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Magnetic Theatre’s Raunchy Comedy, The Bernstein Christmas Spectacular! PAGE 4 Gifts for Everyone on Your List! SEE PAGE 5

Town Hardware & General Store PAGE 19

Susan Marie Designs PAGE

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Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale PAGE 20

The Chocolate Fetish

12 Years a Slave • About Time • Dallas Buyers Club • Great Expectations • Thor 2

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performance THE ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY PRESENTS

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A Classical Christmas

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra presents an Asheville symphonic Christmas tradition with the most beautiful music of the season. Music Director Daniel Meyer will present a portion of Handel’s beloved Messiah alongside orchestral arrangements of seasonal carols. With the voices of the Asheville Symphony Chorus, directed by Michael Lancaster and a cast of superb vocal soloists, this is a concert designed for those who cherish a classical Christmas. The first half of the concert will be comprised of the “Christmas portions” of Handel’s Messiah including the stirring Hallelujah chorus. After intermission, the orchestra, chorus and soloists will return to the stage to perform pieces such as Joy to the World, Silent Night, plus other joyous works of the season, and debut a new work commissioned by the Asheville Symphony Orchestra Dan Kempson, and Chorus in honor baritone

Abigail Fischer, mezzo soprano

Amanda Hall, soprano

of Steven Hageman, past Asheville Symphony executive director. The soloists for this performance are Amanda Hall, soprano, Abigail Fischer, mezzo soprano and Dan Kempson, baritone. IF YOU A Classical Christmas, Sunday GO Matinee, December 15 at 3 p.m., in

the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Tickets are available through the Asheville Symphony or the US Cellular Center ticket office, and range in price from $20 to $58 (with students prices ranging from $10 to $40). Call (828) 254-7046 for more details or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.

The Little Match Girl Passion

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DIRECTED AND CONDUCTED BY MICHAEL BOUSTEAD

This musical event will be thought-provoking, stirring, joyful and inspirational.

affecting piece of great beauty and purity. It is 35 minutes in length and is scored for four voices and percussion. It was composed by David Lang, a New York-based composer who won the Pulitzer Prize for music for the piece in 2008. The Modern American Music Project is committing 20% of all ticket sales to MANNA FoodBank. Join us for a memorable Christmas event. Plan on attending one of the performances, held December 5-8, at NC Stage in downtown Asheville. Tickets are selling fast so reserve your seats today by visiting www.tmamp.org.

Act 1: Hans Christian Andersen’s little match girl wanders shoeless and sick through the snow on New Year’s Eve trying to sell matches. Come hear this beautifully minimal setting of a haunting winter’s tale. Act 2: Pianist David Troy Francis will join the singers in a sensational, raise-the-roof program of festive and entertaining The extraordinary 7 year-old songs of the season. Cyra Ottinger also appears in the original video that The Little Match Girl accompanies the music. Passion features local 7 year-old Cyra Ottinger. Our outstanding soloists include: Jackie Collison, Soprano; IF Nana Hosmer, Alto; Andrew Jason Hiler, YOU The Little Match Girl Passion, Tenor; Jonathan Ross, Bass; and Morgen GO December 5-8 at NC Stage. Cobb, Percussion. An original video created December 5, 6 & 7 at 7:30 p.m. by Shane Meador will accompany the music. Matinees held December 7 & 8 at 2:30 Michael Boustead will direct and conduct. p.m. $25 per ticket. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane, The Little Match Girl Passion is a deeply Asheville. Visit www.tmamp.org

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30th anniversary with days of christmas

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WE ContinuE the celebrati0n of our

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November 21 - December 24 each day a surprise offer, gift or treat

Look for each day’s “special� on Facebook and on our website

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FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

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performance 31st Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular

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The Bernstein’s are coming! The Bernstein’s are coming!

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CHALL GRAY

installment of their most well-known and popular show, featuring the ever-theatrical and ever-misbehaving Bernstein clan.

No, it’s not a war threat from the Middle East, it’s the return of “the Christmas show to see in Asheville!� (Tony Kiss, LIMITED RUN! Asheville Scene) Starring Due to the limited Tracey Johnston-Crum, run of five performancvoted WNC’s Best Actress es, advance ticket sales in the Mountain Xpress’ are very strongly recAnnual Best of WNC Poll! ommended. Last year The crazed and more than 200 people lovable Bernstein family were turned away from are back, just as drunken, the show! And, as usual, dysfunctional and specthe Bernstein’s are not tacular as ever — and for Magnetic Theatre’s raunchy Bernstein even remotely suitable the first time ever they will Christmas Spectacular at ACT for one for children. be performing on the main weekend only! Photo: Tempus Fugit Design The 31st Anstage at Asheville Comnual Bernstein Family munity Theatre! “...we... Christmas Spectacular is directed by Katie Anne are...so...so...oh....oh...ah...oh my god!� Judy Towner. Scenic Design by Kehren Barbour. Bernstein said via telephone while entertaining Sound Design by Mary Zogzas. Choreography a male fan. by Elizabeth Evans. Starring Tracey Johnston“We’re certainly excited to have the Crum, Darren Marshall, Glenn Reed, Erik Bernstein’s back again, and to be at ACT,� Moellering, and Trinity Smith. Written by producer Chall Gray said. “We know that Katie Katie Anne Towner, Mondy Carter, Genevieve Anne Towner (returning as director) has put Packer, Peter Lundblad, Rodney Smith and together a fabulous show of sketches, songs Steven Samuels. Produced by Chall Gray. and surprises, and in fact, Baby Jesus told me personally that this year he will make a surprise appearance just for Asheville audiences that they will never forget!� IF The Magnetic Theatre, fresh off a hit run YOU The 31st Annual Bernstein GO Family Christmas Spectacular, at of their production of Landscape With MissAsheville Community Theatre in ing Person at the 2013 New York Internadowntown Asheville, December 12tional Fringe Festival, has been widely lauded 14. Showtimes 7:30 p.m. nightly; 10 p.m. as one of the most innovative and exciting late shows Friday and Saturday. For more theatre companies in the South. The Asheville information or to purchase tickets, visit www. based company focuses on producing original themagnetictheatre.org. work, and this production marks another

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I HAVE TO REDEEM OLD SCROOGE?

“Scrooge? I have to redeem old Scrooge? The one man I knew who was worse than I was? Impossible!� So begins the journey of Jacob Marley’s heroic efforts to save old o ld Scrooge’s soul—and in the process, save his own. Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol plays at NC Stage from December 11 through the 29. Under the direction of Andrew Hampton Livingston and starring Michael MacCauley, this one man, tour-deforce performance is not to be missed. Aided by Bogle, a mischievous little sprite with an agenda of his own, their hilarious journey takes them from the depths of the underworld to the stars above! This irreverent, funny, and ultimately, deeply moving story retells Dickens’ classic with warmth and infectious zest.

IF YOU GO: Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol, December 11-29. WedPG. 36

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Sat at 7:30 p.m.; Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $16-$28. Call (828) 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.


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we love this place Cool Craft Holiday Market

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Four

DECEMBER 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Stephanie Bauman, H. Tyrone Brandyburg, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Heart Rose Corwin, Amy Downs, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Rob Levin, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, Lindsey Mudge, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Chris Stack, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, December 2013, Vol. 17 No. 4

3 Performance

Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . Asheville Choral Society. . . . . . . . . . NC Stage – Jacob Marley . . . . . . . . . Magnetic Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6 Music

Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Deep Dark Woods. . . . . . . . . . 13 Dar Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

7 Columns

Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 7 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 24 Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . 25 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 26 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. 28 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 28 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

8 Local Shops

Magnetic Theatre’s raunchy comedy, “The Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular.” Photo: Tempus Fugit Design PAGE 4

The Santaland Diaries Asheville’s favorite holiday tradition returns December 1922! David Sedaris’ hilarious comedy comments on the best and worst of people from a retail employee’s point of view. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

Earth Guild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Blue Ribbon Custom Frame Shop . 8 Susan Marie Designs. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Chocolate Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Town Hardware & General Store . 19 Chifferobe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Fresh Produce Clothing . . . . . . . . . 21 Just Ducky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Moe’s Original Bar B Que . . . . . . . 22 Susan’s European Gifts . . . . . . . . . . 23 Angry Giant Forge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Massie Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Sunburst Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

10 Fine Art

Great Gifts! Earth Guild

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Artetude Gallery

The Chocolate Fetish Town Hardware & General Store Chifferobe

Southern Highland Craft Guild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE 20 Biltmore Village Dickens Festival

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Fresh Produce Clothing Just Ducky

Moe’s Original Bar B Que . . . . PAGE 22

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Artetude Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Southern Highland Craft Guild. . . Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julia Fosson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

On the Cover:

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A one-stop shop for purchasing locally made items for the holidays. Gift givers can purchase quality handmade goods, and support our local economy. The Market takes place Friday, Saturday and Sunday, December 13-15. Friday, 5-8; Saturday 10-6; and Sunday 10-4 at HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave., Ste. 101, Asheville. Entrance on Hilliard between Church Street and Lexington Avenue. For more details visit www.handmadeinamerica.org

Downtown Asheville . . . . . . PGS 9-12 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 18-19 Biltmore Village . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 21 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . PGS 22-23 River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 30-31 Weaverville + Northside . . . . PG 37 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 38-39

Susan’s European Gifts

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Angry Giant Forge Points of Light

Massie Furniture

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Sunburst Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE 38

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social!

10 20 31 31

14 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 14

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 5


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captivating performances De-Stress During the Holidays at the Classic Wineseller

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James Hammel kicks off Classic Wineseller’s December line up – Sheila Gordon and the Downtowners wrap up with New Year’s Eve Show. On Friday, December 6 at 7 p.m., James Hammel will kick off December’s live music performances at the Classic Wineseller. Hammel blends his own, often autobiographical originals, with fresh arrangements of jazz standards and some twists on adult pop tunes. Piano man Joe Cruz will play and sing the best of the Beatles and Elton John on Saturday, December 7 at 7 p.m. The evening includes “A Night Before Christmas” singalong. On Friday, December 13, the Classic Wineseller will host its first Jingle Bell Bash, featuring Gypsy Bandwagon. Husband and wife band members Lance and Carrisa Moore, and James and Karin Lyle will perform Celtic, Gypsy, Western, Pop, along with Christmas and holiday favorites on fiddle, vocals, guitar, and drums. Gypsy Bandwagon’s music is delivered with an infectious sense of playful fun. The Wineseller’s restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays serving freshly prepared small plate fare. There is a $10 per person minimum on live music nights which includes food, drink, and retail purchases. Reservations are accepted between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. by calling (828) 452-6000.

BY

KAY S. MILLER

Downtowners on congas, piano, and drums.

Also in December Saturday, December 14, 21, & 28 – Joe Cruz piano, vocals; pop, Beatles, and Elton John.

Sheila Gordon, Dec. 31

Friday, December 27 – Jay Brown guitar, harmonica, vocals; folk, blues, Americana Roots

James Hammel, Dec. 6

Celebrate New Year’s Eve on Tuesday, December 31 with dinner and a show beginning at 7 p.m. Sheila Gordon and the Downtowners will perform pop and jazz standards. The price for dinner and the show is $49.99 per person. Call (828) 452-6000 for reservations. Ms. Gordon’s beautiful voice moves effortlessly between blues, jazz, gospel, and popular music. She’ll be accompanied by the

A Celebration of Love

A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

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Music Director Dr. Melodie Galloway and the Asheville Choral Society will host a holiday concert benefit for Habitat for Humanity.

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM

This is a “come home for the holidays” concert, with an emphasis on having a home to come to, through a partnership with the Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity. “These pieces are very uplifting, and they are about different holiday traditions,” says Dr. Galloway. “The overarching themes of this concert are coming together in community, and the spirit of the holiday season. The music I’ve chosen celebrates family as well as the change of the seasons.” The program for “A Celebration of Love” includes a new take on some traditional pieces, as well as the unique Stella Natalis by composer Karl Jenkins. “Jenkins is very unconventional in that if he wants a certain effect, he treats the singers as he would the orchestra,”

6 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

Friday, December 20 – Jess Cook guitar; Betina Morgan, harp, vocals; pop, show tunes, holiday and Christmas music.

BY

HEART ROSE CORWIN

Dr. Galloway said. “Sometimes he has the chorus singing nonsense syllables just to create an effect.” The Asheville Choral Society will be joined by the Celebration Singers youth choir of Asheville for this piece. There is no admission for “A Celebration of Love.” All freewill donations will go directly to the Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity.

IF YOU A Celebration of Love,” Friday, GO December 6 at 7:30 p.m. at First

Baptist Church, downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 2322060 or visit www.ashevillechoralsociety.org.

The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premier retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue presents local, regional, or national talent each Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m. Jay Brown, Dec. 27

IF YOU The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church GO Street in Waynesville. For more

details call (828) 452-6000 or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

AmiciMusic presents

Four-Hand Fantasy AmiciMusic, Asheville’s world-class chamber music organization, begins its winter season with three exciting performances of four-hand piano music featuring Daniel Weiser and Philip Liston-Kraft playing together on a single piano. On Saturday, December 7 at 7:30 p.m., they will perform at the White Horse in Black Mountain. $15; call (828) 6690816, or visit www. whitehorseblackmountain. com. They will perform a free abridged version of the program on Saturday, December 7 at 2 p.m. at Pack Library, downtown. Open to all; children are welcome and encouraged to come.

IF YOU GO: For more information please call Daniel at (802) 369-0856, or visit www.amicimusic.org.


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fine art Commitment MORE MUSINGS ON PURSUING CREATIVE PASSIONS

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In thinking about my annual resolutions column, I find myself pondering the concept of “commitment”.

BY

GREG VINEYARD

best in the mornings, and I sit at my father’s desk, which he and his father built together in 1949. I draw every day, but it also helps me to arrange two to threehour blocks of time for more complex projects.

For example, I’ve recently re-committed to watching the entire “Farscape” sci-fi series again (because I’m appar2) Set realistic goals for ently going for a Boy Scout ventures. If you typi“Geek” badge). But serically write encapsulated ously, the more I interact stories of 2500 words with specialists and creative or less, work on honing types in WNC who toil so your short story craft. If diligently at their respective you want to write novcrafts and businesses, I’m els, seek advice on how Commit!, Pen and ink, 2013, inspired by their continuto do that, and keep by Greg Vineyard ous dedication! writing every day. As a multi-disciplinary 3) Enter shows and professional myself, I have Commitment requires competitions. There’s come to realize how so nothing like an actual many of us work so hard in escalating levels of deadline to keep one so many areas in addition to diligence, and an on schedule! When I all our other daily endeavhave to finish twenty expenditure of energy, ors. Commitment requires drawings on a particular escalating levels of dilitime and money. theme, knowing I will gence, and an expenditure also be facing photogof energy, time and money raphy, framing, advance PR and more, my — understandable sacrifices when we’re doing organizational level increases quite a bit. what we love. I’m suggesting here that commitment is 4) Sign up with a community of your peers. about passion. Nearly everyone is awesomely Joining a gallery, and sharing within critique zealous about at least one thing. Our range of groups help us learn and grow. It also helps to fascinations are as limitless as there are folks on have professional friends who are committed the planet. I have mentioned in the past how to mutual accountability. if one wants to be a rocket scientist, there’s no 5) And here’s an atypical tactic: Adopt a pet. I time like the present to start taking classes. The guarantee you will spend more time at home. same goes for any matter we’re excited about. For me, this has increased my creative time. Don’t wait for January 1 — start today! But with more meowing and toy mousie-chasPassion isn’t necessarily raucous. It can be ing in the background. as effortless and smooth as those almost unnoticed moments, like when I realize how nice It’s almost time to embrace January. Some it is to sit in a sunbeam with my cat and a good address their intentions every day, but generbook. It can also be deservedly-wrought, like ally, we are once again cresting that universal when I draw the right line or shape or color, or moment when a majority purposefully think when I find a way to use an unusual word in about what the next year might bring, wholemy writing (i.e. “raucous”!). heartedly jotting down goals and plans. These little happenings can be quite I cheerfully challenge you to add to your satisfying. Many find great delight not only in list the over-the-top dreams you truly, truly successfully navigating one’s own projects, but desire, and then go ahead and see how comalso in assisting others with theirs. We are a mitting to even just one or two of them plays community of wondrous helpers. out during your 2014. Happy New Year! One of the grandest ways one can arrive at these fine mental and physical spaces in our lives is to COMMIT. Think about committing Greg Vineyard is an to a plan. Walk in the woods. Take pictures. artist, writer and creative Scrub the floors. Whatever it takes to get you consultant in Asheville, to that compelling moment, where you then NC. ZaPOW Gallery in jump in without hesitation. downtown Asheville, Some additional thoughts about how to (www.zapow.com), carries get there: his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. 1) Schedule regular days, times, places and www.gregvineyardillustration.com. routines. Perhaps rise an hour earlier. I write

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 7


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holiday shopping Try Something New at Earth Guild

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Earth Guild opened its doors in 1970, with the mission of making the tools and materials of craft professionals available to everybody. Forty-three years later, we’re still at it. Fiber-centered, with yarns and fibers and dyes and looms and spinning wheels and knitting needles, our range is uniquely wide. We carry supplies and equipment for basket-making, leatherwork, bookbinding, felting, screen-printing, woodcarving, pottery, stone-carving. Oh, and candle-making, fabric paints, polymer clays, crochet, netting, kumihimo, papermaking and natural dying. Many of our customers are fulltime craft professionals, many are skilled amateurs, but the original idea still rules: we’re here for everybody, beginners most of all. It’s exciting to try something new, and it’s exciting to help. Our classes and free instruction

into something entirely new. You can leave the details up to them, with an Earth Guild Gift Certificate. Handmade gifts always leverage your money with sheets and your time and skill. And knowledgethey can be a blessing for the able staff budget-conscious: candles, have helped bracelets, tie-dyed shirts, thousands of sheets of fancy paper, little people get baskets, felted figures, handstarted, and printed cards. You can turn a we have the few dollars of supplies into a best selection dozen gifts. of craft books Seize the opportunity anywhere in this year, if you have kids, to the region. We carry the tools, materials, and This books to feed your favorite activity. set them up with something off-screen, something that’s time of year, real, that engages them in several levels when people are thinking about gifts of learning, but that is also fun and and excited about the idea of buying productive. There’s a recipe for happy local, Earth Guild can help. There’s no holidays. Make it so. richer gift than something you’ve made yourself, invested with your own energy and love. And there’s nothing more local Earth Guild than your own hands. If you know people who like to 33 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville make things, that works, too. Get them (828) 255-7818 tools or materials or books to feed their www.earthguild.com favorite activity, or encourage them

INTERVIEW WITH MELISSA MAURER, OWNER OF HENDERSONVILLE’S

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Blue Ribbon Custom Frame Shop

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Blue Ribbon Custom Frame Shop.

