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Crafts, Fairs & Festivals pgs 4 & 32 Fine Art by Virginia Pendergrass pg 18 River Arts Studio Stroll pg 18-19

Local Dining Guide

pgs

30-31 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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12-15 • What to Do Guide™

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34-35


Friday Dec. 11

THE PLANETS November 21• 8pm Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville

Haydn Sinfonia concertante Holst

“You would swear that Frank Sinatra has been resurrected.” – New York Daily News

BEETHOVEN’S VIOLIN CONCERTO February 13

The Planets

2015/2016 S E A S O N DANIEL MEYER MUSIC DIRECTOR

2 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

CALL FOR TICKETS: 828.254.7046 www.ashevillesymphony.org


VOORHEES FAMILY ART SHOW A Family of NC Artists • 18th Home Show & Sale Saturday & Sunday, November 21 & 22

Saturday 10am-5pm • Sunday Noon-5pm

Wood-Fired Stoneware Bowl by David Voorhees

89 WOODWARD AVE., ASHEVILLE pg. 21

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pg. 36

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Info & Map: voorheesfamilyart.com

pg. 36

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Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 3


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handmade holiday crafts & fairs Hard Candy Christmas 2015

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The 28th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show is a mountain Christmas tradition. Held the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving , this year’s show takes place November 27-28 from 10 a.m to 5 p.m. The event is held inside the spacious Ramsey Center on the Western Carolina University campus in Cullowhee. Customers looking for handcrafted gifts at great prices are always happy to see what their favorite potters, woodcrafters, and glass artists have created for Wreaths from the A&E Tree Farm. the year. They come early looking for knitted winter wear and something snuggly for the new grandchild. There will be plenty of stocking stuffers, speciality sweets, and designer jewelry. Ornament collectors can always find a unique santa, snowman, or angel. The A&E Tree Farm will be Turkey by Flying Santa Merry Christmas selling fresh evergreen wreaths Kay Chatman by Rich Andrews and table arrangements, as well as trees. The mountain bee keeper has candles, ornaments, and farm fresh Handcrafted gifts at honey. Ronnie Evans will be strumming the favorite carols we grew up with, and selling his great prices. cd’s for holiday listening. This year’s featured artist is North Carolina craftsman William McKinnis of the Country IF Tin Shoppe in Winston Salem. He has been YOU Hard Candy Christmas Arts & GO Crafts Show, November 27-28 preserving the vanishing art of tin smithing for from 10 a.m to 5 p.m. Admission 12 years. His custom pieces include a variety is $4.50 for adults. Children under 12 of handcrafted lanterns, candleholders, and free. Concessions will be available. Free, ornaments that would have been found in convenient parking. Held at WCU’s early American homes. He also creates ‘strip Ramsey Center in Cullowhee. For more art’ that portrays holiday themes. 100 other details call Doris Hunter, (828) 524-3405, craftsmen and artists will be joining Bill for or visit www.MountainArtisans.net. this much anticipated art and craft show.

Hand-Blown Glass Custom Lighting Fine Art Gallery

HAND-CRAFTED

HOLIDAY GIFTS

Monday-Saturday 10-6 Sunday 11-6

828-348-8427

pg. 21

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81 S. Lexington Avenue

LexingtonGlassworks.com

4 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

Voorhees Family Art Show and Sale

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The 18th Voorhees Family Art Show and Sale will be held Saturday & Sunday, November 21 & 22. Held in a renovated historic Arts and Crafts style home located at 89 Woodward Avenue in the Norwood Park area of North Asheville, this weekend show and sale is free and open to the public. This year’s annual event will feature new work created by five Voorhees family members along with two guest artists. Hosted in cousin Marien Bradsher’s circa 1916 house with its majestic American Elm, the event will again be featured in a family home in Norwood Park. Meet this extraordinary family of artists known throughout North Carolina and the Southeast. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to MANNA FoodBank and to Kiva, helping others locally and globally. The arts legacy began with Edwin Voorhees, (19191999) known for his NC coastal watercolor seascapes; and Mildred Voorhees and now their children and grandchildren. Mildred, (1924-2007) was best known for her colorful, patBrown and Gold terned watercolors Bottle by David and rich oil still lifes Voorhees

BY

DAVID VOORHEES

and landscapes. Reproductions of Edwin and Mildred’s artwork will be available. Three of Ginkgo Bottle Vase Edwin and by David Voorhees Mildred’s six children plus one grandchild and two daughters-in-law will be showing their work at this event: Susan Voorhees, oil and pastel paintings; Jane Voorhees, watercolors, pastels, prints, cards and calendars; David Voorhees, wood-fired stoneware and porcelain pottery; David’s wife, Molly Sharp Voorhees, sterling silver jewelry, some incorporating natural beach stones; and David’s daughter Elizabeth Voorhees Becker, color photography; and Amy Voorhees, oil paintings. Also exhibiting are guest artists Chad Alice Hagen, felted art and handmade books and Cheryl Stippich, stained glass. IF YOU The 18th Voorhees Family Art Show GO and Sale, Saturday, November 21

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, November 22 from 12 noon to 5 p.m. 89 Woodward Avenue in the Norwood Park area of North Asheville For more information and a map, visit www.voorheesfamilyart.com

‘Tis the Season Holiday Fair

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AT THE WNC AG CENTER

Enjoy a shopping experience in a relaxed atmosphere where you’ll hear Christmas music and smell the delights of the gourmet row! The three-day show features works from 150 exhibitors from WNC and the Southeast. Some of the wares include pottery, woodwork, handcrafted jewelry, glass art, originals and prints, recycled cashmere, handcrafted knives, spa products, candles, and more. Santa is going to be stopping by for a good part of the time! Be sure to pick out some holiday gourmet gifts and a bottle or two of NC wine. The event takes place in the 45,000-squarefoot Davis Event Center at Gate #5 of the WNC Ag Center. There’s plenty of free parking. Go to www.WNCHolidayFair.net to access a $1 off coupon. Lucky ticket buyers could also win $5 Jingle Bucks to be used at the fair.

Works from 150 exhibitors. IF YOU ‘Tis the Season Holiday Fair, GO November 20-22 at the WNC Ag

Center, across from the Asheville Regional Airport. Admission is $4 for adults. Group rate of $3 per person for 10 or more. Children under the age of 12 are admitted free.


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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Three

NOVEMBER 2015 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Short Stories: Kathleen Colburn Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Marci Bernstein, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Kelen Carlock, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, KaChina Davine, Amy Downs, Rock Eblen, John Ellis, Susanna Euston, Lori Greenberg, Jane Hallstrom, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Amy Jessee, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Jessi Nunez, Wendy H. Outland, Dennis Ray, Erin Scholze, Jeannie Shuckstes, Ken Steiner, Greg Vineyard, David Voorhees, Bill Walz, Angelica R. Wind, J. & R. Woods, Sarah Young.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, November 2015, Vol. 19 No. 3

Hard Candy Christmas 2015 . . . . . . 4 Voorhees Family Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ‘Tis the Season Holiday Fair . . . . . . 4 Asheville Faerie Arts Festival . . . . . 32

6 Music & Performance

Alison Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Magnetic Theatre; ACT . . . . . . . . . . 7 Billy Jonas; Joshua Messick . . . . . . . 8 Jamie Laval. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Bow Thayer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 BMCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

10 Local Food

New stories are added each month!

What Would You Like on Your Mashed Potatoes,

11 Fine Art

The Wrinkled Egg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Blackbird Frame & Art . . . . . . . . . . 17 Virginia Pendergrass . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Elinor Bowman; AGA . . . . . . . . . . 20 Survivors Art Show . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

12 Movie Reviews Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 26 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 28 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

24 Noteworthy Guardian Ad Litem . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Tellabration! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 PARI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

The 48 Days Film Project

Revenge of Pluto, by Michael Landolfi

The Storms of our Lives,

by Phil Okrend

The Mysterious Disappearance of Phyllis Rivers, by RF Wilson by Kaitlin Hayes

The Ballad of the Bayo Family, by Eddie LaSure

At the Intersection of Lord Ganesh and Nookie,

by Matthew Pasulka

Short Story guidelines are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Kathleen Colburn is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

16 Columns

ONLY ONLINE

by Tom Davis

Jonesie and My Frenemy,

Champa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Wasabi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

34 What to Do Guide ON THE COVER: Tom, oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass. PAGE 18

SHORT STORIES

4 Special Events

SPECIAL SECTIONS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . pg 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-23 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 37

Artivational will represent the U.S.

Five continents: North America, South America, Asia, Africa, and Europe, will come together to write, film, and edit a full length feature film in only 48 days. This is the first year the United States will participate. Artivational, a WNC group of filmmakers, has been selected to represent North America.

One Powerful Little Card Purchase a 2016 Go Local Card to receive discounts at hundreds of locally owned businesses. Asheville Grown, in partnership with 450 local businesses, helped raise more than $10,000 for our public schools through the 2015 Go Local Card.

Friends of the Smokies Black Bear License Plates The sale of specialty license plates in North Carolina supports priority projects in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Help fund wildlife management programs in the park, including wild hog control. www.rapidrivermagazine.com

COPYEDITING &

PROOFREADING SERVICES

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

rrshortstories@gmail.com

828-581-9031

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 5


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performance Grammy-Winning Banjo Master Alison Brown

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On tour with her band’s hot new album, The Song of The Banjo.

INJURED

IN A SERIOUS ACCIDENT?

BY JOHN

ELLIS

‘70s and ‘80s, including Dance With Me and Time After Time. The versatile Alison Brown The band’s line-up on this tour and her band are back at the Diana features the talents of Brown on Wortham Theatre for a night of banjo and guitar, Joe Davidian on beautifully imagined bluegrass, the piano, Christian Sedelmyer jazz and other genre-crossing tunes on the fiddle, Gary West on bass, on Friday, November 6 at 8 p.m., and Bryon Larrance on drums. with old favorites along with selecAt the age of sixteen, Alison tions from Brown’s new album, Brown won the Canadian NaThe Song of the Banjo. tional Banjo Championship, and Formed in 1993 by the then recorded an instrumental alNashville-based Compass Records bum with fiddler Stuart Duncan. founders Alison Brown and Gary The versatile Alison Brown. She later earned an AB degree West, the band transforms straight from Harvard University and bluegrass beats into complex mixan MBA in finance from UCLA, spending two tures of jazz, Irish-style melodies, and more. years as an investment banker before returning Alison Brown received a Grammy award in to music. After touring with Alison Krauss and 2001 for “Best Country Instrumental PerforUnion Station, and as bandleader for Michelle mance.” Her music has garnered the International Shocked, she formed the Alison Brown Quartet Bluegrass Music Association’s award for “Banjo with her husband and Compass Records business Player of the Year” (1991). This year, Brown was partner, Gary West. awarded the IBMA Distinguished Achievement Award, and in 2014, she was granted the United States Artist Fellowship. Described by Pulse magazine as a “genreIF bending banjoist,” Brown and her band manage YOU Alison Brown: The Song of the Banjo, GO Friday, November 6 at 8 p.m. Tickets: to incorporate world styles as well as traditional Regular $32; Student $27; Child $20. plucking in their music, the result being highly Student Rush day-of show $10 with valid I.D. original tunes and creative adaptations of the classics. On this latest album, Brown and her stellar For more information, or to purchase tickets, call the Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office at (828) band have mixed seven originals with six surpris257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com. ing covers of pop and rock classics from the

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6 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

The Honeycutters

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The Honeycutters, an Asheville-based original country roots band, released their third studio album, Me Oh My, earlier this year. Fueled by the powerful songwriting and vocals of founder Amanda Anne Platt, Me Oh My moves her into the spotlight as producer, band leader, and principal creative force behind the band. With songs that are honest and relatable, part chagrin and part hope, Platt’s voice carries a timeless appeal. Led by Platt, The Honeycutters include Tal Taylor on mandolin, Rick Cooper on bass, Josh Milligan on drums, and Matt Smith on pedal steel, electric guitar, and dobro. Platt’s songs are shaped by a raw honesty that comes straight from the heart, full of a sort of melancholy happiness. Me Oh My is threaded with themes of love, loss, acceptance and regrowth. It kicks off with an engaging southern swingin’ song, “Jukebox,” about taking life one day at a time and not taking yourself too seriously, “it’s only a song, so for heaven’s sake won’t you sing along?”

The Honeycutters Photo: Eliza Belle Rosbach

Me Oh My brings more of what fans love about The Honeycutters, honestly written songs sung in Platt’s authentic voice. For more information about the Honeycutters visit www.thehoneycutters.com. IF YOU The Honeycutters, Saturday, November GO 14 at 9 p.m. doors open at 8 p.m. $15 adv;

$20 dos. All ages. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 232-5800, www. thegreyeagle.com


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captivating performances

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Washington Place World Premiere

David Brendan Hopes’ play gives life to the women lost in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. Many have heard about the devastating Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire on New York City’s Lower East Side in 1911, and about the important labor laws enacted in its deadly wake. But no one knows much, if anything, about the lives of the young women caught up in this tragedy. Now David Brendan Hopes beautifully imagines their lives for us, bringing us their passions, hopes, and dreams, as well as their songs and laughter, in an effervescent, moving world premiere presented by The Magnetic Theatre, produced and directed by the company’s artistic director, Steven Samuels. The Magnetic Theatre is best known for its raucous comedies, and there are wonderfully funny moments in Washington Place. But the company has always harbored a serious streak (exemplified by such works as John Crutchfield’s Ruth, and Samuels’ own Evening the Score) and it welcomes this opportunity to spread its aesthetic wings with this historical drama.

A

David Brendan Hopes is a well-known local poet and actor as well as playwright. His plays Abbott’s Dance, 7 Reece Mews, Edward the King, and, most recently, The Loves of Mr Lincoln have been produced in New York. Washington Place was developed, in part, at this summer’s Great Plains Theater Festival. Steven Samuels co-founded The Magnetic Theatre in 2009 and has served as playwright, director, actor, dramaturg, and/ or producer for more than two dozen of the company’s productions, including his own The Merchant of Asheville and three shows presented in The New York International Fringe Festival. He also directs the LaZoom Comedy Tours. The Magnetic Theatre presents Washington Place, written by David Brendan Hopes, directed by Steven Samuels, starring Terry Darakjy, Emmalie Handley, Allen T. Law, Valerie Meiss, Devyn Ray, Samantha Stewart, and Sophie Yates. Costume, set, and prop design by Kayren McKnight; hairstyling by Sandy McDaniel; lighting design by Jason Williams; sound design by Mary Zogzas; stage management by Walker Linkous.

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike

Attic Salt Theatre Company presents the Tony-award winning comedy Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, at 35below in downtown Asheville. Nominated for six Tony Awards, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike is one of the most lauded and beloved Broadway plays of recent years. The plot revolves around Vanya and his adopted sister Sonia as they live a quiet life in the Pennsylvania farmhouse where they grew up. Their peace is shattered when their sister Masha, an aging movie star, returns with her young boy-toy, Spike. Rivalries are sparked and regrets are voiced. Oh, and their clairvoyant cleaning woman may or may not have predicted the whole weekend. The cast is made up of local favorites Adam Arthur, Jane Hallstrom, Christy Montesdeoca and Henry Williamson, and also features relative newcomers to the Asheville stage, Amanda Hunt and Josephine Thomas. The play will be directed by Jeff Catanese, who helmed Attic Salt Theatre Company’s All in the Timing, Women and Wallace, God of Carnage, and The Underpants.

BY

MARCI BERNSTEIN

Photo: Rodney Smith / Tempus Fugit Design

IF YOU Vanya and Sonia and Masha and GO Spike, by Christopher Durang.

Performances November 6-22. Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased through the Asheville Community Theatre box office, at ashevilletheatre.org or call (828) 254-1320. 35below is located at 35 East Walnut St. in downtown Asheville.

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Valerie Meiss and Samantha Stewart in David Hopes’ Washington Place. Photo: Rodney Smith

IF YOU The Magnetic Theatre presents GO Washington Place, November 5-22.

Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m. $18 in advance; $23 at the door. For tickets, please visit www. themagnetictheatre.org. Box office telephone: (828) 239-9250. Magnetic 375 is located at 375 Depot Street in the River Arts District.

The Boys Next Door

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Arnold has decided he’s going to move to Russia. Barry thinks he’s a golf pro. Norman can’t stop eating donuts and Lucien is concerned that they don’t have any trees. These men are all roommates and they all have special needs. Written with humor and compassion by Tom Griffin, The Boys Next Door, is a series of vignettes that together form a charming and moving picture of life, friendship and challenges. Mingled with scenes from the daily lives of these four, where “little things” sometimes become momentous (and often very funny), are moments of great poignancy. Perhaps most evidently, the story displays the extraordinary gift that special needs individuals are to society, by offering a glimpse into their lives, their home, and their hearts. The Boys Next Door is produced by Different Strokes Performing Arts Collective. For details, visit www.differentstrokespac.org.

IF YOU The Boys Next Door, November 5-21, GO Thursday through Saturday evenings

at 7:30 p.m. Talk Back sessions follow Friday and Saturday performances. Tickets: $18 at the door; $15 in advance. Early Bird Special: Purchase tickets online by November 12 and receive a $5 discount. The Be Be Theatre, 20 Commerce Street, Asheville.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 7


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sound experience Billy Jonas CD Release Concert

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KACHINA DAVINE

Join award-winning whimsical re-percussionist Billy Jonas and the Billy Jonas Band on Sunday, November 22 at the Altamont Theatre for a concert celebrating the release of their new recording ‘Habayta (Homeward) - New Jewish Songs of Joy and Spirit.’ The lush and beautiful arrangements dig deep to explore of the primal roots and essence of Judaism, in ways relevant to all faiths. The intimate evening will consist of the debut music from Habayta, and a jovial reception featuring delicious gourmet Lebanese food by Gypsy Queen Cuisine (included in the ticket price). Profits will benefit Kids 4 Peace, an interfaith leadership camp for Israeli, Palestinian and American Teens. Billy will be joined on stage by worldclass musicians - global percussionist River Guerguerian and multi-instrumentalist Chris Rosser. To round out the vocal elements will be the rich and vibrant four-part harmonies of the Billy Jonas Band members Ashley Jo Farmer, Sherman Hoover, and Juan Holladay (leader of the Secret B Sides). Other special guests include Congregation Beth Ha Tephila Cantorial Soloists Sarah Kim Wilde and Seth Kellam. Billy Jonas is a composer and performer/ singer-songwriter, using voice, guitar, and “industrial re-percussion” instruments made from found objects. He has performed nationwide and abroad since 1987 and cur-

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rently tours with his quartet, The Billy Jonas Band, which includes Ashley Farmer (vocals, percussion), Sherman Hoover (vocals, bass, re-percussion) and Juan Holladay (vocals, marimba, re-percussion). They were honored with an invitation to perform at the White House in 2010, as well as the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Billy’s upbringing in the Jewish faith in Chicago, as well as his work Billy Jonas and the Billy Jonas Band at Temple Beth Ha Tephila in Asheville, have inspired and families and educators working together for a informed a host of original songs, liturgical better future. More details at www.k4p.org. settings, and prayerful/meditative practices, as well as a repertoire of standards. Habayta (Homeward), his eigth CD, and IF his first Jewish-focused compilation, comes YOU Billy Jonas and the Billy Jonas Band on out this month. For more information, please GO Sunday, November 22. Tickets are $36 visit www.billyjonas.com which includes food and a reception. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Founded in Jerusalem in 2002, Kids4Peace Asheville. For tickets call (828) 270-7747 or visit is an interfaith community of more than 1,800 www.myAltamont.com. Israeli, Palestinian and North American youth,

Hammered Dulcimer Christmas Concert

Join National Hammered Dulcimer Champion and virtuoso Joshua Messick for a fresh and exciting Christmas Concert.

