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Enter Our 16th Annual

Poetry Contest PAGE

The 30th Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular at the Magnetic Field. PAGE 6

PLUS 10 INTERVIEWS! Anna Blair Publow, owner of Canvas, Paint + Mingle, has invited you to a paint party! PAGE 12 Maggie Jones, Turtle Island Pottery. PAGE 9 Janet Carter, Thyme in the Garden. PAGE 17 Stephanie Wilder, Chifferobe. PAGE 18 Amy Taylor, Kitsch Fabrics. PAGE 29 Judi Ferris, The Chocolate Bear.

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Kim Shuford, Massie Furniture’s Elegant Interiors. PAGE 31 Shelly Piper and Natalie Hood, Foundry. PAGE 32 R Bruce Brennan, Fine Artist. PAGE 38 The Chocolate Fetish gives back to the community. Interview with Bill Foley. PAGE 9

INTERVIEW ON PAGE

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2 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4


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stage preview Ensemble Theatre Company presents

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol

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nsemble Theatre Company, Asheville’s newest professional theatre company, presents the mesmerizing one-man show Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol, by Tom Mula. Andrew Hampton Livingston directs and Michael MacCauley stars in this darkly funny and deeply moving twist on the classic Dickens story. We know what happens to Scrooge, but what about his old business partner Michael MacCauley as Marley? Is Jacob Marley. he truly past

redemption, or does every person deserve a chance to change, to do better? In this funny and touching holiday play, see Jacob Marley’s heroic efforts to save Scrooge’s soul – and in the process, save his own. Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol played for two seasons at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre. The show was nominated for four Joseph Jefferson Awards, and received an After Dark Award and the Goodman School of Drama’s Cunningham Prize for Playwriting. IF YOU Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol GO runs December 19-30, Wednesdays

through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for full-time students of all ages. Tickets are available through North Carolina Stage Company, at (828) 2390263, www.ncstage.org, or by visiting the theatre at 15 Stage Lane in Asheville.

HART PRESENTS

A Christmas Carol

2012-2013 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director

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he Haywood Arts Regional Theater is getting ready to unveil what it hopes will become a holiday tradition for the region, a lavish production of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas The set of A Christmas Carol under construction Carol.” Featuring an original script by Mark Jones, and an origiDelilah Jenkins, Tom Dewees, Madison nal score by Ann Rhymer Schwabland, the Garris, Ellery Neal, Jacob Hunt, Amy show is on tap to be a major spectacle with a Hunt, Mark Highsmith, Sherry G. Dewees, cast of forty and a nine piece orchestra. Set Trenton Fish, Anna Kate Hall, Roger construction began last January, and HART Magendie, Leah Hampton, Lindsay Salvati, plans to revive the show annually and add Aaron Hunt, Hannah Parrot, Andrea Cody, more to it each year. But the show is starting Isabelle Baldwin, Nat Neal, Brynna Sinyard. big, with smoke, fog and snow on the stage to add to the mystery. The ghosts are the stars of the story, IF and in this production they are envisioned YOU “A Christmas Carol” has as something truly special. Jacob Marley GO performances on December 7, 8, will appear like a floating octopus of chains 14, 15 at 7:30 p.m.; December 9 and money boxes, the ghost of Christmas and 16 at 3 p.m.; and December 15 at 2 past will appear clothed in twinkling lights, p.m. Tickets for evening performances are Christmas present will lead a mass of carolAdults, $20, Seniors $17, and Students $7. ers from scene to scene, and the ghost of Discounted tickets to matinees are Adults Christmas yet to come will fill the entire $16, Seniors $14, and Students $6. stage. A massive four poster bed will be Box Office Hours Monday-Saturday 1-5 Scrooges chariot taking him from place to p.m. For reservations contact the HART place, time to time. Box Office at (828) 456-6322 or go online HART’s cast includes: Steve Lloyd,San to www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Smith, John Winfield, David Evanoff, Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon Josh Merrell, Strother Stingley, Jack Ross, St. Waynesville, NC 28786.

Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

A Classical Christmas featuring Handel’s Messiah Sunday December 16 at 3pm

BUY TICKETS NOW!

A new Asheville symphonic Christmas tradition begins with the most beautiful music of the season. Daniel Meyer, conductor Jennifer Davison, soprano Deborah Domanski, mezzo soprano Scott Joiner, tenor Asheville Symphony Chorus Dr. Michael Lancaster, director SPONSOR

UPCOMING 2013 CONCERTS FEBRUARY 9, 2013

Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto with Tchaikovsky Competition Winner Daniil Trifonov

MARCH 16, 2013

The American Four Seasons

APRIL 20, 2013

Mozart’s Requiem

MAY 11, 2013

Rite of Spring

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 3


® Enjoy and Give the Best ™

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina 12 Consecutive Years!

Bill and Sue, owners of The Chocolate Fetish

Visit our European style shop where you’ll find fine chocolates, gifts, and chocolate art. Discriminating chocolate lovers have been enjoying awardwinning, handcrafted chocolates from The Chocolate Fetish since 1986. This holiday season place your order online for speedy in-store pick-up or nationwide shipping. www.chocolatefetish.com

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© Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

36 Haywood Street, Downtown Asheville • (828) 258-2353 Monday-Thursday 11-6 p.m. • Friday and Saturday 11-9 p.m. • Sunday 12-6 p.m. 4 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4


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we love this place Cookie Drive

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Four

DECEMBER 2012 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Beth Gossett, Chall Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Willie Repoley, David Simchock, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, December 2012, Vol. 16 No. 4

3 Stage Preview

NC Stage – Jacob Marley . . . . . . . . . 3 HART – A Christmas Carol Carol. . . . . . . 3 Magnetic Field – Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular . . . . . . . . . . . 6

7 Columns

Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 7 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 13 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 14 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 23 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. 28 David J. Simchock – Photo Tips . . 33 Max Hammonds - Health . . . . . . . 33

9 Interviews

Each year Loving Food Resources organizes to collect and distribute homemade cookies to men and women living with HIV/AIDS as an expression of love and care during this season of giving. To participate, please bring four dozen homemade or bakery cookies to the Cookie Party on Friday, December 14. The event takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Kenilworth Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hill, Chiles Ave. in Asheville. There will be holiday treats, music, and lots of cold milk for all to enjoy while we pack 150 boxes of cookies for Loving Food Resources clients. Can’t attend the party? Cookies can be dropped off the day of the party at Ace Hardware on Merrimon Avenue in North Asheville. Visit www.wncap.org for more information.

Sponsor a Child for Christmas

Bill Foley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Anna Blair Publow . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Janet Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Stephanie Wilder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Eileen and Marty Black. . . . . . . . . . 19 Maggie Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Amy Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Judi Ferris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Kim Shuford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Shelly Piper and Natalie Hood . . . 32

10 Local Shops

Northside Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Biltmore Village. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Waynesville Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . 30

18 Fine Art

The Updraft Fine Art Gallery . . . . Handmade Cool Craft Market . . . R Bruce Brennan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Eliada is seeking families, businesses, churches, and other groups who are interested in sponsoring needy children and adolescents for the Christmas holidays. Sponsors can shop from “wish lists” that the children create, or give a cash donation. Children who receive gifts are needy youth from Eliada’s treatment and education programs. For most of these young people, the gifts they receive from sponsors are the only gifts they will get for Christmas. Please join Eliada in bringing joy to children in our community. Anyone interested in sponsoring a child should contact Nora Scheff by emailing nscheff@eliada.org, calling (828) 254-5356 x 303, or visit www.eliada.org.

got gifts? The Chocolate Fetish Interview with Bill Foley

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Canvas, Paint + Mingle Interview with owner Anna Blair Publow

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Thyme in the Garden Interview with owner Janet Carter

Chifferobe Interview with owner Stephanie Wilder

Turtle Island Pottery Interview with Maggie Jones

Kitsch Fabrics Interview with owner Amy Taylor

The Chocolate Bear Interview with owner Judi Ferris

Massie Furniture’s Elegant Interiors Interview with Kim Shuford

Foundry Interview with Shelly Piper and Natalie Hood

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook – Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

15 Music

Michael Reno Harrell . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Carolina Chocolate Drops . . . . . . . 16

24 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 24

38 What to Do Guide On the Cover: Eileen and Marty Black, owners of the Cotton Mill Studios. Photo: Erica Mueller Photography PAGE 19

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 5


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stage preview The 30th Annual Bernstein Family

Christmas Spectacular AT THE MAGNETIC FIELD

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fter multiple years of increasingly popular shows in their home base of Asheville, and coming off a headlining slot at the Wynn Resort Macao’s “Christmas In August Extravaganza,” which saw fans ripping off their clothes and throwing themselves into the ocean out of sheer sketch comedic ecstasy, the Bernstein Family returns!

The most spectacular of all spectaculars! Dubbed “The Christmas show to see in Asheville!” by the Asheville Scene’s Tony Kiss, who also called the Bernsteins “bawdy, bizarre,” the Family will follow up last year’s 28th Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular with their already recordbreaking 30th Annual Spectacular Spectacular.

BY

CHALL GRAY

“This year’s spectacular has already been performed for seventeen Darren Marshall and Tracey Johnston-Crum. dictators, Christmas show will once again return presidents, and prime ministers, three to Asheville, thanks to the award-winof whom were deceased and exhumed ning Magnetic Theatre. just for the performance, which is to “We’re very excited to have the my knowledge a new record for most Bernstein’s back,” said producer Chall diplomats exhumed to view a sketch Gray. “It takes nearly all year to recover comedy show!” Jimmy Bernstein from each visit, what with having to triumphantly proclaimed in between revive all of the young men around martinis after a recent performance. the theatre that Judy exhausts, clean Starring Tracey Johnston-Crum up after Baby Jesus, and replenish the (recently voted Best Local Actress truckloads of gin and vermouth that by in the Mountain Xpress’ annual it takes to keep Jimmy’s martini glass poll) and Darren Marshall, among full. We don’t have time to slack off!” other local favorites, the beloved and The Mountain Xpress proclaimed occasionally tasteless sketch comedy that the Spectacular “features superb acting from some of Asheville’s best.” This year, the Bernstein clan is under the able direction of Katie Anne Towner, Associate Artistic Director and Managing Director of The Magnetic Theatre. “I’m really excited to have some old family members coming back, and a few surprises as well—we BY JENNY BUNN mean it when we say that this will be the most spectacular of all spectaculars. That’s why we’re skipping from the 28th straight to the 30th!” she said recently. Considering that last year the Bernsteins sold out nearly every seat of every performance, advance tickets are strongly recommended for this hilarious, adult sketch comedy Christmas show. The 30th Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular, directed by Katie Anne Towner, lighting design by Jason Williams, sound design by Mary Zogzas, costume design by Giny Speaks, and stage management by message of hope and optimism is the Justin Evans. Starring Tracey Johnperfect antidote to holiday cynicism. ston-Crum, Darren Marshall, Mondy Carter, John Crutchfield, Erik Moellering, Trinity Smith, and Glenn Reed. IF Produced by Chall Gray. YOU It’s a Wonderful Life GO runs December 4 and 5 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. IF Tickets are available through YOU Performances through Asheville Community Theatre, at GO December 22. Showtimes (828) 254-1320 or by visiting www. and tickets available at ashevilletheatre.org. www.themagneticfield.com.

LIVE FROM WVL RADIO THEATRE:

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It’s a Wonderful Life

he beloved local holiday play Live From WVL Radio Theatre: It’s a Wonderful Life returns for a limited engagement December 4 and 5 at Asheville Community Theatre. This fresh new adaptation by local actor Willie Repoley is set in the fictional studio of WVL Radio Theatre, which is struggling to stay on the air one snowy winter night. The professional voice actors are unable to get through, but the show must go on — and so a small but intrepid band of employees manage to create the dozens of movie characters and scenes using just their voices and a sound effects table. It’s a Wonderful Life stars local favorites Catori Swann, Rebecca Morris, and Bradshaw Call, as well as Blythe Coons of Baltimore. The cast of four does double duty, playing the hardworking radio actors, as well as their alter-egos from Bedford Falls. More than 60 years later, this story remains as fresh and relevant as ever. Its 6 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4


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fine art Resolve to Have Resolutions IT’S JUST A MATTER OF THE TIMING...

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s I write this, BY GREG VINEYARD it is not yet Thanksgivmy signature style (Or ing, and I am hadn’t you noticed? And already dodging you’d be amazed how holiday-themed music much I edit out before on the radio. By the YOU are subjected to time you curl up in a it!). comfy chair with the cat, Taking this same a cup of hot cider and tack regarding art, I this edition, you may be note to improve my happily toe-tapping to skills, while protecting Jingle Bell Rock, or any my unique visual style. one of seventy-thousand When I have assignMariah Carey songs. As ments and projects, I I changed the station this want to enjoy them as November morning, the creator that I am. Anna Nalick’s “Breathe And I would like my (2AM)” synchronistically whole life to be like that. came on. Resolutions, A Study in Yellow, 2012. Resolutions help me aim Normally I profhigh. fer this topic early in the As a creative type, calendar. However, it ocmy top-line goals are curred to me that sharing Resolutions help me pretty simple: 1) Walk on the subject BEFORE through fear; 2) Create aim high. year’s end might be more daily; 3) Don’t panic; useful. If this prompts 4) Remain a sci-fi geek; one to remember a and 5) As Nalick’s song simply states over goal of supporting local businesses prior and over again: “Just breathe.” I list all these to going into full-on big-screen TV mode, things out in my day-timer-minder-trapperthereby averting that “big box store Janukeeper-thingy, and I add new revelations ary bill angst,” one might accomplish two throughout the year. resolutions at once. Another might mind Resolutions show us our potential and his dietary restriction list (uh, that’d be me). encourage authenticity. They remind us of And someone else might get a jump on the who and what we want to be, and help us volunteering they’ve always intended to do. trust that each day is an opportunity. I hope Everyone has different methods at your year wraps up beautifully, and that resolution time, and a great many involve ... whatever your resolutions are — whenever The List. My favorite tools: a pad of lined you do them — they help you to launch yellow paper and a favorite pen, also yellow freely into your new year with aplomb. I (the barrel, not the ink; invisible lists, while hope you go do the things you really, really certainly easier, are SO self-defeating). want to do. Starting with “Things I’m Afraid Of” helps me see how I often impede my best intentions. An example: my fear of heights kept me not only from trying zip-lining, but also from considering it as even a remote Don’t Panic! Just breathe. possibility. Once this was discovered by a friendly octogenarian who had recently done it, I was shamed (gently) into giving it a try. I ended up “flying” through, and it was quite liberating. Greg Vineyard is an This process also helps me remember artist, writer and creative topics misplaced amidst the year’s daily and consultant in Asheville, NC. weekly tumult. Floating up like a Star Trek ZaPow Gallery in downtown Asheville carries his tri-corder in zero gravity, these thoughts illustrations and giclees. are symbols of missions gone awry. I pluck these objects from the air, take some readFind his clay works at ings, and reunite each with The List. Constance Williams Gallery in Asheville’s There are other items that I mull-over, River Arts District, at Gallery 262 in and ultimately reject, especially if they do Waynesville, and at Taupe Gallery in not represent the real me. I always have a North Wilkesboro. goal to “write better”; however, “ramble www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net less” likely wouldn’t make the cut, as that is Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 7


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fine art The Updraft Fine Art Gallery

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n a city nationally-known for its fine art galleries (ranking 13th in the nation), the very newest that little Asheville has to offer is an exclusively local, little upstart gallery located in the very belly of downtown, but tucked away down a narrow wind-tunnel of a street and appropriately named, The Updraft. What its title signifies may vary depending on the context, or who you ask, but as a matter of principle The Updraft is a gallery in motion, “run by artists for artists and for lovers of both fine and fine, functional art,” and featuring regular live demonstrations in glass blowing (get yourself a custom handcrafted Christmas ornament made while you visit), pottery, jewelry leatherwork, two-dimensional artwork and much more. The Updraft is open until 9 p.m. every Friday and Saturday, and until 7 p.m., Sunday through Thursday, and a proud participant in every First Friday Gallery Stroll. Located on the sloping ground floor of 84 Walnut Street, directly across the street from

Creekside Artists Retreat

Room and Studio Space For Rent • Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $500/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

Zambra (with its award-winning tapas) and just around the corner from Malaprops bookstore. The gallery comprises less than 1,500 square feet but manages to use every one of its nooks and crannies, without feeling cluttered, to showcase an impressive range and quality of local work, from beginning artists to those already wellestablished, including locallyhandcrafted and heirloom-quality functional fine furniture, custom butcher blocks and islands, jewelry, encaustic, mixed media and oil painting, photography, metal, fiber and sculpture. Owned and equally co-operated by four local artists, each specializing in their own medium, The Updraft is a natural outgrowth of the popular and highly successful bi-annual downtown market known as “Asheville Art in the Park,” which every June and October brings local and regional artists out of their studios and into the streets of Pack Square. Asheville Art in the Park Artists donate 10% of all sales back to local area nonprofits that directly benefit local artists ($45K and counting). The owners embraced the project of The Updraft, working evenings and into the early mornings in addition to their full-time jobs to rebuild and refashion the entire gallery. They did this because they saw an opportunity for creating something positive, welcoming and sustaining for local artists

Have a custom hand-crafted Christmas ornament made when you visit. and Asheville’s abundant art culture. Where before there had been only empty and unused space now is a vibrant gallery. After all, Asheville’s creative and crafting spirit is one of it’s greatest resources, and in a spirit of cooperation and collaboration–rather than competition–the owners are excited to report that there is more than enough local art to go around. After a boisterous grand opening, The Updraft Fine Art Gallery is fully geared up for the holiday season, but local artists still interested in submitting work or becoming demonstrators during two-hour segments that are still available should please contact the appropriate owner asap: Andrew Montrie, glass and 2d; Minne Kane, jewelry; William Hunter, pottery; and Matt Christie, leather, paper and woodwork.

