a fair and just universe The Toadies would be garnering the number of sales or downloads afforded to any number of less talented bands. But I’ve learned long ago the universe — especially the music industry portion — is neither fair nor just. And with a career stretching back to the mid-1990’s the band has likely accepted they’ve reached a certain level of success and are good with that. Veering in a different direction than their last few releases Heretics finds them reconfiguring some older tracks as acoustic numbers combined with a handful of new songs and a cover of the Blondie classic “Heart of Glass.” All of which gives Heretics a slightly disjointed feel even while it explores the depths of their talent. The album kicks off in strong fashion with “In the Belly of a Whale,” a new song which fits nicely with the older ones, while a pair of acoustic tunes “Tyler” and “Beside You” showcases the band’s knack for harmony and song structure. Flourishes of subdued bass, tambourine and mandolin, work perfectly in concert with the layered vocals. The stripped to the bone reworking of “Possum Kingdom,” easily the Toadies most beloved song, is startling in its simplicity but affective all the same. “Heart of Glass” is similarly condensed, with droning guitars and organ replacing the 1980’s gloss and glamour of the original. All-in-all, Heretics may be a bit of a holding pattern but for a band that has slipped a bit under the radar that’s not a bad thing: Reintroducing themselves to their fans while offering a wide range of songs to a potential new audience makes perfect sense. If it gains them some of the larger following they so deserve, than I’m all for it. ***1/2

12 Ways the Reverend Loves You

PUT TOGETHER MUSIC

The good Reverend must love us indeed as this excellent release combines old school rhythm and blues with soul and grit, built around Amos’ powerhouse voice and a band who plays with precise swagger. The themes of betrayal, late night longing for the one you love and asking for redemption when there might not be any, may be as old as the hills that surround Shreveport (where this was recorded) but this music is built on instinct, passion and groove. There’s the required reference to Joliet prison and the admonishment of an unfaithful woman, both of which, drive home the legitimacy of The Reverend as a genuine blues-man. With guest appearances by The Blind Boys of Alabama (the stirring “Days of Depression”) and Missy Anderson 12 Ways The Reverend Loves You hits all the right notes in all the right places and gets my pick of the month. God bless the Reverend. ****

Zeke Duhon Self Titled

BIG DEAL MUSIC

The rather somber tone of the cover, a head shot of a Duhon set against a monochrome urban backdrop, belies the lively mix of youthful charged power-pop that lies within. Steadily building a career via his You Tube channel Duhon-an Oklahoman — who wrote his first song at age 13 and by age 15 was recording them — has packed more into this six-song effort than you’ll likely find on many overstuffed albums. Besides gleefully showing off his influences-ranging from 60’s classic rock to The Decemberists and Conor Oberst-Duhon has an uncanny knack for making music that while meticulously constructed never sounds stale. Some of that credit goes to producer Charlie Peacock, best known for his work with The Civil Wars, but it’s Duhon who writes songs that are astounding in their maturity.

Toadies Heretics

KIRTLAND RECORDS

Brad Mehldau Ten Years Solo Live

NONESUCH RECORDS

One of the most deservedly praised pianists of his generation, Brad Mehldau, is a supremely talented force, acclaimed for his sparse arrangements and skill to reach and maintain a desired ambiance. As a player he simply never wavers. Every note is precise and perfect. continued on page 29


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sound experience A Tribute to Muscle Shoals

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BY JAMES

FEATURING AMY BLACK AND SARAH BORGES

Great music, an excellent band fantastic vocals, humor and lots of energy.

Few recording venues are more synonymous with a specific sound than the legendary environs of Muscle Shoals Studios. Nestled in the hills of northern Alabama, situated just outside Sheffield (population 9039, 2014 Census) and the town seat of Colbert County, the music that has emanated from its walls reverberates throughout the world. Founded in 1967 as the core of Fame studios and immortalized in the 2013 documentary which bears its name, Muscle Shoals the studio and Muscle Shoals the musicians have hosted artists ranging from Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett, The Rolling Stones, Aretha Franklin, and Bob Dylan. And, while the studio’s heyday may have passed, in recent years The Black Keys and Band of Horses have furthered its legacy by recording albums there. So how does one pay tribute to a studio and the songs recorded therein? For performers Amy Black and Sarah Borges — both of whom are noted for their powerhouse vocals and devotion to “old school” music — the obvious thing is to form a seasoned band, select classic songs originally recorded there, and rehearse like blazes. Black and Borges include material from a wide range or artists and wrote a few originals that embody the heart and soul of Muscle Shoals. By her own admission, Amy Black has “Southern soul and storytelling in her blood.” With a pair of critically acclaimed albums of original music to her name, she was inspired to create this revue show after recording a four-song EP at Muscle Shoals which happens to be her family’s homeland. Aided by Rockn-Roll Hall of Famer, Spooner Oldham, she later returned to Fame Recording Studios with an all-star band to turn that EP into a fulllength album, featuring Oldham, Charles Rose of the Muscle Shoals Horns, Regina and Ann McCrary of the McCrary Sisters and Alabama born Will Kimbrough. The “Muscle Shoals Sessions” album,

‘CDs’ cont’d from pg. 28

Recorded between 2004 and 2014 and culled from a series of European (Mehldau is sadly under-recognized in this country) concerts, these handpicked songs represent the breadth and width of his greatness. While conveniently considered a jazz-artist, Mehldau was classically trained and is equally at home playing music by Brahms (“Intermezzo B flat major, Op. 76 No. 4”) and The Beatles. While his replication of such well cherished standards as “My Favorite Things” might be the most attractive stuff here, there’s an equal fascination listening to him rework contemporary numbers ranging from Stone Temple Pilots’ “Interstate Love Song” to

which includes classic covers and new originals, was released a few months back. In support of the record, Black and her sometimes musical partner Sara Borges, whose credentials easily stand on their own, and whose latest album was produced by Steve Berlin of Los Lobos, embarks on an extensive national tour “A Muscle Shoals Music Revue.” In advance of their December 16 show at The Grey Eagle, Amy Black kindly took some time to answer a few questions.

James Cassara: As I understand it, you

grew up in close proximity to Fame Studios and Muscle Shoals. Were you aware of its almost mythic importance to the music world? How much does Muscle Shoals influence the area around it, and how did it directly influence you?

Amy Black: I didn’t grow up in the Muscle

Shoals area, but my parents did and that’s where both sets of grandparents lived all my life. I spent a lot of time there. Amazingly, I did not know the history growing up. I remember passing Fame many times as it’s on a main road. I was curious about it, but never got the full story. Honestly, I’m not sure I would have appreciated the history as a kid because I wasn’t familiar with the music recorded there. I became a big Aretha fan in college and would have been thrilled to know she recorded in that little brown building with yellow lettering.

JC: A lot of musicians I speak with came from families in which music was a central element, singing in church or at family gatherings and such. Was your own upbringing particularly musical? AB: It was, in that we sang a lot at home and at church. My dad was a minister and we were very involved with the congregation.

Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” Mehldau even takes it a step further by mashing up The Verve’s “Bittersweet Symphony” with the Kinks’ “Waterloo Sunset.” It’s a collision of style and sentiment that beautifully showcases the differences and similarities between them, perfectly capturing the wonder of this collection. Mehldau publicly dismisses the notion that one genre is inherently inferior to another and chooses to instead further the cause of music as a primal aspect of our lives. Kudos to him with equal credit going to Nonesuch — a label long promoting a wide range of artists — for supporting his efforts. This is glorious stuff, impeccably crafted improvisations that would fit nicely into anyone’s collection. *****

CASSARA

AB: I wanted to record a few

tracks from my second album at Fame and my producer booked a day for us. He suggested getting Spooner out for Join powerhouse singers Amy Black and Sarah Borges (left) the session, which I thought for a soulful celebration of the incredible music that came out was a great idea. We booked of Muscle Shoals, Alabama in the 1960s and 70s. him, but by the time we were ready to record, I had already completed the album and decide to do someBut it was a denomination that didn’t allow thing totally different and dig into some old instrumentation so we only had our voices. In Muscle Shoals songs. I found four that I was hindsight, this was probably a good thing as it up for singing and we did the EP. That was helped me to develop my voice and ability to what got this ball rolling. sing a-cappella, which I know some performI really didn’t know I was capable of singing ers are intimidated to do. this music. It went so well, and the live shows My parents weren’t big music people, I did to support it went great, so I decided to so I wasn’t exposed to classic rock or pop turn the EP into a full album a year later. It’s through them. I started to appreciate nonbeen an amazing experience that has majorly church music when I began listening to the influenced me as an artist and altered my radio in 5th and 6th grade. direction. JC: How did you come to work with Spooner JC: How did you and Sarah meet up? She’s a Oldham? And few years back I had the pleaBostonian, but I assume she shares your passure of interviewing him and for someone sion for Southern music. whose credentials are so extensive I was struck by his utter lack of ego. He was as down home AB: I got a late start to a career in music and and unpretentious as could be. Sarah was one of the first few people I opened up for in the Boston area. She’s a rocker. Our AB: My producer, Lex Price, suggested bookinfluences are very different, but she’s a fan of ing him for our first sessions at Fame. And yes all good music and enjoys the tunes that came Spooner is incredibly humble. He is one of the out of Muscle Shoals. She’s also game for trykindest people I know. He’s got great stories, ing new things and when I brought this idea to but he never places himself at the center of her she was excited to join. She’s adventurous. them. I’m grateful to count him as a friend. This project was very different from her origiJC: So walk us through this in detail. You cut nal music and usual live show and she’s made a four track EP but later expanded it to a fullit her own and does a fantastic job. length album, correct? Was the EP a way of first testing the waters? continued on page 38

Make Your Own Beer & Wine Plenty of Parking!

Let Asheville Brewers show you how affordable, enjoyable and delicious homebrewing can be!

Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-4

ASHEVILLE BREWERS SUPPLY

pg. 35

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• Asheville, NC • (828) 358-3536 .AB. • S’ F • S 

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 29


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

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Perfect for Shopping, Dining, and Live Entertainment.

pg. 22

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BY

KAY S. MILLER

ting. Food is served Wednesday through Saturday evenings in the restaurant that can accommodate approximately 50 patrons. Drop by from 6-8 p.m. for Wine on Wednesday (W.O.W.) tastings each week, and live music every Enjoy live music every Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Imagine a Harlem speakeasy in the 1920’s – a secret venue where you can escape to a cozy atmosphere, and where the performers are within arm’s reach. The Classic Wineseller is evocative of Hollywood movies about that era, including the European styling and Old-World charm. Everyone is seated around tables, with front row tables for two, where you could (though not advised) reach out and touch The shop’s inventory boasts more than the musicians. The menu has an 12,000 bottles of wine. impressive list of charcuterie and accompaniments including allhotdog, soup, cane sugar sodas, natural cured meats, all-natural local and beer and wine. One ingredient imported cheeses, and olives imported you won’t find on the menu is from Spain and Italy. You’ll also find high fructose corn syrup. Even appetizers, salads, soups, flatbreads, and the ice cream is HFCS-free and small plates prepared fresh inis made just down the road in house and to order. Mooresville, NC. Discrete waitstaff provide table The Millers have partnered service throughout the live perforwith local bakeries, beef producmances, fetching wine and craft ers and farmers (seasonal) for beer orders, tasty small plate fare, most of the menu selections and tantalizing desserts, and a selection you can definitely taste the difof all-natural sodas, tea, and coffee ference. (including the Irish varietal). The Classic Wineseller is well For more information visit ChurchStreetDepot.com or worth a venture out – and down facebook.com/ChurchStreetDepot. – with friends to escape the cares of the world. No matter where you sit, you can dine, drink, and The Classic Wineseller offers tasty The Classic Wineseller relax to an evening of music from small plate fare. American roots and blues guitar Wine. Beer. Food. Live Music to pop, rock, or jazz standards 20 Church Street played on the Steinway piano. Visit Waynesville, NC 28786 ClassicWineseller.com for the full (828) 452-6000 schedule and more information. classicwineseller.com And, if you’re looking for a great burger, the Millers just opened another restaurant at 34 Church Street Depot Church Street, three doors down Burgers. Shakes. Fries. from the Classic Wineseller. 34 Church Street The Church Street Depot serves Waynesville, NC 28786 mouthwatering burgers, fresh (828) 246-6505 hand cut fries, and real ice cream facebook.com/ milkshakes. The menu features an impressive list of ChurchStreetDepot Locally sourced beef is a feature all-natural cured meats and all-natural on the menu, alongside the fries, local and imported cheeses.

Tucked away in an underground cellar at 20 Church Street, just off Main Street in historic downtown Waynesville, is an unassuming retail wine and craft beer establishment known as the Classic Wineseller. For 18 years, founder and owner Richard Miller has been strategic in adding to the shop’s inventory which now boasts over 12,000 bottles of wine and more than 100 craft beers. Wine prices start at $5.99 (less for beer) and can reach more than $3,000 for highly collectible or rare wines. Miller’s shop also has some of the best vertical collections around, as well as large format bottles, a great selection of half bottles, and a room dedicated solely to Port, a wine fortified with brandy. The retail shop opens at 11 a.m. Tuesday through Saturday. In the last few years the Classic Wineseller has gained even more notoriety with the addition of a small plate restaurant and – with help from Richard’s wife Kay – live music in the intimate restaurant set-

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Celebrate with The Classic Wineseller

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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30 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

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Eat, Drink Your Local Food Guide

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Brunch with Santa and Friends

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Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