More About Joshua Messick

At nine, when he got a hold of a pair of dulcimer hammers and coaxed sound from Messick’s Christmas the strings for the first Concert promises to bring time, a music teacher joy, wonderment, passion asked how long he had and the spirit of Christmas to been taking lessons. “I audiences through traditional haven’t,” he said, still Christmas songs including Sigoing at it. It’s as if lent Night, Carol of the Bells, Messick came into this Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring, world equipped with a Patapan, O Holy Night, The preexisting relationship Wexford Carol, and many with the hammered more that embrace the spirit dulcimer. of the Holiday season. Messick began arMessick is well established ranging music at ten as a composer and arranger and composing in high Hammered Dulcimer Champion and has an impeccable abilschool. By the time he Joshua Messick ity to pull both the gentle was eighteen, he became beauty and powerful ethereal the 2003 National Hamtones out of the hammered dulcimer. He will mered Dulcimer Champion. Messick is first demonstrate his progressive techniques and and foremost a composer, crafting original innovative stylings through out the evening compositions drawing from Celtic, Classiand will be joined on stage by percussionist cal, and World styles. For those who love and multi-instrumentalist James Kylen, and more traditional music, he breathes new life other special guests. into Folk, Hymns, Classical, and traditional favorites. “I’ve put my entire life into this

8 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

BY

KACHINA DAVINE

music,” he tells an interviewer, and it is readily apparent. Few musicians can span the breadth of styles he easily plays. Enjoy his music on iTunes or CDs, or catch him playing live and you will feel the soulful presence that stirs in his music. You will be transported to a peaceful, nourishing place. Messick further elaborates his soul by stating, “how music relates to people is something that fascinates me. Music is the sound of the human spirit and for me is prayer without words. There has been a process for me to understand the place music has in my life and why I play it. I used to play only for the purpose of becoming good. Now, I seek to play honestly from the heart, learn as much as I can, and enjoy music.” For more details, visit joshuamessick.com

IF YOU Hammered Dulcimer Christmas GO Concert at the White Horse Black

Mountain on Friday and Saturday, November 27 & 28 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $18 advance/$20 at the door and are available online. Advance purchase recommended. Tickets are available at www.whitehorseblackmountain.com


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performance

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ASO PRESENTS The

Planets

Remember Our Mountains!

This month the Asheville Symphony Orchestra looks at two symphonic masters. Joseph Haydn sought to exploit the sonic characteristics of the solo violin, oboe, cello, and bassoon in a concerto for this unique quartet and orchestra. Stepping into the spotlight, our own Jason Posnock, Alicia Chapman, Franklin Keel, and Michael Burns will take the solos, while the musicians of the ASO provide the charm and zest that makes Haydn’s music so joyous. Under the direction of Daniel Meyer, the Asheville Symphony Orchestra will perform Haydn’s Sinfonia concertante, op.84. Gustav Holst, fascinated with the cosmos and the astrology of our own solar system, devised an orchestral suite with imaginative musical portraits of the planets. Earth and Pluto (which had yet to be classified and then de-classified as a planet) are omitted, but all others, from Mars, the Bringer of War to Neptune, the Mystic, are given astounding sonic renderings using a massive orchestra. The Asheville Symphony Orchestra will perform Holst’s The Planets. IF YOU ASO’s Masterworks 3, The Planets, GO November 21 at 8 p.m. at Thomas

Wolfe Auditorium. Single tickets start at $22 for adults and $11 for youth. Single tickets and season ticket packages can be purchased by calling (828) 254-7046, in person at the U.S. Cellular Center box office at 87 Haywood Street, or at www.ashevillesymphony.org.

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The Literary Season with the ASO The Symphony is pairing literary works with performances this season. On Wednesday, November 11 at 7 p.m. join a discussion of Dava Sobel’s book, Galileo’s Daughter with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra. the event, hosted by Bernard Arghiere of UNCA’s Lookout Observatory, takes place at Malaprop’s Bookstore. Symphony director Daniel Meyer chose Galileo’s Daughter “because it so deftly weaves [together] an important period in science history… and a beautiful relationship between a father and his daughter,” making it a wonderful accompaniment to Holst’s piece.

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA 100 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

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IF YOU Discussion of Dava Sobel’s Galileo’s GO Daughter with the Asheville Symphony

Orchestra, Wednesday, November 11 at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE CONCERT

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville will present Elegy, an annual Holocaust remembrance concert by Pan Harmonia. The concert takes place on Sunday, November 8 at 5 p.m. in UNC Ashville’s Reuter Center, and celebrates the power of the human spirit to triumph over adversity. This event is free and open to the public. The concert is presented in commemoration of Kristallnacht, or the Night of Broken Glass, a coordinated attack on Jewish people and their property in Nazi Germany and Austria throughout the night of November 9, 1938. Pan Harmonia is an independent repertory company based in Asheville, directed by flutist Kate Steinbeck. Elegy also features Franklin Keel performing on cello and Ivan Seng on piano. The trio will play music of lamentation by Ernest Bloch, Hilary Tann and Felix Mendelssohn. Visit www.panharmonia.org

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AMY JESSEE

Clarinetist Fred Lemmons, flutist Kate Steinbeck, and pianist Ivan Seng. Photo: Micah MacKenzie

IF YOU Pan Harmonia’s Elegy, Sunday, GO November 8 at 5 p.m. in UNC

Ashville’s Reuter Center. Free. For more information, please call (828) 251-6140 or visit www.olliasheville.com.

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3 Biltmore Ave.

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885

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All menu items are prepared from the freshest ingredients. Their innovative chefs will create menus customized for any special event. If there’s one event in your life that ought to be fabulous, you can trust Champa’s catering to exceed your imagination and leave your guests speechless. In August 2000, Mile Chen, then 18, moved to the U.S. from China with his parents and sister. Chen knew little English but got a job packing togo orders in the kitchen of a restaurant in Arlington, VA. Six months later, his family opened their first restaurant where Chen furthered his learning and adopting of American culture. After a few months they sold it and moved to Boston where they opened up another Chinese restaurant. As this business grew, so did Chen’s English and his understanding of how to run a successful restaurant. He eventually met Helen who soon became his wife. They relocated to northern Kentucky where Chen found a job at the area’s most popular fine dining Asian Cuisine, Oriental Wok, as a busboy. He quickly moved up to being a server and bartender. According to Chen, the owner, Mr. Wong, taught him many skills and techniques on running a restaurant effectively and successfully. After a while, Chen and Helen continued on page 11


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Now Accepting Reservations for Your Holiday Party

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The Wrinkled Egg

The Wrinkled Egg® is a great place to hang out. Since 1891, the old white general store on the corner of W. Blue Ridge Road and Greenville Highway, now known as The Wrinkled Egg, has been the center of community life in Historic Flat Rock. For almost one hundred years the store offered everything from farm fresh eggs and a relatively recent copy of the New York Times, to a little local gossip around an old wood stove. While life has certainly changed since the turn of the nineteenth century, this special corner is more alive,

Shop for something truly different.

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decided it was time to move to Asheville where Helen’s sister owned three different restaurants. Together, they worked for Helen’s sister for about five years. As time went by Chen’s family grew. His sister Rita married as well as Helen’s brother, Jesse. It was time to for them to branch out on their own. The young couple renovated an old building in Historic downtown Hendersonville and opened Champa Sushi and Thai. Chen and his family would like to welcome everybody to come and enjoy Asian and Sushi Cuisine in a fine upscale atmosphere with affordable prices. “This is a family-owned restaurant. We want you to feel relaxed when you experience our phenomenal food, gorgeous presentations and excellent service the minute you walk in the door,” says Chen.

eclectic, and intriguing than ever before. The Wrinkled Egg now anchors this colorful corner, offering an unusual collection of goods and eateries. Here you will find original southern folk art, well-priced antiques and vintage treasures, beautiful women’s clothing, local pottery, and fun stuff for kids. Named in honor of a very special Rhode Island Red hen that once roamed the backyard with her friends and truly laid an occasional accordion-like “wrinkled” egg, The Wrinkled Egg is as unusual as its name. Some might tell you there’s no such thing as a “wrinkled” egg. In reality, it’s certainly true and one of nature’s special surprises. In this spirit, you’re sure to find The Wrinkled Egg a rare and special find. Shop for something truly different, pet our lop-eared bunny, talk to the finches, enjoy a pizza on the back deck, or savor some wood-smoked BBQ under a shady magnolia. Just like the old days, good conversation, old fashioned service, and friendly smiles are can always be found here. The Wrinkled Egg is nationally recognized as the nation’s leader for exceptional summer camp care packages. The store is locally favored for its organic atmosphere, eclectic mix of equestrian goods, southern folk art, apparel, toys and antique treasures, along with outstanding wood-smoked BBQ and brick oven pizzas offered by adjoining restaurants Hubba Hubba Smokehouse and Flat Rock Village Bakery.

Today, the restaurant has two locations, one in Hendersonville and one in Asheville, both featuring daily specials, take-out, vegetarian delights, full bar, and sake selections. The Hendersonville location offers sidewalk dining, and a banquet room for 10 to 40. Parking is available behind the building after 5 p.m.

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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

On the corner of W. Blue Ridge Road and Greenville Highway.

The Wrinkled Egg 2710 NC Hwy. 225 (Greenville Highway) Flat Rock, NC 28731 (828) 696-3998 www.thewrinkledegg.com

Gourmet Sandwiches & Wraps • Desserts Homemade Soups Salads • Kids Menu Seafood • Steak Chicken • Pasta Pork Tenderloin Gluten-Free Vegetarian Espresso Bar Full ABC Bar Daily Food Specials Outdoor Dining

828.692.6335 Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-11:00 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Extended Lunch Hours 3-5 pm Friday, Saturday & Sunday Dinner: Starting at 5:00 pm Friday & Saturday

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

www.thewrinkledegg.com • 828-696-3998

It’s a Great Day When You Get a Treat from the Wrinkled Egg Southern American Folk Art Eclectic Gifts & Accessories Great Stuff for Kids Antique Furniture Fine Reproductions Summer Camp Care Packages

437 N. Main St., Hendersonville www.champanc.com

Champa Asheville 3 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville www.champaasheville.com Open 7 Days a Week Mon. - Fri.: 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sat. & Sun.: 12 noon - 10 p.m. We Deliver!

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Reel Take Reviewers:

····· - Fantastic ···· - Pretty darn good ··· - Has some good points ·· - The previews lied · - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Bridge of Spies 

Short Take: Good old fashioned story telling about good old fashioned courtroom drama and cold war espionage, based on the true story of an American attorney called upon to defend a Russian spy in the late 1950’s.

REEL TAKE: Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of

Spies is an old fashioned, beautifully crafted and ultimately entertaining film based on the true story of the capture and defense of Russian spy Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance) and a subsequent negotiated prisoner exchange – Abel for captured American U-2 spy plane pilot Gary Powers (Austin Stowell) and Frederick Pryor (Will Rogers), an American college student on the wrong side of the Berlin wall. The unlikely protagonist and hero at the center of the action was insurance

Cooler heads prevail in Steven Spielberg’s cold war drama, Bridge of Spies, starring Mark Rylance and Tom Hanks.

litigator James Donovan (Tom Hanks). The result is Spielberg’s best work in many years and a real crowd pleaser. Spielberg, who of late has had a penchant

THE MONTHLY REEL

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Giving Thanks for Martians, Spies and Lies!

This past month marked a slight lull in cinematic offerings. We are that point before award season competition is in full swing and the holiday season box office blockbusters hit theatres. That said, we were treated to some of the best mainstream title to come down the road in a while. Bridge of Spies, The Martian, and Truth deliver smartly crafted stories with mass appeal. Steven Spielberg’s delivers one of his best movies in years with Bridge of Spies, an old school cold war drama staring Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance. Ridley Scott’s The Martian is 2015’s must-see movie on the big screen. It’s a suspenseful, riveting and thrilling crowd pleaser. After Robert Redford took his ‘grumpy old men’ walk in the woods, he teamed up with Cate Blanchett in Truth. The news drama tells the story of the making of the “60 Minutes” news segment which questioned George W. Bush’s military record, and ultimately lead to

Dan Rather’s retirement. And Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak is no Pan’s Labyrinth, but it’s worthwhile for those seeking a more chilling thrill. Though we had not reviewed it by press time, we have it on good authority that Jobs is not run of the mill bio pic fare and that Michael Fassbender will likely be a contender this award season for his portrayal of Apple founder Steve Jobs. But of course with the good also comes some bad. The good Professor Kaufmann was terribly disappointed and downright disturbed by Joe Wright’s Peter Pan prequel story Pan. And Bill Murray’s Rock the Kasbah sadly failed to rock anyone’s world. November may be a month for dishing up turkey, but not at the movie theatre.

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for browbeating his audience with message movies, returns to what he does best – storytelling. Not that there are not very deliberate points made throughout the proceedings, but he wisely lets the events of the story speak for themselves. The film starts in 1957 with the capture of Rudolf Abel, suspected Soviet spy. Donovan is the attorney tasked with Abel’s defense, a job [given the sentiment of the day] he understandably does not want. His job is to make it look like our great, fair and oh-so-just country gives Abel a solid defense and a fair trial, all the while knowing that Abel will be found guilty. While the country and even Donovan’s own peers clamor for a guilty verdict and the death penalty, Donovan keeps a cool head and deftly wins Abel’s life, with the back room negotiated strategy, based on using Abel as bargaining power if the Soviets were to ever

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MICHELLE KEENAN

On Novemer 6 it’s 007 vs Peanuts. We’re pretty sure that Daniel Craig’s fourth turn as James Bond will turn a gold finger at the box, but everyone’s favorite beagle and that blockhead Charlie Brown will likely fare pretty well too. On November 20 The Hunger Games franchise comes to a close with its final installment Mockingjay Part 2. Hollywood bean counters should be filled with gratitude by Thanksgiving. Rest assured there’s something for everyone this month and the usual array of off the beaten path offerings from the Asheville Film Society (page 14), and the Hendersonville Film Society (page 10). Until next time, enjoy the show and Happy Thanksgiving!

capture any of our guys. Fast forward to 1962; When U-2 spy plane pilot Gary Powers is captured, it’s time to bargain. Only this time, when Donovan is selected for the job, the arena is not a courtroom, but covert conversations in well guarded rooms with Russians and East Germans. Despite its long running time Bridge of Spies is taut. It’s a wonderful combination of well played drama and smartly built suspense, with flecks of humor and humanity in just the right measure at just the right times. The film is beautifully photographed and given a rather chilly look with dark tones and cold hues of blues and green. Spielberg and his team shine here, but taking it over the top are the performances of Hanks and Rylance. Not since Gregory Peck’s portrayal of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird have movie audiences seen such a decent, level headed and humane defense. Hanks owns it. Like Peck, and reminiscent of roles by Gary Cooper, Jimmy Stewart and Joel McCrea, Hanks imbues Donovan with an every man quality that makes Donovan’s legal mind accessible and likable. While Hanks may earn himself a few nominations this red carpet season, the real revelation in Bridge of Spies is Mark Rylance. His portrayal of Abel is reserved and thoughtful. He brings a wonderful humanity to the character as well as an unexpected humor. To my knowledge the only thing I’ve previously seen Rylance in is “Masterpiece Theatre’s” Wolf Hall (he plays a wickedly wonderful Thomas Cromwell), but I eagerly anticipate seeing more of his work. Bridge of Spies, along with The Martian (see this month’s review) is one of 2015’s must-see movies. Rated PG13 for some violence and brief strong language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Crimson Peak  ½

Short Take: Guillermo del Toro’s lavish salute to the Gothic Horror genre is a visually stunning tour-de-force that is dripping with atmosphere and full of palpable dread but its less than stellar box office performance means that it will be a one and done effort. Movies continued on page 13


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REEL TAKE: Of all the movies to come out this year, none was more eagerly anticipated by me than Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak. I’m a big fan of the director and his 2006 film Pan’s Labyrinth (see my DVD pick) is among my all time top films. But even more important is that this is a Gothic horror film which is my favorite film genre and they have been out of fashion for over 40 years.

Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowka) decides to explore her new husband’s estate in Guillermo del Toro’s atmospheric rich Crimson Peak.