The Updraft Fine Art Gallery 84 Walnut St., Downtown Asheville (828) 582-2112 www.updraftgallery.com

Cool Craft Market: Holiday Edition DECEMBER 14-16 AT HANDMADE IN AMERICA

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n Friday, December 14 from 5-8 p.m., HandMade in America is hosting the first annual Cool Craft Market: Holiday Edition VIP Preview Party. This market will feature 25 vendors from around Western North Carolina, selling both functional and decorative items including clothing, accessories, pottery, natural products, kitchenware and ornaments. It will be a fantastic place to find one of a kind gifts ranging from $5-$300. Guests will have their first choice on market items, free small bites from Storm Rhum and Bistro and local wine to celebrate the holiday season. In addition to getting gifts, guests have a chance to give back, by supporting Homeward Bound in bringing our homeless neighbors home for the holidays. HandMade in America is honored to be part of

8 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

Donate an item for Homeward Bound. the solution to homelessness through this year’s VIP Preview Party! Tickets are $10 per person + an item to donate to Homeward Bound’s clients (check out the donation list at handmadeinamerica.org). Since 2006, Homeward Bound has moved 450+ people out of homelessness and into their own homes, then provided support to help them stabilize and stay in housing. With its 89% retention rate in housing, Homeward Bound is ending homelessness in our community. This party is sponsored by Element Advertising, WNC Magazine, and Storm Rhum Bar and Bistro.

IF YOU HandMade in America is located GO at 125 S. Lexington, Suite 101 in

Asheville. HandMade in America’s front doors are located on Hilliard Avenue between S. Lexington Ave. and Church Street.


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Celebrate your artsy side and create your own work of art in this easy step-by-step class.

holiday shopping guide INTERVIEW WITH

Bill Foley

Co-owner of The Chocolate Fetish

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apid River Magazine: Tell us

a little bit about your holiday gift items now available at The Chocolate Fetish.

Bill Foley: We have a wide variety of items including hand molded three dimensional holiday figures and lots of festive gift boxes. We’ve added Santa’s Boot’s and Chocolate Dreidels both decorated by hand with colored cocoa butter in a variety of unique designs. I’m excited about our seasonal flavors! This year we added our classic Holiday Gingerbread Truffle and our brand new Eggnog Truffle. The Eggnog Truffle is made with fresh Eggnog produced on a 7th generation family farm here in North Carolina. A White Chocolate Peppermint Crunch Round and Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Swirl Round are holiday specials. RRM: What perception of chocolate do

you view as being the most inaccurate?

BF: Many people have the percep-

tion that high cocoa content dark chocolate is better chocolate. This is inaccurate and somewhat akin to saying the stronger the drink the better. If that were true more people would be drinking moonshine. While one’s personal preference might be a darker chocolate it doesn’t mean that the higher the cocoa content the better. Many things determine the quality of the chocolate, from the quality of the bean, what variety, how it is grown to how it is processed from the bean into the finished chocolate. You can have a very high percentage dark chocolate from a poor quality bean and it isn’t going to be a high quality chocolate. You’ll just have a high percentage of poor quality.

RRM: Can you tell me what a single origin chocolate is?

BF: A single origin chocolate is a

chocolate that is made from a single harvest of beans grown on one farm. Cocoa beans are very much like wine in that there are subtle differences in flavor based on type of bean and how and where it was grown. Most chocolates are made from a blend of beans grown in different places and from different kinds of beans. This blending ensures that the taste of the chocolate is sustainable over time and throughout subsequent harvests.

PG. 36

HC

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

At The Chocolate Fetish we take advantage of the flavor subtleties of many different chocolates including single origin chocolates. We blend all of our chocolates so that our customers get a flavor that is unique to our shop, even to The Chocolate Fetish has a variety of gifts for the holiday. each specific product. They can rely on the consistency and flavor of our truffles.

20% OFF 735-C Haywood Road West Asheville Check Out Our Online Calendar

www.PaintAndMingle.com

December and January Painting Classes. Use coupon code CHEERS.

828-254-4486

RRM: Do you see any changes for the Chocolate Fetish in 2013?

PG. 36

BF: We plan on continuing The Choc-

HK

olate Fetish 25 year tradition of offering handmade high quality chocolates. And we will develop new flavors and explore new products throughout the year, like our new chocolate bars which were recently awarded a gold and bronze medal in a National competition judged by chocolate experts.

RRM: Your business has been well

known for its giving back to the Asheville community. What else does The Chocolate Fetish do in terms of helping people?

BF: We’ve been a part of Asheville for

years and seen many changes. We’re committed to Asheville’s success and strive to help people in our community in many ways. We also feel that it is important to help the larger world community of which we are a part. Recently we donated over $1,000 (including lots of chocolates) to Rainbow Rapid Response, a grassroots group doing relief work in an area of New Jersey that was hit particularly hard by Hurricane Sandy. This cause is very personal to us. My wife grew up in New Jersey, and our daughter has worked with many of the people doing this work on a personal basis. This is an amazing group of people from all over the country who are serving over 1,000 meals a day to victims and relief workers in Union Beach, New Jersey. If anyone reading this would like to donate or get involved you can do so at www. facebook.com/groups/RainbowSuperSandyResponse. You can also see a local news broadcast about what they are doing at www.abclocal.go.com/ wabc/video?id=8888175

RRM: Do you feel that business own-

ers should be leaders through example in giving, and why?

Elizabeth Foley, Anne Flynn director of Helpmate, and Geo Canizales, retail sales associate, with gifts donated by The Chocolate Fetish staff.

BF: As the owners of a successful busi-

ness, Sue, our daughter Elizabeth, and I, feel it a moral obligation to support the community that supports our business. Although we also market on a regional and national level, the local community is where we live and we think it important to set an example. An inspiring example from our business is our long-term relationship with Helpmate. After years of Helpmate being our primary recipient of charitable giving, our employees decided to join in. Previously we had various holiday gift exchanges going on at work, like secret Santa. A few years ago everyone decided that we would rather bring gifts to give to Helpmate. The response from our employees has always been overwhelming and heartwarming.

PG. 36

U

RRM: What do you feel is the key

ingredient to owning a successful small business today?

BF: Learn how to run a business

before you start a business! Go to school and then work for a successful business and learn everything you can, then decide if you have what it takes to run your own business. Establish a ‘Chocolate Fetish’ continued on page 17

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 9


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NORTHSIDE NEIGHBORS HOLIDAY SHOPPING Rise ’n Shine

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ise ’n Shine is a locally owned and operated small business. We use local and organic products to make a wide selection of breakfast dishes, sandwiches, fresh juices, and smoothies. Free range eggs and chicken, organic carrots, organic greens, organic milk and organic yogurt are all featured on the menu. Dynamite Coffee Roasters supply a shade-raised and fair-trade organic Sumatra coffee. Humanely harvested meats always served ,and free range eggs are always cooked in real butter. Local honey is provided by Haw Creek Honey.

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Rise ’n Shine 640 Merrimon Ave, Asheville, NC 28804 828-254-4122, www.risenshinecafe.com PG. 36

Monday-Saturday, 7:30 a.m to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Thyme in the Garden

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ur business is a unique garden and gift shop offering whimsy to the refined, bringing the outdoors in, and delightfully mixing the old with the new. Open year-round, we have a wide range of charming gifts, pots, statuary, and tropical plants. During the growing season, we carry perennials, annuals, and specialize in container plantings. We offer potting services in the store, as well as at customer’s homes. We also offer garden design and consultation. We are located in a unique location that makes our shop an interesting and fun place to bring the whole family. There are paths through demonstration garden, small stream and bridge, chickens and much more to discover. We are a family-run business; dedicated to our love of gardening and beautiful things. Our regular local customers love to bring their out of town guests to our shop to enjoy the garden and to have a unique shopping experience.

Keep Our Holidays Happy!

Thyme in the Garden 190 Weaverville Hwy. Asheville (828) 658-3700 www. thymeinthegardenasheville.blogspot.com

Support Your Local Merchants * Buy Local

10 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4


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BILTMORE VILLAGE SHOPPING Village Wayside Bar & Grille

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ocated in historic Biltmore Village in the original 1896 train depot is the newly renovated Village Wayside Bar & Grille. They offer new twists on the classics we all know and love. Owners, Mark and Polly

dreamed of their menu, incorporating the Midwestern and southern influences they grew up eating. Try the turkey Reuben, slow roasted and brined in house with a sweet peach hibiscus tea brine, or Mark’s favorite, the beef brisket, smoked in house and smothered

in homemade Cheerwine BBQ sauce served with hand dipped local Kolsch beer battered onion rings. Craving something more substantial? Check out Potsy’s Pigs, Hungarian style cabbage rolls, or fillet tips over a bed of house made hummus. The Village Wayside serves lunch and dinner all day long with something for everyone!

IT’S TOY TIME!

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nd things are in full gear at Once Upon A Time. The shelves at packed with exciting new toys and books, as well as classics that everyone remembers and wants.

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Come and see for yourself. The kids will be glad you did …and so will you.

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The Village Wayside Bar & Grille

Once Upon A Time

30 Lodge Street, Biltmore Village Asheville, NC 28803

7 All Souls Crescent Historic Biltmore Village

(828) 277-4121 www.villagewayside.com

(828) 274-8788 Open 7 days a week!

Mon-Thurs 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fri-Sat 11 a.m. until late Sunday from noon to 9 p.m.

Biltmore Village Dickens Festival

xperience a magical weekend of merriment, music and memories — all on the streets and in the shops, restaurants, and galleries of Historic Biltmore Village. It’s the annual Dickens Festival, now in its 23nd year. There’s entertainment for every age and interest. The main stage will be filled continuously with musicians, choral groups, singers, dancers, and Montford Park Players. This year the Festival will feature more than 300 performers who, after their stage segments, will rove throughout the Village entertaining on the streets and in the shops and restaurants. Friday and Saturday evenings will feature main stage concerts for the entire family. And when dusk turns into evening, more than 250,000 white lights outlining the historic Village buildings will combine with the streetlights to enhance the ambiance. Shops will stay open both evenings until 7 p.m. with many of the shopkeepers dressed in Victorian-era garb. In addition, there will be horse-drawn rides all day Saturday and Sunday. Chestnuts roasted on

an open fire by chestnut roaster Sakshi Gentenbein will be available next to the main stage. The Village will be decked out with Fraser fir holiday wreaths on each streetlight, on the doors to the shops and at other locations throughout the Village.

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IF YOU Biltmore Village Dickens Festival, November 30 GO - December 2. Hours: Friday, 5-7 p.m.; Saturday,

11-7 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 274-8788 or visit www.biltmorevillage.com. BA

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holiday shopping INTERVIEW WITH

Anna Blair Publow Owner of Canvas, Paint + Mingle in West Asheville

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apid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Canvas, Paint + Mingle.

Anna Blair Publow: We have been

open two years and are locally owned and operated by a stay-at-home mom (me). We offer EASY paint classes, using acrylics on canvas. No artistic skills needed. It is the perfect atmosphere to have an alternative, relaxing evening out with friends or family. All adult classes are BYOB.

RRM: What

was the genesis behind the business:

ABP: I had

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been practicing Occupational Therapy for 13 years, treating both adults and children, and as much as I loved the job and seeing my patients succeed, I was getting burned out emotionally. Then, about 3 years ago, I was home in Mississippi and there was a “paint and sip” place that was ALL THE BUZZ. I went to a class and was astonished at what these “non-artistic” people created. They were thrilled, ecstatic really, because they had just created a piece of art that they were really proud of. I wanted to be a part of that. I used art everyday during my therapy sessions, especially with kids so the transition from OT to Art teacher/studio owner was natural. Franchising was an option, but I knew Canvas could evolve without the restraints, so I am independent. In Asheville, that is like being in the cool kid’s club.

RRM: What are the typical costs for a class

RRM: How

did you first get into the arts:

ABP: I have

an old cassette tape that my parents recorded of my sister and I when I was about 2 or 3 Canvas, Paint + Mingle years old. I was asking Santa for markers, colors, glue, scissors and “that thing that you put colors in.” In college, I would do projects and put them in the trash. Then I noticed people were pulling them out of the trash and hanging them in their dorm rooms. Subsequently, I began to paint for festivals, craft fairs and began doing commissioned pieces as well.

RRM: Tell us about your paint parties and

ABP: Typical adult class is $31 and kid’s

ABP: The beauty of it is that we do all the

RRM: Tell us a little about the classes and what to expect, wear and bring.

ABP: We operate on a pre-registration basis

12 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

you may want. Wear something you can get paint on. Upon arrival, you’ll grab an apron, find a seat at an easel where your blank canvas, water, Anna Blair Publow brushes and palette await you. Our instructors are all local Asheville artists with varying styles. Each time you return, the experience and techniques could be completely different. He/she shows you how to complete the painting step-by-step, using terminology and techniques that anyone can follow. We chat, mingle, have snacks and wine, listen to good music, and relax. At the end of the 2 hour class, you leave with a dry, completed rendition of the featured painting.

and do you offer discounts for groups or multiple classes?

classes are $25 . All supplies are included. We offer group discounts. You get a price break if you have a minimum of 10 painters at an adult gathering or 7 painters at a kid’s party. We do lots of team building events, Ladies Night Out, book clubs, church groups and of course, kid’s birthdays

8LI7SYXLIVR,MKLPERH'VEJX+YMPHMWEREYXLSVM^IHGSRGIWWMSRIVSJXLI2EXMSREP4EVO7IVZMGI(ITEVXQIRXSJXLI-RXIVMSV

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

for our classes. You sign up/pay for the class online in advance. (We have an online calendar.) We provide everything, you just bring yourselves and any wine/food/snack

day camps

set-up and clean-up. You can bring in any food or beverages you would like, AND you leave with an amazing “party favor” at the end of the event. In summer, we have two sessions of day camps for kids. Ages 5-13 are welcome, 3 days a week for ½ days. The best way to stay in the loop on our summer camp dates and special events/coupons is to “like” us on face book.

Canvas, Paint + Mingle 735-C Haywood Road, West Asheville 828-254-4486 www.paintandmingle.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings Humor in Craft

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WRITTEN BY BRIGITTE MARTIN

received this look-at-me-size gallery book months ago but waited until now to review it because I think it would make a perfect holiday gift. In this city of artists, craftspeople and lovers of all creative media, not to mention the huge number of folks who are just downright funny, this beautiful award-winning book, Humor in Craft Craft, would find many appreciative coffee tables upon which to rest. In the field of craft books, there are many lovely books, but most of them are organized by media (i.e. ceramics or gourds) or function (i.e. jewelry or candles). Some are geared toward specialist markets, such as weaving with exotic wools or Appalachian basketry. Such books appeal to craft people and fans in those specific fields, but rarely attract others. A book with a theme, however, particularly one as enjoyable as humor, goes beyond narrow niches and makes the work shown in the book accessible to a wider readership. As a former craft book editor/writer myself, I thought Humor in Craft was a brilliant concept. I was thrilled to discover that it was also an exquisitely planned and produced book, all the more delightful because it’s the debut book of a new writer. Brigitte Martin is a jewelry maker and gallery owner in Pittsburgh, PA and the creator and editor of crafthaus, a social network for professional craft artists world wide. Her author photo at the beginning of the book immediately sets the tone for the whole volume. She’s lounging imperiously on a found chair, renovated with red fabric and bottle caps (Pharoah’s Pharoah’s Chair Chair, by the artist Mr. Imagination, 2003). She has a hilarious regal look on her face. “Yes, I’m totally ludicrous,” she seems to say. “We’re serious artists but we don’t have to take ourselves

Balanced Diet, Alice Abrams. Clay, metal chain; 17 x 14 x 12 in. Photo: Monica Ripley

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

DECEMBER

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

BOOKSIGNINGS & BOOKCLUBS December 1 at 3 p.m. – Booksigning with Carolyn J. Brown, author of A Daring Life: A Biography of Eudora Welty. December 2 at 3 p.m. – Poetrio: Rebecca Baggett, Joe Mills & Nan Watkins, Dreamweed: Posthumous Poems. December 3 at 7 p.m. – Bridging Differences Bookclub, hosted by Patti Digh, discusses Twelve by Twelve: A OneRoom Cabin Off the Grid and Beyond the American Dream by William Powers December 5 at 7 p.m. – Malaprop’s Bookclub, hosted by Jay Jacobi, discusses Silas Marner, by George Eliot. Cygne Noir, emiko oye, 2009. Neckpiece from My First Royal Jewels series. Repurposed LEGO®, elastic, sterling silver; 14.5 x 14.5 x 2 in. Photo: emiko oye Cover image, Smug Mug, Joseph Kishell. Porcelain; 4.5 x 4 x 4 in. Photo: Aimee Kishell

seriously. Lighten up, everybody! “It was an invitation I couldn’t resist. My favorite image in the book is the goofy mug on the cover. It makes me laugh just to imagine drinking my coffee every morning from it. “Part of what I love about being an artist,” says Houston artist Joseph Kishell, “is using my art to entertain people.” Craft artists like to play with words as well as images. I didn’t really get the humor of of the clay donut piece until I saw the title, Balanced Diet Diet, and then I laughed out loud—someone discovered my favorite diet—the same number of donuts on alternate days. “Sometimes we take food a little too seriously, says Missouri-born ceramicist, Alice Abrams. I love wearing my craft purchases, especially if they’re humorous. San Francisco recycling artist, Emiko Oye, made her fit-for-a- princess “ceremonial jewels” neckpiece from Lego pieces. She calls it a 21st century take on Lalique’s Necklace with Insect Women and Black Swans. How much fun it would be to walk into a room wearing an announcement of what my mood was. “I challenge the viewer to look at the world with a grin,” says Seattle jewelry maker, Lori Bugaj. “It is my goal to have my work bring a smile to your face.” Humor in Craft contains the work of 200+ craft artists, mostly Americans, but a few from Europe and Asia as well. The media are traditional, non-traditional, new, and recycled. The humor is in-your face,

December 8 at 3 p.m. – December Authors Birthday Celebration for Children. You are invited to a party for authors with December birthdays! Recommended for ages 4-10, but all welcome. December 9 at 5 p.m. – Poems of Devotion. Readings by Malaika King Albrecht, Richard Chess, Morri Creech, Luke Hankins, Richard Jackson, Suzanne Underwood Rhodes and Daniel Westover. December 10 at 7 p.m. – Mystery Bookclub, hosted by Sally Bissell, discusses The Affair, by Lee Child. December 15 at 3 p.m. – Booksigning: Asheville Beer: An Intoxicating History of Mountain Brewing by Anne Fitten Glenn, Zane Lamprey.