Melissa Maurer: My husband,

Bruce, and I opened our doors in May 1986 on Main Street Hendersonville. I have been framing since 1975 and Bruce since 1983. Over the years we have relocated our shop twice, and we are now located on the “Busy Bend” of Kanuga Road. We have been blessed with many loyal longtime customers who have helped us through the recent tough economic times. Our work is always interesting as every project is unique. Our motto is “Service, Quality, Selection,” and we strive to offer the best in all these areas.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

RRM: What are some of your Holiday specials? MM: December is definitely one

of the busiest months in our shop. We try to carry a variety of frames and supplies so that we can offer swift service as needed. Typically we do not run any sales over the holidays, but we always offer a variety of services and price points for any project. We always do everything we can to get everyone’s projects complete on time and at a We carry a variety of frames so that we can offer swift service. good price. No framing project is ever too small or too large. It is important They volunteer with multiple nonfor our customers to remember that the profit organizations providing everything widest selections are available when you from grunt work to board membership. RRM: Can you share your thoughts on give us a week or two to complete your Their families are critical to our past, why we should “Shop and Buy Local” project, but we will always do all we can present, and future. Without our small this holiday season? to meet the price and completion goals. business people our community would MM: Having grown up in HendersonYou name it — we frame it! look and feel very different. ville, I have known many long time We, for instance, have impacted small business owners. These folks our community in many ways for years. Blue Ribbon have helped to make our hometown the From PTO to scouting, from coaching Custom Frame Shop wonderful place it is. Besides tending sports to supporting dance, from chamtheir businesses, these folks often “tend” 414 Kanuga Rd. #A, ber to school board — we have contribto our community as well. They are the Hendersonville, NC uted to our town’s success. first to step up and help those in need. (828) 693-7967

8 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3


® Enjoy and Give the Best ™

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina 12 Consecutive Years!

Bill and Sue, owners of The Chocolate Fetish

Visit our European style shop where you’ll find fine chocolates, gifts, and chocolate art. Discriminating chocolate lovers have been enjoying awardwinning, handcrafted chocolates from The Chocolate Fetish since 1986. This holiday season place your order online for speedy in-store pick-up or nationwide shipping. www.chocolatefetish.com

®

© Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

36 Haywood Street, Downtown Asheville • (828) 258-2353 PG. 11

Monday-Thursday 11-6 p.m. • Friday and Saturday 11-9 p.m. • Sunday 12-6 p.m.

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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Susan Marie Designs

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Local goldsmith and designer Susan Marie Phipps creates elegant and affordable one-ofa-kind jewelry of exceptional quality at Susan Marie Designs, her gallery and studio in Downtown Asheville.

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“Though I love to work with all varieties of colored gemstones, my favorites include diamonds, all colors of sapBlack Opal phires, tourmalines and garnets, and Tahitian black pearls, which come in many natural fancy colors,” she reveals. Customer service is the most important aspect of running her business. Susan takes time with clients in order to figure out their style and translating that into Aquamarine custom designs. “For me designing jewelry is never about the one time sale. It’s about developing long term relationships with people and creating jewelry they will love and enjoy wearing for many years.” Susan Marie Phipps is a DeBeers and AGTA Spectrum Award-Winning Designer/Goldsmith

With visionary talent and skills acquired in over thirty years working as a professional goldsmith, Susan transforms nature’s most precious materials into wearable items of stunning beauty, to be treasured for a lifetime. As a G.I.A. Graduate Gemologist, Susan carefully selects the most vibrantly colored, highest clarity and well-cut stones available for use in her work. For many years Susan has been purchasing stones from independent stone cutters in the U.S., many are Cutting Edge award winners and have Sapphire created innovative faceting patterns. “Whenever I find a stone I like I design Susan Marie Designs for it. The stone drives the design, leading 4 Biltmore Avenue, Downtown Asheville me to do something that complements it,” states Susan. Glancing around her shop, one (828) 277-1272 is met by a dazzling array of exotic stones www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com from around the world.

Artful Giving at Artetude Gallery

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With the holiday season upon us, Artetude Gallery invites new and established art lovers to the gallery. Find extraordinary gifts that will be treasured for a lifetime for someone special while enjoying holiday treats during your visit. In addition to selections from a wide range of artists, the exhibition “Circles and Cycles: Year 13” will continue during the holiday season, showing a dynamic new body of work by nationally renowned Asheville based artist Kenn Kotara. Artetude will offer holiday nibbles and cider on weekends through December 22 to sustain you while shopping. The gallery is open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sundays noon until 4 p.m.

Artetude Gallery, Inc A

10 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

Circles and Cycles: Year 13, Kenn Kotara

89 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com


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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

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MacBook Pro with Retina display More power behind every pixel.

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

INTERVIEW WITH ELIZABETH FOLEY CO-OWNER OF ASHEVILLE’S

With fourth-generation Intel Core processors, the latest graphics, and faster flash storage, the incredibly advanced MacBook Pro® with Retina® display moves even further ahead in performance and battery life.* *Compared with the previous generation. Apple, the Apple logo, Macbook Pro and Retina are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

828.225.6600 252 Charlotte Street, Asheville

charlottestreetcomputers.com

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The Chocolate Fetish

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about The Chocolate Fetish.

Elizabeth Foley: The Chocolate

Fetish has been Asheville’s premier Fetish chocolate shop since 1986. We handcraft our high quality chocolates in small batches right here in downtown Asheville. We are a locally owned, family run business. Our chocolates have won awards nationwide including recently being named as one of the

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

country’s best chocolatiers by the International Chocolate Salon and Taste TV.

RRM: Why do you think it’s im-

portant to shop and buy local this holiday season?

The Signature Holiday Collection features an assortment of Truffles, Sea Salt Caramels, and New England style Buttercrunch, freshly packed in a collectible vintage-style tin. Photo: acmephotography.com

EF: Shopping local is important to

help strengthen our local economy. According to UnitedWeStand.org

when you spend $100 at a locally owned businesses an average of $68 per $100 stays in the local economy versus only $43 per $100 when spent at a national chain. One example of how shopping local keeps money in our local economy is our partnership with Helpmate, a local organization that provides support to victims of domestic violence. All year long we sell a special Helpmate Assortment the proceeds from which are donated to Helpmate. This October, which was domestic violence awareness month, we created a special promotion with Helpmate which resulted in us donating more than $500 to the organization. When local businesses thrive we are able to reinvest in our community. Another benefit of shopping local is that local businesses are often able to give you more specialized service. For example when you place an order on our website and fill out a gift message we will actually hand write the message on a gift tag, rather than the standard printed packing slip message that big box stores will give you.

RRM: What are some of your holiday specials?

EF: We have a variety of special assortments for the holidays, handmade chocolate Santas, and delicious stocking stuffers. I’m really excited about our newest seasonal flavor our EnticeMint Ecstasy Elite Truffle©. Our EnticeMint Truffle is a dark chocolate ganache infused with fresh mint and dipped in an extra dark chocolate shell. Order online for easy in-store pick up or nationwide shipping, www.chocolatefetish.com

The Chocolate Fetish PG. 36

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36 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com www.facebook.com/chocolatefetish


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sound experience

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The Deep Dark Woods

The Canadian based unconventional folk band Deep Dark Woods seem to carry an aura of density about them, as mysterious as the Saskatoon woods for which they are named.

Like the environs from which they came, the music they create is one of extremes, drawing from disparate influences while coalescing into a sound that is distinctly theirs. Formed in 2005, the band is comprised of singer and guitarist Ryan Boldt, bassist Chris Mason, organist and pianist Geoff Hilhorst, guitarist Clayton Linthicum, and drummer Lucas Goetz. Guitarist Burke Barlow, a founding member of the group, no longer tours with them but continues to contribute songs and ideas to their studio The Canadian based folk band, Deep Dark Woods, recordings. perform Friday, December 6 at Isis Music Hall. Signed to Sugar Hill Records in the U.S. the band has released five albums: their self-titled 2006 debut, this year’s magisterial Jubilee, which was 2007’s Hang Me, Oh Hang Me; Winter Hours enthusiastically reviewed in our October issue. (2009); The Place I Left Behind (2011); and Certainly, comparisons to fellow Canucks,

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BY JAMES

CASSARA

The Band, are reasonable, but the Deep Dark Woods lean less towards historical observation and more towards the dynamics of relationships and the struggles faced every day. Opening for the group is the Asheville based band, Raising Caine, whose recently released debut reflects a high degree of musicianship spirited by an eclectic blend of folk, jazz, funk, and reggae. It’s all distilled through what is broadly referred to as country music, which makes them an ideal fit to share a stage with the Deep Dark Woods. As their web site so correctly states, the band is “cultivating their own take on country music by delivering a heartfelt message of hard work, family and having a good time. Y’all enjoy!” IF YOU The Deep Dark Woods w/ Raising GO Caine, Friday, December 6, at 9 p.m.

Tickets for this limited seating show are $8 in advance and $10 day of show. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

WNC Jazz Profiles: Byron Hedgepeth

~ Bassist Bruce Lang

Byron pursues a full career as performer, recording artist, composer and educator. He was the founder and director of Percussion Studies at UNC Asheville for 24 years. He currently teaches percussion and Afro-Cuban Ensemble at Appalachian State University, where he assists Professor Rob Falvo. Byron has been teaching percussion in the Asheville area now for over 40 years. Principal timpanist with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra for 15 years, Byron still performs on timpani and percussion with the Charlotte and NC Symphonies, and is principal timpanist with the Brevard Philharmonic Orchestra. He has been active as a timpanist/ percussionist with Asheville’s All Souls Cathedral since his first performance of “Amahl and the Night Visitors” in 1975. “Performing and touring in Europe and Asia has been very enriching for me. Two that stand out are the World Percussion Festival concert tour in Taiwan with drum set artist Chris Wabich, and Light In The Corner concert tour of Belgium and France with flute artist Kate Steinbeck. Performing at the National Theatre in Taiwan and the U. S. Ambassador’s residence in Brussels, Belgium were also some of my best music experiences abroad.” Notable collaborations include jazz-fu-

Rhiannon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops gave a show-stopping performance during the Another Day, Another Time concert, which will be broadcast on Showtime beginning December 13. The Grammy Award– winning The Carolina Chocolate Drops band will perform live December 7 & 8. Their Grammy-nominated CD, Leaving Eden, was released in 2012.

IF YOU GO: Carolina Chocolate Drops

bid farewell to founding member Dom Flemons, who is starting a solo career. December 7 & 8 at The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. Call (828) 398-1837, (828) 225-5851, or visit www.theorangepeel.net.

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“I’ve played music with Byron for over 30 years in a variety of bands. He possesses amazing skills on drums, vibraphone, tympani, and every other percussion instrument, is one of the most versatile musicians I’ve ever played with, and is extremely knowledgeable in all styles of music. I can always count on him to show up on time and give his best — a true professional in every sense!” ~ Saxophonist Stuart Reinhardt

Within any artistic community there are always those who have been part of its creative fabric long enough that they deserve special recognition, not just for their talent, but also for the lasting imprint they’ve made on the scene. In WNC, Byron Hedgepeth is on that list, having paid his dues in jazz, classical, rock, contemporary and world music. Born and raised in Raleigh and later moving to Charlotte, Byron’s passion for drumming began while studying piano and violin as a child, with the strong musical influence of parents Sara Jo and Elbert. “They enjoyed music associated with Big Band, rock, folk and jazz, plus my mom plays piano and they’re very good dancers, especially jitterbug.” Byron studied drum set and percussion with Joy Gentile at Mars Hill College while completing a Bachelor of Music. He continued his studies with music educator Charles Leonhard and percussionist Tom Siwe at the University of Illinois, where he earned a Master’s Degree. “A truly “melodic” drummer, I’m always amazed at the variety of sounds Byron can coax out of his instrument.”

Carolina Chocolate Drops

sion group InsideOut, Jack Coker Trio, Kate Steinbeck, Con Clave, Pavel Wlosok Trio, bassist Mike Holstein, David Holt and the Lightning Bolts, and The B’s — a trio of Bill Covington, Bruce Lang and Byron that plays regularly at the Grove Park Inn. Byron Hedgepeth Photo: Frank Zipperer “I’ve had the pleasure of working with my buddy Bryon Hedgepeth for several years. He’s one of the only guys I know who can play a great jazz, pop or country groove on drums, do some soulful originals on vibes, and then go play tympani with the NC Symphony.”

~ Pianist Bill Covington

Latin jazz group Con Clave, founded by Byron and percussionist Ozzie Orengo in 1990, features many of Byron’s compositions. Consisting of Byron (vibes), Orengo (congas), Stuart Reinhardt (tenor sax), Eliot Wadopian (bass), Keith Davis (piano) and Ozzie Orengo Jr (timbales), they have performed regularly throughout the southeastern United States.

EDDIE LESHURE

“Some of the drummers and vibists that were influential for me were Ginger Baker, John Bonham, Charlie Watts, Gene Krupa, Max Roach, Baby Dodds, Philly Jo Jones, Tony Williams, Milt Jackson, Steve Gadd, Peter Erskine, Tito Puente, Cal Tjader, Ndugu Chancler, and Vinnie Colaiuta. My recent musical listening includes Pat Metheny, Chick Corea, Gary Burton, Joe Locke, and Herbie Hancock.” Byron lives near Black Mountain and would like to produce a recording soon, featuring original compositions, and create a personal website. with Mike Holstein byronhedgepeth.mikeholstein.info with Kate Steinbeck www.lightinthecorner.com Con Clave www.reverbnation.com/conclavelatinjazz Eddie produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 13


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

12 Years a Slave ∑∑∑∑∑

his agonizingly long journey back to freedom. British director Short Take: The Steve McQueen, who fact-based story of previously directed Solomon Northrup, the emotionally heavy a free black man hitting dramas Hunger living in upstate and Shame, turns in New York in 1841, his most impressive who was duped work to date, spanning by a business the depths of humanChiwetel Ejiofor and Michael Fassbender in proposition and ity, creating a guttural, Steve McQueen’s powerful and disturbing sold into slavery. raw and deeply disdrama, 12 Years a Slave. turbing experience. REEL TAKE: Based In 1841 Northrup was living the Amerion the writings of Solomon Northrup, 12 Years can dream – a loving wife, two kids, a nice a Slave tells Northrup’s own story as a freehome and the respect the townspeople of man, his abduction and sale into slavery, and Saratoga Springs, NY. When he is duped into believing he’s been hired to perform with a circus (he’s a violinist), he soon finds himself shackled and being shipped to the auction block in New Orleans. So begins his journey to hell and back. Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Hollywood has produced plenty of films Movieline (828) 254-1281 that depicted slavery and films that have www.ashevillepizza.com depicted romantic notions of the grand Old Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) South, but never before has Hollywood made a Movieline (828) 298-1234 film depicting slavery and the culture that perpetuated slavery like this. For that, Hollywood Biltmore Grande should be ashamed. This British-American 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 production, produced in part by Brad Pitt’s www.REGmovies.com production company Plan B, breaks new Carmike 10 (Asheville) ground and brilliantly so. Movieline (828) 298-4452 Chiwetel Ejiofor delivers a heart wrenchwww.carmike.com ingly beautiful and stalwart performance. He imbues Solomon with a grace and honesty that Carolina Cinemas evokes incredible strength and vulnerability. (828) 274-9500 His first master, Mr. Ford, played by Benedict www.carolinacinemas.com Cumberbatch, is a kind and learned man. He possesses refined manners and a gentle soul. Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com He admires and respects Solomon, but while he is clearly not comfortable with slavery, he The Falls Theatre (Brevard) does nothing to defy or challenge the social Movieline (828) 883-2200 and business conventions of the day. When Solomon finds himself at odds with Ford’s Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) overseer, one of the most repulsive and morMovieline (828) 232-1536 ally reprehensible characters ever beheld on www.fineartstheatre.com screen (played altogether too well by Paul Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Dano), Solomon is sold to another planter, Movieline (828) 697-2463 Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender). www.flatrockcinema.com Unfortuantely for Solomon, Epps makes Ford’s overseer look like a dance in the park. A Four Seasons (Hendersonville) more boozy, bible toting, moralizing, prosMovieline (828) 693-8989 elytizing, womanizing, unholy mess of a mad Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) man there never has been. Fassbender embodMovieline (828) 452-9091

Theatre Directory

14 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

ies the role so believably, one cannot help but wonder how he protected his own being from the flames of such a character. He is mesmerizing, fascinating and horribly tragic. McQueen’s experience as a visual artist prior to becoming a filmmaker serves 12 Years most beautifully. Like Terrence Malick, McQueen has a poet eye with the camera, and he uses it here to speak volumes in ways that words cannot. He lingers in certain moments and images and it profoundly effective. 12 Years is not an easy film, nor is it a short film, but it is exactly as it should be and exactly as it was intended. Though I have not delved more deeply into the story or the performances from the rest of the supporting actors (including Brad Pitt, Sarah Paulson and Lupita Nyong’o), not a note is missed. 12 Years a Slave should be mandatory viewing for all American citizens. Unfortunately the audiences that will gravitate to it are not the ones who need to see this film. For those who venture to it, they will be rewarded with a masterfully told story that will remain with them for a long time to come.