The director is a true classic horror movie geek and often references them in his films. The heroine of the film (Mia Wasikowska in a role intended for Emma Stone) is named Edith Cushing (hmmm, where have I heard that surname before?). She is a socially awkward young woman from a well-to-do family in 1914 Buffalo NY. She has a Romantic temperament and enjoys writing not ghost stories but stories “with a ghost in them”. She hopes to have them published but is constantly being turned down. Enter Thomas Skye (Tom Hiddleston in a role intended for Benedict Cumberbatch) and his sister Lucille (Jessica Chastain in a role intended for Jessica Chastain) as impoverished English aristocrats who have come to America to seek financing for some special machinery to dig up rich red clay on the family estate. They approach Edith’s father (Jim Beaver) but are turned down flat. After the father is murdered in what is believed to be an accident Edith, who dreams of living on an English estate, marries Thomas and goes to live with him and his sister. The ancestral home, Allerdale Hall, is vast but seriously in need of repair. In true Gothic literature fashion, once she arrives, things go downhill from there as various skeletons from various closets are revealed (in some cases quite literally). If you know your Gothic fiction, then you know how it will turn out. The ending is a foregone conclusion so that isn’t the point. The point, as in a gourmet meal, is in what it contains and how it is presented. The overall look of the film is a combination of the “old dark house” genre and the European Gothic films of the 1960s. Imagine James Whale’s

The Old Dark House as directed by Mario Bava. Not since the heyday of the Hammer Horrors have I seen a movie use color, camerawork, and editing like Crimson Peak although del Toro has tools and a budget that Terence Fisher or Freddie Francis never dreamed of. I realize that I’m getting into horror movie geek territory here with names that most people won’t recognize but you don’t have to be one to appreciate what is going on There is life on Mars! Matt Damon stars in The Martian. here. If you have a Gothic or Romantic temperament than this movie will ing days or weeks here, but years! Meanwhile stay with you long after it’s over. back on Earth NASA scientists realize, through My initial reaction after seeing the movie satellite images of the Mars surface, that Watdespite unreserved admiration for it is that it ney is in fact alive. What ensues is two riveting goes on a little too long and that in a couple of hours of Watney working against the odds to sequences, it was more explicit than it needed stay alive and NASA working against the odds to be. A little more restraint as in The Woman to bring him home. in Black (which it closely resembles) would be Along the way there is a lot of NASA speak. in order. On reflection though I realized that Most of us wouldn’t have a clue if the termithe European Gothic films I loved when I was nology, science, and math stacked up or not. younger were just as graphic only the effects However, according to credible sources much weren’t as good. of it actually does check out. In the end, it ends While I plan to revisit Crimson Peak a up really working to the story’s advantage and couple of times before it leaves the local it’s downright inspiring to think about what theaters, my meager efforts will not keep it we could do and become, and where we could from being classified as a box office flop. It will go, if we had actually paid attention in math probably break even when all is said and done and science class (or if math and science had but that lackluster performance will ensure been taught with tangible applications, like that there will be no new Euro-Gothic films planting potatoes on Mars). on the horizon and that’s a prospect that sadKeeping the adventure utterly balanced dens me greatly. and likeable is our ‘Martian’ – Matt Damon. Rated R for bloody violence, sexual content, and strong language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Martian  ½

Short Take: When an astronaut is accidentally left on Mars, he works against the odds to stay alive and NASA works against the odds to bring him home.

REEL TAKE: Ridley Scott’s The Martian,

based on the book by Andy Wier, is the most suspenseful and exciting cinematic experience so far this year. And for a movie with a running time of almost 2 and half hours that’s saying something. It’s smart, absorbing and entertaining. The film takes place in the not too distant future. Manned missions to Mars are part of NASA’s space program. When a fierce and sudden storm forces an evacuation of one such mission, the crew’s botanist, Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is separated from the others when he is hit by a large piece of debris. Unable to locate him, and receiving no signal from his vital signs monitor, his crewmates fears the worst and reluctantly leave the planet. After the storm passes, Watney awakens to realize that he has not only been left for dead but he has also been impaled by an antenna (talk about a bad day at the office). He quickly and methodically administers first aid, which is nothing short of major surgery, and then sets to the business of figuring out how to survive until the next mission arrives. We’re not talk-

There’s no denying Damon is a great talent, but he also possesses a sensibility that makes him pretty much universally likeable. That attribute is used to its full potential here. Watney keeps a video diary as a means of documenting his survival and as a lifeline to sanity. This offers the story great moments of levity, but also strength of character and fragile vulnerability. While Damon’s efforts are largely solitary, the film boasts and amazing ensemble which includes Jessica Chastain, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Sean Bean, Donald Glover, Jeff Daniels, Kristen Wiig and Michael Pena. This particular story is an exceptionally good vehicle for the spectrum of Ridley Scott’s talents. Beautifully filmed, flawlessly directed and impeccably acted on all counts, this space castaway sci-fi adventure returns science fiction to its more credible and intelligently stimulating roots. That said, one does not have to be a sci-fi fan or nerd to enjoy this film, in fact quite the contrary. The Martian is mainstream moviemaking at its best. If you see nothing else on the big screen this year, see The Martian. Rated PG-13 for some strong language, injury images and brief nudity.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Pan 

Short Take: Unbelievably wrong-headed attempt to create a back story for Peter Pan is a huge mistake for everyone involved especially director Joe Wright.

REEL TAKE: There are just so many things wrong about this latest cinematic version of Peter Pan that it’s hard to know where to begin. Of course it really isn’t Peter Pan but an attempt to create a back story for how Peter came to Neverland. In other words, it’s a prequel and a most unsatisfactory one. The biggest problem for me is the storyline that director Joe Wright and company use as the basis for the film. Taking the story out of its original setting (1904) and transferring it to World War II is the first mistake. Turning Peter into a Dickensian character like Oliver Twist or David Copperfield is the next. Throw in the topical subjects of evil Catholic nuns and child abuse and you begin to get the picture. Here’s a brief synopsis of what goes on and believe me, you’ll need one. Peter is left as a baby on an orphanage doorstep. During WW II the head of the orphanage has been hoarding food for herself and when Peter (Levi Miller) and a friend try and distribute it to the other orphans, they are caught and sold to pirates who whisk them away to Neverland to mine fairy dust for Blackbeard (Hugh Jackman). It is here that Peter befriends another miner named James Hook (Garrett Hedlund).

Hugh Jackman as Blackbeard gives Peter Pan the thumbs down gesture in Joe Wright’s preposterous prequel Pan. Is Jackman trying to tell us something?

After angering Blackbeard and forced to walk the plank, Peter discovers that he can fly. Peter, Hook and his friend Smee flee into a forest where they meet Tiger Lilly (Rooney Mara) the daughter of a native chief. Peter has a pan flute pendant which means his father was a Fairy Prince. He then learns that Blackbeard killed his mother and has plans to attack the Fairy Kingdom. Aided by the fairy Tinker Bell the fairies along with Tiger Lilly and Hook battle the pirates and defeat them. They then take Blackbeard’s ship, the Jolly Roger, return to London, and bring the orphans now the Lost Boys to Neverland. Peter & Hook vow to be friends forever. What!? The End. This is a heavily condensed version of the plot but it does give you some idea of just how far afield writer Jason Fuchs and director Joe Wright (Atonement, Pride & Predjudice) have gone from J.M. Barrie’s source material. Throw in the anachronistic use of Nirvana’s Smells like Teen Spirit and you have to ask yourself what were these guys thinking (or perhaps smoking). There is not a fairy’s Movies continued on page 14

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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. November 1:

The Adventures of Robin Hood This remains the best known and best loved of the many cinematic versions of the Robin Hood legend. It features Errol Flynn in his prime and Olivia de Havilland as a lovely Maid Marian. The supporting cast and the gorgeous Technicolor photography make this a true Hollywood classic. Directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. 1938, USA, Color, 108 minutes. November 8: Isn’t Life Wonderful? This rarely seen D.W. Griffith effort was his last independent feature. Shot entirely on location, it follows the plight of a group of Polish refugees as they try to survive in inflation ridden post-World War I Germany. The film co-stars Neil Hamilton and Carole Dempster. Directed by D.W. Griffith. 1924, USA, B&W, 115 minutes. November 15: My Fellow Americans Now that the 2016 elections are behind us, let’s sit back and enjoy this political comedy-thriller about two ex-Presidents on the run. The movie was partially shot in Western North Carolina and features winning performances from Jack Lemmon and James Garner. Dan Ackroyd co-stars as the current Chief Executive. Directed by Peter Segal. 1996, USA, Color, 101 minutes. November 22: It’s A Wonderful Life It’s hard to believe this perennial Holiday favorite was a colossal flop upon its initial release. Come experience it anew with your friends in a newly restored print with subtitles. You’ll be surprised at what you missed. James Stewart, Donna Reed, and Lionel Barrymore co-star in this American classic. Directed by Frank Capra. 1946, USA, B&W, 130 minutes. November 29: The Other Boleyn Girl This revisionist look at the life of King Henry VIII focuses on behind-the-scenes politics in Tudor England. Anne Boleyn and her sister Mary vie for the affections of the King as he seeks a new wife and they seek advancement for the Boleyn family at the Royal court. Natalie Portman and Scarlett Johansson portray the two sisters, with Eric Bana as King Henry VIII. 2008, USA / U.K. Color, 115 minutes.

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thimble full of charm or whimsy to be found in the film’s nearly 2 hour running time and that is the most serious of its many flaws. What might have made Pan bearable would be engaging and/or capable performances and there are really none to be found here. Levi Miller looks the part of Peter but leaves little impression despite having the most screen time. Rooney Mara looks out-of-place as Tiger Lilly and I’m not just talking about her being a non-Native. Garrett Hedlund’s James Hook is faux Indiana Jones and as for Hugh Jackman well, he gives overacting a bad name. I could go on but I’m running out of space and it’s just as well. Nothing disturbs me more than to see something old that I cherish

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Pan’s Labyrinth”

revamped for modern sensibilities. I had high hopes for Pan and we all know what happens when reality fails to live up to expectations. Two good things to say about the movie are 1) the CGI special effects are most impressive and 2) it ends (but not soon enough). Rated PG (not PG-13 which it should have been) for fantasy violence, language, and thematic material. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Rock the Kasbah  ½

Short Take: This comedy-drama about a down and out Rock promoter who discovers a hidden talent in Afghanistan is everything I hoped it wouldn’t be.

REEL TAKE: I went to an advance screening

November DVD Picks

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

Having been enthralled by Guillermo del Toro’s latest effort Crimson Peak, I decided to choose his masterpiece Pan’s Labyrinth for this month’s DVD pick. I say masterpiece because I can’t imagine him doing anything to surpass this but only time will tell. If I’m still around and he does then I’ll revise my opinion. The film is set in 1944, five years after the Spanish Civil War. It focuses on 11 year old bookish Ofelia who goes to the countryside along with her pregnant mother to be with her new stepfather, a sadistic Army officer still hunting down antiFranco rebels. Once there she discovers an ancient labyrinth which she imagines leads to a fairy kingdom. As her domestic situation deteriorates she delves further and further into a fantasy world that may not be fantasy after all. The movie works on several levels. It can be seen as a variation on Alice in Wonderland with all sorts of magical though terrifying creatures. There is also a strong historical and sociological undercurrent to the rise of Fascism in the guise of the Franco like army officer and how he treats those around him. Director del Toro has stated that the film is a parable of modern life that has been influenced by fairy tales and Roman mythology. The faun that appears throughout the film is not Pan as the literal translation of the Spanish title is The Labyrinth of the Faun. Distributors thought the name Pan would sell more tickets and they were right as the film was a box office success on both sides of the Atlantic. It also won numerous awards. Pan’s Labyrinth is one of the most creatively visual movies ever made. Its use of color and setting along with all the

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animatronics necessary to bring the mythical creatures to life are all seamlessly blended into a remarkable whole. It also features one of the best child actor performances ever by the 11 year old Ivana Baquero as Ofelia. After choosing this as my pick, I discovered that the Asheville Film Society plans to show an’s Labyrinth this month (Thursday, November 19) as part of their Thursday Night Horror Picture series. The film really isn’t a horror film so don’t let that keep you from renting the DVD first then going and seeing it on the big screen. For those of you who suffer from a common phobia, be advised that the film is in Spanish and is subtitled.

Peter Pan (2003)

I was rooting for Joe Wright’s Peter Pan prequel story Pan. His Atonement and Pride and Prejudice are favorites of mine. His Anna Karenina was arrestingly innovative and stunning. But with his terribly disappointing and disturbing Pan (see Chip Kaufmann’s review this month), I thought it might be nice to keep J.M. Barrie’s beloved creation well intact by recommending the 2003 Peter Pan, a version fairly well received but largely overlooked, eclipsed in part by a young boy wizard named Harry Potter and some hobbits. Writer director P.J. Hogan is probably bet-

of Rock the Kasbah with some trepidation only to discover that my fears were justified and this “comedy” turned out to be everything that I hoped it wouldn’t be. In other words Bill Murray plays an overbearing jerk that the majority of people find funny. I, as you can already tell, am not one of them. It isn’t that Murray can’t be funny or isn’t talented, he’s both, but for me to accept him as such he needs to do something other than be Bill Murray. Two good examples are St Vincent and Lost in Translation. Both of those films were story driven and while Rock the Kasbah has a story, a good one, it is forced to take a back seat to Murray’s antics. Here he plays a down-on-his-luck Rockn-Roll manager reduced him to taking money Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Peter Pan” ter known for Muriel’s Wedding and My Best Friend’s Wedding, but he unleashes is own lost boy in this delightful, if not quite definitive, telling of the Darling children, the boy who won’t grow up and his arch nemesis Captain Hook. The film stars Jeremy Sumpter as the titular character and a wickedly fun Jason Isaacs before he was so widely known to Harry Potter audiences as Lucius Malfoy as both Mr. Darling and Captain Hook. The film is visually sumptuous and action-packed good time with all of the whimsical fantasy one imagines of Neverland. Its slightly edgier, darker aspects do not diminish the charm, but make the proceedings more accessible to a 21st century audience. Its slightly bawdier aspects also add to the fun. Sumpter, who was largely unknown to audiences at the time, and whose star never quite soared as some thought it would, is cocky and confident with a wonderful boyish charm, the perfect embodiment of Pan. He has great chemistry with Rachel Hurd Wood as the rosy cheeked, dew kissed Wendy Darling and also great chemistry with Isaacs as Hook. French actress, Ludivine Sagnier is the most delightful Tinkerbell ever, and always good Lynn Redgrave and Olivia Williams round out the cast. As I recall, some criticized the film’s darkness and violence at the time, which I find highly ironic, considering its main competition at the time of its release was Return Of The King, the last and incredibly violent installment in the Lord of the Rings trilogy and a film in which a complete stranger’s three year old came and sat on my lap for most of the movie. If you are a fan of the J.M. Barrie’s beloved tale, skip Pan and rent P.J. Hogan’s Peter Pan instead.


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from talentless individuals who audition for him in hopes for a shot at the big time. He bamboozles his “latest discovery” (Zoey Deschanel) into appearing in a USO show in Kabul, Afghanistan but she leaves him in the lurch with no money and without a passport. He is then “recruited” by an ill-tempered mercenary (Bruce Willis) and two opportunistic gun runners (Scott Caan & Danny McBride) into helping them smuggle weapons to an Afghan village chief. Once in the village he hears a young woman (Leem Lubany) singing in a cave. It turns out that the Village chief is her father and that she must keep herself veiled, be married off to a local villager, and never, ever sing especially in public.

Bill Murray as “quitter, not loser,” rock promoter Richie Lanz in Barry Levinson’s disappointing Rock The Kasbah.

She dreams of being on Afghan Star, the Afghani version of American Idol and when Murray finds this out, he sees his ticket back to America. So, after smuggling her into Kabul, he gets her on the show where she sings unveiled and in English and then all Hell breaks loose. It is then that Murray’s eyes are opened to her plight and that of the Afghan people and he decides to do something about it. His conversion is brought about not only by the girl’s situation but by a high class hooker (Kate Hudson in the film’s best performance) who is trying to make enough money to open a real estate business in Hawaii. After stating that “I am not a loser, I’m a quitter”, Murray uses his one gift, that of bullshitting , to go back to the girl’s village, rescue her from her father, and then stand up to rival tribesman who want her and her father dead. On the surface this storyline sounds fairly interesting and it could have been but Murray, screenwriter Mitch Glazer, and director Barry Levinson drop the ball on numerous occasions. The first ¼ of the film in Van Nuys is as funny as a toothache and the second ¼ after Murray arrives in Kabul is like having that tooth pulled without anesthesia. The last half is certainly the best the film has to offer but it winds up being undermined by trying to make an important statement regarding the Afghan situation that is both simplistic and heavy handed. I won’t even discuss the Beau Geste like ending except to say that I wish that they had followed it to the letter.

For once I am in agreement with most critics regarding this movie. Rock the Kasbah has a less than 20% rating on Rotten Tomatoes and that is what it deserves. Don’t believe me? Go and see it for yourself but don’t say I didn’t warn you.

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the Society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special Members Only events and screenings.

Rated R for language, drug use, and for brief violence. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Truth  ½

Short Take: The story of the making of “60 Minutes” segment questioned President George W. Bush’s military record and culminated in Dan Rather’s resignation after leading the CBS news team for decades.