Enjoy an extraordinary old world Christmas filled with wonder! Families will be transported back in time to Santa Claus’ beautiful Victorian home with old world holiday decor. Children will meet Santa Claus, the Balloon Fairy, and Santa’s Helpers. Once families are seated and breakfast is served, trumpets will announce Santa’s arrival. Santa will share his favorite tales and stories, made all the more magical with music and sound effects. Each child will spend quality time with Santa, and receive a personalized gingerbread cookie and autographed framed photo to take home. Families will be escorted to Santa’s horse-drawn carriage for a five minute carriage ride, or be delighted by the Balloon Fairy’s wonderful magic, balloon creations, and games. This perfect gift will be remembered for a lifetime. $58 per person includes: gourmet breakfast brunch menu and beverages, professional photos for downloading, horse-drawn carriage ride in Santa’s city sled, magic, music and storytelling performances. In addition, children receive a personalized gingerbread cookie gift, and an autographed framed photo. IF YOU Brunch with Santa plus Santa’s GO Horse Drawn Carriage Ride,

Sunday, December 6, 13 & 20 at 9 a.m. and 11:45 a.m. All tickets are $58, including childrens tickets. Hosted by Lex 18, 18 North Lexington Avenue in downtown Asheville. Advance registration requested. Call (828) 575-9494 or visit www.lex18avl.com.

BY

MICHELLE ROgERS

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse pg. 22

WA

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Reservations at 828-452-6000

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pg. 21

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

Asheville’s Exuberant Foodie Scene National Geographic Travel identified Asheville as an “up-and-coming” city in its new book, World’s Best Cities: Celebrating 220 Great Destinations. The book calls Asheville “a mecca of awesome mountain scenery, bohemian art and high southern cuisine.” “This laid-back town draws a funky mix of artists, nature lovers, and professional foodies.” The write-up continues, “Asheville’s exuberant foodie scene is all about fusion and updated southern favorites.”

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Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 31


The Face of War

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artful living

~ A SOLDIERS LAMENT ~

NEW BOOK!

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Hadaya Toys

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KACHINA DAVINE

A luminous candlelight vigil and fundraiser to benefit Syrian refugee children. The evening’s hosts are award-winning filmmaker and teacher Jennifer MacDonald, and artist, photographer, and entrepreneur Vanessa Bell. Hadaya Toys is a grass-roots organization dedicated to supporting the overlooked needs of refugee children through creativity and play. They spread joy, one toy at a time, by providing books, toys and art supplies to the child refugee population suffering from the devastation of war. The candlelight evening will feature Middle Eastern music by world super-group Free Planet Radio (River Guerguerian, Chris Rosser, and Grammy Award winner Eliot Wadopian), and other special musical guests. Habibi baklava and other delectable treats will be available to enjoy along with a spoken word and film presentation about the Syrian refugee crisis and Hadaya’s first ‘joy delivery’ this summer to four refugee camps on the border of Lebanon and Syria. This community event is to specifically raise funds for the children of the BEITI orphanage in Southern Turkey, who have lost one or both parents in the war. Hadaya Toys was developed in response to the current Syrian refugee crisis, widely considered to be largest humanitarian disaster since WWII; however, we are concerned with all refugee children, worldwide.

This benefit will raise funds for the BEITI orphanage in Southern Turkey.

Our aim is to address the immediate psychological needs of these children who form the majority, and most vulnerable portion, of the refugee population, by bringing toys that not only provide instant joy but help them overcome distress caused by violence, conflict and displacement. We provide creative alternatives to the violence and exploitation that many of them are subjected to in the camps whilst encouraging positive group behavior and teamwork. Visit www.hadayatoys.com IF YOU Hadaya Toys, Sunday, December 6 GO from 6-8 p.m. at Jubilee on Wall Street

in downtown Asheville. Tickets are $10 and are available at the door or in advance at Malaprops Bookstore. All proceeds will benefit Hadaya Toys.

4th Annual Holiday Benefit

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FEATURING TOWN MOUNTAIN & THE LARRY KEEL EXPERIENCE

Provide much needed hunger relief for one-in-six of our WNC neighbors.

The intent of this work is to honor and acknowledge the physical and mental hardships imposed upon the individuals engaged in armed conflict.

Available for $15.98 each at

soldierslament@gmail.com Include Your Name & Address Visit www.soldierslament.com

32 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

In 2012 local bluegrass ambassadors, Town Mountain, decided they wanted to initiate a holiday concert to help fight local hunger. Each year since, they have teamed up with another band, and host Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, to throw a holiday party featuring some of the best local and regional pickers. In total, the Holiday Benefit Concert has raised $7,500, enough money to provide food for 22,500 meals through MANNA FoodBank. MANNA FoodBank, says, “When our community works together we can accomplish so much. Thank you to every individual who makes this possible. With your help, we can end hunger in WNC.” In addition to providing the space free of charge as host of the event, Isis Music Hall has also waived many production costs and been generous enough to donate both in kind and cash contributors to the event each year in order to facilitate the event’s success. “The need to provide a hot meal and shelter to those in need is ever present. Not only is

BY

ERIN SCHOLZE

it something we need to be aware of 365 days a year, it’s something that always stands out around the holiday season,” says Town Mountain’s founding member Jesse Langlais. Town Mountain is Robert Greer on vocals and guitar, Jesse Langlais on banjo and vocals, Bobby Britt on fiddle, Phil Barker on mandolin and vocals, and Adam Chaffins on bass. The Larry Keel Experience features Larry Keel, an innovative and original acoustic flatpicking guitarist, Will Lee on the 5-string banjo, and Jenny Keel on upright bass. Solid and imaginative bass lines and vocal harmonies make for an exhilarating performance. IF YOU Annual Holiday Benefit concert, GO Saturday, December 19, door 8 p.m.;

show 9 p.m. $20. Partial proceeds go to MANNA FoodBank. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com


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artful living Awakened Politics “I am not only a socialist but also a bit leftist… When faced with economic or any other kind of injustice, it is totally wrong for a religious person to remain indifferent.” ~ Dalai Lama

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The word “Buddhism” comes from the root word “Buddh” meaning “awaken” and “ism,” the suffix meaning a doctrine, a practice, adherence to a system of principles. Often the suffix “ism” is connected to political philosophies, as in this country we can say that in an election we are asked to endorse candidates who represent conservatism or progressivism. One current progressive candidate for President has, at times, identified himself as an advocate for Democratic Socialism, the political perspective that guides our allies in Western Europe. This is a courageous declaration in American politics for Socialism and those who espouse its tenants have been slandered viciously in the history of modern American politics as “Commies,” “Bolsheviks,” even as traitors. It therefore is very instructive to have a beacon of Democratic justice and compassion, such as the Dalai Lama, own Socialism as his political philosophy. I too share the Dalai Lama’s point of view. I have identified myself as a follower and practitioner of both Buddhist and Democratic Socialist principles for they are quite compatible. I agree with the Dalai Lama that it is a matter of religious principle to engage actively the political process in the confrontation and overcoming of economic and other forms of injustice. It is the “awakened” thing to do, for in the Buddhist context, to be awakened is to see the interconnectedness and interdependence of all people

