Page 1

Renowned pianist Joyce Yang performs with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra. page 3 pages

Mark Henry is dedicated to capturing natural vistas and crafting original frames for his paintings. page 12

Judy Levine’s scarves are all about color. page 10 Apple’s new 13" MacBook Pro will be flying off the shelves at Charlotte Street Computers. page 31

Plus: The Complete Works of William Shakespeare at NC Stage. page 6 Mary Webster, fine artist. page 11

Enter our 16th Annual

Poetry Contest page

16

Interview with

Stephen Janton

page

19

00-00


R

pg. 36

D

bold curves

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

2012-2013 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17

8pm

s

Rachmaninoff’s Paganini Variations with Van Cliburn Medalist Joyce Yang Bizet Rachmaninoff

Beethoven

Joyce Yang

SPONSORS

L’ArlÊsienne Suite No. 1 Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini Joyce Yang, piano Symphony No. 4

Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Kramer

BUY TICKETS TODAY

A Classical Christmas featuring

Handel’s Messiah Sunday December 16 at 3pm A new Asheville symphonic Christmas tradition begins with the most beautiful music of the season. SPONSOR

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org  November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

P

I

D

 

R

I

V

E

R

 

A

R

T

S

stage preview HART presents the Pulitzer Prize Winning Drama

H Oxidized sterling and garnets

A

August Osage County

ART closes its 2012 main stage season with one of the most celebrated plays of recent decades, August Osage County by Tracy Letts. Compared to the works of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller the drama hit Broadway like a storm in 2008. HART is one of the first theaters in North Carolina to produce the acclaimed work. The play originated at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theater Company then moved to New York for a run which lasted almost two years. In 2009 Entertainment Weekly put it on its “End of the Decade, Best-of� list. A film version is in the works, staring Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Sam Shepherd, and Ewan McGregor, and is set to come out at the end of 2013. Letts, a native of Oklahoma, uses his skill to capture the desolation of the plains. In the midst of his tale of family there are plenty of laughs, albeit dark humor. Audiences should be forewarned the play contains adult language and situations and is not suitable for children. Letts writes about the plains he knows, just as Williams wrote about the South, Miller the northeast, and William Inge the Midwest. He also uses humor the most powerful way a playwright can, to seduce an audience into lowering defenses only to hit them with the play’s most powerful moments. It is thrilling theatre because you never see it coming. “August Osage County� tells the story of a family, coming together under extreme

conditions. As you meet each member they present one image, but as is true with most people, the longer you spend time with them, the more you know, and in this case the darker it gets. This is a three act play that flies by and leaves you laughing and then gasping as you discover what these people have done and are doing to one another. HART had one of its biggest turnouts at auditions for this show. Many of the region’s most experiences actresses and actors vied for the thirteen roles. Under the direction of HART Executive Director, Steve Lloyd, the cast includes: Barbara Bates Smith, David Spivey, Allison Stinson, Carl Bredahl, Julie Kinter, Jeremy Bridges, Christy Bishop, Farah Mokhtarie, Jennifer Riddlie, Ricky Sanford, Scott Shanken, Kathryn Wells, and Tom Dewees.

If You HART presents August Osage Go County by Tracy Letts. November

9, 10, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, November 11 and 18 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $20 for adults; $18 for seniors; students $8. Special $6 discount tickets for students for Sunday Matinees. Box Office Hours Monday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. For reservations contact the HART Box Office at (828) 456-6322 or go online to www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC 28786

Standup Comedy with Paula Poundstone

A

ppearing on stage with a stool, a microphone, and a can of Diet Pepsi, Paula Poundstone is famous for her razor-sharp wit and spontaneity. Paula is so quick and unassuming that audience members at her live shows often leave complaining that their cheeks hurt from laughter. Paula grew up in Sudbury, Massachusetts and by the time she was nineteen was traveling on a Greyhound bus across the country – stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. In 1979 Paula began nurturing her standup comedy talent as part of the Boston comedy scene, and then moved to San Francisco where she continued to

flourish. By 1990 she’d relocated to Los Angeles and had starred in several comedy specials for HBO, as well as appeared on Saturday Night Live. Paula was the first woman to win an ACE Award for Best Standup Comedy performance and the first woman to be invited to perform at the distinguished White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. www.paulapoundstone.com

If You Go: Paula Poundstone performs

Friday, November 16 at the Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 North Pack Square Asheville. 8 p.m. all ages. Tickets are $34 advance; $37 day of show. Phone (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

<hWc_d]iebkj_edij^Wjh[Ô[Yj oekhijob["oekhZ[Yeh"oekhWhj$$$ WdZoekhXkZ][j$

performance Asheville Symphony presents

Rachmaninoff & Beethoven

T

he Asheville Symphony Orchestra continues its 52nd season on Saturday, November 17 at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. The concert will consist of works by Bizet, Rachmaninoff, and Beethoven, conducted by music director Daniel Meyer, and featuring the renowned pianist Joyce Yang. The evening will begin with the familiar L’Arlésienne Suite No. 1 by Georges Bizet. Known best as the composer of the opera Carmen, the composer wrote incidental music for a play by Alphonse Daudet called L’Arlésienne (The Woman from Arles) in 1872, when he was desperate for money. The play did not survive many performances, but the music, arranged as an orchestral suite, has been popular ever since. Meyer describes the score as “joyous… unforgettable melodies, and music of great color and vitality – a

by

Steven R. Hageman

Parisian’s take on the spirit and stories of southern France.” The concert will continue with Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini by Sergei Rachmaninoff, who composed it in 1934 and performed the premiere with the Philadelphia Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski. The piece is based on the 24th Caprice from Niccoló Paganini’s Caprices for Violin Solo, Op. 1. Paganini’s virtuosic variations have also served as source material for such diverse composers as Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Brahms, Schnittke and Lutoslawski. “This is a work that tests the mettle and musical depth of any great pianist,” according to Meyer. Piano soloist Joyce Yang came to international attention in 2005 when she won the silver medal and two additional awards at the 12th Van Cli-

NdjL^aa7Z=Veen###L]Zc Ndj;gVbZ>iIdVI

8jhidb;gVb^c\//6gi//<^[ih

Renowned pianist Joyce Yang Photo by Larry Ford

''&)8h[lWhZHeWZ

burn International Piano Competition, despite being the youngest contestant. At the age of 26, she has established herself as one of the leading artists of her generation. In 2010 she received an Avery Fisher Career Grant – one of ‘Symphony’ continued on page 4

CZVg7^aibdgZHfjVgZBVaa ^c6h]Zk^aaZ

.(.,,+#--)& mmm$\hWc[_jjeWj$Yec pg.

36

BA

ASHEVILLE’S

De`eX_ijeeX_]ehjeeicWbb

FREE Trolley !!! park once ride all over all day

Nov. 10 & 11

10 to 6

Saturday & Sunday Thanks to the River Arts District (RAD) Artists for producing the 18th year of this one-of-a-kind even. Thank YOU for visiting us. Give a Gift of Art from over 190 artists!

www.RiverArtsDistrict.com THE ARTISTS WISH TO THANK THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES FOR THEIR SUPPORT.

Photo credit: Catherine Vibert Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

performance

D

Asheville Symphony Selects New Executive Director

avid N. Whitehill, Pacific Symphony in Santa the executive direcAna, CA. He received his tor of the Bangor education at the League Symphony Orof American Orchestra’s chestra in Bangor, Leadership Academy in New Maine, has been named the York, NY, the Conductor’s new executive director of the Institute at Bard College in Asheville Symphony OrchesAnnandale-on-Hudson, NY, tra in Asheville, NC. and the School of Music Whitehill will replace at Chapman University in Steven R. Hageman who is Orange, CA. He is married retiring as executive director to Reston, VA native Jessica after managing the orchestra Whitehill. for sixteen seasons. Mr. HageWhitehill said, “I am man will continue to assist the thrilled and honored to be organization on a part-time joining the Asheville Symbasis. phony. I believe strongly in David N. Whitehill is the Whitehill, a native of this orchestra and its mission. new executive director of West Palm Beach, FL, has I’m excited to join a committhe Asheville Symphony Orchestra. been the executive director of ted board and guild, the Bangor Symphony since vibrant chorus, thriving November 2007. Under his leadership, youth orchestra, dedicated staff, and pasthe BSO has expanded its audience base, sionate musicians and music director as we increased its annual fund and surpassed build upon the great tradition that has been budget goals, for which the orchestra was established. There’s a wonderful culture named the 2011 Bangor Region Chamber of live music in Asheville and Buncombe of Commerce Nonprofit Business of the County, and I look forward to being part of Year. In May 2012 Whitehill was named to that.” the Maine Today Media Forty Under 40 list Bill Gettys, ASO Board President said, of the top young business and community “We are very excited that David Whitehill leaders in Maine. He currently serves as will be joining us to lead the Asheville Symvice chair of the board of the Bangor Area phony in its mission to promote great music Children’s Choir. Prior to his position in and educate young and old about the value Bangor, Whitehill was manager of artistic of this art form. His innovative ideas and operations at the Philharmonic Society creativity will make our city a better place to of Orange County in Irvine, CA. He also live.“ worked in the education department of the

‘Symphony’ continued from page 4

classical music’s most prestigious accolades. The Los Angeles Times has referred to her “compelling virtuosity and sensitivity”, while the Chicago Tribune described her playing as “brilliant”, and the Washington Post commented on her “musical maturity”. Yang appears in the film In the Heart of Music, a documentary about the Cliburn Competition, and she is a frequent guest on American Public Media’s radio program Performance Today. Her debut disc, distributed by harmonia mundi usa, contains live performances of works by Bach, Liszt, Scarlatti, and the Australian composer Carl Vine. A Steinway artist, she resides in New York City. The second half of the concert will feature the beloved Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60 by Ludwig van Beethoven, written when the master was 36, in the same year as many of his other landmark works including the Fifth Symphony. “With its  November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

mysterious introduction, contemplative adagio, off-kilter scherzo, and frisky finale,” says Meyer, “the ‘Fourth’ marks a special place among Beethoven’s enormously creative symphonies.” Beethoven had started first on the stormy Fifth Symphony, but put it aside to work on the Fourth, which he finished in early 1807. The work was premiered in March of that year at a private all-Beethoven concert that also included the premieres of the Fourth Piano Concerto and the Coriolan Overture.