Mood Swing, Lori Bugaj. Sterling silver pin with hand-painted plastic woman on swing that moves; 1.5 x 2 in. Photo: Ralph Gabriner

or subtle. It runs the gamut from child-like to sophisticated, R-rated, to political, an incredible range of humor that was an amazing feat to collect in one volume. Every page of this book is a treat.

Bottom-line: A terrific gift for any craft person or art lover.

Purchase Humor in Craft online at www.humorincraft.com. For more information on author Brigitte Martin, visit www.crafthouse.ning.com.

December 16 at 5 p.m. – Poetry Reading: Remember Me as a Time of Day by Emoke B’Racz, Piri B’Racz Gibson. December 18 at 7 p.m. – Comix Club, hosted by Lauren Napoli. Saga Volume 1, Space opera/fantasy series by writer Brian K. Vaughn and artist Fiona Staples.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Humor in Craft, written by Brigitte Martin; Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. 2012; hardback; 256, pp. $50.

Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/ reviewer. She wrote and edited craft books for local publisher Lark Books for three years.

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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Ascent Drag City

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No one will ever accuse Six Organs of Admittance of being complacent. After the subdued Americana aspirations of 2010’s Asleep on the Floodplain (which made my top-10 list) the band has taken another unexpected twist, crafting an album of spiraling guitar fireworks that is as far removed from Asleep as might be possible. Much of this shape shifting is a result of the bands revolving door membership: Only guitarist/vocalist Ben Chasney remains as a founding member and the quintet he has assembled clearly suits his needs for wild eyed experimentation. In some regards it’s a rather traditional rock albumbuilt largely around six strings, bass, and drums, but the adornments that sit atop the main course are what makes it all so exciting. The balance between lengthy blues-rock jams and Utopia styled spacedout psychedelia keeps the flow even and assured. The album kicks off with “Waswasa,” a persistent and intentionally chaotic instrumental before breaking into “Close to the Sky” a stunning bit of Doors like intoning built around a solid bass and drum bashing. Its trippy stuff and I mean that in all the best ways! Other highlights include the masterfully textured and haunting “They Called You Near” but that’s really just one delight among many. Aided by the incredibly nuanced bass playing of Noel von Harmonson and the thumping drums of Utrillo Kushner Ascent rarely lets up and never loses its sway. While it sounds more like a Ben Chasney solo outing than the group effort it wants to be that in no way detracts from its power, immediacy and sheer wonder. ****1/2

David Olney Robbery & Murder Dead Beet Records Continuing his string of EP releases, seven or eight track collections running well under 30 minutes, Olney offers up another snapshot of love gone wrong, painful choices and memory dipped in bittersweet. He’s seldom veered from his folkie roots and these tales of murder and mayhem (best exemplified in the mournful “Another Place, Another 14 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

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It’s hard to imagine another year is drawing to an end, a year which saw further bifurcation between artistry and commerce. Contrary to conventional wisdom there’s a lot of innovative and enjoyable music being made. The challenge is in finding a delivery system which allows us to readily discover it. Downloads continue to supplant physical sales but somehow the industry manages to slowly adapt. Next month I’ll survey a few of my favorite 2012 releases. In the meanwhile, here are some recent—and not so recent—discs that deserve a bit of attention.

Six Organs of Admittance

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Time”) lay firmly in that tradition. What makes them work is the careful interplay between Olney and his longtime compatriots Jack Irwin and Jim Hoke. They have played together so long they no doubt think as one. When Hoke’s saxophone kicks up their remake of Chuck Willis’ classic heartbreaker “Betty and Dupree” it raises the song to an entire new level. Like his other releases Robbery & Murder it succeeds largely on Olney’s capable way of making the universal seem as intimate as a stolen glance or a shared cup of brew. His growl-like-voice certainly isn’t for everyone and might resonate best depending on the mood you’re in, but for certain late night loneliness or early morning regret Robbery & Murder hits just the right note. ***

Kasey Chambers and Shane Nicholson Wreck and Ruin Sugar Hill Records The notion of a thriving Australian country music scene may seem baffling to some but that nation has always shared a commonality with the American South: Both can directly trace their musical ancestry to the Scottish Highlands and British farming communities from which they were largely settled. So, if Kasey Chambers (a native of Southern Australia)so easily masters Appalachian folk melody you can understand why. But that short changes her own considerable skills; as a singer and songwriter Chambers has talent aplenty. She also works hard at what she does, taking nothing for granted while continually honing her craft. Chambers and her husband, the equally talented Shane Nicholson, have followed their superb 2008 effort Rattlin’ Bones expanding on the acoustic premise of that album in logical and rewarding fashion. The result is some of the purest and most satisfying country sounds of anyone working today, a record that reminds us how great music is rarely restrained by geography. Most of the tunes on Wreck & Ruin are unconventional love songs, slightly off kilter numbers in which Adam and Eve are cast as outlaws on the run, and where good men are held responsible for saving troubled women. “Familiar Strangers” is a heartbreaking study of a relationship gone wrong, while the title tune is a cheerful celebration of turmoil and personal failings. The harmonies

are excellent, both in technique and emotion, and the baker’s dozen songs the pair wrote for this project are sublime, hitting their target with impressive skill whether they’re trying to elicit tears, laughs, or some concoctive mix of both. Wreck & Ruin has a natural, easygoing feel that never undercuts the skill or force of the performances, sounding like it was cut live in the studio with support musicians clearly sympathetic to the material. The end result is an album that hearkens to the past while leaning towards a bright future. And you can bet that Chambers and Nicholson will be an integral part of whatever lies ahead. ****1/2

Jeff Lynne Long Wave Frontiers Records It must be wonderful to be Jeff Lynne, having the time and money to pretty much do as you wish without the burden of having to please anyone other than yourself. One can easily envision Lynne wandering around the vast hallways of his English castle (he really does own one) calculating the royalty checks from his days with the Electric Light Orchestra and mulling what unorthodox project he should next take on. It’s obviously a nice problem to have. Yet despite that luxury, Lynne has never forgotten his roots. As a youngster he listened to music on long wave radio, absorbing the sounds coming through the big box into his living room. Long Wave is a loving tribute to the often (and unfairly) maligned days of pop in the years before the Beatles transformed his homeland, music and just about everything else. It’s not quite a standards album, although Lynne does revisit everything from show tunes to ‘50s big-band vocalists, but rather a history lesson of the era, which included the first inkling of rock-n-roll. And not the operatic rock of ELO, but rather the more primal music that preceded it by some 15 years. He tears through Chuck Berry’s “Let It Rock” with surprising grit and glee, but can just as easily slide into the transcendent harmonies of the Everly Brothers “So Sad.” His cover of Don Covay’s “Mercy, Mercy” is a sublime delight, as Lynne digs to the essence of the song while infusing it with his own distinct sound. These are the cuts that stay closest to the original hit recordings. When Lynne tackles Rodgers ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

& Hammerstein “If I Loved You”, Rodgers & Hart “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered”, and Chaplin “Smile” he does so with surprising restraint, reducing the songs to their melodic core. And while there’s no shortage of Lynne’s trademark layered arrangements they avoid the saccharine dilution he too readily falls back upon. The overall affect is not unlike the prime ELO years, when Lynne and company virtually ruled the radio waves; in that sense he’s gone full circle, creating a sort of blueprint in reverse. By going to back to his roots he ends up better understanding where they have taken him. ****

of “Winter Wonderland” or the poignant reflection of “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” On “I Wonder as I Wander” she manages to sound both contemplative and hopeful while the playful romance of “What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve” is both sexy and refined. The album includes a fine liner essay from Edie’s son Josh Mills which attests to both her love of the season and his own dedication to preserving her proud legacy. She was in a class of her own, and these recordings are a testimony to just how uniquely talented she was. *****

Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble

Edie Adams The Christmas Album Omnivore Records While best remembered as a lovely and gifted actress/comedienne, not to mention the wife and show business partner of Ernie Kovacs, few people today seem aware of Edie Adams’ successful career as a singer. First breaking through in 1951 as a regular on Kovacs’ television series, she frequently displayed her vocal gifts on the show, playing a role far beyond that of Kovacs’ comic foil. The two married in 1954 and while Adams was a recurrent presence on television and movies well into the ‘90s she continued to perform in a number of successful stage musicals and top flight nightclubs. Classically trained she even dipped her toes into opera, starring in the Seattle Opera Company’s production of Offenbach’s La Pericole. Beginning in 1952 Adams was frequently called upon to sing Christmasthemed material on the Kovacs Unlimited show; the Edie Adams Christmas Album is comprised of 15 air check she made prior to her proper radio performances, giving this album high mark in both entertainment and historical significance. The songs were all performed live, with just a piano for accompaniment, and have been preserved here as they were originally done. There’s no fixing the occasional flub (such as when Adams garbles the lyrics on “It’s A Marshmallow World”) but that only adds to the charm and immediacy of the music. As for Kovacs’ contributions, he may have been one of the most wildly inventive comedians of his time, but his two duets here demonstrate his shortcomings as a singer. No matter, as Adams is in superb form. That she had a fine voice is no surprise but what does startle is the charm and imagination she brought to the table. She was equally at home delivering the cool jazz

The Boxed Set! (2000 / 2012) What would the holidays be without at least a few killer box sets? This careerspanning bonanza of three CDs and a DVD celebrates a legacy that looms larger than that of any blues-rocking guitarist since Jimi Hendrix. And despite a surplus of posthumous releases, there’s plenty of previously unreleased material herein. Highlights extend from Vaughan’s swaggering apprenticeship with Paul Ray and the Cobras to slash-and-burn concert performances from the final weeks of his life. There are obligatory dips into the songbooks of Hendrix and Buddy Guy, appearances on MTV Unplugged and Austin City Limits, and instrumental interplay with his brother Jimmie and tour mate Jeff Beck. Though his guitar never loses its flamethrower intensity, the set documents his progression from the showoff licks of the young “Stevie Rave On” into a fully rounded artist of soulful depth. Vaughn’s monster chops, huge sound and deep soul won adoration from rock fans and blues stars around the world, all of whom will want to indulge themselves with this collection: 18 live and studio tracks plus 36 unissued recordings (some very early and amazing tacks) including an astounding DVD of never-aired Austin City Limits performances. At over four hours (4 discs plus a 72page book) it might be an embarrassment of riches but for the diehard SRV fan too much is still not enough. ****

Dave McGraw & Mandy Fer Seed of a Pine Dave and Mandy Music It’s always a pleasure when an album sneaks up on you, grabbing your consciousness in unexpected fashion. Such is the case with this understated nugget, a collection

Michael Reno Harrell at the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

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ew performers BY JAMES CASSARA better capture the sensibiliin-residence at the Inties and ethos of ternational Storytelling Western North Center, and playing Carolina than musisuch prestigious music cian and storyteller events as MerleFest Michael Reno Harrell. and the Walnut Valley Both in song and print Festival. In addition to his casual but highly his own performances, developed observations Harrell often conducts of what makes people workshops in songtick— their absurdities, writing and storytellfaults, and instinctive ing. goodness that reside Harrell’s tradewithin — are populated mark, gentle humor with characters who and wit, as well as the feel as everyday as the emotional depth of his Michael Reno Harrell artist himself. Born and songs, have won him raised in the Southa dedicated fan base that continues to ern Appalachian Mountains, Harrell grow. While he’s played virtually every performs music for children and adults local venue (including previous outing in alike, and does so with equal ease and this series) Harrell takes pride in making respect for his audience. every show special. You never know He likes to compare his shows to when someone is seeing you for the first “my granddaddy’s pocket knife — well time, and Michael Reno Harrell clearly warn and familiar feeling, but razor sharp takes that to heart. and with a point,” but in many ways I liken them to a favorite sweatshirt. No matter how many times you put it on it IF always feels just right. YOU Michael Reno Harrell Harrell recordings of topped the GO plays the Mountain Spirit Americana Music Association charts for Coffeehouse series at the UU several years and have garnered him nuof Asheville Congregation: Sunday, merous awards; his many honors include December 9 at 7 p.m. Tickets: $15 Adults, $10 Students, no charge for being a featured teller at the National music lovers under age 14. Storytelling Festival, as well as an artist-

of 11 story-songs that pull and tug with restrained ferocity. Prior to being sent Seed of a pine I was completely unfamiliar with either artist; now I feel compelled to seek out more. Both are based in Arizona (Fer has released a handful of solo records under the name Mandy Ferranini) and both have performed with the relatively unknown but terrific songwriter Peter Mulvey. In fact it is his band that provides the musical heft for this effort. What I do know is they’ve crafted an album that overflows with excellent songs, wonderful playing and exquisite vocals. Although they don’t co-write (dividing that role nearly equal) the two are so well matched in style and the vocal harmonies seed of a pine is nearly seamless. The opener “So Comes The Day” brings to mind the dust bowl ballads of Calexico (although it’s not as tightly arranged) while “Forget the

Diamonds” is a stark and powerful declaration of intent. McGraw’s voice sounds a bit like the great Tom Rush which is high praise indeed,while Fer has one of those malleable deliveries that sounds at once both familiar and distinct. The songs are well served by the minimally impressionistic backing (although Fer does let loose with a couple of outstanding guitar breaks) while the cello/piano arrangements conjure memories of early Pentangle and Nick Drake. Seed of a pine is by no means a statement album it could do with a bit more oomph and at times the song pacing weighs things down, but its strengths easily sustain it and provides ample evidence that these two are clearly on to something fine. The next release should be even better, and this time it won’t escape my notice. ***1/2

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sound experience Carolina Chocolate Drops

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AT THE ORANGE PEEL

n very broad terms, bands either perform live to help finance their recordings or record albums so to have songs to sing on stage. Few bands seem to juggle both with equilibrium; as to the good time ensemble known as The Carolina Chocolate drops their best moments clearly come in front of an audience. Which is not to suggest their five album catalog is in anyway inconsequential, merely the symbiosis that occurs between the band and their loyal, and often rapturous fans, cannot be denied. The three original members met in 2005 at the Black Banjo Gathering at Appalachian State University in North Carolina, drawn together by their mutual love of bluegrass, jug music, and primitive country and rock. The strictly acoustic musicians played a lively combination of standards and originals rooted in those styles, but in no way beholden to them. Sporting tongue-in-cheek, old-timey outfits and a spirited irreverence that belies their extraordinary technical facility the

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Jug-band, early jazz, not readily heard these days. group, whose current lineup includes Dom Flemons (4-string banjo, guitar, jug, harmonica, kazoo, and snare drum), Rhiannon Giddens (5-string banjo, fiddle, kazoo), Adam Matta (Beatbox and tambourine), Hubby Jenkins (guitar, mandolin and 5-string banjo), and cellist Leyla McCalla, evoke an experience not unlike the depression era traveling “medicine” shows that worked the Southern circuit. Their 2006 debut, Dona Got a Ramblin Mind, was released on the Music Maker label to wide acclaim. They then recorded three additional independent albums before

WNC Jazz Profile:

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signing with Nonesuch Records, who heavily promoted their first widely distributed effort, 2010’s Genuine Negro Jig Jig. The group’s next release on the label, which appeared early in 2011, was a four-song EP recorded with the New York City-based Romanian Gypsy punk band the Luminescent Orchestra. It was during that period that they added McCalla and Matta to the fold. Both players contributed mightily to this year’s Leaving Eden (produced by Buddy Miller) and it’s

16 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

IF YOU The Carolina Chocolate Drops GO with guests The Two Gentlemen

Band Saturday, December 8 at the Orange Peel. Doors open at 8 p.m. for this 9 p.m. show. Tickets are $20 advance and $22 day of show.