REEL TAKE: Adapted from Mary Mapes’ memoir Truth and Duty: The Press, the President and the Privilege of Power. Truth tells the story of the making of the 60 Minutes segment that ultimately led to Dan Rather’s retirement and Mapes firing. Mapes was a longtime producer for 60 Minutes. She and Dan Rather were a tight team. They trusted one another implicitly. They considered what they did on 60 Minutes to be the gold standard of journalistic integrity in television news. This relationship is illustrated capably and eloquently by Cate Blanchett as Mapes and Robert Redford as Rather. In 2004 Mapes revisited a story that she had begun researching four years earlier. The story questioned President George W. Bush’s service in the Texas Air National Guard. (It should be noted that this happened in the wake of the ‘Swiftboating’ of presidential nominee John Kerry.) CBS rushed the story and the segment aired just weeks before the 2004 presidential election. Immediately it elicited a maelstrom of scrutiny, criticism, accusations of document forgeries, questionable and recanted sources. In a matter of days the journalistic integrity of one of the most respectable news teams in the industry was shredded in salvo of sensationalist headlines. First-time director James Vanderbilt (writer of Zodiac) does a solid job. Vanderbilt is aided by a talented cast that clearly cares about the

Cate Blanchett and Robert Redford can handle the Truth; they just can’t prove it.

project. Blanchett is fascinating to watch as Mapes. At first Redford is a seemingly odd pick to play Rather, but in the end he bridges a nice blend of both men, affecting Rather’s cadence and demeanor without rendering an imitation. Blanchett and Redford are flanked by an appropriately reserved yet strong Dennis Quaid, a surprisingly good and impassioned Topher Grace, and an under-utilized Elisabeth Moss. Stacy Keach as Lt. Colonel Bill Burkett, Noni Hazelhurst as Burkett’s wife, and Bruce Greenwood as CBS Exec. Andrew Heyward all deliver pitch perfect performances as well. Truth is reminiscent of All The President’s Men, and with Redford’s presence that’s certainly not an accident. Truth however doesn’t quite earn the credibility that Woodward and Bernstein did. Evidence leans towards the story’s truth and legitimacy, but painting her team as journalistic martyrs, burned at the stake by political and corporate posturing, Mapes may earn our sympathy, but somehow lessens the journalistic objectivity and ergo the significance of the story. Unless you are a right wing nut or Fox [not] News fan, the Truth is worth your while. It will likely pick up a nomination or two during awards season, so hopefully more people will see it than would be inclined to otherwise. By the time you read this, Truth should be playing The Fine Arts Theatre in downtown Asheville and The Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Rated R for language and a brief nude photo. Review by Michelle Keenan

November 3: One, Two, Three (1961) Comedy about Coca-Cola’s man in West Berlin, who may be fired if he can’t keep his American boss’s daughter from marrying a Communist. Stars James Cagney, Horst Buchholz and Pamela Tiffin. Directed by Billy Wilder November 10: Good Vibrations (2012) A chronicle of Terri Hooley’s life, a record-store owner instrumental in developing Belfast’s punk-rock scene. Stars Richard Dormer, Liam Cunningham, and Jodie Whitaker. Directed by Lisa Barros D’Sa. November 17: My Learned Friend (1943) An insane murderer is on the loose, and gunning for the men who put him away. Stars Will Hay, Claude Hulbert, and Mervyn Johns. Directed by Basil Dearden and Will Hay. November 24:

Desire

(1936) An automotive engineer bound for a holiday in Spain meets a sultry jewel thief. Stars Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper and John Halliday. Directed by Frank Borzage. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW The Asheville Film Society presents free horror movies every Thursday night at 8 p.m., in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. November 5: House

of the Long Shadows (1983) An American writer goes to

a remote Welsh manor on a $20,000 bet: can he write a classic novel like “Wuthering Heights” in twenty-four hours? Stars Vincent Price, Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. Directed by Peter Walker. November 12: The Last Circus (2010) A young trapeze artist must decide between her lust for Sergio, the Happy Clown, or her affection for Javier, the Sad Clown, both of whom are deeply disturbed. Stars Carlos Areces, Antonio de la Torre and Carolina Bang. Directed by Alex de la Iglesia.

November 19:

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) In the falangist Spain of 1944, the bookish young stepdaughter of a sadistic army officer escapes into an eerie but captivating fantasy world. Stars Ivana Bequero, Ariadna Gil and Sergi Lopez. Directed by Guillermo del Toro. November 26: Thanksgiving, No Show

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 15


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fine art Things We Learn Along The Way

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PART II: IS EVERYTHING IN ORDER?

Hope is varied, reachable, and always right where it should be.

In September’s column about learning things along the way, I mentioned “staying in the flow of what we do” – and I warned there might be a Part II. In addition to larger lessons, like learning you get more with honey than with vinegar, I’m continuing to learn humility with some typical not-so-graceful moments. Like when I forget that I can’t actually carry more than about ten books in a stack before the scene becomes me surrounded by ten strangers jumping in from the left and the right to pick things up off the floor for me. (A nice testament to how folks will kindly help a bumbling, middle-aged guy exhibiting a mild failing of common sense.) Specifically related to my experiences in the visual arts, I have more musings to share, because as I write this I am in the midst of an intensive commercial illustration course. It’s fantastic. I’m terrified. It’s a wonderful, scary romp. And certain methodologies can help. After adhering to the main principle of Just Participate (an early slogan Nike didn’t use – ha!), one of the main lessons in this for me is GET ORGANIZED. Have you heard the term “Mise en place” from the restaurant industry? Pronounced Meez Ohn Plahss, it means to have everything needed in its place, and it is a useful strategy in kitchens. One can employ it anywhere.

Primarily about efficiency, it also provides structure. Currently, all my tools and supplies are where I need them, in a consciously mapped-out order. Everything is at the ready, including the paper I prefer, already cut, and the pastels I want, all sorted by color (you may recall I recently resorted them: Rapid River, September 2015). Speaking of structure, the next quite important issue is to HAVE SOME. “How are you today?” “I am STRUCTURED within an INCH of my life, how are you?” “I’m pretty sure I’m fine. And that I’ve had less coffee than you.” I jest. Sort of. I am drawing early each morning, continuing with my notes and other online tools at lunch, catching up with the group’s social media on breaks and after work, doodling new ideas at the longer stoplights in town, and then drawing again each night. I am dreaming of colors and patterns and shapes. I am waking up having thought up new little characters and icons that dance on the pages. If I don’t follow a calendarizational plan during this intensive course – the type that I’ve always dreamed of taking – I may as well have not signed up in the first place. So I’m structured down to the hour at the moment. I have been drawing daily for years, so I was kind of ready, but it’s critical to participate on additional levels every day. I’m in week two of

Some Lessons Are Simple, 2015. Illustration by Greg Vineyard

six weeks of an amazing experience, and I want to glean every bit of knowledge and experience offered. My other lessons? Be true to what visually flows out of me and onto my Arches 140 lb. cotton rag paper. And to have fun! How do I know I’m taking the right course? Because the teacher reminds us every day in many ways to do both of those things. It’s about authenticity. It’s about each of us being who we are, and finding personal bests doing something we love. And about sharing, and

THE BUSINESS OF ART Dreading Deadlines

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support, and so many other topics. In the times I’m not able to sign up for a market-encompassing, skill-enhancing, global-member, peer review, delightful workshop, I still have all my usual ways that I find inspiration to keep moving forward as I pursue my passion. I always continue my learning curve, whether in school or not. I’m not always sure if everything is indeed in order. Sometimes my Mise en place is really more like Me Is Bewildered And Needs A Break. But I always know I can take a moment, recharge, and try again. Because my other lesson along the way is HOPE. Seeing how hope is varied, reachable, and always right where it should be, is one of the simplest lessons of all. Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

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Many of us are intimidated by deadlines! For me, it began several years ago when my business started to gain momentum. Between responding to inquiries about my services and then setting a time to confer with the interested party, providing resources and materials to help artists, posting my clients’ accomplishments and/or upcoming events on Facebook, researching galleries across the country (an ongoing chore, as there are new locations opening every month), visiting studios and exhibitions, attending (and sometimes presenting at) conferences, jurying and judging shows, organizing and installing exhibits, sitting on panels, and trying to evaluate new opportunities…it can become quite overwhelming! For the past few months, I have missed the Rapid River deadline due to a hectic schedule and overload of work. For this issue, though, I was determined to carve out some time to get

gREg VINEYARD

my article written. And it occurred to me that sharing my thoughts about deadlines might help readers. So below are a few tips. When you initially receive a deadline, figure out the estimated time it will take you to complete the task. Then check your calendar, assessing whatever other obligations you may have prior to the deadline. If you realize you cannot meet the deadline, sort it out right away. Sometimes a deadline can be extended. If someone asks to visit your studio, or set a meeting with you at a particular time, politely explain if you have pending deadlines and apologize that you simply cannot be available.

WENDY H. OUTLAND

Whenever possible, be sure to offer alternate dates/times. I have found that when a particularly challenging task with a deadline comes my way, it often helps to break it down into segments, sometimes working just 30-45 minutes and then setting it aside until the next day. Often I return to the job with fresh ideas and, dealt with bit by bit, the work becomes less onerous. Hopefully, having now written about deadlines, I won’t have to miss another one any time soon!

Contact visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland by email to imwhoknowsart@ gmail.com. WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. www.whoknowsart.biz


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UnFramed

ASHEVILLE PRINTMAKERS’ GROUP SHOW

Selected work by members of the Asheville Printmakers, a group of local artists exploring print media, will be shown at BlackBird Frame & Art during November and December. the arts community and share experiences among members. The group has adopted a broad definition of the print to include most work in which artists are engaged hands-on in the production of their work. Thus, members employ a variety of relief and intaglio methods such as woodblocks, linocuts, engravings, etchings, collographs and photogravure as well as monotypes and alternative photographic printing processes. Asheville Printmakers is an open group for artists having “an interest and motivation in printmaking with artistic intent” who are invited to join members on the fourth Tuesday of every month at the West Asheville Library. As the show’s title suggests, these works will be displayed unframed. Made on paper or other non-rigid material, prints are usually framed for protection from the elements and presentation in a viewable format. These unframed prints Amphitheatre Tunnel, will be shown photogravure with chine-collé alongside a selecby Clay Harmon tion of frames to

These are original prints, typically small editions made from a single printing plate as distinguished from prints such as giclees and offset lithography that are reproductions of a single original work. For many art collectors, the most appealing aspects of original prints are their relative affordability and the intimacy of the viewing experience. The artist and printer, often one and the same, are challenged to use specialized skills, inventive techniques and mutiple processes to achieve the desired artistic outcome. Asheville Printmakers was formed in 2014 to encourage printmaking in

Sunset, monoprint with pochoir and hand-coloring by Melanie Finlayson

Strange Attraction, etchings hand-sewn with chine-collé by Dona Barnett

illustrate the effect a frame and mat will have on the final presentation of the art. As tastes vary, there is no single “correct” way to frame a print, although there are important considerations to ensure long-term preservation. The ability to “try out” each print in the context of different frame designs should be an interesting exercise for experienced and new collectors alike. There will be a casual artist reception with refreshments on Friday, November 6 at 6:30 p.m. The show will run through December. Please join us to meet the artists and learn more about the innovative and involved processes used to make these fascinating prints. BlackBird Frame & Art is a custom framing studio that features fine art prints. IF YOU UnFramed, Asheville GO Printmakers’ Group Show. Artists’

Reception, Friday, November 6 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. On display November and December at BlackBird Frame & Art, 365 Merrimon Ave, ¾ mile north of downtown Asheville. Hours are 10-6 weekdays and 10-3 Saturdays. (828) 225-3117 or visit blackbirdframe.com.

Southern Appalachian Splendor Through the Seasons

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Juried group exhibit at the Green Sage restaurant in Asheville. This juried exhibit of Exhibit of the Carolinas’ Nature Photographers Association Asheville Region (CNPAAsheville) features photographs that portray the Southern Appalachian region’s rich and colorful vistas and intimate landscapes throughout the year, in 21 beautifully captured images. The photographers represented in the exhibit live in Western North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. They represent a diversity of men and women, amateurs and professionals, 20-somethings and seniors. CNPA was founded in 1992 as a non-profit organization to promote

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SUSANNA EUSTON

nature photography in the Carolinas; to help conserve and preserve the diverse natural ecosystems in the Carolinas; and to educate others interested in nature photography. An additional goal of CNPA-Asheville Region is to develop a community that celebrates the beauty of nature through photography and promotes an appreciation of nature within our region. This is accomplished through monthly meetings, photography outings, educational seminars, workshops and exhibits of members’ work. For more details, please visit www.cnpa-asheville.org.

Leaf in Free Fall by Phyllis Hunter

IF YOU Southern Appalachian Splendor GO Through the Seasons, on display

through January 2, 2016 at the Green Sage Cafe, 1800 Hendersonville Rd. in South Asheville.

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v Fine Arts & Crafts v Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

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Thanksgiving Dinner

“Tom” is not going into an oven at Thanksgiving. He is a barnyard star at a historic farm in Richmond, VA. The President regularly reprieves turkeys from the White House, and surely he wouldn’t allow the axe to fall on this grand old bird. “Tom” represents a painting style Virginia Pendergrass, a Brevard, NC artist, calls contemporary impressionism. Impressionism is representational painting but while the subject matter is clearly recognizable, it is romanticized by intent. “What drew me to painting is the leeway offered to depict what speaks to me, and to make it beautiful,” she explains “A tree or building ruining my vista? I move ‘em. The scene has so many details that the most special parts are lost in the clutter? I simplify or abstract shapes to represent my reality. Didn’t like the color? I choose a not-quiteright but beautiful color. The goal is a sense of distance or movement? I fiddle with edges and colors to create that visual impression on canvas.” “Tom” shows abstraction to simplify and focus on his wonderful shape and striking colors. Details of ground clutter, fencing and background trees are eliminated, or abstractly by suggestive brushwork, and small variations in color and value.” “However,” continues Pendergrass, “his colors are as vivid in my memory

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18 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

Leaf Season-Davidson, 9 x 12 in. oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass

Tom, 18 x 24 in. oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass

Wind on the Meadow, 18 x 24 in. oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass

as in the painting. Perhaps I am exaggerating a feature that made me want to paint him in the first place. But I have to say he was pretty darn colorful.” Pendergrass’ paintings have been selected for multiple juried regional and national shows, such as American Impressionist Society, Oil Painters of America, and Women Painters of the Southeast, where her art has been recognized with several awards of merit. “Tom,” along with other animal paintings, is currently on display at the Silver Fox Gallery in Hendersonville, NC. Pendergrass also shows her still life and landscape work at her French Broad Artists studio in Riverview Station #216 in the River Arts District, and the Asheville Gallery of Art in downtown Asheville. Virginia Pendergrass, fine artist, has works on display at French Broad Artists studio #216 in Riverview Station in the River Arts District, the Asheville Gallery of Art in downtown Asheville, and the Silver Fox Gallery in Hendersonville. Visit her at www.virginiapendergrass.com


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SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS FINE ART STUDIO IN THE

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT FALL STUDIO STROLL

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Saturday & Sunday, November 14 & 15 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Artists of Asheville’s River Arts District open Free trolleys will run their doors for a full throughout the weekend. weekend in the Fall Studio Stroll and Art Walk, welcoming the public to see and collect amazing art in their studios and galleries. The River Arts District consists of a vast array of artists and working studios in 22 former factories and historical buildings nestled along the French Broad River. More than 180 working studios, many with showrooms and galleries, are open every day, all year round. Artists work in paint, pencil, pottery, metal, fiber, glass, wax, paper and more. Getting to the River Arts District is easy, you can find a map and more details by visiting www.riverartsdistrict.com. Take advantage of ample parking and hop aboard one of our free trolleys running throughout the Studio Stroll Weekend. Come be inspired, shop, meet the artists and watch live demonstrations. The River Arts District is located along the French Broad River, just minutes from downtown Asheville.

Winter Grasses, 16 x 20 in. oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass www.virginiapendergrass.com

Please visit us during the River Arts District Stroll    November 14 & 15, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Riverview Station #216, South Entrance RV

191 Lyman St • Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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IF YOU The Studio Stroll is produced by the River Arts GO District Artists. Details at riverartsdistrict.com

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ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

RICHARD C. BAKER

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Fine Ar t and Por traiture

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Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

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More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 19


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Small Works

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OPENING RECEPTION Friday, November 6 • 5-8PM

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Elinor Bowman arrived in Asheville in 2002 and took up the study and practice of art.

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Works on display at Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 Patton, Asheville, and at Twigs & Leaves Gallery, Downtown Waynesville View online at ashevillegallery-of-art.com • Judyart@bellsouth.net

ELINOR BOWMAN

After careers in business, she found a passion in art. Her favorite subjects have been people, though she also enjoys painting still lifes and landscapes. Experimenting with different mediums— ink, watercolor and oil—has interested her. Seated in Gold, watercolor by Elinor Bowman

ASHEVILLE, NC

Mostly Blue, watercolor by Elinor Bowman

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT: Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District

pg. 21

For several years, she has focused on painting live models in watercolor and ink, and has recently added still life subjects with the model. She says, “I like the watercolor process, not always being able to predict how the painting will turn out.”

Paintings by Elinor Bowman can be found at the Asheville Gallery of Art downtown, in the Wedge in Asheville’s River District, and on her website, www.elinorbowman.com.

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ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART PRESENTS

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Small Works

Nineteen of the gallery’s 28 artists will display small works with dimensions 12 by 12 inches or less. A wide range of subject matter, media, and styles will be represented. Asheville Gallery of Art hopes that art lovers will not only enjoy the show, but will use it to purchase affordable (and packable) works of art by local artists for holiday gift giving. The public is cordially invited to attend a reception on Friday, November 6, from 5-8 p.m., where they can view the small works, as well as the works of the 28 gallery artists. The show runs November 1 to 30, 2015.

“End of Summer” by Sahar Fakhoury

ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 16 College Street

Downtown Asheville www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Mon. - Sat. 10-5pm Sun. 1-4pm

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Elinor Bowman, Artist

Works measuring 12 x 12 inches or less, created by 19 of the gallery’s 28 artists.

“Tea Rose” by Olga Michelson

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

On Display November 1-30, 2015

“Valley View” by Sandra Moore

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20 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

Valley View by Sandra Moore

IF YOU Small Works at Asheville Gallery of Art, located across from GO Pritchard Park in downtown Asheville. Regular gallery hours are

Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. For more details, you may contact the gallery at (828) 251-5796, or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.


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Call to Artists

The Asheville Art Museum

Due Date: November 9, 2015

The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack.

The Asheville Gallery of Art, located at 16 College Street, invites area artists to apply for membership by November 9, 2015. The 28-member co-op provides artists with the opportunity to show their work in an established, thriving, downtown gallery, soon to be located in an exciting new space. All 2-D work, except for photography and digital art, is considered. The diversity of this gallery continues to make it one of Asheville’s most popular and successful art destinations. Interested artists should obtain a copy of the prospective member guidelines and a membership application, which are available at the gallery located across from Pritchard Park in downtown Asheville, and at www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com. For more information, call (828) 450-1104 or e-mail Cheryl Keefer ncartist@att.net.

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v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com

29 Biltmore Ave.

That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

15 N. Lexington Ave.

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PACK SQUARE

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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Maple Tree

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Celtic Music & Stories with Jamie Laval

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Veterinary Hospital

Jamie Laval creates rapt audiences with his passionate performances of traditional music of Scotland, Ireland, Brittany and Quebec.

• • • • • • •

Wellness Care Laser Therapy Digital Dental X-Ray Surgery Pain Management Boarding for Cats and Dogs Day Camp with Supervised Group Play for Dogs • Grooming

The accomplished violinist blends an ancient art form with stunning virtuosity and contemporary flair that resonates with families, youth, seniors, and devotees of ethnic, jazz, and classical music. An evening concert experience with Jamie combines soaring melodies, toe-tapping rhythms, and amusing stories to create a beautiful atmosphere of the Scottish Highlands.

