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All is Lost

The Book Club Play

Captain Phillips

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Escape Plan

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Jonas Gerard Jeff Pittman Karen Keil Brown Julie Bell

Gravity • Machete Kills

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Beethoven’s

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BILTMORE VILLAGE

26 lodge st., asheville, nc 828-277-6222 open mon.-sat.: 10am-7pm, sun.: 12-5pm

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For more fine crafts visit: Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | 828-298-7928 PG. 36

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Guild Crafts 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

www.craftguild.org


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we love this place Benefit for the BeLoved Community

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Three

NOVEMBER 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Proofreading: Diane Levy Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, Michael J. Morel, T. Oder, R. Woods, Bill Ramsey, Dennis Ray, Caleb Seeling, Chris Stack, Billie Sue Thompson, Greg Vineyard, Kelly Walker, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, November 2013, Vol. 17 No. 3

9 Unique Asheville

An extraordinary literary and musical event takes place Sunday, November 17 at 7 p.m. Award-winning authors Ron Rash, Patricia Smith, Keith Flynn, and R. B. Morris read from their work, accompanied by Free Planet Radio, Bill Altman, Susi Gott Seguret, Jonathan Scales, Ten Cent Poetry, and other guest muFree Planet Radio sicians.

10 Columns

All proceeds benefit The BeLoved Community, a volunteer organization that feeds, clothes, and advocates for the homeless and disenfranchised citizens among us. Help end homelessness and make a stand for social justice.

6 Performance

Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . Asheville Choral Society & Asheville Symphony Chorus . . . . . . NC Stage – The Book Club Play . . NC Stage – Jacob Marley . . . . . . . . . HART – The Heiress . . . . . . . . . . .

NC Stage presents The Book Club Play written by Karen Zacarías. PAGE 7

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Asheville Faerie Arts Festival . . . . . . 9 Salt Lamps and Their Benefits . . . . 12

Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . .

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13 Music

At the Diana Wortham Theatre. $20 for Students, $30 General Admission, $50 Vip Seating. For more details, call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com. Sponsored and produced by Keith Flynn and LIVE at White Rock Hall.

14 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 14

The Asheville Gallery of Art (AGA) opened its doors on Painting by Cathy Searle, November 1, 1988. founding member. AGA, Asheville’s longest-established downtown art gallery, celebrates its 25th anniversary this month. Located at 16 College Street, across from Pritchard Park, the gallery’s extensive collection ranges from quintessentially traditional to cutting-edge abstract. AGA has been unique, important, and successful because of its commitment to Asheville area professional artists. View works by current AGA professionals at www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

The Bernsteins are Back! The ever-popular, always inappropriate Bernstein clan presents their 31st Annual Christmas Spectacular. We love it when the Bernsteins come to town, and they are promising an especially spectacular Spectacular this year on the big stage.

December 12-14 at Asheville Community

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Cody Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Claire Lynch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Susan Werner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Downtown Asheville . . . . . PGS 10-12 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 18 River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 19-23 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . PGS 30-31 Weaverville + Northside . . . . PG 38 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 39

Theatre, 372 Depot St., in Asheville. That’s right, a new venue for your favorite Jewish Family’s Christmas show!

Thursday, December 12 at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, December 13 at 7:30 and 10 p.m.; Saturday, December 14 at 7:30 and 10 p.m. $15 for Thursday and late shows; $18 for Friday & Saturday shows at 7:30 p.m. Not suitable for children or those easily offended. For more details visit www.themagnetictheatre.com

18 Fine Art

Blue to Black Art Stroll & Tour. . . River Arts District Studio Stroll. . . Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G. Carol Bomer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karen Keil Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Pittman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Julie Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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The he Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . The Green Room Café . . . . . . . . . . Angry Giant Forge . . . . . . . . . . . . . Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

On the Cover:

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Asheville Gallery of Art Celebrates 25 Years

34 What to Do Guide

29 30 31 38

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 5


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captivating performances Beethoven’s Seventh Highlight’s Asheville Symphony’s November Concert

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One of Beethoven’s most popular symphonies will headline the program when the Asheville Symphony Orchestra takes the stage November 17 for the third concert in its Masterworks series.

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM

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MICHAEL J. MOREL

infectious, unyielding use of rhythm as a driving force Lissie Okopny, the Asheville Symphony’s principal flutist, will highlight the Bach work, which is considered one of the most recognizable works for flute. Okopny, who is a faculty Music Director Daniel member at Lenoir-Rhyne Meyer will conduct the Asheville University in Hickory, N.C., Symphony Orchestra as it peris a member of the Western forms Beethoven’s Symphony Piedmont Symphony in No. 7 for the second half of the Hickory. She maintains an acconcert. The first half includes Lissie Okopny, the tive performance schedule as Bach’s Suite in B Minor, which Asheville Symphony’s soloist and chamber musician will feature one of the orchesprincipal flutist. as well as a teaching studio in tra’s own members, Bartok’s Winston-Salem, N.C. Divertimento. Okopny received her master’s degree in The concert starts at 8 p.m. at Thomas music from The Juilliard School in 2008 and Wolfe Auditorium in the U.S. Cellular Center. her bachelor’s of music in 2006 from the InMeyer will give a preconcert lecture at 7 p.m. diana University Jacobs School of Music. She The lecture is free to ticketholders. made her professional solo debut with the BirBeethoven’s Seventh Symphony is one mingham-Bloomfield Symphony (Michigan) of the most performed and popular works in in 2004, performing the Ibert Flute Concerto. the classical canon. It is also one of the most Her other awards and honors include influential – Richard Wagner called the work first prize in the 2003 Detroit Bohemian the “apotheosis of the dance” because of its

Concerto Competition and third prize in the 2011 Myrna Brown Artist Competition. She was awarded scholarships from The Juilliard School, Indiana University, the National Repertory Orchestra in 2007, and the Sarasota Music Festival in 2005. Her teachers include world-renowned flutists Carol Wincenc, Thomas Robertello, Ervin Monroe, and Jeffery Zook. Bartok’s Divertimento, which highlights the string section, is an homage to the Hungarian musical heritage.

IF YOU Beethoven’s Symphony No. GO 7, performed by the Asheville

Symphony Orchestra, November 17 at 8 p.m. in the U.S. Cellular Center’s Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Tickets are available at the U.S. Cellular Center box office, and range in price from $20 to $58. Subscriptions are also available at prorated prices, or on a “pick three” basis for $55 to $169. Significant discounts for students are available. For details, call (828) 254-7046, or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.

A Once-in-a-Lifetime Choral Experience

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Have you ever experienced a major choral work performed by more than 200 voices? You will have that opportunity right here in Asheville—something you might not find in major cultural centers in the USA. In a spectacular, first-ever collaboration, the Asheville Choral Society and the Asheville Symphony Chorus will join forces to present Brahms’ German Requiem in two performances, November 8 and 9. The 200+ chorale

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will sing under the direction of Dr. Melodie Galloway on Friday evening, 7:30 p.m., and under Dr. Michael Lancaster on Saturday afternoon at 3:30 p.m., both at Arden Presbyterian Church, 2215 Hendersonville Rd., Arden. The two choruses have graced Asheville’s music scene for decades. The Asheville Choral Society, one of the first chorales in the community (1977), is known for its excellence in

The Asheville Choral Society

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BILLIE SUE THOMPSON

performing an eclectic repertoire of music from classical to pop. They give three performances a year to appreciative audiences. The Asheville Symphony Chorus, formed in 1991 for the purpose of complementing the Asheville Symphony Orchestra, performs large classical works with ASO twice a year. In addition, ASC gives one independent concert each year, focusing on classics both traditional and contemporary. Both choruses have new and exciting directors who teach in the local academic community: Dr. Galloway, Director of Choral and Vocal Studies at UNCA; and Dr. Lancaster, Director of Choral Activities at WCU. The two conductors agreed that joining 200+ voices for the Brahms Requiem would be a monumental experience for singers and audience alike. Truly the Brahms Requiem requires a substantial body of voices. The sonorous opening that explodes into soaring passages of joy escorts music lovers into both the emotional and intellectual life of the composer. Brahms wrote this work in the midst of ‘Choral Experience’ continued on page 8


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performance The Book Club Play at NC Stage

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North Carolina Stage Company (NC Stage) is excited to present The Book Club Play, a The hilarious new comedy written by Karen Zacarías and directed by NC Stage Artistic Director, Charlie Flynn-McIver.

Present a Major Choral Work Performed by More Than 200 Voices The Book Club Play is a smart comedy about books and the people who love them.

Join Ana, the fearless leader of the local book club, as she and her cohorts become the focus of a documentary filmmaker. Under the all-seeing eye of the camera in her living room, their ‘off the record’ discussions about life, love, and literature take on a new meaning. Combine the unexpected arrival of an avantgarde new member and some questionable new titles and voila!

“Book Club is Lord of the Flies with Wine and Dip!” “Book club is Lord of the Flies with wine and dip.” These lively, self-described book junkies are sure to charm audiences with their dysfunctional group dynamics and soulful glimpses into the reality of everyday life. Moving effortlessly through mediums Zacarías asks the audience to answer the question, “Isn’t being cultured, truly cultured, being curious?” Flynn-McIver is directing a brilliantly funny cast including NC Stage regular Bill Muñoz joined by Jennifer Gatti, Kyler Griffin, Stephanie O’Rear, Catori Swann, and Mark Woodard. Bring YOUR Book Club! Discounts are offered for groups of six or more.

Friends of the Library Night – Friday, November 1. A portion of ticket sales will be donated to Friends of the Library to support the Buncombe County Libraries! Malaprop’s Night – Friday, November 8. With your ticket, enjoy a complimentary glass of wine before the show at Malaprop’s and a post-show discussion with the cast and Malaprop’s staff! North Carolina Stage Company is Asheville’s only professional theatre celebrating its 12th year producing plays for the Asheville community. Founded by Charlie and Angie Flynn-McIver, the theatre has been voted best local theatre eight out of the past nine years in the Mountain Xpress Best of WNC Poll. NC Stage was recently awarded the American Theatre Wing National Theatre Company Grant. IF YOU The Book Club Play, October 23 GO through November 17. Performances

Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m.. Tickets: $16-$28; Student tickets are $10 anytime! Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting www.ncstage.org. NC Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

The Asheville Chamber Music Series

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Asheville Symphony subscribers will recall Joyce Yang’s stunning performance of Rachmaninoff-Paganini Variations last season. Yang joins the Parisian Quartet, Modigliani on their North American Tour. The Modigliani formed in 2003 and quickly won international competitions as well as the prestigious Young Concert Artists Auditions in New York in 2006. “Hayden Pianist, Joyce Yang and Ravel live

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MARILYNNE HERBERT

again with the Modigliani Quartet’s unforgettable flame,” (LeMonde de la Musique). As one of the nation’s oldest continuous performing chamber music organizations, the Asheville Chamber Music Series is reknowned for its outstanding programs. IF YOU The Modigliani String Quartet GO and pianist, Joyce Yang, Friday,

November 15 at 8 p.m. at the Biltmore United Methodist Church, corner of Hendersonville Road and Yorkshire Street in Asheville. Tickets are $35 and are available at the door. To purchase tickets or for more information visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org or call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427.

Arden Presbyterian Church

2215 Hendersonville Road, Asheville

Friday, November 8

Directed by Melodie Galloway ~ 7:30 PM

Saturday, November 9

Directed by Michael Lancaster ~ 3:30 PM

$25 Adults :: $15 Students Tickets & Information 828-232-2060

www.ashevillechoralsociety.org

828-254-7046

www.ashevillesymphonychorus.com This project receives support from the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

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performance

The Asheville Symphony Chorus ‘Choral Experience’ continued from page 6

personal chaos. Kurt Palen writes in World of the Oratorio (Amadeus Press, 1990): “The horrible death of Schumann, the rejection of his application for a position in his native city of Hamburg, and the death of his mother all contributed with mounting intensity to the emotional prerequisites for such a work.” But according to Palen, “His work was not a Mass for the Dead in the Catholic sense. He felt as Bach did that death had no sting, and was more like an older brother, a great peacemaker who opened his arms with love to receive the tired and heavy laden to lead them home to eternal rest.” The German Requiem is not a typical liturgical work, but rather a freely formed work of seven movements, each expressing a truth

about life and death. But it is interesting to note that closing each movement, the common theme is that of joy.

IF YOU The Asheville Choral Society and GO the Asheville Symphony Chorus

present Brahms’ German Requiem, Friday, November 8 at 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, November 9 at 3:30 p.m. at Arden Presbyterian Church, 2215 Hendersonville Rd., Arden. Tickets available from the Symphony Office (828) 254-7046), at the door, or from choristers. $25 per person, $15 per student or groups over 10. For more information visit www.ashevillesymphonychorus.com, and www.ashevillechoralsociety.com

I Have to Redeem Old Scrooge?

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NC Stage celebrates the holidays with an encore performance of Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol Ensemble Theatre Company, in conjunction with North Carolina Stage Company, is proud to present Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol! Playing exclusively at NC Stage, from December 11 through the 29. Under the direction of Andrew Hampton Livingston and starring Michael MacCauley, This one man, tour-de-force performance is not to be missed. “Scrooge? I have to redeem old Scrooge? The one man I knew who was worse than I was? Impossible!” So begins the journey of Jacob Marley’s heroic behind-the-scenes efforts to save old Scrooge’s soul—and in the process, save his own. Aided by Bogle, a mischievous little sprite with an agenda of his own, their hilarious journey takes them from the depths of the underworld to the stars above! This irreverent, funny, and ultimately, deeply moving story retells Dickens’ classic with warmth and infectious zest. This thrilling performance is sure to become a holiday classic for generations to come, and has been performed to rave reviews and standing ovations in theatres across the

8 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

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KELLY WALKER

country! Here’s what the critics had to say about this remarkable show: “The verbal and physical virtuosity of MacCauley’s embodiment of Mula’s play is masterful, interpreting the voices of 16 varied characters with almost gymnastic physical power.” “MacCauley, giving us Marley and Scrooge in dialogue, and more than a dozen other voices – male, female, animal – offers a tour-de-force bravado performance.” IF YOU Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol, GO December 11-29. Performances:

Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets: $16-$28 depending on the night of the week. Student tickets are $10 anytime! Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting www.ncstage.org. Discounts are offered for groups of six or more. Subscriber Tickets and Flex Passes are available. For more information and a full calendar of events, visit www.ncstage.org or call (828) 239-0263. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.


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color yourself brilliant

unique asheville Asheville Faerie Arts Festival

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Created as a complement to Bioflyer Production’s annual Asheville Talent Slam, which occurs each Spring, the Asheville Faerie Arts Festival will be an annual holiday celebration of all things mythical, magical, and mystical! The inaugural launch takes place all day November 16 at the Renaissance Hotel in Asheville. It will celebrate the holiday season with many of the regions best artists and musicians. The daytime segment (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) is family friendly with all the Faerie basics: storytelling, costumes, music, magic, dance troupes, tea parties, stilt walkers, puppets, and more! Evening segment (6-11 p.m.) is adult themed with fashion show and great local bands, organic chocolates, food and drinks, and crafts by local artisans. Everyone is welcome to dress in their ‘good faerie’ or ‘bad faerie’ best as there will be prizes for best costumes. In the words of internationally acclaimed faerie artist, Brian Froud: “To dress as a faerie, donning wings, is to actively join in the dance, to be connected to creative spirit. Graceful or ecstatic dance; the radiant, rhythmic heartbeat; friendship; music; all these move easily across the boundaries, transcending language, race, and time.� Bioflyer Productions has a history of mounting unique and progressive entertainment ranging from original rock musicals and talent competitions to Broadway hits such as JC Superstar, RENT, and most recently Spring Awakening. Artistic Director, Rock Eblen, Awakening continues to feature all his productions as fund raisers for his family’s service organization The Eblen Charities.

HART PRESENTS

The Heiress

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The Haywood Arts Regional Theatre will conclude its 2013 main stage season with the classic Broadway drama “The Heiress� which runs through November 3. The show is based on Henry James’ novel “Washington Square,� and tells the story of a middle aged women destined to inherit a fortune from her father, who is suddenly courted by a handsome, but penniless gentleman. The story is set in New York in the 1890’s and HART’s production will feature elaborate sets and costumes for the piece. “The Heiress� opened on Broadway at the Biltmore Theatre on September 29, 1947 and closed on September 18, 1948 after 410 performances. Directed by Jed Harris the cast starred Wendy Hiller, Basil Rathbone, and Peter Cookson. The 1949 film version starred Ol-

14k gold

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Melissa Coxe

Joining him as Co-Director for Asheville Faery Arts Festival will be Heather Cohen, who organized last year’s Asheville Chocolate and Arts Festival at the U.S. Cellular Center.

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

IF YOU Tickets are $15 in advance for adults GO ($20 at the door), and $8 for students.

Children under 10 will be admitted free. Performances, music, fashion shows, and workshops will run throughout the day, so re-entry is permitted. For more details, please visit bioflyer.wordpress.com.

ivia d’Haviland, Montgomery Clift, and Ralph Richardson. HART’s production is being directed by Frances Davis and will feature: Christy Bishop, Roger Magendie, Lise Hoffman, Ashleigh Millett, Shandee Trevino, Sean Bruce, Brooke Atwood, Michael Ottinger, and Holly Cole. IF YOU “The Heiress� has performances GO November 1 & 2 at 7:30 p.m., and

November 3 at 3 p.m., at the HART Theater, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville. Reservations can be made by calling (828) 456-6322 or going to www.harttheatre.com.