Breast Cancer

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and all life and to realize that only the truth of unity leads to peace. Nature is a unity, a balance in which each takes only what they need, and so a harmonious balance is sustained. As a favorite bumper sticker of mine declares, “One People, One Planet, One Future” and the political philosophy that best shares this perspective is most certainly Democratic Socialism, and I see it as an awakened political philosophy that progresses the ideal of a harmonious, peaceful, sustainable human society. Conservatism, on the other hand, seeks to conserve a system that has shown itself to be based in aggressive nationalism, classism, prejudices, inequity and exploitation. Examining the term Democratic Socialism, Democratic means favoring political, economic and social equity and justice, with full participation of all citizens in the political life of the society, respecting individualism; while Socialism means governmental regulation of privately owned commerce toward a fair and equitable distribution of the wealth of a society. It is not communistic; rather, it establishes a range of distribution that allows for wealth but not poverty. It seems that Democratic and Socialism naturally go together, one representing political egalitarianism and the other economic egalitari-

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

The media are consumed with frightening medical issues – the most recent being breast cancer.

opt for aggressive therapies in relatively mild cases in which there is no proof that intervention improves outcomes or changes mortality rates.

Some articles are well-written and balanced. Some are more hype than substance. What is the current medical understanding on breast cancer – and what do we not yet know?

Fact #3: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – Stage 0, non-invasive and unlikely to metastasize – is the breast cancer causing the most controversy. Increased mammography use has discovered this low level breast cancer in much higher numbers than previously suspected. In 20-34 year olds, DCIS can mean a high likelihood of future trouble, necessitating genetic testing and probable further surgery. In older women, DCIS may mean that this cancer only needs active surveillance.

Fact #1: The mammograms and biopsies and various cancer therapies have saved lives in the past and continue to do so today. However, not every breast cancer patient needs every aggressive treatment. Some need only to be watched closely. Fact #2: Like most things in life, breast cancer is not just one disease with one treatment. Like all cancers, there are various stages of breast cancer – from not likely to grow or metastasize for decades (if ever) – to – likely to kill in the next twelve months. Unfortunately, only one word – cancer – describes them all. This leads to fear and confusion, causing the patient – and sometimes the medical professional – to

Fact #4: Except for patients who have known risk factors (genetic predisposition, family history, previous breast cancer), no one knows which category most patients with DCIS fall into – to actively watch or to aggressively intervene. The various cancer agencies and various cancer experts disagree on how to proceed – because the studies have not yet been done to

BY

BILL WALZ

anism. Capitalism, on the other hand, is a system that not only allows for, but favors wealth. It is organized so as to concentrate great wealth in the hands of a small segment of the society to the necessary consequence of significant poverty for others, and can be significantly oligarchical and anti-democratic. Capitalism, per se, meaning private ownership of commerce, as a strategy for engaging entrepreneurial energy and creativity is a good concept. Unfettered Capitalism, however, inevitably becomes a ravenous carnivore without limit on its appetites, necessitating victims of its appetites and is a very poor model upon which to organize a society. No such creature exists in Nature except humans when their society is organized around selfish ego rather than compassionate fairness. It is not an awakened philosophy and the Dali Lama sees it as contrary to religious principles, as does the current Pope. They urge us to follow compassionate unity rather than selfish separateness. If we look to Denmark, France, Germany, even to some extent, our neighbor Canada, all being governed by some expression of Democratic Socialism, we can see this blending of capitalist creativity and reward with compassionate fairness. There is a fundamental belief in human dignity and full participation and access to the fruits of society as a human right not as a prize for the most blessed and aggressive. “There is a need for financial reform along ethical lines that would produce in its turn an

economic reform to benefit everyone. This would nevertheless require a courageous change of attitude on the part of political leaders. “I would like to make an appeal to those in possession of greater resources, to public authorities and to all people of good will who are working for social justice: never tire of working for a more just world, marked by greater solidarity! No one can remain insensitive to the inequalities that persist in the world! “The culture of selfishness and individualism that often prevails in our society is not, I repeat, not what builds up and leads to a more habitable world: rather, it is the culture of solidarity that does so; the culture of solidarity means seeing others not as rivals or statistics, but brothers and sisters. And we are all brothers and sisters!”

~ Pope Francis

The people and the political leaders of the United States are faced with finding within themselves the courage, honesty and wisdom to change their beliefs and biases, as the Pope suggests, to create a society that is more equitable and conscious, that recognizes that the corporate capitalism that has become a sort of unquestioned religion of our society, has created exactly “The culture of selfishness and individualism… (that) is not, I repeat, not what builds up and leads to a more habitable world.” We are in need of a social evolution that is peaceful and democratic, for peace and democracy is what we seek, and only what Buddhism calls “right” means can achieve right ends, “right” meaning continued on page 36

say for sure which DCIS can be watched and which ones must be pursued. Breast cancer in women – especially DCIS – is in the same situation as prostate cancer in men: 1) we know that many small cancers will cause little or no problem in the future, 2) we know that past treatments have been too aggressive and sometimes harmful, but 3) we know that to do nothing will miss some whose lives could be saved. Do we stop testing? No, only the unnecessary ones. Do we stop treatments? No, not for those who need them. But who should be tested and who needs the treatments for DCIS? At this point in our medical knowledge, no one knows for sure. And everyone is being cautious. If you receive this diagnosis, talk to several qualified people. Know your personal risks. Consider your treatment options and their foreseeable consequences in concert with your personally-engaged health care professional. Consider lifestyle changes that can materially assist your treatment plan and affect your outcome. Even with invasive cancer, don’t to rush to judgment. Think it through, then act.

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 33


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what to do guide through December

Friday, December 4

Ceramic Art Exhibit

Asheville Chamber Music Series Benefit Concert

New show celebrating works by Mark Harmon, Ed Rivera, and other gallery members. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue in Asheville’s River Arts District. (828) 285-9700, www. Odysseyceramicarts.com.

December 4-6

Toe River Holiday Studio Tour

Biannual, free open studio tour in Mitchell and Yancey Counties. More than 110 artists, craftspeople, and galleries open their studios to visitors. Friday from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday from 10 to 5 p.m. Reception on Friday, December 4 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Spruce Pine TRAC Gallery, 269 Oak Avenue. Call (828) 682-7215 or visit www.toeriverarts.org.

through December 5

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike

Written by Christopher Durang, produced by Attic Salt Theatre Company. 7:30 p.m. at 35below, 35 East Walnut St., Downtown Asheville. Asheville Community Theatre. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Blue Ridge Books

Cellist Gary Hoffman and pianist Cecile Licad Cecile Licad will perform at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation, at the corner of Edwin Place and Charlotte Gary Hoffman Street in Asheville. $40. Nathan Shirley, (828) 575-7427, ashevillechambermusic.org.