A native of Seattle, Jamie initially studied classical violin at the Victoria Conservatory of Music and made his living as a professional symphony musician, recording studio artist, improvising violinist, and contra dance fiddler. But his passion for the haunting sounds of rural Scottish folk music eventually usurped all other preoccupations, and he now devotes himself exclusively to Celtic music.

Jamie Laval

IF Jamie Laval, Saturday, November 7 at 7:30 p.m. at YOU GO the Strand Theatre, 38 N. Main St., Waynesville.

Dr. Brian H. Birthright, DVM

$20 Adults / $12 Students. Purchase tickets at www.38main.com or call (828) 283-0079.

www.mapletreevet.com

1855 Russ Ave., Waynesville

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Featuring Local Sunburst Trout

Open Monday - Saturday • 828-452-5211

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FROG LEVEL WP WU

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70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

128 N. Main Street

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Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00 pg. 22 pg. 36

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

22 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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This is a perfect time to explore Waynesville’s galleries, restaurants and gift-shops during Art After Dark, Friday, November 6. Art After Dark transforms Downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and perform-

Watercolor by Pam Haddock

ing arts center. Festive Art After Dark flags designate participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery. November offers a wonderful variety of artists and mediums to explore, including demonstrations. Cedar Hill Studios will be featuring local artist, Karen Zimmerman, who will be demonstrating her whimsical bird artwork at Cedar Hill Studio, across from the Old Courthouse on Main St., during Art After Dark, November 6. Zimmerman uses a combination of paint and collage to create images of many of the song birds that frequent this area. She creates her work on paper and weathered boards. Come enjoy the demo and wonderful music and dancing with the Steve Whiddon one man band outside and Lynn Hendrick playing keyboard inside. Serving great refreshments and representing the works and fabulous talent of 90 amazing artists. Gallery 86 Haywood County Arts Council Gallery hosts the much anticipated It’s a Small, Small Work show. Start your Christmas shopping early with small (but powerful) art at affordable prices. Join us for receptions on November 6 and December 4. The show provides a unique opportunity for budding artists to exhibit their work,

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as well as the opportunity for more seasoned artists to test their boundaries. The Mahogany House Art Gallery and Studios welcomes you to a demonstration by award winning watercolor artist Pamela Haddock. She will be with us in studio for Art After Dark on Friday, November 6 from 6-9 p.m. Our resident artists Teri Siewert, Dominick DePaolo, and Danny McLain, will also be in studio demonstrating their craft. Come join us for warm food, good wine, and beautiful art. The Village Framer invites you to visit with the students and alumni of Haywood Community College. Stop by to see demonstrations in weaving and clay, and enjoy refreshments. Just in time for holiday shopping, Jean Wilkes will be painting pillows in Twigs and Leaves Gallery during Art After Dark on Fri-

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day, November 6 from 6-9 p.m. Jean’s artistry is amazing as she creates “moveable art” with her gorgeous pillows. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music and indulge in the savory hors d’eurves. Twigs and Leaves Gallery is located at 98 North Main Street in Waynesville. They are open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sundays from 1-4 p.m. For more details, please call (828) 456-1940, and visit www. twigsandleaves.com. IF YOU Art After Dark, Friday, GO November 6, downtown

Waynesville. For more details, visit the Waynesville Gallery Association at www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com

“Movable Art” Painted Pillows by

Jean Wilkes Demonstrating at

Art After Dark Friday, November 6 from 6-9PM

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Art After Dark

With the apple harvest in full swing, and a chill in the air, the season is ripe for festivities and gift giving.

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

McLAIN POTTERY Studio Now Open at the Mahogany House Art Gallery and Studios Pottery, Beginner Wheel Throwing Classes, Demonstrations

Featured Artist JIM MICHIELSEN • On display thru November

Art After Dark, Friday, November 6 from 6-9

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coldcove@gmail.com

240 Depot Street • Frog Level • Waynesville, NC

Burr Studio

GALLERY OF AMERICAN ART & CRAFT

136 N. Main Street • Waynesville • 828-456-7400

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 23


The Face of War

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The annual arts show is a unique community event that features visual and performance art created by survivors of sexual assault. “Art is a powerful vehicle for healing,” explains Angelica Wind, Our VOICE executive director. “Heart Works offers an opportunity for those impacted by sexual assault and abuse to share their story, which can be an important step in the healing process. “The arts show also serves as vehicle to raising awareness and starting conversations regarding the impact of sexual assault. More than anything, it serves as a testament of the strength and resiliency that survivors have and that healing is possible.” One out of every six American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime according to the National Institute of Justice and Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Males are the least likely to report sexual assault, though they make up about 10% of all victims. Wind says, “The trauma of sexual assault lingers long after the actual event or events. Victims of sexual assault are 3 times more likely to suffer from depression and 26 times more likely to abuse drugs. As a community

Available for $15.98 each at

soldierslament@gmail.com Include Your Name & Address Visit www.soldierslament.com

24 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

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we need to know how to support victims and take action to stop sexual assault and abuse in the first Speak With Pride, place.” by Jean Wall Penland The first Survivor’s Arts show was in 2000, and has grown each year. This year the 14th Annual Survivors Arts Show will include works of art from Jean Wall Penland, a local painter and etcher whose work has been exhibited in over 20 solo shows throughout North Carolina and England over 35 years. Penland was the art director for “The Arts Journal” in Asheville from 1978-1989 and her work is found in several permanent collections including the Coca-Cola Bottling Company, the Biltmore Estate, Carolina Power and Light, Duke University, and Rock well International. IF YOU The 2015 Survivor’s Arts Show will be GO held on Thursday, November 12 at the

YMI Cultural Center (39 S. Market St, Asheville) with public viewing beginning at 5:30 p.m. and performance art starting at 7 p.m. More details can be found at ourvoice.nc.org.

Be the Voice for a Child in Your Community

The Buncombe County Guardian ad Litem Program is seeking community volunteers to help make a difference in the lives of local children.

The intent of this work is to honor and acknowledge the physical and mental hardships imposed upon the individuals engaged in armed conflict.

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Heart Works: A Survivors Arts Show

Our VOICE presents the 14th Annual Heart Works, Survivors Arts Show, Thursday, November 12 at the YMI Cultural Center.

by Anthony Guidone

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artful living

~ A SOLDIERS LAMENT ~

NEW BOOK!

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The Buncombe County GAL Program is part of the North Carolina Guardian ad Litem Program, a division of the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts, which recruits, trains, and supervises volunteer advocates in every county across the state to repre-

BY

SARAH YOUNg

sent and promote the best interests of abused, neglected, and dependent children in the state court system. Volunteer advocates work with an attorney to form a plan that ensures these children are placed in a safe, permanent home. The North Carolina Guardian ad Litem Program thrives on volunteerism, and its vital work is only made possible by dedicated volunteers who are committed to the cause of keeping children safe from future harm. If you have an interest in becoming the voice for a child, contact the Buncombe County GAL office at (828) 251-6130. Our local program provides training for new volunteers four times throughout the year.

PARTICIPATE: Our next training will begin in January 2016. You can find out more about the program by visiting www.volunteerforgal.org or www. facebook.com/ncGuardianAdLitem.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Tellabration!

NCBTMB #582633-09

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One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

Asheville Storytelling Circle, founded in 1995, celebrates 20 years with a cornucopia of tellers and tales! nonprofit organization dedicated to excellence in the oral tradition by affirming various cultures through storytelling and nourishing the development of emerging and established artists. Directions to the Folk Art Center: From Interstate 40 East: Take Exit 55 to Highway 70. Turn left and go about one mile to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Go underneath the Parkway and exit right onto the Parkway entrance ramp. At the stop sign, turn left (north) onto the Parkway. Go approximately one-half mile and the Folk Art Center is on the left. Tellabration is sponsored by Asheville Storytelling Circle in partnership with the Southern Highlands Craft Guild and the National Storytelling Network. Asheville Storytelling Circle monthly meetings are held 3rd Mondays, except August and December, 7 p.m. at Asheville Terrace apartments Community Room, 200 Tunnel Road in Asheville. New members and guests welcome. For more information, please call (828) 595-2251, (828) 274-1123, or visit www. ashevillestorycircle.org.

The Writers’ Workshop

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Book Marketing in the Age of the Internet – with Jane Gari

Writing Children’s Books – with Bobbie Pell

Shifting your perspective from artist to marketer is difficult, but if you want to be a published author, you have to adapt. The class will learn comprehensive book marketing strategies, including identifying your target audience; social media strategies; blogging; traditional media and publicity outlets; and creating a solid Amazon Authors Central Page. Gari has been published in print and online in literary journals, arts magazines, and blogs such as Writers Digest. Her memoir was published by Touch Point Press, and she is under contract with Alpha Books (a division of Penguin/ Random House) for a book in the Idiot’s Guide series.

Whether you’re write about talking elephants, bullies at school, or rhyming texts for lullabies, this class is for you! We will look at the primary categories of books for ages 3-11, from Concept/Novelty Books, Picture Books, Easy/Early Readers, to Beginning Chapter Books. Through close examination of Caldecott Winners books, we can learn what strategies make a successful children’s story: plot, believable characters, setting, style, and word choice. Pell earned her MFA degree at Goddard College, and is the author of A New Star and Scary Stories. She has worked with young children for many years as Writing Instructor and Storyteller.

Meets Saturday, November 7 from 10-4 p.m. Cost: $75; $70 members.

Meets Saturday, November 14 from 10-4 p.m. Cost: $75; $70 Workshop members.

IF YOU GO

Classes meet at 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville. Registration is in advance only, at www.twwoa.org. For more details, contact writersw@gmail.com or (828) 2548111. Financial assistance is available for low-income writers.

Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

Linda Neff

A WORLDWIDE STORYTELLING EVENT

It’s Time for Tellabration! when thousands of people around the world gather in small towns and big cities to celebrate storytelling during the week before Thanksgiving. The international celebration of storytelling, known as Tellabration! serves to build grassroots community support for the age-old art of storytelling. Since its beginning in 1988, the annual observance has grown into one of the most impressive collective events in the history of the modern storytelling revival. Citizens from Asheville and surrounding areas join the global Tellabration! Spirit for the 19th year, as Asheville Storytelling Circle hosts the regional event with a diverse line-up featuring tellers drawn from the best North Carolina has to offer. This year the perennially sold-out performance showcases the abundant talent of ASC tellers: Lloyd Arneach, Marvin Cole, Rose Lynn Katz, Gwenda Ledbetter, Sherry Lovett, David Novak, tandem tellers Wayne & Jane Sims, and Donna Marie Todd. A short history of the group will be shared by Sandra Gudger, the Asheville Storytelling Circle founder. Asheville Storytelling Circle is a

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

pg. 22

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IF YOU Tellabration! A Worldwide GO Storytelling Event, Sunday,

November 22 at 3 p.m. at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway. General Admission $10. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Tickets are available at the door on the day of the concert. This show usually sells out; advance reservations suggested. For more details, or to reserve tickets, call (828) 2741123 or (828) 777-9177.

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Didn’t See It Coming

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An event with the Writers Block Project. On Monday, November 16 at 7 p.m. the Perry Correctional Facility’s Writers Block Project will celebrate the release of the anthology Didn’t See It Coming. The anthology is the product of an advanced creative writing workshop at a maximum-security prison in South Carolina. The anthology includes poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction from the Project. This is a unique opportunity to hear wholly original work from some truly talented voices.

IF YOU Didn’t See It Coming, GO Monday, November 16 at 7

p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, malaprops.com.

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 25


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BY

CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

TRUST YOUR VOICE SPEAK YOUR TRUTH

Next, there was a list of truth tellers who inspire these young people: James Baldwin, Eleanor Roosevelt, Alice Walker, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Sojourner Truth, Howard Zinn, Cesar Chavez, Chief Joseph, From the wisdom of Soulspeak Aldo Leopold, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Asheville, young poets considered Douglas, Robert Shetterly, and Rev. Barber. I’d like to add to this list my heroes and the question: “What does it mean to heroines: Yuval Ron, Pablo Casals, Wenspeak the truth in America?” dell Berry, Jimy Carter, Beethoven, Jeremy I was one of three judges at a reading this Rifkin, Al Gore, Osip Mandelstam, and week. In answer to the question, these poets Anna Akhmatova. responded: (I have paraphrased their comThe Soulspeak poets are in flower. Their ments) words bloomed in the dim light of the room. They took • It means to be comfortable on “The” Coffee Shop, sexbeing uncomfortable #1212 ism, bullying, abuse, poverty, from Emily Dickinson • Be as brave as anyone in the homelessness, and racism. past. I recently read a quote A word is dead from Emily Dickinson, • Every truth is important. When it is said, “Truth is such a rare thing it Some say. • Every truth should be spoken. is delightful to tell it.” When I delved into • Speak until you are hoarse. I say it just Stephen King’s book, On Begins to live • Your voice matters. Writing, I stopped at the That day. • You have what it takes. quotes on the front page of his memoir. First came this from Miguel de Cervantes, “Honesty’s the best policy.” Next was from anonymous, “Liars prosper.” (Sounds like an election year to me!) Of the poems I’ve studied, the most difficult one involving truth was written by Anna Akmatova, April first, 1957, in Leningrad. She and a crowd of women stood outside a prison trying to get food to their family members. Anna’s son had been imprisoned because of Rapid River Magazine

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

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her words, which included a reference to “Yezhovian.” Yezhov was head of the Soviet Secret Police, noted for his ferocity.

Instead of a Preface from Anna Akmatova In the awful years of Yezhovian horror, I spent seventeen months standing in line in front of various prisons in Leningrad. One day someone “recognized” me. Then a woman with blue lips, who was standing behind me, and who, of course, had never heard my name, came out of the stupor which typified all of us, and whispered into my ear (everyone there spoke only in whispers): - Can you describe this? and I said: I can. Then something like a fleeting smile passed over what once had been her face. Writer, it is time for you to flourish. It is time for passion. Your truth is important. Tell the truth until you are hoarse. You have what it takes. Be Brave. Write on! I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

Web Exclusive

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine

Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

26 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

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David Madden Reading

Author David Madden will read from his new book, The Tangled Web of the Civil War and Reconstruction. The author will have copies of the book for sale and signing on Friday, November 13 at noon at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts. The event is free; participants are encouraged to bring a lunch.

POETRIO Sunday, November 1 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: John Hoppenthaler (Domestic Garden), Nancy Dew Taylor (Sleeping on Air), and Diana Pinckney (Alchemy).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville. Details at (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Madden will perform a dramatic reading of “Lincoln’s Second Gettysburg Address.” The author and historian will also tell the story of the sinking of the Sultana, the nation’s worst maritime disaster, and the simultaneous burning of nine bridges from Alabama to Virginia. Madden combines scholarly and personal essays with fictional stories. The author of thirteen books of fiction, he is well known for his Civil War novel Sharpshooter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. A native of Knoxville, David Madden has lived in Black Mountain since 2008. IF YOU David Madden reading and GO booksigning, Friday, November 13 at

noon at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. For more details call (828) 669-0930.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Anthony G. Photographer/Writer

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Anthony Guidone is an American freelance photographer whose focus is realism through fine art and journalism.

reveals the sheer beauty of our shared humanity, with all its tragedy and hope. The images can evoke a feeling of sorrow and distress not meant for the faint of heart. The photography of The Face of War: A Soldier’s Lament records a view of life as it passes from one generation to another in a changing world.

Guidone has devoted himself to documenting conflicts and critical social issues escalating into wars. The Face of War: A Soldier’s From Anthony Guidone’s The “I am compelled by the Lament is his latest project, Face of War: A Soldier’s Lament. importance of preserving a pictorial book documentevents, both natural and ing the physical and mental unnatural, that make a difference and hardships imposed upon individuals engaged give substance to our lives. The intent in armed conflict. He approaches his subject of this work is to honor and acknowlmatter in a unique way, with artistically enedge the physical and mental hardships hanced photos and words grounded in utmost imposed upon the individuals engaged journalistic integrity. in armed conflict.” Having an appreciation of realism and ~ Anthony G. abstract art, his photography is direct and

NOVEMBER

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, November 3 at 7 p.m. VIRGINIA PYE, Dreams of the Red Phoenix, war. From Anthony Guidone’s The Face of War: A Soldier’s Lament.

To place an order for The Face of War: A Soldier’s Lament ($19.95 plus shipping) send an email to soldierslament@gmail.com. Include your name, address, and telephone number. The Face of War, A Soldier’s Lament, hardcover; copyright 2014 by Anthony Guidone. ISBN #978o-615-98456*8.

Thursday, November 5 at 7 p.m. ELLEN HOPKINS, Traffick, YA, sequel to Tricks. Friday, November 6 at 7 p.m. LAURA WRIGHT, Vegan Studies Project. Saturday, November 7 at 7 p.m. DIANE CHAMBERLAIN, Pretending to Dance. Monday, November 9 at 7 p.m. MARK DE CASTRIQUE, A Specter of Justice. Tuesday, November 10 at 7 p.m. ROBERT J. NORRELL, Alex Haley, biography. Thursday, November 12 at 7 p.m. JODI LYNN ANDERSON, Diary from the Edge of the World.

Sabrina: A Great Smoky Mountains Story

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WRITTEN BY LISA HORSTMAN

A new children’s book published by the Great Smoky Mountains Association’s is now available at visitor centers in and around the national park. Lisa Horstman, author and illustrator of such popular children’s books as The Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball, and The Troublesome Cub, has outdone herself with Sabrina: A Great Smoky Mountains Story, the retelling of the classic ugly duckling story from a flying squirrel’s point of view. This is the tale of a special kind of squirrel who finds herself in a strange new home

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after a run in with an owl. Throughout the story readers are invited to follow along as Sabrina learns how to survive, and then thrive, in her new environment. Sabrina and her ilk are denizens of the rich and rare spruce-fir forest that clings to the Smokies highest peaks. Children will cheer Sabrina’s heroic effort to protect her new family, then discover that a much larger danger is approaching. Northern flying squirrels are endangered because the spruce-fir forest where they live is getting smaller, Horstman tells her readers. This forest in the southern Appalachian Mountains is found only on the highest mountains where the weather is always cool or cold.

Charlie Lovett Reading

The perfect story to get you in a holiday mood!

Charlie Lovett’s The Further Adventures of Ebeneezer Scrooge is, like Lovett’s previous book First Impressions, “a loving homage to one of literature’s most beloved authors.” It tells the story of Scrooge after the events of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol. Scrooge’s Christmas spirit is so exuberant that he’s still at it twenty years later—in July. Can he help his old friend Jacob Marley find peace after all these years?