Jacob Rodriguez

“Michael Buble Meets Madison Square Garden,” and “Crazy Love.” “Performing with Buble has taught me the ins and outs of being a professional entertainer. It’s a daunting journey to be making a living strictly of Music. “I felt like I by doing music-related had a lot of catching up activities. You can be havto do, so I strictly listened ing the worst day of your to jazz for about three life, but just have to grit years - until my buddy your teeth and smile since Jesse Lewis turned me 12,000 people are watching on to Nick Drake’s “Five you who paid good money Jacob Rodriguez Leaves Left” which blew to have their lives lifted. It’s Photo: Frank Zipperer me away.” While in New your job to put on a show, York, Jacob performed around the counbut I’m always up for the challenge.” try with legendary artists such as Aretha “Jacob has a great sound. His rhythFranklin, Cyrus Chesnut, and the Baltimore mic, melodic, and harmonic sensibilities Symphony Orchestra, as well as with jazz are outstanding. But, I think the defining contemporaries Walter Smith III, Ambrose attribute of his playing is heart. He tells a Akinmusire, and Marcus Gilmore. Jacob story with every solo. That’s a rare gift.” also played with the Soulful Symphony in ~ Trumpeter Justin Ray Baltimore. “I absolutely cherished my early years in New York. Where else can you live Jacob makes his home in Asheville. where you can see the best jazz in the world “Currently, I’m playing with a quintet that almost every night of the week?” uses Hard Bop Explosion as its moniker and Jacob has been a member of the Miplays a lot of the hits of the 50’s and 60’s. chael Buble band since 2007, playing arenas Also Coconut Cake, an amazing hodgeacross the U.S. and around the world, and podge of touring Asheville musicians who appearing on two Buble Grammy winners: perform traditional Congolese music in a

“Jacob sets the bar high for not only saxophonists, but all local musicians. His deep harmonic knowledge and technical ability allow him to play whatever he wants and we’re all lucky to have Jacob in the local music scene.” ~ Bassist Zack Page orn in Seattle in 1981, Jacob Rodriguez grew up in San Antonio, Texas and began playing saxophone at the age of 11. “I had the fortunate experience of growing up with an older brother who played a lot of Guns ‘n’ Roses, NWA, Dr. Dre and Red Hot Chili Peppers. But it wasn’t until he gave me Duke Ellington’s “The Great London Concerts in 8th grade that I really fell in love with jazz. I was playing alto then so Johnny Hodges was an early influence. Then I was into John Coltrane’s “Lush Life” and I can still sing all his solos. I switched to baritone in High School and fell in love with the sound of Pepper Adams and Harry Carney. It was Carney’s melodies that really drew me to its sound.” Jacob played with the San Antoinio ska band Spies Like Us from 1996-1999. When he was 20, Jacob moved to New York City to pursue his Bachelor and Master’s degrees at the Manhattan School

The Carolina Chocolate Drops

from that album that much of the current set list is drawn. There will of course be favorites from their prior releases at this upcoming show as well as a few cover tunes and stylistic twists and turns. Intrigued with the central role African-Americans played in shaping our nation’s popular music from its beginnings more than a century ago, the band is committed to exposing their audiences to a framework of music, string-band, jug-band, fife and drum, early jazz, not readily heard these days. Yet none of this education is at the expense of a good time. Their concerts are first and foremost fun, a lively experience that just happens to teach us a thing or two about our rich heritage. When the Carolina Chocolate Drops stop by for a visit be prepared to be both entertained and enlightened.

BY

EDDIE LESHURE

very nontraditional way. I’m in the house band for the Alien Music Club’s weekly jazz jam at Barley’s. When in town, I also sometimes play with Shannon Whitworth, the Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, the Archrivals, stephaniesid and Russ Wilson. I love the diversity of the Asheville music scene!” Jacob was also recently hired to teach saxophone and assist with ensembles at UNCA. “It’s exciting to work with Bill Bares and Brian Felix on improving their expanding jazz program and it’s a very inspiring environment to be in. In the past couple of years, I’ve been blessed to record with some very inspiring songwriters. Check out Moses Atwood’s “One Bright Boat,” “Starfruit” by stephaniesid, and Jon Reid’s “Reverb and Tambourine,” to name a few. I am currently writing with the intention of recording and am excited about that!” So are the rest of us Jacob!

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently off-the-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.


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holiday shopping INTERVIEW WITH

Janet Carter

Owner of Thyme in the Garden

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apid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Thyme in the Garden and what was the genesis of this business?

Janet Carter: I owned a garden design and landscape company and my husband, Tom, daughter, Laura and I decided to open a small garden retail shop. It seemed a natural extension since I was already purchasing plant material for my clients. We found this property on the north side of town that had a lot of promise with an onsite garden, stream and interesting features in an old 1950’s building. Our focus quickly became selling interesting and unusual perennials, seasonal annuals and ornamentals, as well as tropicals and beautiful potted arrangements. RRM: How has your business grown since you first opened six years ago?

JC: It has really grown into a whole new

venture. While we continue to keep the shop stocked with houseplants and pots year

‘Chocolate Fetish’ continued from page 9

sound foundation, then perfect and protect it while you try to grow the business with a well thought out strategy. Fads are tempting to pursue but your investment in them can disappear overnight. Don’t get caught up in a “rain dance.�

RRM: What do you mean by a rain dance? BF: In a rain dance everyone runs around

singing, chanting, beating on drums, and has a good time, but the results are very questionable. Remember one basic fact: for a business to be sustainable it must first make a profit.

RRM: Where

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Offering whimsy to the refined, bringing the outdoors in, and delightfully mixing the old with the new.

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round and packed with garden plants in the growing season, we have become known for our gift shop as well. One way I describe our shop to folks who have never visited is to think less garden center, and more home and garden boutique. There is always something new to discover in our gift shop with an eye for unusual and delightful pieces for home and garden as well as small gift items perfect for cheering up anyone.

RRM: When did you first get into gardening?

JC: I have always gardened since I was a child, but it became my focus as my children were almost grown.

Gabriel & Co 14 kt gold pendant with diamonds

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ'RZQWRZQ$VKHYLOOHĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

RRM: Thyme in the Garden is more than a garden and garden gift store. What else do you offer?

‘Thyme’ continued on page 39

tions, and we intend to continue to grow the company by concentrating on these strengths. We excel in dealing directly with our customers and do not plan to branch out into the broad wholesale arena. We will continue to grow the business locally, regionally and nationally by continuing to offer our loyal customers the highest quality products and services they have come to expect from The Chocolate Fetish, while attracting new customers with innovative marketing programs and products. As for exactly where we will be in five years you will need to ask Elizabeth because she and the management team will be running the business. Sue and I plan to retire‌ some day. It’s hard to give up something you have so much fun doing.

December 14, 15 & 16 at HandMade in America

Buy Handmade for the Holidays ! Three Days & 25 Local Artists VIP Preview Party

Friday December 14th, 5-8 pm Light appetizers and drinks. $10 plus requested donation*

Saturday 10am-5pm Sunday 11am-4pm

Cool Craft HolMarket iday Edition

do you see the Chocolate Fetish in five years?

BF: The Chocolate

Fetish is a manufacturer, direct retailer and multi-channel marketer of high quality, handcrafted artisan chocolate confec-

The Chocolate Fetish Inc. 36 Haywood Street Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

* Please support Homeward Bound by donating a household item, see HandMade's website for more info.

More info at: handmadeinamerica.org 125 S. Lexington Ave, Suite 101 * Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 252-0121 * (Doors on Hilliard between Lex. and Church) Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 17


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local holiday shopping guide INTERVIEW WITH

Stephanie Wilder Owner of Chifferobe in Black Mountain

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apid River Magazine: What was the

inspiration behind naming your business Chifferobe? (A chifferobe is a closet-like piece of furniture that combines a wardrobe with a chest of drawers.)

Stephanie Wilder: Growing up my parents

had a chifferobe in their bedroom and it always smelled wonderfully of linseed oil. It’s a charming name for a shop. I was an English teacher for most of my life and I love words. I love the sound of the word “chifferobe” and also the southern homeyness the word conjures up for me. I never heard the word before I moved to the south, probably because I was raised in New York City, and people have armoires there, not chifferobes! Also, one of my favorite books to teach was To Kill A Mockingbird. If you recall, the hussy that lures a young man into her trashy house, leading to his destruction, tempts him inside saying, “You look like someone who could bust up a chifferobe...” For me, then, chifferobe is sort of quaint, southern, but also a little bit edgy: a perfect description of my shop.

RRM: Tell us about all that we can find in Chifforobe.

SW: You will find a mixture of things that

I love ion the shop. It looks very much like my house: rustic with touches of elegance. I love old stuff, especially things that show wear; my favorite things are pieces of furniture with old, chipped paint or anything with an obvious repair, showing that someone once really valued the humble object. I also love anything beautiful made by hand.

PG.

INTERVIEWED BY

SW: All the time! Conversely, there are

DENNIS RAY

I carry work by Asheville potters Melissa Weiss and Marisa Domanski, both of whose work shows the mark of a person’s hands. Each piece is unique, not looking like it was turned out by a machine. I also have pottery by Preston Tolbert whose work fills up both hands in its chunky heartiness. I sell gorgeous glasses blown by Asheville Glassworks, jewelry by several talented crafts people, and soaps by Seven Sisters Unique finds at Chifferobe. Photo: Liza Becker in Black Mountain. I also just got in some wonderRRM: Why did you choose to open a shop in ful “UnPaper Towels,” soft organic rolls of Black Mountain? towels to use, throw in the washer, and then use again. How green can you get!! SW: I live in Black Mountain and always I am always finding some new stuff I wanted to start a business here. The downcan’t live without to add to the collection. town is charming and friendly and just feels The other category I adore is folk art. I carry welcoming. several artists of this genre as well as serious RRM: What are your future goals with this artists. Mike Jones of Georgia makes skelbusiness? eton sculptures with great personalities.

RRM: It’s an interesting story how you first opened your business. Would you mind re-telling it?

SW: I had been teaching at the Swannanoa

Valley Youth Development Center and imagined I would stay there forever. Then the state decided to close the facility. I went from there to ABCCM, working under a grant that ended. Then I decided to follow my bliss and open a shop, something I had always dreamed of doing. As I was mulling over this idea, my friend Kathryn pointed me towards the space she had just vacated when she moved her Pilates Studio to a larger space. I walked inside, called the landlord, and signed a lease immediately.

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SW: I would like to grow my on-line busi-

ness through my website, www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com. That way, the period after Christmas would be more productive. I also plan to have some teas and discussion groups in the shop through the winter. It’s a charming space and would be cozy for such events.

RRM: Have you ever sold something and

later thought “I wish I should have put that in my house?”

quite a few old things in the shop that used to live in my house. I simply found stuff I liked better and traded out my old things for something different.

RRM: What items are you looking to purchase to sale?

SW: I always have my eyes open for folk art. Also anything beautiful, simple, and quirky.

RRM: Tell us a little about your monthly gallery openings.

SW: My first opening was on November 9

featuring the work of Ursula Goebels-Ellis, a gifted ceramicist, and the next one will be Friday evening, December 14, from 5-7 p.m. It will feature the whimsical work of Hollie Chantilles, a nature artist, specializing in paintings of bees. I met her when she visited my shop in July and we just clicked. I will be serving wine and food and hope to lure locals downtown to mix and mingle. A few other shops in Black Mountain have agreed to stay open the same nights, and we are hoping to start a gallery crawl event monthly here. Sometimes we just get tired of having to drive into Asheville for so many events. We invite our friends from Asheville to make the drive and hope these openings will make that happen. Black Mountain is evolving and we need to move it along.

Chifferobe 118 D Cherry St, Black Mountain 28711 (828) 669-2743 www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Niche – Grove Arcade

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t Niche we encourage the freedom to be unique. Our customers project themselves as women of personal depth, intellectual strength and individual creativity — authentically living and flowing amid their many activities in clothing that inspires them to be free to awaken imagination, animate wit, twinkle with charm, glow with wisdom, celebrate individuality, kindle enlightenment and be taken seriously. The gals at Niche adore artsy, layered pieces with mixed textures that are easily adaptable, amplifying wearing opportunities and making easy transitions from day to night and from season to season. Colleen Hoerner opened Niche over 10 years ago in Hendersonville. The boutique was moved to the Grove Arcade location about two years ago. Designers include Flax, Cynthia Ashby, Magnolia Pearl, Skif and Comfy. Niche also proudly carries clothing by local artists, including PatteCoats, Jude

Stuecker, Cara May Knits, Nancy Allen, and Sheila Thibodeaux. Local jewelry artists C.C. V’Soske, and Bobbie Polizzi are also represented at Niche.

Niche – Grove Arcade 1 Page Avenue, #145 downtown Asheville Open 10-6 Mondays – Saturdays (828) 575-2057, www.NicheOnline.com


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

Eileen and Marty Black Owners of the Cotton Mill Studios

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he Historic Cotton Mill Studios, located in the River Arts District of Asheville is what remains of the Cotton Mill Complex which was destroyed by a devastating fire in 1995. The building was purchased by potters Eileen & Marty Black (The Potter’s Mark Ltd.) in 2002 and is the home to fifteen artists.

Rapid River Magazine: This December

marks your 10th year in the River Arts District (RAD) and your purchase of the Cotton Mill Building. What would you say has been the greatest change to (RAD) since 2002?

E&M: When we purchased the remnants

of the Cotton Mill, RAD was basically a dilapidated neighborhood called the River District. It had about 35 artists, who only opened their studios for a one day studio stroll and handed out a black & white flyer for their guide. The crime rate was high and, if they could find it, most people were reluctant to visit this rather depressed area. Now we have over 180 artists in a vibrant area that has become an international destination. Our stroll is now a two day event twice a year, we have a full color brochure (about 70,000 were printed last year) and offer a free trolley. Out of town

INTERVIEWED BY

mon walls in the building for displaying the artwork of all the tenants. We intend to hold more exhibitions in the Mill Gallery that feature Cotton Mill Artists. Many of these shows will benefit not for profit organizations. The goals of the building are dependent on the goals of the artists who rent studios. Our intention is to provide whatever support is necessary so our artists can make a decent living creating their art. We also want to continue the contribution that The Cotton Mill Studios provides to the growth of RAD. We are thrilled to be a long term part of this dynamic district. More changes will come and we expect to be involved in further growth.

RRM: How has your personal involvement changed the look and feel of RAD?

EB: Over my forty years, as a potter, I have

been involved with many arts organizations. I started with the Ceramic League of Miami, and became the founding president of the Carolina Clay Guild. Being an integral part of the RAD offered me many opportunities. I was membership chair for five years and eventually served as president for two years. With the help of a handful of artists and building owners, we shaped the community to what it is now. It was totally an artist driven organization, with no financial help from the city, county, or state. The artists built what is now known as The River Arts District.

RRM: What would you like seen

Eileen Black in her studio.

visitors often tell us that we are second only to the Biltmore house as one of the reasons, to visit Asheville. Over half the buildings are owned by artists, many of whom are open most days of the week. We now have six restaurants, with more coming, all helping to make visiting the RAD an adventure that can last a whole day.

RRM: What goals do you have for the Cotton Mill Studios Building in the coming years?

E&M: A few years ago, we set up the Mill Gallery, which incorporates all the com-

added to RAD either for those who work there or those who shop there that is currently lacking?

E&M: We need a safer way for visitors to

stroll through the district. A one word answer is sidewalks.

RRM: Being both an artist and a building

owner do you ever feel like one job is hurting the other?

E&M: No, in fact, it has given us a bet-

ter perspective of what the artists need. As building owners, we try to keep the rents at a reasonable level by having us, as artists, paying our fair share of the rent and not using the building income for personal gain.

Cotton Mill Studios

RRM: Has the poor economy over the past

Mike Lightcap

four years changed the way you run your business and perhaps made you stronger because of it?

v Custom Designed Jewelry

E&M: Because RAD is now such a desirable

place for artists, we have never experienced a time when we could not rent our studios. Even with the economy the way it is, we have enjoyed having our building being fully rented. Our pottery business has increased every year.

v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

29 Biltmore Ave.

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

RRM: I can honestly say your building easily holds some of the most talented artists in the area. In choosing who will rent studio space do you require certain qualifications or awards?

(828) 281-4044 PG.

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www.vandykejewelry.com

E&M: Thank you, We feel the same way. We

value all of our artists and choose potential new tenants that are talented and have the ability to fit into our Cotton Mill Community. We do insist that the tenants become a member of the RADA and are comfortable with being open to the general public. After all, if you’re not open, you certainly can’t expect to sell. We want the Cotton Mil Studios to continue to be a major draw for the RAD.

RRM: Tell us a little about the mural on

the outside of the building and how that came about?

E&M: Cotton Mill Studios is a remnant of

a much larger Cotton Mill Complex which burned down in 1995. Our building was saved by a change of wind direction, however, the building did show signs of the fire on the north wall and the northern section of the front wall. The north wall was painted and an illustration of a gear identifying RAD was added. The front wall was an eyesore and rather than simply paint it, we engaged Ian Wilkinson of the Asheville Mural Project to paint a trompe l’oeil mural that would both clean up the building and attract visitors. It has been a great success with visitors constantly taking pictures of the mural.

Historic Cotton Mill Studios 122 Riverside Drive, Asheville Hours: Mon-Sat. 10-4pm., Sun. Closed (828) 252-9122 www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 19


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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER

Support Local Artists ❖ Suppo Indulge and Support Self Expre

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ABOUT THE RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ artist member strong collective, who, along with dozens of Associate Members and Friends, provides a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art for any aspect of their lives. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

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* 240 Clingman * 347 Depot * 97 Roberts Street * Cotton Mill Studios * CURVE studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Northlight Studios * Odyssey Center * The Old Wood Co.

* Phil Mechanic * Pink Dog Creative * Riverside Studios * Riverview Station * Roberts St. Studios * Roots Studios * Studio 375 Depot * The Wedge * Warehouse Studios

Mark Henry, Cotton Mill Studios

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ort Local Creativity ❖ Buy Local ession ❖ Invest in Our Future

Barbara Zarestky, Cotton Mill Studios

Nancy Hilliard Joyce, Cotton Mill Studios RD

HOLIDAY CELEBRATION & ART SALE Saturday, December 8, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Works will include paintings, mosaics, prints, ceramics, mixed media, and sculpture, as well as holiday gift cards available at various prices. Several artists will also accept commissions if you have something special in mind. Gift certificates for the artist in your life start at just $30 and can help with career development. Live music and refreshments. Free parking in front and behind the building.