Friday, December 4

Winter’s Tune

Music to Warm an Appalachian Night. A special evening of traditional mountain music at 7 p.m. in Broyhill Chapel on the campus of Mars Hill University. Rhiannon Ramsey. Advance tickets are Photo: Hannah Furgiuele $15. $18 at the door. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be provided. Contact Hannah Furgiuele for tickets at (828) 689-1571, or at hfurgiuele@mhu.edu.

Friday & Saturday, December 4 & 5

7th Annual WNC Fly Fishing Expo

Friday from 12 noon to 7 p.m. Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $15. Free for children 16 years of age and younger. Free admission Saturday with Friday ticket purchase. Details at www. wncflyfishingexpo.com.

Friday & Saturday, December 4 & 5

Echoview Christmas Bazaar

4th annual Christmas Bazaar. Friday from 2-6, Saturday from 10-4 p.m. About 30 local vendors. Echoview Fiber Mill, 76 Jupiter Road, Weaverville. 855-693-4237, www.echoviewnc.com

Saturday, December 5

Beautiful Bizarre

Reception from 7-9 p.m. Great gifts. Prices ranging from $5-$5,000. ZaPow! 21 Battery Park Ave., Downtown Asheville. www.zapow.com

Saturday, December 5

The Legend of La Befana

Red Herring Puppets’ present the perfect holiday show for the entire family at 10 a.m. Befana embodies the spirit of goodness and hope. Tickets: $5. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, December 5 at 3 p.m. Ann Woodford, When All God’s Children Get Together: A Celebration of the Lives and Music of African American People in Far Western North Carolina. Saturday, December 12 at 3 p.m. Carroll Jones will read from the new sequel to his historical novel, Master of the East Fork. Saturday, December 19 from 10 a.m. - noon, Banned Book Club Every Thursday – Smoky Mountain Chess Club, 1-4 p.m. Players of all levels are welcomed. Blue Ridge Books 152 S. Main Street, Waynesville (828) 456-6000 www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Saturday, December 5

A Handcrafted Christmas

Artisan crafts, food and wine at Addison Farms Vineyard. More than ten local vendors – jewelry, wreaths, art and chocolates. Complimentary wine tasting with every $10 donation at the door to Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy. 12-5 p.m. 4005 New Leicester Hwy. 581-WINE, www.addisonfarms.net

Saturday, December 5

Clogging & Dance Workshop

The Bailey Mountain Cloggers will offer a Clogging & Southern Appalachian Dance Workshop from 9 a.m. until 12 noon in the studios of McConnell Hall on the campus of Mars Hill University. $10 at the door. All levels of experience are welcome. Pre-registration is not required. (828) 689-1304.

Saturdays, December 5 through May 21, 2016

Family-Friendly Theater

Suitable for children ages 4 and up. $5 per person. 10 a.m. Produced by Attic Salt Theatre Company at Magnetic 375. 375 Depot Street, Asheville. Details: 347-678-9869; www.atticsalt.org.

Sunday, December 6

Brass Quintet Christmas Concert

Christmas music performed by the Pyramid Brass Quintet at 3 p.m. Christmas favorites arranged for brass quintet. Herb Wolf and Bill Shank on trumpets, Bryan Graeber on horn, Keith Poole on trombone, and Zach Taylor on tuba. A free-will offer-

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ing will be taken for the artists and the restoration fund for the historic church. St. Matthias Episcopal Church, 1 Dundee St., across from the Public Works Building on S. Charlotte and Max Streets.

Sunday, December 6

A Chamber Music Messiah

Baroque keyboard maestra Barbara Weiss leads a merry band of musicians in a rousing instrumental version of Handel’s favorite Christmas tradition. David Ginn, Kate Steinbeck, Proceeds Eric Wall, Rosalind Buda, and to benAlicia Chapman. efit Homeward Bound. 3 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, downtown Asheville. For tickets and more information, call (828) 254-7123, or visit www.panharmonia.org.

Sunday, December 6

Classical Piano Masterworks

Solo concert by Christopher Tavernier, pianist. 3 p.m. Biltmore United Methodist Church, 376 Hendersonville Road. Free. (828) 274-2379.

December 7 & 8

Wednesday, December 9

Appalachian Trail Hiker Happy Hour Hikers and enthusiasts. Door prizes and a raffle. 5 to 7 p.m. at Black Dome Mountain Sports, 140 Tunnel Road in Asheville. Free. Call the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, (828) 254-3708.

Friday, December 11

Steve Lippia performs Sinatra’s Classics

The Asheville Symphony presents a concert on the 100th anniversary of Sinatra’s birth with an emphasis on Christmas and holidaythemed works. 8 p.m. at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22-$74. Reduced student pricing. Tickets/Info: (828) 254-7046 or www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Saturday, December 12

Christmas with Santa

Bright Star Touring Theatre presents a 45-minute, hysterical Christmaswrapped comedy. Performance begins at 10 a.m. All tickets are $5. Asheville Community Theatre. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Saturday, December 12

Second Saturday

Visit Odyssey Co-op Gallery located in the River Arts District at 238 Clingman Avenue for food, music, and artists’ demonstrations. Open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. www.odysseyceramicarts.com

Thursday, December 17

Auditions for Seussical

6 -9 p.m. Open to all, no previous experience required. Directed by Mark Jones with musical direction by Sarah Fowler. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. (828) 254-1320. Details at www.ashevilletheatre.org/ get-involved/audition.

Tuesday, December 8

One Hike and Three Waterfalls

Hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein will lead the last Classic Hike of the season for Friends of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Visit Juney Whank, Indian Creek, and Toms Branch waterfalls. Breathtaking views. The hike is 5.5 miles in length with a total elevation gain of 600 feet and is moderately difficult. Deadline to register is December 6. Cost: $35, includes membership to Friends of the Smokies. Members hike for $10. To register, visit friendsofthesmokies.org/calendar.

RiverFront Bus Tour

Tour the French Broad and Swannanoa Rivers with RiverLink. 11:45 to 2 p.m. Learn some local history and visit surrounding neighborhoods. $20 per person; free for RiverLink members. Reservations required. (828) 252-8474, ext. 10, or www.riverlink.org.

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Velvet & Lace

Takes place on the first Thursday of each month for the next six months. Katey Ryder of Sovereign Remedies featured in January. Each event showcases craft cocktails made by female bartenders currently working in Asheville, with a focus on smoke, fire, herbs, elixirs, and tinctures. Mary Kelley, a.k.a. DJ Dr. Filth, will be spinning dark classics. Rose Hecht will bring photo booth fun. Food will be served alongside the delicious cocktails. 10% of sales will be donated to Our Voice. 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Buxton Hall Barbecue, 32 Banks Avenue, Asheville.

DECEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4


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what to do guide The Green Room

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

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John Mac Kah Studio Classes, Workshops, and Private Fine Art Instruction. Enroll now for 2016. Complete schedule at www.JohnMacKah.com.