Enjoy an evening with Scrooge, Dickens, and Lovett, who is a teacher, playwright, and a former antiquarian bookseller. IF YOU Charlie Lovett, Tuesday, November GO 17 at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, malaprops.com.

BY

LISA DUFF

A retelling of the classic ugly duckling story. Scientists are concerned that if the climate gets warmer, this kind of forest will disappear. Sabrina: A Great Smoky Mountains Story is Horstman’s tenth book. Combining her love of books with the craft of illustration began with the publication of Fast Friends in 1994, when she was the recipient of the Dr. Seuss Picturebook Award from Alfred A. Knopf. Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball, her first collaboration with Great Smoky Mountains Association, led to six more picture books with the nonprofit organization: The Troublesome Cub, Wee Ones, and The Smokies Yukky Book, written Doris Gove; We’re Going to the Mountains, written by Steve Kemp; Scavenger Hike Adventures, written by Kat and John LaFevre; and Sabrina: A Great Smoky Mountains Story. Horstman’s adorable illustrations for Sabrina are the result of a technique she pioneered using handmade puppets and her usual whimsical style of painting. “This book is a perfect ‘sit on my lap and I’ll read you a story’ book,” said Kemp. Sales of both books support ongoing educational, scientific, and preservation efforts of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Those who wish to strengthen their national park experience are encouraged to Get Rooted in the Smokies through membership.

Friday, November 13 at 7 p.m. TAKE BACK THE NARRATIVE, sexual assault survivors. Saturday, November 14 at 7 p.m. DAVID GILBERT, The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime. Sunday, November 15 at 5 p.m. JAMIE MASON, Monday’s Lie, mystery. Monday, November 16 at 7 p.m. Didn’t See It Coming, anthology. Tuesday, November 17 at 7 p.m. CHARLIE LOVETT, The Further Adventures of Scrooge. Wednesday, November 18 at 7 p.m. GEORGE SINGLETON, Calloustown, short fiction. Thursday, November 19 at 7 p.m. J. SCOTT BROWNLEE, Requiem for Used Ignition Cap. Friday, November 20 at 7 p.m. JIMMY GUIGNARD, Pedaling the Sacrifice Zone. Monday, November 23 at 7 p.m. BYRON BALLARD, Asfidity and Mad-Stones: A Further Ramble Through Hillfolks’ Hoodoo.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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For more information about GSMA and to order these books, visit www.SmokiesInformation.org or call toll-free 1-888-898-9102, ext. 226.

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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Cradle to the Grave VIRGIN EMI

When Glen Difford and Chris Tilbrook reunited in 2007 it was largely to keep Squeeze in the public eye as a touring act. Their 2010 return to the studio was a reworking of older songs, making Cradle to the Grave the first proper album from the band in nearly two decades. Thankfully it’s a return to form of sorts, certainly not up to the standards of such classics as Cool for Cats or East Side Story but comfortably on par with such early 1990’s efforts as Play and the highly underrated Some Fantastic Place. The band seems remarkably unconcerned with modernism and perfectly content to reinvestigate their inherent strengths: razor sharp melodies, engaging hooks, and lyrics void of pretense or unnecessary abstraction. It’s also a delightfully varied effort-while the title track’s Motown influence may come as no surprise, the disco dance floor of “Nirvana” is a nice twist on an old theme. In under 45minutes (the ideal length for a vinyl release) Difford and Tillbrook-along with current band mates Simon Hansen, Stephen Large and John Bentley-give us a primer on constructing imminently joyful and ideally made pop music. ****

Joe Jackson Fast Forward

WORK SONG MUSIC EMI

We’re Hyper Local & Super Social! Discount Coupons ✿ Contests

Keep up with Local Arts, Events, Performances, and Festivals. www.facebook.com/ rapidrivermagazine

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Another wide ranging number of discs to cover, and a brave attempt to keep my comments as brief as possible; keep supporting the music and be sure to buy local.

Squeeze

Like Us on Facebook

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Despite his many gifts Joe Jackson has never come across as a man satisfied with his own accomplishments. For the second half of his career he’s explored juke joint blues and big band jazz, written a symphony or two, created music for Broadway, and scored more than a dozen films. And while such ambition is admirable he’s always been best at writing smart and edgy pop songs, the sort that dominated FM radio and wove their way into your brain with disconcerting ease. Recorded in New York, Amsterdam, New Orleans, and Berlin, Fast Forward finds Jackson striving to balance various ends, crafting some of the catchiest tunes of his career and stretching them in a manner reminiscent of masterpiece Night and Day. Utilizing the talents of such guests as Bill Frisell and Brian Blades, and employing the New Orleans based sextet Galactic as his primary backing band, Jackson is at his most sophisticated and relaxed. A cover of Television’s “See No Evil” (with a blistering solo by Frisell) is a rare treat while the Cabaret miscue of “Good Bye Johnny” would have been better left on the cutting floor. But it’s the originals that save the day, and

28 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

though the Amy Winehouse condemnation of “Junkie Diva” seems overly cruel, the rest of Fast Forward is Jackson at his best. It’s a path back to his roots, and one I’ll welcome enough to excuse a few bits of bad judgment. It swings more than any Joe Jackson album in decades, and punches enough buttons to remind us how much we missed him pounding the piano and spitting out intelligent, rancorous and topflight rock -n- roll. ****1/2

Donnie Fritts

Oh My Goodness

SINGLE LOCK RECORDS

In a career dating back to the late 1950’s Donnie Fritts has been an integral part of the Southern music scene; a songwriter, producer, staff arranger for the fabled Muscle Shoals studios, and studio keyboardist, Fritts-who has played on hundreds of records and thousands of tracks — has for the better part of 40 years toured with Kris Kristofferson. Yet his own solo work has largely taken a back seat, with Oh My Goodness being only his fourth solo and his first in a decade. Given the better known names who have profited from his presence-including Percy Sledge, Clarence Carter, Bonnie Bramlett, and far too many to include-it’s no surprise that his latest serves up a healthy plate of soulful blues, swampy rock, and a twang that you could cut with a knife. Teamed with producer John Paul White (best known for his work with The Civil Wars) Oh My Goodness sounds both contemporary and timeless, with a new slate of originals, a remakes of Fritts’ classic “Choo Choo Train” and a few songs written by others. Backed by The Alabama Shakes and assisted by such friends and fans as John Prine, Jason Isbell, and studio vets Reggie Young, David Hood, and Spooner Oldham (with a career such as his you get to pick from the best) Fritts’ Wurlitzer organ sits front and center while his voice-which sounds a bit like a slightly less grizzled Tom Waits-spins tales of misspent youth, getting clean and sober, and the sensual joys of “Memphis Women and Chicken.” It’s all done with an endearing charm and absolute lack of pretense, which makes this the ideal album for a lazy weekend afternoon, a cold brew, and nowhere in particular to go. ****

Duncan Sheik Ledgerdemain KOBALT RECORDS

To the casual listener Duncan Sheik is best known as the one hit wonder behind the adult contemporary luster of “Barely Breathing,” yet his career has been much more than that. Since 2002 Sheik has largely concentrated on Broadway (he’s composed seven scores to

date) while occasionally releasing a solo album and contributing to various tribute projects. All of those efforts have showcased his intrinsic strengths: a ridiculous knack for melody, a voice of surprising range and delicacy, and the sort of coy wordplay that might remind you of Lloyd Cole or early Leonard Cohen. Coming 20 years after his debut album Legerdemain is a nice tidying up of his career, a bridge between his lofty stage ambitions and the hazy affectations of his pop songs. His voice rarely rises above a whisper but it’s no less powerful, and if the themes that dominate herein, longing for acceptance, heartache and the search for meaning, are hardly new, Sheik instills them with a sense of maturity and grace all his own. It’s an album built on textures rather than declaration, and even if it sometimes slips into the chilled sterility of new wave synthesis there’s enough here to satisfy longtime fans and perhaps arouse the curiosity of the uninitiated. ***

Bob Forrest

Survival Songs

SIX DEGREES RECORDS

In an odd way it’s a shame the LA musician and ex-Thelonious Monster front man Bob Forrest is better known as a celebrity drug counselor and reality television star than for his music. Forrest’s struggle with heroin addiction — detailed via his work with Dr. Drew Pinsky and the subject of a full length documentary — is the thematic link that binds his newest, a reckoning with the demons that once controlled him and a testament to his remarkable endurance. Produced by Ian Brennan, Survival Songs is a haunting and potent listen, deeply personal, but told in ways that are collective and inspiring. As clichéd as it sounds, his battles become ours. Sparsely arranged, largely played by Forrest on acoustic guitar and ex-Circle Jerks guitarist Zander Schloss on rhythm (and a few other instrumental adornments) the songs narrate the darks days of Forrest’s life, a harrowing descent into a world none of us would want to be part of. “With teeth that can’t chew cereal” he tells us in the mournful “Cereal Song”, one of 13 songs of depravity that would make Charles Bukowski blush, “I’m lucky I’m alive / I should be dead.” Forrest’s voice is as scarred as his life, but it’s a powerful vehicle for his words. The lone trumpet that announces “Looking to the West,” set against stand-up bass and pedal steel, is like a siren call to the wounded; come back, there is life after addiction. The immediacy and ultimate redemption of Survival Songs brings to mind Neil Young’s “Tonight’s The Night,” but while that work of uneasy listening was told by someone who witnessed firsthand the destructive nature of continued on page 29


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sound experience Bow Thayer Arrives with New Album, Sundowser

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Multi-instrumentalist Bow Thayer might well define the modern day Renaissance man; an artist whose work exemplifies his past influences and present day state of mind in equal doses. As a songwriter Thayer is remarkably adept at extracting ideas from the music and the world around him while weaving those emanations into something that is entirely his own. Much in the spirit of Beck Hansen, Thayer is a chameleon of sorts, able to fit comfortably into any number of genres. Sundowser, his latest and most fully realized effort, ranges wonderfully from blues rock to something a bit akin to old-time, back over to Southern swamp country, and straight ahead to a bit of power pop. Among its dozen tracks are themes ranging from interpersonal examination to interpersonal struggles, to historical geo-political storytelling. And at its best all three might be found within the same song or verse. In addition to the superb and deeply layered songwriting, the musicianship – played by a core group of Thayer’s inner circle, including friends Marco Benevento on piano, and violinist/pianist Tracy Bonham – is nothing short of brilliant. I could go on and on singing the praises of Sundowser but I’ll instead allow Thayer to offer his own reflections, since who knows the creation better than the creator?

‘CDs’ cont’d from pg. 28

heroin, Bob Forrest lived it. Survival Songs is certainly not for the squeamish, and at times can be a difficult listen, but it’s a hell of a worthwhile ride. ****

The Zombies Still Got That Hunger

THE END RECORDS

It’s been a four year break since The Zombies released Breathe Out, Breathe In which followed its predecessor by nearly 40 years, but Still Got That Hunger somehow seems neither rushed nor overly calculated. Original members Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone (whose voice is as magical as ever) are on board along with keyboardist Jim Rodford (from Argent’s post Zombies band) and guitarist Tom Toomey and drummer Steve Rodford. Given that personnel it’s no surprise that Still Got the Hunger sounds as much like Argent as it does the Zombies, straddling (and not always successfully) a wire between bombastic arena rock and understated psychedelia. When it works (as in the keyboard driven “Chasing the Past”) it sounds seamless and inspired. However, as has often been the case with this band, the uneven songwriting lets them down.

ridiculous amount of music, probably 150 albums a year. Sundowser would be in my top five. I’m pretty much in love with this record!

Bow Thayer: So glad you dig it. There is a lot

of music to take in on this one and I appreciate you taking the time to digest it.... Something that’s kind of rare in today’s listening audience.

that musical styles will mesh. You can say the Airline Bojotar is the common point.

JC: I have the sense with Sundowser that there

JC: Having only seen you perform once, an intimate solo acoustic show here in Asheville, I was frankly stunned by the complexity and depth of Sundowser. You clearly know your way around a studio and understand the nuance of making an album rather than a collection of songs. Can you talk a bit about the process that went into assembling Sundowser? I hear it as a sound collage — a construction of ideas arriving at some common point.

“Moving On” is perilously close to the big stage rock of Argent, the sort of song that sounds much better on stage than blasting out of your speakers, while a unneeded remake of “I Want You Back Again” doesn’t come close to matching the 1965 version. Worse yet, is “New York’, an overly saccharine bit that exposes The Zombies worst tendencies. Much better are “Beyond the Borderline” and “Little One,” both of which are driven by Argent’s still remarkable keyboard skills. Relative newcomers Steve Rodford and Tom Toomey hold up their end of the bargain, and while Still Got That Hunger comes nowhere near to approaching the band’s best moments it does serve to remind us that they’re still alive and kicking; having seen their performance last year at The Orange Peel, I for one am grateful. ***

is a LOT going on, as if you had so much material the challenge was in whittling it down to a manageable length. Were there leftover songs or fragments that didn’t make the cut? How much influence did the musicians involved have in shaping the material?

Bow Thayer

explorations. I think the instrument I am playing had a big part of shaping the sound. In creating an instrument that is essentially a blend of other instruments it is inevitable

In many ways it’s a more fitting tribute to McLennan, setting aside some of the pensive melancholy that is typical of Forster’s songs while embracing much of the lighthearted friskiness that was McLennan’s stock and trade. The irreverence of the Brazilian tinged “Love is Where It Is” the good natured self-deprecation of “I Love Myself and I Always Have” showcase a side of Forster rarely exposed. Even his best work has often taken itself too serious which makes the bouncy, swiftly toned nature of these songs all the more surprising. Even when he veers towards introspection, as

BT: Yes, there were several songs that did not make it on the record. Not because they are bad songs or the production did not come out good enough. They were songs that we could not fit with the flow of the record and we did not want to make the record too long. It’s funny because the songs that were left off are probably the most “catchy” or “accessible” ones. We do plan on releasing them soon; my continued on page 38

he does in “The Poet Walks,” he smartly tosses in a bit of mariachi trumpet to keep us alert. Forster’s low key vocal style is an acquired taste and the songs here are among the best he’s ever penned, at times approaching the lofty heights he set with The Go Betweens. It’s hard to imagine his ever again capturing that sort of lightning in a bottle but there’s no denying that Songs to Play marks a return to form from one of Australia’s most enduring and talented exports. ****

Make Your Own Beer & Wine

Robert Forster Songs to Play TAPETE RECORDS

It’s been seven years since Go Betweens co-founder Forster has released a solo effort (this is his sixth) but this one is worth the wait. While 2008’s The Evangelist was clearly a healing process (as Forster grappled with the untimely death of his songwriting partner and band mate Grant McLennan) Songs to Play is a declaration that life must go on.

CASSARA

Thayer’s Bojotar is a new stringed electric instrument combining elements of a resonator guitar, banjo, and electric guitar. The instrument was developed by Thayer for Eastwood Guitars.

James Cassara: Let me first say I listen to a

BT: I have worn many hats over the years and explored various musical styles, everything from Bluegrass to punk rock, old time, reggae, prog-rock, country blues, to whatever. And of course I have been influenced by everything I have heard since I was a child. I think Sundowser is a culmination of all those different

BY JAMES

Plenty of Parking!

Let Asheville Brewers show you how affordable, enjoyable and delicious homebrewing can be!

Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-4

ASHEVILLE BREWERS SUPPLY

pg. 35

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712-B Merrimon Ave

• Asheville, NC • (828) 358-3536 .AB. • S’ F • S 

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 29


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Wasabi: Always Fresh

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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Located downtown, Wasabi is Asheville’s favorite sushi restaurant (as well as actors from The Hunger Games). We offer the freshest ingredients Beautiful Presentation – Freshest Ingredients and the most delicately prepared sushi you can get. Come in for the awardwinning taste! With open arms, Wasabi invites you to come and Wasabi experience our fresh ingredients, intense flavors, elegant surroundings and attentive service. Our talented chefs 19 Broadway Street, Downtown Asheville create authentic Japanese meals using traditional Japanese Lunch: Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; recipes. Saturday-Sunday, Noon - 3 p.m. Wasabi’s overall dining experience is worth a trip to Dinner: Monday-Thursday, 4:30 - 9:45 p.m.; downtown Asheville. Wasabi has been voted best sushi Friday 4:30 - 10:20 p.m.; Saturday, 3 - 10:20 p.m.; restaurant in Asheville by the readers of Mountain Sunday, 3 - 9:45 p.m. Xpress for 2005-2014. (828) 225-2551, www.wasabiasheville.com To make a reservation, please call Wasabi at (828) 225-2551.

Local Provisions

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Chef Justin Burdett’s Local Provisions to open in the heart of downtown Asheville.

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Burdett, who describes his food as modern redneck, will stray away from typical Southern fare for his interpretation of long-standing cooking traditions of the area. Burdett’s progressive approach to the region’s food culture will be presented through unexpected flavor profiles, often with Native American influences, and an emphasis on fermenting, canning and preserving. Modernizing the preparation of the area’s local produce and products, Burdett hopes that Local Provisions will connect with the community through his take on dishes that have been on their family dinner tables for generations. Burdett’s menu features tastes, small plates, entrees, preserved options and sweets. Menu highlights include: buttermilk curds and whey, shaved and roasted cauliflower; green peanut risotto, sorghum pork belly, whey fermented carrots, sweet tea brined quail with charred apple jus, Georgia rabbit served four ways and a selection of preserved meats and produce. Dishes will range from $5 for tastes to $24 for large plates. Local Provisions is located at 77 Biltmore Avenue in Asheville, and will be open daily for lunch and dinner. Details at www.facebook.com/LocalProvisionsAsheville

30 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

Chicken Salad Chick Opens

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Fast-casual restaurant opens in Asheville.