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IF YOU GO: Riverside Studios, 174 W. Haywood Street

in Asheville’s River Arts District, just across the railroad tracks from White Duck Taco. For further information, call (828) 551-5045. RN

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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

Maggie Jones

DENNIS RAY

apid River Magazine: Tell us a

from what most potters in this area are doing. We make all size vases, umbrella stands and large floor pots, mirror frames, food-safe decorative tureens and more. All hand decorated with sculptural details.

Maggie Jones: Since the early 80’s

RRM: Turtle Island Pottery is

Co-owner of Turtle Island Pottery

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INTERVIEWED BY

little about the artwork you do.

we have produced a functional line of pottery decorated with a white glaze, blue flowers, dragonflies, and green and yellow accents. Made to be used, it has been very popular and we still produce it today. About the year 2000 I began to notice antique art pottery and began to produce more decorative and sculptural work…still based on function and inspired by nature. The work on the website shows these images. The forms and motifs are largely influenced by early Art Nouveau, which began in Eastern Europe middle 1800’s, and the Arts and Crafts movement which was during the early 1900’s. A lot of Asheville architecture is in the Arts and Crafts movement style. Because of these designs and the altering of forms that I do, the work is very different

yourself and your husband Freeman. Do you each have separate duties in creating the art or are there separate pieces by you both?

MJ: Generally, Freeman does the

wheel work, starting the basic forms, and I do the sculptural Face Pitcher, one gallon in size. Inspired by details, altering, handles, lids, English Toby jugs and Martin Brothers pottery from etc. I also do the glazing. Freethe late 1800’s. Stoneware clay. man loads the kilns and most of the maintenance. Freeman also comes up with a lot of the ideas for themes, There are so many especially the humorous ones. Our daughdifferent things that can ter, Molly, has been making her version of be done with clay. the southern folk art face jug for over 10 years now. That line is under our studio name. Again, the humorous themes usually come from her and Freeman. RRM: How did you first get into pottery?

Twisted Gourd, 10" tall. Wheel thrown then altered, stretched, pinched and pulled in stages. Stoneware clay.

MJ: Art has always been my passion. In

elementary school I was drawing animals at the request of friends. In 9th grade I had an art teacher who knew the potter’s wheel, so I began then. I knew at that time I wanted to go into the crafts and create functional items. My father set up space in the basement at home and we learned together. By the time I graduated from high school I was proficient enough at the potter’s wheel for an apprenticeship. I was a full time apprentice for over a year, then set up my own studio. I went to a lot of workshops in the 70’s, and was a special student with Paul Soldner at Scripps College in California in 1984. Freeman played with clay in his childhood, finding it in creek banks. He grew up in Etowah, NC, and at that time there were brick factories and red and white clay instead of golf courses. He also did a work study in college where he loaded kilns, mixed clay, etc., for the ceramic department there.

RRM: Your work is at times elegant and deli-

cate, at others whimsical and charming. Why do you think your work is so broad?

MJ: I just have too many ideas. There are so

many different things that can be done with clay. It is the most versatile of all the craft mediums. Also, with Freeman and Molly’s ideas it gets pretty crowded!

RRM: You tend to work very close with colors. When you first think of a piece, when it is still just in your mind’s eye, does color play a part or does the color come to you from the finished piece itself?

MJ: Usually form first and color comes as

I work on it. I use a wide variety of glaze sources. My own recipes, some commercially prepared glazes, and some are locally found minerals. I like a full spectrum of color and texture.

RRM: When do you find yourself most cre-

ative and what about that time of day do you think makes it so?

MJ: No consistency there, any time anywhere. No two are alike.

RRM: Have you ever sold a piece that you

Turtle Island Pottery

MJ: Yes. We do have a collection of pieces

Maggie and Freeman Jones 2782 Bat Cave Rd., Old Fort 28762

wished you should have kept for yourself? we have kept and I have pieces from workshops and the different locations I have worked dating back to 1968. They are housed in our showroom in Old Fort. 22 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

Tomato Jar, 8x8, stoneware clay.

Home/Studio: Call first (828) 669-2713 Old Fort Showroom... Most Saturdays (828) 337-0992


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artful living Peace

BY

BILL WALZ

Peace is every step, The shining red sun is my heart, Each flower smiles with me.

Within us is constant anxious movement of mind that leads to nervousness and tension of the body.

How green, how fresh all that grows. How cool the wind blows. Peace is every step. It turns the endless path to joy.

~ Thich Nhat Hanh

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s with so many virtuous concepts, peace is really not very well understood by most of us. We mostly think of peace through its opposite - as the absence of conflict – rather than as a profound state of its own, possible even in the midst of conflict. We have very little understanding of the nature and depth of peace itself. If we think of it at all, we think it belongs to the world of the spiritual, not our everyday existence. This is where Buddhism is particularly unique amongst world religions; it emphasizes inner peace for the everyday lay-person, as Thich Nhat Hanh poetically expresses, in “every step,” turning “the endless path to joy.” But how? Buddhism, also unique among world religions, does not preach virtues without showing us the path to their realization. So it is with peace. Buddhism practices what it preaches – quite literally. It has a practice that it teaches, in a sense, complete with a how-to manual. What then really is peace? And what is the practice that leads to the realization of peace? Thich Nhat Hanh is telling us. It is in the shining sun, in the beauty of a flower, in the green, freshness of all that grows, and the cool of the breeze. But wait, we say, these things are there every day, and we see them, but we still don’t know what this mystical state of peace is. Ah, but do we really see them? Another of Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings is that we must learn to look deeply. Now, we are coming to the practice. Without looking deeply we do not have the eyes to see. Looking deeply is what Buddhism calls “mindfulness,” and mindfulness is the every-day fruit of Buddhist meditation. We must not just casually look at the flower or the green of the world, not just casually feel the radiance of the sun and the wind blowing coolly as we go about our everyday business, we must experience them in full presence. We must experience the space of the moment in which they and we occur, realizing we are connected with the flower, the trees, the sun, the breeze, and

with each other, in that space. In that space, we encounter the moment shimmering in dynamic stillness. It is the fabric of life itself. Buddhism tells us to realize that what we are is life, and lifeas-who-we-are can be experienced in the movement of our breathing, in the sensation of life-energy that pervades our bodies, in the awareness that is the essence of mind before thought and emotion. We are that awareness, that shimmering dynamic stillness that has a body and a mind. This is very important. From a Buddhist perspective, we are not a person who has awareness. We are awareness that has a person, with a mind, body and circumstances. First, we are awareness. To realize true peace is to realize that the dynamic stillness that connects the entire world, and that we experience as awareness, is peace. It is within us and all around us – even if there is conflict going on around us. We must realize and see it is who we are in order to not be carried away by the turmoil of the world, and this realization happens in the deeper levels of Buddhist meditation. Without the ability to experience the stillness that is the underlying fabric of the world, we cannot know peace. Within us is constant anxious movement of mind that leads to nervousness and tension of the body, and this is what psychology calls neurosis. It is being caught in the thoughts and emotions of a mind that mistakenly believes it is separate in the world, and therefore in an endless competitive relationship with the world. And neurosis requires constant mental movement to hold together this idea of itself in separateness. It could be said that constant mental movement is the very definition of neurosis; it just takes on different flavors, such as anxiety, depression, anger, compulsivity and impulsivity,

but it always robs us of peace within, and leads to conflict without. We are all some combination of all these neurotic traits, and because of them swirling through our mental-scape, we are unable to experience the underlying stillness of the world. We are unable to tolerate the underlying stillness. We have to keep moving, and so our every step is blind and conflicted. We cannot see the fabric of life that we are within, along with the flowers, the trees, the sun and the wind. Nor can we truly see our fellow humans and creatures of the world. Having seen deeply our interconnectedness with the world around us, a natural morality emerges, a morality that sustains our peace. In Buddhist teaching it is noted that to obtain the peace that eliminates suffering, we must realize eight practices known as The Eightfold Path. These practices are: Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration. While I won’t go into a discussion of the details of this instruction, it is important to realize that the “Right” in these practices is not some morality in the conventional sense, meaning instruction that is imposed. There is a reason why the teaching begins with “Right View” for here we return to Thich Nhat Hanh’s teaching of “looking deeply.” The purpose of Buddhist teaching is always to lead a person to see things as they truly are, not to tell you how things ought to be. In the case of our discussion on peace, to have peace, the right view is to not see yourself as separate and opposed to anyone or anything, but rather, connected in the human condition and connected in the natural world. To have peace, to put it simply, you must not be trying to get away with anything that is harmful to anyone or anything, but rather practice a simple ethics stated best in what is called “The Golden Rule.” Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. If you meditate on this, it will become clear: To experience what in Biblical terms is referred to as “The peace that surpasseth all understanding,” your view, intention, action, livelihood, effort, mind and concentration must be peaceful, that is, you must treat others and the world with the same respect, honesty, and care that you would want for yourself, for in truth, others and the world are yourself. In Buddhism, this is not moral instruction, but rather smart living, with yourself as the principle beneficiary – experiencing a profound peace in every step of your life. “It turns the endless path to joy.”

As for the seasonal wish: “Peace on Earth, Goodwill to all,” it would be good to realize this can only begin at home, with ourselves. As the Dalai Lama has expressed it, “Although attempting to bring about world peace through the internal transformation of individuals is difficult, it is the only way.” Peace. Shalom. Namaste. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Visit www.billwalz.com

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 23


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

dramatic, it is never maudlin and it had a powerful effect on me and the audience that I saw it with. The film is getting mixed to negative reviews from most critics who point out clichés in the script and almost totally negative reviews from musicians who wanted more music and less personal drama. An understandable reaction perhaps but a misguided one for it cannot see the forest for the trees. This film was not made for critics or musicians, it was made for moviegoers and may do more to foster an understanding of and an appreciation for chamber music than any recording or music course. Easily one of my Top 10 films of the year. Rated R for language and some sexuality.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN The four members of A Late Quartet: Mark Ivanir, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Christopher Walken, Catherine Keener.

A Late Quartet ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: A truly remarkable film about the members of a string quartet and the challenges they face after a member is diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

REEL TAKE: The first of many pleasant

surprises regarding A Late Quartet occurred right at the beginning when the film opened with the RKO Pictures logo. Not the old black and white logo but a brand new 21st century version that looks really neat (they’ve dropped the ‘Radio’ for obvious reasons). Things just got better from there. I was initially wondering if this film was an updated, Americanized version of the 1984 Italian movie Basileus Quartet about a long time string quartet who must suddenly deal with the death of one of their members. It’s not. The outline of both movies is similar. A Late Quartet deals with the retirement of one of the members and the effect it has on the ensemble. Basileus goes in a much darker direction when the quartet hires a much younger player which negatively alters the lives of the others. Late explores the lives of the various members, how they started, where they’ve gone, and what the future holds for them. Two of the members (Philip Seymour

Hoffman, Catherine Keener) are a couple with marital problems whose daughter (Imogen Poots) is a budding musician. The first violinist (Mark Ivanir) is a note perfect automaton who thinks of nothing but the music until he falls in love with the daughter. The cellist (Christopher Walken) is the heart and soul of the quartet who’s just lost his wife (Anne Sofie von Otter) and has just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. The musical glue that holds all the diverse elements together is Beethoven’s String Quartet, Op. 13, a late work that was the maestro’s personal favorite. It is in 7 movements, takes 40 minutes to play, and is played without a break between movements. The problems with playing the quartet are interwoven by writer-director Yaron Zilberman with the problems each member of the quartet faces. How they try to overcome them and what finally occurs at the end makes for a deeply moving experience. The performances from everyone involved even in the small parts (Wallace Shawn and Anne Sofie von Otter are especially noteworthy) are all that you can ask for. Yes the script is melodramatic at times but the story is a soap opera and that’s to be expected. While A Late Quartet is melo-

24 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

Anna Karenina ∑∑∑∑

The solid support of Matthew MacFayden, Emily Watson and especially Domhnall Gleeson (son of Brendan) in key character parts added to my enjoyment. Unfortunately Aaron Johnson (now Taylor-Johnson), as Anna’s love interest Count Vronsky, is ultimately little more than a momentarily sensitive upper class cad. The most striking aspect of Anna Karenina is its blatant theatricality. This comes as no surprise considering the screenplay is by Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare ( in Love) who at 75 is now the grand old man among English playwrights. The film often resembles a cross between Ken Russell’s The Music Lovers (1970) and Terry Gilliam’s Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1989) but Wright’s rapidly emerging trademark visual style and Stoppard’s character dialogue elevate the film above all previous ones.

Short Take: Joe Wright’s stylish direction elevates another 19th century literary classic into a 21st century film masterpiece.

REEL TAKE: According to the Internet

Movie Database, there have been 18 other film adaptations of Anna Karenina dating all the way back to 1910. The three best known versions were made as star vehicles for their leading actresses. Two of them starred Greta Garbo (the silent 1927 Love and the famous 1935 remake directed by Clarence Brown), the third was a British version (1948) with Vivien Leigh. The most authentic version is considered to be the 1967 Soviet adaptation which has been rarely seen outside of Russia. I confess to having a soft spot for the silent version even with its shockingly altered ending (the exact opposite of the book and other film versions) and I have never seen the Russian film but this adaptation has been instantly catapulted to the top of the list by virtue of Wright’s typically stylish direction and by the memorable performances of its large ensemble cast. While Keira Knightley’s Anna is beautiful to look at and she makes us feel the joy and later desperation of the character it is Jude Law, who really captured my imagination. He invests the character with a depth not found in other treatments of the story.

Keira Knightley as Tolstoy’s tragic heroine in Anna Karenina.

The film captures the world of 19th century Russian upper class society in a way that few others have. This is due to the fact that, like an opera, everything is stylized (two dimensional settings, colorful costumes on a grand scale, snow covered model trains) and larger than life. The staging of a fancy dress ball and a horse racing accident are but two of several memorable set pieces. As much as I enjoyed the film and would readily see it again it should be pointed out that the film is somewhat slow in parts but that is more Tolstoy’s fault than it is Wright’s. Having a more sexually mag‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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film reviews his own devices. For Lincoln, he dialed back the melodrama – way back – creating a more academic, reverential portrait of the last 42 netic rather than just a really good looking days of Lincoln’s life and administration. This Vronsky wouldn’t have hurt matters either. works as both a positive and a negative. If what you are looking for is another The positive is that he creates a meticuMasterpiece Theater costume drama then lous time capsule. The viewer feels like a fly this version will probably disappoint you. on the wall in 1865 Washington D.C. The However if you allow its wildly theatrical White House is house seemingly far less nature to transport you then there is much formal with people coming and going at all here to savor. I’ve never really cared for hours. The film also shows a most realistic Anna Karenina before. The fact that Joe depiction of congressional sessions, the inWright and company have made me care is timacy and jocularity of which may surprise my ultimate critical assessment. That and many. The negative is that an academic apthe fact that I can’t wait for Joe Wright’s next proach is not Spielberg’s strength. film no matter what it may be. At his best (i.e. Schindler’s List List, MuRated R for some sexuality and violence. nich) Spielberg can tell a great story, an REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN important story and still entertain. Here Spielberg seems to have made a conscious effort to avoid giving Lincoln the hero-worship treatment and instead, through restraint, show the very real, very human man behind the most iconic political figure in American history. Until the very end, he goes out of his way to avert sentiment. This is a commendable approach and the film succeeds brilliantly in parts, but Spielberg’s restraint over all results in a film that will simply be too dry to really engage the masses. It could have been a cinematic masterpiece and it’s not. Just hand him the damn Oscar; Daniel Day Lewis stars as the 16th President of the United States in Lincoln. What undeniably works for the film are its actors. Daniel Day Lincoln ∑∑∑∑ Lewis is mesmerizing as Lincoln. You find yourself leaning in to hear what yarn he’ll Short Take: Steven Spielberg tackles tell next. I couldn’t help but think the spirit history and Doris Kearns Goodwin’s of Lincoln sat on his shoulder too. Amazdefinitive work Team of Rivals: The ingly, while Lewis’ performance is truly Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. commanding, he in no way over shadows REEL TAKE: As a history major with a focus his fellow actors. Sally Field, Tommy Lee on American studies, my favorite semester Jones, James Spader, John Hawks, David of college was spent studying with a Lincoln Strathairn and others all turn in tremenbiographer. It was as if the spirit of Lincoln dous performances. sat upon our shoulders while we listened Even John Williams scaled it back for and learned and debated. As I entered the the score to the film. In this case, he hits all theatre to see Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln Lincoln, I the right notes, providing a very appropriate was excited but also a tad trepidatious. Doris backdrop for Lincoln. Ultimately seeing an Kearns Goodwin’s book from which it is incredibly important chapter in our history sourced, Team of Rivals: The Political Geunfold is a wonder to behold even if the film nius of Abraham Lincoln is a masterpiece; isn’t quite. Bottom line, thought slightly would Spielberg do it justice? disappointed over all, this history geek will be The title itself implies that it will be a rooting for Daniel Day Lewis on Oscar night. sweeping biopic. It most certainly is not, and Rated PG-13 for an intense scene of war violence, it is perhaps therefore ill-titled. Goodwin’s some images of carnage and brief strong language. book (aptly titled) is a rich tapestry that REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN delves far more deeply into its subject matter than a film can possibly capture in 2 hours. Skyfall ∑∑∑∑ That being the case Spielberg focused in on the passage of the 13th amendment and Short Take: Daniel Craig returns for a 3rd and powerful tour of duty as 007 in Lincoln’s all-consuming zeal to do what the 23rd Bond film, Skyfall. needed to be done to make that happen during a lame duck session of congress. REEL TAKE: The life expectancy and relSpielberg is a master storyteller and proevancy of the Bond franchise was completely lific filmmaker, but even he can fall prey to rejuvenated with Daniel Craig’s debut as ‘Movies’ continued from page 24