If You Tickets for the performance are Go available through the Symphony

office or the U.S. Cellular Center Asheville box office, and range in price from $58 to $20. Subscriptions are also available on a “pick three” basis for $167 to $55. Significant discounts for students are available. For details call (828) 254-7046 or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

we love this place The Asheville Bow-Wowhaus

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Three

November 2012 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray Contributing Writers: Judy Ausley, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Chris Cloonan, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Javier Folgar, Beth Gossett, Steven R. Hageman, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Amanda Leslie, Jennifer Mayer, Marcianne Miller, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, David Simchock, Jane Sims, Josh Talley, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, November 2012, Vol. 16 No. 3

3 Performance

Asheville Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

6 Stage Preview

NC Stage – Complete Shakespeare . 6 HART – August Osage County . . . . 2

9 Columns

Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . . . 9 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . . 13 Eddie LeShure - Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 17 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . . 24 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 27 David J. Simchock – Photo Tips . . . 38

10 Fine Art

Judy Levine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Webster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephen Janton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . River Arts District Studio Stroll . . . Barbara Frohmader, Lynn Smith Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicholas M. Raynolds . . . . . . . . . . .

10 11 12 18 19 20 22 30

15 Music

Loudon Wainwright III . . . . . . . . . . 15 Yusif in the Mountains . . . . . . . . . . 16 Viva La LAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

25 Movie Reviews

AIA Asheville, along with Fine Arts Theatre, Asheville Art Museum, Aloft Downtown Asheville, and Brother Wolf Animal Rescue, is sponsoring a design/build competition of doghouses to be auctioned on Saturday, November 10. This event will also include a screening of Michael Miner’s movie Romanza, the California Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, at the Fine Arts Theatre (36 Biltmore Avenue), followed by a reception, gala and auction at the Asheville Art Museum (2 S. Pack Square). The doghouses will be on display November 3-10 at Aloft Downtown Asheville prior to the Gala event. In addition, a replica of a Frank Lloyd Wright doghouse will be on display the weekend of the event. Tickets include heavy hors d’oeuvres, beer, wine. A dawg gone good time for just $45 per person. Tickets may be purchased for the movie only for $10 per person. For more information visit www.aiaasheville.org, phone (828) 253-3227 or visit www. ashevilleart.org

Natural Abstract – Work by William Ambrose Mills IV William Ambrose Mills IV, a second grader at the New Classical Academy, loves math. Other favorites include the book Captain Underpants, Mozart, the Saturn moon Titan, and work by Jackson Pollock and Roy Lichtenstein. Mills presents three types of work in his exhibition. The first are small sculptures made out of wood scraps. He first created these at “Wood Day” at the Folk Art Center at the kids’ craft table. Mills exhibits a second type of sculpture made with popsicle sticks and other wood shapes from craft stores. Finally, Mills exhibits his “paintings,” which are hung on the wall, but are wood bases with drips (like Pollock). The drips are either colored glue from glue guns or dirt applied to dripped wood glue. Mills, who is seven years old, is currently working on an art on paper project, as well as “mysterious” sculptures of planets. Opening reception Saturday, November 3 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. On display through November 27, 2012 in the Chamber of Art at Phil Mechanic Studios in the River Arts District. Flood Gallery Fine Art Center, 109 Roberts Street in Asheville. For more information visit www.floodgallery.org.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook –

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 25

31 Asheville Shops

Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Charlotte Street Computers . . . . . . 31 Liberty Bikes – Laurel Mountain . . 39

32 Restaurants

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo . . . . . . . . . 32

38 What to Do Guide On the Cover: Stephen Janton.

Photo: Erica Mueller Photography page 19

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . 39 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 39 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . . 39 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . . 39 Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods 39

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

stage preview The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)

W

ondering what to do once you’ve eaten your fill of turkey, watched your team win (or lose), and seen all the parade floats you can handle? NC Stage has the answer: an hour and a half of non-stop laughter from three of the funniest actors in Western North Carolina. Opening Thanksgiving weekend and running through December 16, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare is a fast-paced romp through, yes, the entire Shakespeare canon (plus a sonnet or two). Whether you love or loathe the Bard, this play is for you. Complete Works stars Charlie Flynn-McIver,

Damian Duke Dominque and Scott Treadway, who have appeared together many times at NC Stage and Flat Rock Playhouse, including a 2004 production of this very same play, which sold out every seat of its run. The play is directed by Angie Flynn-McIver, co-founder of NC

North Carolina Stage Comedy presents the funniest play you’ll see all year! Stage with her husband Charlie FlynnMcIver. North Carolina Stage Company is Asheville’s professional theatre, tucked away at the end of an alley in the heart of downtown. The theatre is an intimate, 100-seat venue, meaning there’s not a bad seat in the house. Call for directions, because it’s easy to miss. Parental warnings: contains immature jokes, the occasional crude word, and actual Shakespearean monologues.

Performances are If You Wednesday through Saturday Go at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday

at 2 p.m. No performance on Thanksgiving; bonus matinee Saturday, November 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $16, $25, and $28, based on day of the week, with $10 student tickets available for every performance. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 239-0263 for more details, or visit www.ncstage.org

Gwenda LedBetter Performs

Old Woman in the Basement

R

enowned storyteller Gwenda LedBetter performs her original one-woman show Old Woman in the Basement at NC Stage in downtown Asheville, November 2 – 11, 2012. The play chronicles an all too common battle we all will face as we get older – losing things. Old Woman in the Basement is directed by David Novak as part of the Catalyst Series. For over 50 years, LedBetter has entertained audiences across America, starting with her role as the StoryLady at the Pack Library and on the Mr. Bill Show which aired on WLOS-TV. She went on to star in several Asheville Community Theatre musical productions including South Pacific and Camelot. In 2006, she wrote her first play, Friday’s Father about her childhood growing up on Virginia’s Eastern Shore with an alcoholic father. With David Novak as director, she performed the one-woman play at NC Stage to standing ovations. That same year, Gwenda was awarded the

 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

by

Amanda Leslie

An elder tale of descent and discovery at NC Stage. Oracle’s Circle of Excellence by the National Storytelling Network. In 2009 she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from North Carolina’s Storytelling Guild. At age 82, Gwenda has written her second solo work, Old Woman in the Basement. Her personal life unfolds in the everyman experience of the losses that come with aging – a process anyone may face at any time. Come see how one woman struggles with acceptance, enabling her to reinvest in the world.

More about The Old Woman in the Basement and Gwenda LedBetter at www.oldwomaninthebasement.com

Renowned storyteller Gwenda LedBetter

If You Performances November Go 2-11 at NC Stage, 15 Stage

Lane in downtown Asheville. Friday & Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Please call (828) 239-0263 for tickets or visit www.ncstage.org.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

performance

A

AmiciMusic features the Woodwinds in November

miciMusic will present two different programs highlighting the woodwind family in November. First up is “Flashy Flute” featuring flutist Dilshad Posnock in collaboration with pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser in a program that will include music by Handel, Barber, Poulenc, and Bolling.

Friday, November 30 at 7:30 p.m. at a home in Asheville. $35 ticket includes great food and wine. Buy tickets online at www. amicimusic.org, call Dan at (828) 505-2903, or e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org. Sunday, December 2 at 3 at the new Performance Space in the Asheville Music School, 126 College Street on the 3rd floor. Tickets are $15 with discounts for AMS students and teachers. Tickets will Flutist Dilshad Posnock Flashy Flute be available at the door. To reserve, call Dan at (828) The duo will perform 505-2903 or e-mail daniel@ Saturday, November 3 at amicimusic.org. 6 p.m. in a special potMr. Loew studied at luck House Concert at a the Juilliard School of Muhome in Arden, NC. $25 sic and is a 14 year veteran includes food and wine. of the United States Marine Reservations are required. Band and a member of the You can purchase tickets White House Orchestra, online at www.amicimusic. performing for Presidents’ org, call Dan at (828) 505Ford, Carter, Reagan and 2903, or e-mail daniel@ Bush Senior. amicimusic.org. Steve has performed Dilshad Posnock is with the New York Philoriginally from Bombay, harmonic, The National India. She has appeared Symphony Orchestra, The as a soloist and chamber Long Island Symphony, musician in concerts and The Chautauqua Symfestivals across the United phony and the National States, England, Puerto Clarinetist Steve Loew Gallery Orchestra. He has Rico and India. She has performed with Marvin also been featured on BBC TV and BBC Hamlisch, Doc Severinsen, Johnny Mathis, World Service Radio. Roberta Flack, rock star Meatloaf, and jazz Ms. Posnock has performance degrees great Barbara Cook and has toured and perfrom the Royal College of Music, London, formed extensively throughout the United and Carnegie Mellon University. While in States and abroad. Pittsburgh, she performed regularly with ensembles including the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Pittsburgh Ballet and Pittsburgh Opera. Ms. Posnock served as Artist Lecturer in Flute, and Director of the Artist Diploma Program at the Carnegie Mellon School of Music. Now based in Brevard, NC, Ms. Posnock performs with the Asheville Choral Society and has appeared as Guest Principal Flute with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra.

Clarinet Climax At the end of November, clarinetist Steve Loew will join Dr. Weiser in “Clarinet Climax,” a varied program with music by Weber, Finzi, Verdi, Joplin, as well as some Klezmer. There will be three concerts. Thursday, November 29 at 7:30 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15/$5. Phone (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Asheville Tango Orchestra AmiciMusic will present the Asheville Tango Orchestra on Saturday, December 1 at 8 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain. Open for both dancers and those who just want to listen to the premier Tango Orchestra in the Southeast, comprised of an accordion, a bandoneon, a bass, two violins, and a piano. Come listen to authentic Argentinian Tango and see some amazing dancers! Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for dancers. Phone (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

If You For more details on AmiciMusic’s Go concerts contact Dan at (828) 505-

2903, e-mail daniel@amicimusic. org, or visit www.amicimusic.org.