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

TRUE BLUE SHOW BENEFITS LOCAL CHARITY

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True Blue will host an opening reception for Greg Vineyard, who will unveil a collection of illustrations entitled “Art Is Good Is Life: Nurturing Through Art.” Greg is donating a porArt Is Good Is Life tion of his sales to the ALIVE Program, a charity that provides art supplies to under-funded areas of the community. Prints are available on a “pay-what-you-can” basis. The show’s signature piece will be silently auctioned, with 100% of the proceeds benefiting the charity. The public is invited to a free reception, Friday, November 1, featuring local music and light refreshments. The exhibit runs until the end of the month and all works are for sale. Greg Vineyard is an illustrator, designer, creative consultant and writer, living in Asheville. His work is carried by ZaPow Gallery in Asheville, and he is a monthly contributing arts writer with Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine. He supports Asheville’s Buy Local campaign, and connects his art and artistic activities with charitable needs. Known for positive messaging in his works, Greg’s theme and visuals for this show are upbeat and encouraging of the giving spirit. He believes that art heals. “I love that ALIVE, run by Jarrett Rutland, focuses on ‘art and outreach’ to ensure that those who need this crucial activity to keep moving forward in their lives get a chance to have a hands-on experience!” True Blue Art Supply is Asheville’s local source for fine art materials, carrying a wide selection of top-quality art supplies at excellent discount prices. True Blue has been exhibiting the work of local artists since 2010.

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IF YOU Opening reception, Friday, GO November 1, from 6-8

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p.m. Store hours: Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. - 7 p.m., Sunday, 12 noon - 5 p.m. True Blue Art Supply, 30 Haywood Street, Asheville.

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special ~ Support Local Shops ~ Handmade items, jewelry, and gift certificates make great holiday gifts!

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

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MacBook Pro with Retina display

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

More power behind every pixel.

Salt Lamps and Their Benefits

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Minerals are the fixed elements in a volatile world.

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With fourth-generation Intel Core processors, the latest graphics, and faster flash storage, the incredibly advanced MacBook Pro with Retina display moves even further ahead in performance and battery life.* *Compared with the previous generation. Apple, the Apple logo, and Mac are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

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PG. 20

Salt in its mineral form is an integral part of life on Earth and plays a vital role in human development. Salt actually prevents microbial proliferation and drains bad secretions from our bodies. It belongs to both the earth and the sea. All salt in its mineral form is crystalline, with each tiny crystal formed in the shape of a cube. Natural sea salt is totally white, yet in the process of transmuting itself into rock salt deep in the earth, salt takes on an orange-colored hue. When you look at a salt lamp, 200 million years are “looking” back at you. Studies show that we receive 56% of our energy from the air we breathe. In fresh country side air we find up to 4000 negative ions per cubic centimeter; near a beach or close to a waterfall it goes up to 10,000. The number of negative ions that can be measured in most major cities at rush hour does not even reach 100. A series of scientific studies show that Salt Crystal Lamps can increase the negative ion count by up to 300% in their vicinity. It has been noted that aggressive and/or depressive behavior in

humans and animals have been found to be attributed to environments that have few negative ions. An environment rich in positive ions causes tiredness, trouble concentrating, repeat migraine headaches, insomnia, continual irritation and recurrent depressive states. The saturation of our air with positive ions seriously handicaps our powers of thought and our ability to reach our human potential. An environment rich in negative ions reinforces the bodies vital process, slowing down, and even reversing, health problems such as pain, depression, fatigue, headaches, andasthma. Salt lamps diffuse negative ions into the atmosphere which are particularly good for the human organism. These lamps enhance the regeneration of our cells and will accelerate the self-healing process of our bodies. Relaxation often increases awareness. When we let go through relaxation we enter a deep hypnogenic state, a zone between waking and sleeping in which our brains emit alpha waves and we become deeply relaxed. Salt lamps are a wonderful complement to deep relaxation exercises. The specific color of a salt lamp has significant effect on its healing actions. This is known as Chromotherapy. Installing crystal salt lamps in each

Our Salt Lamps and Candleholders are made from natural salt crystals.

room of your home can help elevate your level of well being, Choose different sizes and colors for different spaces within your home. Size should be proportional to the time you spend in that particular room or space. Visit Asheville’s Therapeutic Salt Cave’s Salt Market for unique salt products and gift items. Gift Certificates are available.

Asheville’s Therapeutic Salt Cave 12 Eagle St., Downtown Asheville www.ashevillesaltcave.com (828) 236-5999

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“Small Moves, Ellie, Small Moves…” SOME MUSINGS UPON LAUNCHING AS AN ARTIST

My regular readers know that I often manage to work a Sci-Fi reference into my columns.

PG. 20

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Because I’m a Geek. The title is a line from the film “Contact”, starring Jodie Foster as a woman searching for signs of extra-terrestrial life. Her father shows her how to move a radio dial veeerrry slowly in order to hear the frequencies in-between. I say this line to myself when patience becomes essential. Life can be like this, with a need to slow down, to tackle the To Do List one item at a time, and to capture additional steps hidden amongst the main ones. A useful concept when tackling something big – like moving to

12 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

BY

GREG VINEYARD

Read everything – and support the advertisers. Asheville as an artist – is to think about the “small moves.” Baby steps, one paint-drip-covered shoe after the other. I fell in love with this area on my first visit years ago, but there was much research to do. My files at home eventually contained a relocation guide from the Chamber, artist, gallery and art group brochures, local resource pamphlets, and copies of all regional publications. I also reached out to locals via the web in order to ask questions about Asheville.

It’s important to learn about the art-related businesses here. As a tourist, I went to every single venue that was open, and immersed myself in this cool mountain town’s mix of art and commerce. One summer I was here for an unexpected extra day that turned out to be during a River Arts District Studio Stroll. It was an amazing, bustling and energetic bonus visit, and by the end of that day I needed more room in my suitcase. A note about studio-visiting etiquette. I have worked in a few studio and gallery environments the last few years, and it is amazing how many folks don’t look at the art at all, and just walk right up to the artist (who is usually in the middle of working), ‘Small Moves’ continued on page 24


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sound experience INTERVIEW WITH RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S MUSIC COLUMNIST

James Cassara

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Rapid River Magazine:

INTERVIEWED BY

SIMONE BOUYER

JC: The first vinyl

album I ever bought was The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour Tour. This was a few weeks JC: Since the second issue. I after it was released. picked up the first issue and I bought it at Blue called up Dennis. I’d previDiamond Records in ously written for the now South Florida, and defunct Out and About paid $4.49! Sadly, they, here in Asheville, and while like too many indeat Florida International pendent record stores, University I worked at are long gone. the college radio station, I’m not sure of doing on air interviews and the first CD, but I reviews. So Rapid River was think it might have James Cassara, the man behind our a natural fit. been John Mayall’s monthly music reviews. I’m proud to say I’ve Turning Point Point. I been in every issue since. bought several CDs before I got around to I love the challenge of coming up with just actually buying a player. Mayall remains a fathe right way to say things. I put about 12-15 vorite of mine, as I have a great love for British hours into it each month. For some perverse folk and blues. reason, I dig the deadline pressure, and the joy Several years back I visited Amoeba of getting it done on time. Records in San Francisco and went nuts. I shipped home about $500 worth of vinyl. RRM: What was the first album you ever purHow long have you been writing reviews for Rapid River R iver Magazine?

chased — and the first CD?

I

RRM: Do you own a turntable? JC: Heck, yeah! I own a lot of jazz, Broadway

shows, blues, and classical albums that will never be released on CD. What I dislike about CDs is the lack of cover art and detailed liner notes. As an artist and music historian, of sorts, I always loved those sorts of extras.

RRM: Is there any place locally where you really enjoy music?

JC: Asheville is so blessed with great venues I

cannot get to them all. But my two favorites are the Grey Eagle and the Altamont Theatre. I’m 57 years old... standing for the duration of a concert is no longer much fun for me!

RRM: If you were to host a music festival who would be in the line-up?

JC: It would depend on the theme of the festival. A few years ago I tried to organize a RAM over Asheville benefit, with local musicians playing post-Beatle McCartney songs, including the RAM album from start to finish. It never got off the ground, but I still hold hope of someday making it work.

RRM: Any predictions for the future of music? JC: It’s really hard to say. I’m afraid that physical product, be it CD or vinyl, will become regulated to a niche market for aging baby boomers. I’d hate to see it, as I still enjoy own-

WNC Jazz Profiles: Cody Wright

~ Grammy winning guitarist Al Petteway “Nowadays, I love funk. It’s the backbone of my style and I love the role the bass plays in funk. I also love jazz and R&B horn and piano players. Three of my all-time favorite musicians are Roland Kirk, a force of nature on any wind instrument but also a stunningly emotional soloist, pianist Art Tatum, the most amazing solo musician I’ve ever heard, and guitarist Tommy Emmanuel — my biggest influence as a composer.” “Cody Wright is a bright light in the music scene. He’s a multi-instrumentalist with chops galore, and he plays with sophistication beyond his years.” ~ Guitarist Don Alder In 2012, Cody was able to share the stage with legendary bassists Victor Wooten and Oteil Burbridge. “I learned what it really means to be humble. On the bandstand, every player was equal in their eyes. Their whole intent is focused on what the ensemble calls for, not on waiting for the right moment to “let rip.” As Oteil said, the bass ‘has to be a slave to the song first.’ Oteil also taught me the value of overcoming the natural fear of exposing yourself and just letting it all out - the good,

RRM: Do you have a Facebook page? Can we follow you on Twitter?

JC: I am on Facebook, probably too much, but, not Twitter.

RRM: Any other comments? JC: I’m a public school art teacher, so visual

art is my talent. But, I love words and music, and greatly enjoy the occasional feedback I get from our readers. I consider myself a reviewer, NOT a critic. I have zero musical training, so it really comes down to what I like and what I think my readers will enjoy. Special thanks to all of our monthly columnists. Without you we’re nothing! ~ Rapid River Magazine www.rapidrivermagazine.com

BY

“It’s not often that I run across a musician like Cody. His charming personality and virtuosity on both bass and guitar should serve him well. I look forward to watching his career blossom. Cody is becoming a world class musician of the highest order!”

Raised in Florida, Virginia and Georgia, Cody Wright has been a music lover since early childhood and musician since age 13, his early instrumental training revolving around blues and rock guitar. “I was exposed to R&B and rock by my mom, and blues, country, and bluegrass by my dad. I also dug funk, listening to it in the video games I played at the time. Later as a teen, I also checked out rap and metal: Pantera and Alice in Chains were my favorites. I began studying jazz guitar at the age of 16 and was a member of Warren Wilson College’s Jazz Ensemble from 2008 until my graduation in 2011.” Although originally a guitarist, Cody joined the Jonathan Scales Fourchestra as a bassist in 2011. When switching to bass, Cody was able to capitalize on the picking and left hand techniques developed playing fusion guitar in the style of Scott Henderson, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Frank Gambale and Shawn Lane. His guitar training and musical tastes also left him with a sense of harmony and melody advanced for a bassist.

ing them. But, having said that, I have thousands of albums on my hard drives…I rotate them onto my Android phone for when I go to the gym or on a run. As for musical styles, who can guess? I find it amazing that the elementary aged kids I teach love much of the same music I grew up with. But I try to be receptive to any music, even if it’s not my thing. I don’t much care for Rap or contemporary Bluegrass but I can appreciate their influence.

Cody Wright Photo: Frank Zipperer

bad, and ugly — because it’s all art, anyways! Victor Wooten is a big risk-taker, but even his “risks” groove like nobody’s business. He just plays everything with so much taste, feel and groove before anything else. When he takes a chance, he jumps into it all the way. He doesn’t think about it — he’s concentrated on being as groovy as possible. They both have such an intense way of committing to their phrases that it’s almost impossible to not be influenced by them.” The best advice he’s ever gotten from a musician? “Years ago, blues man Corey Harris told me that he thought I was great, but so was everybody else, commenting, ‘There are a million great players, just look on YouTube. If you want to really go somewhere as an artist,

EDDIE LESHURE

you’ll have to do something different and unique.’” In 2013, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra released their selftitled album with Wooten (along with fellow Flecktone Howard Levy) as a special guest, as well as compositional help from Cody and drummer/percussion master Phill Bronson. When asked about advice for up-and-coming musicians, Cody stressed the value of staying true to one’s own good taste. “Give into the emotions in the music. Let it make you cry, laugh, ponder. Let it take you for a ride. That way, you can learn about those emotions from experience, and develop your own ability to channel them outward.” “Seriously righteous bass... a groove that won’t quit.” ~ Kevin Johnson, www. Notreble.com www.codywrightmusic.com Eddie produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 13


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

All is Lost ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: A man struggles to survive after being lost at sea.

REEL TAKE: All is Lost is a huge departure

from J.C. Chandor’s last film Margin Call, the talky Wall Street drama. In this minimalist tale, Robert Redford plays a man on a solo sailing expedition on the Indian Ocean. The film opens with some of the only dialogue heard in the film. Redford’s voice, “I think you would all agree that I tried – to be true, to be strong, to be kind, to love, to be right …” The film then switches to the events that precipitate the letter. ‘Our Man’ (how the character is billed in the end credits) awakens

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

After the screening nounced as the action heats up, Hanks turns I attended, several of us in a tour de force performance. The last 20 (all reviewers) discussed minutes of the movie will no doubt earn him how implausible it would a best actor nomination if not the gold statue be to be so stoic given itself, but I digress. the circumstances; we all I knew going into the film that Greengrass confessed we’d have been would deliver a heart poundingly exciting adcussing from the get go. aptation of the story, but what I did not expect But after thinking about was to have a ruthless story to be layered with it, to Our Man, wasting such nuanced humanity – a humanity saved energy with muttering, not just for the captives but the captors. I don’t All is lost for Robert Redford as man on a ill-fated cussing and talking to oneknow how much liberty was taken with Capsolo sailing adventure. self would distract from the tain Phillips’ story, as it’s presented here, but issue at hand, survival. as I haven’t heard a whole lot of fussing about All is Lost is for a very limited audience. it, I’m presuming it’s a fair [albeit cinematic] to water flooding the cabin of his sailboat. A I would venture only die-hard Redford fans, treatment of the facts. cargo container which has apparently fallen sailors worth their salt, and certain art house The film starts by showing Captain Philoff a freighter has rammed his boat, leaving a film goers will enjoy the merits of this film. lips at home in Vermont preparing to leave for gaping hole. his gig on the Maersk Alabama. He’s clearly The next hour shows Our Man patiently, Rated PG-13 for brief strong language. concerned about the threat of Somali pirates, diligently and methodically repairing the hole REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN but he keeps it to himself, instead talking about and doing what he can to keep the Virginia his teenage children as he drives to the airport Jean afloat, if not quite sea worthy. With the Captain Phillips ∑∑∑∑1/2 with his wife. Meanwhile we are introduced to electronics destroyed, his best hope is to get to the young man who will be the ‘captain’ of the Short Take: The dramatic true story of the shipping lanes, where he’ll be spotted and pirates who board the Alabama. Captain Richard Phillips who was taken rescued. The only thing more economic than Muse is a fisherman whose village has hostage by Somali pirates in 2009. his emotions is his words. He is strong, silent been out of work because of comand practical. He endeavours to survive. mercial trawlers. Local warlords prey Never getting a break, he endures terupon Muse, and men like him, to do rible storms. Eventually all is truly lost and he their bidding on the high seas, with watches from the safety of his life raft as the promises of riches. This is all the Virginia Jean succumbs to her wounds and to background we are given. the mighty sea. Our Man pushes away emoGreengrass builds the suspense tions that could potentially threaten his ability brilliantly, from the first game of cat to stay strong and focused, as seen when he and mouse between the freighter starts to open a card tucked in a box of special and the pirate skiffs to the game of antique navigational equipment (obviously a hide and seek within the ship; from gift) and then stops, tossing it aside. He charts the mind games Muse and Phillips the course of his drifting raft using manual play with one another to the game of the equipment and the stars. He desalinates chicken between the US Navy and the salt water to survive and still he perseveres. At little band of pirates. The unexpected some point however the story must shift from humanity of the film builds during the the fight to survive to the will to survive. There’s never going to be an amusement park ride conversations between Captain PhilThe film is well done. The hand held but with their name on it: Tom Hanks negotiates with lips and Muse. This is a rich element, stable camera work, gives an intimate feeling Somali Pirates in Captain Phillips. drawing us in and making us care even to the proceedings and conveys the confined more than we already do and building spaces of the boat and raft while never letting REEL TAKE: Director Paul Greengrass’s the climax to a fever pitch before its delivery. us forget about the vast ocean. Redford, now talent for gripping suspense (The Bourne First time actor Barkhad Abdi, as Muse, 76 and showing every well-lived year of it, Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum) is has a tremendous presence. He plays well is perfectly cast in this solitary tale. The only put to good use in the true life action thriller against Hanks, giving the film believability and other person I could possibly imagine playing depicting the 2009 hijacking of the Maersk likeability because both men are so un-Holthis part is Clint Eastwood (about ten years Alabama. Tom Hanks stars as the titular charlywood. Hanks’s performance throughout is ago). People may underestimate the difficulty acter and both he and Greengrass raise the bar strong, but he reaches unexpected new heights of taking on a project with so little dialogue. on their own careers with Captain Phillips. and depth in the last half hour of the film. It is a daunting task, but Redford handles it With the exception of a painfully bad Boston almost two easily. ‘Movies’ continued on page 15 accent, which fortunately becomes less pro-

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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 14

Captain Phillips is astonishingly good. Put it on your must-see list, along with Gravity this fall. Captain Phillips does not have to be seen on the big screen, though it is certainly better if you do; if you are at all prone to sea sickness however, you may want to take a Dramamine first. Rated PG-13 for sustained intense sequences of menace, some bloody images of violence and substance use.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Carrie ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: While Kimberly Peirce’s remake isn’t in the same league as Brian De Palma’s iconic original, it’s still not half as bad as some critics say it is.