Saturday, December 5 – Deb Bridges & The Grove

Drawing or Painting – Monday & Thursday, 9-4 p.m.

Saturday, December 12 – Norm Cole & Steve Whiteside

Children’s Art with Alisa – Tuesday & Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Thursday, December 31 – New Years Eve with Mark Lynch

Thursday Morning Demos – 10 a.m. to noon Studio Painting – Thursdays, 6-9 p.m.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Landscape on Location – Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 122 Riverside Dr., Studio H, Asheville (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

White Horse Black Mountain Saturday, December 5 – Rhoda Weaver Rattles the Rafters. Soul, gospel, R&B. $10 advance/$12 door. 8 p.m.

Altamont Theatre

Monday, December 7 – Two Keyboards, Four Hands. “Take Two Jazz” with Dr. Bill Bares and Brian Felix. Jazz. $12. 7:30 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain 105c Montreat Rd., Black Mountain (828) 669-0816 www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

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Live dinner music 5:30-7:30 p.m.

The Green Room Café & Coffeehouse 536 N. Main Street, Hendersonville 828 692-6335 www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

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LIVE MUSIC Friday, December 11 – Chuck Cannon. Doors at 7 p.m.; Show at 8 p.m.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Thursday, December 17 – Bradford Lee Folk and the Bluegrass Playboys . Doors at 7 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. Friday, December 18 – Willis Alan Ramsey. Doors at 7 p.m. Show at 8 p.m.

Friday & Saturday, January 8 & 9

Saturday, December 19 – Byrds of a Feather: A Tribute to Gene Clark & Gram Parsons. Doors at 7 p.m. Show at 8 p.m.

Steep Canyon Rangers

CD release concert for Radio. All-original bluegrass/Americana. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837, theorangepeel.net.

Pawsitive Pup Beginnings

Sunday, December 20 – Jon Stickley & Travis Book. Doors at 7 p.m. Show 8 p.m.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Six-week socialization course for puppies 6 to 16 weeks old. Specialized program focuses on building a relationship of trust, positive experiences and education to create a well-rounded dog. Cost: $120. Maple Tree Dog Camp, (828) 2469770, email campleader@mapletreevet.com

Classic Wineseller

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Learn Filmmaking

Affordable part-time and weekend classes in film production for all experience levels. Asheville School of Film, 45 S. French Broad Ave., Ste 120, Asheville. 1-844-AVL-FILM (285-3456), www. ashevilleschooloffilm.com.

Safe Step Walk-In Tub

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

310 Art Classes

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by the Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than 4 inch step-in. Wide door. Antislip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 800-886-8956 for $750 Off.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes

Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and children’s classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort, NC.

Altamont, 18 Church Street, Asheville www.thealtamont.com

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain?

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-408-9017.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 35


Find It Here

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Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org

Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

Hearn’s Bike Shop (828) 253-4800 www.facebook.com

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Ichiban (828) 252-7885 Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com

Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany

Lexington Glassworks www.LexingtonGlassworks.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burr Studio www.facebook.com/burrstudionc CA’s Cheesecakes www.cacheesecakes.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Maple Tree Vet Clinic www.mapletreevet.com McLain Pottery coldcove@gmail.com

Carolina Mountain Artists Guild www.facebook.com/CarolinaArtists

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com

Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300

Modesto Trattoria (828) 225-4133

Champa www.champanc.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

NC Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Faces of War, Anthony Guidone www.soldierslament.com French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Green Room Cafe www.thegreenroomcafe.biz Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

It Works! You need to know if your advertising is paying off. Learn all about branding. Discover how to position yourself to succeed. Call Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 or email rick@ rapidrivermagazine.com.

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

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‘Awakened Politics’ cont’d from pg. 33

compassionate and aligned with truth. I choose to use the word evolution rather than revolution deliberately because it is not a change of governmental system that we need, only an expanding of the consciousness of the democratic system we already have. Our problem is that the democracy of our American Revolution is struggling to evolve in the manner I believe the founders intended when they enshrined principles such as “We the people, in order to form a more perfect union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.” The conservative forces of this nation have always fought against the true realization of the promise of “we the people” free of conditions or exceptions. And sadly, they often do so hiding behind manifestations of religion quite antithetical to what the Pope and the Dalai Lama espouse. The struggle for full sharing of a more perfect union, justice, domestic tranquility the general welfare, and the blessings of liberty continues. Awakened politics is to engage in the peaceful struggle to realize this more perfect union, and I suggest that the American people look to the sort of Democratic Socialism that our friends in Western Europe have adopted and that one candidate in this American Presidential election has courageously espoused for the more than forty years of his public service. This is socialism that is no threat to individual expression, creativity or a comfortable style of life, it only expands the circle to whom these blessings are available. “Religious people must struggle to solve these problems… If we act when our inner motivation is hatred toward another person, then that hatred expressed as anger will lead to destructive action. This is negative action. Anger that is motivated by compassion or a desire to correct social injustice, and does not seek to harm the other person, is a good anger that is worth having… That anger is

MERRIMON AVE.

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

WNC OVERVIEW

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PATTON AVE. WA

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

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HENDERSONVILLE RD.

(828) 646-0071

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TUNNEL ROAD

t.e. siewert www.tesiewert.com

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WAYNESVILLE RUSS AVENUE

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Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

WAYNESVILLE

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Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

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Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

WAYNESVILLE

CLYDE

NORTH ASHEVILLE

Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com Zapow www.zapow.com

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The democratic elective process our forefathers bequeathed us gives us the opportunity to fulfill the promise of “we the people,” but only if we engage our democratic system through peaceful political action and free our election process and governmental institutions from special-interest domination. We must direct whatever energy of anger we feel towards social injustice into bringing about this social evolution. We can achieve this evolution, inspired by the non-violent principles of the Dalai Lama and the Pope, principles shared and lived by Martin Luther King – a man who understood fully his religious duty to engage social injustice with peaceful anger so as to bring about the fruits of “liberty and justice for all.” This is awakened politics. In this Christmas season and in the months and years to come, if we work energetically motivated by “Peace on Earth, Good Will to All,” we can create a human culture of solidarity that Pope Francis assures us “leads to a more habitable world ... seeing others not as rivals or statistics, but brothers and sisters. And we are all brothers and sisters!”

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Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Red House Studios and Gallery www.SVFALarts.org

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~ Dalai Lama

Seven Sisters Gallery www.sevensistersgallery.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

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directed toward the social injustice itself, along with the struggle to correct it, so the anger should be maintained until the goal is achieved. It is necessary in order to stop social injustice and wrong destructive actions.”

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

Stephanie Grimes www.artist-f.com

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

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Zest Jewelry www.zestjewelry.com

36 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

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GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

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fine art ‘AGA Moves’ cont’d from pg. 20

College Street, the prospect of a move seemed, at first, almost impossible. However, the strength of the co-op model and the determination of the membership prevailed. Each gallery member is considered a co-owner. They not only display work at the gallery but also help take care of all responsibilities and duties of running the business.