Autumn Odyssey

If You Go:

A

n afternoon of exquisite music performed by two of Western North Carolina’s finest musicians: flutist Kate Steinbeck, and guitarist Amy Brucksch. Kate and Amy have been collaborative partners since 2005 and produced a critically acclaimed CD, Luminescence, in 2010. All are invited to meet the musicians following the concert.

Amy Brucksch and Kate Steinbeck

Sunday, November 4 at 3 p.m. at the Altamont Theater, in downtown Asheville. Tickets are $18, or upgrade to a sponsorship ticket: “Prelude” $36; “Encore” $118. All proceeds benefit Asheville’s Jewish Family Services.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 


R

Creekside Artists Retreat

Room and Studio Space For Rent • Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $650/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

holdiay performances A Great Way to Kick Off the Holiday Season!

E

xpect the brilliantly unexpected from Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre’s third annual performance of The Nutcracker and the Mouse King. ACDT shocked and surprised audiences last year with their original version of The Nutcracker. Though The Nutcracker might be the world’s most famous ballet, if it is being performed by ACDT you can guarantee it is something you haven’t seen before. Their version couldn’t be farther from Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet. It is based on the original and much darker story written in 1816 by German author E.T.A. Hoffmann. “I always want to go back to the original work” artistic co- director Collard says. “The characters and the story are always so much more interesting.” Take for example the King and Queen of Sausages, who surprised and delighted last year’s audience with delightful humor, and the party guests wrapped in gorgeous costumes dancing a wild and wonderful polka. And then there is the famous Mouse King, his lovely wife, and their three children creating havoc all over the ballet while magical aerialists fly overhead, creating a surrealism to visually delight all ages. This year’s performance features special guest artist Roger Henry Pech of Merida,

T

Mexico as well as the ACDT adult company, White Dog ProjectX International, and the students of New Studio of Dance. With typical ACDT flair, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King will again prove to be a wonderful Christmas story full of adventure, courage and loyalty where love comes Dancers Sky McDowell and Jaime McDowell as the Sausage King and Queen. Photo by Toby Maurer alive in a spectacular modern dance experience. If Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre You Asheville Contemporary Dance (ACDT) is a non-profit professional dance Go Theatre and New Studio of Dance company created in 1979. As western North present The Nutcracker and the Carolina’s first professional modern dance Mouse King, at 7:30 p.m., November 30 company, they believe that everything evand December 1. Diana Wortham Theatre Pack Place in downtown Asheville. Tickets: erywhere is dance and everyone is a dancer. $25 general admission, $20 children, ACDT is devoted to local and international students and seniors. work, forging collaborations and partnerships between Asheville artists and dance Call (828) 257-4530 for reservations or artists from around the world. more information, or visit www.acdt.org

In the Nutcracker Mood

he Asheville Puppetry Alliance presents Mountain Marionettes’ production of In The Nutcracker Mood, featuring some of your favorite holiday music such as Spike Jones’ All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth, Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree, and, our holiday diva sings Santa Baby. The trick marionettes, always an integral part of a Mountain Marionettes production, perform to a very special rendition of The Nutcracker by the incomparable Glenn Miller Orchestra.

For more information visit www.ashevillepuppetry.org and click on Young Audience Series.

 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Mountain Marionettes is a full time professional puppet company that specializes in entertainment for the entire family. Mountain Marionettes productions are designed to be wholesome family fun that will charm the young ones and the young at heart. The Asheville Puppetry Alliance is a nonprofit organization bringing quality puppetry to Western North Carolina.

If You The Asheville Puppetry Alliance Go presents Mountain Marionettes’

production of “In The Nutcracker Mood,” Saturday, November 24 at 2 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets are $8. Call the Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office at (828) 257-4530 or visit online, www.dwtheatre.com.

Inspecting Carol November 16 - December 2 on ACT’s Mainstage A Christmas Carol meets Waiting for Guffman meets Noises Off in this hilarious comedy. A man who asks to audition at a small theatre is mistaken for an informer for the National Endowment for the Arts. Everyone caters to the bewildered wannabe actor and he is given a role in the current production, A Christmas Carol. Everything goes wrong and hilarity is piled upon hilarity.

If You Go: Inspecting Carol by

Daniel J. Sullivan, directed by Joan Atwood. Performances are Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. No performance Friday, November 23. Tickets are $12-$22 and are available online, by phone or in person at the Box Office. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street in Asheville. Phone (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

fine art Musings Upon Creativity & Other Things Amidst the River Arts District’s Studio Stroll

1

70-plus artists by Greg Vineyard across twentytwo historic buildings in their processes. down by the I concur that what French Broad River ultimately defines open their doors us as “creative” is collectively to weloutside ourselves. come thousands of But we are at least Inspiration on the fridge. visitors November able to grant kudos 10 & 11 during the to each other and River Arts District promote to the Studio Stroll. A full marketplace that We each have something weekend of imwe have someto offer, both individually mense creativity! thing to offer, both and collectively. A colleague individually and recently conveyed to collectively. me that creativity is I recently rea result of hard work, and is a label granted found an old quote from last century, where by one’s culture rather than self-applied. I had scrawled in red pencil upon a torn It is evident in the progression of our daily piece of yellow, lined notebook paper: “Am I artistic exercises that every step we take has honoring my gifts by using them?” And then a reason. I evidently packed it away in a box for twenAll this got me to thinking about the ty-odd years before unearthing it again the word CREATIVE. A word that I most surely other day to jolt me anew. It’s now on my over-use myself. So I looked it up in my fridge, next to a little note that reads “portfothousand-pound (give or take) Webster’s lio 100” from my high school art teacher, Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the and they are held down by three magnets: English Language - Updated, Revised, DeDeibenkorn’s “Ocean Park No. 38”, a Laura luxe Edition (It’s SO big, it has the longest Loercher heart that reads “home,” and an dictionary title known to mankind.). oval “AVL-Asheville” symbol, apparently to remind me that I am here. Creativity: 1. the state or quality of I’m grateful for the stream of inforbeing creative. 2. the ability to tranmation that comes my way so that I can scend traditional ideas, rules, patterns, ponder where I’m at as a visual artist. I’m relationships ... and to create meaningreminded that our potentials are limitful new ideas, forms, methods, interless. No matter what creativity definition pretations, etc.; originality, progressiveeach of us relates to, we can cherish our ness, or imagination... 3. the process by activities and remain in-process, letting the which one uses creative ability. 4. Being Pantone color chips fall where they may inspired by sci-fi. without worrying too much about the rest OK, I made that fourth one up. The of it. See you at Studio Stroll! first of the three definitions feels a bit circular and dictionary-ish to me. Accurate, yet If a bit remote. The second one seems more You River Arts District Studio Stroll, on-target, although I don’t know if one Go Saturday and Sunday, November must “transcend” anything other than pro10 and 11, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. crastination and just get to work. However, Free and open to the public. the word “imagination” does jump out as something we each have and can continue to cultivate. And number three mentions Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative “process,” conveying a reality-based concept consultant in Asheville, NC. about all that hard work artists are performZaPow Gallery in downtown ing every day. Asheville carries his Daily in the River Arts District, I illustrations and giclees. encounter a cornucopia of great art in a zillion (it’s in the dictionary, I checked) Find his clay works at styles. Some link directly back to traditional Constance Williams Gallery in Asheville’s themes, but each artist Interprets and Makes River Arts District, at Gallery 262 in Waynesville, and at Taupe Gallery in in a unique way. Others generate new exNorth Wilkesboro. pressions, backed-up by their personal histories. Either way, everyone is actively engaged www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net

pg. 36

DB

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 


R A P I D   R I V E R   A R T S

&

c u l t u re

River Arts District Artist interview with

Judy Levine

Designer and Artist

R pg. 36

WK

Celebrate your artsy side and create your own work of art in this easy step-by-step class. pg. 36

HC

20% OFF 735-C Haywood Road West Asheville Check Out Our Online Calendar

www.PaintAndMingle.com

December and January Painting Classes. Use coupon code CHEERS.

828-254-4486

apid River Magazine:

Tell us a little about yourself and your work

Judy Levine: As VP

of Creative Design at Springs Industries, I had been with the company for twenty years. I knew it was time for a change, but I had no idea what I would do until I took a weaving class. In that class I discovered my next career move as I learned the ins and outs of a loom. I soon left Springs to start AboutColor, a weaving business that specializes in passementerie (trims for draperies and pillows). That was about 12 years ago. That business operates out of Charlotte where I have a studio and several weavers who handle the production. We sell the trims out of Design showrooms in Atlanta, Denver and Palm Desert. Once I got that end of the business going, I couldn’t stop weaving scarves. Scarves are like a canvas to me. It is very hard to plan moves in advance since my work is all about color and just as an artist puts color on the palette as they go along, I do the same thing.

interviewed by

ville. It didn’t take any time at all to meet a lovely lady who wanted to share her space in the Warehouse and to also find a great furnished apartment to live while in Asheville. I now commute and spend 3 days working in Asheville and getting to know it better. I love working among other artists and in a space that is just dedicated to my work.

RRM: How did your get into weaving? JL: I bought a beautiful woven jacket at the Amercian Craft Council show in Charlotte. I told my friend about the jacket and she said they teach weaving here in Charlotte. It was just serendipitous that she would send me the catalog and that I would follow up on it. I never thought about weaving in my entire life. I’ve knitted, I’ve embroidered, I’ve quilted but I never thought about weaving. It just wasn’t on my horizon at all.

RRM: What inspires you to create? JL: For years I put color on the surface

of a fabric by designing printed fabrics. Now it is like I am designing fabric from the inside out. I love putting colors together to see what is going to happen. I use very simple structures because I use a ton of color.

RRM: How do you come up with designs?

RRM: What

Upcycle: \ʼup-sī-kəl\: the environmentally driven process of converting discarded materials into useful products of better quality and value.

The place for upcycled goods. 92 Charlotte St, Asheville, NC 28801 828.255.2533 Free Parking Next to City Bakery

pg. 36

CF

brought you to the River Arts District?