Chloe Grace Moretz in the climactic seen from the new remake of Carrie.

REEL TAKE: I must admit I had grave

misgivings before going to see Carrie. If there was a movie that didn’t need remaking, it was Brian De Palma’s iconic original. But it was made 37 years ago and, as much as it may have been a part of my age group’s movie consciousness, there are still people out there who know it only by reputation. When I went to see the remake there were a number of teens and twenty-somethings (almost all of them women) in the audience and they gasped and shrieked as if it were all new to them and most remarkable of all, quit texting during the movie. I have been impressed with Chloe Grace Moretz ever since I saw her in the first Kickass movie and in Hammer’s remarkable Let Me In. When I heard that she was going to be cast in the title role I thought, if anyone could pull it off, she could. She is much closer in age to the character than Sissy Spacek was and can project the same kind of naïve vulnerability which is the key component to the character. Yet when it’s time for her to take over, she dominates the screen without the aid of De Palma’s split screen trickery. Julianne Moore has the much harder job of playing Margaret White, Carrie’s mother. Piper Laurie played the character as if she were the Witch in Hansel & Gretel which made her a classic over-the-top villain. When it’s time for her to get hers, the audience cheers. Moore goes in the opposite direction and underplays the character so that we

actually feel sorry for her and can understand where she’s coming from. When she does what she’s destined to do and pays the price, it comes as more of a shock. It’s a good thing that Moretz and Moore turn in such dynamic performances for most of the rest of the cast are left behind and don’t have the panache of their 1976 counterparts. Gabriella Wilde and Ansel Elgort as Sue & Tommy (the good kids originally played by Amy Irving & William Katt) are so bland that you hardly notice them. Portia Doubleday tries hard as Chris the true villain of the piece but she lacks the self-assurance and downright shamelessness of Nancy Allen. Alex Russell in the John Travolta role makes no impression whatsoever. Director Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry) and screenwriter Larry Cohen (It’s Alive) Cry stick close to the outline of the original film and just as far away from the Stephen King original. All of the expected scenes are there from the shower humiliation to the grand prom finale but Peirce injects a feminist undercurrent as Carrie is not only aware of her power but actively tries to develop it. When payback time finally arrives she knows who to use it on and who not to. As I stated at the beginning, I liked Carrie a whole lot more than I expected to. While it is sufficiently updated to include cell phones and Facebook, the small town timelessness of the original is left intact. Should it have been remade? Probably not. The 1976 version is in no danger of being supplanted, but this remake is a lot better than it had any right to be.

the screen in his later years. Escape Plan (originally called The Tomb and later Exit Plan) is a prison breakout film, another in a genre that goes all the way back to The Big House of 1930 and continuing through such films as Riot in Cell Block 11(1954) and Escape From Alcatraz (1979). Sylvester Stallone plays Ray Breslin, a former prosecutor who now tests the reliability of maximum security prisons. He is offered a multimillion dollar deal to test a new top secret prison known as “The Tomb”. Once inside he is drugged and imprisoned like the other maximum security criminals and must set up alliances if he hopes to find a way out. One of these alliances is with a prisoner named Rothmeyer (Schwarzenegger) the other is with a Muslim inmate (Farin Tahir). They devise a complex plan to fool the sadistic warden (Jim Caviezel effectively cast against type) and are joined by the prison doctor (Sam Neill) once he is convinced that there is something fishy going on. In the meantime Breslin’s associates on the outside learn that the prison is operated as a for profit operation by the military and that his business partner (Vincent D’Onofrio) has been paid off to have Breslin incarcerated. While Stallone and Schwarzenegger are certainly long in the tooth, they are more than capable of handling themselves in the action driven sequences. Watching them, I’m reminded of the 60 year old Burt Lancaster in 1973’s Scorpio who, Rated R for bloody violence, disturbing images, despite his age, was more than a match for language and some sexual content. his younger pursuers. Swedish director REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN Mikael Hafstrom, who in the past has directed such action fare as Vendetta and Escape Plan ∑∑∑1/2 Derailed, knows how to manage the key Short Take: Sylvester Stallone goes set pieces. Like most mainstream movies to jail. He does not pass Go. He does today, Escape Plan goes on a little too not collect $200. He does team up with long, yet thanks to the film’s characterizaArnold Schwarzenegger and together tions, I was never bored. In addition to they kick all kinds of butt. the actors and the action, special mention should go the concept and the execution of the sci-fi like prison design which is actually the most intriguing aspect of the movie. Aside from the settings, Escape Plan offers nothing new. The protagonist gets in, is aided by like minded Just Like Old Times: Stallone & Schwarzenegger compare notes in inmates, and then their new action-adventure Escape Plan. gets out and gets even. Caviezel is so despicable that you REEL TAKE: Just as John Wayne kept at know he’s going to get it in the end. it until he was in his late 60s, action stars However predictability is not the issue, Sylvester Stallone and (no longer Governor of entertaining the audience is. Does Escape California) Arnold Schwarzenegger are followPlan entertain? Yes, and it’s not just my ing in his footsteps. Not that there’s anything admiration for contemporary aging action wrong with that; I’m glad that they’re still able stars talking (Stallone & Schwarzenegto make movies, but now I know what it felt like for my parents to see John Wayne up on ‘Movies’ continued on page 16

Monthly Reel

T

The films I reviewed this month all shared a common denominator, people placed in dire and near hopeless situations. All is lost for Robert Redford, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney are lost in space and Tom Hanks stars in a pirate movie that will never have an amusement park ride named after it. Cuaron’s Gravity is one of the must-see movies this year and it must be seen in the theatre, preferably in 3-D. All is Lost (opening locally in mid-November) will be lost on most everyone except die-hard Redford fans (which I am) and a select group of art-house film goers. Captain Phillips was the revelatory film to me, a suspenseful and humanely nuanced in spite of a rather jarring accent from Hanks. Meanwhile the good Professor Kaufmann plundered his way through the bloodier, grittier side of recent movie fare, taking in the blood spattered remake of Carrie,, Stallone and Schwartzenager doing what they do best with the support of Geritol in Escape Plan, Plan and Robert Rodriquez’s campy sequel to Machete, Machete Kills. At press time we found ourselves in hopeful anticipation of Ridley Scott’s latest film, The Counselor Counselor. It looks razor sharp and has a great cast but has been shown to very few critics prior to its release. We were both also curious about the not-so-mainstream horror film We Are What We Are. Fellow critic, Ken Hanke calls it ‘art house horror.’ None of us are quite sure who its audience is going to be, but for the right audience, it looks like it will be quite satisfying. Happily, there are some wonderful new releases each week this month, so you’ll have plenty to choose from at your local cinema. Titles to be sure to catch include 12 Years a Slave, About Time, Time Dallas Buyer’s Club, The Wolf of Wall Street,, and NeStreet braska. Next month, with the holidays in full swing and the Oscar race in full gear, there’ll be even more films vying for your expendable income. ~ MICHELLE KEENAN

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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call 697-7310. For its final Sunday films of the year, the Hendersonville Film Society will show examples of four different movie genres: the pre-code film, the historical epic, the suspense thriller and the musical. HFS will take the month of December off and resume screenings in January. November 3:

The Cheat

(1931) This remake of a Cecil B. DeMille silent film is a classic example of a precode melodrama. Tallulah Bankhead stars as a socialite who steals charity money to pay off her gambling debts. When she borrows money from an unscrupulous art dealer to pay back the charity, he wants more than money in return. Directed by George Abbott.

‘Movies’ continued from page 15

ger have been making movies now for almost 40 years). The much younger audience was enjoying it just as much as I was. Escapism is alive and well in the aptly named Escape Plan. Rated R for violence & language throughout.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Gravity ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Adrift after space debris collides with their shuttle, two astronauts endeavour to make it to the safety of a space station and a capsule that can deliver them safely to Earth.

REEL TAKE: Slipping the surly bonds of

Earth, Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity goes where no other film has gone before. When a disaster in space renders two astronauts stranded, they try to reach a space station and a capsule to get them back to Earth. George Clooney is Matt Kawalski, the space-loving veteran astronaut

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Red Pony”

on his final mission. Sandra Bullock is Dr. Ryan Stone, a NASA greenhorn and scientist who’s not entirely comfortable with being in space. Alone and drifting with a limited oxygen supply and the constant threat of space debris, the odds of our heroes’ survival seem insurmountable. The circumstances may seem completely implausible, but while you’re gripping the arms of your seat and gasping for air right along with them,, it’s as Sandra Bullock and George Clooney are lost in space real as real can be. The visuals in Alfonso Curon’s gripping Gravity. are staggering, creating an overwhelming and confusing sense Clooney is as easy and comfortable in this role of the vastness and aloneness of space. Cuaron as he seems to be in life. He is fine in the role, manages to give the audience the dizzying but when I heard that Robert Downey, Jr. feeling they are right there with Commander had originally been cast in the role, could just Kawalski and Dr. Stone. as easily see him in the role. The film really As two of the most beloved actors in belongs to Bullock. She will most certainly Hollywood, the audience is immediately comfortable with both Bullock and Clooney. ‘Movies’ continued on page 17

November DVD Picks

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Way Way Back”

November 10:

Mary, Queen Of Scots

(1971) Essentially a remake of John Ford’s 1936 Mary Queen of Scotland, this 1971 version is a showcase for its two stars, Glenda Jackson and Vanessa Redgrave. Throw in Patrick McGoohan as the future King James and lots of Scottish scenery and you have a classic historical epic. Directed by Charles Jarrott. November 17:

Cash On Demand

(1961) This taut British thriller concerns a robbery at a small bank branch during the Christmas holidays. A fake bank investigator forces the straight laced bank manager to take part in the robbery by holding his family hostage. Stars Andre Morell and Peter Cushing. Directed by Quentin Lawrence. November 24: That’s

Entertainment 3 (1994) The third and final installment in MGM’s That’s Entertainment series. Showcased performers include Gene Kelly, Esther Williams, Cyd Charisse, Debbie Reynolds, Mickey Rooney, and Ann Miller. Directed by Bud Friedgen and Michael J. Sheridan.

The Red Pony (1949) For years The Red Pony has only been available in washed out, substandard prints first on VHS and then later on budget line DVDs. This new version from Olive Films looks and sounds gorgeous. The sound is as important as the picture because the film’s score was composed by Aaron Copland. Now it can be heard in all of its glory. If you know the orchestral suite then you’ll recognize it immediately throughout the film. The casting is perfect with Myrna Loy beautifully understating the role of the wife and mother who is estranged from her husband. Veteran thespian Louis Calhern is perfect as the pioneer grandfather who regales the family over and over again with his former exploits on the Plains. Robert Mitchum, 31 when this film was made, has one of his first opportunities to play a gentler character much like he would do 20 years later in Ryan’s Daughter. The story of a young boy (Peter Miles) learning to raise a pony and the responsibilities it entails never becomes too sentimental or cloying thanks to John Steinbeck’s screenplay from his own stories and the creative direction from Lewis Milestone (All All Quiet on the Western Front Front). Milestone, Steinbeck, and Aaron Copland had worked together 10 years earlier on Of Mice and Men. It is quite obvious that Walt Disney, who had yet to make a full length live action feature, took this film as his template. He would produce the somewhat similar Old Yeller 10 years later. If you have never seen The Red Pony or

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you haven’t seen it in years then you owe it to yourself and your family to see this new, beautifully restored version. It looks even better now, thematically as well as visually, then when it first appeared in 1949.

The Way Way Back (2013) New on DVD this month is The Way Way Back Back. This little film was of the summer’s most unexpected and understated treats. If you missed it, it’s well worth renting. Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, the creative team that brought us The Descendants, make their directorial debut with The Way Way Back Back. It’s not an important film, but it’s a well done and tenderhearted delight. The opening sets the tone for the movie. Duncan, a quiet and awkward 14 year old, is sitting the back, the way back, of one of those big old wood paneled station wagons (the kind with last seat facing the back window). This in and of itself creates nostalgic feel even though the film takes place in present day. Duncan and his mother, Pam (Toni Collette), are traveling with her boyfriend, Trent (Steve Carell), and his teenage daughter

to Trent’s beach house on the Massachusetts coast for the summer. During the drive (while the ladies are dozing), Trent asks Duncan on a scale of 1 to 10, what he consider himself. Baffled by the question, but in attempt to answer, he says, “I don’t know – I guess a 6.” Trent tells him he thinks he’s a 3. Who does that?! At the beach Duncan is introduced to an array of characters. Eager to escape the overbearing eye of Trent, Duncan takes off on bicycle and eventually finds himself at a water park managed by a kooky character named Owen (brilliantly played by Sam Rockwell). Laid back, likeable and in near-constant comic monologue, Owen takes Duncan under his wing and gives him a job. At Water Wizz, Duncan finds a place among the assorted oddballs that work there (including Faxon and Rash in very fun bit parts). This is where the film really takes off. Knowing straight away that Trent is a grade A Jerk obviously doesn’t bode well for his and Pam’s relationship. The film in fact holds little mystery. It is familiar coming of age, teen angst territory and it is quite predictable, but none of that detracts from the story or our enjoyment of it. Instead, Faxon and Rash delve into the humanity of their characters in a way that evokes empathy and reminds us we’re all a work in progress. Part of what really sets The Way Way Back apart is the nostalgic feel of summers past. This will resonate particularly with anyone who grew up in the 70s and 80s.


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 16

and deservedly be a best actress nominee this year. Ironically, for all its visual and technical prowess the story is very simple and very human, even schmaltzy and old fashioned, and that’s ok. It’s what Hollywood does so well - breaking new ground cinematically while preying upon familiar heartstrings and universal bonds. Gravity is one of only three films I think must be seen in 3D (the others being Avatar and Hugo). The 3D effects are not always blatant, but when they are they are amazing, beautiful and even important. The use of 3D in Gravity absolutely enhances the experience. If you don’t want to cough up the extra bucks for 3D glasses, Gravity must at least be seen on the big screen. Rated PG-13 for intense, perilous sequences, some disturbing images and strong language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Machete Kills ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Robert Rodriguez’ follow up to his highly successful 2010 film Machete (which began as a joke trailer in Grindhouse) has little to offer outside of Charlie Sheen and Mel Gibson as a James Bond style villain.

REEL TAKE: One man band Robert

Rodriguez (producer-director-writer-cinematographer-composer) can knock out a film in no time at all thanks to all the hats he wears. He can also make his films very inexpensively because in addition to all of the above, he has a stock company of performers who work for him for scale. This is all very admirable. It recalls the days of Poverty Row studios like Republic and later AIP (American International Pictures), and he has his films distributed by their modern

Chameleon came across as uninspired. Perhaps it’s simply the genre and Rodriguez did his job too well (I’m not a big fan of non-stop action films especially when they do stop to wink at me) but I found myself disengaged right after the first shootout. Yet Machete Kills is not a total loss thanks to the antics and the personas of Carlos Estevez (Charlie Sheen using his real name) and Mel Gibson. Just the idea of Charlie Sheen as Director Robert Rodriguez gives new meaning to the term the President of the United “booby trap.” One of the many outrageous images in the States is funny, especially lackluster Machete Kills. when you consider father Martin’s turns as the Chief day equivalent, The Weinstein Company. Executive. He is appealing and appalling at B movies, by their very nature, are a the same time. Mel Gibson, on the other hit or miss proposition and Machete Kills is hand, is absolutely infectious and is having a miss. Part of the reason for this is that it is the time of his life portraying a classic vilan obvious follow-up to the first Machete lain in the James Bond mode. Too bad he (2010) which was never intended to be a doesn’t appear until halfway through the film in the first place. Rodriguez designed movie. it as a joke exploitation trailer to accompany Just so you know, Machete (Danny his and Quentin Tarantino’s homage to Trejo) is saved from hanging by a phone 1970s B movies, Grindhouse. However call from the President who wants him to one thing led to another and with his usual kidnap the head of a Mexican drug cartel efficiency and stock company in tow, Ro(Demian Bichir). His contact is beauty pagdriguez turned out the first film (primarily eant contestant Miss San Antonio (Amber to see if he could do it) and it was a big Heard). It turns out that the drug lord is hit unlike Grindhouse. One could call it a financed by a mysterious technology manuhappy accident. Lightning, however, rarely facturer who has really big plans. Both the strikes twice in the same place. drug lord and Machete are being pursued What was brash & original in the first by The Chameleon. You know how it ends. film seems completely tired & predictable The question is…do you want to buy a in this one. Everything from the off-theticket for this ride? wall humor to the ultra violence (according Rated R for strong bloody violence, language, to imdb over 100 people are killed in the and sexual content. film) even the stunt casting of Cuba GoodREVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN ing Jr , Lady Gaga, and Antonio Banderas as the same character, a hitman known as The

An Honest Look at America Through the Eyes of a Film Critic

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Cinematic States, a new book by Gareth Higgins, a well-known writer, peace activist and speaker, will be available for purchase on November 5, 2013.

miracle-working gardeners, what do the stories we tell reveal about ourselves, and how can we reimagine who we are? Mentored by John O’Donohue and Walter Wink, Gareth has worked as an academic, teaching Reconciliation Studies and Sociology, and broadcaster In Cinematic States, northLocal author for BBC Radio. For the past seven ern Irish writer Gareth Higgins explores American myths in one of Garreth Higgins years he has co-presented the award-winning internet radio their most powerful forms. This show The Film Talk Talk. He is deeply rooted irreverent yet moving journey through each in the celtic tradition of earthy spirituality, of the 50 states of his adopted homeland good humor, and unbridled imagination. asks whether a Kansas yellow brick road reGareth is taking Cinematic States ally does lead to the end of the rainbow, and on the road in 2014, speaking, facilitating does it first have to pass through Colorado’s conversation, and leading workshops that Overlook Hotel? reflect on cinema, storytelling, being huAmidst the multipurpose woodchipman, and rethinking America. He is offerpers, friendly exorcists and faulty motel ing several kinds of opportunities to engage showers, resurrected baseball players and

BY

CALEB SEELING

with the provocative and healing ideas in the book, including “Storytelling as a Way to Personal Transformation,” “How Movies Helped Save My Soul: Finding Spiritual Fingerprints in Culturally Significant Films,” and “Reimagining America through Active and Self-Critical Citizenship.” Visit Burnside Books for more details, www.burnside-books.com IF YOU The Asheville Film Society GO screening of Being There,

Tuesday, November 12 at 8 p.m. Garreth Higgins will read a chapter about the film from his new book Cinematic States. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd., (828) 274-9500.