Domnhall Gleeson (son of Brendan Gleeson) is Tim, a likeable, gangly young man who yearns not just for female companionship but love. Like Hugh Grant in Notting Hill and Love Actually Actually, Gleeson is also the narrative voice, and as with Hugh Grant, it’s part of what draws us to him and to the story. When Tim’s father, played by the always great Bill Nighy, tells him about his gift for time travel, Tim decides he will use that gift for the purposes of love. So when he meets the girl of his dreams, he very easily can correct any misstep on the path of love by going back in time to the point of error and – fix it. That girl is Mary, played by Rachel McAdams.

Rated R for violence/cruelty, some nudity and brief sexuality.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

About Time ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: A charming British romantic comedy [from the King of British romantic comedies] about a young man with the ability to time travel within the confines of his own life.

REEL TAKE: Romantic comedy is a much

maligned genre and with good reason. In contemporary cinema, if Richard Curtis isn’t at the helm or the typewriter, it generally isn’t good. With Notting Hill and the film adaptation of Bridget Jones among his writing credits, Love Actually and Pirate Radio among writing and directing credits, we are quite simply spoiled. And now Curtis treats us to About Time, the story of a romantically challenged young man who learns on his 21st birthday that the men in his family have the gift of time travel. Yes it’s a little outlandish, but they keep it pretty simple with the caveat that their ability for time travel is confined to their own lives. Like so many stories involving time travel, you have to just take it at face value; if you can’t do that, stop reading now, About Time isn’t for you.

Rachel McAdams and Domnhall Gleeson fall in love in About Time, the latest romantic comedy from Richard Curtis.

As with all Richard Curtis films the warmth of the relationships and the humanity within the story sets it apart from others. In this case Tim has a wonderful rapport with his family and his relationship with his father is one of the film’s greatest strengths. I believe Curtis gave Tim’s character the ability of time travel because we’d all love to be able to do that. But it’s also a ploy to get our young hero to the live his life so fully every day that he’d never want to be anywhere else than where he is. About Time is not perfect, but it’s awfully wonderful. Parts of it were utterly charming. I have a feeling on a second viewing I will like it even more. Rated R for some language and some sexual content.

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Dallas Buyers Club ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: The fact-based story of a Texas electrician, rodeo rider, womanizer and all round ruffian who, when diagnosed with AIDS in 1985, sought alternatives, broke boundaries and helped thousands of people facing the same death sentence.

REEL TAKE: Dallas Buyers Club is an

unapologetically ugly, honest raw, wonderful and unsentimental story of redemption. Based on the true story of Ron Woodruff, a hard drinking, indiscriminate womanizer, and man of many vices, who was diagnosed with full blown AIDS in 1985 and given about 30 days to live. Woodruff, and the band of ruffians he ran with, was massive Texas-style homophobe. His diagnosis came at time when the world was just starting to learn about AIDS, thanks largely in part to Rock Hudson’s own diagnosis and outing as a gay man.

Jared Leto and Mathew McConaughey are stunning in the AIDS drama, Dallas Buyers Club.

Ostracized and forsaken by his so-called friends, Woodruff begins to look for answers, alternatives, anything but death. As he begins reading everything he can about the disease, he realizes the drug the local hospital and big pharmaceuticals are peddling will do more harm than good. When he finds a doctor in Mexico whose protocol actually provides help and hope, he opens the Dallas Buyers Club; $350 a month for all the vitamins and meds you’ll need. And so begins a Woodruff’s road to redemption, purpose and success. Matthew McConaughey gives the most stunning performance of his career as Woodruff. He lost a huge amount of weight for the role. This can be a gimmicky tactic for actors, and it doesn’t always work. McConaughey is a bag of bones and he looks like hell, but he also seems to really love and understand his character. He, like the movie, makes no apologies for Woodruff’s life or lifestyle. The weight of his performance and his distinct lack of pretense negates any sense of gimmick. The same goes for Jared Leto, who plays Ray, a beautiful, sweet, drug addled transvestite who befriends Ray in the hospital. Leto’s drastic weight loss seems to have really helped him bring a real femininity and vulnerability to his role. They play wonderfully off of one

another. Leto and McConaughey give truly transformative performances and both should be nominated for Oscars come award season. Jean-Marc Valle, whose only other film that I’ve seen is The Young Victoria, will surely be in high demand in the director’s chair after the critical success of Dallas Buyers Club. I hope he too will be nominated for an Oscar, though of that I am not quite assured. There has been some criticism of the film for making an AIDS movie set in the 80s and not taking the Reagan administration to

task (I read somewhere, “…an AIDS movie the Tea Party can watch.”). While I understand that perspective I find it irrelevant. Woodruff’s enemy was the big pharmaceuticals and the FDA and that’s about as political as this story needs to be. Dallas Buyers Club is Woodruff’s story and it’s remarkable. Rated R for pervasive language, some strong sexual content, nudity and drug use.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Great Expectations ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Exquisite adaptation of the Dickens classic has glorious cinematography, superb period recreation, an excellent screenplay adaptation, and fabulous performances from Ralph Fiennes and Helena Bonham Carter.

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REEL TAKE: Brit director Mike Newell has made an interesting variety of films over the

‘Movies’ continued on page 16

We’re Making a List and Checking it Twice

YOUR HOLIDAY SEASON MOVIE PREVIEWS

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By the time this issue hits the free paper news stands, The Hunger Games Catching Fire will Catching be burning up the box office. Also out and not to be missed — but not yet reviewed by Reel Takes — are Philomena and The Book Thief Thief. We’re not quite sure when Alexander Payne’s Nebraska will hit Asheville area theatres, but it will be some time in December. The buzz surrounding the film’s limited release, and veteran actor Bruce Dern’s performance, suggest it is a must see. With award season and Christmas just around the corner, the movie studios will be looking to make box office and critical bank this month. Here are a few of the highlights. Opens November 29

Frozen - When a prophecy traps a kingdom in eternal winter, Anna, a fearless optimist, teams up with extreme mountain man Kristoff and his sidekick reindeer Sven on an epic journey to find Anna’s sister Elsa, the Snow Queen, and put an end to her icy spell. Animation featuring the the voices of Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel.

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom – A moving

drama based on South African President Nelson Mandela’s autobiography of the same name, which chronicles his early life, coming of age, education and 27 years in prison before becoming President and working to rebuild the country’s once segregated society. Stars Idris Elba.

Oldboy – A provocative, visceral thriller that

follows the story of Joe Doucette, a man who is abruptly kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years in solitary confinement, for no apparent reason. When he is suddenly released without explanation, he begins an obsessive mission to find out who imprisoned him, only to discover that the real mystery is why he was set free. Stars Josh Brolin, Sharlto Copley and Elizabeth Olsen. Directed by Spike Lee. Opening December 6

mafia, and politicians. This all-star thriller is getting great advance buzz. Stars Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Christian Bale, Jeremy Renner and Amy Adams.

Out of the Furnace - From Scott Cooper,

Opening December 20

the critically-acclaimed writer and director of Crazy Heart Heart, comes a gripping and gritty drama about family, fate, circumstance, and justice. Stars Christian Bale, Woody Harrelson, Forest Whitaker, Casey Affleck, Zoey Saldana and Sam Shepard.

Inside Llewyn Davis - Follows a week in the life of a young folk singer as he navigates the Greenwich Village folk scene of 1961. Stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, Justin Timberlake and John Goodman. Opening December 13

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug – More Hobbits, more Middle Earth … prob-

ably doesn’t need much more explanation than that. Tolkein and Peter Jackson fans will be delighted. Stars Martin Freeman, Ian McKellan and Richard Armitage.

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Christmas – Madea

dishes her own brand of Christmas Spirit in a small country town. Tyler Perry fans may be surprised to see Larry the Cable Guy in the cast. Um, did we mention it’s a small country southern town? Opening December 18

American Hustle – David O’Russell directs

the fact-based story of a brilliant con man, who along with his equally cunning and seductive British partner, is forced to work for a wild FBI agent to bring down Jersey power brokers,

Saving Mr. Banks – Author P.L. Travers

reflects on her difficult childhood while meeting with Walt Disney during the film production of her novel Mary Poppins. Stars Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks.

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues –

Will Ferrell reprises his role as San Diego’s favorite 1970’s newsman Ron Burgundy, only now it’s the 1980’s. Like it or lump it, it’s gonna be funny. If you don’t like Will Ferrell, then just don’t go see it. Opening December 25

The Wolf of Wall Street – Martin

Scorsese directs this adaptation of Jordan Belfort’s memoir surrounding his indulgent ride as a crooked banker made headlines in the 1990’s. Not to be missed. Stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill and Matthew McConaughey.

August: Osage County – The critically ac-

claimed stage play gets the big screen adaptation for the dark, darkly funny and deeply touching story of the strong-willed women of the Weston family, whose lives have diverged until a family crisis brings them back to the Midwest house they grew up in, and to the dysfunctional woman who raised them. Stars Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis, Ewan McGregor and Abigail Breslin. According to the buzz, Meryl can start working on another Oscar speech.

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ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. December 3:

Amelie

(2001) Amelie, an innocent and naive girl in Paris, with her own sense of justice, decides to help those around her and along the way, discovers love. Stars Audrey Tatou, Mathieu Kassovitz and Rufus. Directed by Jeanne-Pierre Jeunet. December 10:

Love Actually

(2003) Love Actually follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely and interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London. Stars Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Emma Thompson and a slew of other British notables. Directed by Richard Curtis. December 17:

A Christmas Carol

(1951) The Christmas classic based on the Charles Dickens novel about a curmudgeonly old miser given the chance for redemption when he is haunted by three ghosts on Christmas Eve. Stars Alistair Sim, Jack Warner and Kathleen Harrison. Directed by Brian Desmond Hurst. December 31:

A Day at The Races

(1937) A vet posting as a doctor, a race horse owner and his friends struggle to help keep a sanitarium open with the help of a misfit racehorse. Stars Groucho Marx, Chico Marx and Harpo Marx. Directed by Sam Wood.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

course of his 33 year career. His first film 1980’s The Awakening is a somber, beautifully realized version of Bram Stoker’s Jewel of Seven Stars that starred Charlton Heston & Susannah York. Later on would come such well known movies as Enchanted April, Four Weddings and a Funeral, and Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire. The majority of his films are literary adaptations which makes him an ideal choice to direct Great Expectations which, while not the longest of Dickens’ works, is certainly one of the most complex regarding plot twists and character development. Newell rises to the challenge and gives us a beautifully photographed and perfectly paced cinematic adaptation which tops the famous

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Cash On Demand”

1946 David Lean version. Of course Newell has the advantage of newer technology and more time to devote to the story but where this version really soars is in the casting and the performances. For my money, what turns great literature into classic literature are the supporting players. Who could imagine Othello without Iago and Roderigo or Dracula without Van Helsing and Renfield? No one was better at creating a multiple array of distinctive characters than Dickens which

Helena Bonham Carter is the perfect Miss Havisham in this handsome remake of Great Expectations.

December DVD Picks

Cash On Demand (1961) Having done a feature article on British actor Peter Cushing for this issue, it seems only fitting to select one of his many available movies as my DVD pick. Since this is the December issue and the holidays are just around the corner, I decided to select a film with a holiday theme. The crime caper film Cash on Demand focuses on a bank robbery being committed just a few days before Christmas. Cushing plays Harry Fordyce, a local bank manager with Scrooge like tendencies. He never smiles, berates his employees, and never contributes any money for the annual Christmas party. Into his tightly controlled world comes Colonel Gore Hepburn (Andre Morell), a bank insurance investigator who turns out to be a clever but ruthless robber who is holding Fordyce’s family hostage with plans to seriously harm them if Fordyce doesn’t help him with the robbery. The once lordly and unflappable Fordyce slowly becomes more and more unglued as the robbery unfolds and he comes to the realization that he has no friends and is powerless to help his family. Will the heist succeed and, if it doesn’t, what will be the consequences for everyone involved? Clocking in at a brisk 84 minutes, Cash On Demand is a highly suspenseful British B movie with the tension occasionally relieved by some dry deadpan humor and the less than flattering observations that the Colonel makes concerning Fordyce’s character. Cushing loved this role of the aloof bank manager and considered it to be his finest screen portrayal. He may be right. Cash On Demand is one of six films found on the Sony 3 DVD set Hammer Films: The Icons of Suspense Collection.

16 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

The other five titles are very similar so that if you enjoy old black & white suspense films in the Alfred Hitchcock tradition, then you should give this set a try. It’s available locally and from Netflix, one DVD at a time.

Love Actually (2003) After reviewing About Time this month, my DVD (and holiday) pick just had to be my favorite Richard Curtis film (and the seasonably appropriate) Love Actually Actually. Just released in a 10th anniversary edition, Love Actually offers a pleasant alternative to more traditional holiday movie fare. If you’ve never seen it before, it may just become a new perennial favorite. Written and directed by Richard Curtis, Love Actually stars a cast of who’s who in current British cinema. The film tells the stories of eight loosely related and inter-related couples in the month leading up to Christmas in London. Here’s just a few of the highlights: Liam Neeson is a recent widower and now single father to his young stepson (Thomas Sangster). Emma Thompson is a housewife and mum who suspects her husband, Alan Rickman, is cheating on her with his secretary. Colin Firth is a best-selling author, who retreats to the French countryside to work on his latest novel and nurse a broken heart. Bill Nighy is an aging rock star and former drug

is why, in a film adaptation, the casting is so important. The two key characters, as far as the plot is concerned, are Miss Havisham and the convict/benefactor Magwitch and they are given superlative performances by Helena Bonham Carter and Ralph Fiennes. Fiennes can always be counted on to give a fine performance but Bonham Carter’s performances tend to be all over the road. In Miss Havisham she has found a character that she was born to play and she gives her most fully realized performance in quite some time. Robbie Coltrane is extremely effective as the solicitor ‘Movies’ continued on page 17

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Love Actually” addict who’s trying to make it back to the top of the pop charts with a Christmas song (achieved only if his beats a popular young boy band), and last but not least, Hugh Grant is the newly elected Prime Minister who finds himself more than a little distracted by a member of his household staff. Remember – those are just a few of the highlights. With so many plots and sub plots, we’ve got about twenty characters to follow. It sounds like it should be a train wreck, and in many hands it would be, but here, it’s sheer perfection. Love Actually is a true delight, raising the bar on romantic comedies. It opens and closes with Hugh Grant’s narrative and a fantastic, ever growing collage of real-life footage of loved ones meeting loved ones off the plane at Heathrow International Airport. The opening narrative combined with the images sets the tone for the whole film. Every character is in pursuit of love in one form in another. Couched with genuine comedy and heart, the film smartly fires on all cylinders and has a surprising universal appeal. In addition to the actors mentioned above, the cast also includes Rowan Atkinson, Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 ( Years a Slave), ), Gregor Fisher, Martin Freeman, Keira Knightley, Andrew Lincoln, Kris Marshall, Martine McCutcheon, Lucia Moniz, Rodrigo Santoro, and Billy Bob Thornton. Love Actually marked Richard Curtis’ directorial debut. Known previously as the writer of Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Hill this was a fitting [if not overdue] debut. This movie reminds you that even during hectic time of year, love actually is really all around us. Rent it, watch it with someone you love and enjoy a respite from the season.