JL: Life takes some strange turns and several months ago I decided to spend more time in Asheville and more time weaving. A divine light came down, and a little voice in my head said “why not combine the two?” I thought it was a great idea and I immediately started looking for studio space and place to live while in Ashe-

digfoundry.com

10 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Dennis Ray

JL: Yarns, colors and

textures inspire me. I mix yarns with varying shrinkage to create three dimensional cloth. I fell in love with felting several years ago and most of my work contains an element of felting in one way or another. All of my work is very textural.

RRM: What projects are you currently working on? Tell us a little about your woven scarves and belts. They are beautiful, wearable artworks.

JL: There are four

Scarves by Judy Levine

structures that I have been playing with for several years. I move from one to another just depending on what

Judy Levine Photo by David Simchock

creative inspiration I want to try out. I am always thinking of new ways to achieve something a little different, tweaking my creations over and over again to make them more beautiful to me.

RRM: What colors are you drawn to? JL: I love color but am very picky.

Combining colors uniquely and imaginatively has been the cornerstone of my career. Right now, I am doing a lot of teal, orange, neutrals and soft shades of lime and my favorite color, celedon a blue/green shade.

RRM: Have you ever sold a woven scarf or belt, only later to wish you had it back?

JL: Yes I have. I did some unique pieces that were dyed, woven and felted in a class I took at Penland. I sold all of them and have regretted it ever since! Usually I just love the newest things I do, but I have a personal collection with some scarves that I did very early on in my career.

RRM: What other items do you design? JL: I have woven belts inspired by our trim line. I have made table runners inspired by one of the scarf designs. Jewelry is a passion and I have made my own jewelry for years. People always compliment me, but I never thought about selling it since my business keeps me pretty busy. However, now that I have the Warehouse Studio I have created a line of necklaces that are being sold out of my space, along with the scarves.

Judy Levine, AboutColor The Warehouse Studios 170 Lyman Street, Asheville (704) 560-1601 www.aboutcolor.net judy.aboutcolor@gmail.com Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 12-4 Call to visit at other times.


R A P I D   R I V E R   A R T S

&

pg. 36

c u l t u re

BC

River Arts District Artist Mary Webster New Beginnings

M

ary Webster is an artist at a cross roads in her career. For more than 20 years she has had a successful mural and decorative painting company. Mary Webster and Associates specialize in public and private murals that range in size and complexity. They also have the abilities to transform spaces from fine to fabulous with custom paint, glazes and faux finishes. Webster loves her career and has no intention of letting it go. But since moving to Asheville the urge to create noncomJackson Weaver, Oil missioned and Gold on Maple, work has 11" x 8" become even stronger. “Asheville has such a vibrant artist community! Creativity, artistic experimentation and Gilded Nest Bas exploration Relief, Oil and Gold on Walnut, 8" x 10" are sup-

Greg Vineyard

G

reg Vineyard is an artist, art/design consultant and writer living in Asheville, NC. Greg’s Ceramics for Contemplation and Connectivity simultaneously portray complexity and simplicity. In Asheville, his hand-made tiles, Communication Animals, Meditation/Tea Bowls and more are found only at Constance Williams Gallery in the River Arts District. Selections are

Mary Webster with mural of 1850’s Boston Harbor. Respectful nod to Fitz Hugh Lane.

ported and encouraged here.” For years, Webster has painted and gilded animal icons, particularly birds. But now she is also “branching out” with nests. In her Gilded Nest she has begun experimenting with texture and a bas relief effect. Webster has also painted a number of intricate nests on canvas. “When I begin one of these nests from my “New Beginnings” series, I think how can I possibly do this?” “But like the bird, twig by twig it comes together,” she explained with a smile. The latest painting in this series is the Finch Nest with Brown Headed Cow Bird Intruder. The Cow Bird doesn’t hatch or nurture her own. She leaves her

also carried by Gallery 262 in Waynesville, and Taupe Gallery in North Wilkesboro. Greg’s editorial, conceptual and connective illustrations and giclee prints are found only at ZaPow Illustration Gallery in downtown Asheville. His flowing, bold, artistic expressions reveal a stylistic immediacy, focusing on messaging and communication. This is Greg’s ninth and final Studio Stroll — his clay works are priced to move!

For more details visit www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net or “Creative Wayfinding by Greg Vineyard” on Facebook

Finch Nest with Brown Headed Cow Bird Intruder - Oil on Canvas 24" x 24"

eggs in other birds’ nests. The problem with this is that the Cow Bird is much larger than the Finch. It’s appetite usually means that the little Finch don’t get enough food. “I tried to paint this nest with an ominous feeling. I made the branches a bit thorn like and painted the background dark,” say’s Webster. If you would like to see more of Mary Webster’s commercial work, please visit www. marywebsterandassociates.com Mary Webster’s work can be seen at: Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street; 10-5 Monday - Saturday (828) 251-5796 Warehouse Studios, 170 Lyman Street in the River Arts District; Wednesday - Saturday or by appt. (828) 505-1562

pg. 36

A

ARTathon

An 8-hour art-making marathon to benefit Arts For Life! You’re invited to the ARTathon, an 8-hour art-making marathon to benefit Arts For Life! Brought to you by The Lift Studios, Roots + Wings School of Art, and Earth Fare, the ARTathon is a full-day celebration of hands-on creativity. Complete with live demonstrations and art supplies galore. the creative community will come together in a marathon effort to support Arts For Life’s educational arts programs for young patients and families battling cancer and other serious illnesses.

If You Go: ARTathon, Sunday, November 18 from 10 a.m.

to 6 p.m. Space is limited! Register today, visit www.aflnc. org/artathon.html. The LIFT studios, 349 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Questions? Contact Rachel at (828) 712-8120 for more information.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 11


R A P I D   R I V E R   A R T S

&

c u l t u re

River Arts District Artist interview with

Mark Henry

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

Fine Artist & Craftsman

R

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about yourself. Could you describe your background a little – what got you into the arts, and in particular painting? Mark A. Henry: I was the class artist

in high school and dabbled in art all through childhood. When one has to decide which college to attend, I worked with my counselor to find an art school. It was called Ringling Art School and with there requirements it fit the bill for me. Art school seemed to be my road – my attitude towards academics was not my cup of tea. At this school I meet teachers with skills that blew me away. I saw painting as my way in life. Although my dad and mom supported me on this choice, they had taught me to be self reliant and how to get a job, (thanks to them on that). Off and on through regular school we had art appreciation class and I was drawn to the great masters, old and modern. Rembrandt, Vermeer, Dutch painters mostly, the rest were just as influential. Landscapes were the best for subjects, and when they (the great masters) did an interior

Road on Craggy by Mark Henry

Misty Afternoon by Mark Henry

design, through modeling in clay, which later helped me in my various careers. Three teachers at Ringling Art School also got me on-track skills in painting; Moe Mitchell, Mrs. Patmanagren, and Harry Hablits. These teachers began directing me in the different ways of building a painting by way of mediums, types of painting supports, and understanding the spirit of creativity.

RRM: What inspires

you outside of other art? What are some influences that have always been part of your career?

MH: All the arts and

pg.

36

WE

12 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

the creative skills, dance, music, etc., move me in different Folk School Garden by Mark Henry ways and in endless new ways. Just the sun rise and sunwith wood this wowed me every time sets have a symphony of knowledge I saw these works. Thus I pushed myto teach. I’m influenced by my fellow self to be a realistic Romantic painter. artists in thinking out of the box by Although I started with the imprestheir successes and failures as well sionist style, as many of my artist as mine. The one greatest phrase of friends at the time, I learned how the influence was from Mr. Posey, “Learn old masters did it. to correct your fumbles and mistakes without being seen.” RRM: Your work is quite stunning and beautiful. I’m curious as to whom you RRM: You paint and draw. Which was would name as influences, and how your first love? did they influence you? MH: Drawing, I have learned, is the MH: Mr. Lesley P. Posy, a sculptor I foundation of my type of art; painting studied under for a number of years, just accents it. Thus, I love to draw. guided my disciplines in drawing and ‘M. Henry’ continued on page 18


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

authors ~ books ~ readings

F

Two by Ted Olson

ormer Rapid River Magazine poetry columnist Ted Olson doesn’t skydive or find buried pirate treasure hidden on gorgeous beaches around the world. But he is, in my estimation, a man who has entirely too much fun in life. He’s a poet, which means that he feels every thing he sees or hears more intensely than the average person does. He’s a professor in the Appalachian Studies Department at East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, Tenn., where he has the satisfaction of introducing young people to the study of a fascinating region of the U.S. As a cultural historian, he wrote a superb book on Appalachian culture, Blue Ridge Folklife (1998), which Ted Olson, author of every Asheville Revelations: Poems newcomer should read. Not just a word man, Olson is also a musician, who’s made notable contributions (gaining two Grammy nominations) in his work as a music historian. As a book editor, Olson has brought to readers the literary legacy of writers who deserve more recognition, such as Sarah Orne Jewet and Sherwood Anderson. His latest editorial project is The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still, a labor of love that took almost a decade to accomplish. James Still (1906-2001), once known as the Dean of Appalachian Literature, spent much of adult life alone in a log home in eastern Kentucky. He was a novelist, poet and short story writer, most well-known for his 1940 novel, River of Earth, which was constructed by recycling a dozen of his short stories. “I was interested in James Still’s work” Olson says, “because he found beauty and nobility in a hardscrabble Appalachian landscape, expressed through his literary efforts in a poetical interpretation of regional dialect.”

“And what can the future hold for people with no stories?” The 53 stories in this collection are indeed short, written in a style that is spare and full of action—perfect for today’s busy reader. The characters are simple people who face their struggles with a quiet dignity that is almost mythic. But life is not necessarily fair or forgiving for these characters.