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. November 5:

This Gun For Hire (1942) When hired killer Philip Raven shoots a blackmailer and his beautiful female companion dead, he’s is paid off in marked bills by his treasonous employer who is working with foreign spies. Stars Veronica Lake, Robert Preston and Alan Ladd. Directed by Frank Tuttle. November 12:

Being There

(1979) Chance, a simple gardener, has never left the estate until his employer dies. His simple TVinformed utterances are mistaken for profundity. Local author Garreth Higgins will also read a chapter about the film from his new book Cinematic States. Stars Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLain and Melvyn Douglas. Directed by Hal Ashby. November 19:

Waikiki Wedding (1937) A beauty contest winner of the “Miss Pineapple Princess” pageant takes part in a publicity scheme in Hawaii, and is pursued by an advertising executive for the agency doing the promotion. Stars Bing Crosby, Bob Burns and Martha Raye. Directed by Frank Tuttle. November 26:

Paper Moon

(1973) During the Great Depression, a con man finds himself saddled with a young girl who may or may not be his daughter, and the two forge an unlikely partnership. Stars Ryan O’Neal, Tatum O’Neal and Madeline Kahn. Directed by Peter Bogdanovich.

BIG SCREEN BUDGET FILM $5 for members, $7 general. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 20:

Sabrina

(1954) A playboy becomes interested in the daughter of his family’s chauffeur. But it’s his more serious brother who would be the better man for her. Stars Audrey Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart and William Holden. Directed by Billy Wilder.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 17


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Blue to Black Art Stroll & Tour

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More than 40 artists, studios and art venues from the BLUE Ridge Parkway at Hwy 70 heading east to BLACK Mountain and beyond will be open to the public.

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Studios participating in the Blue to Black Art Weekend Art Stroll & Studio Tour will be open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, November 16-17. The two-day event, sponsored by AnTHM Gallery, Greybeard Realty, Seven Sisters Gallery and The Inn on Mill Creek, is a chance to visit working artist studios and downtown Black Mountain art venues. Take part in live demonstrations, workshops, studio tours and musical entertainment throughout the weekend. Weekend activities are free and open to the public and include an antique spinning wheel in Black Mountain, potters’ Fred Feldman studios off Montreat Road, a 3D found-object art sculptor’s studio in East Asheville, a photographer’s studio with demonstrations in Old Fort, and tours of pastel and acrylic painters’ studios in Black Mountain, as well as a fine furniture-maker’s workshop. Spinning wheel demonstrations, handspun yarns, art quilts, earthy ceramics, and Arts & Crafts handmade chairs and bowls can be discovered during the two-day event. David Kaylor

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River Arts District Studio Stroll

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NOVEMBER 9 & 10, FROM 10-6PM

During the nationally known River Arts District Artists Studio Stroll, more than 180 artists open their studios to the public. Art collectors and enthusiasts come from around the world to view and purchase art as they tour studios in 25 of the district’s historic industrial buildings.

STUDIO STROLL HIGHLIGHTS Potters Mark Studio @ Cotton Mill Studios Wheel throwing demos both Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Desert Moon Designs Studios Hands on loom weaving demonstrations by Karen Donde. Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 372 Depot St., Suite 44.

Letting Go by Brad Stroman

Kyle Carpenter

352 Depot St. Oil painting demo by Jeff Pittman, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Riverside Studios Ongoing painting, mixed media, textile and sculpture demos, both Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Jonas Gerard Studio & Gallery Live painting performance, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. The Village Potters at Riverview Station Wheel throwing and handbuilding demos, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Planet Art @ 375 Depot St. Ongoing chair caning demos, Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Andrea Kulish

Free trolleys run approximately every 15 minutes, bringing visitors to gallery shows, kid activities, and art demonstrations, such as glass blowing, wheel throwing, wood turning, and more. This is the 19th year for this internationally known event. Located along the French Broad River, just minutes from downtown Asheville. Get an inside look at the artist’s way, learn how they make their work and invest in a piece of local Asheville.

IF YOU River Arts District Studio Stroll, GO November 9 & 10, from 10-6 p.m.

Wendy Whitson

The Studio Stroll is produced by the River Arts District Artists. For more details, please visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 19


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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios

THE VILLAGE POTTERS

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The Village Potters, located in Asheville’s River Arts District in historic Riverview Station, join more than 180 artists in 24 buildings to present the Studio Stroll on November 9-10. Resident potters will have ongoing demonstrations of the wheel, handbuilding, and sculpting processes they use to create the beautiful, handmade pottery found in their three showrooms. In addition, they will welcome painter Jenny Buckner and Potter’s Skin Butter founder Cara Steinbuchel to share their talents. The Village Potters, 191 Lyman Street, Asheville. (828) 253-2424, www.thevillagepotters.com

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Free trolleys run approximately every 15 minutes. Make your plans now, visit www.riverartsdistrict.com to download a complimentary Studio Guide.


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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

A Time For Art

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CHRIS STACK

THE CREATION OF JONAS GERARD’S 2014 FINE ART CALENDAR

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“A man should hear a little music, read a little poetry, and see a fine picture every day of his life, in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful which God has implanted in the human soul.” ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Art is not something to be locked away in fancy rooms and saved for special occasions. It’s something to be enjoyed every day, enriching our lives on every level. It was towards this goal that Jonas embarked on the creation of his first calendar in 2013, featuring a broad selection of paintings drawn from the many styles and periods of his 50-year career. Time has a funny way of playing serendipitous tricks on us all though.

When the time came to choose art for his 2014 calendar, Jonas was undergoing a tremendous shift in his painting style. It became obvious that the 2014 calendar was a perfect medium to commemorate Fine-tuning the colors at Blue Ridge Printing. this new path: the only problem was that he was still in the midst of creating it. in Asheville made it easy for Jonas and staff to Energized by this fresh direction, the work closely with them to fine-tune the calenresult was an outpouring of new art. Confludar design, and keep things local! ence, a show of his new large flow paintings The resulting calendar captures the spirit sprung from this same creative well. Choosing of Jonas’ new works and is the perfect way to the calendar images from this artistic avalanche let art flow into every day of the coming year. was a daunting task, and some paintings were photographed and added to the calendar design The Jonas Gerard 2014 Calendar is before the paint was dry. available at Jonas Gerard Fine Art, or online The next task was to find a printer with at www.jonasgerard.com the quality, experience, technology and artistic sensitivity needed to translate the magic of Jonas’ paintings into the commercial printing process. We were lucky enough to find one Jonas Gerard Fine Art is located at 240 in our own backyard. Blue Ridge Printing has Clingman Avenue, Asheville – in the heart worked for over thirty years to build a reputaof the River Arts District. Studio and tion amongst the top commercial printers in Gallery are open every day from 10-6 p.m. the United States. Their facility being located

G. Carol Bomer

SOLI DEO GLORIA STUDIO

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I have been painting for more than 30 years and have a studio in Asheville’s River Arts District.

“There are people for whom art is just there—it’s like water or air to them; not a game, a career move, or a market. It offers communication, mystery, and kicks—in the deepest sense.”

Seek the eternal in My current painting medium is cold wax and oil. My the present, process of layering wax and oil paint and mark-making is seek it in the past and not mindless but it is mysterious. Grace Carol Bomer. Morning Star Arising the future. by Grace Carol Bomer. I believe that Link them with the creativity is part of trajectory of your course. who we are as humans made in the image of The Creator. For you are We are made to give worth to / worship. This heart direcyou are tion is what my work addresses-- universal longings for you are immortality juxtaposed with a sense of our mortality and you are the vessel. brokenness. Broken beauty is as paradoxical as seeing the ~ Michael O’Brien unseen. I like Jem Cohen’s quote in a recent interview about the movie Museum Hours which he directed. Grace Bomer is the owner of Soli Deo Strangers and Aliens, Pilgrims on Earth by Grace Carol Bomer.

WORKS BY JONAS GERARD ON DISPLAY AT NC STAGE

Gloria, Inc., 140-D Roberts Street in Asheville’s River Arts District.

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KELLY WALKER

After an extensive renovation of the lobby and theatre, NC Stage held a ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday, October 29, 2013. A special exhibit by Jonas Gerard is on display in the newly renovated lobby. Works displayed are part of Confluence, his new series of large flow paintings, and are complimented by selected earlier works. The exhibit can Opposites Attract II be seen by Jona Gerard during the run of The Book Club Play through November 17, and during Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol which runs from December 11-29, 2013.

IF YOU GO: North Carolina

Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

Diane English, Great Cosmic Happy Ass While dawdling along dozens of spiritual paths in search of my inner muffin, I began doodling the zany cast of characters that live in my head. From wacky gurus, irreverent monks to blessed bovines, I’ve shared my world as greeting cards, prints and magnets since 1996. I’ve managed, on occasion to get in touch with my ‘bean of light’ and discovered the fastest way to enlightenment is a good laugh and a cosmic happy ass. Great Cosmic Happy Ass, 375 Depot St., River Arts District www.greatcosmichappyass.com

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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

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Jeff Pittman

Jeff Pittman has been painting scenes of Asheville and the surrounding area for over a decade now and is primarily known for his use of vibrant color in both his street scenes around town or in his vast luminous skies over familiar mountain ridges.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about how you first got into painting.

Jeff Pittman: I didn’t pick up a paintbrush

until moving to the mountains of Western NC back in 1997. Ever since then I’ve been inspired by the local scenery & have been refining my style ever since.

RRM: What influences your artwork the most each day?

JP: Sunlight & color mostly. I enjoy

observing the atmospheric effects of the Appalachian Wildflowers by Jeff Pittman

sun, clouds & mountains for my landscape, and different vantage points and interesting shadows for my cityscape scenes.

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

ing Rhododendron.

RRM: Talk a little about

your style and how it has evolved over the years?

JP: I realized early on

that I couldn’t really draw that well, but once I added color, I found I was on to something. I think my work has gotten more expressive over the RRM: Any years. I try not to be so Jeff Pittman Photo: Erica Mueller new projects literal with my subject you care to talk about at this time? matter, but loosen up, both with the brushstrokes and in color selections. JP: I’m juggling a couple of commissions at the moment, but they’re still in the early stages. I am working on composition & ideas in my head while stretching the large canvasses Jeff Pittman’s studio is located in the needed. One is a large triptych for a family’s heart of Asheville’s thriving River Arts new home in South Asheville. They have the District at 140-D Roberts Street. (828) perfect spot in their foyer for the three panels 242-8014, www.jeffpittmanart.com depicting a single mountain view with bloom-

INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

Karen Keil Brown

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INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Rapid River Magazine: How did you get into painting?

Karen Keil Brown: I have been creating art as long as I can remember. After graduating from college with an art degree, the time I have dedicated to my craft has varied throughout the years. When we were raising our family, I concentrated on commissions and seeking out local areas to show and sell my work. I enjoyed being an art teacher for 10 years in the private school system and sharing my art knowledge with our children. As the years progressed, I created more time to paint and developed a sustainable art business. I joined the COOP, Asheville Gallery of Art, and Gold Leaf Design Gallery in Chattanooga TN. Three years ago I moved my art studio out of the house and into the River Arts District, first in the Warehouse Studios and currently at Pink Dog Creative Studios on Depot St. The River Arts District is a great location with fabulous energy, creative people and good exposure for selling.

RRM: What influences you?

KKB: God’s perfect

nature influences me Karen Keil Brown and Life Inspires me! I was raised in the beautiful mountains of WNC and I have been marcanvas by stimulating their imagination at the veled for many years by the power and beauty same time. of nature and its seasons and cycles. I take lots I have tried different mediums but I preof photographs while hiking or biking around fer oil paint because I like the way it flows and the area and I use them to inspire my composimixes on the canvas. tions not to dictate them. I paint intuitively as I RRM: What is in the future for your Art? try to communicate to the viewer the message of a peaceful, tranquil sense of positive energy. KKB: I try not to plan too far ahead because Artist influences: Monet, JM William Turner, I want to be open to new opportunities. I am Van Gogh, Marc Rothko, Joan Mitchell. always looking for something new to inspire me. Today I am working more abstract and in RRM: How would you describe your style? stronger colors. KKB: My landscapes have an ethereal, contemI continue to give back to the community porary, semi-abstract style. My oil paintings by donating my art to non profits and volunoften have rolling misty fog dipping into the teering in our art community. I am fortunate valleys and mountain ridges. Many people to be able to follow my passion and to create visiting the area want to have a painting that art work that brings joy into my buyers’ home reminds them of the Smoky or Blue Ridge or office. Mountains; I enjoy trying to convey that on

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Painting by Karen Keil Brown

Karen Keil Brown currently has works on display in Brevard, at the Element Spa from October 23 through January 24, 2014, and November 9-10 for the River Arts District Art Walk open studio tour. Visit Karen’s website for more information www.karenkbrown.com

Karen Keil Brown Fine Art Original Paintings Ethereal Landscapes, Oil and Acrylic Pink Dog Creative Suite 160 Depot St., Asheville, NC 28801 www.karenkbrown.com/news


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INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about the artists at 375 Depot.

Julie Bell: First, I’d like to tell you

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DENNIS RAY

RRM: I understand you’re a

nurse. How did you end up at Studio 375?

about my great studio-mates in Suite about JB: A few years ago, Michael and 107 at 375 Depot. They have helped I moved to Asheville for the art, me release creative energies that were hiking, food, and changing seainside me waiting to explode. Some sons. Michael was painting and of the joys of sharing space are the keeping our home together while laughter, stories, and positive encourI attempted to balance a busy agement to learn and grow. career and graduate school. Four of us share working studio I would do homework in space in Suite 107 at 375 Depot the studio and started itching Street. Michael Allen Campbell to play with all the colors and retired from a career in health care textures. I started creating multito create vibrant, fluid abstracts with media pieces with my photos, acrylic gels and pigments. paper I made in our Lynn Stanley is a kitchen, and found classically trained Sumi-e objects like rusty Asian brush painter at metal. My studio Silver Poem Studio. She’s is “Stories and always willing to talk Whimsies” because with studio visitors about I try to blend past her technique, brushes, and present with papers, and lessons fun and joy. learned from the process. This past year, Barbara Frohmader, of as I wrestled with Abbi’s Brush Studio, some issues, that paints bright, colorful energy came out landscapes and florals in in pieces featuring acrylic, watercolor and weights, wires, and fences. oil. She’s often joined Now, I’m exploring wire Lynn Stanley in Suite 107 by her dog, sculpture and discovering Teddy, and her grandhow the wires move and daughter Anna, a budding interact with one another artist. and space. Our suite is at the In 34 years as a nurse, end of a hallway filled I’ve developed great with an amazing diversity respect for the partnerof artists. Four women, ship between the patient including Scot Cameronand the healthcare team. Bell, create ceramics. As professionals, we often They have known each have a vision of what is other for a dozen years right for the patient, just and each have a unique like I might have a vision approach to their arts, of what I want wires or from jewelry to useful obphotos or colors to do. Painting by Julie Bell jects to whimsical pieces. But, in the end, it Our building is is the patient who must owned by Steven Keull, a decide on the right course professional photographer for herself or himself. who has been in the River And, it is the wires, Arts District for over photos, papers, gels, and 20 years. His works are colors which ultimately displayed in a large galdecide where they intend lery space along with oil to go. I am a participant paintings by Gary Duda. and cheerleader for the Next, down the hall is process. And, I’m blessed Diane English, creator with studio mates who are of the cards, posters, and cheering for me! original paintings of the RRM: What are your Great Cosmic Happy-Ass hours? Card Company. Scot Cameron-Bell

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Artist Julie Bell

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Barbara Frohmader

JB: Please come visit Michael, Lynn,

Barbara and me! We are open many days of the week. Count on finding us open on Fridays, Saturdays & Strolls. Feel free to make an appointment if you’re coming at another time and want to make sure we haven’t stepped out for a moment! All our contact information is in the River Arts District printed guide, or go to www.riverartsdistrict.com. We also have a Facebook page for Studio 375 Depot and most of us have studio websites. Find mine at www. storiesandwhimsies.com.