BY JESSI

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Located in the Asheville Market Retail Center at 4 South Tunnel Road, the new Chicken Salad Chick is owned and operated by long-time franchisee team Michelle Singleton and Julie Beville of Sing Bev Hospitality, LLC. “We’re thrilled to be opening Asheville’s first Chicken Salad Chick,” said Singleton. “We are confident that the Asheville community will love our fresh, homemade recipes and look forward to becoming a favorite destination for friends and family.” Michelle Singleton and Julie Beville both started their careers in sales and marketing before becoming stay-at-home moms. Singleton, an Auburn resident, had been dining at Chicken Salad Chick for years when it came to her attention that there was an opportunity to become a franchise owner. After partnering with her friend, Beville, and meeting with cont’d on pg. 39


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Eat, Drink Your Local Food Guide

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Healthy Good Thoughts

Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

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I’ve been BY KATHLEEN COLBURN thinking about one more simple sweet thing. Now might be a good time to consider sweet treats that are less sweet. A few Thanksgivings ago I made a chocolate pie from silk tofu. Just for fun I waited a few bites before revealing my secret. Once I knew everyone was enjoying it, I confessed. They still enjoyed it! The pie is super simple and easy, and you can make it as sweet as you want. In the food processor blend up a package of silk tofu with some vanilla extract. If you like, you can add some fresh orange zest and a splash of orange juice. Get this mixture to the flavor you like. Next melt some chocolate chips (start with a cup) and add that to the blended tofu mixture, tasting as you go. If the sweetness of the chocolate chips isn’t enough, add some sweetener. Want more chocolate? Add some. Scoop into a pie shell and refrigerate until firm. Okay, just one more thing. A simple alternative to jams and preserves. Take the fruit, whether frozen or fresh, mash it up and spread it. You could even spread some over slices of chocolate pie. Oh my!

MICHELLE ROgERS

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

Top-10 Cities for Best Restaurants and Healthy Eating Establishments 1. New Haven, Conn. 2. Scottsdale, Ariz. 3. Boston, Mass. 4. ASHEVILLE, NC. 5. Traverse City, Mich. 6. Berkeley, Calif. 7. Boulder, Colo. 8. Burlington, Vt. 9. Omaha, Neb. 10. Washington, DC.

Think good thoughts! Kathleen is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s short story editor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached at rrshortstories@gmail.com

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EBLEN CHARITIES ANNUAL BENEFIT SPONSORED BY WICKED WEED BREWING

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Faerie Arts Festival SATURDAY

November 14 2-11PM at the Asheville Renaissance Hotel $15 Adults, $12 Adv. $5 Kids at door DAYTIME: FAMILY FRIENDLY Costumes Magic Stilt Walkers Balloon Sculptures EVENING: ADULT THEMED Juan Benavides Group Body Art Fashion Show www.bioflyer.wordpress.com Photo: Ken Lane

The Art of Raymond Byram

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The Art of Raymond Byram: A Labor of Love is a hardcover coffee table book featuring 60 images of oils, serigraphs, and etchings.

Every piece is described in detail, including the mediums used. It also includes articles by an art historian and gallery owners on Byram’s work. The Art of Raymond Byram: A Labor of Love retails for $75. A preview of the 9x12 inch, 64 page book, can be found on Byram’s website, www.raybyram.com

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3RD ANNUAL BENEFIT FOR EBLEN CHARITIES

Celebrate the holiday season with some of the region’s best artists and musicians.

donning wings, is to actively join in the dance, to be connected to creative spirit. Graceful or ecstatic Bioflyer Productions dance; the radiant, presents its 3rd Annual rhythmic heartbeat; Asheville Faerie Arts Festifriendship; music; val on November 14, held all these move easily once again in the beautiful across the boundaries, ballroom of the Renaistranscending language, sance Hotel in downtown race, and time.” Asheville. Bioflyer ProducThe daytime segment, tions has a ten year held from 2-6 p.m., is history of mounting family friendly, featuring unique and progressive storytelling, costumes, entertainment, ranga magic show, Whee ing from Broadway Ahh Faerie Kin, life-size musicals to original sculptures by Marcie The rock musicals, talent Balloon Fairy, an inflated competitions, and castle bouncer, and more! most recently the loWhee Ahh Faerie Kin The evening segcal food competition ment (7-11 p.m.) is Pizza Pandemonium adult themed and features the popular world at Highland Brewery. Artistic Director, Rock music of Juan Benavides Group, plus Sarah Eblen, continues to feature all his productions Merrell’s Body Art/Painting Fashion Show, as fund raisers for The Eblen Charities. organic chocolate, and crafts by wonderful local artisans. The all day event is sponsored IF by Wicked Weed Brewing of Asheville and YOU 3rd Annual Asheville Faerie Arts is an annual fundraiser for Eblen Charities, GO Festival, November 14 from 2 to 11 one of the area’s most generous family service p.m. Adult Advance Tickets are $12 ($15 day of event), and $5 for kids under age 15 at organizations. the door. More details and tickets at bioflyer. In the words of internationally acclaimed wordpress.com. faerie artist, Brian Froud, “To dress as a faerie,

Annual OLLI Art Bazaar

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November 13-14 at UNC Asheville The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville will host the third annual OLLI Art Bazaar in the Reuter Center. The Bazaar is free and open to all.

Autumn Market by Anne Bonnyman

The Art Bazaar features a broad range of work created by OLLI members, including paintings, fiber arts, photography, jewelry, scarves, mixed media, handcrafted soaps and lotions, cards and paper art, pottery, wood art, sculpture, vintage button items, and more. IF YOU OLLI Art Bazaar, noon to 6 p.m. GO on Friday, November 13, and

10 a.m to 2 p.m. on Saturday, November 14 in the Reuter Center. For more information, visit olliasheville.com or call (828) 251-6140.

The Montford Park Players Masquerade Ball

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The Montford Park Players will host their 3rd Annual Masquerade Ball on Saturday, November 14 at the newly renovated Masonic Temple in downtown Asheville. The viewing for the silent auction will begin at 6 p.m., and the Masquerade Ball itself will commence at 7 p.m. and continue rocking until 10 p.m. The Montford Park Players are just finishing up their 42nd season of bringing free Shakespeare in the Park to Asheville, and looking forward to their 43rd. They have recently announced their upcoming season and have some major things in the works beside, such as additions to the existing stage, upgraded and handicap-accessible seating and a new Welcome Center! Never has raising funds been

32 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3

more exciting and enjoyable. The Venetian-inspired Masquerade Ball, with all the fun and glamour surrounding a Grand Ball, will feature the music of local band Fritz Beer and the Crooked Beat, playing all your favorite dance songs from the ’60s through today. Unique and treasured items will be up for bidding during the night through a silent auction. There’s no need to worry if you don’t have a mask, as keepsake, Venetian-designed masks will be available for purchase with your tickets. Hors d’oeuvres and beer and wine will be provided throughout the evening.

Tickets Regular Admission ($45 per person) – Includes hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine, drinking

BY JANE

HALLSTROM

and general carousing throughout the evening. VIP Patron ($100) – Be treated like the king and queen of the ball with VIP table seating in the ballroom. You will receive table side service of hors d’oeuvres and beverages throughout the evening; a unique Venetian or lorgnette mask; a special VIP broach; acknowledgement during the Ball, and a listing in the Masquerade Ball Program. IF YOU The 3rd Annual Montford Park Players GO Masquerade Ball, Saturday, November

14. Doors open/Silent Auction Viewing at 6 p.m. Masquerade Ball from 7-10 p.m. at the Masonic Temple, 80 Broadway St., downtown Asheville. Tickets are available now at The Montford Park Players web site, www. montfordparkplayers.org.


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artful living Gratitude is a Healing Choice “Every day we touch what is wrong, and as a result, we are becoming less and less healthy. That is why we have to learn to touch what is not wrong – inside us and around us… Peace is available. We only have to touch it… Life is filled with suffering, but it is also filled with many wonders, like the blue sky, the sunshine, the eyes of a baby… We must also be in touch with the wonders of life. They are within us and all around us, everywhere, anytime… Wherever we are, any time, we have the capacity to enjoy the sunshine, the presence of each other, even the sensation of our breathing.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh

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Many people seem to define themselves by what they see as wrong with the world. Social conversations are quite often an exchange of complaints, judgments and negativity. Yet, reality is that side by side, every moment, a choice exists to be experiencing gratitude for ever-present gifts or complaint about perceived lacks, and quite simply, the quality of our lives is in the choice we make. Unfortunately, we don’t really see this as a “choice” -our conditioning to complaint and negativity is so automatic. Mostly, we make no conscious choice at all. Yes, sometimes at the forefront of our experience something wonderful may be occurring, and gratitude naturally flows forth. “Yes! Thank you!” And then there are the times when we have forced upon us great difficulty or pain. Usually, our lives move along humdrum in a kind of neutral zone, some people tending toward a more optimistic nature and some toward more persistent pessimism. Then

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with a mind like some autonomous happiness meter, events around us swing our needle between happy and unhappy. We are not conscious that we have a choice in these circumstances. Life events run our mental well-being. Buddhism teaches us it does not have to be this way. Buddhism teaches us that the human egoic mind compulsively divides the world into the three categories of the things we want, the things we don’t want, and the things we have no preference for one way or the other, neutral. Buddhism further teaches us to not assume things are as they initially appear and that there really is no “or” in this formula, for every moment is filled with the wonderful and the terrible and the neutral; it’s only a matter of what you focus upon and the conditioned value-system you bring to what

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BILL WALZ

is experienced. Buddhism teaches us to notice that happiness and unhappiness are choices that are usually made at an unconscious level, and calls to us to bring this choice-making up to the level of consciousness. It teaches us to be present to experience as much of the all of what is happening as we are able. So – what do we want? We want to be happy and we don’t want to suffer, and if life is filled with the wonderful, the terrible and the neutral, and we experience these evaluations to a great extent by how we are conditioned, what happens if we train our minds to seek the wonderful and to look deeply into the neutral and even the terrible for hidden wonders and opportunities to grow in joy, wisdom, compassion and skillfulness? What happens if we train ourselves to find reasons for gratitude with whatever life presents us? Won’t there be more happiness and less unhappiness, more gratitude and less resentment? Deeper still – and this is what Buddhism is opening us to – there will be discovered a peacefulness, a sense of equanimity, an ability to abide with what is – no matter what it is – with a faith and confidence in ourselves that we will be OK – and that this is not happenstance, but the fruit of our practice in mindful

Our lives are remarkably blessed. living. When we bring consciousness into our experience, into what is happening around us, to us and within us, and we learn to be masters of responding to the full potential of each moment rather than reacting to superficial elements that register our “happinessunhappiness meter,” our lives most certainly become deeper and richer. We discover that we have choices no matter what is happening, and we discover that the choice for gratitude is a powerful tool for affecting the quality of our lives. Gratitude for the bounties that life bestows is clearly an important element of living with depth and quality, and fortunately for most of us, in the balance, our lives have been bountiful. Certainly in the flow of human history, to be an American at the beginning of the 21st Century is an absolute bubble of security and plenty. There are no plagues or famines, no invaders sweeping across the borders pillaging and enslaving as they go. It’s pretty important to remember that these devastating circumstances have often been the general human condition throughout history and still are in some places on this planet. We are free of that, even if, right now, for some individuals, by American standards, life may be pretty difficult. On the whole, our lives are remarkably blessed. continued on page 36

We Are Fearfully and Wonderfully Made

How does a fetus breathe? Do its lungs work? How does it get oxygen? Are the kidneys functioning? Where does the urine go? In a normal human, by breathing, the lungs receive oxygen. The blood from the right side of the heart goes into the lungs where it picks up the oxygen. This oxygenated blood is sent back to the left side of the heart for distribution to the body. The kidneys filter out liquid wastes and send them to the bladder. By urination, this waste water is eliminated from the body. How does the fetus do these functions? The fetus in utero is a marvel of isolation. All bodily functions take place while confined inside the body of the mother by special adaptations of the various organ systems. Since there is no air in the womb, the fetus cannot “breathe” air. The fetus does make small “breathing” motions with some minimal motion of the liquid that fills the lungs. The presence of the lung liquid creates a high pressure in the lung arteries, effectively stopping most of the blood flow from the right side of the heart.

– A MIRACLE AT BIRTH – Instead, the oxygen comes to the fetus from the placenta through a blood vessel (umbilical vein) in the umbilical cord. This oxygenated blood flows partly to the fetal liver and shunts partly through a special vein (ductus venous) into the large vein (inferior vena cava), going directly to the fetal heart. In the fetal heart (since this blood already has oxygen) 95% of this blood bypasses the lungs through a hole in the heart (foramen ovale), going from the right side to the left side of the heart and out to the body. What little blood that tries to flow to the lungs (through the pulmonary artery) is shunted through a special short artery (ductus arteriosus) into the large artery (aorta) going to the body. The urine from the bladder flows through a special tube (urachus) from the top of the bladder to the umbilical cord into a special sac that is part of the placenta. At birth – the miracle happens, the conversion from life in the uterus to life outside. With the first breaths, the lungs expand, bringing in oxygen. The decreased pressure in the expanded lungs allows the blood to flow

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

from the right side of the heart into the lungs. The increased oxygen coming to the heart constricts the special small artery (ductus arteriosus), stopping the shunt of blood away from the lungs. And the increased blood flow from the lungs to the heart closes the flap (septum primum) over the hole in the heart (foramen ovale), stopping the shunt of blood away from the lungs. Within the first few seconds of life, the fetal circulation is converted to newborn circulation. The blood vessels of the umbilical cord also constrict, shutting off blood flow to and from the placenta. And the urachus constricts, shutting off the flow of urine to the placenta. All of these special vessels remain as small fibrous cords, reminders of the miracle of life which occurs at birth.

Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 33


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what to do guide through November

Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery

Ceramic art of Libba Tracy and Reiko Miyagi and other gallery members. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue. Call (828) 285-9700, or visit Odysseyceramicarts.com

through November 30

Anything Goes, Everything Shows

What do shoes, phones, records, bottles, dolls, sculptures, tapes, skeletons, beach balls, cricket cages, and horns all have in common? They have been all mailed to the Courtyard Gallery for the 10th annual Mail Art Exhibition. On display at the Flood Fine Arts Center, 109 Roberts St. in Asheville’s River Arts District.

Tuesday, November 3

Bach’s Lunch Organ Recital

Monthly series of half-hour concerts featuring organist Tate Addis. 12:05 p.m., First Baptist Church, downtown Asheville. Box lunch available for purchase. Free admission.

will weave together storytelling, poetry, and analysis of disability oppression. Free and open to the public at 7 p.m. in Highsmith Union. Details at oaa.unca. edu/disability-diversity-week.

Tuesday, November 3

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood

The band’s most recent album, Betty’s Blends, Volume Two: Best From The West, is a limited edition release presenting live performances recorded and mixed straight from the soundboard by legendary Grateful Dead archivist Betty Cantor-Jackson. Doors 8 p.m.; Show: 9 p.m. All ages. $20. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837, www.theorangepeel.net.

November 3-17

Looking at Appalachia

Traveling exhibition of photos provides a counterpoint to stereotypes of the region, and includes work by UNC Asheville student George Etheredge. Free. S. Tucker Cooke Gallery in UNC Asheville’s Owen Hall. Gallery hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays. (828) 258-7723 or ctomberl@unca.edu

November 5-8

Tuesday, November 3

Climbing the Mountain: Super Crips and Poster Children Eli Clare, author of Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation,

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

City of Color

The Asheville Aerial Arts mix color, diverse music and costuming. Performances Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2:30 pm. Tickets: $10-$22. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Friday, November 6

UnFramed

Asheville Printmakers’ Group Show. Artists’ Reception from 6:30-7:30 p.m. On display through December at BlackBird Frame & Art, 365 Merrimon Ave. in Asheville. (828) 225-3117 or visit blackbirdframe.com.

Friday, November 6

The New Mastersounds

The modern soul and funk band is touring in support of their new album, Made For Pleasure. Tickets: $15. Doors: 5 p.m.; Show: 9 p.m. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com.

Saturday, November 7

American Folk Songs: Sacred and Secular

The Asheville Symphony Chorus will perform at Arden Presbyterian Church. Michael Lancaster, director. Details at www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Saturday, November 7

2nd Annual Storytelling Dinner Theatre

Fundraiser for St. Johns Episcopal, featuring Gwenda Ledbetter, Asheville’s nationally renowned “Story Lady.” Chili, assorted soups, salads, breads, desserts and beverages followed by a Storytelling concert. Dinner & Storytelling $20. Dinner reservations recommended. Dinner 6 p.m. Storytelling 7:15 p.m. Held at St. Johns Episcopal Church, 290 Old Haw Creek Road, Asheville. Information and reservations at (828) 274-1123 or (828) 777-9177.

Saturday, November 7

11th Annual WNC Pottery Festival

More than 40 master potters; many demonstrations. Daylong raffle, silent auction. $5 per person. Children under 12 admitted free. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain Featured potter, or shine in DillsSarah Wells Roland boro, NC. See who can make the largest cylinder, widest bowl, etc. at the WNC Clay Olympics competition, Friday, November 6, 1-3 p.m. Call (828) 631-5100, or visit www.wncpotteryfestival.com.

November 7 December 31

Crimson Laurel Gallery

Two featured Bede Clarke exhibitions in Bakersville, NC. New Work by Lana Wilson. Fire and Flash: Recent work from Bede Clarke. Work from the exhibition can be seen and purchased online. Call (828) 688-3599 or visit www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com

Thursday, November 12

Heart Works, Survivors Arts Show

Visual and performance art created by survivors of sexual assault. Public viewing at 5:30 p.m. Performance art at 7 p.m. YMI Cultural Center, 39 S. Market St., Asheville. Deadline for submissions is October 30, 2015. More details at ourvoice.nc.org.

Thursday, November 12

Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band

Their latest album, Funk Life, features sassy vocals with contagious rhythms and bold horn hits. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837, www.theorangepeel.net.

Thursday, November 12

DJ Rekha Dance Party

The “Ambassador of Bhangra” Rekha is among the first DJs to merge classic

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Classic Wineseller Live music every Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Reservations are recommended. Friday, November 6 - Sheila Gordon, piano, vocals. Pop, jazz, originals. Saturday, November 7, 21 & 28 Joe Cruz, piano, vocals. Music of the Beatles, James Taylor. Friday, November 13 - James Hammel, guitar, vocals. Pop, jazz, originals. Saturday, November 14 - Peggy Ratouz, vocals, Michael Jefry Stevens, piano. Jazz, blues. Friday, November 20 - Bob Zullo, guitar, vocals. Pop, jazz, soft rock. Friday, November 27 - The Blue Ribbon Healers, mandolin, guitar, vocals. Swankytonk: old-timey, jazz vocals, Gypsy. The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street in Waynesville (828) 452-6000 www.classicwineseller.com Bhangra and Bollywood sounds into the contemporary electronic dance music. Dance to the mix starting at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Justice Center. Tickets $6 with info at cesap.unca.edu.