In the title story, “The Hills Remember,” a nasty old codger makes sure he’s not the only man to meet his Maker on the day he’s been accidentally shot in the back. Women don’t fare well in these tales. Like in “The Burning of the Water,” their men pursue unattainable dreams that become nightmares for their families. Childhood is no idyllic time. In Still’s most anthologized story, “Mrs. Razor” (1945), a 6-year-old girl is convinced she is the mother of three children and married to a “lazy shuck of husband” who brings nothing but hunger and humiliation to their lives. Like his first poetry collection, Breathing in Darkness (2006), Olson’s most recent volume, Revelations: Poems (2012), consists of 78 short poems. His poetry books make perfect gifts for those people who claim they don’t like poetry—his work is so clear you’ll have no trouble understanding what the poem is about, and so meaningful you’ll be breathless from the focused insight of its few lines. A revelation is something that is disclosed from another source—God, or nature, or perhaps another person—rather than dug out from tragedy, or discovered on a long journey. The inspirational details of nature and the meditative, almost abstract nature of Olson’s poetry, make me think he is channeling his inner Celtic Christian monk. In “Questions” Olson bemoans the deteriorating changes in Appalachian life: “And what can the future hold for people with no stories?” In a poem about walking, which he claims is his one skill, Olson catapults his simple walks on land to the contemplation of the locomotion of other creatures. “What sustains me are whims I have when tired from walking: my limbs are wings or fins, if I get the notion.”

reviewed by

Marcianne Miller

“…she’ll wake, look out, and have no doubt she’s part of life.” In Economy, Olson reminds politicians what a real economic plan is. “Truth is there’s never enough money to buy a sunrise.” My favorite poem, which is so loving it made me cry, is Caretaker, about an older man who is determined to take care of the weeds at the house of his homebound mother: “… he’ll cut those weeds, so at sunrise/ she’ll wake, look out, and have no doubt/ she’s part of life.” In November, Olson fans are in for a treat. He’s reading not once, but two times at local bookstores. A natural storyteller, Olson will entertain us with how the insights of the poems were revealed to him, who were the real people behind the rhymes, and the secret languages in which the creatures and the landscapes disclosed their mysteries. If You Ted Olson at the Altamont Poetry Go Series, Monday, November 19

at 7:30 p.m. Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. For more information call (828) 348-5327 or visit www.myaltamont.com Ted Olson poetry reading, Friday, November 30 at 7 p.m. Montford Books & More, 31 Montford Ave., Asheville. For more information call (828) 285-8805 or visit www.montfordbooks.com

WAnt More? For information about the life of author James Still, including a glossary of dialectical words and phrases, visit The Hills Remember at www.kentuckypress.com, and http://thehillsremember.wordpress.com. For information on Ted Olson’s first poetry book visit www.windpub.com/books/ breathingindarkness.htm.

November

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

Partial Listing More events posted online.

readings & booksignings November 7 at 7 p.m. In Becoming Clementine by Jennifer Niven, Velva Jean works with the French Resistance. November 8 at 7 p.m. Selma James presents Sex, Race and Class: The Perspective of Winning. November 9 at 7 p.m. Ron Rash presents the paperback version of The Cove. November 10 at 7 p.m. London Bridge in Plague and Fire by David Madden. November 11 at 3 p.m. Descent: Poems by Kathryn Stripling Byer. November 12 at 7 p.m. 30 Days With My Father, A Memoir About Wartime PTSD by Christal Presley. November 13 at 7 p.m. Song of the Vikings by Nancy Marie Brown. November 14 at 9:50 a.m. Elza’s Kitchen, a celebration of Hungary by Marc Fitten. November 15 at 7 p.m. Mark Powell’s The Dark Corner tackles the cultural banes that plague Appalachia. November 16 at 7 p.m. David Loy presents The World is Made of Stories. November 17 at 7 p.m. Triple cookbook event featuring Fred Thompson, Debbie Moose, and Kathleen Purvis. November 27 at 7 p.m. Nathan Kotecki, Suburban Strange, and Kristen-Paige Madonia, Fingerprints of You, for teens. November 29 at 7 p.m. Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-Called Hospitality by Jacob Tomsky. November 30 at 7 p.m. Nonbeliever Nation: The Rise of Secular Americans by David Niose.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM pg. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

For information about Ted Olson’s newest poetry book, visit publisher page www. celticcatpublishing.com/revelations.htm. To contact Ted Olson about purchasing his other books, email him at olson@etsu.edu. Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 13


R

A

P

I

D

spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

R

I

Ghost Season Old Dark Will Music

K

In stark contrast to their previous offerings, The Mason Brothers’ Ghost Season is the sound of the two in full gear, moving beyond their folk roots to include horns, orchestrated dense arrangements, and a diversity of style that 2007’s The Sun, the Moon, and the Sea scarcely hinted at. Equally inspired by the dark musings of Elliot Smith and Nick Drake — as well as the off kilter machinations of Syd Barrett era Pink Floyd — the album is a kaleidoscopic ride of sound and spirit. While James’ singing is often little more than a calm whisper, it fits the tortured nature of the material perfectly. The vocal dynamics of such tracks as “Water Well” and “Ignore that Ghost” are so understated that it’s easy to first miss the amazing quality of nuance that goes into their creation. Yes, they often veer too readily into the dreaded “sensitive guy singer” category but the there’s something undeniably attractive in their sound, a sort of field recording ethos that carefully blends together the past and present. At times the ramped up production seems at odds with the vocals and much of the lyrical content is lost in the mix. And while Ghost Season lacks the sort of catchiness that will bowl you over, it sounds better with each listen. Since its release the band has expanded into a trio and recorded yet another record. I’ll be sure to review Ivy in the Orange Groove in the coming months; if nothing else Ghost Season has left me wanting to hear more. ***

Aimee Mann Charmer Superego Records With 2008’s @#%&*! Smilers Aimee Mann began to move away from the introspective song cycles she’d so successfully explored and return somewhat to the pure pop pleasures with which she’d made her mark. Leaving behind to sober remembrances of The Forgotten Arm — a record I loved then and know — Mann brightens her musical palette with trebly guitars, drum kits, and synthesizers that would sound right at home in the 14 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Back again with an assortment of music I’ve been enjoying and suspect you will too. Be it given two stars or five, everything covered here offers something for someone. Be sure to continue supporting our fine, locally-owned record stores, letting them know with your dollars how glad we are to have them.

The Mason Brothers

pg. 36

V

early years of MTV. Which, considering that Mann once fronted the band ‘Til Tuesday is not such an odd thing. Co-produced by Paul Bryan — whose association with Mann goes back to 2006 — Charmer is over-stuffed with the sort of spiky hooks and precise melody that Mann seems to so effortlessly concoct. She’s at her most insistently listenable, delivering an eleven song gem that begs to be hummed along to. But make no mistake, in no way is Charmer either light weight or some garish new wave revival record. Mann still has a fondness for stately mid tempo marches (“Slip & Roll” and “Barfly) and three minute pop delights (everything else) but she layers her songs with a muscularity that gives even the more popish moments heft. Combined with Charmer’s running time of under 40 minutes, you’ve got an album that never overstays its welcome, relying on the inherent charms of the singer. It’s an amusing side note that Mann has chosen to name her label Superego. As an artist she’s pretty damn super. As a person one gets the sense her ego is balanced just right. ***1/2

Ryan Bingham Tomorrowland Axster Bingham Records It’s an old adage that a band (or solo artist) spends twenty years making their first album and six months making the second. Nowhere does this sound truer than on Tomorrowland, Bingham’s closely watched follow up to his stunning 2010 debut Junky Star. If that album had the desperate wail of a man possessed, this one smacks a bit too much of giving the people what (he thinks) they want. Following the release of Star, Bingham ditched his record company (as well as his long time band the Dead Horses) and started his own label. It’s the sort of ballsy move that might in the long run pay dividends but for now seems to be a retreat. Tomorrowland was co-produced by the artist and Justin Stanley. Its 13 songs run the gamut, from tightly written, acoustically driven Americana tunes to loud — and deliberately shambling — rockers. Given the socio-political themes here, it’s clear that Bingham has an axe to grind, both as an artist and as a citizen of the world. That doesn’t always work to his advantage, however, and therein lies part of this album’s charm and potential downfall.

The opening “Beg for Broken Legs” is a lovely balance of acoustic and electric guitars, nicely kicking drums and a bass line that grabs you by the throat. But with verses sung from one perspective and a chorus from another it loses focus; even its Woody Guthrie like refrain (“I ain’t gonna stand in line/Beg for bread from up off the floor”) becomes a bit of a drone. The six-minute “Western Shore” is much well defined; its mix of strummed 12strings, mandolin, and muted electrics work their way into a swirling tempest of sonic textures that never succumb to the deliberate excess in the track’s production and create a necessary tension — they are easily the strongest tracks here, and a direction that Bingham would do well do explore. Unfortunately he soon follows it with “Guess Who’s Knocking,” a clumsy barroom singalong that feels as forced as it is flat. For the rest of the album Bingham bounces from rockabilly to faux soul and back to country rock. The result is an album full of the artist’s frustration, anger and conviction that ultimately misses the mark. It could have been so much more and, given the quality of its predecessor, can only be considered a let down. **1/2

Ken Stringfellow Danzig in the Moonlight Spark and Shine Records Despite an eight-year drought between solo albums, Ken Stringfellow has been one busy guy. Between touring with R.E.M. fronting the re-formed Big Star, recording a new Posies record, and releasing two albums with his Norwegian garage rock outfit The Disciplines, he’s hardly had time to catch his breath. But he did find a spare moment to gift us with his latest delight. Danzig in the Moonlight (and no, I don’t have the slightest idea what the title means) finds the venerable singer/songwriter tossing all of those experiences into the blender and serving up a veritable horn of plenty. Recorded in Brussels — with the assistance of friends from all corners of the globe — his fourth solo outing is as spellbinding as it is willfully schizophrenic, incorporating elements of progressive art rock, country, soul, R&B, and straight-up Posies-inspired jangle pop without a care in the world. ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience Loudon Wainwright III