Studio 375 Depot 375 Depot Street, Asheville in the River Arts District

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poetry + culture Lonely in the Heart of the World An 800+ page epic fantasy by Mindi Meltz, an amazing writer who lives on the outskirts of Hendersonville. Titled Lonely in the Heart of the World, the book tells the story of a forgotten princess who leaves her tower to search for the prince who never came. Her half-god father created the City, a mechanized illusion of paradise. Named Lonely by the wind, she is the City’s ideal of feminine beauty. Now a witch curses her: find proof of love or be trapped beneath this tower forever. The book features cover art by Brian Mashburn, interior art by Chiwa, calligraphy and illuminated lettering by Krys Crimi, and design by Susan Yost, all Asheville residents. Mindi Meltz’s first novel, Beauty, Beauty was published in 2009. Her essays have been published in WNC Woman (2009), Animus of Wells, Maine (2001), in the literary anthology Earth Beneath, Sky Beyond by Outrider Press (2000). Visit www.logosophiabooks.com

IF YOU GO: Mindi Meltz booksignings

and readings: Saturday, November 9, City Lights Bookstore in Silva at 3 p.m.; Friday December 6, Firestorm Cafe in Asheville at 7 p.m.

The Poet’s Voice

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AN OASIS OF PEACE

I spent four October days in St. Paul, MN. I taught writing classes at Wisdom Ways Center for Spirituality. My cello went with Center me, and together we sang Pablo Casal’s Song of the Birds, and an Appalachian Melody Melody. People wrote, listened, breathed. Together, we created sanctuary. A sanctuary is a place of refuge, a haven. In a class of twenty-five, quiet was intense. I heard pencils mummer on pages. When sharing our writing with the group, there was quiet respect for the Word. (Yes, with a capital “W”.) We read e.e. cummings poem, “i thank you god for most this amazing /day”, a poem from lucille clifton, writings of Evelyn Underhill, an Anglican theologian who wrote in 1937. Her book, The Spiritual Life, is a mainstay of my classes. Black Elk came into our meeting place with his wisdom, “The holy land is everywhere.” The mood of the classroom was reverent. Here is the poem by lucille clifton: when I stand round among poets, sometimes I hear a single music in us, one note dancing us through the singular moving world. This is lucille at a poetry reading, knowing herself to be part of the music. I wrote a similar poem at a Malaprops reading, before I knew lucille’s poem. I feel good with these strangers gathered in this church of poetry hearing the Word believing every divine syllable.

‘Small Moves’ continued from page 12

The Spaces In-Between, pen and ink by Greg Vineyard.

asking things like “How do I get my work in here?” and then walk right back out. I’m not suggesting that one pretend to look at art they’re not interested in before initiating a conversation, but rather, just chat with artists (and the staff, who are also busy), when one really does appreciate the art. It’s much more genuine, thus allowing true connections to be made. Another way to learn more about artists is through their websites. Read their statements and blogs, and note their professional affiliations. Many of the questions one might ask may already be carefully answered in writing. And an art association website could be the most appropriate avenue to inquire about membership fees, studio availability and seasonal sales activity. It’s also important to establish what one is bringing to the party. Are your branding,

24 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

A friend of mine in Minnesota went to a reading by Seamus Heaney. Charles Preble is a retired Episcopal priest, and master carpenter. He mailed this poem to Seamus, and received a reply three days before Mr. Heaney died. Here’s Charles’ poem:

Seamus Heaney On that wind-full night, the hall was full to hear your voice, and I was keen to listen. Your words, your brogue, came blurred, my hearing clogged. I heard a wordless ocean I heard the voice of waves, which swayed my boat of skin, tolled my bones; cadences, and silences, rolling, rocking me in an Irish sea. At close I rose to give you applause. I had heard a deeper sound which took me into a sea uncharted and free. Your books for sale, Human Chain, District and Circle, charts to sail me home. And still I hear your ocean call as on that wind-full night. On this visit, the Minnesota sky did its usual magnificent tricks — clouds and sunsets. Highway scenery boasted Brontosaurus-sized machines harvesting soybeans, grains, and corn. Autumn is ahead of us there, in full glory. When my husband and I travel, we get off the interstate and often ramble about, this time, along the Mississippi River. We stopped to watch barges maneuver locks and dams. We had our pictures taken with trolls and Vikings (not the football team) in a city park.

business and marketing plans set? Do you have a unique identity to share with the world? In your communications, are you providing your business card or e-card to your new contacts? Asheville’s a small town, and these folks could very easily turn out to be your new business associates, studio mates and best allies once you’re here, so it’s important to stay in touch. Say all these small moves have led to the Big Move. Or, like many, you’re already here. Read everything – and support the advertisers, as many of them are artists, as well as professionals who offer art services. Plus, they are our local friends! Attend as many events as possible. Take marketing classes and business workshops. Have shows. Support your colleagues. And, most importantly, create your art every day! A thoughtful progression is a perfect way to consider all potential steps along the way and to stay the course! When one is launching (or re-launching), those Small Moves – where

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

We brought home Minnesota pumpkins and colorful corn for our front door. There was breakfast and cookies from a cousin and Aunt, ninety-eight years old, to give us strength for the journey. And... there were tigers! (We listened to The Life of Pi, by Yann Martel.) I didn’t know this article was about gratitude until I re-read and revised. There’s gratitude for readers, listeners, tigers, silence, sanctuary, and yes, this opportunity to share my trip. Opportunities abound, not only in Minnesota, but right here in Western North Carolina. Visit your favorite independent book store. Head to a library. Read William Stafford, Mary Oliver, T. S. Eliot, R. S. Thomas, Scott Owen, Sharon Olds, Tommy Hays. These poets, hearing lucille’s “music,” create sanctuary. Their work is intimate; revealing. Read. Listen to the small voice inside you. Listen well. Write it. I took photographs of Minnesota clouds. I wrote poems, too. The poems put me “there,” more clearly than the photos. I can not only “see” but feel and know the place.

October In the field the corn dance begins it’s dry rattle, awaits the vicious combine, all blade and chop. The honey-gold grain pelt stretches to the horizons.

~ Carol Pearce Bjorlie

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

one is detecting new things in the spaces inbetween – can really add quality to the journey. I’m wishing you much success – and I look forward to seeing what you do! IF YOU Illustrations by Greg Vineyard will GO be on display November 1-30 at True

Blue Art Supply, 30 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. Opening reception takes place Friday, November 1, from 6-8 p.m. Free and open to the public.

Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville (www. zapow.com), carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Eyes of the Heart

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

Photography as a Christian Contemplative Practice

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WRITTEN BY CHRISTINE VALTERS PAINTNER

Every now and then a book comes along that can change your creative life. Its pages help you discover what is sacred, touches you deep in your soul, and yes, even brings you closer to God. It doesn’t happen too often, but when it does, it’s worth re-reading such books, putting their wisdom into practice and sharing them with others. The first book that did that for me (and still does) is Julia Cameron’s seminal book on creativity: The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity Creativity. It changed my life when I first read it in 1994. Practicing its simple principles every day re-charged my creativity, or as Cameron might say, reconnected me to The Creator. Another book important to me is The Tools: Transform Your Problems into Courage, Confidence and Creativity by Phil Stutz and Barry Michaels (2012). This book, based on five “tools,” is a specific way to change behavior with reliance on a Higher Power—a challenging, often difficult, therapy program,

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which has become very popular in Hollywood. Both these books speak to a wide range of artistic pursuits, such as writing and performing and, in the politically correct way of things these days, steer clear of saying anything that might come close to being called “religious.” You know, “I’m spiritual, but not religious.” Eyes of the Heart: Photography as a Christian Contemplative Practice is not only more specific in the art it emphasizes – photography – but makes no bones that it is based on Christian principles. But its Christianity is so all encompassing, so enthusiastic, so beautiful, that anybody, even an agnostic, can find inspiration in its words and illustrations. I’ve read quite a bit of contemplative literature but no book has touched my inner monk like this one. Born in the U.S., author Christine Valters Paintner, along with her husband, are now oblates (laypersons) in a Benedic-

Girls and Monsters

FOUR YOUNG ADULT WRITERS COME TO MALAPROP’S

It’s a curious coincidence that two of Asheville’s favorite Young Adult authors have names that sound alike.

The Skylark Trilogy Trilogy, for which she’s written the first two books. The first was titled Skylark and the second is Shadowlark. Shadowlark www.meaganspooner.com

Gwenda Bond lives in Lexington, Kentucky, Asheville authors, Megan in a house that’s over That’s where Shepherd (L) and Meagan Spooner. hundred years old. She’s their similarities end, the author of Blackwood though. Their work is wildly different as (which is currently in development as a well as wonderfully inventive. They’ll be TV series), The Woken Gods and Girl on a joined at this special event with two other Wire, that will come out in 2014. talented American authors, all of whom http://gwendabond.typepad.com have become enormously popular with young readers, especially those who love their stories on the dark side. Here’s info about them including their websites so you can read up about them and get their books before the event. Megan Shepherd’s first novel, The Madman’s Daughter Daughter, is told from the point of view of the 16-year old daughter of the mad doctor in The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells. The sequel, due out in January is Her Dark Custody Custody. www.meganshepherd.com Meagan Spooner puts her world travels into her gripping dystopian series,

NOVEMBER

“…no book has touched my ‘inner monk’ like this one.”

April Genevieve Tucholke hails from Oregon. Her first novel is Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, a gothic thriller romance, set against a creepy summertime backdrop. www.apriltucholke.com IF YOU Girls and Monsters, Thursday, GO November 17 at 7 p.m.

Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Christine Valters Paintner

tine monastery in Galway, Ireland. Her extensive scholarly studies combined with her artistic pursuits to form her “Eyes of the Heart” philosophy. She explains it in several chapters with titles like “The Symbolic Significance of Color” and “Seeing the Holy Everywhere,” which end in fun, practical exercises that turn photography into acts of contemplation. Instead of compiling photographs of 50 flowers, make 50 photos of one dandelion so you can see all the wonders in one of God’s creations. Instead of taking a photo, learn to receive it. Instead of framing an object in a conventional way, experiment with all kinds of framing, as if creating portals to its different essences. Instead of looking at things, gaze at them, behold them—really see them. Most of Paintner’s inspiration, in addition to the Bible, comes from the ancient contemplative traditions, such as the desert mothers and fathers, and monasteries, and spiritual luminaries such as Teresa of Avila and Rumi. A modern day mystic who saw photography as a contemplative practice is one of my heroes, the Trappist monk Thomas Merton (1915-1968). He wrote more than 70 books, including his most famous one, Seven Storey Mountain (1948), which ignited a world-wide interest in the contemplative life. Paintner is impressive in the way she has one foot solidly planted in the past, and the other gleaming with the latest global technology. In addition to writing several books, she is also the abbess of an on-line monastery. At the website Abbey of the Arts: Transformative Living through Contemplative & Expressive Arts, you can sign up for her free online “Monk in the World” class. And become a member of The Holy Disorder of the Dancing Monks, a growing online community of people who love to combine contemplation with creativity.

Friday, November 1 at 7 p.m. DANIEL COSTON, North Carolina Musicians: Photographs and Conversations. Tuesday, November 5 at 7 p.m. ANN PATCHETT, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. $15, plus take $10 off Ann’s new book! UNCA’s Lipinsky Auditorium. Saturday, November 9 at 7 p.m. LENOIRRHYNE graduate students reading, hosted by Laura Hope-Gill. Sunday, November 10 at 3 p.m. KAREN LAURITZEN, Nothing Vanishes, Memoir of a Life Transformed. Wednesday, November 13 at 7 p.m. Spruce: Step-By-Step Guide to Upholstery and Design with Amanda Brown. Friday, November 15 at 7 p.m. TARA CONKLIN, The House Girl. Saturday, November 16 at 3 p.m. Marie Harris and Vanessa Brantley Newton, authors of The Girl Who Heard Colors. Monday, November 18 at 7 p.m. ELIZABETH BERRIEN, Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path From Loss to Hope. Tuesday, November 19 at 7 p.m. Create a Targeted Job Search; Produce Results. Wednesday, November 20 at 7 p.m. PHIL GARRETT, Inside Acrylics: Studio Secrets from Today’s Top Artists. Thursday, November 21 at 7 p.m. MATT FRAZIER, No Meat Athlete: Discover Your Fittest, Fastest, Happiest Self. Friday, November 22 at 7 p.m. JOSHILYN JACKSON, Someone Else’s Love Story. Saturday, November 23 at 7 p.m. WILLIAM CONESCU, Kara Was Here. Saturday, November 30 at 7 p.m. JENNIFER PHARR DAVIS, hiking memoir, Called Again.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

For more information on Christine Valters Paintner and Abbey of the Arts visit www.abbeyofthearts.com Eyes of the Heart: Photography as a Christian Contemplative Practice; written by Christine Valters Paintner; Sorin Books, Notre Dame, IN (2013); paperback, 143 pp., illustrated.

Marcianne Miller is a local writer/critic. You can reach her at marci@aquamystique.com.

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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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On the eve of the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Festival I’m whetting my appetite with a few of the more audacious spirits out there; a nice eclectic bath of “musical biscuits”! As always be sure to support our fine independent local shops; without them your music listening life would be fallow indeed.

ARP “More” Small Town Super Sound Records With the release of “More” ARP wunderkind Alexis Georgopoulos moves even further from the bluster rock inclinations of his first two albums towards pop structures that, while hardly conventional, give the listener something to go by. He’s also wisely augmented the harsher techno beat aspects of his music with a bit of much needed familiarity: I’m all for synthesizers but an acoustic piano and gently strummed guitar — not to mention a bit of pump organ — can go a long way towards giving a human element to music. Sure there’s an over reliance on drum programming but Georgopoulos also digs deeply into the sort of chamber pop that Van Dyke Parks and Richard Barone do so brilliantly. For history buffs there’s a bit of Warm Jets era Brian Eno (the delightful “Judy Nylon”) while the sorrow laden bits of “Light + Sound” and “17th Daydream” could pass for a pair of Left Banke outtakes. But while Georgopoulos proudly embraces his influences he’s never beholden to them, making “More” much greater than some mere collage of nostalgia. Instead it’s one of the more pleasant surprises of the season and an album that lingers long after the experience has ended. ****

Sara Hickman Shine Kirtland Records While a virtual icon in her home state — in 2010 she was even declared the Official State Musician of Texas — Sara Hickman has somehow managed to avoid the major league spotlight even thought her songs have been covered by the likes of Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett, Shawn Colvin, Rhett Miller, and others. She did flirt with a number one hit (the VH1 promoted I Couldn’t Help Myself”) and is a generally considered one of the most generous philanthropists and nicest people in the industry. So why isn’t she better known? Part of the reason lies in her refusal to make records that cater to the masses. In fact, her albums are often pejoratively considered insular, but that’s a charge Sara Hickman will tread with pride. Her records also tend to lack a thematic identity. In some ways Hickman is a throwback to the 60s, when artists released a series of 45s before collecting them into a single entity. As such Shine is all over the stylistic map, but that’s much of its charm and durability. From the confectionary pop of “Tasty Sweet” (“You’re the kind of boy I’d love to eat / Ice cream and honey, Tasty Sweet!”) to the oddly morose “Trouble With Boxes” this is go

26 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

down easy music, Not simplistic mind you, but songs clearly intended to stick in the brain with cotton candy certainty. “Selfish Freak” is another peculiar turn, as Hickman dresses down her suitor in ways that make you almost feel sorry for the poor recipient of her vitriol. Shine is a collection of contrasting songs, most of which blossomed out of a series of poems Hickman was working on. They do feel at time half formed but there’s a friendly vibe here that partially compensates for the ill defined final product. This may be a case of a record being less than the sum of its parts but there’s enough good stuff herein to balance the scales. ***

Neko Case The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You ANTI Records Neko Case, who preceded the release of this album with a media blitz that included several interviews, has never been one to hide her true feelings. She can often across as brash, a bit overly defensive, and at times even contrived. Her songs, on the other hand, are an entirely different matter; from the start she’s couched them in metaphors and illusory comments that made it difficult to separate the “real” Neko Case from the characters who inhabited her albums. With the release of the wildly adventurous The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You (heretofore known as TWTG), a 12track cornucopia of sound and fury, Case the public figure seems more closely hinged to her music. It’s her most exposed and rawest effort yet; as such it takes some getting used to but amply rewards the listener willing to invest in repeated listens. Its dozen tracks are neatly divided between the quieter, more pensive moods of “I’m from Nowhere” and a beautifully redolent cover of Nico’s “Afraid”, both of which rely on sparse and unsettled arrangements, and the more foot to the pedal rockers “City Swans” and “Man”, the latter of which echoes Case’s earlier punk leanings. At the core of the album are the midtempo bits which anchor the proceedings and balance the duality of Case’s life and artistry. While Case adorns the album with guest contributions from such heavy hitters as M. Ward and various members of Calexico, Los Lobos, Mudhoney, and My Morning Jacket (along with longtime collaborators The New Pornographers) her voice is still the centerpiece. And what a voice it is: at once sturdy and elastic, bellicose and warmly gentle. Neko Case may just be the most unique stylist since the great Sandy Denny. With