AGA reception on College Street.

A dedicated group of members spent innumerable hours looking for a new location and negotiating the fine points needed for the move. With full vote of the membership, the gallery signed the lease for the new space and hopes to be fully moved into their new home by January 1, 2016. Sandi Anton, current AGA president, says, “The success of our gallery lies in our members who not only have a passion for making great art but a commitment to marketing and selling to a discriminating public. We attribute the gallery’s longevity, unique to Asheville, to our proven business practices that encourage change and growth.” For more information about the gallery, call (828) 251-5796 or visit ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Nancy Hilliard Joyce, Fine Artist

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Nostalgic, mysterious and iconic figures riding bikes or holding umbrellas act as muses for most of Nancy Joyce’s paintings.

BY

gLENN SHAW

never paint again unless it was for the greater good of humanity or the broadThe rain isn’t threatening or uninviting but ening of education locally or across the rather alluring and symbolic. “My paintings globe. She now uses her art as a platwith rain and the images of the umbrella are form to create awareness or strengthen more than meets the eye,” Nancy says in a coy voices that may not be noticed. Most tone of voice. “It’s really about the nuances recently, she raised over $6000 for a of everyday life, the relationship between our not-for-profit called Lotus Pedals to id and ego.” She continues, “The umbrella provide all-terrain bicycles to young, symbolizes protection and the bike represents underprivileged girls in Cambodia. freedom.” Her year-long dedication to this cause She refers to her work as gestural impresculminated into a trip to Vietnam and sionism, a term she coined upon realization Cambodia where she was part of a dedithat her paintings didn’t necessarily fit into cation ceremony in the village where a classical style but rather walked a fine line the bicycles were given to young girls. within the confines of fauvism, impressionPrior to this, she painted 13 historical ism, abstraction and realism. “I’m obviously a and influential women and gave back contemporary artist but I wanted to define it to Girls on the Run of Asheville. Next Nancy Hilliard Joyce, mixed-media fine artist. further than with this broad term so I came to year, she is collaborating with a few a comfortable place with my gestural strokes other artists to bring awareness to the evoking an impressionistic feeling, hence Monarch depletion and the degradation of our ing things going on and I generally work a few ‘gestural impressionism’ was born”. land. The artists will be giving back to Monyears ahead of myself. I constantly challenge A few years ago, Nancy decided that she’d arch Watch and the interactive show will open myself, it’s invigorating and keeps my mind near Mother’s charged. I like to cultivate ideas, have them Day 2016 and marinate and then just send them off into the eventually migrate world to do their thing.” down the East Not surprisingly, Nancy continues to folcoast and into low the beat of her own drum – she is saying Florida. goodbye to the River Arts District on DecemNancy works ber 31. She’s taking these ideas into her home late hours in order studio. Stay tuned... to balance family Visit www.NancyJoyceGallery.com as well as a few new projects she’s got up her sleeve. Nancy Hilliard Joyce, mixed-media fine Although she’s artist, has works displayed in the OMNI not yet willing to Grove Park Inn, The Windsor Asheville, divulge her plans Désirant, The Asheville House in Black she does say, “I Mountain, and in ONE in Greenville, SC. The Departure Go Forth and Have No Fear have some excitby Nancy Hilliard Joyce

by Nancy Hilliard Joyce

‘t.e. siewert’ cont’d from pg. 20

surrounded by. Her newest series, entitled “treedom,” has been well-received and the artworks are at home in private collections across the country. To see more of siewert’s work, visit the Asheville Gallery of Art at 16 College Street in downtown Asheville, or the Mahogany House Art Gallery and Studios at 240 Depot St. in Waynesville where she works and teaches afternoons in her studio. Visit www.tesiewert.com to view more works, and for details regarding classes.

t.e. siewert encaustic landscapes Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street, Downtown Asheville www.tesiewert.com

‘Toys’ cont’d from pg. 20

and of course we have brighter and more durable colors now. Color is almost always what techniques were not child-like. first attracts me.” Children will no doubt enjoy Her informal art trainthe bright colors and depiction ing consisted of painting and of toys they love. However, her drawing courses at Old Lyme impressionistic painting style Art Academy in CT, Crealde pays attention to hard, soft and School of Art, and Valencia disappearing edges, light and Community College in FL, shadow to create volume, acand numerous workshops with complished drawing, and other her favorite artists. techniques of the experienced Pendergrass’ oil paintings and educated painter. This have been accepted into remakes for an unusual combinagional and national exhibitions tion of an a child’s love of toys Pink Bear by of the American Impressionand her 16 years of experience Virginia Pendergrass ist Society, Oil Painters of as an artist. America, Paint the Parks, and Pendergrass describes her art Women Painters of the Southeast, where she as “contemporary impressionism. I like broadhas won multiple awards of excellence. er brushstrokes than the early impressionists,

Recently, she began urban sketching (pen and ink drawings with watercolor) while traveling. She found the sketches so appealing that she has continued to catch street scenes at home in small towns in North Carolina. In addition to the Asheville Gallery, her work is on display at the Silver Fox Gallery in Hendersonville, and her French Broad Artists studio (with AGA partners Sandra Brugh Moore and Sahar Fakhoury) in the River Arts District. IF YOU Toys, works by Virginia Pendergrass, GO on display from December 1-30, 2015

at the Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, downtown Asheville. For more information, visit ashevillegallery-of-art.com or call (828) 251-5796

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 37


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sound experience Space Jesus Premiering new material from “Close Encounters.” Space Jesus, aka Jasha Tull, is a Brooklyn, NY based electronic music producer. Jasha’s firm roots in hip-hop are apparent in most of his productions. Heavy hip-hop influences with a distinct psychedelic flare and a focus on bass-line synthesis, commanding beats, and futuristic feels. Join Space Jesus’ extraterrestrial journey at www.spacejesusmusic.com

IF YOU GO: Space Jesus w/Esseks,

Saturday, December 12. Doors open at 9 p.m. Tickets: $7.77 advance; $13.04 day of show. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com.

New Year’s Eve Celebration with stephaniesid & Jon Stickley Trio

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Join seven-time “Best Pop/Rock” (Mountain Xpress) band winners stephaniesîd, and their cadre of stellar guest musicians. Their show is a celebration in the deepest sense... a journey... a battle stephaniesid with obstacles... a gut-wrenching soul plea... and ultimately, a groovy party for the world’s heart. stephaniesid will be joined by the Jon Stickley Trio, who’s been making waves with their new album Lost at Last. This will be a standing show with limited number of seats in the music hall; RSVP required. The dinner and show combo includes a four-course dinner, champagne toast and an evening of entertainment. General tickets (does not include dinner) are also available – doors open at 8:30 p.m. For those who reserve seats for dinner, the Isis New Year’s Eve menu includes Baked Oysters, Pork Belly, or Seared Sushi Tuna Ceviche, along with Lobster Bisque or Pickled Beet and Citrus Salad, as well as Pork Roulade, Filet Medallion, Sunburst Farms Trout, or Root Vegetable Poutine. The fourth course includes Champagne Mousse Verrines or Chocolate Tres Leches.