A

lthough he is largely associated with the affluent environs of Westchester county, the area north of New York City in which he grew up, Loudon Wainwright III owes his very existence to the tarheel state. The son of Loudon S. Wainwright Jr., an acclaimed writer and editor at Life magazine and a direct descendant of colonial governor Peter Stuyvesant, the singer was born in Chapel Hill, were his father was pursuing a degree. And while his songs are known and loved for their piercing sardonic wit and painful observations of family life they also hint at a genteel and folksy charm that seems right out of the South. Wainwright became a folk singer/songwriter in the late ‘60s, plying humorous and nakedly honest autobiographical songs that were equal parts hysterical and uncomfortably candid; Wainwright has long been brilliant at tackling subjects considered by many and talked about by few. Signed to Atlantic Records, he recorded Album’s I and Album II in quick succession, accompanying himself on acoustic guitar in true folk music fashion. Both efforts attracted rave reviews but scant sales-a trend that would be repeated throughout his long career-and the label promptly dropped their once rising “new Dylan.” In a Dylanesque simple twist of fate, Wainwright had already switched to Columbia Records but, contractually owing one last effort to Atlantic, he quickly made the folk-rock Album III (1972) which featured the Top 40 novelty hit “Dead Skunk.” It

‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

The result is his most audacious studio offering yet, and one of the most satisfying projects he’s ever been associated with. From the opening “Jesus Was an Only Child,” a temperamental joy which glides easily from dreamy electro-pop to world beat, the record feels like a fan’s dream proposal come to life. Even when it doesn’t work — and any record this ambitious is certain to have a few missteps — there’s always the sort of unexpected moment, such as the breezy radio friendly bliss of “You’re the Gold” that strikes the proper balance between adventurous and self absorption. If anything, Stringfellow fans of every persuasion will walk away with at least one or two prizes flashing back to their favorite Stringfellow song. In a career as vital yet underappreciated as his, Ken Stringfellow has had every reason to pack it up and go home. Thankfully he’s kept plugging away and if we have to wait another eight years for a record as good as this then so be it. ****

by James

Cassara

Wainwright’s biting humor and engaging stage persona made him a concert favorite.

was Wainwright’s first and only brush with real commercial success and it likely scared the hell out The Last Man on of him. For decades he reEarth was released days fused to perform the song after September 11, on stage while making 2001 (and subsequently records — such as 1973’s sank in the midst of that Attempted Mustache and aftermath) while yet the half-live Unrequited another live album, So (1975) — which seemed Damn Happy marked almost deliberate in their his debut for Sanctudetermination to garner ary in 2003. A quartet great reviews and lacklusof studio albums, Here Loudon Wainwright III ter sales. Instead WainCome the Choppers wright focused on inces(2005), Strange Weirsant touring; his biting humor and engaging dos (2006) and Music from and Inspired stage persona made him a cult figure and a by the Film Knocked Up (2007) and 2008’s concert favorite. Recovery were noted for the rapidity of their Meanwhile, his songs were recorded by release. It was the first time Wainwright had others, notably Kate (his wife, later divorced, made four albums in as many years. who died in 2010) and Anna McGarrigle. In 2011, Shout! Factory issued a long Wainwright also focused on acting; he apoverdue career retrospective: a five-disc peared in the off-Broadway show Pump box set entitled 40 Odd Years that included Boys and Dinettes and for two seasons album tracks, a complete CD of rare and played a featured role on the successful unreleased material, and a 200-plus-minute M*A*S*H television series. He also emDVD that showcases a European made docbarked on a series of restless label hopping, umentary as well as dozens of performances. moving first to Arista Records for 1976’s In 2009, Wainwright released High Wide T Shirt, and 1978’s Final Exam — both of & Handsome: the Charlie Poole Project. which featured backing from a full honest to The set featured songs by the American folk gosh rock band — but soon turned his back and country icon, as well as new songs that on the major labels for a more approprihelped move his odd legend forward. ate home on the folk-based indie Rounder His most recent studio effort, Older Records. Both A Live One (1980), and Fame Than My Old Man Now came out earlier and Wealth (1983), were modest hits, giving this year. It’s a somewhat ragtag collection Wainwright the capital to make yet another of 15 songs featuring contributions from abrupt departure. all four of his children and two of his three This time he pulled up stakes and wives, and includes a song co-written with moved to England. He had previously done Kate McGarrigle. And, while it’s a record a pair of sold out tours of the UK while his Wainwright clearly wanted to make, it furrecord sales there had always been solid. thers his propensity to baffle his most ardent Wainwright was also stinging from a recent followers. But none of that matters as much divorce, and clearly needed a change of as the opportunity to see Wainwright at his scenery. 1985’s I’m Alright and the following most comfortable, guitar in hand, tongue in year’s More Love Songs were co-produced cheek, and the sort of cozy setting that The by British singer/guitarist Richard ThompGrey Eagle offers. son, a friendship that stands to this day. No matter if you’ve seen Wainwright Therapy (1989) found Wainwright liva dozen times or not at all, his live pering back in the U.S. and again with a new laformances never fail to delight. Now well bel. He signed to Virgin Records’ Charisma into his 60s, his grown up concerns might subsidiary for History (1992) and the live just be yours as well. Heck, given the Career Moves (1993), the latter of which right prompting he might even sing “Dead remains the best selling album of his long Skunk,” or not. career. Grown Man, his 15th album, was released in 1995, followed three years later by Little Ship. 1999 saw the release of Social If Studies, an out of print and highly collectYou Loudon Wainwright III Sunday, ible gathering of topical, humorous songs Go November 11. Tickets are $25/$28 Wainwright had been composing since the for this fully seated 8 p.m. show. late ‘80s for National Public Radio; the Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave. in Asheville. For tickets and information, (828) following year the BBC Sessions collected 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com favorites and new compositions.

Music & Dance Saturday, November 3 – Celtic Rock

with the Clumsy Lovers, 9 p.m. at Jack of Hearts Pub in Weaverville. Free.

Friday Dance Party – at Arcade Ashe-

ville, 130 College Street, in downtown Asheville. Featuring live DJs and plenty of room to shake your tush. 9 p.m. Free.

Thursday, November 15 – Contra Dance

at Warren-Wilson College. Starts at 8 p.m. Beginners Lessons at 7:30 p.m. $6, Warren Wilson students $1. Music by Hot Sonata (Karen Gaughan on piano, Art Shuster on mandolin, and Laura Lengnick on fiddle) with caller AnneMarie Walter. More details at (828) 258-4809.

Saturday & Sunday, November 10-11 – Sing My Sister, Sing. Womansong’s

25th Anniversary Concert. Saturday at 7 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville. Featuring dynamic choral singing along with drumming, dancing, and colorful visuals to celebrate the unity, diversity and empowerment of women. Tickets $20. Group discount for 5 or more, $15.

Friday, November 9 – Western Square Dance. Honoring not only veterans of the

Armed Forces, but those who have served in other countries. Hosted by Land of Sky Squares at the Opportunity Center, 36 Grove Street, Asheville. Caller: Jerry Biggerstaff; Cuers: Don and Linda Hichman. Rounds at 7 p.m., Squares and Rounds from 7:30 p.m. Call (828) 667-1257.

Clogging and Step Dance Classes

– Beginning and intermediate classes in clogging, Irish, and fitness are offered. Classes for children and adults at 235 A Weaverville Hwy. in Woodfin. Call Director Heidi Kulas for more details (828) 319-7202.

Salsa Dance Lessons in Black Mountain. Christey Carwile specializes in Salsa, Cha Cha Cha, and Afro-Latin Dance forms. For more details call (828) 664-0400.

West African Dance Classes offered every Tuesday night from 7:30-8:30 p.m. at Terpsicorps Studio, now on Old Lyman Street. Classes are taught by Sarah Yancey. Live drumming. Classes are $10 and are open to all levels. Call (828) 319 2486 for more details.

West Coast Swing Zone with Jason & Amy Barnes, Thursdays at Asheville Ballroom & Dance Centre, 911 Sweeten Creek Road in Asheville. Lessons for beginners and advanced level dancers 8 p.m. The party begins with a mixer, and the DJ plays your requests. Open dancing 9-10:30 p.m.

Sunday, November 18 – Community Contra Dance from 4 to 6 p.m. at Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave. For families and all ages. Caller: Diane Silver; Music: June Advincula, keyboard Jeff Baker, fiddle. Suggested donation: $7 adults/$3 kids. Stay for supper! Gluten-free and vegetarian options. Adult plate, $10; kid’s plate $5. For more information: call (828) 575-2557.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience Yusif in the Mountains

B

orn in Seattle and raised between there and Kuwait the Washington based pop rocker known as Yusif lived in Kuwait during The Gulf War. At the age of four, he and his mother soon found themselves separated from his father, a time of fear and uncertainty that has manifested itself in song and spirit. The end result is an immersion in sentiment and sound; a self titled ten song album that shifts readily from melodicallyrich indie-folk storytelling to hook-laden rock and roll. And it’s all with a distinctive, yet memorable base that imagines a parallel universe in which Cat Stevens stole the Heartbreakers away from Tom Petty. “Sometimes our most destructive moments and greatest tragedies end up becoming our triumphs,” says Yusif, who leads the band bearing his name. He’s discussing the record, a largely homemade effort released in early fall: songs that gravitate to lyrics about love, lost love, internal conflicts and struggles, and emotionally-charged anti-war anthems. “I was a little kid living in Kuwait during the Gulf War and had to be evacuated with my mom. Then twelve years later I was living in America during the War on Terror. It has been pretty intense to be part of both cultures, especially at a time when 9/11 and the Iraq War were happening and there was such a divide between the cultures,” he adds. The musical journey continued with Yusif returning to Seattle after living abroad for ten years in an attempt to rediscover his musical roots and begin his career as a recording artist. Arguments with a strict Kuwaiti father, clashes that were both