007 in 2007’s Casino Royale, only to be badly dented with the disappointing follow up Quantum of Solace. The latest Bond film, Skyfall, not only brings the franchise back full throttle, but also up fits it for several years to come. The gist of Skyfall is fairly simple; Bond’s faith in M is tested when she gives an order that may or may not result in his death, and his power to Daniel Craig returns as 007 in Skyfall, the 23rd Bond film. protect her is stretched to the limit when her frame, to look as good and be as effective. past comes back to haunt her. Daniel Craig My only real criticism of the film is and [the always wonderful] Dame Judi that it should have been (and could have Dench once again share a terrific chemistry been) at least ten minutes shorter. Howthat, for my money, makes them one of the ever, the audience in attendance the night best teams in cinematic history and certainly I saw the film wasn’t bothered in the least in the Bond franchise. and neither was I. It’s a sacrilege of sorts to say any Bond is better than Sean Connery, so let’s put it Rated PG-13 for intense violent sequences this way – Daniel Craig is clearly the most throughout, some sexuality, language and talented actor to play Bond. To me, he is smoking. the book Bond. His Bond is a man of many REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN layers and more than a few vulnerabilities and flaws. Craig is also not afraid to look less than pretty. He deftly balances a brooding intensity, brutal physicality and levity. Adding to the fun is the latest Bond vilAsheville Pizza & Brewing Company lain, Silva (Javier Bardem).Silva is a former Movieline (828) 254-1281 MI6 agent turned psychopathic bad guy. www.ashevillepizza.com His mad-genius-with-a-vendetta persona gives Bardem just the right platform to play Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) the villain to the hilt. Reveling in Silva with Movieline (828) 298-1234 florid abandon, Bardem tows the fine line Biltmore Grande brilliantly between pushing the limits and 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 going too far. www.REGmovies.com Skyfall also welcomes Ralph Fiennes and Ben Wishaw to this generation of Bond.. Carmike 10 (Asheville) Fiennes is Gareth Mallory, an assistant to Movieline (828) 298-4452 the prime minister who seem an adversary www.carmike.com to M and Bond, but who, after proving his Carolina Cinemas allegiance to MI6, will be part of the team (828) 274-9500 henceforth. Wishaw is the new ‘Q’ and www.carolinacinemas.com brings millennial generation computer geek and 21st century high tech smarts to the part. Cinebarre (Asheville) The director of American Beauty www.cinebarre.com and Revolutionary Road is not an obvious The Falls Theatre (Brevard) pick to direct a James Bond film, but Sam Movieline (828) 883-2200 Mendes proves himself perhaps the best director of the franchise to date. The little Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) boy who grew up watching Bond films on Movieline (828) 232-1536 television at Christmastime has the love www.fineartstheatre.com (and respect) for the classic Bond elements Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) while imbuing the new film with contemMovieline (828) 697-2463 porary smarts and elegance. www.flatrockcinema.com Skyfall is smart, ruthless and sexy, but not just because of its script and actors. The Four Seasons (Hendersonville) photography raises the bar for the franchise as Movieline (828) 693-8989 well. Future Bond films will have to maintain this caliber of work, with its use of light and Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Theatre Directory

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 25


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sneak preview Coming Soon to a Theatre Near You…

T

he holiday season is upon us. That means Hollywood will be rolling out some mainstream crowd pleasers and Oscar contenders. Whether it’s wholesome family fun, a CGI action-fest, or pretentious art house indie, there’s something for everyone at your local theatres. Here’s a sampling of what’s heading to the big screen this holiday season.

Now Playing

Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert DeNiro. Directed by David O. Russell (The Fighter Three Kings) Fighter,

REEL BUZZ: Romantic comedies are tricky enough to do well without adding mental health issues to the mix. David O. Russell walks a tightrope with this one, but with his track record and directional nuance, it’s likely a big score.

Opening November 30

Hitchcock SHORT TAKE: The love story of Alfred

Hitchcock and his wife Alma during the filming of Psycho. Stars Anthony Hopkins, Helen Mirren, Scarlett Johansson, Danny Huston, and Toni Collette. Directed by Sacha Gervasi.

in the wake of a botched casino heist, and their unlikely reunion during another family’s Thanksgiving celebration. Stars Eric Bana, Olivia Wilde, Sissy Spacek. Directed by Stefan Ruzowitsky.

THE BUZZ: Solid cast, good premise, but it may be a little too convoluted for its own good.

Killing Them Softly

Hyde Park on the Hudson

SHORT TAKE: When

fair between FDR and his distant cousin Margaret Stuckley, centered around the weekend in 1939 when the King and Queen of the United Kingdom visited upstate New York. Stars Bill Murray and Laura Linney. Directed by Roger Michell (Notting Hill, Changing Lanes)

three idiots, who think they’re smart, Three dumb guys who think they’re smart rob a Mob protected card game, causing the local criminal economy to collapse. Brad Pitt plays the enforcer hired to track them down and restore order. Killing Them Softly also features Richard Jenkins, James Gandolfini, Ray Liotta, Scoot McNairy, Ben Mendelsohn, and Vincent Curatola. Directed by Andrew Dominik (The ( Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford Ford).

Brad Pitt plays an enforcer hired to restore order in Killing Them Softly.

SHORT TAKE: The story of the love af-

Silver Linings Playbook SHORT TAKE: Pat has lost everything — his

house, his job, and his wife. He now finds himself living with his parents after spending eight months is a state institution on a plea bargain. Pat is determined to rebuild his life, remain positive and reunite with his wife, despite the challenging circumstances of their separation. All Pat’s parents want is for him to get back on his feet-and to share their family’s obsession with the Philadelphia Eagles football team. When Pat meets Tiffany, a mysterious girl with problems of her own, things get complicated. Stars Bradley

THE BUZZ: We’re anticipating forgive-

ness and perhaps 7 pounds of emotionally manipulative sentiment from director Gabriele Muccino, but when Butler trades testosterone-laden action flicks for estrogen-fest melodrama, oh how his female fans do swoon.

Opening December 7 Deadfall SHORT TAKE: A thriller that follows two

siblings who decide to fend for themselves

26 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

Opening December 21

long hunt for al-Qaeda terrorist leader Osama bin Laden after the 9/11 attacks, and his death at the hands of the Navy SEAL Team 6 in May. Stars Chris Pratt, Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton and Jason Clarke. Directed by Kathryn Bigelow (The The Hurt Locker Locker).

THE BUZZ: There is a great deal of

controversy surrounding this film and whether the filmmakers were given classified information, but with Kathryn Bigelow as commanding officer, Zero Dark Thirty is in good hands and will no doubt be a powerful film.

The Guilt Trip SHORT TAKE: An inventor and his mom

hit the road together so he can sell his latest invention. Stars Seth Rogan and Barbara Streisand. Directed by Anne Fletcher (The Proposal)

SHORT TAKE: A former sports star who

cock even creepier than Hannibal Lector?

Con types probably haven’t been this twitterpated since the first pre-quel to Star Wars.

SHORT TAKE: A chronicle of the decade-

Playing for Keeps

REEL BUZZ: Is it us, or is Hopkins’ Hitch-

THE BUZZ: J.R. Tolkien fans and Comic

Zero Dark Thirty

REEL BUZZ: Preliminary buzz is good on this, but then again it’s the Weinstein Company, so of course the buzz is good. It’ll be grisly beat down to be sure, but with this cast and director, it’s got our attention.

has fallen on hard times starts coaching his son’s soccer team in an attempt to get his life together. Stars Gerard Butler, Jessica Biel, Dennis Quaid, and Judy Greer. Directed by Gabriele Muccino (Seven ( Pounds).

Andy Serkis and Richard Armitage star; Peter Jackson directs.

THE BUZZ: This one is just for laughs and THE BUZZ: It’s expected to be a great per-

formance from Bill Murray. IMDB calls it, “….the American response to season three of Downton Abbey Abbey.”

Opening December 14 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey SHORT TAKE: A curious Hobbit, Bilbo

Baggins, journeys to the Lonely Mountain with a vigorous group of Dwarves to reclaim a treasure stolen from them by the dragon Smaug. Martin Freeman, Ian McKellan,

we’re thinking the director of The Proposal and 27 Dresses will but the f-u-n in dysfunctional family road trip.

Jack Reacher SHORT TAKE: A homicide investigator digs deeper into a case involving a trained military sniper who shot five random victims. Stars Tom Cruise, Rosamund Pike, Richard Jenkins, Alexander Rhodes. Directed by Christopher McQuarrie.

THE BUZZ: He’s already Mission Impossi-

ble’s Ethan Hunt; Will Tom Cruise’s next alter ego be writer Lee Child’s Jack Reacher? ‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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sneak preview ‘Movies’ continued from page 26

THE BUZZ: Matt Damon was set to direct

There’s something for everyone at your local theatres this month.

How to Survive a Plague

Les Miserables

and star in this environmental vehicle, but good friend Gus Van Sant took over the reins. We don’t know why, but we’re pretty sure we’ll respect the endeavour.

SHORT TAKE: An adaptation of the suc-

On the Road

Quartet

SHORT TAKE: Young writer Sal Para-

SHORT TAKE: At a home for retired opera

Blisteringly powerful, How To Survive A Plague transports us back to a vital time of unbridled death, political indifference, and staggering resilience, constructing a commanding archetype for HIV/ AIDS activism today. A discussion about the state of U.S. and global AIDS advocacy will follow the screening. No charge, but donations will be accepted.

THE BUZZ: With this cast, older audiences

Hosted by WNCAP, along with RESULTS, a global anti-poverty group. Monday, December 3 at 7 p.m., at Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd., Asheville. Visit www.wncap.org

Opening December 25

cessful stage musical based on Victor Hugo’s classic novel set in 19th-century France, in which a paroled prisoner named Jean Valjean seeks redemption. Stars Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter. Directed by Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech)

THE BUZZ:

Tom Hooper, boldly brings the beloved stage musical to the big screen. It’s a strong cast and the buzz is good, but we’ll see if it appeals to members of the academy as much as it appeals to fans of the musical.

Opening December 28 Promised Land SHORT TAKE: A salesman for a natural gas

company experiences life-changing events after arriving in a small town, where his corporation wants to tap into the available resources. Matt Damon, Frances McDormand, John Krazinski, Hal Holbrook. Directed by Gus Van Sant (Good Good Will Hunting Hunting).

dise has his life shaken by the arrival of free-spirited Dean Moriarty and his girl Marylou. As they travel across the country, they encounter a mix of people who each impact their journey indelibly. Stars Garrett Hedlund, Sam Riley, Kristen Stewart, Viggo Mortensen. Directed by Walter Salles (The Motorcycle Diaries).

THE BUZZ: The director of The Motorcycle Diaries may just be the perfect filmmaker to bring Jack Kerouac’s iconic novel.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Love”

singers, the annual concert to celebrate Verdi’s birthday is disrupted by the arrival of Jean, an eternal diva and the former wife of one of the residents. Stars Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly, Tom Courtenay. Directorial debut by Dustin Hoffman. will no doubt enjoy Dustin Hoffman’s directorial debut. Reviews have been polite but not exactly standing ovations.

December DVD Picks

Love (1927) With the latest incarnation of Anna Karenina starring Keira Knightley having just having hit the big screen (see review this issue), I thought I would recommend my second favorite version of the story which is the 1927 silent film starring Greta Garbo and John Gilbert. It was recently restored as part of an ongoing TCM project and released through the Warner Archive Series. It has the added bonus of having a brand new soundtrack that matches the action and that the DVD was taken from a screening at UCLA before a live audience who react to the proceedings showcasing what it is like to attend a silent movie screening Even though Garbo would do the sound remake of the film 8 years later, she was never lovelier than she was here at the ripe old age of 22. Her co-star John Gilbert (who was 7 years older) had fallen madly in love with her during their previous film together. Their obvious affection for each other shows through every frame and makes them the ideal Anna and Vronsky because here real life was mirroring the fictional story. This also necessitated a title change so the marquee could read “John Gilbert & Greta Garbo in LOVE. Today the most celebrated aspect of this film is the way it ends. MGM shot two different endings, one for Europe and one for America. It appears that only the American ending survives. I won’t tell you what it is but if you are familiar with the book then it will come as a surprise. However the ending is right in

keeping with the Holiday season. Love is available only as a DVD-R but it can be obtained locally from Rosebud Video or from Orbit DVD in West Asheville.

Love Actually (2003) When I think about movies to watch at Christmastime, I tend to favor more classic holiday fare, but if you prefer something more contemporary, Love Actually might be the ideal holiday pick. Love Actually is written and directed by Richard Curtis and stars a cast of who’s who in current British cinema. The film tells the stories of eight (or maybe it’s ten) loosely related and interrelated couples in the month leading up to Christmas. Here’s just a few of the highlights: Liam Neeson is recent widower and now single father to his young stepson (Thomas Sangster). Emma Thompson is a housewife and mum who suspects her husband, Alan Rickman, is cheating on her with his secretary. Colin Firth is a best-selling author, who retreats to the French countryside to work on his latest novel and nurse a broken heart. Billy Nighy is an aging rockstar

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Love Actually” and former drug addict who’s trying to make it to the top of the pop charts (and beat a young boy band) with a Christmas song, and last but not least, Hugh Grant is the newly elected Prime Minister who finds himself utterly distracted by a member of his household staff. With so many plots and sub plots, we’ve got about twenty characters to follow. It sounds like it would be a train wreck, and in many hands it would be, but it’s not. Love Actually is a true delight. It opens and closes with Hugh Grant’s narrative and a fantastic, ever growing collage of real-life footage of loved ones meeting loved ones off the plane at Heathrow International Airport. The opening narrative combined with the images sets the tone for the whole film. Every character is in pursuit of love in one form in another. Couched with genuine comedy and heart, the film smartly fires on all cylinders and has a surprising universal appeal. In addition to the actors mentioned above the cast also includes Rowan Atkinson, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Gregor Fisher, Martin Freeman, Keira Knightley, Andrew Lincoln, Kris Marshall, Martine McCutcheon, Lucia Moniz, Rodrigo Santoro, and Billy Bob Thornton. Love Actually marked Richard Wright’s directorial debut. Known previously as the writer of Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, this was a fitting [if not over due] debut. Even at this hectic time of year, love actually is all around us. Rent it and enjoy a respite from the season.

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 27


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the curmudgeon Curmudgeon Meets the Black Weekend

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urmudgeon came in the general store on the Saturday afternoon of the Black Friday weekend. His hair was slightly mussed and his demeanor seemed to be even worse. “What’s happened to this country?” he asked of nobody in particular. “I sat down in front of the TV and saw people pulling guns on fellow folks in line, apparently for pushing. I saw crowds of folks streaming through store doors like running lines of carpenter ants after being disturbed in their nests. This cannot be real –” “Seems it is,” said Mrs. Storekeep, her feelings echoed by the smile on the Breadman’s face. “Well, I,” said Curmudgeon, “want to return to those golden days of yesteryear and in order to do so, I am going to relate some thoughts on vegetables, veggies being calm and beneficent things. “Did you know –,” he said, much in the manner of a kindergarten teaching extolling his or her pupils to get out his or her rug and settle down for story time.

SPECIAL EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS Friday, December 14 Biltmore Winery Tour and Tasting. Join the Weinhaus as we tour the winery facilities at the Biltmore Estate with winemakers Bernard Delille and Sharon Fenchak. After the tour we will adjourn to Cedric’s Tavern Loft for a six course small plate dinner and wine pairing. This is a special opportunity to view the processes of a working winery in our own backyard. Time: 6 p.m. Place: Biltmore Winery. Price: $65. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations.