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film reviews Peter Cushing: England’s Beloved Gentleman Ogre

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2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of my favorite screen personages, British actor Peter Cushing.

peared in James Whale’s version of The Man in the Iron Mask and worked alongside Laurel & Hardy in A Chump at Oxford (“a absolutely wonderful experience”, he later recalled). The 1940 film Vigil in the Night with Carole Lombard was his Hollywood high water mark. Celebrations, marking that fact, have been When World War II broke out, he taking place in the U.K. throughout the year went back to England to enlist. Denied acbut not here in America. Although he has his tive service because of health issues, he did devoted fans here amongst people of a certain radio work and toured the country in morale age (like myself), he is known to the general boosting stage shows. It was during one of public at large as Grand Moff Tarkin, comthese tours that he met his wife, dancer Helen mander of the Death Star in what was then the Beck. They were married in original Star Wars (1977). 1943 and remained married In England he is lionuntil her death in 1971. It ized, along with his frequent was she who kept him from co-star Christopher Lee, as despairing over his initial one of the twin icons of Britlack of success and eventuish horror cinema due to his ally he was cast by Laurence appearance in several HamOlivier in his film version mer films, the company that of Hamlet (1948) as the gay made stylish horror fashioncourtier, Osric. able for a brief period back This got him noticed in the 1960s and early 1970s. but didn’t lead to many film Altogether he made 22 films Peter Cushing in his first parts so he went into the for Hammer between 1957 Hammer film, Curse of new medium of television, and 1974 but made more than Frankenstein. scoring a big hit as Winston 100 films in his overall career. Smith in George Orwell’s 1984. That and While it was his appearance as Baron other TV work got him noticed by Hammer Frankenstein in 1957’s Curse of Frankenstein executives who cast him in Curse of Frankenthat made him a recognizable star at the age stein as a recognizable TV face and the rest is of 44, Cushing had been in films since 1939 history. With his distinctively dapper voice and when he had gone to America where he ap-

‘Movies’ continued from page 16

Jaggers who not only moves the plot forward but acts as a go-between for all the others. It’s hard to imagine anyone who doesn’t know the storyline but then the average person today doesn’t read Dickens outside of school. For those who don’t, here is a brief and simple summary. An orphan boy named Pip, living in the countryside with his aunt, is “rented” by a wealthy eccentric as a playmate for her ward, Estella, with whom he falls in love. They are together only briefly. Once Pip grows up he receives an unexpected windfall and is sent to London to “become a fine gentleman.” However things are not what they seem and circumstances arise that alter his life and his “great expectations.” This movie was made to take part in the 200th anniversary of Dickens’ birth last year but it is only just now getting here. It is a fitting tribute in every way and is also a must see for any fan of Dickens or classic English literature. You may want to see it more than once as it’s that full of rich details but you better hurry. Since Dickens is no longer the draw he once was for the general public and because it’s only at one theater (Carolina Cinemas), I wouldn’t count on it to be in town for long. Rated PG-13 for some violence including disturbing images.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

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CHIP KAUFMANN

gaunt facial features, Cushing became instantly recognizable and he remained active for the next 30 years. As well known as he became for his Frankenstein and Van Helsing roles, Peter Cushing became a permanent part of pop culture when George Lucas cast him in Star Wars. Lucas had come of age watching many of the Hammer films and he needed a human face to complement Darth Vader’s masked features Peter Cushing in the role American audiences and he knew whose face he wanted. know him best, Star Wars’ Grand Moff Tarkin. Cushing was delighted saying that it was a good part for his fans to see him in. mentary called Flesh & Blood: The Hammer Although celebrated for his horror film Heritage of Horror Horror. roles, Cushing’s two favorite parts came early Fortunately all of Cushing’s major films on in his career. One was as Sherlock Holmes are readily available on DVD. These include in the 1959 Hound of the Baskervilles (Cushthe Hammer Frankenstein & Dracula films, ing would reprise the role in the 1984 TV his Amicus anthologies such as Tales from the movie Masks of Death, his last major appearCrypt Asylum, and From Beyond the Grave. Crypt, ance), the other was as the Scrooge like bank Then there are the non-horror items such manager in Cash on Demand (1962) which he as End of the Affair with Deborah Kerr and considered to be his finest film portrayal. Sword of Sherwood Forest (as the Sheriff of Once Hammer shut down in the mid Nottingham). Cushing was one of those rare Nottingham) 1970s, Cushing continued to appear in films performers who dignified every film he was in but in smaller parts. His increasing age and no matter how lowly and we are lucky to have health related issues slowed him down but so much of his film legacy preserved for he didn’t stop him. Peter Cushing died in 1994 truly was a class act on and off the screen. at the age of 81. He and Christopher Lee had just finished co-hosting a retrospective docu-

Thor: The Dark World ∑∑∑ Short Take: Uninspired sequel to the 2010 original is one long video game which lacks a remotely interesting or original screenplay and a prime example of Directing 101.

REEL TAKE: If it were up to me personally,

I would rate Thor: The Dark World much lower but that wouldn’t be fair. The film lacks an interesting storyline and the assured and creative direction of Kenneth Branagh that were the great strengths of the first film. That did not stop the younger audience that I saw the film with from eating it up. In a sense the movie is critic proof as the box office numbers will attest to but I enjoyed it far less than the first installment. The primary reason for this is that the film is about 20% story and 80% action. The entire first hour was an extended “Helm’s Deep” sequence form The Lord of the Rings with a brief timeout for a visit to London so that we can bring Thor’s mortal girlfriend, Jane Porter, into the proceedings. The second half adds more character interaction and finally gives Loki something to do but that was not enough for me. I will admit to being surprised by the twist at the end but that’s only because of Anthony Hopkins. However it was quickly forgotten along with the rest of the movie. Now that the Marvel Cinematic Universe franchise has been created allowing the various

Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) are determined to overcome the perfunctory script of Thor: The Dark World.

Marvel characters to interact with each other in anyway the screenwriters see fit, it’s possible to come up with all sorts of combinations. I hope that future installments will avoid the paint-by-numbers approach Thor: The Dark World takes but then it’s hard to deny the appeal of making an awful lot of money for very little work. Not that the army of special effects people these movies require weren’t busy but they seem to have done 95% of the work. What little plot the three credited screenwriters came up with is basically a ripoff of Lord of the Rings. The Dark Elves, after being defeated eons ago (battle scenes), have come back to threaten the stability of the universe. They attack Asgard (more battle scenes) but

don’t destroy it completely. Thor must join forces with Loki to vanquish them along with Jane Porter who is infected with the “Aether”, the core essence of universal evil. This leads to a final confrontation (even more battle scenes) and that surprise twist I mentioned earlier. The actors seem at a loss this time around. Chris Hemsworth is all posture as Thor because he isn’t given anything to do except brood or fight. Tom Hiddleston’s Loki, who is the most interesting character, has very little to say which is totally out-of-character as we’ve come to expect his dark witticisms. Natalie Portman’s Jane Porter makes Margot Kidder’s Lois Lane in the old Superman films look like Meryl Streep in Sophie’s Choice while Sir Anthony Hopkins’ voice is still as imposing as ever just as his paycheck must have been. Thor: The Dark World has already made millions and will continue to do so especially overseas where the Marvel movies are even more popular. The fanbase is there and continues to grow larger which means more Marvel Cinematic Universe films are in the offing (4 are already in post-production). If they’re as forgettable as this one, I hope I don’t have to see them but then, to look on the bright side, I won’t remember them. Rated PG-13 for sequences of Sci-Fi action and violence and for suggestive material.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

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BLACK MOUNTAIN EVENTS

Until December 31 – Gallery Show of Fabulous Fakes. Artist interpretations of famous works of art at the Monte Vista Hotel. www.svfalarts.org Until December 31 – Artist exhibit at Red House Studios and Gallery, 310 W. State St. www.svfalarts.org December 4 – Deck the Trees. 24 beautiful Christmas Trees on display. Free. At Monte Vista Hotel. Kick-off Party & First Viewing 6-8 p.m. on December 4 with live music and drink specials. Winners party December 20 from 5-8 p.m. Benefits the SVCM. (828) 707-7615 info@anthmgallery.com December 6 – Holly Jolly Pottery Market. Teacher/Student Pottery Show & Sale at Black Mountain Center for the Art Clay Studio. www.blackmountainarts.org December 6 – Holly Jolly Christmas. 5-9 p.m. downtown. Stores open late, refreshments, Santa. (828) 669-2177 December 7 – Chamber Open House with Santa. Noon to 3 p.m. Light refreshments, pictures with Santa, $10. Blk. Mtn. Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce (828) 669-2300 December 7 – Christmas Parade, 4 p.m. Rocking Around The Christmas Tree, www.exploreblackmountain.com December 7 – Circle of Lights at Lake Tomahawk. 6 p.m. Free. Blk Mtn Parks Rec. (828) 669-2052 December 12 – Art of JAZZ Concert. 7:30 p.m. Michael Jefry Stevens and Jason DeCristofaro. $10. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 669-0930, www.blackmountainarts.org December 14 to December 15 – Visions of Sugar Plums. Annual B&B / Country Inn Cookie Tour. Visit www.exploreblackmountain.com or call (828) 669-2300 for details

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December 19 – Rediscovering Christmas. Theatre performance, 7:30 p.m. at Black Mountain Center for the Arts, www.blackmountainarts.org

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INTERVIEW WITH PETER BALLHAUSSEN OWNER OF BLACK MOUNTAIN’S

Town Hardware & General Store

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

INTERVIEWED BY

about Town Hardware & General Store.

Peter Ballhaussen: The store has been at

the same location since 1928, so we have the been a vital part of the community for 85 years! The sound of the bell ringing when you open the door, the creaking hardwood floors, and the old-fashioned courteous attention will take you back to a simpler, more relaxed period of time.

DENNIS RAY

RRM: Can you share

103 W. State Street Black Mountain

your thoughts on why we should “Shop and Buy Local” this holiday season?

PB: “Shop and Buy

Town Hardware & General Store BH

(828) 669-7723 Photos: Keli Keach Photography

Local” is a relatively new trend in many communities, but Black Mountain has been supporting it for a long time, and we are very grateful for that. My wife, Beth, and I like to joke that we don’t own the store. We are just caretakers for the town and that drives how we approach the business. Our customers have found that we have competitive products, an unsurpassed selection, and great service. Shopping local is simply a win-win for everyone. More local business means more local jobs and that is nothing but good in the difficult economic situation that our country is currently experiencing. Why go anywhere else when you can do all your Christmas shopping here?

Boker knives, which are perfect as a Christmas gift for the man in the house. We offer unique products year round, so just come and browse — you are sure to find something for everyone on your Christmas list!

Old-Timey Toys

Extensive Gift Selection

RRM: What are some of your Holiday specials? Beth & Peter Ballhaussen

We are a place to “get lost in.” Every family member can get those unique, hardto-find items, whether it is in our fully stocked hardware section, our extensive gift and housewares section, or our old-timey toy section.

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PB: We have a sales circular with monthly

specials. For December we’re featuring gift ideas, as well as tree-trimming and decorating products, fireplace products, products to feed the birds, and a variety of home improvement products. We have some new gift items we added, and we have just become a dealer for

Stocking up for Christmas

I have been bombarded lately by messages and friends’ forwarded bon mots about avoiding the materialism of Christmas. “Isn’t it awful how the true meaning of Christmas has been lost in the frenzy of gift-giving?” I’ll be honest with you, now that I am a shop-keeper, I am all about materialism. Now there is just not enough emphasis on spending for the holidays to suit me! Yes! It is possible to maintain the spirit Edo Creek Hats

of Christmas while buying lavish gifts to show your loved ones how much they mean to you. In fact it is absolutely necessary. So come in and let’s get started piling up the gifts for everyone on your list. So does that make me a hypocrite? Well, as Walt Whitman said, “Do I contradict myself? No, I contain multitudes.”

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Chifferobe 118 Cherry Street in Black Mountain Open M-Sat 10:30-6, Sunday 1-5 (828) 669-2743 www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

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holiday shopping Best Bet for Holiday Shopping

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Join us for the Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale at the Folk Art Center on December 7 and again on December 14.

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Members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be on hand in the center’s auditorium on these two Saturdays to sell select work 10-50% off retail. The sale is an excellent opportunity for the artist to liquidate overstocks and 2013 items, try out new techniques, and sell studio seconds. For the customer, the sale means great deals for holiday shopMarc Tickle ping and a chance to connect with the craftsperson. It also provides an exciting, festive alternative to mall and big box import shopping. Choose from a variety of gift items including ceramics, jewelry, fiber, paper, glass and wood. Buying from artists supports the local economy and promotes the mission of the Guild which is bringing together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. Over 50 artists will be participating over the course of the two sales, with a different group Laurey-Faye Long Nancy Darrell of artists each weekend — so plan on coming to both for best selection! For a complete listing of exhibitors visit www. IF craftguild.org. YOU Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale at the GO Folk Art Center, December 7 and While at the Folk Art Center, visitors can December 14. The Folk Art Center be inspired by three galleries showcasing the is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue work of current Guild members and collecRidge Parkway in east Asheville. tions from the Guild’s history. They can also shop at Allanstand Craft Shop, the nation’s For more information, call (828) 298-7928 or oldest craft gallery, where they will find gifts visit www.craftguild.org. for everyone on their list.

HOLIDAY ACTIVITIES AT THE BILTMORE ESTATE

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Visit Biltmore for fun events like building your own gingerbread house, special holiday dining opportunities, and much more.

Friday & Saturday, December 6 & 7

2000 Riverside Drive, Asheville.

December 19-21 Gingerbread House Tea. Build your own gingerbread house with the hands-on assistance of a Biltmore Pastry Chef. The price includes instruction, supplies, a special tea service, and an assortment of tea sandwiches. $49 per person, plus tax.

Biltmore Warehouse Sale. Just in time for your holiday shopping, Dozens of trees, thousands of ornaments, and come stock up on miles of brightly lit evergreen garland are on great gifts at fantastic display at the Biltmore House. savings for everyone on your list! Enjoy 60 to 70% savings on home décor and accessories, IF YOU GO: Purchase tickets by calling 1-800plus jewelry, apparel, and seasonal decora411-3812 or visit www.biltmore.com. tions. Open to the public from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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BILTMORE VILLAGE SHOPS Annual Dickens Festival: Shopper’s Wonderland!

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Experience a magical weekend of merriment, music and memories — all on the streets and in the shops, restaurants, and galleries of Historic Biltmore Village. It’s the annual Dickens Festival, now in its 25th year. There’s entertainment for every age and interest. The main stage will be filled continuously with musicians, choral groups, singers, dancers, and Montford Park Players. This year the festival will feature more than 300 performers who, after their stage segments, will wind their way through the Village, entertaining on the streets and in the shops and restaurants. Friday and Saturday evenings will feature main stage concerts for the entire family.

When dusk turns into evening, more than 250,000 white lights outlining the historic Village buildings will combine with the streetlights to enhance the ambiance. Shops will stay open both evenings until 7 p.m., with many of the shopkeepers dressed in Victorian-era garb. In addition, there will be horse-drawn rides all day Saturday and Sunday. Chestnuts roasted on an open fire by chestnut roaster Sakshi Gentenbein will be available next to the main stage. The Village will be decked out with Fraser fir holiday wreaths on each streetlight, on the doors to the shops and at other locations throughout the Village. IF YOU Biltmore Village Dickens Festival, December GO 6, 7 & 8. Hours: Friday, 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, 11-7

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p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 274-8788 or visit www.biltmorevillage.com.

Fresh Produce Clothing

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Where do you go after a decade in the Caribbean? For Ted and Carol Simpson, the answer was Asheville! Their journey began in Boulder, Colorado where Carol first fell in love with Fresh Produce Sportswear, a local clothing company that made fun, colorful clothes that real women loved for their comfort and versatility. Carol went to work for Fresh Produce at their headquarters in Boulder, Colorado, eventually overseeing the company’s retail stores. Seven years later, opportunity knocked and the couple opened their own Fresh Produce store in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. The store was an instant success. Then in 2009, they visited Asheville and were hooked. Fresh Produce Asheville opened

Just Ducky CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE STORE

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Just Ducky offers classic children’s fashions and unique gifts, just perfect for the children in your life! Founded by a mom in 1980, Just Ducky Originals offers classic children’s clothing that can be customized to create a one-of-a-kind outfit. Choose from a wide range of fabrics and styles. Add a monogram, trim and button of your choice and

in October 2009, and the family made Asheville their home Encanto, in 2012. eco-friendly, fair Whether you live trade jewelry. in the Asheville area or are visiting, stop in to see their great selection of apparel and accessories made in the USA. They are proud to provide great service in a warm and welcoming store, and they will go that extra mile for their customers.

Fresh Produce Clothing 18 Lodge Street Biltmore Village, Asheville (828) 505-7775 www.freshproduceasheville.com

Reversible, Signature Classic jacket from Winding River. This five button lapel jacket has a fashionable flair. These jackets rarely wrinkle, making them terrific for travel!

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HISTORIC BILTMORE VILLAGE you have an outfit as unique as your child! Our distinctive Spring and Fall Collections feature the perfect mix of trendy and classic fabrics to choose from in m... any styles including capris, dresses, bubbles, bloomers, tunics, shortalls, rompers, swimsuits, and much more! Just Ducky’s line includes shoes and accessories, girls clothing size 6m14, boys clothing size 6m-8, custom-de-

signed outfits, coordinating outfits, monogrammed outfits and gifts for children and babies. Just Ducky children’s and infant clothing can be purchased at our Biltmore Village store, online at www.justduckyoriginals.com, or on Facebook.

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Just Ducky 10 All Souls Crescent Historic Biltmore Village Asheville, NC 28803

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(828) 277-7084 www.justduckyoriginals.com Mon-Sat 10-5:30; Sun 1-5

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HENDERSONVILLE Moe’s Original Bar B Que

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Moe’s Original Bar B Que is a Southern Soul Food revival in the heart of downtown Hendersonville with meats smoked fresh daily and made-from-scratch down home sides.

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Let Moe’s prepare your holiday feast while you enjoy more time with your family! Order 12-14 pound Whole Smoked Turkeys for $50. And, 20 person pans of Southern sides, such as Award-winning! Green Beans, Sweet Potato Casserole, Collard Greens, Squash Casserole, Cornbread Dressing, Mac N’ Cheese, Baked Beans, Marinated Slaw, Potato Salad, and Banana Puddin’ for $27. Need a cool spot for your holiday party or special event? Book Moe’s Original Bar B Que’s upstairs venue, complete with a private bar, dining room, TVs, stereo system, lounge and first class views of Main Street. Designed with a rustic feel with delicious Southern staples, this comfortable setting is perfect for families, retirees and professionals alike with accommodations inside as well as al fresco seating on the patio. Moe’s Original Bar B Que serves up an award-winning, all things Southern, Alabama BBQ experience. The fast casual eatery and catering company also offers Gift Certificates for your holiday giving!

Moe’s Original Bar B Que 114 N. Main St., Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828) 595-9200, www.moesoriginalbbq.com

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INTERVIEW WITH SUSAN BLEVINS, OWNER OF

Susan’s European Gifts

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Rapid River Magazine:

INTERVIEWED BY

What prompted you to open a European gift store here in the Appalachian Mountains?

DENNIS RAY

Susan Blevins: As

a child, I lived in Turkey and Germany for five years. Later, my husband and I lived in Germany for eight years. I came to appreciate the special quality of their handPolish Pottery crafts. Today, I offer unique gifts from 13 different European countries.

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RRM: What sort of

items are we talking about?