TWTG her songwriting chops have matured to a point that her dynamic vocals are no longer the raison d’être to buy her records, but rather an additional component to an already near perfect package. I’ll admit to initially finding Neko Case the public figure a bit off putting — she seemed to be wearing her punk creed in ways that seemed forced and shallow — but darned if I haven’t come around. Give TWTG the consideration and contemplation it deserves and I can virtually promise you’ll do the same. ****1/2

Carly Ritter S/T Vanguard Records As the granddaughter of Country and Western legend Tex Ritter (and daughter of actor John), Carly Ritter might easily be pigeonholed as a folk country artist. She did after all spend several years studying Scottish folk and Vanguard Records, to which she is attached, is known primarily as a folk label. So it comes as a pleasant surprise to discover the heavy 60s pop feel to her debut, a record that conjures up the delightful strands of Jackie DeShannon, Bobbie Gentry, and even a bit of Nancy Sinatra. Not so much in the arrangements—Carly Carly Ritter (the album) is largely built upon acoustic guitars and an understated drum/bass rhythm section — but the buoyant atmosphere and songs (all but one written or co-written by Ritter) are concise, cheery, and a joy to listen to. The opening track “It Don’t Come Easy” (not the Ringo song) is as infectious as it is delightful, with a hook and chorus that are nearly impossible to ignore. “Princess of the Prairie” is a powerful tale, and one which shows that Ritter can construct ambitious narrative when called upon to do so. Ritter has acknowledged Carole King as a major influence and much like King she always keeps the song at the forefront. Her debut is never cluttered or distracting, and the pacing of the songs (a lost art in these days of digital downloads) is impeccable. I get the sense that Carly Ritter is only scratching the surface, and that this fine album is merely indicative of how far she can go. I for one look forward to the journey. ****

The Band Live at the Academy of Music 1971 Capital Records Whoa Nelly! This four CD/1 DVD mega set is culled from much of the same source materials as The Band’s celebrated Rock of Ages ‘CD’s’ continued on page 27


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sound experience Majorly Talented

Claire Lynch

BY JAMES

CASSARA

later Whatch Gonna Do, her second Rounder release, arrived. In addition to singing her to various on her solo albums and industry publishrecordings with the Front ers. As a result, Porch String Band, Lynch Lynch’s songs continues to lend her vowere soon covcals to albums from such ered by Stephanie artists as Ralph Stanley, Davis (“MoonEmmylou Harris, Patty lighter”), Patty Loveless, Dolly Parton, Loveless (“Some and Pam Tillis. It is this Claire Lynch Photo: Mike Melnyk Morning Soon”), wealth of experience that and Kathy Mattea she brings to her Asheville (“Hills of Alabam’”), and she was signed by appearance, her first in many years. Polygram to a staff writing contract. In 1990, By any measure Claire Lynch is a she and Larry formed a new version of the major talent, one of Bluegrass music’s “A Front Porch String Band. List” artists. Seeing her on stage at the very The following year, the band released its intimate Isis Theatre will be a treat for fans comeback album, Lines & Traces. In subseold and new alike. quent years the lineup of the group has continually changed while Claire and Larry have remained mainstays. Claire Lynch’s second IF solo album, Friends for a Lifetime, released in YOU Claire Lynch and her band at 1993 and reissued in 1995, was a celebration of GO the Isis Theatre in West Asheville gospel music. on Saturday, November 16. Her 1995 effort, Moonlighter, was nomiTickets are $18 advance / $20 at the nated for a Grammy Award as Best Bluegrass door, General Admission: Doors 5 p.m; Album. Silver and Gold, released in 1997 was Show 9 p.m. Seated concert. Limited tables nearly as successful while Lovelight (2000) available with dinner reservations. Isis and Out in the Country (2001) followed soon Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood after. In March of 2006, following a five year Rd., Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit break, Lynch released New Day. Three years www.isisasheville.com.

While she’s best known as a voice for bluegrass, the music that helped shape Claire Lynch goes far beyond the confines of a single genre.

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Born in Kingston, Kentucky it would seem only natural that Lynch would fall under the spell of music that emanates from that region but, from an early age, she was equally enamored with the folk songs of Joni Mitchell and the studio wizardry of The Beatles. Her high pitched voice, which has been compared favorably to that of Nanci Griffith and Alison Krauss, is equally at home singing songs of Abbey Road or Mountain Laurels. And while often seen as a relative newcomer to music her career dates back to the late 1970’s. By the age of twelve her family, who had always shared her love of music (Lynch and her sisters sang together in an informal trio) had been uprooted and moved to Alabama. That move, while certainly traumatic for Lynch, exposed her to the sounds of soul and country. Dusty Springfield, herself no stranger to genre crossing, became a favorite with her seminal recording Dusty In Memphis — essential listening in the Lynch household. While still in high school Lynch met her future husband Larry, also an aspiring musician. After their graduation, Claire worked at an insurance agency while he attended the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa. A turning point came when Claire

‘CD’s’ continued from page 26

live album from the same period. It digs deeply into the Band’s year-end four-night stint at New York City’s Academy of Music unearthing previously unknown footage and tracks. The original two disc album has been sequenced to more accurately reflect their set list while the actual recordings, remixed from the soundboard, are clear and bright. Unfortunately, such an exhaustive overview of four consecutive nights results in far too much duplication. The first two discs contain only one previously unreleased song (as scorching “W.S. Walcott Medicine Show”) as well as the four song encore with Bob Dylan, but the remaining excavated moments — 17 tracks in all — will entice the most fervent of Band enthusiasts. More frustrating is the “live” DVD which doesn’t actually contain any live footage, but rather the fabled 1971 New Years Eve Show with cleaned up audio and a series of still photos and other memorabilia. Ouch! Nevertheless this is one of our nation’s greatest bands caught at the absolute peak of their creativity, so in that regards it is hard to kvetch. The boxed set is pricey — around $100 at most retailers — but for those who

was invited to hear a bluegrass band — soon dubbed Hickory Wind — that Larry was forming with fellow students. She was so taken by the performance that she accepted, on the spot, their invitation to sing with them. It was when Hickory Wind was hired as the house band of a club in Birmingham, that they changed their name to the Front Porch String Band. Over the next seven years, Claire and Larry, who were married in 1976, and the Front Porch String Band became one of the hardest-working groups in Alabama. Their self-produced debut album, Smilin’ at You, released in 1977, was followed by Country Rain later that same year. In 1981, the Front Porch String Band released a self-titled, nationally distributed album while Claire released her solo debut, Breakin’ It, on Ambush Records. In 1982, with Lynch now pregnant with the first of her two children, she and her husband disbanded the Front Porch String Band and settled in northern Alabama. They both enrolled back in school but continued to perform weekends around the clubs of Huntsville, even while Claire continued to write songs. Her real break came when she met former Seldom Scene singer John Starling, who himself had left the music business. Starling became her unofficial mentor, helping Lynch hone her composing skills while promoting

love The Band beyond reason and have pockets deep enough to indulge themselves I say go for it. ***1/2

Muscle Shoals (DVD) Magnolia Pictures If Hitsville USA was synonymous with the fabled Motown recordings of Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, The Temptations, and so many more, than Muscle Shoals Sound Studios is no less celebrated for the particular brand of Southern Rock that emanated from its amplifiers. Formed in 1969 when sessions greats Barry Beckett (keyboards), Roger Hawkins (drums), Jimmy Johnson (guitar) and David Hood (bass); collectively known as The Swampers left FAME Studios to pursue their own ideal of a musical collective, the Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section — as they soon became known — was the first rhythm section to own its own studio and, eventually, its own

publishing and production companies. That distinctive accompaniment and arrangement has been heard on a tremendous number of legendary recordings, ranging from Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, and the Staple Singers to Paul Simon. Legend has it that Simon called the studio wanting to “get some of those Black musicians” to record with him. Little did Simon, and most of the music listening public, realize that Beckett, Hawkins, Johnson, and Hood were all white. Such is stuff of great story making and telling. Director Greg “Freddy” Camalier tells that story with a nice mixture of awe and precision. It would be too easy to get caught up in the minutiae of Muscle Shoals — obsessing over trivial bits that only the most fanatical would care to know about — but Camalier instead wisely focuses on the music and its impact on the day. At the center is Rick Hall, who rose up from abject poverty to become owner and principal architect of FAME, the studio which laid the groundwork for Muscle Shoals to follow. His is a fascinating tale of perseverance, an ear for talent, and impeccable timing. In a trim 112 minutes, not one second of which seems superfluous, the door is open to one of Rock and Roll’s sacred shrines. *****

Red June Celebrates 5 Years Red June seamlessly blends bluegrass, old-time, country and American roots John Cloyd Miller, Natalya Weinstein and Will Straughan music, while integrating striking three-part harmonies, tasteful instrumental work, and honest, soulful songwriting. Red June will celebrate their recent recording contract with Organic Records at the Grey Eagle on Saturday, November 16.

IF YOU GO: Saturday, November 16.

Amanda Anne Platt of the Honeycutters opens the show. Doors 7 p.m.; Show 8 p.m. $10 adv/ $12 at door. All ages. At The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave. Asheville. www.thegreyeagle.com/events/red-june, (828) 232-5800.

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noteworthy The Daring and Innovative Singer-Songwriter Susan Werner

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The ever-inventive visionary musician Susan Werner returns to Diana Wortham Theatre with her newest release, The Hayseed Project, Thursday, November 21 at 8 p.m.

BY JOHN

ELLIS

music career in Philadelphia, after studying classical voice at Temple University. Inspired by a Nanci Griffith concert, Werner left behind her opera training and began performing as a singer-songwriter at With Hayseed, the fourth coffeehouses throughout the in a series of concept albums, Northeast. Werner again keeps her audiences A brilliant lyricist, Werner guessing and laughing simultaneself-released her first album ously. Presented in partnership Midwestern Saturday Night in with ASAP (Appalachian Sustain1992 and then went on to put able Agriculture Project), The Singer-Songwriter out Live at Tin Angel the folHayseed Project revisits the lanSusan Werner lowing year. guage and people Werner knows Her breakout album, BMG/Private best, and pays homage to Werner’s rural Iowa Music’s Last of the Good Straight Girls, was upbringing. released in 1995. Werner turned another Asheville and Western North Carolina corner in her multifaceted musical career with audiences in particular may appreciate as her vibrant album, Kicking the Beehive, an Werner lends her wry humor and passionate 11-song collection of provocative, poignant, voice to subjects such as farmer’s markets, lyrical originals, infused with the rustic roots of agrochemicals, climate change, drought, longAmerican folk, blues and country music. ing for a sense of place, and the movement towards sustainable agriculture. www.susanwerner.com As an artist, Werner commands rapt attention from her audiences, regardless of the IF variety of musical material she uses to enthrall YOU Susan Werner: The Hayseed her audiences. She plays songs that slide easily GO Project, Thursday, November 21. between folk, jazz and pop all delivered with Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack a dose of sassy wit and classic Midwestern Place at 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular: $30; charm. Student: $25; Child $15; Student Rush Called the “empress of the unexpected” day-of show (with valid I.D.) $10. For more by National Public Radio, Warner was raised information or to purchase tickets, call at (828) in rural Iowa but began her professional 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

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JENNIFER PHARR DAVIS PRESENTS HER HIKING MEMOIR “CALLED AGAIN”

In 2011, Jennifer Pharr Davis became the overall record holder on the Appalachian Trail. By hiking 2,181 miles in 46 days, an average of 47 miles per day, she became the first female to ever set that mark. But this is not a book about records or numbers; this is a book about endurance and faith, and most of all love. The most amazing part of this story is not found at the finish, but is discovered through the many challenges, lessons and relationships that present themselves along the trail. This is Jennifer’s story, in her own words, about how she started this journey with a love for hiking and more significantly a love for her husband Brew. Together, they were able to overcome rugged mountains and raging rivers, sleet storms and 100 degree heat, shin-

splints and illnesses. They made new friends and tested old friendships; they shared together laughter, and tears — a lot of tears. But, through it all, they fell more in love with one another and with the wilderness. By completing this extraordinary amateur feat, Jennifer rose above the culture of multi-million dollar sports contracts that is marked by shortcuts and steroids. This is the story of a real person doing something remarkable. Jennifer Pharr Davis is a modern role-model. She is an authentic hero. IF YOU Jennifer Pharr Davis presents GO Called Again, November 30 at 7 p.m.

at Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

28 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

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Southern Comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Do Not Destroy Good Journalism

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This month, the entire issue of the Columbia Journalism Review is ddedicated edicated to the theme “What is Journalism For.” It also includes written comments from many news people who have achieved greatness in their professions. I started my news career in 1961. I have been in and out of newsrooms in North Carolina for 40 years. Here is a quote from an editorial written in 1961: “Journalists are to assess the performance of journalism… to help stimulate continuing improvement in the profession, Speak out for and to speak out what is right, fair for what is right, fair and decent.” and decent. In my day we heard a lot of these types of quotes from editors. None of us could have imagined the changes we would encounter in the years to come. Many of us began seeing fragments of what was to become of reporters and editors in the 70’s. We started hearing phrases like, “cold type” instead of “hot metal.” The most alarming thing was to see new equipment being dragged into the newsroom; old manual typewriters disappeared, and old printers in the composing rooms vanished, along with the old lineotype machines. No more metal words telling the news waiting for some composer to copy and send to the proofreaders who sat in a little room reading and correcting copy. Many predictions about journalists and journalism, and what is to come of it, have been made recently. More people in big board rooms make the big decisions, not reporters. What should we do? How to we preserve the stories we carry around in our heads all day? I agree with a statement written by professor Jay Rosen when he wrote, “we

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

should place ourselves in a wider universe and become creatures of our time.” We must be out there among the people and be more aware in the moment, the present. Brings to mind another phrase I learned a very long time ago when I heard an editor say, “real reporters are not going to find a story by sitting at a desk, you have to be out and about with the people who live in the community and streets before you will find a different news story to write.” I always remembered that and got many great stories when I was out and about and in the middle of the news. We do not know what is ahead for journalism, but I for one loved every minute of the years I spent writing news stories. I hope that newspapers and the need for professional writers never stops. There are so many stories to write today, it makes my head spin. It’s not so much about what we did in another day; what we learned and what we know today is important, and that, combined with the wisdom we own, should not be thrown out like trash, but be used over and over again in the stories we write. That is what I say and believe is true.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY Author Sherman Alexie has begun an Indies First project where authors are encouraged to put an indie bookstore’s BUY button at the top of their websites. To help promote the project, Alexie is asking indie bookstores to invite authors to sell books in their local bookstores on Small Business Saturday. On Saturday, November 30, local

WNC authors will be hand-selling books to Malaprop’s customers from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. This is a great way to support independent bookstores!

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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local favorites

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Live Music at the Classic Wineseller

Americana, Folk, Hot Swing, and Jazz Among Offerings All shows take place at 7 p.m. On Fridays and non-ticketed Saturdays there is a $10 per person minimum purchase which includes food, drink, and retail. Fresh small plate fare is prepared in the Wineseller kitchen beginning at 5:30pm. Reservations are accepted between 6pm and 7pm by calling (828) 452-6000. Appearing Friday, November 1st is the Vermontbased duo Sam and Zack DuPont. After years of geographical separation, Sam and Zack have been reunited to forge a strong musical collaboration aptly Sam & Zack DuPont named, The DuPont Brothers. For years the singer-songwriter siblings have been honing their skills independent of one another. A groundbreaking show in Burlington, Vermont earlier this year convinced the brothers to blend their unique writing and singing styles and become co-conspirators in this shared family passion. For more information about the DuPont Brothers visit www.dupontbrothersmusic.com. On Saturday, November 2nd, Centerpiece Jazz performs at the last of four shows in the Wineseller’s Fall for Jazz series. Band members Joseph Hasty, guitar/vocals; Leo Johnson, lead guitar/voJoseph Hasty, cals; and, Zack Page, bass, Centerpiece Jazz band leader will perform classic jazz, swing tunes, and show tunes--everything from Armstrong, Ellington and Ella, to Coltrane, Miles and Monk. The evening includes dinner and live jazz for only $39.99 per person. To reserve your table call (828) 452-6000, or email requests to info@ classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited. The remaining November performers include: Friday, November 8 - Michael Pilgrim mandolin, vocals; Drew Kirkpatrick guitar, vocals; Don Mercz guitar. Gypsy jazz & Hot Swing Saturday, November 9 - Joe Cruz piano, vocals. Pop, Beatles, Elton John Friday, November 15 - Jay Brown guitar, harmonica, vocals. Americana roots, folk. Covers and original music Saturday, November 16 - Joe Cruz piano, vocals. Pop, Beatles, Elton John Friday, November 22 - Stuart McNair guitar, vocals. Country, bluegrass, zydeco, folk Saturday, November 23 - Joe Cruz piano, vocals. Pop, Beatles, Elton John

BY

KAY S. MILLER

Friday, November 29 - Ben Wilson guitar and vocals. Original music, covers from the 60s, 70s, 80s

Stuart McNair

Saturday, November 30 - Jacob Johnson guitar, vocals. Neo acoustic folk- funk Enjoy local, regional, or national talent each Friday and Saturday night in the underground environs at the Classic Wineseller.