Friday, December 27 Friday Night Flights presents Bubbles for a New Year. Treat this evening as a warm up for the coming Monday night. Explore several different types of sparkling wines and decide which style you enjoy best. Cheers to the New Year. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. The price is $10. Held at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

BY

PETER LOEWER

“– that instead of taking Illustration by Peter Loewer our lives in hand to shop for things we do not need, we could turn our thoughts to things past like all the good things that vegetable do? Vegetables, you know have their stories, too. And I always did wonder why nobody wrote classic poems dedicated to veggies? Why is there no “Ode to the Potato” or verses that celebrate Brussels Sprouts?” Stunned, the folks in the store were quiet as a room full of mice. “Concerning beans,” he said, “there’s a legend that tells of a bean travelling with a chunk of coal who became so bemused by that antics of the coal, that he split his pod-sides laughing and had to be sewn up by a tailor using black thread, hence the black spots on some beans. Pliny is reported to believe that anyone eating garlic could improve their powerful breath by chewing on a roasted beet, and in the Fifth Century Apuleius reported that beets were excellent in curing snake bite.” “Beets for snakebite?” asked the local Vet who was in the store for a few cans of catfood. “Yep,” said Curmudgeon, “and back in Europe, legend always said that babies were to be found in cabbage patches and the Egyptians actually built altars to honor the cabbage, not to mention that Gerarde, the vegetable writer of the Middle Ages wrote in his famous Herbal that cabbages give little nourishment and eating of the their leaves makes one gross and melancholy. “Carrots, for example, were often called Bird’s-nest or Bees’-nest, referring to the form of the seed head being drawn together,

Great values & styles FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

28 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

Why is there no “Ode to the Potato?” much like the seed heads of Queen Anne’s lace — it, too, belonging to the carrot family. “As to leeks, they are dedicated to St. David, for on his day the Welsh wear leeks in their hats. Leeks are the national emblem of Wales and the notoriety of leeks got around because the Emperor Nero at them to improve his voice and Pliny relates that he ate leeks certain days of each month with nothing else, not even a bit of bread.” “I’m aghast,” said Mrs. Storekeep. “I, too,” said the Breadman. “And, I,” said the Vet. “It even applies to politicians,” continued Curmudgion. “Pliny, who was always into good government, told of a knight under Tiberius who was accused of misgovernment, and worrying about his life being painfully taken, drank large quantities of leek juice and died without any torment.” “Handy to know,” said the Vet. “And remember,” said Curmudgeon as he went out the door, “a roasted onion placed in the ear is said to be good for earaches, and the juice excellent in curing deafness.” Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

Harm for the Holidays MEMOIRS OF A HALLMARKED MAN

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ne man’s hilarious story of survival highlighting his family’s history of mishaps on the holidays, all holidays! From a Valentine’s Day massacre, to a harrowing Halloween, to a string of Christmas calamities, in this household, disaster never takes a day off. Written and performed by Tom Chalmers and directed by Josh Batenhorst. Part stand-up comedy, part one-man show, Harm for the Holidays is a funny, often heartfelt, occasionally gross, gift to all those who enjoy a good story about things gone bad. IF YOU Harm for the Holidays, GO Thursday, December 13 at 8

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

p.m., and Friday, December 14 at 8 and 10 p.m. Tickets $15. Altamont, 18 Church Street in Asheville. For more information visit www.myaltamont.com.


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holiday shopping guide INTERVIEW WITH

Amy Taylor

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Owner of Kitsch Fabrics ocated in the historic INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY heart of West Asheville, Kitsch carries a variety of fabrics for quilting, apparel and home decor, with an emphasis on the fun, funky and unusual.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Kitsch Fabrics. Amy Taylor: I think of Kitsch as an oasis for creative people. We can meet like minded friends, exchange ideas, show off our work, learn new techniques, and get inspiration and encouragement.

Funky and unusual fabrics at Kitsch. Photos: Liza Becker

RRM: How did Kitsch Fabrics first begin? AT: It all began when someone gave me a hand me down

Homemade is the best for gift giving.

sewing machine. Some years later a class at Mountain Bizworks gave me the courage and direction to begin building Kitsch. It is a long journey that I hope to continue for many years to come!

Kitsch Fabrics 742 Haywood Rd. Asheville

RRM: What items do you carry that people might be surprised

(828) 505-8280 www.kitschfabrics.com

that you carry?

AT: I look for unusual fabrics and trims anywhere I can find

them. I love the hunt! Another passion is good tools. We have the best selection of felt around and are setting our sights on other craft items as the store grows.

RRM: Tell us about your classes and studio time.

AT: We offer some great

quilt classes, as well as beginning sewing for children and adults. Our studio is well equipped and we encourage people to rent time that includes use of our sewing machines and many wonderful tools.

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RRM: When did you first learn to sew? Amy Taylor, owner of Kitsch Fabrics. Photo: Liza Becker

AT: I began sewing

around the age of 32, I was making wooden puppet theaters and needed some curtains for them. Once I started hanging around fabric stores, I was hooked!

RRM: What types and color of fabrics seem to be the most popular today?

AT: Quilting cottons are the most popular fabrics right now. Even if you don’t quilt the prints are amazing and the fabric is easy to work with. Great for curtains, dresses, handbags, and even quilts.

RRM: Are you offering any specials for the holiday season you care to tell us about?

AT: We are promoting the philosophy that homemade

is the best for gift giving. We have so many great ideas/ classes to share to help get you on your way to a mall free holiday season!

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Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 29


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WAYNESVILLE HOLIDAY GUIDE INTERVIEW WITH

Judi Ferris

Owner of The Chocolate Bear in Waynesville

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Wine, and Tapas Bar

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Tell us a little about what the Chocolate Bear is serving up for this Holiday Season.

Piattino Ristorante

20 Church Street, Waynesville 828-452-6000

apid River Magazine:

www.classicwineseller.com

Judi Ferris: We are

Photo: Liza Becker

featuring our seasonal favorite, Peppermint Bark — dark chocolate with white chocolate sprinkled with peppermint candy pieces. Photo: Liza Becker We also have holiday truffles: Cranberry orange, peppermint, red velvet to name a few. And we’re also serving up specialty chocolates and cocoas. We do offer complimentary gift boxes for your purchases.

RRM: What is your best selling chocolate and why? JF: It’s the chocolate with sea salt or the combina-

tion of caramel, chocolate and sea salt. Pretty much everything we sell with sea salt is a huge seller. This is popular because the salt enhances, as it does with other foods, the chocolate. A second place winner at The Taste of Chocolate at the Maggie Valley Country Club in this year’s contest was our Sea Turtle: Chocolate pecan caramel and sea salt. This is also among our customer favorites.

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RRM: What chocolate goes best as an after dinner treat for multiple guests?

JF: We recommend shooters — a chocolate outer

shell with a creamy ganache infused with a liquieur. The first place winner at The Taste of Chocolate was our Wild Turkey Shooter, a crowd favorite. We do have other flavors including Bailey’s, amaretto, and Fire Jack (Jack Daniels).

RRM: Do you recommend any chocolate pairings with coffee?

JF: A lot of people love to serve chocolate truffles

with coffee. For this season we have a Mexican Hot Chocolate truffle and a pumpkin spice truffle. We also have our best-seller dark chocolate Sea Salt Truffle that folks really tend to enjoy with coffee.

The Chocolate Bear 170 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC PG. 36

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(828) 452-6844 Hours: Mon - Sat: 10-6 p.m. Sun: 12-5 p.m.


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WAYNESVILLE HOLIDAY GUIDE INTERVIEW WITH

Kim Shuford

Elegant Interiors, Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

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s an Interior INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY Designer, Kim Shuford looks at the rooms her clients want to decorate and considers the potential. She helps them to balance function with aesthetics. She then helps the client select the right colors and fabrics to create a certain mood, decides what to put on the walls and floors, and the size and style of furniture they need. She works to make each home an extension of the owners personality.

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Let Massie Furniture Co. help with your home needs. Most major brands of furniture, carpet and appliance are available at discounted prices. Enjoy free delivery, easy terms, and always friendly folks to help you.

Massie Furniture Company Fine furnishings and interior decorating. 39 North Main Street, in Waynesville. Monday through Saturday, 9 to 5 p.m. (828) 452-3509, www.Massiefurniture.net

Rapid River Magazine: What kind of furniture does

Elegant Interiors Bringing Your Home Together in an Elegant Manner Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

Elegant Interiors carry?

Kim Shuford: We carry middle to high end furni-

ture lines – good quality furniture with a reasonable price. Some of the well known upholstery lines we carry are Bassett, Broyhill, Bradington Young, Fairfield, Jetton, La-z-boy, Sam Moore, and Temple. Some of the well known case good lines are American Drew, Bassett, Broyhill, Kincaid, and Lane.

RRM: Is there such a thing as a wrong or right when

39 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC

decorating your house?

KS: There is no right or wrong style. Some styles

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are more popular than others, but popularity changes over time. There are basics of good design that remain constant. Be sure the proportions are pleasing, the colors are harmonious, and the scale is appropriate.

828-452-3509 • Monday-Saturday 9-5

Everyone’s Favorite for the Holidays

RRM: When one thinks of redecorating a room,

what factors do you look at to determine what they want?

KS: Analyze the space you are working with. Look

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at the size, shape, and the intended use of the room. Add color and texture. Select the right lighting to show off colors, forms, and textures.

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RRM: What makes Elegant Interiors special? KS: My passion for my work results in elegant and

comfortable interiors that reflect my client’s unique personality. Making my client’s home sophisticated and welcoming, I focus on the preferences of my clients rather than making my own statement in design. My most important goal is to make my client happy. I want them to love what I have done for them. I enjoy making lasting relationships with my clients. I believe in going the extra step to insure the highest level of customer satisfaction.

Peppermint Bark Special Orders & Shipping Available PG. 36

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170 North Main Street Waynesville, NC 828.452.6844 Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 31


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holiday shopping INTERVIEW WITH

Shelly Piper and Natalie Hood

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Co-owners of Foundry

apid River Magazine: Tell us a little

INTERVIEWED BY

about the Foundry and what it offers the public.

DENNIS RAY

SP & NH: Found-

ry is an alternative to the usual gift store. All of our items are upcycled, which means that the raw materials that the item was made from, were meant to be discarded, but now they’ve been directly transformed into something useful or beautiful. It’s like taking recycling to a new level.

RRM: Your business is

The Foundry takes recycling to a new level. Photo: Liza Becker very popular, having won a local readers poll (Mountain Xpress) as best gift store two solidarity. It is an honor to know other local years in a row after just opening. What’s artists and business owners personally, and to driving your huge success? work with them to build a community that we are all proud to call ours. SP & NH: It’s our concept that has really

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Social Ambassadors Wanted Do you love Music? Theatre? Art? Festivals? Be a representative for Rapid River Magazine. Attend a different event every night of the week. Help us build awareness. Earn referral fees. No selling required. We’ll provide you with free tickets and your own blog! INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, info@rapidrivermagazine.com

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Wireless Internet Access!

Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine (828) 646-0071

Free web links • Free ad design Easy monthly billing www.rapidrivermagazine.com

32 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

struck a cord with people. All of us love art and craft, enjoy shopping and being creative….but we’ve found a way for people to feel even better about their buying and gifting. Customer purchases have three benefits: they support a local business, they support handmade, and keep unwanted materials out of a landfill. It’s a win win win situation. We’ve also realized that even if someone doesn’t buy anything, they are very complimentary about the concept behind the store, and the products we’ve carefully selected for it.

RRM: How is art and creativity a part of your

RRM: Tell us what is happening with the at

years?

Foundry on December 7?

SP & NH: We are hosting an event called

“Wear Art Thou?”, where guests will be able to meet and talk with three of our artists who design accessories like hats, vintage jewelry, scarves, etc. The idea is to make it a really fun and personalized experience for the guest, because the artist will be on hand to help you find just the right piece, and tell you about their work. We’re also unveiling our Harvey’s Seatbeltbag winter selection that day.

RRM: You’re a big supporter of buying local. Other than keeping the money here in our community what other benefits does “buying local” help, and why should we work harder towards purchasing as much as we can locally, including food, entertainment as well as products we need?

SP & NH: We feel that buying local not

only supports the community; it also builds

business?

SP & NH: It’s a huge part! One minute we’ll

be reconciling a bank statement, and the next we’ll be making a four foot tall owl out of cardboard and grocery bags! We find every avenue possible to be creative, and are often making some of our own products to sell. Our most successful items have been our gift bows, our birdfeeders, and handmade cards. Watch out, because this year we have gift bows plus coordinating tags!

RRM: Where do you see the Foundry in five SP & NH: We hope that in five years Foundry has hit its stride and is the first place people go to when they consider upcycled art and craft gifts.

RRM: Any upcoming projects or events you would like to share with us?

SP & NH: Right now we’re in full Christmas mode making cards, bows and ornaments! We encourage everyone to check out our Facebook page for updates on new merchandise and upcoming events, facebook. com/digfoundry.

Foundry 92 Charlotte St., Asheville (828) 255-2533 www.digfoundry.com


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artful living PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS & TRICKS: 5 Steps to Better Holiday Photography

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o your holiday photos live up to the excitement and vibrancy of this festive time of year? No? Well, sometimes all it takes are a few tweaks to turn your holiday snap-shots into quality, long-lasting memories that you will cherish forever. Here are a few easy tips to get you through the December family gatherings, not to mention the annual office Christmas party.

BY

DAVID SIMCHOCK

Photos by David Simchock

1. Understand exposure.

1. Do not use “auto” flash. Sure, it’s much easier when the camera makes all of the decisions for you, but that is exactly why things don’t always turn out the way that you want them. This is particularly true when using flash. When photographing holiday decorations, trees or candles, or doing most types of “night” shooting, be sure to turn your flash “off” in order to capture the true ambiance of the light. Otherwise, the camera will likely pop off its flash, resulting in a flat, washed-out image. But, remember… A tripod is very useful, if not essential, when shooting in low light without a flash.

2. Don’t forget about the detail. Is there a special ornament on your Christmas tree? If so, then isolate it by getting closer and/or zooming in. A shallow depth of field can also be useful in these cases (i.e., wide lens aperture).

3. Optimize your “white balance” setting. What is “white balance”, you ask? Most

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digital cameras allow you to account for the type of light you are shooting in by adjusting your white balance setting. Of course, there is always the “auto” white balance (AWB), but if you are getting a color cast to your images (usually yellowish or bluish), then the first setting to check is your WB. Try to match the WB pre-set with the type of light that your subject is in (e.g., sunlight).

4. Photographing children. Let’s face it – kids love the December holidays. And, you only get one chance to capture that special moment when they open a gift (or, perhaps, give a gift). A simple way to improve your “kid” photography is to lower the camera to their eye level such that you are shooting “across” rather than down. Yes, this may require you to kneel down or, even, lie down on the ground. But, the results will make it worth exercising those wobbly knees.

These Could Be Prevented

ore than 2.5 million Americans die every year. Most people would like to avoid being in that group and live a long, healthy life, but aren’t sure how to do it. Is it a matter of bad genetics? Limited access to health care? Let’s look at the facts and draw some conclusions.

Fact # 1: What are the major killers of

Americans? Depending on what age group you check, the major killers are heart disease, cancer, diabetes, stroke, chronic lung disease, auto accidents, suicide, infectious disease, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s disease. The top four of these events alone account for over 60% of the deaths.

Fact #2: What are the top risk factors in eight of the above ten processes? Smoking and obesity account for roughly two-thirds of the deaths in Americans. Other contending risks factors include high blood pressure, high

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

I’ll say it again. Understand exposure. No matter how easy to use the camera manufacturers try to make their products, the quality of your work often comes down to how well you expose your subject matter. And, the tougher the lighting conditions – which is often the case with holiday scenes – the more difficult it is for your camera to get the correct exposure when in its “auto” mode. So, the better you understand your aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings, the more likely you are to get the optimum exposure for each situation. David Simchock is a professional photographer and instructor based in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more about David, including his popular Vagabond Vistas Photo Tours, visit www.DijonCreative.com. Looking for more insight? Check out the “Got f-Stop?” photo blog at www.gotfstop.com

• Exercise regularly • Don’t smoke • Drink less alcohol • Get regular and restful sleep

blood sugar, high cholesterol, low Omega-3 fats, low intake of fruits and vegetables.

• Have healthy gums

Fact #3: Two dozen studies of centenarians

• Stay positive in attitude, cope with anxiety

show that 16 lifestyle habits can strongly predict who will live healthfully to be 100. (You can take a quick questionnaire online at www.livingto100.com to see if you qualify.) These 16 habits include: • Have low blood sugar (less than 100) • Have low blood pressure (less than 115/75) • Have low cholesterol (less than 200) • Keep weight low and steady • Eat fewer calories • Eat mostly vegetarian diet • Avoid nutritional deficiencies

• Challenge your mind • Shed stressors, have daily structure, be resilient • Stay socially connected Practicing just four of these activities will add 14 good years to your life. Practicing # 1, 2, 4, 8, and 9, increases your chances to live pass 90 by 50%. These statistics hold even for those who start living a healthier lifestyle after age 50. If this works that well in older people and you are younger, what are you waiting for?

HOME FOR SALE Help Judy Ausley avoid foreclosure! This is a space that a creative person would choose. 2 bedroom, 2 bath town home. Close to town, university, Greenlife (Whole Foods), Lexington and Merrimon Avenues. Large screened porch and screened entrance. Special laminated floors, some carpet, all appliances. Complete garage underneath home. $139,000. Call Judy at your earliest! (828) 253-3655.

Rapid River ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

16th Annual

Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Tickets to the theatre; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Any unpublished poem 35 lines or less is wanted! Deadline January 15, 2012. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2012 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems. For more information please call (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 33


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what to do guide through December

Sweet Lights A display and sale of hand-made candlesticks, candelabra and candy dishes on display through December 31, 2012. Mica Gallery is located on North Mitchell Avenue in downtown Bakersville, NC. Open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visit www.micagallerync.com or call (828) 688-6422.

Saturday & Sunday, December 1 & 2

Toe River Studio Tour

Concerts at St. Matthias Sunday, December 2 – The Pyramid Brass Quintet at 3 p.m.

Sunday, December 9 – The

Reynolds-Miller Chorale’s Christmas concert at 3:30 p.m.

Sunday, December 16 – Christmas concert by the Musike Antiqua at 3 p.m.

A free-will offering will be taken for the restoration project. The church is located in Asheville just off South Charlotte Street at Max Street on the hill across from the Asheville Public Works Building (1 Dundee St.).

Self-guided free tour offers an opportunity to search out the professional artists and craftspeople working in the coves and hollows of Yancey and Mitchell Counties. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information contact Toe River Arts Council at (828) 682-7215 or (828) 765-0520, or visit www.toeriverarts.org.

cember 8 at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Featuring delicious beer from Asheville Brewing Company. Performance benefits the Manna Food Bank. Bring canned food to help the hungry and get a free beer! At the Be Be Theater, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-2621, or visit www.acdt.org.