SB: From Germany I

have traditional glass and wooden ornaments, nutcrackers, and also pewter ornaments which have been made by the same family for more than 230 years. Additionally, I have “smokers,� hand-carved wooden figurines which burn incense. Other items include Russian nesting dolls; tapestries German Nutcrackers

‘Susan’s European Gifts’ cont’d on page 32

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Art ApprAisAl services of the

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Specializing in the challenging area of valuing fine art, paintings, prints, drawings, sculpture, and photography. 3URIHVVLRQDOFRQĂ€GHQWLDO DSSUDLVDOGRFXPHQWVSUHSDUHGIRU Insurance Claims

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poetry & books The Poet’s Voice

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MORE IS TOO MUCH

We are in the season of excess: more! more! more! Excess is what it is… too much. Remember Halloween? In a word: excessive. Thanksgiving? Ditto. NOW here comes Santa Claus, polar bears, train sets, tinsel, elves, blue-and-silver Christmas trees, wrapping paper, gift boxes, ribbons, houses decked-out and over-decked with plastic holly and lights! Lights! Remember November’s sky? Did you see it? Did you look up and say, “Oh! Ah!” Did you notice the mackerel clouds, surreal sunrise, and thinnest moon ever? Did you make a poem? One of the jobs assigned to poets is reveling in, and revealing daily wonders; nature, being at the top of the list. This brings me to my theme: less is more, or less is enough. Consider Matsuo Basho, (1644-1694) Japanese Haiku master. He made great art from ordinariness, like clouds, and moons. He placed his trust in his walkingstick. From Knapsack Notebook Notebook, “Nothing’s worth noting that is not seen with fresh eyes.” Considering the nature of war, he wrote: summer grasses: all that remains of great soldier’s imperial dreams. In Haiku, Basho practiced simplicity. Simplicity is a gift we can incorporate in our words. Two lines of your words can make a connection, like “invisible strings” between you and a reader. When I read a line in a book that “speaks my name,” I hold the book to my chest and say, “Thank you.” Heck! Robert Bly kisses his books! Minnesota poet, Jim Moore has a collection of poems on stillness, one of his favorite excesses. His work is called, “lyrically spare.” (Imagine! To be lyrical with economy.) From his 2005 collection, Lightning At Dinner Dinner, Jim used a daily prompt (write seven short verses.) In “Seven Invisible Strings,” verse seven reads: Almost sixty: from now on even begonias are amazing.

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

17th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline January 31, 2014. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2014 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

In nine words, Jim Moore captures, with simplicity, the beauty of aging. There’s hope here, and gratitude. Zen-like? Absolutely.

Words on Stillness from Jim Moore Writing poems in stillness is like fire in an empty theater. Do not mistake stillness for God stillness was present before God. As if quiet were the most natural thing in the world. In sitting still you are working. Stillness comes after words. Love the thing inside us that feels no need to move. Like the moon, stillness has it phases, even when you can’t see it you know it is there. Even if stillness could speak, believe me, it wouldn’t bother. When I take time to stop on my walks, and am “given” the gift of a platter-sized sycamore leaf, I say I’ve had a “Mary Oliver moment.” I return from my outings with feathers, (once, an entire woodpecker’s wing), magnolia’s red-studded cones, rocks, and lichen-covered bark. Mary Oliver returns from her adventures with her notebook scribbled full of lines, like fishing lines, connecting her attentiveness to the poems she reels in. The title of one of Mary’s poems is a poem in itself. From A Thousand Mornings, “In Our Woods, Sometimes a Rare Music.” This is poem enough for me. This volume also includes a two-line poem:

Was it Necessary to Do It? I tell you that ant is very alive. Look at how he fusses at being stepped on. Peruse your poetry library. Search out three or four-line poems. Imitate the lyrical spareness of haiku. Begin a writing session with the purpose of making seven short verses, two lines each. Keep it simple. When you’ve finished the seventh poem, read what you’ve written. How do invisible strings connect the verses? Be filled with gratitude, a simple thing.

Resources A Thousand Mornings, Mary Oliver, Penguin Press, 2012. Lightning At Dinner Dinner, Jim Moore, 2005. The Poetry of Zen, translated by Sam Hamill and J. P. Seaton, Shambhala Press, 2005.

Malaprop’s Bookstore Staff Recommendations

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And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled

Hosseini – “A gorgeous and touching exploration into the choices we make in life and the ways we grow apart — and the ways that we can come together again. Hosseini speaks to the human condition with a vibrancy and insight rarely seen.”

~ Kendra Castle

This is the Story of a Happy Marriage

by Ann Patchett – “Patchett’s lovely, unique voice is present in every essay included in This is the Story of a Happy Marriage whether she’s discussing writing, opera, RVs, marriage, divorce, loss, or Eudora Welty.”

~ Lauren Harray

The Mysterious Woods of Whistleroot

by Christopher Pennell — “I adore Carly Bean Bitters, the lonely 11-year-old orphan who only sleeps during the day, and Lewis, the violin-playing rat. Pennell crafts a timeless feel, a suspenseful plot, and a genuinely sinister and amoral villain. An unforgettably magical tale for ages 7-12.”

~ Robin Criscoulo

The Bookman’s Tale by Charlie Lovett

— “An engaging literary mystery. Book people, Shakespeare folk, and mystery readers will love this one. An excellent gift for Dan Brown fans!”

~ Caroline Christopoulos

The Time Fetch by Amy Herrick — “I

can’t recall the last time I was so completely captivated! Fresh, clever and full of surprises. The combination of folklore and science is amazing! Recommended for readers 9-12.”

~ Laura Donohoe

Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay

Jones — “This biography delves into Jim Henson’s creative process, how he was able to connect different generations of people to share in the lives of these creatures, making moments which were relateable and which touched us. A biography which made me smile often and admittedly, cry a bit too.”

~ Erin Makara

Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen

Russell — “Russell’s debut novel Swamplandia nearly won the Pulitzer prize last year. Russell’s stories are masterfully crafted, hauntingly beautiful, and most of all unflinchingly unique. Grab a copy and get it signed when she visits in February!”

~ Kevin Mann

The Humans by Matt Haig — “A wonderI want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

24 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

ful, evocative, often humorous book about being human, told from an alien’s perspective. Matt Haig spins a thriller tale with charm and wisdom.”

~ Linda Marie Barrett

Remember Me as a Time of Day — “This

anthology of 12 local poets still amazes me. Remember Me as a Time of Day is a lovely gift for those who wish to get to know some of the lesser known but strong local voices.”

~ Emöke B’Racz

The Wes Anderson Collection by Matt Zoller Seitz — “Not to be dismissed as a simple coffee table book, The Wes Anderson Collection is stuffed with production stills, artwork and interviews with the director himself, making it the most in-depth look at Anderson’s singular filmography imaginable. A definite must-have for any cinephile.”

~ Justin Souther

The Diviners by Libba Bray — “Set in New

York City during the Roaring 20s, Bray’s newest book is full of thrills and chills, with an all star cast of characters: glamorous Ziegfield girls, occult museum currators, rakish pickpockets, a wise cracking heroine, and a supernatural serial killer on the loose. A crackling, lavish, spine-tingling page turner – try the audiobook for those holiday roadtrips!”

~ Lauren Napoli

I Wonder by Annaka Harris — “This chil-

dren’s picture book reminds us that we needn’t invent mysteries. There are plenty of real ones all around us.”

~ Brian Wood

Isa Does It by Isa Chandra Moskowitz

— “The queen of vegan cooking has outdone herself with this beautifully designed new cookbook. Full of gorgeous photos and delicious recipes made without hard to find ingredients, it’s a real treat.”

~ Christine Lavigna

The Gone and The Going Away — “Poet

Maurice Manning draws on the storytelling traditions of his native Kentucky and evokes a place and a time now gone. With concise imagery, precise details of language and character, quiet humor, and subtle music, his poetry expresses a joyful gratitude for all of creation.”

~ Virginia McKinley

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt — “The

Goldfinch deals with a teen aged New Yorker who finds himself the owner of a stolen masterpiece. Tartt fans have been waiting a decade since her last novel. They’ll be thrilled that her new book is nearly 800 pages long!”

~ Alsace Walentine

Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe 55 Haywood St. downtown Asheville (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings Suggestions for Reading in Front of the Fire

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Here are a few of the good books I’ve read this year that you might enjoy this holiday season. ENVIRONMENT

Global warming might not be at the top of your favorite topics, but this terrific book — readerfriendly and with “eye-grabbing graphics” — could make it so. Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming: The Illustrated Guide to the Findings of the IPC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) by Michael E. Mann and Lee R. Kump.

HISTORY American Cuisine If you’re a foodie, you’ll love this remarkable slice of history about how the icons of American cuisine happened to hang out in southern France one year and, one by one, found themselves abandoning the tyranny of French cooking and moved toward an American cuisine. Provence, 1970: M.F.K. Fisher, Julia Child, James Beard, and the Reinvention of American Taste by M.F.K. Fisher’s nephew, Luke Barr.

European History Amsterdam: A History of the World’s Most Liberal City by Russell Shorto is an utterly entertaining look at the city that epitomized tolerance for centuries. Home to generations of dissidents and radical thinkers, its liberalism greatly affected the new country of the United States of America.

U.S. Politics Having been married for 27 years to an avid Rush Limbaugh fan, I deliberately balanced my left-wing reading with works from or about the right. This policy never ended up changing my mind, but it did open my eyes to different perspectives. In his memoir of his White House staff days, Tip and The Gipper: When Politics Worked, MSNBC “Hardball” anchor Chris Matthews remembers with fondness and memorable detail the civil way political adversaries used to get things done. In Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House, reporter Peter Baker from the New York Times takes an up-close and personal look at the relationship between President Bush and his VP. It might surprise readers from both sides of the aisle to know how different the relationship was in real life from its image in the press.

REVIEWS BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

GODDESS WOMEN

LOCAL HONEY

You can’t really be a goddess-honoring woman if you don’t have a We’Moon appointment book, an exquisitely illustrated and inspirational time management aid. This year the book features poetry from Black Mountain composer and poet Annelinde Metzner. www.wemoon.ws

If you’re making gift baskets this year, be sure to add a copy of local food guru Laurey Masterton’s, lovely Fresh Honey Cookbook, filled with yummy book recipes and Laurey’s usual wonderful stories. In a recent taste contest presented by the Center for Honeybee Research, Masterton’s honey won the award for Best Local Blend. www.laureysyum.com

HUMOR Asheville’s favorite newspaper writer for over a quarter century, Susan Reinhardt, happens to be one of the funniest gals on the planet. Her first novel, Chimes from a Cracked Southern Belle, is cellulite-thigh-slapping hilarious and makes you cry, too. Check out her website to keep up with Susan’s performance schedule. www.susanreinhardt.com With Novel #13, Miss Julia Stirs Up Trouble, Hendersonville’s Ann B. Ross continues her heart-warming tales about the resilient Miss Julia and her household of lovable oddballs. A cherished gift package would include the newest novel with the first one that introduces the main characters, Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind. www.missjulia.com

LITERATURE As readers of this column know, my favorite regional male writer is the prolific Tuckasegee resident, Thomas Rain Crowe — poet, writer, translator, memoirist, editor, environmentalist and musician. All his works are gift-worthy, including his latest, a collection of poetic travel memories, Postcards from Peru. If you’re new to Crowe’s work, be sure to read Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods (2005), his story of living alone in North Carolina for four years in a cabin without electricity. www.newnativepress.wordress.com First-time novelist West Virginia resident Wiley Cash wowed reviewers with A Land More Kind Than Home, a powerful literary mystery about two brothers and evil in a small North Carolina town. I couldn’t put it down and can’t wait for his second novel, This Dark Road to Mercy Mercy, which comes out next year. www.wileycash.com

NATIVE AMERICAN VIEWS OF THE UNIVERSE A long time ago, I discovered Standing Rock Sioux writer Vine Deloria Jr. His book, God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, changed my life. One day I was a devout white Christian — the next I questioned everything I had ever been taught. So I was thrilled when former Rapid River Magazine poetry editor and my friend, MariJo Moore, who is part Cherokee, dedicated her latest work, as an anthology co-editor, to Mr. Deloria. Unraveling the Spreading Cloth of Time, Indigenous Thoughts Concerning the Universe is a stunning collection of 40 Native American writers and their sacred views on the relationship human beings have to the universe. It’s the kind of book that can shake up your universe. It’s not a quick read — gift it to yourself during the holidays and read it slowly for the rest of the year. www.marijomoore.com

DECEMBER

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Sunday, December 1 at 3 p.m. POETRIO, featuring Hilda Downer, Tony Reevy, and Jillian Weise. Monday, December 2 at 7 p.m. CASSANDRA KING, dark secrets at Moonrise. Wine and cheese reception. Monday, December 2 at 7 p.m. Bridging Differences Bookclub, Far From the Tree by Andrew Solomon. Hosted by Patti Digh. Tuesday, December 3 at 7 p.m. WILD Bookclub, hosted by Susan Blexrud at the Battery Park Book Exchange, presents Orphan Train by Christina Baker Cline. Wednesday, December 4 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookclub: Julian Barnes’ The Sense of an Ending. Hosted by Jay Jacoby. Thursday, December 5 at 6-8 p.m. AMY RIDENOUR, Historic Inns of Asheville. Sunday, December 8 at 3 p.m. DANNY ELLIS, The Boy at the Gate, an Irish singer/songwriter’s debut memoir. Monday, December 9 at 7 p.m. Mystery Bookclub, The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz. Hosted by Sallie Bissel. Tuesday, December 10 at 5-6 p.m. MEAGAN SPOONER, These Broken Stars, science fiction trilogy for teens. Tuesday, December 10 at 7 p.m. students from Odyssey Middle School present their fiction, poetry, and illustrations. Wednesday, December 11 at 6 p.m. GRINCHMAS! Meet the Grinch! Tuesday, December 17 at 7 p.m. COMIX CLUB, Black Hole by Charles Burn. Hosted by Lauren Napoli. Monday, December 30 at 7 p.m. Politics of Food Bookclub, The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World by John Robbins.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Note: Most of these books can be ordered through your local library. All can be purchased — ready for gift-wrapping — at your local book store. Marcianne Miller is a local writer and critic. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 25


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Back again with an assortment of new under the radar releases and a pair of monster re-releases. As always you’re encouraged to first support your local independent record store, of which Asheville is blessed to have several. And away we go!

Jesse Terry Stay Here With Me Following the release of Empty Seat on a Plane by a scant ten months, Jesse Terry’s Stay Here With Me is an even greater leap forward than I might have hoped for, a refresher course in how to make bouyant country rock sounds bright and clear and heartfelt. In essence it’s an eleven song love letter to his New Zealand born wife who has chosen the love of her husband over the natural beauty of her homeland. Terry remains in awe of his good fortune in finding someone willing to share and support his nomadic lifestyle. In the hands of a less assured songwriter eleven variations on a theme might sound limited at best, and at its worst mushy and contived. But Terry is on the top of his game here, spinning tales and melodies with such ease as to be almost unnerving. “Feel That Way Again” has one of the most engaging choruses I’ve heard in some time, while “Deeper Wells” and “This Should Be Home” speak directly to the hard work that helps forge a lasting relationship. None of this is relevatory. Much like Bob Dylan’s Nashville Skyling helped reinvent our notions of country music by extracting the essence of what made it pure, Stay Here With Me gives us a glimpse of why words that strike to the heart of relationships, when set to an engaging melody and played with precision and love, can still work wonders. I’m certainly not comparing this record to Dylan’s influential masterpiece, but in terms of sheer listening pleasure Jesse Terry’s 2103 gem can stake its own claim to greatness. ****1/2

Carol Kleyn Return of the Silkie Drag City Music Originally released in 1983 on the ultra obscure Turtle Dove label, songwriter and harpist Carol Kleyn’s third recording took her back to her beginnings. Her first album (all three have now been reissued by Drag City Music) was 1976’s Love Has Made Me Stronger, Stronger a sparsely arranged collection of piano, harp, and Kleyn’s own amazing voice. For 1980’s Takin’ the Time she — likely at the assistance of her label — added a full rock band with admittedly mixed results. That attempt failed to increase her audience while simultaneously jilting her small-in-number but impassioned followers. Here she returns to the basics of harp and voice but dubs in various nature sounds as befits the material.

26 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

Recorded in a barn that has since been converted to the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, Return of the Silkie is augmented by the sounds of ocean waves, seals, and various bird calls. It reflects Kleyn’s uncompromised commitment to environmentalism (Kleyn was attuned to the issue of global climate change long before it became fashionable), while equally anchored by her interest in Celtic music and mythology. As such it is the sort of record that no doubt has a limited audience. Those who are sympathetic to Kleyn’s sensibilities will be greatly rewarded. As to the music itself, Return of the Silkie stands out among her trio of highly regarded and collectible records; it is punctuated by folk legends and mystical traditions in ways that make in new age before the genre truly existed. Songs such as “Sailor in the Sun” and “Hello Mr. Drifter” are minor key masterpieces, portraying Kleyn’s affinity for transcendence, mobility, and a world beyond the material. As such, it might come across as simplistic or even naïve, but to me it’s a message worth keeping, more poignant and immediate than it was three decades past. I for one am grateful that Drag City has seen fit to reissue the entire catalog in such loving fashion. Kleyn herself — who now works full time in the field of environmental advocacy and marine life rescue — has helped oversee these efforts, connecting her past and present in ways that are both enjoyable and highly admirable. ****

Andrew Leahey & the Homestead S/T I’m embarrassed to say this disc, released nearly ten months ago, has, until now, lingered on my desk. Such is the plight of music reviewers who, even at the local level, are sent far more music than they can reasonably attend to. It’s a happy predicament, and while I understand a publicists’ desire to have a record reviewed reasonably soon after its release. In this case, the debut effort from Andrew Leahey and company, is too good to ignore. It’s homegrown at its finest. A reminder that even the most overexposed and diluted genre — and the all inclusive term “roots rock” certainly qualifies — can still have much to offer. Leahey is himself a former music journalist for a number of national publications; one of the few to make the elusive jump from observer to participant. His background in journalism shows. Leahey has a knack for crisp phrasing and clever (but not overly so) wordplay, but he also has a heck of a sense of melody.