Jacob Johnson

IF YOU The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church GO Street in Waynesville. For more

details call (828) 452-6000 or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

PG. 39

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“Thank you, Rapid River Magazine, for supporting the arts and culture of Western North Carolina! I have been painting for more than 30 years and have a studio in Asheville’s River Arts District. Rapid River Magazine is a great resource and platform for all the arts. I encourage you to support Rapid River Magazine and the arts and culture of WNC!

~ Grace Bomer is the owner of Soli Deo Gloria, Inc. She stands in front of a painting from her Vessel Series, “Take These Broken Wings and Learn to Fly.”

Soli Deo Gloria Studio, 140 D Roberts St. in the River Arts District

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 29


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HENDERSONVILLE - 28792

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Culturally Rich HENDERSONVILLE

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The Green Room CafĂŠ & Coffeehouse

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The Green Room CafĂŠ & Coffeehouse is celebrating its first year anniversary by giving thanks to our customers and friends.

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Join us any time and especially on November 22 to help us celebrate our one year anniversary. To show our appreciation and thanks to our customers we will offer mouth watering lunch, dinner and drink specials. Come in and enter our drawing for gift certificates for complimentary entrees and free wine. Are you looking for a dining experience that includes scrumptious food made fresh with local ingredients prepared and served to you with personalized service in with a cozy relaxing ambiance? You will find exactly that and more at the Green Room CafĂŠ.

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We welcome you to The Green Room CafĂŠ & Coffeehouse at 536 North Main in Hendersonville. We specialize in preparing fresh and scrumptious artisan crafted sandwiches and dinner entrees, breakfast, baked treats, beer & wine, locally roasted primo espresso & coffees and assortment of loose-leaf teas. We offer vegan and vegetarian options. Join us for live dinner music on Friday and Saturday nights starting at 6:30 p.m. We gather the freshest ingredients and make each breakfast, lunch and dinner entrĂŠe to order. Our thoughtfully created dinner menu offers a selection of choices, from our succulent Sea Scallops pan seared in garlic butter and seasonings, and topped with our balsamic glaze to our tender cuts of pork tenderloin topped with Raspberry Chipotle Sauce to our filet wrapped in apple-wood smoked bacon, grilled and served with blue cheese aioli. “We serve the best sandwiches on Main Street and all of Henderson Countyâ€? we are constantly told by our customers. Our lunch menu offers a selection of choices of gourmet ‘Green Room’ continued on page 37

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Art ApprAisAl services of the

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Specializing in the challenging area of valuing fine art, paintings, prints, drawings, sculpture, and photography. 3URIHVVLRQDOFRQĂ€GHQWLDO DSSUDLVDOGRFXPHQWVSUHSDUHGIRU Insurance Claims

Estate Distribution

Charitable Donations

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(828) 551-3278

www.artappraisalcarolina.com 30 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

PG. 36

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Angry Giant Forge

Jason Brown – I am an artist...my mediums are glass-engraving; stone-lapidary and sculptor; wood-carver and copper along with bone carving. I’m now able to incorporate some of my talents into blacksmithing where we are able to make anything such as hooks to gates and furniture and all are custom made to order. Our prices range from $5 and up. Jason Redick – Always had to have a creative outlet in my life so I made my first knife with my grandfather at age 9 and have been blacksmithing ever since. I also knap arrowheads, turn wood, do lapidary and

woodworking. Jason and I met in college and became great friends. Together, we decided we could run our own business with all the talents we have combined. We also make rustic to fine knives. I have a booth at The Curb Market in Hendersonville. We make gifts for special occasions or custom homes — pretty much anything you can think of. We can do it all, just ask. Call (828) 273-3212, (828) 785-3091, email angrygiantforge@hotmail.com, or visit us on Facebook.

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Jason Brown

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Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 31


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local favorites ‘Blue to Black’ continued from page 18

STUDIO ARTISTS INCLUDE: Dazzle Artworks Studio – Alan Kaufman, 3-D found object folk art; East Asheville Nancy Clausen – Pastels & acrylics; visiting artist of Dazzle Artworks Studio

Wood & Water Studios – Thomas Whalley, ceramics; Swannanoa

Alice Constantine – Fine oil paintings; Black Mountain

Imagine That! Creations – John Wayne Jackson, botanical sculpture; Black Mountain

David Kaylor – Wood turning; Black Mountain Barbara Rogers – Clay arts; Black Mountain

Libba Tracy – Abstract ceramic wall art; visiting artist of Imagine That! Creations

Sarah Vekasi – Decorative & functional pottery; Black Mountain

Brian Brace – Fine furniture maker; Black Mountain Ray Mata – Photography; visiting artist at Brian Brace Fine Furniture Maker

Big Bear Artisans Studio (inside AGS) – Helen Sullivan; fine art, wreaths, scented candles; Old Fort

Allen Arcand

Big Bear Artisans Studio (inside AGS) – John Sullivan, wood working; Old Fort

Olivers Woodworks – Alan O. Arcand, wood furniture; Black Mountain Studio 208 – Fred Feldman, mixed media, wood, sculpture, clay, found object art; Black Mountain Barbara Rogers

John Wayne Jackson

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

PG. 36

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Wireless Internet Access!

“Our Blue to Black Art Weekend Art Stroll & Studio Tour is a wonderful way to step inside a working studio or downtown art venue and see how works of art are made. Thousands of people have

IF YOU An interactive tour map is available GO at www.bluetoblackartweekend.

com, where you will also find driving directions, map markers, web links and contact information for each site. For more details call (828) 707-7615.

NOVEMBER EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS Saturday, November 16

Friday, November 29

Grovewood Café wine dinner! The Grovewood Café is located behind the Grove Park Inn, in one of the seven historic Biltmore Industries buildings. These structures were designed by Fred Seely, the architect of the Grove Park Inn. Chef Larry Waldrop and his staff always present sumptuous courses which are expertly served. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $65 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at 254-6453.

Friday Night Flights presents A Night of Zin. Please join us for a wonderful evening Zin in our new Cork&Keg bar area. The price is $10 for 4 tasting pours. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $6. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave. Asheville.

The Weinhaus • 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC • (828) 254-6453

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32 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

toured the studios since 2006 when the first studio tour started— formerly known as the East of Asheville Studio Tour—and we are pleased to continue this event bi-annually — the first weekend in May, and now, the third weekend in November — to kick-off Mathilda Tanner the holiday gift-giving season,” said Cappi Macsherry, executive director of Blue to Black Art Weekend.

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artful living The Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are “The collective egoic mind is the most dangerously insane and destructive entity ever to inhabit this planet. What do you think will happen on this planet if human consciousness remains unchanged?” ~ Eckhart Tolle

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In 1966, Alan Watts, the great British-born to embrace all living creaAmerican-transplant, San Francisco-beat-guru, tures and the whole of nature imp-genius Orientalist philosopher wrote a in its beauty.” book entitled simply, The Book. It carried Einstein also said, “A a sub-title: On The Taboo Against Knownew type of thinking is ing Who You Are. Its Preface begins with the essential if mankind is words: “This book explores an unrecognized to survive and move but mighty taboo – our tacit conspiracy to toward higher levels,” ignore who, or what, we really are. and, “Problems Briefly, the thesis is that the prevalent cannot be solved on sensation of oneself as a separate ego enclosed the same level of in a bag of skin is a hallucination which acconsciousness cords neither with Western science nor with that created the experimental philosophy-religions of the the problems,” East… This hallucination underlies the misuse while being of technology for the violent subjugation of quite clear that the man’s natural environment and, consequently, necessary consciousness its eventual destruction.” must be of widening circles of compassion Watts went on to say: “We are therefore into the undeniable realization of, not only all in urgent need of a sense of our own existence peoples, but of all life as connected, interdewhich is in accord with the physical facts and pendent and worthy of caring relationship. which overcomes our feeling of alienation As Watts is being diagnostic, Einstein from the Universe.” is being prescriptive in his statement. They As Watts outlined his thesis as based in are also opening a conversation that is taboo both Western science and the philosophy-re— meaning none of the major institutions of ligions of the East, he was pointing to another our society — not government, not education, taboo which is the realization that true spiritunot economics, not religion, not medicine, not ality must be a confirpsychology, nor jourmation of experienced nalism — are willing to Society conditions into us reality. He was saying address this issue with a delusional preference for that there is a taboo any of the urgency that against individuals both Watts and Eindogmas of separateness and the institutions of stein clearly believed is and specialness. society holding as their warranted. highest motivation the As a scientist, Einsearch for the truth and the nature of reality. stein knew that Western civilization’s enamorHe was saying that society conditions ment with technological fixes was symptomatic into us a delusional preference for dogmas of the consciousness leading us deeper and of separateness and specialness, of ego as the deeper into what Watts called “the misuse prime reality, with, as he pointed out, devastatof technology.” He understood completely ing consequences that create a kind of spiritual how dualistic consciousness that experiences insanity, that lead to the full plethora of insanihuman-beings, individually and collectively, ties that infect our society on the personal and as separate from the wholeness and interconcollective levels. nectedness of the natural Universe, from each More than a decade prior to Watts’ asserother and the ecosystem of this planet Earth, tion, Albert Einstein stated a similarly prophetwas at the root of what both he and Watts were ic insight into the notion of humanity as caught describing as an inevitable catastrophe of inesin a delusional state and offered a vision of timable proportions for humanity and Nature. how humanity can evolve so as to escape Watts’ Over half a century later, any reasonapocalyptic warning of “eventual destruction.” able assessment of the condition of humanity "A human being is part of a whole, called and Nature can only conclude these warnings by us the 'Universe,' a part limited in time and remain unaddressed on any meaningful level. space. He experiences himself, his thoughts There is an inescapable sense that the situation and feelings, as something separated from the is crazier than ever, and the need for a path out rest--a kind of optical delusion of his conof the morass isn’t even being seriously considsciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison ered. The predictions are plainly proving true. for us, restricting us to our personal desires In reminiscence of the old wisdom that insanand to affection for a few persons nearest us. ity is marked by obliviousness to being insane, Our task must be to free ourselves from this modern humanity seemingly hasn’t a clue. prison by widening our circles of compassion As Watts and Einstein, along with so

BY

BILL WALZ

many others in the scientific, consciousness, and progressive political communities, are offering a true description of the dire state of human civilization and what needs to be done, and nothing of any great significance is being done to address this undeniable failure of consciousness, this delusional state, we have to be left with the conclusion that humanity, in its current collective expression, is insane. While in recent years a growing number of people certainly have significantly evolved their consciousness of the problems created by the existing socio-cultural and psycho-spiritual paradigms, most of our population, and all of our institutions, remain mired in variations of regressive egocentric, materialistic, competitive, dualistic consciousness based in irrational dogmas incapable of seeing clearly and responding appropriately. We are locked into belief systems quite divorced from reality. Little if anything has changed in the approach to solutions that, as Einstein articulated, represents a prison of consciousness completely inadequate to address these problems. We remain mired in what Watts called the taboo against knowing who we are, that is, in knowing what a human-being on the planet Earth needs to know so as to shape our institutions and society towards the establishment of a truly flowering world that can take humanity and its fellow life-forms into a worthy and inspiring future. Importantly, it is not as if we have to invent the consciousness necessary to answer the questions of who we are and what is needed. The necessary consciousness has existed since the beginning of the human journey. Out of the ancient past, meditative, contemplative traditions have fully understood the interdependence and interconnectedness of all life and the destructive delusional aspect of human ego. Buddhism, in particular, has managed to hold coherently into the modern age a message of infinite interconnection that when applied and examined through meditation, contemplation, and action gives rise to the natural experience of interconnection and its principle effect of compassion in the world, just as Einstein called for. It is incredibly exciting and hopeful that from Einstein forward, those at the cutting edge of science are realizing these truths. The question remains, why is general science, and why is society, ignoring what the leaders in science are telling us? Here is where we are confronted with the taboo. In the contemporary world, many in the science, consciousness and progressive political

realms all have in common their intention to awaken the evolutionary consciousness necessary for humanity to enter a new era of sanity marked by the application of consciousness and technology to harmony, peace, justice and sustainable civilization. What is needed that is new, that is evolutionary, is the application of these ancient philosophies of unity melded with modern quantum science as the guiding inspiration that can turn modern technology from “the violent subjugation of man’s natural environment” to the support, protection and preservation of that environment in the realization that the environment is who we are. What is needed is a psychology, a spirituality, an application of science, and new vision of human society that can guide us into expanded sanity that rescinds the taboo against knowing who we are in the vastness and balance of the Universe. We must break free of the taboos. We must be willing to break free of lazy dogmatic thinking, to follow the lead of modern quantum science and ancient philosophies such as Buddhism, constructed around asking questions you may or may not have thought, but should have, to ask utopian questions, continued on page 37

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 33


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what to do guide Friday, November 1

A Tribute to Barbra Streisand Valerie Sneade debuts her critically acclaimed show 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $19. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 2541320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Friday, November 1

A Brush with North Carolina Opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Oil paintings by Renee Williams. On display through November 30, 2013. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street. (828) 251-5796 or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Saturday, November 2

Free Day of the Dead Festival Featuring the KreKtones, Ahleuchatistas, Kovac & the Polar Bears, Juan Benavidas Group and Goodness Graceful. 2 p.m. until 12 a.m. Rain or Shine. Zia Taqueria, 521 Haywood Rd., Asheville. Call (828) 377-9393, or visit www.ziatacom.com.

Sunday, November 3

Haywood Community Band Free concert honoring founding director Bob Hill. 4 p.m. at First United Methodist Church in Waynesville, 566 South Haywood Street. Selections

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

include Joplin’s Ragtime Follies, The Symphonic Beatles, and Greensleeves. www.haywoodcommunityband.org.

Center in Arden, NC. Info: Ann Holtz at (865) 414-8509, www.awakeningsoulpresents.org

Tuesday, November 5

Friday, November 8

Smoky Mountain Brass Quintet

Everybody CAN CAN Dance

Concert featuring works by J.S. Bach, Rathburn and others. In the recital hall of WCU’s Coulter Building at 7:30 p.m. Open to the public, free of charge. For more information, call the WCU School of Music at (828) 227-7242.

UNC Asheville’s Dance Program’s 16th Annual Benefit Performance. 7:30 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Hall. $5 or four cans of food. Benefits MANNA FoodBank and UNC Asheville’s Dance Program. Info: cschrade@unca.edu or (828) 232.5652

Tuesday, November 5

With Kat Williams. Jazz, Blues, Motown, R&B, Rock, Pop. White Horse Black Mountain at 8 p.m. Tickets $18. White Horse, 105C Montreat Road, Black Mountain, (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Ann Patchett Book Signing The author of State of Wonder, Run, and Bel Canto, examines her deepest commitments to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband in This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. Held at UNCA’s Lipinsky Auditorium. Tickets at Malaprop’s, (828) 254-6734 or www.malaprops.com

Tuesday, November 5

Teapots with Donna Flanery 6 p.m. in the Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. $30 (includes all materials). Info/reservations: (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Wednesday, November 6

Friday, November 8

Dance ’til You Drop Party

Saturday, November 9

Appalachian Pastel Society From 10 a.m. – noon, the Appalachian Pastel Society will present a free demonstration by pastelist Patricia Savage, followed by a workshop ($45 members/$55 non-members) from 1-4 p.m. At the Black Mountain Library, 105 N. Dougherty St.. For more information visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org or call Suzy Hart at (845) 986-3653.

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CrackerJack, The Dye Wells, Pierce Edens, Sarah Tucker and more. From 1-9 p.m. in Marshall, NC. Tickets are $6 in advance, $8 at the door. Visit www.h2h2o.org for details.

Sunday, November 10

A French Feast for Winds 5 p.m. Pan Harmonia performs music by Francis Poulenc, Albert Roussel, and others. $15 advance/$5 for students, or $20/$5 at the door. Altamont Theater, 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville. www.pan-harmonia.org.

Sunday, November 10

1st Annual CiderFest NC Four WNC Cidermakers will serve up one of the coolest ways to use the many apples grown in our region. 1-5 p.m. at Echoview Fiber Mill, 76 Jupiter Road, Weaverville. Proceeds support the WNC Green Building Council (www.wncgbc.org). $15 advance, $20 day of. Kids admitted free. ciderfestnc. splashthat.com.

Crossing to Safety by Wallace Earle Stegner. 6:30 p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. Book lovers gather for lively and insightful discussions on selected books. Free; the only requirement is that you read the book. Info/reservations: (828) 210-9837 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, November 9

Friday, November 15

Yamato: The Drummers of Japan

Circles and Cycles Kotara Studio Exhibition Opening Reception 6-8 p.m. Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Avenue, downtown Asheville. (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com

Concert at 7:30 p.m. in the recital hall of the Coulter Building at Western Carolina University. Works by Steve Reich, John Cage, Chick Corea and others. Open to the public, free of charge. Call the School of Music at (828) 227-7242.