December 1, 7, & 8

December 1 & 8

Feral Chihuahuas: Boy Bands Strike Back You may believe that boy bands signal Armageddon, if not, we will prove it to you! Performances held Saturday, December 1 at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday, December 7 at 8 p.m. Saturday, De-

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale Members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be on hand in the Folk Art Center’s auditorium to sell select works at 10-50% off retail. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. For more details, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

December 1-22

The 30th Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular At the Magnetic Field. Directed by Katie Anne Towner. Showtimes and tickets and more details available at www.themagneticfield.com.

Sunday, December 2

Baroque Bliss! Kate Steinbeck, flute; Rosalind Buda, bassoon; Kate Steinbeck, Barbara Weiss, harpBarbara Weiss sichord. 4 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church St, downtown Asheville. Suggested donation $15. Benefit for Room at the Inn Homeless Shelter for Women, and Pan Harmonia. More information at www.pan-harmonia.org

December 4 and 5

It’s a Wonderful Life 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Tickets are available through Asheville Community Theatre, at (828) 254-1320 or www.ashevilletheatre.org. More details at www.immediatetheatre.org.

December 6

Women’s Night Out From 5 to 8 p.m. at Thyme in the Garden. Offering a festive evening with refreshments and extended hours. Save 10% during event by mentioning this listing. Thyme in the Garden, 190 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville, NC 28804. For more details call (828) 6583700 or visit thymeinthegardenasheville.blogspot.com.

Friday, December 7

Teacher/Student Exhibit Opening reception from 6-8 pm., at the Black Mountain Annie Singletary boxes Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. Opening coincides with the Holiday Pottery Market part of Black Mountain’s annual Holly Jolly Christmas. Music provided by Asheville Rhythm Section. The Market continues through December 21. The exhibit continues through January 18, 2013. For more information call (828) 669-0930.

Friday, December 7

Intersections Sing Together

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come alive, how to use dialogue from another century, where to find research materials, and much more. With Anne Barnhill from 10 to 4 p.m. $75. Presented by the Writers’ Workshop, 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville, NC 28805. (828) 254-8111, www.twwoa.org

Saturday, December 8

Jazz Concert Geary Moore, guitar; Elise Pratt, vocals. Performance at the Living Room Coffeehouse and Cafe, 436 N. Main Street, Hendersonville, NC. Call (828) 6926335 for more information.

Sunday, December 9

Asheville Community Band Holiday Concert 3 p.m. in the Asheville High School Auditorium. Students free when accompanied by paid admission. Call (828) 254-2234 for details.

Sunday, December 9

Meet-the-Author Book Signing Author FCEtier presents his new political thriller, The Tourist Killer Killer, at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main Street, Waynesville, at 3 p.m. Call (828) 4566000 for more information.

Wednesday, December 12

Friday, December 7

December 13-16

Opening reception from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. In A Different Light features watercolor landscape paintings. On display through Sunday, December 30, 2012. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

December 7-16

A Christmas Carol At the HART Theater, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville on December 7, 8, 14, and 15 at 7:30 p.m. Matinees December 15 at 2 p.m. and December 16 at 3 p.m. Tickets for evening performances are adults $20, seniors $17, and students $7. Discounted tickets to matinees are adults $16, seniors $14, and students $6. Reservations can be made by going to www.harttheatre.com or by calling (828) 456-6322.

Saturday, December 8

Writing Historical Fiction Learn how to make historical figures

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Pamela Haddock Exhibit

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Saturday, December 15

The Gift of the Magi & Other Tales Bright Star Touring Theatre returns with stories of generosity and the power of giving with The Drum, an Indian folktale, and Stone Soup. Performance begins at 10 a.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at the door. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Sunday, December 16

Swannanoa Solstice Featuring musicians Al Petteway, Amy White, and Robin Bullock, joined by a wealth of storytellers, dancers and special guest musicians. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets: Regular $35; Students $30; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Sunday, December 16

Bandana Klezmer CD Release

The Justin Ray Quintet Featuring Jacob Rodriguez on saxophones, Bill Bares on piano, Zack Page on bass, and Michael Davis on drums. Tickets $10, show at 8 p.m. Altamont, 18 Church Street in Asheville. Visit www.myaltamont.com

The Santaland Diaries David Sedaris’ hilarious comedy commenting on the best and worst of people from a retail employee’s point of view. Performances are Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

December 14-16

Cool Craft Market Friday December 14: VIP Preview Party from 5 to 8 p.m., $10 + one item for Homeward Bound of Asheville. Saturday, December 15 from 10 to 5 p.m., free. Sunday, December 16 from 11 to 4 p.m., free. Homeward Bound donations accepted throughout the weekend. HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington, Asheville. Details at www.handmadeinamerica.org.

CD release party for WNC’s premier klezmer band! 6 p.m. at The Loft, Asheville Music School, 126 College Street, downtown Asheville. Admission $20, includes a CD. $10 without CD. Light fare and beverages will be available. Klezmer is dance music so bring your dancing shoes! More details online, www.bandanaklezmer.com

Sunday, December 16

Amici Music’s Home for the Holidays Singer Amanda Horton performs a holiday inspired program featuring carols and Amanda Horton lullabies from around the world along with some jazzy holiday standards. The program will take place at 1 p.m. in the new Performance Loft at the Asheville Music School, 126 College St. in Asheville. Special intermission performances by students. Admission is $20 for adults, $10 for students and family members of the Asheville Music School, and free for those 12 and under.

Monday, December 17

Brown Bag and Books Literary Series event, “Best-Loved Christmas Poems,” will include sea-

DECEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4


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what to do guide sonal poems, with participants writing one of their own as a Christmas Gift Poem. Hosted by Tina Barr from noon to 1 p.m. Bring a lunch. There is no charge but donations are accepted. For more information call (828) 669-0930. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts is located at 225 W. State Street.

Best in Show

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Thursday, December 6 – Western Carolina University, Bardo Arts Center.

December 12-14

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Wednesday, December 12 at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, December 13 and Friday, December 14 at 5 and 7:30 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Box office (828) 257-4530 or dwtheatre.com. Tickets only $10 to $25. More information by calling (828) 255-5777 or visit www.BalletConservatoryofAsheville.com.

Blue Ridge Ringers Holiday Concerts

Jazz Concert

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

December 19-30

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for full-time students. Tickets available through, (828) 2390263, at www.ncstage.org, or by visiting North Carolina Stage Company at 15 Stage Lane, Asheville NC 28801.

p.m. in the community room.

Sunday, December 16 – Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Brevard, 4 p.m.

Monday, December 17 – Henderson County Public Library, 2 p.m. in Kaplan Auditorium.

For more information call (828) 692-4910.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Assuming an error in calculation was made by the Maya and we all live to see another show, David Wilcox will perform at The Grey Eagle Music Hall at 8 p.m. Tickets and more information at www.davidwilcox.com.

Steep Canyon Rangers in Concert Friday, January 4 at the Grove Park Inn in Asheville.

Friday, January 11

Friday, January 11 at the Orange Peel – Benefit

Home is Where the ART Is

Deadline: February 15, 2013

Handbell concerts of holiday favorites performed by experienced ringers from Henderson, Transylvania, Buncombe and Polk counties. Flute soloist is Natalie Ambrose.

Monday, December 10 – Fletcher Public Library, 2

Sunday, December 22

Opening reception from 6-9 p.m. Young patients tell their stories. On display January 4 through February 5, 2013. The ARTery, 346 Depot Street in the River Arts District. Call (828) 258-0710 or visit www.ashevillearts.com.

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Ballet Conservatory’s Nutcracker

Tueday, December 18

Concert for the End of the World

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The traditional holiday ballet and family favorite.

Auditions for BARK!

Original music by Jason DeCristofaro on vibes with Michael Jefry Stevens on piano beginning at 8 p.m. By donation. At the Altamont Theatre in Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

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December 18-19 The North Carolina premiere of David Troy Francis’ smash hit musical. Directed by Eric Mills with musical direction by Brad Curtioff. Be prepared to sing 16 bars of music. Bring your sheet music in the key in which you will be singing. We will provide an accompanist. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. Call (828) 2541320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

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to support literacy initiatives at Vance Elementary School.

Saturday, January 12 at the Orange Peel – Benefit

to support Evergreen Charter Schools ‘More Than a Gym’ campaign.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Post Card Show Call for Artists

www.steepcanyon.com/tour

Rain Barrels for Sale

Support the Asheville Area Arts Council and the arts councils of the western counties by donating your work in this simple and fun way! It’s an easy way to share the wealth of your creativity, strengthen the arts, and benefit your community! Call (828) 258-0710, email mica@ashevillearts.com, or visit www. ashevillearts.com.

Made from recycled pickle barrels, each barrel holds 55 gallons of water and can be purchased for $80.25. A great enhancement for serious gardeners these barrels can also be painted. Order online at www. haywoodwaterways.org, email info@haywoodwaterways, or call Christine at 226-8565. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 35


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find it here AboutColor www.aboutcolor.net

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248

Kathmandu Cafe cafekathmanduasheville.com

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

Fast Lane Electric Bikes www.FastlaneEbikes.com

Mark A. Henry www.naturalviewsinc.com

Massie Furniture Company www.massiefurniture.net

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Foundry www.digfoundry.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Mountain Top Appliance

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com

Jeff Pittman Art www.jeffpittman.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Niche www.NicheOnline.com

Canvas www.paintandmingle.com

Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Jonas Gerard www.jonasgerard.com

Nicos Cafe www.Nicoscafe.net

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Chifferobe chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Kitsch Fabrics www.kitschfabrics.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Guitar Trader www.ashevilleguitartrader.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Once Upon a Time http://onceuponatime. mybooksandmore.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Handmade in America www.handmadeinamerica.org

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

HART www.harttheatre.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

WAYNESVILLE

BREVARD ROAD

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

Turtle Island Pottery www.turtleislandpottery.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Updraft Fine Art Gallery www.updraftgallery.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

David J. Simchock www.vagabondvistas.com

Village Wayside www.villagewayside.com

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org Stereo Innovations www.stereoinnovations.com Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

Style www.shopatstyle.com

R Bruce Brennan Fine Art RBruceBrennanFineArt.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmphippsdesigns.com

Rise 'n Shine

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

This holiday season your choices can make a dramatic impact in Asheville!

WEAVERVILLE

WEST ASHEVILLE

CHARLOTTE ST.

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Wendy Whitson Paintings www.wendywhitson.com

Help fuel America’s economic innovation and prosperity – Buy Local!

Studio 375 Depot BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

MERRIMON AVE.

Thyme in the Garden http://thymeinthegarden asheville.blogspot.com

www.risenshinecafe.com

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WAYNESVILLE - 28786 LA Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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Dell, HP, Compaq, Toshiba, Sony, Gateway, eMachines, Apple & more

unique shops Rapid River Magazine is pleased to introduce

ADVERTISING MANAGER RICK HILLS

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WeFix ALL C O M P U T E R S

ick Hills has headed up our advertising department for several years. He brings 29 years of professional advertising and marketing success to his results driven approach. Currently, Rick has five paintings in the Haywood Arts Council’s Small Works Show at Gallery 86, Main Street, Waynesville. Meet Rick at the opening reception on Friday, December 7, from 6-9 p.m. You can contact Rick to discuss your promotional and advertising needs at rickg8tor@yahoo.com or phone (828) 452-0228.

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Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 37


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holiday shopping guide Best Bet for Holiday Shopping

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oin us for the Guild Artists’ Holiday Sale at the Folk Art Center on December 1 and again on December 8. Members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be on hand in the center’s auditorium on these two Saturdays to sell select work 10-50% off retail. The sale is an excellent opportunity for the artist to liquidate overstocks and 2012 items, try out new techniques, and sell studio seconds. For the customer, the sale means great deals for holiday shopping and a chance to connect with the craftsperson. It also provides an exciting, festive alternative to mall and big box import shopping. Choose Tom and Pat Bauman from a variety of

Local Fine Artist

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apid River Magazine: You

have done what every artists strives for but few actually succeed in; you’ve created a style that is entirely your own. How long did it take to get your own look, so to speak?

R Bruce Brennan: My style started to

emerge when I was between 19 and 21 years old. During those years I studied painting for my BFA degree. I was lucky enough to be living in major world art cities at the time; New York, Paris and San Francisco. The creative energy of that time and those places were felt all around in the air. This profoundly affected my course over the years. The same subjects of intrinsic value to me kept showing up in my paintings. It was at that realization I knew this was what my style was to be and who I was as a painter.

INTERVIEWED BY

38 December 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 4

DENNIS RAY

again that manages to sell well, thus making their work more craft and technique than creative). Have you been tempted to recreate something that you know would sell again and again, and what has kept you from doing so?

RBB: It’s a common problem or

blessing for artists, depending on your point of view. On the one side you don’t want to just become a copier of your own work. On the other, it’s good to pay the bills. And yes I have wrestled with this, but found it too limiting. With the availability of signed fine art printing, the demand, if it is there, can be satisfied without becoming a factory.

RRM: Your body of work

seems absent of self-plagiarism (where an artist goes back and simply recreates something over and over

APRIL NANCE

gift items including ceramics, jewelry, fiber, paper, glass and wood. Buying from artists supports the local economy and promotes the mission of the Guild which is bringing together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. Over 70 artists will be Harriet Smith Magruder Glass participating over the course oldest craft gallery, where they will of the two sales, with a different group find gifts for everyone on their list. of artists each weekend – so plan on coming to both for best selection! Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete listing of exhibitors. IF While at the Folk Art Center, visiYOU The Folk Art Center is tors can be inspired by three galleries GO located at Milepost 382 on the showcasing the work of current Guild Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. For more information, members and collections from the call (828) 298-7928 or visit www. Guild’s history. They can also shop craftguild.org. at Allanstand Craft Shop, the nation’s

INTERVIEW WITH

R Bruce Brennan

BY

R Bruce Brennan Photo: Liza Becker

RRM: Each of your

paintings seems to tell a story or part of a greater one. Are they based on moments from your past or from stories you’ve written or heard?

RBB: My cosmic or vi-

sionary paintings are all related to a very specific spiritual vision that has been with me since my childhood. This has led me to look into most

Photos: Liza Becker

of the world religions, and like many people, found the threads of truth in all that spoke to me. Sorry, getting a little heavy here. I just want to add that I love to paint landscapes and seascapes. These images I get from traveling.

RRM: Tell us a little about your use of

color. Are they ever used symbolically or to capture a mood?

RBB: Very much so! My colors tend

to be bright and intense, something I picked up probably from having lived in northern California. The light there, as in Italy, makes things appear to glow. This moved me to use color in a non-traditional way at times. ‘R Bruce Brennan’ continued on page 39


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local holiday shopping guide ‘R Bruce Brennan’ cont’d from page 38

‘Thyme in the Garden’ continued from page 9

RRM: What does Thyme in the Garden offer

RRM: How did you become an artist? RBB: I really think most artists would

JC: Laura is talented putting together beau-

JC: We love that the whole experience here

RRM: What are you working on now

RRM: Tell us a little about your classes. JC: Our classes are mostly hands-on,

RRM: Any specials or gift items for the Holi-

say they were born that way. And I’d have to agree. If you are a painter, sculptor, writer or dancer and you have talent, then it has probably something to do with your genetics. that you would like to share?

RBB: I am presently working on two

paintings; an interior female nude and a landscape. I like to work on two paintings at the same time. When you get blocked with one you just go over to the other.

tiful potted arrangements and many of our customers appreciate her potting services at the shop or clients’ homes. I offer garden consultation, design, and a bit of landscaping. Through this last year we have offered weekly classes as well.

workshop style learning. Our most popular classes are miniature fairy gardens and terrariums. We also fit in some seasonal themed classes from time to time. We have hosted other teachers’ classes such as making hypertufa pots, keeping urban chickens and flower arranging.

RRM: Any changes you care to talk about

R Bruce Brennan Cotton Mill Studios in the River Arts District 122 Riverside Drive, Asheville (581) 827-3641

that may be happening in 2013?

JC: We already grow flowers for bouquets

behind the shop, but in 2013, part of the garden is going to be dedicated to a flower grower who will sell cut flowers in the shop. We hope to be able to offer a more regular supply of fresh cut flowers than in the past.

that other gardening stores do not?

between our retail and workshop space as well as the demonstration garden and stream behind the shop offers a destination to slow down and enjoy beauty. We offer a very personal touch, in which we value the connection we have with our customers. We love collaboration and always try to offer a creative approach. day Season you care to tell us about?

JC: On December 6th we’ll be open till 8pm

and will serve refreshments. Some of our most popular gifts are the fabulous Frasier Fir home fragrance from Thymes, honey and body butter from Savannah Bee Company, and luxurious bamboo clothing from Yala. We have beautiful ornaments and holiday decorations to enjoy for years to come as well as popular wish lanterns, solar lanterns, soaps and candles, and all sorts of great stocking stuffers. Keep us in mind too when it comes to creating your holiday centerpieces; we’d be happy to help you put something memorable together.

Thyme in the Garden 190 Weaverville Hwy. Asheville (828) 658-3700 www.thymeinthegardenasheville.blogspot.com

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Vol. 16, No. 4 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — December 2012 39


Wishing You a Safe and Prosperous New Year! Happy Holidays from Rapid River Magazine

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The Guitar Trader â?&#x2013; 732 Haywood Rd. (828) 253-2003

Open 7 days a week until 7 PM

www.AshevilleGuitarTrader.com Like us on Facebook


December 2012 Rapid River Magazine