‘Muscle Shoals’ cont’d from page 29

JC: Talk a bit about The Muscle Shoals Music Revue. Do you have a set band you’re touring with or has it evolved over time? Given how in-demand they are as studio musicians, not to mention their own solo work, I assume the folks who were on the album aren’t tagging along. Although that would be nice! AB: This summer, we did 35 shows across the country with the same band, and no, it’s not the guys who played on the album, but a bunch of young guys recently out of music school. They brought a lot of great talent and energy to the project. The band for the Asheville show will include two of these fellas, Sam Smith on guitar and Mike Murray on keys, plus some new faces—Asheville’s own, Michael Rhodes on drums and Nashville bassist Chris Autry. pg. 21

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JC: So what can we expect at the show? AB: Great music, excellent band and vocals,

humor and lots of energy. It’s a great show. It leaves people dancing and with big smiles.

38 December 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 4

BY

ERIN SCHOLZE

Jon Stickley Trio

stephaniesid and the Jon Stickley Trio at Isis on Thursday, December 31 $15 Show Only – Doors open at 8:30 p.m. (does not include dinner). $55 Dinner Only – 6 p.m. seating (threecourse dinner). $75 Dinner and Show – 8 p.m. seating; (fourcourse dinner). IF YOU stephaniesid and Jon Stickley Trio at GO Isis on December 31. Dinner at 8 p.m.;

Jon Stickley Trio at 9 p.m.; stephaniesid at 10:30 p.m. Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in Asheville. For Dinner only, or Dinner + Show Tickets you must call Isis for reservations, (828) 575-2737. More details, full menu and ticketing info at www.isisasheville.com.

JC: So I’ll close by putting you on the spot. Is there any one album recorded at Muscle Shoals you’d want to be buried with? Out of all the great music recorded there, do you have a few favorites? AB: I’d have to say the songs on my iPhone are the ones I’d be buried with instead of the album. Ha! The Staples Singer’s “I’ll Take You There” is my number one, which interestingly I don’t do in the show, along with “Never Loved a Man” by Aretha, and “Tell Mama” by Etta James following right behind… Mmm mmm good. IF YOU The Muscle Shoals Music Revue, GO Wednesday, December 16. Doors open

at 7 p.m. for this all ages 8 p.m. show. Tickets are priced at $12 in advance and $15 day of. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www. thegreyeagle.com


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Plan a Great Family Bike Ride

Despite the whole range of electronic devices intended for our pleasure, it is hard to beat a good bike ride in the country.

BY

DENNIS RAY

be required, or perhaps because they can’t commit Many of us remember our first bike, to a team sport due the first time we learned to ride without to time pressures. training wheels, feeling as if we could go Most of us know anywhere. Freedom. how to cycle and once you have learned Bikes are just as much fun today for you don’t forget. All you need is a bike, a adults as they were when we were chilhalf an hour here or there when it suits, dren. Buying bikes for the entire family and a bit of confidence. is a wonderful way this winter to stay in Cycling is not an activity solely involvshape while strengthening ties with our ing the legs. It builds strength throughout children. the whole body. It also improves general You can ride a bicycle almost muscle tone with little risk of over exeranywhere, at any time of the year, and cise or strain. Regular cycling strengthens without spending a fortune. Many people leg muscles and is great for the mobilare put off doing certain sports because ity of hip and knee joints. Cycling also of the high level of skill that seems to builds stamina and is quite effective because people enjoy cycling and they don’t really notice that they have gone farther than the last time they went cycling. Cycling strengthens the heart and helps improve cardio-vascular fitness. Studies have shown it to increase cardiovascular fitness by 3-7%. Cycling raises heart rate to benefit stamina and fitness. A bike ride also helps clear the mind, relax the soul and lets you Hearn’s Bike Shop has a large selection find your inner peace. If you do not of new and used bikes.

like to ride with traffic or you live on unfriendly roads, Asheville offers a few bike tracks and even a bike park, Kolo Bike Park (fees) 1 Resort Dr. (828) 707-4876, or Carrier Park, Sports facilities and trails by the river (free) (828) 251-4024. Bikes also make great gifts! Hearn’s Bike Shop was established in 1896 by the Hearn’s family. Probably the oldest bike shop in the U.S., it is the oldest business is Asheville. Hearn’s Bike Shop carries a great selection of new and previously owned bikes (road, mountain, and hybrid). The staff is friendly, knowledgeable and helpful. They have all the gear and accessories you need.

Hearn’s Bike Shop 28 Asheland Ave., Asheville (828) 253-4800 Find us on Facebook.com

Geminid Meteor Shower Observations at PARI

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Astronomers at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) invite the public to join them for observing the Geminid meteor shower. “The Geminids are one of the more reliable meteor showers,” said PARI Astronomer Dr. Bob Hayward. “This year, the Geminids are calculated to reach a peak of about 120 meteors per hour around 1 p.m. December 14. Thus, the best times for observing should be overnight on December 13-14th and the 14-15th. Successful observing of the Geminids can start as early as 10 p.m. as the constellation of Gemini the twins rises higher in the sky. “Observers should choose a clear, dark location with a good horizon,” Hayward added. “The Outdoor Planetarium at PARI is an ideal dark-sky location with unobstructed views and comfortable seating, so we invite you to join us for what should be a spectacular evening. “PARI astronomers and volunteers will be available to answer questions

about the meteor shower and to join visitors with the expected Ooh’s and Ah’s as the meteors flash overhead.” Participants are cautioned to dress warmly and perhaps bring a warm nonalcoholic beverage with them. PARI telescopes will be available to gaze at other astronomical objects as well. The Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute is located in the Pisgah National Forest, 30 miles southwest of Asheville. The 200-acre campus is the former site

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of an historic NASA satellite tracking station. Today, PARI is a science education and research center. The site houses radio and optical telescopes, earth science instruments and the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive. Exhibit galleries display NASA Space Shuttle artifacts and collections of rare meteorites and minerals. PARI observing sessions cost $15 per person. Children 10 and under are admitted free. In the case of cloudy weather, a cancellation decision will be made by 3 p.m. and will be posted on the PARI website. Registered attendees will be informed of any cancellation by email or telephone. IF YOU View the Geminid Meteor GO Shower at PARI, Sunday,

Observe the Geminid meteor shower at PARI’s Outdoor Planetarium.

December 13 from 10 p.m. until midnight. Reservations are required and can be made by calling PARI at (828) 8625554 or visiting www.pari.edu.

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pA

Vol. 19, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2015 39


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December 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
December 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Fine Art by Nancy Hilliard Joyce..p3. Inside: The Classic Wineseller..p30; Seasonal Theatre..p4; Holiday Shopping..pgs 18-19.

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