Yamato brings the ancient art of Taiko drumming into the present in a heart-pounding spectacle of athleticism and speed, superhuman feats of coordination, and phenomenal precision. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. (828) 2574530, www.dwtheatre.com

November 7-10

Saturday, November 9

Thursday, November 7

WCU Percussion Ensemble

Modern Mind, Ancient Soul Speakers include Duke Divinity School professor Lauren Winner, Jungian analyst, Jerry Wright and Bishop Brian Prior. At the Lutheridge Conference

NC Fresh Catch Festival Menu includes oysters, clams, smoked and grilled fish, a Deep South boil, and more. Craft beer from NC breweries, along with music by Pleasure Chest,

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Saturday, November 16

2nd Annual YART Sale A wide variety of items at yard sale prices. Paintings, pottery, art supplies, vintage items. At the First Congregational Church Hall, corner of White Pine Drive and 5th Avenue West in Hendersonville. Hosted by the Arts Council of Henderson County, (828) 693-8504, www.acofhc.org

Saturday, November 16

Blue Ridge Rollergirls

Saturday, November 16

With Georgette Pressler. For first time painters and experienced artists! Face paint 101, from 2-5 p.m. Sugar Skull Face Painting, 6-9 p.m. Each class is $80, or $140 for both classes. Supplies come in an original hand-painted gift bag! Space is limited! ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville. (828) 5752024, www.zapow.net.

Intersections Book Discussion

Founding member of the UK spacerock band Hawkwind, Nik Turner presents Space Gypsy. At the Mothlight, 701 Haywood Road in West Asheville. For more information visit www.themothlight.com.

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Body Painting Classes

Bonnie Cooper and Don McGowan Fine Art Photography Exhibit. On display throughout November. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. Free to the public. Refreshments served. Grateful Steps Publishing House and Bookshop, 159 South Lexington, Asheville. 828 277 0998, www.gratefulsteps.org

Nik Turner CD Release Concert

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At the WNC Agricultural Center. www.blueridgerollergirls.com

A Sense of Place II

Wednesday, November 6

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Sunday, November 10

Tuesday, November 12

Progressive indierock. At Hi-Wire Brewing, 197 Hilliard Ave., Asheville, 8 p.m. No cover. www.hiwirebrewing.com.

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You Knew Me When

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November 15-17

Hobson’s Choice A lighthearted Victorian comedy performed by the Autumn Players. Friday Director and Saturday, November Arnold Sgan 15 and 16, in 35below, 35 East Walnut St. in Asheville. Sunday, November 17, at the Reuter Center at UNC Asheville. Shows begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 cash at the door. Asheville Community Theatre, (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Christmas with Santa Hysterical comedy in which two hilarious elves have misplaced most of Santa’s presents. Performance begins at 10 a.m. Tickets are $5. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Saturday, November 16

Tire Amnesty Day Volunteers will accept tires on and off rim at no charge. Held at the Walmart on Bleachery Blvd. for Buncombe County residents from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Call (828) 254-1776, or visit www.ashevillegreenworks.org.

Sunday, November 17

Art of Jazz Jazz vocalist Rockell Scott; the Michael Jefry Stevens Trio. Music by Duke Ellington, George Gershwin and more. 4:30 p.m. $35. Freeburg Pianos, Hendersonville NC.

Tuesday, November 19

Explore Fontana’s Lakeshore Trail An all day 9.4 mile hike led by hiking expert and author Danny Bernstein. Bring lunch, water and appropriate hiking clothes. $10 for Friends of the Smokies members; $35 for non-members. To register call (828) 452-0720. www. friendsofthesmokies.org.

Wednesday, November 20

World Music Artist “Bombino” Fierce, hypnotic guitar playing. UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Auditorium at 7 p.m. $20; $5 for UNCA students. Get tickets at www.uncatickets.com or at the Highsmith University Union desk. (828) 251-6674, cesap.unca.edu

NOVEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3


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Best in Show

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Middle East Film Series

Call (828) 693-4545 to reserve your spot!

November 4 - December 5

Canvas & Corks – Wednesday evenings

Stories that bend toward justice and peace. Showings: 7 p.m. at the Black Mountain Library (Blk. Mtn.), 105 N Dougherty St. on Mondays; Brooks-Howell Home (Avl.), 266 Merrimon Ave. in Asheville on Thursdays.

from 6-8 p.m. or Tuesday afternoons. Get together with friends, share a bottle of wine, and paint away.

Tuesday, November 5 – Silk Painting, led by Kim Anderson.

Budrus – November 4 in Blk. Mtn.;

November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

November 7 in Avl.

– Rug Hooking, 10 a.m. to 12 noon with Sharon Richmond.

November 9, 19, 20, and December 4

– Bob Ross Painting, 12 to 4 p.m. Learn to paint landscapes with Pete Kerry.

The Gatekeepers – November 11 in Blk.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Precious Life

– November 18 in Blk. Mtn.; November 21 in Avl.

Tuesday, November 12 – Mosaic Mirror, 1-5 p.m. Create a small mirror using stained glass, millefiori, ball chain, and other fun items.

The Other Son

– December 2 in Blk. Mtn.; December 5 in Avl.

November 13 & 15 – Basket Weaving,

1-4 p.m. Create a prancing Reindeer ornament, a miniature Apple Basket ornament, and a cute Peppermint basket. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace 124 4th Avenue East Downtown Hendersonville www.artmobstudios.com

Mtn.; November 14 in Avl

Sponsored by Western Carolinians for Peace and Justice in the Middle East. Visit www.mepeacewnc.com

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Thursday, November 21

Pierce Edens and The Dirty Work LIVE

Interfaith Dialogue

South Eastern roots music mainstays host a CD release and DVD screening.

Knowing the Mystery of Life Within, the selected writings of Isaac Pennington presented by R. Melvin Keiser, 5:30-7 p.m. Free and open to all faiths. Refreshments served. Grateful Steps Publishing House and Bookshop, 159 South Lexington, Asheville. 828 277 0998, www.gratefulsteps.org

Thursday November 21 – DVD Screen-

November 21-24

Columbinus UNC Asheville’s student theater presents a play examining the shooting at Columbine High School. A discussion will follow each performance. Thurs.-Sat. 7:30 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m., in UNC Asheville’s Carol Belk Theatre. $10. Call (828) 232-6610, http://drama.unca. edu/theatre-unca.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

ing. $5 ticket, doors 8 p.m., show 9 p.m. The Fine Arts Theater, 36 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 232-1536, www.fineartstheatre.com

Friday, November 22 – Release Party Con-

cert. $8 adv. / $10 d.o.s. Doors 8 p.m. Show 9 p.m. Isis Music Hall and Restaurant, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com

Medical Guardian

November 24-25

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month. 800-892-4631

Auditions for Cabaret Cast of 17 with both lead and chorus roles. Auditions are open to all, no previous experience required. Be prepared to sing, no CDs. Bring sheet music, accompanist provided. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Precious Life

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

SAVE on Cable TV Internet-Digital Phone-Satellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-871-6180

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

Customer Service Evaluators Needed

at the Classic Wineseller Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

FT/PT In search of detail oriented individuals who are able to work under minimal supervision. You will evaluate services at various outlets and locations. Contact Robertbrown115@outlook. com with your resume for consideration.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 35


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find it here Angry Giant Forge

Bogart’s Restaurant

Faison O’Neil Gallery

Just Ducky

Nancy Silver Art

The Spice & Tea Exchange

Art Appraisal Services, LLC

Cafe 64

Frugal Framer

Karen Keil Brown

Newbridge Cafe

The Starving Artist

Arts Council of Henderson Co.

Cathy Searle Fine Art

GD Whalen Photography

John Mac Kah

North Carolina Stage Company

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro

The Art House

www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe

O’Charley’s

Sunburst Market

Art MoB - www.artmobstudios.com

Cheryl Keefer

The Green Room Cafe

Points of Light

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Susan Marie Designs

Asheville Salt Cave

Chifferobe

HART Theater

Mangum Pottery

On Demand Printing

Town Hardware & General Store

The Chocolate Fetish

www.chocolatefetish.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Jeff Pittman

Octopus Garden

TPennington Art Gallery

Common Ground

Hey Hey Cupcake

McCarter Gallery

Potter’s Mark

True Blue Art Supply

Cottonmill Studios

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Morning Sky Pottery (828) 273-5317

Satellite Gallery

Twigs and Leaves Gallery

Double Exposure Giclee

Jewels That Dance

Mountain Top Appliance

Soapy Dog

Earth Guild

Julia Fosson Fine Art

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Southern Highland Craft Guild

angrygiantforge@hotmail.com

www.bogartswaynesville.com

www.artappraisalcarolina.com

www.cafe-64.com

www.acofhc.org

www.artbycathysearle.com

www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

www.CherylKeefer.com

www.ashevillesaltcave.com

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

BlackBird Frame & Art

www.blackbirdframe.com

Black Mtn. Iron Works

www.BlackMountainIron.com

(828) 458-1566

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney

www.blackmountainstove.com

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

www.doubleexposureart.com

Blue to Black Art Weekend

www.bluetoblackartweekend.com

www.earthguild.com

www.faisononeil.com

www.frugalframer.com

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HV HF

www.ondemandink.com

www.mangumpottery.com

www.heyheycupcake.com

www.jewelsthatdance.com

(828) 251-0028

www.thesatellitegallery.com

www.craftguild.org

MERRIMON AVE.

BLACK MOUNTAIN

TUNNEL ROAD

CHARLOTTE ST.

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

www.twigsandleaves.com

www.thesoapydog.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

www.juliafosson.com

www.tpennington.com

www.pottersmark.com

www.mccarter-gallery.com

www.susanmariedesigns.com www.townhardware.com

www.theOG.us

www.jeffpittmanart.com

www.stormrhumbar.com

www.sunburstmarket.com

www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

www.pointsoflight.net

www.harttheatre.com

NORTHSIDE NEIGHBORS

www.ocharleys.com

www.malaprops.com

www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

(828) 693-3191

www.ncstage.org

www.johnmackah.com

www.gracecarolbomer.com

www.spiceandtea.com

www.thenewbridgecafe.com

www.karenkbrown.com

www.gdwhalen.com

WEAVERVILLE +

HENDERSONVILLE RD.

www.nancysilverart.com

www.justduckyoriginals.com

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(828) 646-0071 HF

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BILTMORE VILLAGE

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LEXINGTON AVE.

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healthy lifestyles They All Have Side Effects Look at the folded paper stapled to the professional white pharmacy bag which instructs you on how to use the drug you just received.

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Or look at one of several websites which discuss various drugs or herbals that you might be taking. In either of these sources, did you notice, in addition to the “mechanism of action” and “how to use” sections, the “serious side effects” section? Every drug listed in the United States Pharmacopeia has side effects. And so do all the herbal medicines. Many common medicines have serious side effects. Statins – those wonderful drugs which lower cholesterol – carry a risk of liver damage. NSAID’s – miracle medicines which relieve pain – can lead to a heart attack. Certain antidepressants – which lift people’s spirits and get them going – can lead to suicide or violent behavior.

‘Green Room’ continued from page 30

Hydroxytamoxifen – holding cancer at bay in those with a family history of breast cancer – can increase the risk of uterine cancer. Simple aspirin – the

Aspirin can lead to hearing loss in adults and death in children. wonder drug of the 19th Century – can lead to hearing loss in adults and death in children. Herbals used for various common ailments also have side effects. Country mallow – used as an anti-inflammatory and fever lowering agent – can cause heart arrhythmias and strokes. Goldenseal – used for inflammation, colds, constipation and as a general medicine – can cause abortions. Licorice – used commonly for healing ulcers and lowering potassium in patients on dialysis – can cause major loss of potassium, high blood pressure, and arrhythmias. St. John’s wort – known to be effective for depression – can cause sedation and confusion and make schizophrenia worse. All herbals beginning with the letter “g” (garlic, ginseng, ginkgo) – useful

‘Taboo’ continued from page 33

Ben & Sue Green, owners of The Green Room Café.

sandwiches with homemade sauces, homemade soups and salads. You can top your meal off with one of our spectacular homemade desserts – award winning cheesecake, key lime pie and old fashioned apple crumb cake to name a few. We have delicious options for a dinner that lingers and a quick working lunch. Or pop in for an ice cold beer or a glass of wine paired with one of our delicious appetizers. Gather your friends and come try our favorites and hang out for an enjoyable time at your downtown Hendersonville premier gathering place. Visit us at www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz for hours, live music schedules, menus and much more!

The Green Room Café & Coffeehouse 536 North Main in Hendersonville www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

to ask how humanity can evolve into undreamed of peace, harmony, wisdom, and yes, sanity into a future at least as far reaching as humanity’s past. Why isn’t science and religion, hand-in-hand forging such a vision that is as natural for every young person to be considering as what career path they should follow? And it must be realized that these ancient teachings are not entirely sufficient, for they come out of cultures radically different from modern human culture. We must look at these old ways with new eyes, to find a new old way — one that remembers ancient wisdoms and brings them into modern context and vocabulary. Watts did that. Eckhart Tolle has more recently done it, as are many authors, speakers and teachers, but more people, all people, need to pay attention. This is not esoteric philosophy. It is an issue of the quality of life, even survival, for generations to come. We must break the taboo against asking such questions so that a new era of human expression and sanity can

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

for various medical problems – are blood thinners and can cause bleeding. Are these side effects happening because these medicines are inherently dangerous? Look at that paper from the pharmacy and notice the areas affected in the list of side effects – heart, liver, bowel, kidney, muscles, brain. These side effects happen because the body is extremely complex. The normal proteins, hormones and other naturally occurring chemicals of the body serve in multiple sites. Medicinal agents – drugs and herbals alike – also affect all of these sites – with resulting sides effects; that is, unintended consequences. All medicines – both drugs and herbals – are intended to be taken in controlled amounts over a short time span – never for a long time over which the drug or herb can accumulate and cause the “side effects.” When treating long-term, chronic disease states, first look for non-medicinal treatments: exercise, weight control, balanced diet, adequate water, adequate sleep, healthy social and spiritual interactions, refrain from alcohol, tobacco, narcotic and stimulant use. Almost 85% of all common medical conditions will respond to these “natural” health promoters. Some medicines (drug or herbal) are necessary, but be sure you have effectively and consistently used the non-medicinal therapies first.

flourish. Delusion will no longer do. We need to be awake, honest and courageous. We must find and actualize the truth of humanity’s place in the Universe or the future for the generations to come will only be even more desperately insane.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Call toll-free: 1-800-381-7278

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Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 37


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unique shops

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Points of Light

TWIGS AND LEAVES GALLERY

Points of Light crystal and mineral gallery, located in North Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, is a wonderful source for fine crystals, gems, minerals and living art.

in addition to healing stones, mineral specimens and a wide variety of books on stones. They specialize in breathtaking interior design pieces and one-of-akind specimens for decorators, collectors and healers. Every item on display has been The gallery, which boasts an amazing carefully and lovingly hand-selected collection of huge Quartz crystals, including for quality, beauty and energy. The a seven-foot-tall Agate geode, is much more gallery works with a renowned group than just another rock shop. of internationally acclaimed crystal and Points of Light's collection includes many mineral artisans, and as a result carries unique Quartz clusters and Amethyst geodes some of the finest cut and polished pieces available anywhere in the United States. Points of Light is also home to one of the largest selections of crystal singing bowls on the east coast, as well as a comprehensive and truly beautiful group of crystal healing wands, including tools cut by world-famous lapidary artist, Lawrence Stoller. From museum pieces Quartz Angel weighing more than a ton, Quartz Sphere

Wonderful WEAVERVILLE

& Northside Neighbors

Bolivian Amethyst Cluster

down to the smallest of their tumbled stones, the quality and scope of their inventory is unsurpassed. Points of Light is a “must see” destination in Asheville!

Points of Light Crystal and Mineral Gallery 391 Merrimon Avenue, downtown Asheville (828) 257-2626 Shop online! Visit www.pointsoflight.net

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38 November 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 3

IF YOU Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North GO Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Monday through Saturday 105:30 and Sunday 1-4. For more details call (828) 456-1940 or visit www.twigsandleaves. com. Find us on Facebook.

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Jewelry designer Keri Hollifield, Waynesville native and owner of Earthstar Studio, will be demonstrating her techniques at Twigs and Leaves Gallery, Friday Tree pendant by evening, November Keri Hollifield 1, from 6-9 p.m. Inspired by the natural world, Keri’s work can be seen in the gallery year round. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Waynesville’s Dr. Bill Stecher and delight in the savory hors d’eurves.


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~ Waynesville Has it ALL ~

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Great Food combined with Live Music, Home Furnishings, Fine Arts & Crafts.

Elegant Interiors

Live Music

Every Friday & Saturday at 7pm

Bringing Your Home Together in an Elegant Manner Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

PG. 36

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Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

WA

39 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

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828-452-3509 • Monday-Saturday 9-5

Vol. 17, No. 3 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — November 2013 39


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November 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
November 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: NC Stage presents The Book Club Play..p7; Inside: The Asheville Symphony Chorus & Asheville Choral Society..p6; Blue to Black...

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