Rapid River ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

16th Annual

Poetry Contest 5 Winners! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Tickets to the theatre; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Any unpublished poem 35 lines or less is wanted! Deadline January 15, 2012. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2012 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems. For more information please call (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

by James

Cassara

generational and culin the city, every club tural, inevitably led Yusif and coffee house you can to seek his own path. name,” remembers Yusif. “The fights with “Sometimes I did my father furthered my two or three in a night unhappiness in Kuwait,” and as many as eight in he says. “The isolation I a week. It was like my was feeling grew deeper job, only I wasn’t getting and stronger; I felt like an paid. A couple of times outcast and was bullied in I strummed my acoushigh school because I was tic guitar so hard that I very different, with one would lose half a finfoot in both cultures.” gernail and there would At this point he be bloodstains on the convinced his parents inside of my Martin after to let him move back to performances. But it was Yusif became a regular on the Seattle and live with his a great training ground.” Seattle folk-pop scene that emerged grandparents. But once He still has that simultaneous to grunge. back in Seattle the same same Martin, and used pattern continued. Yusif found himself it on acoustic parts in the recording of the isolated and depressed, turning to drugs self-titled full-length album. Opening with and alcohol for comfort. Due to a bureau“Third World Soldier,” a harrowing tale cratic hitch he was unable to get into high of a mother losing her child in war, with school, but did manage to enroll in a comimages of battleships and a mother’s love, munity college. It was there he discovered desperation, and despair at the loss, a tune grunge, Nirvana and Soundgarden. Songs originally written as a piano ballad becomes like “Fell on Black Days” seemed to speak a gritty, rough-around-the-edges, and comdirectly to his heart. Yusif would eventupletely raw pop-rock song. Cutting through ally earn his high school diploma from the pretension, it delivers a bleak, yet powerful American School of Kuwait. anti-war message. After graduating from John Hopkins While the album has plenty of politiUniversity he once again headed back to Secal underpinning there’s ample room for attle. Packing everything he could fit into his romance and heartache, best exemplified in battered 1987 Honda Accord, he embarked “Underdog,” a light pop-rock number about on a solo cross-country trek from Baltimore, finding comfort and love with someone only Maryland to Seattle. Once there, he quickly to discover you’re nothing more than a mere began playing the local open mic circuit, beconvenience to them. coming a regular on the burgeoning Seattle “The song is about somebody that folk-pop scene that was emerging simultathinks that they have finally found a person neous to grunge. “I played every open mic to love who is a true friend, but finds out

N

The experiences of our past can lead to the artistry of our future. that that’s not what’s happening, that reality is very different from your perception of it sometimes.” Its relatively lightweight approach is directly countered by “Reach Out” (the album’s heaviest, hardest hitting track) as Yusif struggles to find himself and his voice in the post-drug-induced world he’s just created. “I was looking for the answer to getting out of my drug habits and I found them by doing the album,” he says of the full-length, and the lyrical content of “Reach Out.” Ending with “Only Fools Know Better,” Yusif delves deep with a soul-searching love song detailing heartbreak, loss, moving on, and trying to find yourself, all delivered in a quirky ballad form; funky but with its heart on its sleeve. Smartly under-produced by Joe Reineke (of the band Audio Orbit), the result of this ten-track debut is something that is raw, engaging, hopeful, and a clear statement of who Yusif is. We’ll get to see it first hand, as the artist plays a pair of local shows at venues small enough to go up, shake his hand, and see first hand how the experiences of our past can lead to the artistry of our If You Two shows by Yusif and his Go Martin guitar. November 6 at

Good Stuff 68 N. Main St. in downtown Marshall, (828) 649-9711; and November 8 at Mary Jane’s Cafe, 110 East Main Street in Burnsville, NC, phone (828) 678-9362. Please call the venues for ticket prices and times.

Intimate Musical Revue Naughty But Nice!

aughty But Nice!, an original revue of the music of Cole Porter and Noel Coward, will run from November 1-25 in 35below, the black box theatre at Asheville Community Theatre. Naughty But Nice! captures the sophistication of Cole Porter and the wit of Noel Coward. Departing from the more traditional repertory, the musical design of this intimate cabaret revue takes us to the inner circles of New York, Paris, London and Cannes where both the composers held court. This collection of saucy songs in tandem with a few marvelous monologues

16 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

by Jenny

Bunn

stars Carol Duermit, Ryan Hessenius, Mark Morales, and Jorja Ursin. Naughty But Nice! is produced by Francis & Francis Productions and presented in 35below. If You Naughty But Nice! will run Go Thursday, Friday and Saturday

has the appeal of several dryNaughty But Nice!Naughty But Nice! is created by stage director Francis Cullinan and musical director David Troy Francis. The revue

nights through November 25 – no performances Thursday, November 22, or Friday, November 23. A matinee performance takes place Sunday, November 25 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience Viva La LAB

by James

Cassara

T

he international artist Viva DeConcini has played everywhere from Bonnaroo to the historic Monterey Jazz Fest, where she shared a stage with the avant-garde Jazz provocateur Peter Apfelbaum. She has played sold out clubs in the heart of Manhattan, performed burlesque and variety shows at The Slipper Room and Joe’s Pub, and is one of the few females to have been featured in Guitar Player Magazine (2009). In 2011 she made her NYC theatrical debut as the musician in Taylor Mac’s play WAAFME, which the NY Times hailed as one of 2011’s ten best. She will also be performing with him throughout this next year as part of his 24 hour-long concert of imperfection. But while such excursions seem in character for the mercurial songstress she is first and foremost a musician. As such DeConcini has just released the eagerly anticipated Rhine-

Viva DeConcini steps into the friendly confines of the LAB listening room for her first ever Asheville performance.

stones and Rust and is on the road throughout the fall promoting the new album. Her video for “A Thousand Horses” premiered last week at No Depression and features BMX trickster Tory King, a park carousel, and the band performing the 6/8

shuffle in a half pipe in Queens. DeConcini is a true guitar wizard, one of the most inventive players on the scene. In a recent rave review of live performance Vintage Guitar declared, “Viva DeConcini proves she’s a force to be reckoned with if rock and roll is to survive and grow.” That may be lofty — and admitted hyperbolic — praise but there’s no denying the talent the twentysomething artist brings to the fold. See for yourself when Viva DeConcini steps into the friendly confines of the LAB listening room for her first ever Asheville appearance. This might just be the rare occasion to catch a rising star before they become all the rage. And isn’t it always great to be on the ground floor of something new and different?

D

~ Singer Michael Buble

“I’ve been in Buble’s band for almost 10 years. We’re on hiatus for the moment, but I’m generally on the road about 5-6 months of the year with him.” Born July 1, 1975, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Justin received a scholarship after high school to the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston where he graduated with a Degree in Music Education and performed with a number of different ensembles. He completed his Masters Degree at the University of Southern California and fast became one of the most in-demand jazz trumpeters in the region, performing with artists including Bill Cunliffe, Alan Pasqua, Joe LaBarbara and Kurt Elling. “I think I was 11 when I first picked

~ Drummer Michael Davis

“I was about 16 when I became interested in playing jazz, which was when I decided to take trumpet lessons. My first teacher was a jazz musician and he turned me on to improvising, so I started listening to some of the jazz trumpet greats, mostly Clifford Brown, Freddie Hubbard, and especially Lee Morgan. I still listen to them and find something new every time. I’m also a big fan of Sinatra, Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson, but I also like more current stuff like Coconut Records, one of my favorite indie rock bands.” Justin’s first album for commercial release, the self-titled “Justin Ray”, came in 2006. It features ex-Bublé band mem-

If You Go: Yellow Dubmarine, Friday,

November 9 at 8 p.m. All ages, $10, at the Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave. in Asheville. Phone (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com

November 16. Cover charge is $6, the show begins at 9 p.m. 39 North Lexington Avenue in Asheville. Phone (828) 252-0212 or visit www.lexavebrew.com

by

“My fondest memory of Justin was at the Las Vegas Hilton in 2006.” up the trumpet. My first two choices were drums and saxophone, but I guess the trumpet thing worked out okay. I go through phases where I’ll spend a lot of time practicing other instruments, but I never connect with them in the same way. I’ve been singing for the last year or so, and I’ve really enjoyed that.” “Justin is one of the most communicative musicians I’ve ever heard or played with. Where other players push people away, Justin always draws you in.”

Washington D.C. based Yellow Dubmarine creates a new and fresh sound that combines their tightly rehearsed reggae style with some of the Beatles greatest songs.

If You Viva DeConcini at the Lexington Go Avenue Brewery on Friday,

WNC Jazz Profiles: Justin Ray

uring Justin’s astounding highenergy solo on “Smile” one night, a lady in the audience rose to her feet to applaud his performance. She turned out to be Justin’s mum and looked so proud of her immensely talented son up on stage. It was a truly remarkable reaction to an overwhelming performance. As much as Justin plays his heart out every night, you couldn’t help but feel that he’d found a little something extra that evening, just to give his mum!

Yellow Dubmarine

Justin Ray Photo by Frank Zipperer

ber Randy Napoleon on guitar, New York drummer Quincy Davis, and the sought after Hammond B3 organist Jared Gold. “I also recorded “Love Songs,” which features my music behind the works of some wellknown poets.” “Justin is more than a melodic trumpet player with an impressive command of the instrument. He’s a probing, searching player who is a rhythm section’s dream as he leaves tons of space in his solos for us to jump in and interact – the essence of jazz! His approach puts him in the elite company of very few trumpet players – Wynton Marsalis and Miles Davis come to mind – who’ve learned how to use space to build tension rather than relieve it. The sky’s the limit for him.”

~ Pianist/composer/professor Bill Bares

Eddie LeShure

“I’ve done quite a bit of composing, but am now getting into creating longer form pieces. I’ve received a grant from the Asheville Arts Council to do a semisymphonic work for jazz quintet and string quartet which will be premiered at the Altamont Theater in downtown Asheville on December 12. I’m really excited about that!” In Asheville since 2008, Justin performs with “almost too many groups to mention. Stephaniesid, The Archrivals, Hard Bop Explosion, and the Alien Music Club are those I play with the most consistently. My groups are J Ray Goes Beatnik (a jazz and poetry combo), plus the J Ray 5, where I sing and play jazz standards. I’ve been fortunate to perform with a number of really amazing musicians since moving here, and I’m thankful to live where I’m surrounded by such creative people!” First CD, www.cdbaby.com/cd/justinray Love Songs, www.cdbaby.com/cd/jray5 www.facebook.com/pages/ Justin-Ray/7082092941

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently off-the-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 17


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

fine art Black & White III

‘M. Henry’ continued from page 12

E Mark Henry at work.