While this album was recorded with a makeshift band — mostly friends and colleagues whose inexperience mirror his own — you’d hardly know it by the result. The songs range from breezy country/rock (“Heart off My Hands”), to balls out rock (““Penitentiary Guys” and “Virginia”), that grab you by the throat and refuse to let go. The backing band — anchored by guitarists Philip Heesen and Kerry Hutcherson — lay down the grooves, while the rhythm section of bassist Robbie King and drummer Matt Morton hold everything in place with a versatile mix of swing and swagger. Leahey’s voice finds that intangible balance between tender sweet and roadhouse tough and knows just when to call on which. He’s also a rollicking good piano player, lending playfulness to the record just when things threaten to get too heavy. All in all this is one heck of an impressive debut, well worth seeking out. While finishing this review I learned that Leahey had recently undergone life threatening brain surgery and was thankfully expected to make a slow but complete recovery. Given the enormous medical debts he’s no doubt incurred, anyone reading this now has an even better reason to visit www.andrewleaheymusic.com and support a worthy cause while adding an even more worthy release to your music shelf.****

Blood Washed Band Driftin’ Along House of Mercy Music Part Bakersfield brand country, and part tormented gospel plow rumination, Blood Washed Band’s Driftin’ Along is a powerhouse collection of songs that may have an eye on the eternal but are entrapped in the carnality of the here and now. Fronted by singer/guitarist Page Burkum the band — guitarist Jeremy Szopinski, bassist Quillan Roe, jack of all trades Erik Brandt, fiddler Chris Becknell, and drummer Levi Stugelmeyer (abetted by vocalist Angie Talle) — are one unified assemblage who play on each other’s strengths and somehow allow everyone ample space to show their stuff. Only they rarely do, which makes Driftin’ Along a grand lesson in teamwork. While the band doesn’t write the bulk of their material, they’ve a knack of finding just the right songs to get across their message of faithful redemption and the promise of a better world. Be it Hank Williams’ “Calling You” or a selection of songs by B. Larson written specifically for them, this is good time stuff, full of pinwheel rhythms, swirling vocals, and careening arrangements that never jump the rails. ‘CD’s’ continued on page 27


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sound experience The Folk Artistry of Dar Williams

‘CD’s’ continued from page 26

And while the confessing their sins part is no doubt genuine, one gets the sense that while Blood Washed Band is truly sorry for the their trespasses — both real and imagined — given half a chance they do them all over again. ****

The Horse’s Ha Water Drawn Fluff and Gravy Records By adopting your band name from a Dylan Thomas short story you’re pretty much showing your cards, and, in some snooty circles, opening yourself up to charges of reaching beyond your means. While the Chicago duo of Janet Bean (lead vocalist for Freakwater) and Jim Elkington have done just that, the music herein, while proudly building on a tradition of literate folk music, is anything but pretentious. In fact it’s beautifully constructed, moving, and downright gorgeous, evoking memories of the earliest years of Richard and Linda Thompson — as seen through a 21st century lens — and harkening back to Steeleye Span. While the opening “Conjured Caravans” seems a bit disjointed, with Bean’s lilting voice at odds with Elkington’s baritone growl, things quickly get much better. The title track is simply stunning, while “Bonesetter” shows how well the two can mesh. Strangely enough, while I truly do enjoy the vocal interplay, its “Sea Shanty”, the closing instrumental track that offers up the album’s most emotionally arresting moment. It’s as perfect a melody as I’ve heard this year, and helps finish off Water Drawn on a very high and satisfying note. ***1/2

Ten Years After Recorded Live (Expanded version) The cover of Ten Years After’s 1973 album, Recorded Live, depicts a giant reel-to-reel recorder, which certainly captures the era when this double-LP set was recorded. Approaching the end of their run — only one more album would come, Recorded Live is clearly a relic of its time. From the album cover photo of a reel-toreel recorder, to the stretched out arena rock improvisations (which in some strange way foretold the arrival of jam bands), the 21 tracks found herein — eight more than the original release — may be little more than excuses for Alvin Lee’s slow burning guitar solos, but that in itself isn’t a bad thing. Sure it’s a bit self indulgent, in a way albums of that period often were, but for fans of Lee and company, this generous expansion of the original should strike just the right power cord. ***1/2

BY JAMES

CASSARA

From the start Dar Williams has always been a bit of an outsider, an anomaly amongst the male dominated folk music scene of her day.

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Even with the emergence of such female artists as Shawn Colvin, Lucy Kaplansky, and Suzanne Vega, Williams stood slightly apart. While the others engaged in a more personal view, writing material that reflected their individual journeys and tribulations, Williams wrote from a more expansive perspective, looking at the world from without as well as within. Her best songs (“Christians and the Pagans” and “Teenagers Kick Our Butts” come readily to mind) also demonstrated a sense of humor largely absent in the slightly insular world of modern-day folk. She is also adept at avoiding the cloying and unnecessarily eccentric leanings of her contemporaries. It is with good reason that her songwriting and performing style has been compared to that of Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez, yet with an acidic sense of humor. Born in Mount Kisco, New York, but raised in nearby Chappaqua, Dar Williams was raised in a socially liberal and highly intellectual family — her parents were educated at Yale and Vassar — two traits which impacted her work to varying degrees. She began studying guitar at age nine and wrote her first song at 11. In high school she was interested in athletics, but an ankle injury led her to somewhat impulsively audition for the musical Godspell. She became active in drama, and by her senior year, after composing more music and writing plays, declared herself a playwright, blaming an “existential crisis” at age 16 for her creativity and sharp sense of humor. During her sophomore year at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, Williams spent a few months in Berkeley, California,

King Crimson The Road to Red Burning Shed/ Panegyric At 21 CDs, 1 DVD, 2 Blu-Ray discs, and a comprehensive booklet, not to mention exquisite packaging, The Road to Red is clearly the ultimate geek fest for King Crimson fans, and an overload for the senses. Culled from performances spanning the spring and summer of 1974, the discs essentially follow a roadmap of the band’s historic US tour, playing in support of 1972’s Larks Tongue in Aspic and the just released Starless and Bible Black. Sure it’s indulgent: There

where she wrote songs and began performing. After earning a B.A., she moved to Boston in 1990 to find a career in the arts, dabbling in everything from directing plays and operas, to performing. By the year’s end she was stage manager for the Opera Company of Boston. She also began taking voice lessons and, at the urging of her Dar Williams at the Grey Eagle, Saturday, December 7. voice coach, starting playing the local coffeehouse circuit. After two day. Williams knows her strengths as an artyears of struggle she abandoned Boston for the ist and wisely works within that structure. relaxed folksy, artsy atmosphere of NorthampDar Williams continues to tour reguton, Massachusetts. It was there she found her larly and, in addition to remaining a major niche, fitting in well with both the folk and presence on the concert trail in 2010 she university scene. released the career-spanning two-disc set After several self-released cassettes, WilMany Great Companions. It featured one liams made her proper debut in 1993 with compilation disc of fan favorites and anthe independent produced Honesty Room. other disc of newly recorded songs from her The album gained considerable critical accatalog performed in an acoustic format. claim for both her beautiful soprano voice And while her 2003 set Out There and her straightforward yet intriguing songs. Live/The Green World did a reasonable The following year she signed to Razor & job of capturing the essence of her shows, Tie Records, which reissued the album — in the only way to experience the artistry a slightly differing format — while Williams of Dar Williams is seeing her on stage. continued touring and building an audience. Which is precisely why her performance at Her second album, Mortal City (1995), the Grey Eagle is such a rare and not to be was similarly praised. Seizing the momentum, missed treat! Williams almost immediately began work on 1997’s End of the Summer, considered by many of her fans (including myself) to be her IF finest moment. But one mark of Williams’ YOU Dar Williams Saturday, career has been her consistency. GO December 7. Doors open at 7 Since then she’s released seven albums p.m. Tickets are priced at $22 in for the Razor and Tie label, and while each advance and $25 day-of, for this fully has their own distinctive personality they are seated, all ages show. The Grey Eagle, 185 remarkably sturdy and enduring. Much of Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232that has been her refusal to hastily grab hold 5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com of whatever new trend or style is dictating the

are no less than a dozen versions of “Starless” or the epochal “21st Century Schizoid Man” but isn’t that the point? Beautifully packaged with abundant sleeve notes and replica memorabilia, The Road to Red is clearly not intended for the faint of heart or light of wallet (it retails for slightly over $200). It further includes a stereo remix — courtesy of Robert Fripp and Steven Wilson — of the studio album Red, making this collection the perfect holiday gift for the King Crimson fanatic in your life. Especially if its’ yourself! *****

Bluegrass Holiday Benefit Featuring Town Mountain and Larry Keel. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Manna Foodbank.

IF YOU GO: Friday,

Town Mountain Photo: Joe Shymanski

December 20 at Isis Music Hall. Doors open at 5 p.m.; show begins at 9 p.m. All ages. $20, standing, some balcony seating. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com

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All Work and No Play

Then he worked around Asheville for years, first as a telephone solicitor for burglar alarms (you would be amazed at how cheap this service can be!), then for a different company selling home medical alerts with a hard sell that began by telling the person answering the Robo-Call that the product being sold had been purchased for the customer by a member of his family who wanted to help him out but was embarrassed by caring. He then worked for a major appliance outlet but that job fell apart with the sale of the store and the eventual property change from appliances to a popular motel chain. With that he decided to try his hand at being a blackjack dealer but found that his inability to remember number sequences led to that job fading into the night. He felt that a personal assessment of his talents might be better in the warm atmosphere of the General Store so it was a rainy Wednesday morning when he parked his Chevy truck in the side parking area of the General Store, and walking into this wondrous salute to all things great and small, almost tripped over the wash bucket being used by Mrs. Storekeep to wash the old wooden floor. “Sorry, Curmudge,” she said, “I didn’t expect to see anybody this morning until the rain let up.” “I’m sorry, too,” he answered, “but I’ve been getting very discouraged lately about the world in general. My daily glooms seemed to be telling me that a cup of coffee would be just the thing to brighten up my day.” “I’ll brew a new pot,” she said, “just give me a few minutes to mop things up.”

So with still-dripping shoes he walked to the back of the store where the Post Office maintained a branch of boxes. Finding his own repository he twirled the letter combination, opened the box and removed some bills: a circular for subscription rebate for Harper’s Bazaar that featured an article on the return of Madonna (he had no idea she had been gone); a special deal on The Wall Street Journal; a large and colorful magazine published by the

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Southern Comfort

the curmudgeon Note: It should be remembered by those who have been following the exploits of The Curmudgeon, that before the transformation into his present character — and after a two-year sojourn in the US Army — he completed a degree in liberal arts.

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COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

PETER LOEWER Illustration by Peter Loewer

electric company featuring fun ways to bring the electric thrill to his back yard by installing a wet bar and an electric bar-b-cue; and, finally an invitation to be first in line for buying a condo located on the shores of an obscure lake located on the side of an obscure stream in the hinterlands of Madison County. While he read his mail, silence reigned in the store; the only sound that of Mrs. Storekeep’s mopping, and the rustle of his advertising pages as he ripped up each page and consigned such to the large trashcan over on his right.

I’ve been getting very discouraged lately about the world in general. Cityfella entered the store, and being a most perceptive man (though he was born in Georgia), he immediately sensed that the Curmudgeon was not in his usual tip-top frame of mind. Removing his Ingle’s baseball cap, Fella walked over to wish Curmudgeon his best wishes and prepared to listen to a great amount of vocalizing about the state of the world — but nothing emerged from the Curmudgeon’s mouth. There is something to be said about personal gloom but this was the kind of day that very little would be forthcoming. “Curmudgeon,” said Cityfella, “I do feel your pain because this morning I received notice from the managers of the property our vacation cabin is on, that some thirty-five years ago it was a dumping ground for a very large manufacturer of industrial electric hardware and certain chemicals have leached into the ground.” “It seems to me,” said Curmudgeon, “that today would be the best day for us to invite the Storekeeps to an early lunch, where the food is reasonably good and the local beers are available in refreshing amounts.” And turning to the lady with the bucket, and using her real first name asked: “Elaine, care to dump that bucket and call your husband in from the storage shed to join us, and at the same time put a sign in the door “Back at 3:00?” “I would be delighted,” she answered, and soon the four of them were in the Curmudgeon’s Chevy, off for an unexpected adventure that will be reported in next month’s column. Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

28 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

Wishes and Hopes for a Better Year in 2014

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I don’t know if other writers would agree with me or not, but I think the holidays are the worse time of the year to write. At least it is for me! It is a true time of much procrastination. There is so much serious commentary to write about, I find it hard to write light, so I think I will just write my personal wish list for 2014. Most anything will be better for me than 2013 has been; I call it my year of physical bad luck, as I live with osteoarthritis in my bones. For the new year, I wish for peace in these United States. The killing in this country needs to stop. I read today that the American population, “all of US,” are so accustomed to carrying and using guns on other people and animals that it is really not that big of a deal nowadays. This is truly sad, SAD! I wish that in 2014 in America there are no more hungry children and older generations not being fed. No more little children running to a family next door, begging for a sandwich. This is America; this should not be happening. I wish that no more young women and men will be shot in the face, just trying to get help from “any” house in America. Comment: They just needed help! They did not deserve to be killed. If that had happened in the 60s I would not be here to write this column now. I wish that the child sex abusers in Asheville would either go to prison if convicted or leave western North Carolina for good. Comment: Look in the local newspaper or listen to WLOS. How many times a week do we need to read or watch these evil people. If they are just passing through or if they live here, hit the road and never return!

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

I hope Republicans and their Governor will get my drift. Their unknowledgeable members are carrying the reins in Raleigh, and they are doing bad deeds to all state residents and families. These people have no conscious. They are changing what used to be one of the best states in this nation into a place no one will want to live in the near future. I really think more people in this country should get “their conscious thinking mind back.” The next time you pick up a gun and point it at a person or a defenseless animal, stop and think; there are better ways to handle a problem than by grabbing and firing a gun. There is much more I could write on the many issues happening right here in Asheville. My list is longer so I will save those comments for another column. I wish for all of the folks like me, who walk softly on this earth and live creative lives, more happiness in 2014. We must stay strong. Have a wonderful holiday season with your partner. Come on back next year, we still have lots of work to do. Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

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CHRISTMAS AT CONNEMARA

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site will host holiday musicians and storytellers every Saturday until New Years. This festive celebration highlights the Sandburg family tradition of singing holiday music. The holiday program features award-winning musicians, storytellers and performers, who will share regional holiday traditions. Enjoy guided tours of the Sandburg home (small fee for tours), decorated in the simple style of the Sandburg’s with poinsettias and a traditionally decorated Christmas tree.

IF YOU GO: Music and storytelling, Saturdays at 11 a.m.

Make-and-take vintage holiday crafts Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site is located three miles south of Hendersonville off U.S. 225 on Little River Road. Call (828) 693-4178, or visit www.nps.gov/carl


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We at Moe’s Original Bar B Que appreciate the team at Rapid River Magazine Magazine. Thank you for your long lasting commitment in highlighting the creative culture of Hendersonville and our greater western North Carolina region.

Aaryn Joyner

As a new restaurant on N. Main Street, we’re thankful for the opportunity to showcase our delicious Bama-style BBQ!

Moe’s Original Bar B Que, Hendersonville, NC • (336) 469-1536

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 29


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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios

THE JONAS GERARD RIVERVIEW COLLECTION

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New explorations in flow painting techniques and work on larger canvases has caused Jonas Gerard Fine Art to expand to an additional location. The perfect venue was found in Riverview Station. Currently the Jonas Gerard Riverview Collection is temporarily housed in studio #104. In early 2014 the gallery will move into its permanent 4,700 sq. ft. home, in studio #150. The new location will be a blank canvas for Jonas to explore the nature of creativity, light and color. Together, the Jonas Gerard Fine Art and Jonas Gerard Riverview Collection art spaces will house the creative rewards of a lifetime spent in art. Jonas Gerard Fine Art is located at 240 Clingman Avenue, in Asheville’s River Arts District. Studio and Gallery are open every day from 10-6 p.m. For more information, visit www.jonasgerard.com


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INTERVIEW WITH AWARD-WINNING PLEIN AIR PAINTER

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INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Cheryl Keefer

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Rapid River Magazine: What are

some things you have been working on recently?

Cheryl Keefer: I have been work-

ing on intimate little landscapes and cityscapes that will be featured at The Red House Galleries, Black Mountain in December, opening Friday, December 6, from 5-7 p.m. These small paintings range in size from 4x4" and are sized and priced for gift-giving. Painting small is so gratifying. You can say a great deal with a little canvas!

RRM: Why do you paint? CK: So awed by simple

truth and beauty, I need a creative outlet. I sometimes write poetry, but painting is my preferred medium. The paintings are inspired by everyday scenes, a lingering sunset, the misty mountains, glistening rocks in a stream. I am fascinated by God’s magnificence

me in my tracks! Patterns made by colorful reflections in wet pavement also interest and inspire reflected in this me. Viewers respond ever changing with emotion to my world. work, and I think it’s I often because we tend to French Broad Afternoon, 5x7" oil on enjoy painting respond with emolinen by Cheryl Keefer. outdoors, en tion to scenes that plein air. Using primarily oil, and somespark a memory. I hope you enjoy times watercolor, painting allows me to what you see! communicate my excitement about the Works by Cheryl Keefer can be visual world.