Saturday, November 14

Asheville Faerie Arts Festival

Eblen Charities benefit sponsored by Wicked Weed Brewing. Daytime family friendly: costumes, magic, stilt walkers, balloon sculptures! Evening adult themed: Juan Benavides Group, Body Art Fashion Show. 2-11 p.m., $15; $12 adv. $5 kids at the door. Asheville Renaissance Hotel, www.bioflyer. wordpress.com.

Saturday, November 14

Second Saturday Event

Food, music, and artists’ demonstrations. 24 local clay artists; functional and non-functional pottery and works of figurative and abstract sculpture. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue in the River Arts District. www.odysseyceramicarts.com

Saturday & Sunday, November 14 & 15

River Arts District Fall Studio Stroll The Artists of Asheville’s River Arts District open their doors from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., welcoming the public to see and collect amazing art in their studios and galleries. More details at www. riverartsdistrict.com.

Tuesday & Wednesday, November 17 & 18

MOMIX Botanica

Dance, light, and motion make MOMIX’s Botanica an astonishing performance of athleticism and multimedia art. 8 p.m. The Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com

Friday, November 20

The Interbeing Project

The Interface of Woman & Nature by Bonnie Cooper. We women are inseparable from nature. When we are truly engaged, the experience can feel like merging with all that is present. 5:30-7:30 p.m. aSHEville Museum, 35 Wall St., Asheville. Find more details at www.aSHEvillemuseum.com

November 20-22

‘Tis the Season Holiday Fair

At the WNC Ag Center, across from the Asheville Regional Airport. Admission is $4 for adults. Group rate of $3 per person for 10 or more. Children under the age of 12 are admitted free.

Saturday, November 21

The 18th Voorhees Family Art Show and Sale

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, November 22 from 12 noon to 5 p.m. 89 Woodward Avenue in the Norwood Park area of North Asheville For more information and a map, visit www. voorheesfamilyart.com

Sunday, November 22

Billy Jonas Band CD Release

Habayta (Homeward), New Jewish Songs of Joy and Spirit. Tickets are $36 which includes food and a reception. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets call (828) 2707747 or visit www.myAltamont.com.

Monday, November 23

GeneratioNext!

Pianist Maria Parrini plays the music of Debussy, RachMaria Parrini maninoff and Scriabin. 7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Asheville, 5 Oak Street, downtown. Suggested donation $10-$20. A benefit for the Academy for The Arts Scholarship Fund.

November 27-28

Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show

10 a.m to 5 p.m. Admission is $4.50 for adults. Children under 12 free. Concessions will be available. Free, convenient parking. Held at WCU’s Ramsey Center in Cullowhee. For more details call Doris Hunter, (828) 524-3405, or visit www.MountainArtisans.net.

NOVEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 November 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 3


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what to do guide Ray Byram Exhibits & Booksigning

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

www.raybyram.com

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Friday & Saturday, November 27 & 28

Hammered Dulcimer Christmas Concert

Hammered Dulcimer champion and virtuoso Joshua Messick performs a fresh and exciting Christmas Concert at the White Horse Black Mountain at 8 p.m. Tickets are $18 advance, $20 at the door. Advance purchase recommended. Tickets at www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

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Feral Fire Drum Circle

American Mosaic 3 Pan Harmonia presents the music of Dana Wilson, William Grant Still, Daniel Godfrey, and Leonard Bernstein. Kate Steinbeck, flute; Fred Lemmons, clarinet; Andrea Pettigrew, violin; Franklin Keel, cello; Ivan Seng, piano. Friday, November 13 at 7:30 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain, 105 Montreat Rd. Sunday, November 15 at 3 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, Asheville.

through December 4

The Upstairs Artspace

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

$15 in advance at www.panharmonia.org; $20 at the door; $5 for Students. Cash, check, or credit card at the door.

John Mac Kah Studio

December 4-6

Toe River Holiday Studio Tour

Classes, Workshops, and Private Fine Art Instruction. Register anytime. Drawing or Painting – Monday & Thursday, 9-4 p.m.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Children’s Art with Alisa – Tuesday & Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday Morning Demos – 10 a.m. to noon Studio Painting – Thursdays, 6-9 p.m.

Asheville Area Arts Council Seeking Operations Manager

Landscape on Location – Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 122 Riverside Dr., Studio H, Asheville (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

Classic Wineseller

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

310 Art Classes

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes

Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and children’s classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort, NC.

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Join in the joyful noisemaking to go within and connect to your primal power. RSVP Required. $10 Contribution. Tiggs Pond Retreat Center, 10 min. south of Hendersonville. Tina@TinaFireWolf.com

One man show on display through November 28 at the Design Gallery in Burnsville, 7 S. Main St. (828) 678-9869.

The AAAC office is a public, energetic, and dynamic environment. The Operations Manager’s role is to provide support services for the operation of the organization including programs, and for the effective function of the AAAC’s Grove Arcade facility. Applications will be reviewed by the HR committee beginning November 6, 2015. Asheville Area Arts Council, One Page Ave., Suite 144 & 143A, Asheville. For more information, go to www.ashevillearts.com.

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Saturday, November 7

Opening Reception Sunday, November 15 from 1 to 5 p.m. at G.G.’s Art Gallery, Main St., Statesville, NC.

Biannual, free open studio tour in Mitchell and Yancey Counties. More than 110 artists, craftspeople, and galleries open their studios to visitors. Friday from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday & Sunday from 10 to 5 p.m. Reception on Friday, December 4 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Spruce Pine TRAC Gallery, 269 Oak Avenue. Call (828) 682-7215 or visit www.toeriverarts.org.

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Book signing Saturday, November 7 at Mountain Made Gallery in the Grove Arcade in downtown Asheville.

“Why Paper?” features three-dimensional art by Sandy Singletary and Heea Crownfield. “Paper Thicket” features works by Elizabeth Shanks. The Upstairs Artspace, 49 South Trade Street, in downtown Tryon. Call (828) 859-2828, or visit www.upstairsartspace.org.

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Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain?

Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-408-9017. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 35


Find It Here

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Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Asheville Faerie Arts Festival www.bioflyer.wordpress.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Joshua Messick www.JoshuaMessick.com

Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

Judy Rentner Judyart@bellsouth.net

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com

Billy Jonas Band www.BillyJonas.com

Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Lexington Glassworks www.LexingtonGlassworks.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burr Studio facebook.com/burrstudionc CA’s Cheesecakes www.cacheesecakes.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Faces of War, Anthony Guidone www.soldierslament.com French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Green Room Cafe www.thegreenroomcafe.biz Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show www.MountainArtisans.net HART Theater www.harttheatre.com Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Ichiban, (828) 252-7885

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com The Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Maple Tree Vet Clinic www.mapletreevet.com McLain Pottery coldcove@gmail.com Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com Modesto Trattoria (828) 225-4133 Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

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‘Gratitude’ cont’d from pg. 33

We still are vulnerable to death, disease, family disintegration, job loss, financial crises, and for far too many, either transitory or implacable poverty, so, on the individual level, even though the society on the whole may be pretty comfortable, life can get very difficult. It is in these circumstances that the choice to see reasons for gratitude as your response to life can be, while not easy, very important. There is a story of a man who lived on the Chinese northern frontier in the days of the Mongol Empire. One day his only horse ran away over the border. Everyone tried to console him, but while the man thanked the consoling people for their concern, he also said, “We must wait and see.” Then, one day the horse returned, bringing with it a Mongol pony, and everyone congratulated the man. The man again said, “Thank you but we must wait and see.” Soon thereafter, while trying to ride the Mongol pony, the man’s only son fell and broke his hip. Consolations came and the man again responded with hesitancy to commit to the meaning of the event. The story goes on that the Mongols invaded, all able young men were called to fight, and nine out of ten were slaughtered in the fight, but because of the hip injury the man’s son had not been conscripted and so was spared. Through it all the man maintained equanimity, and equanimity is peace, and peace of mind is the essence of that which is even deeper than happiness or unhappiness. Another story has a man, this time in the south of China, walking through a forest when he is chased by a tiger. He flees, and finding himself trapped at the edge of a precipice over a killing drop, he notices a vine growing from the face of the cliff within his reach and outside the reach of the tiger. He clambers over the edge and holds on to the vine knowing that to fall is certain death. As Chinese symbolism would have it, two mice, one white, one black, pop out of a burrow and begin gnawing

Take time to notice the beautiful commonplace. at the vine. The tiger is above him, falling to his death is below him. The man notices a berry growing within reach and eats it. His mind is filled with appreciation at how sweet the berry tastes. Rather than the reactive choice of terror, he consciously sought a small element of the moment that could bring delight. In this moment of certain death, he made a choice for gratitude. Both these stories point to what in the Biblical tradition could be called “the peace that surpasseth understanding.” Do take time to notice the beautiful commonplace and make the choice to give thanks that there are no tigers or invading Mongols in your life, or if there are, hold to waiting and seeing while noticing that there are also berries just within reach, even if the berry is only learning that you have reserves of strength and peace deeper than you imagined. Remember:” Life is filled with suffering, but it is also filled with many wonders … Wherever we are, any time, we have the capacity to enjoy the sunshine, the presence of each other, even the sensation of our breathing.” That remembering is a choice for gratitude that heals our pain and lightens our heart. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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November 28: SHOP SMALL SATURDAY - Shops open till 7pm. LIGHT UP BLACK MOUNTAIN - Christmas Tree Lighting at 6pm.

Art

Art, a play by Yasmina Reza directed by Lyn Nihart and produced by the Actor’s Center of Asheville in partnership with the Front Porch Theatre at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts.

“We are so pleased to be able to bring this wonderful play that is powerL-R: Kevin Patrick Murphy, Robert fully acted and Dale Walker, Dan Clancy. impeccably directed to Black Mountain for this one weekend,” said Gale Jackson, Executive Director of the Black Mountain Center for the Arts. The play, which won the Tony Award for best play in 1998 and the Olivier Award for Best Comedy in 1996, stars Kevin Patrick Murphy, Dan Clancy and Robert Dale Walker. After one of three friends purchases an extremely expensive all-white painting, the characters must examine what constitutes art... and friendship. Asheville Citizen-Times writer Jim Cavender applauded, “Whatever the source of the excellence, the three men all shine in their roles.” According to Newsweek, the play is “a nonstop cross-fire of crackling language, serious issues of life and art expressed in outbursts that sound like Don Rickles with a degree from the Sorbonne. Reza is a fiendishly clever writer. ‘ART’ sounds like a marriage of Molière and Woody Allen.”

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107 Vol. 19, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2015 37


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drummer Jeff Berlin and co-producer and engineer Justin Guip had a very large part of these decisions.

JC: I want to talk about some of the individual songs. Had I first heard “Horus” on the radio I would have assumed it was a lost Allman Brothers song with some unknown vocalist. I mean, there’s some serious jamming going on!

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‘Bow Thayer’ cont’d from page 29

BT: The song “Horus” was worked on the most, all the jamming was arrived at through some scrutiny during the rehearsal stage. We wanted to make all those time changes seamless, and I think that song harkens back to my hard rock days in the nineties. JC: Interesting in that “Drug Lust”, which is my favorite song on the album, and “Lympus” which I must confess to being the one song that doesn’t work for me, deal with similar issues. Both examine how hard it is to keep the darkness at bay; thematically they seem closely linked but stylistically they are worlds apart. How much does the subject matter influence the music you write for it? BT: The subject matter influences the music quite a bit. “Drug Lust” was written as sort of a pop number because opiate addiction has

become such a mainstream problem. Junkies are not just the dudes sleeping in the park but housewives and professionals and working class people, many of them introduced to drugs by their doctors. Then there is the whole idea of treating drug addiction with other drugs and Big Pharm. and all that…. The problem is so complicated and there are many levels of hypocrisy, you could dedicate a whole album to the matter. So I guess packaging this epidemic in a tight pop song is all I could do to shed light on the subject. There are other songs on the record that swing deeper into some of the sources of this epidemic, just in more subtle ways. “Lympus” is very much dealing with drug addiction. It is a true story of a meth-lab, prostitution ring that went very wrong in a backwoods trailer park near where I live. I wrote this as a classic murder ballad in the vein of “Lil Sadie” or “Pretty Polly” or even ‘Poor Ellen Smith.” This song is as brutal as any of those and I think the “big band sound” puts a modern twist on it. I personified some of the characters to give it a mythic vibe as well as not put a personal face on those involved. It is a small world up here in Vermont.

JC: Seeing it in a broader sense, do you typically begin with lyrics, or music? Or is there no one way? BT: There is no one way. I try and stay open to anyway the songs comes to me. JC: Walk us through some of the recording process. Was Sundowser recorded in a continuous period, or was it spliced together from sessions stretched over an extended time? Did you go in with a dozen songs and keep going until they were completed? BT: Sundowser was written and recorded in

the studio I built on my property.... The building itself was literally carved from the hemlock trees that grew where the studio now sits. I even timber-framed it the traditional way, with mortis and Tenon. All the windows and doors and even the walls ( S.I.P.S) were salvaged. I

Tribute to Syd Barrett The Mad Cap Collective is a collaboration of Asheville musicians from bands such as Alarm Clock Conspiracy, Wham Bam Bowie Band, Marsupial, Pawtooth, and others. The evening will share the music of Barrett, as well as feature the work of artists from Aurora Studio, a supportive art studio for artists in recovery from mental health needs, addiction and/or homelessness.

IF YOU GO: Friday, November 20 at 8

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p.m. $7 adv., $10 day of. All ages. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com.

had absolutely zero money to get this going so it took a long time, something like 13 years. So you can say that is how long it took to make the record. Anyway I was able to get a loan to put solar panels on it so I am completely solar powered and that is one reason for the album’s name. As for the songs they were all brought to the table during a transitional time band wise. I was seeking out local dudes to play with, so there were some folks who came and went as these songs were worked on. The recording was done here in three or four days and we did a little overdubbing at Justin’s place in New York and mixed it there as well. We kept the whole thing as live as we could. I play better during basics than I do in an overdubbing situation, so there are some flubs here and there.

JC: Which I think help enliven the record! BT: Absolutely, but that was the vibe and feel

that we were going for.

JC: Let’s switch gears a bit. Talk about the upcoming show with Dave Desmelik and Pierce Edens. I know you’ve shared a stage with Dave (that’s when we met) but how did this particular show come about? BT: I have immense respect for Desmo and I love his songs. Any chance I get to play a show with him I will take it, and if I am anywhere near Asheville my first phone call is to the Desmelik house. I met him through mutual friends and Benders bass man Nolan Mckelvey, and we were kindred spirits from the get go. Coincidentally, I saw Pierce when he played a tiny little joint near my house.... I bought his record and really dug it.... I had no idea he and Dave were friends. So I am really looking forward to playing this show with these guys. JC: What about the show’s format? I assume you won’t be bringing a full band, so will you and the others back one another up? BT: Well, I was going to bring the full band, that was the idea, but unfortunately my drummer Jeff suffered a series of strokes over the summer and is still in recovery. Replacing him or finding a sub is not even an option at this point. I am traveling with Alex Abraham on upright bass and my organist J.D. Tolstoi, so we have stripped things back a bit. I am hoping we can ALL do some playing together at the Grey Eagle show. JC: I appreciate your time in answering these questions. Is there anything we haven’t covered that you’d like to add? BT: Maybe just mention that Marco Benevento and Tracy Bonham make appearances on this record. IF YOU Dave Desmelik, Pierce Edens + Bow GO Thayer, Thursday, November 5 at 8

p.m., 7 p.m. doors. $7 adv.; $10 day of show. All ages. Standing room only. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 232-5800.


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the K-Pg (K-T) boundary layer of the Earth’s surface that is rich in the rare platinum group metal iridium. “My presentation will include The presentation will explore the artist’s depictions of the event and catastrophic meteorite impact 65 milthe resulting changes in the Earth. lion years ago that is thought to have I will also show samples of K-Pg caused the mass extinction of dinoboundary material that was collected saurs. The evening will include a tour in Colorado and New Mexico. Select of the PARI campus and, weather samples will be available for purchase permitting, an observing session using during the evening.” PARI telescopes. The Evening at PARI program will begin at 7 p.m. with a campus tour, including a trip to the Space Artifacts Gallery and the newly expanded Meteorite & Mineral Gallery. The presentation and observing session will follow. The program will take place regardless of the weather so attendees are encouraged to dress appropriately for being outside and to wear comfortable walking shoes. This artist’s depiction shows what Earth would The Pisgah Ashave looked like 65 million years ago, moments tronomical Research before a massive meteorite crashed into our planet with catastrophic results. Institute is located in the Pisgah National Forest, 30 miles southwest of Asheville. The program is part of PARI’s The 200-acre campus is the former monthly Evening at PARI series and site of an historic NASA satellite will feature a presentation by John tracking station. Sinclair, PARI Curator of Meteorites. Today, PARI is a science education “About 65 million years ago,” said and research center. The site houses Sinclair, “a meteorite estimated to radio and optical telescopes, earth scibe six miles in diameter crashed into ence instruments and the Astronomithe Yucatan Peninsula, creating the cal Photographic Data Archive. Chicxulub crater that measures 110 Exhibit galleries display NASA miles in diameter and 12 miles deep. Space Shuttle artifacts and collections “The impact created climate of rare meteorites and minerals. change, huge fires, massive tidal waves and the mass extinction of For more information about PARI and many species of life on Earth, includits programs, visit www.pari.edu. ing dinosaurs. The event also created

IF YOU T-Rex and the Doomsday Impact, GO Friday, November 13. Reservations are

required and will be accepted until 3 p.m. the day of the event. Evening at PARI programs cost $20 per adult and $15 for seniors/ military. Children 10 and under are admitted free. Register and pay online at pari.edu or call (828) 862-5554.

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founders, Kevin and Stacy Brown, the pair established Sing Bev Hospitality, LLC in 2013. The new Chicken Salad Chick in Asheville marks the ninth restaurant for Sing Bev Hospitality. Chicken Salad Chick puts an edgy twist on a Southern classic, offering guests a “custom fit” chicken salad experience, with 15 original flavors to choose from, as well as gourmet soups, flavorful side salads, and freshly-baked desserts.

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November 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
November 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by Virginia Pendergrass..p18. Inside: Hard Candy Christmas..p4; Voorhees Family Art..p4; ‘Tis the Season Holiday Fair...

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