RRM: How has your work changed? CK: I find human interaction with the

land more and more intriguing and have really enjoyed exploring this theme through painting cityscapes. I compose vehicles, figures, buildings and sidewalks to capture various moods of being in the city. City lights seem festive at night, rain and a figure underneath an umbrella can be a bit somber. The pure visual stimulation of the city, fleeting car lights, changing street Cheryl Keefer, lights, and stop lights... stop fine artist.

INTERVIEW WITH ENCAUSTIC ARTIST

Julia Fosson

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about your artwork.

Julia Fosson: Painting lets me com-

municate through a visual conversamunicate tion. I love to tell a story in a painting and hope that the viewers enjoy listening visually. I started painting in the late 80’s and discovered my passion for working in encaustics (beeswax, resin and pigment) in 2003. There is something about the texture, the translucencies and the way the light is held in the wax. I love the challenges of painting with wax as it goes from liquid to solid quickly. Most of my paintings have 15 to 25 layers of wax. I believe in creating work with a solid structure, not unlike building a house; the layers act like footers. This

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found at these fine galleries:

The Red House Galleries, 310 State St., Black Mountain Seven Sisters Gallery, Cherry St., Black Mountain Mahogany House Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College St., Asheville The Wedge Studio, 129 Roberts St. 2-A, Asheville

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

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INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

have made a home in Asheville. I was a Hand Therapist for 19 years. allows me the ability Though I loved my to dig, scrape and work, I realized my use a lot of heat to passion for painting. develop a smooth Photo: Keli Keach Photography I have exhibited work surface. I believe since 2000 in solo and group shows the ceramic-like shine on my works is in Connecticut, Chicago, North from my technique and the way I heat Carolina and received two individual the wax. artist grants while in Connecticut. I I like to use visual components in am currently in The Hatchery Stuthe work, like chairs, couches, simple dios and a member in the River Arts house structures, and trees with broken District in Asheville. swings. My chairs are empty which can evoke an absence and a prescence immeRRM: Tell us a little about your diately. Chairs are about people; each difthoughts on why we should “Shop ferent and not one are exactly the same, and Buy Local” this holiday season. like people. The houses are just a simple structure to evoke a thought about home JF: It’s really simple: local business or house, and my trees are new and they gives back locally. For instance, I use deal with thinking moments. a local panel maker, and when I sell Originaly from Connecticut, I

continued on page 32

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Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 31


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local holiday shopping INTERVIEW WITH JASON REDICK AND JASON BROWN OF HENDERSONVILLE’S

Angry Giant Forge

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Angry Giant Forge

Jason Brown: Jason and I met at college

and right away became fast friends. I had and never met anyone with as many talents as I have, and we realized that we could start a blacksmithing business together. Some of my talents besides blacksmithing are: artist, glass engraver, stone and metal sculptor, wood and antler carver, leather burner, and lapidary arts and welding. Jason Redick’s talents include: blacksmithing, wood turner, lapidary arts wood worker, leather craft and welder. As a bow and arrow maker, he knaps his own points for hunting and making necklaces. So, with all of our combined talents, we can make virtually anything.

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The custom of carving a wooden spoon for someone you love has been a custom in Wales since the 1600s. From this tradition we got the term “spooning,” in regards to courtship.

RRM: Do you have

more European items, other than the Russian nesting dolls? Russia is not part of Europe you know!

SB: That would be the Pol-

Austrian Handpainted Eggs

RRM: What’s your most unusual item? SB: For sure, the Welsh Love Spoons.

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

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Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

32 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

quantity purchases of two or more items. We are able to handle custom orders with a fast turn-around time. Some of the gifts we craft include fireplace sets, B-B-Q sets, steak turners, knifes for collectors and culinary use, and one-of-a-kind bottle openers. We can also create larger items such as tables and benches.

our community along with supporting all of the local artists, and it helps us believe in the American dream. Jason Brown Plus it creates pride in great American quality that can be trusted to last. Wouldn’t you like to know that it was made here and not over seas? We give a 100% guarantee on our products; if it breaks under normal use we will fix it or replace it at no extra cost to the consumer. And we try to recycle when possible.

popular line?

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JB: We give price breaks on

JB: It helps support

RRM: What’s your most

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holiday specials?

thoughts on buying and shopping local this holiday season.

from Belgium; wool scarves, capes, and hats from Ireland; decorative eggs from Austria; and much more.

Angry Giant Forge 514 Jones Rd. Fletcher, NC 28732 Jason R. (828) 273-3213 Jason B. (828) 785-3091

ures made by Carruth Studios in Ohio.

RRM: What’s the favorite part of your job?

SB: Definitely, my customers. Some

have never seen these types of items before and are amazed to learn about the customs and legends associated with them. Others have lived in Europe and love to come in to reminisce and share good memories of their time spent there. If your readers mention this article, I’ll be happy to give them 15% off any purchase.

SB: Ok, I stretched the

Susan’s European Gifts

term Europe a bit. But yes, I have water jugs and other glass things from Blenko, a 6th generation family of glass-blowers in West Virginia. Also whimsical stone fig-

‘Julia Fosson’ continued from page 31

he benefits as well as the local lumbar yard, etc. It helps me to support my community, not only the River Arts District, but the city of Asheville. You don’t have to be a msater collector or curator to buy art, you just need to see it and let your heart follow. What better way this holiday season but to give a gift of original art?

DENNIS RAY

RRM: What are some of your

RRM: Tell us your

‘Susan’s European Gifts’ continued from page 23

ish Pottery. I have plates, mugs, serving bowls, etc., in more than a dozen different patterns. Not only are they beautiful, but they are oven, dishwasher, and microwave safe.

INTERVIEWED BY

419 North Main Street Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828) 694-1022

RRM: What are some of your holiday studio

plans?

JF: This year will be the first time I will have

greeting cards of my work – ONLY for the month of December. I haven’t had greeting cards in this studio as in prior studio’s. Now that I have been in my studio for more than two years, I feel it’s a good time to have them during the holiday season for gift giving.

Julia Fosson Julia Fosson.

Photo by Keli Keach Photography

Hatchery Studio’s, 1 Roberts Street, #201, Asheville’s River Arts District www.juliafosson.com jfosson@mac.com, (860) 930-8166


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artful living A New Cosmology

BY

BILL WALZ

“Evolution occurs in a cosmic context, on a planet under a star, so terrestrially evolved brains are well equipped to construct a rich and accurate cosmological story… the Universe has, in a sense, made us in its own image — meaning we’ve evolved with a natural ability to understand Nature… We’re descended from stars… and evolving within Nature has shaped our intuition in such a way that we can comprehend the cosmological story. In a sense, we’re children of Nature, at home in the Universe.”

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~ Mark Whittle, Professor of Astrophysics, University of Virginia

To bring up the topics of spirituality and religion in any cross-section gathering of contemporary society is the proverbial can of worms. To intersect science and religion in the conversation spills the can on to the floor. And to throw politics into the mix can set off a riot. We have a very difficult time talking with each other concerning these topics; we rather have the tendency to talk at each other — vigorously, and at times, violently. A big part of why these topics invoke such energy and argument is because they are conversations into suppositions about truth; they are even stabs at absolute Truth, and what can be more important? Religion is the discussion of the origin, meaning and destiny of existence, and the manner in which these beliefs are institutionalized, with a related conversation concerning ethics thrown in, all in mythic, subjective language. Science also addresses the origin, meaning and destiny of existence, but the emphasis is on the observable, measurable, and quantifiable, in objective language. The social sciences — philosophy, psychology, anthropology, sociology and political science — attempt the same, but since the topics are so subjective, objectivity is very difficult. The ethics conversation is also of great importance in these scientific discussions, although often not as vigorously applied as it ought to be.

Hepatitis C

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“Bruce, can I talk with you for a minute?” Dr. Burnstock spoke quietly to his neighbor. “Sure, Doc. What’s up?” Bruce followed the doctor away from the neighborhood group. “Do you mind if I ask you a personal question?” “Sure,” Bruce responded, though his face registered surprise. “What’s this all about?” “How long have you had those small blistered areas on your neck?” “What?” Bruce slapped his hand on the back of his neck, trying to hide the most recent lesions. “Oh, those. I don’t know. Just a few weeks I guess.” “You have scars from other lesions that are older than a few weeks. How long, Bruce?” “I guess maybe six months. Actually, it’s come and gone for a year or two — or three. I don’t know really,” Bruce’s face changed from

A big part of the problem lies in the failure of religion and science to recognize that they really need to be converging rather than splintering the conversation. We’re caught in our typically human dualistic conundrum of “either-or.” Somehow the simple observation that the discussion concerning the truth of the way things are has to be a single conversation eludes us. The truth has to be the truth, applicable universally. As a saying that has emerged in recent political conversation goes: “Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but no one is entitled to their own facts,” yet that seems to be what happens as contradictory opinions are presented as if they are facts. The history of humanity’s conversation about truth has been plagued by a recurring theme where belief, that is, a story about the way things are as we imagine it, keeps getting substituted for the way things actually are. Dogma gets foisted as fact. Metaphor is arguing with metaphor. Trouble is sure to ensue. Buddhism has taken a very constructive approach to this problem for thousands of years. Certainly debates amongst Buddhists occur, but Buddhism, from its very origins has been able to keep these debates rather civil by noticing that dogma is the bane of truth and cautions against confusing the way we think things are from the way they really are.

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

deception to worry. “Why? What’s wrong?” “It’s called porphyria cutanea tarda,” the doctor explained. “It means your body is not processing a particular chemical in your blood. There are several possible causes.” The doctor paused. “I was reading today about a particular disease that sneaks up on you.” He paused again, considering. “You’re about 59 or 60, yes?” “Sixty-one next April. Why?” Bruce was now paying close attention. “Three-fourths of all Hepatitis C is found in those born between 1945 and 1965.” Dr. Burnstock smiled wryly. “Remember those years? The 1970’s?” “Yeah, some years, huh?” Bruce laughed softly. “I was kinda wild back then.” “How wild, Bruce?” The doctor was now very serious. “ Drugs? Shooting up?” “Yeah, pretty wild.” “You might have Hepatitis C, Bruce. It’s a serious disease. Most of the liver transplants

Dark Matter, Millenium Simulation

Neural Network

The very important Buddhist concept of “emptiness” actually allows that all things are empty of absolute nature because we only have a picture of reality as our minds create it. It allows that everyone is free to have their own opinion, but these opinions ought not be foisted off on anyone else. Rather, every opinion, every point of view must be examined very carefully over and over again with the fullest application of all human faculties of observation and understanding to ever-improve our approximation of what any phenomenon actually is. It also states that no phenomenon stands alone, rather always in infinite interconnectedness and interdependence with all phenomena, that there is no single phenomenon other than the Universe itself, beyond actual comprehension.

For years, Westerners attempting to understand Buddhism have surrendered to allowing it to be more a philosophy of life, a psychology, a study of mind, than a religion. The area of Buddhism that does clearly fall into the realms of religion are in its teachings concerning the non-material aspects of existence and about ethics. Here too, however, whereas the major world religions seem to teach perspectives of exclusion and judgment, Buddhism teaches inclusion, insight, investigation and tolerance. The Dalai Lama has even made a very great point of saying that where scientific and modern understanding demonstrate error in Buddhist teaching, it is the religious teaching that ought to bow and give way. With this open, searching, non-dogmatic, even non-dualistic perspective as central to Buddhism, I find it best to consider Buddhism, rather than a religion, a cosmology, the field of exploration that seems to me to be open and integrative, to contain the domains that have been compartmentalized into spirituality, religion, philosophy, science and even politics as basically one gestalt. As we are at a critical historical moment in Humanity’s evolution where divisive dogmas and interests are threatening to tear apart not only the social fabric, but the ecologic fabric of continued on page 36

are done for people who have had liver failure because of Hepatitis C. We also get a lot of liver cancer from this disease. In fact, a recent idea is to test everyone in your age group.” “Wow, I had no idea,” Bruce whispered. “I thought that came from blood transfusions.” “It did — some — before 1992 when we started testing for it in all blood transfusions. But the largest source is IV drug use, sharing needles, getting tats with unclean instruments — that sort of thing. In about 15% of the cases, the body heals itself. In 85% of cases the infection quietly persists over the years, eventually 30-40% getting cirrhosis — with liver failure, maybe 10% developing cancer.” “Can it be treated? How do I know if I have it? What can we do, doc?” “Whoa, slow down.” The doctor patted his friend. “We don’t know for sure if it’s Hepatitis C. And yes, we can test for it. And yes, there are some excellent new treatments for it that are 95% effective. But first, let’s find out if that’s what you have. Can you come in tomorrow?”

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 33


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what to do guide Tuesday, December 3

Enchanted Broadway Holiday Features “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” “Carol of the Bells,” and “Some Children See Him.” 7:30 p.m. in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at WCU. $5; free for students.

December 4-31

Deck the Trees The Monte Vista Hotel presents its annual Christmas Celebration. 24 beautiful and unique hand-decorated Christmas trees will be on display. Monte Vista Hotel, 308 West State St., Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-8870, or visit www.themontevistahotel.net.

Thursday, December 5

Karen Keil Brown Reception Featuring original art work. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. On display through January 8, 2014. Brevard Element Spa and Shop, 29 West French Broad St., Brevard, NC. www.elementsspashop.com

Thursday, December 5

Show and Tell TAPAS (Teaching Artists Presenting in Asheville Schools) showcase their works.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

A percentage of sales will benefit artist residencies. 5:30-8:30 p.m., 5 Walnut Wine Bar, downtown Asheville.

December 5, 12 & 19

Skin Care Demonstrations 6-8 p.m. $10 includes one complimentary glass of wine, hors d‘oeuvres, and a $5 discount on any purchase of Bellanina products. RSVP to Katie Hughes (828) 452-3848 or Katie@sunbursttrout.com. Sunburst Market, 142 N. Main Street in Waynesville, NC. Visit www.sunburstmarket.com.

Friday, December 6

Arrayed in Light Opening reception for Judy Rentner from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The exhibition features oil paintings infused with the light and color of North Carolina landscapes using the palette knife. On display December 1-31, 2013. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, across from Pritchard Park in downtown Asheville. For more information, call 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegalleryof-art.com. Radiant by Judy Rentner

Friday, December 6

The Crossroads Opening reception 7-10 p.m. for works by Adam Void. On display through January 3, 2014. PUSH Skateshop & Gallery, 25 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. www.pushtoyproject.com

December 6, 7 & 8

Biltmore Village Dickens Festival A magical weekend of merriment, music and memories — all on the streets and in the shops, restaurants, and galleries of Historic Biltmore Village. Hours: Friday, 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, 11-7 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 274-8788 or visit www.biltmorevillage. com.

December 6, 7 & 8

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever In this hilarious Christmas tale, a couple struggles to put on a church Christmas pageant. Terrific for family audiences! Directed by Cary Nichols. Performances Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets range from $12-$22. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 2541320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

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Saturday, December 7

Toe River Studio Tour

Christmas Dance Party

Free holiday open studio tour of galleries in Mitchell and Yancey Basket by Counties. Friday, 12-4, Billie Ruth Saturday and Sunday, Sudduth 10-5. Reception Friday, 5-7 at the Spruce Pine TRAC Gallery. For more information: (828) 682-7215 or www.toeriverarts.org.

Dance party for adults at the Waynesville Recreation Center from 7 to 8:45 p.m. Dance music and songs provided by Paul Indelicato from 7 to 8 p.m. Open to all. $5 per person. Please bring a finger food dish of your choice. For more information call the Waynesville Parks and Recreation Department at (828) 456-2030 or email recprograms@townofwaynesville.org

Annual Holiday Open House Enjoy a celebration of the holiday spirit and shop from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Alot of specials and give aways. Visit our Facebook page each day for our “Daily Deals.” Each day of the week we will offer a different special. Mine and Yours Consignments, 234 New Leicester Hwy., Asheville, 28806. (828) 251-9231, www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

Saturday, December 7

Coloring Book Launch

Saturday, December 7

Christmas in Appalachia A fundraising concert for Shindig on the Green. 7:30 p.m. in the Upper Anderson Auditorium at Montreat ConWhitewater ference Center. Bluegrass Company Headliner Whitewater Bluegrass Company, and The Griggs. Adults $20; Children 12 and under $10; Groups of 10 or more, $15 ea. Reserve tickets at info@folkheritage.org or call (828) 258-6101 x345.

Saturday, December 7

A Touch of Gold! Gold Leaf with Heather Shirin, noon - 4:30 p.m. $65 plus $15 for materials. Use delicate gold leaf to create a finished She Sleeps with piece to take home. the Angels, by Heather Shirin. Wonderful fun for holiday art making! More details at www.310ART.com. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St, Asheville’s River Arts District.

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p.m. at Echoview Fiber Mill, 76 Jupiter Road, Weaverville, NC. Make reservations by calling (828) 665-1386 or email: lorien@alpacafleece.com.

December 11-29

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol Starring Michael MacCauley. Wed-Sat at 7:30 p.m.; Sun at 2 p.m. Tickets: $16-$28. Call (828) 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

December 12-14

Mystery Fukubukuro Hot mulled wine, new work from Akira Satake, holiday wear and gift items from BZDesign, and festive Yuzu Patisserie sweets. 11-6 p.m. at Gallery Mugen, studios C & D in the Cotton Mill Studios, 122 Riverside Drive in the River Arts District, www. gallerymugen.com

December 7 & 14

Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale 10-50% off ceramics, jewelry, fiber, paper, glass and wood crafts and fine art. At the Folk Art Center, Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. For more details, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

Opening for group show MYTH, and the Launch of Jake LaGory’s coloring book Cryptozoology. 7 to 9 p.m., ZaPow!, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. www.zapow.com

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Sunday, December 8

Sounds of the Season Performance featuring faculty and students in small chamber groups and larger ensembles. 3 p.m. in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. $5-$15. Call (828) 227-2479 or visit bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

Sunday, December 8

Chamber Music Messiah Unique and beautiful performance of the Christmas portion of Handel’s masterpeice. A Bassoonist benefit for Homeward Rosalind Buda. Bound presented by Pan Photo: Frank Zipperer Harmonia. 4 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, downtown Asheville. $25 suggested donation; $30/family; no one turned away for lack of funds. (828) 254-7123, www.pan-harmonia.org.

Monday, December 9

Fiber Animal Farmers’ Forum Speakers will address ways to increase the value and market for local fleece and fiber. All farmers who currently raise fiber animals, or would like to, are welcome. The cost is $10/person, which includes lunch. Presented by Local Cloth Inc. from 11 a.m. to 2

The Bernsteins are Back! The always inappropriate Bernstein clan present their 31st Annual Christmas Spectacular at Asheville Community Theatre, 372 Depot St., in Asheville. Thursday, December 12 at 7:30 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, December 13 & 14 at 7:30 and 10 p.m. $15 for Thursday and late shows; $18 Friday & Saturday. Not suitable for children or those easily offended. For more details visit www.themagnetictheatre.com

Thursday, December 12

Poetry Reading The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center presents an evening of poetry with Caleb Beissert, Landon Caleb Beissert Godfrey, Beth Keefauver, Griffin Payne and Eric Steineger. $7; $5 for BMCM+AC members and students. 7:30 p.m., 56 Broadway, downtown Asheville. (828) 350-8484, www.blackmountaincollege.org.

Friday, December 13

Christmas Poems A reading and writing workshop with Tina Barr, noon to 1 p.m., free. Bring a lunch. At the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For details call (828) 669-0930, or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org

Saturday, December 14

The Village Potters Exquisite, contemporary ceramics, from functional to decorative collector’s pieces. 10-6 p.m., Riverview Station #180, 191 Lyman Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. (828) 253-2424, www.thevillagepotters.com

December 15

A Classical Christmas For those who cherish a classical Christmas, the Asheville Symphony Orchestra presents the most beautiful music of the season. Music Director Daniel Meyer presents a portion of Handel’s Messiah alongside orchestral arrangements of seasonal carols.

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what to do guide Accompanied by the Asheville Symphony Chorus, directed by Michael Lancaster, and a cast of superb vocal soloists. Sunday Matinee at 3 p.m. Abigail Fischer, mezzo soprano Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Purchase tickets throught the ASO office at: (828) 254-7046

Best in Show

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UNC Asheville Concerts Wednesday, December 4 Blue Ridge Orchestra Open Rehearsal. Community orchestra directed by Milton Crotts holds open rehearsal for holiday concerts, 7 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Free and open to the public. Info: (828) 251-6140 or olliasheville.com.

Thursday, December 5

A Swannanoa Solstice

through January 3, 2014

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Experience the reflection, connection and celebration of the season with award-winning Al Petteway, Amy White recording artists and Robin Bullock. Al Petteway, Amy Photo: Stephen Houseworth White and Robin Bullock. Hosted by Doug Orr who is joined by a wealth of storytellers, dancers and special guest musicians. Performances at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: Regular $38, Student $33, Children 12 and under $15; Students day-of-show, $10. (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

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Judi Lampert and friends in Concert. Flutist Lampert of UNC Asheville’s Music Department faculty performs in different instrumental settings. 7:30 p.m., Lipinsky Auditorium, $5; students free. Info: http:// music.unca.edu/ or (828) 251-6432.

Sunday, December 8 Music Department Holiday Concert. Holiday music performed by various UNC Asheville student ensembles. 4 p.m. in Lipinsky Auditorium, $5; students free. Info: http://music.unca.edu/ or (828) 2516432.

Monday, December 9

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

In the Subtle Avenues of the Maze Mixed media works, oils, and acrylic paintings by Kathryn Ervin. On display through Friday, January 3, 2014 at MESH Gallery, 114-B West Union Street, downtown Morganton, NC. For details call (828) 4371957 or visit www.meshgallery.com.

Reuter Center Singers Holiday Concert, directed by Chuck Taft. Classical, popular, show tunes and other favorites. 7:30 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Free and open to the public. Info: (828) 251-6140 or olliasheville.com.

Mixed media work by Kathryn Ervin

Tasty Weasel Taproom

January 23-26, 2014

Fringe Arts Festival Features local and out of town artists, presenting original works that push boundaries. Purchase tickets January 20-24 from Fringe Central at Firestorm Café, located on Commerce Street, near the Bebe Theatre. More details at www.ashevillefringe.org.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Book the trolley for a group trip to the brewery! Contact Aaron Baker at aaron@ oskarblues.com.

January 25, 2014

Taste of Opera The Asheville Lyric Opera hosts their annual Winter Gala fundraiser at the Crowne Plaza Expo Center at 6 p.m. The evening includes an operatic concert, delicacies from Asheville’s finest restaurants, and a silent auction. $75 per seat. To purchase tickets call (828) 236-0670 or visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

Two Saturday trolley pickups! Departs at 4:45 p.m. from Westville Pub in W. Asheville and drops back off at 8:45 p.m. Departs at 5 p.m. from the Aloft Hotel in Asheville and drops back off at 9 p.m. Reserve your seats for free.

Taproom hours: noon to 8 p.m. Sunday to Thursday; noon to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Oskar Blues, 342 Mountain Industrial Drive, Brevard, NC. Call (828) 883-2337 or visit www.oskarblues.com.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Medical Guardian Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month. 800-892-4631

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller

Bookkeepers Needed

Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

For immediate hire. Must be a minimum of 18 yrs of age. Attention to detail, strong organizational ability. Send resume to Stevenfox31@ hotmail.com.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 35


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Just Ducky www.justduckyoriginals.com

Artetude Gallery www.artetudegallery.com

Kirk’s Collectibles & Custom Framing (404) 625-1689

Art Appraisal Services, LLC www.artappraisalcarolina.com The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com Art MoB - www.artmobstudios.com www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com Asheville Salt Cave www.ashevillesaltcave.com BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Blk. Mtn. Center for the Arts www.blackmountainarts.org Black Mtn. Iron Works www.BlackMountainIron.com Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com

Karen Keil Brown www.karenkbrown.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net Mangum Pottery www.mangumpottery.com McCarter Gallery www.mccarter-gallery.com Mine & Yours Consignments mineandyoursconsignments.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com Mellow Mushroom

Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

(828) 236-9800

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

Newbridge Cafe www.thenewbridgecafe.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Charlotte Street Computers

(828) 225-6600

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Chifferobe www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Satellite Gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com

Common Ground (828) 458-1566

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Spice & Tea Exchange www.spiceandtea.com

Earth Guild www.earthguild.com

Starving Artist (828) 693-3191

Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeil.com

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

Fresh Produce Clothing www.freshproduceasheville.com

Sunburst Market www.sunburstmarket.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Susan’s European Gifts (828) 694-1022

Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com

The Green Room Cafe www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

True Blue Art Supply (828) 251-0028

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

(828) 253-4800

life on the planet Earth, we very much need to bring a new conversation into our exploration of the truth of the way things are that is open, integrative and universal. We need to move humanity forward into a future that is clearly and necessarily marked by expanding integration and unity as humanity understands more of its origins and place in the vastness of the stars, and that conversation, both religious and scientific, might be best served under the nomenclature of cosmology. Cosmology is a particularly useful paradigm because it has always comfortably contained both myth and science, that is the intuitive-symbolic and the empirical-observational understanding, and that our best approximations of truth combine both of these human mental faculties. It is the explanation and exploration of the origin and nature of existence spanning everything from ancient creation myths to modern-day astrophysics and quantum physics. What is exceptionally exciting is that the world of physics, in both its intuitive theoretical dimension and its hard experimental science capacities for observation and measurement, are dovetailing into a new creation story. This new story can supersede the cosmological stories of the world’s religions, allowing them to bow, as the Dalai Lama suggests, to a new perspective that seems to integrate a great Universal intelligence, symbolically nomenclatured as the myriad names of

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Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

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“God,” with a story of consciousness as the evolutionary trait of humanity, of all the Universe for that matter, linking the material universe with the immaterial dimension of consciousness. Consciousness energy becoming and infusing material energy is a cosmological story thousands of years old. Only now, science is tremblingly close to proving it. Interestingly, humanity is seemingly coming full circle. From Creation myths in antiquity explaining the immaterial dimension of the Godhead manifesting into the material world with humans as the God-head’s special and necessary link between the realms of symbolic consciousness and physical manifestation, to modern science realizing consciousness as an inherent property in all matter, only requiring a sufficiently complex coalescing of the great diversity of matter through evolutionary processes into a unified organism for consciousness-in-matter to be self-realizing. Human beings realizing consciousness as a product of the totality and the particular of the Universe is the completion of that circle. There is no contradiction between Creationism and evolutionary science. There is intelligent design, and the intelligence is inherent in the Universe itself. Modern science may be about to make the connection through discoveries in quantum physics, dark-matter, dark-energy and the Higgs-Boson field that the very complexity and connectedness that allows the immensely intricate organism that is a human brain to manifest consciousness just may be a micro-version of the true nature of the vastness of the Universe. It may be that we are created in God’s image, and the projection of that image, rather than being the physical appearance of a human being, is the vast web of neural connection that is the cerebral cortex of a human brain that is tantalizingly similar to what we understand of the web created by dark matter and dark energy, and gives rise to self-aware consciousness. “Evolving within Nature has shaped our intuition in such a way that we can comprehend the cosmological story. In a sense, we’re children of Nature, at home in the Universe.” And so, it is time for us to stop arguing, to realize, as visionary Buckminster Fuller described, that we are the citizens of “space ship Earth.” That the Earth itself is an organism with a field of mind organized by the billions of individual minds in a single field of consciousness that is humanity, linked with all the consciousness of the trillions of fellow organisms sharing our journey through the Universe, to fulfill a destiny of Unity in individual diversity at home in the Universe. This is the new Cosmological story and conversation that I hope is only beginning.

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness.

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He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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Hey Hey Cupcake www.heyheycupcake.com

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

Angry Giant Forge angrygiantforge@hotmail.com

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Join renowned hiking author and guide, Danny Bernstein, December 17 on Old Sugarlands Trail for a short day-hike. Enjoy a 3.9 mile hike along Little Pigeon River in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Visit historic homesites, Sugarlands Cemetery and nearby Cataract Falls. $10 for current Friends of the Smokies members; $35 for non-members, who will receive a complimentary membership. To register call (828) 452-0720 or email outreach.nc@friendsofthesmokies.org.


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local holiday shopping Points of Light

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Points of Light crystal and mineral gallery, located in North Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, is a wonderful source for fine crystals, gems, minerals and living art. The gallery, which boasts an amazing collection of huge Quartz crystals, including a seven-foot-tall Agate geode, is much more than just another rock shop. Points of Light's collection includes many unique Quartz clusters and Amethyst geodes

Bolivian Amethyst Cluster

in addition to healing stones, mineral specimens and a wide variety of books on stones. They specialize in breathtaking interior design pieces and one-of-a-kind specimens for decoraQuartz Angel tors, collectors and healers. Every item on display has been carefully and lovingly hand-selected for quality, beauty and energy. The gallery works with a renowned group Quartz Sphere of internationally acclaimed crystal and mineral artisans, and as a result carries some of the finest cut and polished pieces available anywhere in the United States. Points of Light is also home to one of the largest selections of crystal singing bowls on the east coast, as well as a comprehensive and

NORTH ASHEVILLE

& Wonderful Weaverville

truly beautiful group of crystal healing wands, including tools cut by world-famous lapidary artist, Lawrence Stoller. From museum pieces weighing more than a ton, down to the smallest of their tumbled stones, the quality and scope of their inventory is unsurpassed. Points of Light is a “must see” destination in Asheville!

Points of Light Crystal and Mineral Gallery 391 Merrimon Avenue, downtown Asheville (828) 257-2626 Shop online! Visit www.pointsoflight.net

ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Saturday, December 7 – Enjoy a celebra-

tion of the holiday spirit and shop from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. A lot of specials and give aways. Visit our Facebook page each day for our “Daily Deals.” Each day of the week we will offer a different special. Mine and Yours Consignments, 234 New Leicester Hwy., Asheville, 28806. (828) 251-9231, www. mineandyoursconsignments.com

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TOE RIVER STUDIO TOUR More than 100 artisans and galleries will open their doors and welcome the public. From world-famous to emerging... glass blowers, potters, wood turners, basket makers, printers, painters, fiber artists, photographers, sculptors, jewelers, metal workers, and more. The free, selfguided tour visits Rob Levin, studios in Yancey Yellow Urn #3 and Mitchell Counties. Studios are open Friday, December 6, from 12-4 p.m.; Saturday, December 7 from 10-5 p.m.; and Sunday, December 8 from 10-5 p.m. A reception will be held Friday, December 6 from 5-7 p.m. at the The Spruce Pine TRAC Gallery, 269 Oak Avenue.

IF YOU GO: For more information

contact Toe River Arts Council at (828) 682-7215 or (828) 765-0520, or visit www.toeriverarts.org

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WAYNESVILLE

INTERVIEW WITH KIM SHUFORD OF WAYNESVILLE’S

INTERVIEWED BY

Massie Furniture

DENNIS RAY

RRM: What makes Elegant Interiors special?

KS: My passion for my work

results in elegant and comfortable interiors that reflect my client’s unique personality. Making my client’s home sophisticated and welcoming, Rapid River MagaI focus on the preferences of Let Massie Furniture Co. help with your home needs. Most major brands of furniture, zine: What kind of my clients rather than making carpet and appliance are available at discounted prices. Enjoy free delivery, easy furniture does Elmy own statement in design. terms, and always friendly folks to help you. egant Interiors carry? My most important goal is to make my client happy. I want KS: There is no right or wrong style. Some Kim Shuford: We carry middle to high end them to love what I have done for them. styles are more popular than others, but popufurniture lines – good qualI enjoy making lasting relationships with larity changes over time. There are basics of ity furniture with a reasonmy clients. I believe in going the extra step good design that remain constant. Be sure the able price. Some of the well to insure the highest level of customer proportions are pleasing, the colors are harmoknown upholstery lines we satisfaction. nious, and the scale is appropriate. carry are Bassett, Broyhill, Bradington Young, Fairfield, RRM: When one thinks of redecorating a Jetton, La-z-boy, Sam Moore, room, what factors do you look at to determine Massie Furniture Company and Temple. Some of the what they want? well known case good lines Elegant Interiors are American Drew, Bassett, KS: Analyze the space you are working with. 39 North Main Street in Waynesville Broyhill, Kincaid, and Lane. Look at the size, shape, and the intended use Monday - Saturday, 9 to 5 p.m. of the room. Add color and texture. Select the RRM: Is there such a thing as (828) 452-3509, right lighting to show off colors, forms, and a wrong or right when decowww.Massiefurniture.net textures. rating your house?

Elegant Interiors, Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

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As an Interior Designer, Kim Shuford looks at the rooms her clients want to decorate and considers the potential. She helps them to balance function with aesthetics. She then helps the client select the right colors and fabrics to create a certain mood, decides what to put on the walls and floors, and the size and style of furniture they need. She works to make each home an extension of the owners personality.

Skin Care Demonstrations at Sunburst Market

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Sunburst Market now sells Bellanina Skin Care products. The creator of Bellanina, Nina Howard, will present a series of lectures and skin care demonstrations in the shop’s new Apothecary. Sunburst Market moved their retail store to 142 N. Main Street a month ago, offering a variety of local,

natural and sustainable products to support eager customers seeking out the best product ingredients for food consumption and application to the body. Sunburst has begun offering Bellanina Skin Care and will begin their monthly educational events, “Who Made It”, with Waynesville resident, Nina Howard, artist, licensed esthetician, massage therapist, polarity therapist, national skin care educator and creator of

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Bellanina Skin Care. Nina is also the founder of Bellanina Spa & Institute, located in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Bellanina has trained thousands of massage and skin care professionals in their unique treatment, The Bellanina Facelift Massage as well as served over 50,000 clients in their unique spa, retail store and art gallery. Nina’s first of a 3-series lecture/ demonstration on Thursday, December 5 is titled “Great Skin At Any Age” and will focus on understanding how to select anti-aging home care product ingredients and skin care treatments to support the reversing of the aging process. The second lecture/demo will be focused on “Managing Acne in Teens and Adults” on December 12, 2013. The third lecture/demo, “All I Want for Christmas is Lifted, Glowing Skin” will be held December 19. This third class will teach techniques of self-massage and home care and will also provide a demonstration on the techniques of the Bellanina Facelift Massage, for lifting, toning and firming the face, naturally. All lectures and demonstrations take place from 6-8 p.m. A charge of $10 admission will include one complimentary glass of wine and hors d‘oeuvres, and a $5 discount applied to any purchase of Bellanina products on the

evening of the seminar. RSVP to hold your place. Event limited to 20.

IF YOU To RSVP for the Bellanina GO lectures and demonstrations call

or email: Katie Hughes, Manager, Sunburst Market (828) 452-3848 or Katie@sunbursttrout.com. Visit www.sunburstmarket.com

Sunburst Market 142 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786 828) 452-3848 www.sunburstmarket.com


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Great Food combined with Live Music, Home Furnishings, Fine Arts & Crafts.

Elegant Interiors

Live Music

Every Friday & Saturday at 7pm

Bringing Your Home Together in an Elegant Manner Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

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Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

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39 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

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December 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
December 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Magnetic Theatre's Raunchy Bernstein Christmas Spectacular..p4. Inside: The Chocolate Fetish..p12; Guild Artists' Holiday Sale...

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