Folk Art Center Main Gallery Exhibition

very other year the Southern Highland Craft Guild hosts a Member Exhibition in the Folk Art Center Main Gallery. The theme for the 2012 exhibition is “black and white.” All Guild members were invited to be in the show and space filled within the first month after the invitation was sent. This is the third time the theme has been chosen and it

RRM: What was the best advice given to you as an artist?

MH: Best advice to another artist: learn

the disciplines in your medium; learn how to use your materials to express your art; find love in the toil of your art.

RRM: How many hours do you spend, on average, on any given painting?

MH: On the average a drawing or paint-

ing ranges from one hour to eight hours over a given time space.

RRM: You make your own frames. How did this come about?

MH: For one of my jobs, I worked in a

museum as a frame conservator and fell in love with the frames. I said to myself, in time I will build them. And now is the time. With happiness, my son Jon is now learning to build frames with me.

Judy Simmons

Mark A. Henry Studio

Proofreader Do you like finding mistakes? Are you detail oriented? A stickler for rules? We need your help! A volunteer is needed to help proofread each issue. Fast turn-around. All done via email or Dropbox. Work from home.

Interested? Call (828) 646-0071 or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

April Nance

continues to be an artist favorite. While many see the theme as a direction, others see it as a challenge and a way to push the limits of their creativity within their own craft. Each craft media represented by the Guild including wood, paper, fiber, natural materials, clay, glass, metal, mixed media, leather and jewelry, appears in the show and 88 artists are participating. Black & White III is an amazing representation of the talent and creativity of the members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The Southern Highland Craft Guild, with headquarters at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center, is an educational, non-profit organization founded in 1930. The Guild’s mission is to “bring together the crafts and the craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation.” Today, Guild membership stands at more than 900 artisans selected by a jury for the high quality of design and craftsmanship reflected in their work. The Guild represents artists living in the mountain counties of nine states: Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.

Nancy Fleming

If You The Folk Art Center is open daily Go and admission is free. To learn

more about Black & White III, the Folk Art Center and the Southern Highland Craft Guild call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

~ Black & White III Exhibitors ~

Cotton Mill Studios, River Arts District (828) 658-8891 or (828) 242-7402 www.naturalviewsinc.com

by

Lori Anderson, natural materials Hugh Bailey, clay Sharon Bailey, jewelry Joan Bazzel, jewelry Bonne Jean Bertlshofer, natural materials Cindy Billingsley, clay Georgia Bonesteel, fiber Norma Bradley, fiber Judy Brater, clay Connie Brown, fiber Marcia Bugg, clay Ed Byers, clay Jim Charneski, jewelry Ruthie Cohen, jewelry Jane Cole, fiber Bill & Tina Collison, wood Darrell Copeland, wood Chery Cratty, paper Lisa Banner of Crossnore Weavers, fiber

Nancy Darrell, paper Peggy DeBell, mixed media Claudia Dunaway, clay Catharine Ellis, fiber Lee Entrekin, wood Carla Filippelli, natural materials Nancy Fleming, jewelry Cat Francis, jewelry David Goldhagen, glass Amy Goldstein-Rice, clay Sue Grier, clay Lynne Harrill, fiber Karen Hawkins, mixed media Marcia Heatwole, paper Derek Hennigar, wood furniture Bill Henry, wood Donald Herrick, glass Harriet Herrick, glass

18 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Gail Holt, mixed media Ivan Ivanoff, leather Barbara Joiner, jewelry Royelvis Lee Joiner, wood Ray Jones, wood Collene Karcher, mixed media Alicia Kelemen, glass Jan Kransberger, glass Mike Lalone, clay Jan Lee, clay Rob Levin, glass Annie Fain Liden, mixed media Becky & Steve Lloyd, clay Janice Maddox, fiber Rita de Maintenon, fiber Libby & Jim Mijanovich, fiber Barbara Miller, fiber Joe Miller, metal

Katrina Miller, metal Betsy Morrill, fiber Rose Tripoli Mueller, clay Holden McCurry, clay Valerie McGaughey, fiber Joe Frank McKee, clay Lee Zimmerman-Nelson, fiber Mary Nichols, fiber Joe Karst, fiber Terry Ostovar, clay Martha Owen, fiber Charlie Patricolo, mixed media Susan Marie Phipps, jewelry Amy Putansu, fiber Diana Ramsay, fiber John Richards, mixed media Kathie Roig, fiber

Bernie Rowell, fiber Joe Ruminski, wood Tommye Scanlin, fiber Alice Schlein, fiber Judy Simmons, fiber Laura Sims, fiber Liz Spear, fiber Cheryl Stippich, glass, Billie Ruth Sudduth, natural materials Barbara Swinea, fiber Teena Tuenge, fiber Kathleen Weir-West, fiber Tamela Wells, jewelry Ali Wieboldt, jewelry Carol Wilcox Wells, fiber Amolia Willowsong, jewelry


R A P I D   R I V E R   A R T S

&

c u l t u re

The River Arts District interview with Portrait Painter

R

apid River Magazine:

Tell us a little about what it is like being an artist in Asheville.

Stephen Janton: Being an artist in Asheville is a really exciting and fulfilling experience. Asheville’s unique vibe draws artists from all over the country. I owe most of my Asheville experience to my wonderful clients. Joining the River Arts District Artists (RADA), an association of 180 or so artists has also had significant impact. RADA is a group of artists that volunteer their time to organize and promote art events like Studio Stroll and Second Saturday.

Stephen Janton

to create?

RE

Stephen Janton Photo by Erica Mueller

SJ: The challenge, the joy of paint-

Photo by Erica Mueller

RADA also focuses on helping artists to become better at business. It is very obvious to me that the arts community here cares about the city and really wants to help keep the uniqueness that is Asheville. I also find the Asheville arts community to be very giving, donating their time and artwork to many important causes in the area.

RRM: How did you get into becoming a professional painter?

SJ: I have been taught by a

handful of accomplished art teachers who were also professional artists. My primary education is in the human sciences (Physical Therapy) and art was always a second interest. My education in the sciences,

Dennis Ray

chemistry and anatomy prepared me for becoming an oil portrait painter. 20 years ago, I had the opportunity and the time to further my art education through a mentor and also at the Fort Lauderdale Art Museum’s studio fine arts program. I was always drawn to paintings of the human figure and portraiture and wanted to try my best to become a recognized portrait painter. I am also a member of the Portrait Society of America and that has helped me in developing my professional career as a portrait painter.

RRM: What inspires you

Nepal Man by Stephen Janton

interviewed by

ing and getting lost in the process of painting is very addicting. Also, the reaction of others to my work inspires. An expressed emotion in response to something that you have created is a very strong motivator to keep going and strive to become better. My studio is relatively small and is basically a work space. However, during Studio Stroll, many people (800 or so on a weekend) come in and view my work. In the beginning, it was a bit uncomfortable sitting close by and hearing unsolicited comments from perfect strangers. Over time I’ve learned to really appreciate and enjoy hearing and seeing viewer’s comments and reactions.

RRM: What makes for a great portrait painting?

SJ: 1) Technically: Inherent artistic

quality. A portrait that demonstrates the traditional attributes of truth and beauty through sound draftsmanship, realistic and appealing color, creative and intelligent design of the composition, and exciting execution (brushwork). 2) Evoking the reality of the portrait’s subject: a portrait should transmit, to the maximum degree, the character and human qualities of the subject. A great portrait vibrates with the living aura at a specific moment in time. 3) The amount of time a viewer

spends looking at, absorbing and reacting to the painting is a true measure of greatness. Greatness is something you just cannot take your eyes off. If it doesn’t stir something they may say ‘That’s nice’ and move on, and wouldn’t walk 10 steps to look at it again. To qualify as great it has to create a substantial amount of activity in the viewer’s mind or heart.

RH

RRM: Which two contemporary

artists work do you feel personally drawn towards?

SJ: The first is my mentor and

friend George Weymouth (American born 1936) known better as “Frolic” Weymouth. Frolic is a Yale art school graduate and was quite close to Andrew Wyeth and his family through his artistry. Frolic is the founder of the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, PA where many of the Wyeth paintings are displayed. Weymouth has painted portraits of Luciano Pavarotti (1982), several members of the British Royal family including Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (1995), Queen Elizabeth’s husband, which hangs in Windsor Castle. I actually modeled for this portrait where my thumb was painted into the composition while holding the plans for the Windsor Castle fire restoration. His skill as an artist and his passion for the arts are inspiring. ‘Janton’ continued on page 22

RC

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 19


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

Asheville’s River

Support Local Artists v Supor Indulge and Support Self Expre

RC

RB RG RE RO

RW RH

RD

RL

RK

RK RR RL RS

River Arts Studio Buildings

RC

* 240 Clingman * 347 Depot * 97 Roberts Street * Cotton Mill Studios * CURVE studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Northlight Studios * Odyssey Center * The Old Wood Co.

* Phil Mechanic * Pink Dog Creative * Riverside Studios * Riverview Station * Roberts St. Studios * Roots Studios * Studio 375 Depot * The Wedge * Warehouse Studios

River Arts District Studio Stroll

T

November 10 & 11

he River Arts District Studio by Jenny Moore Stroll is the first, largest, and most walkable tour of working artists’ studios in the region. Located in 19 historic buildings along the French Broad River, the District features artists’ demonstrations and hands-on activities during the 2-day event. Sprinkled throughout the District are lots of great places to eat, drink, see a performance, or just hang out. Try some nationally renowned barbeque, organic juices and teas, tacos, or great-tasting local food. Try Asheville’s famous microbrews at The Wedge. On Studio Stroll weekend you can catch the free trolley at any of the eight stops, or take a leisurely walk from studio to studio. Demos and activities take place all day. In some studios you can try your hand at different techniques. Easily accessible from Downtown, West Asheville, and Biltmore Village, the River Arts District offers plenty of free parking. An information booth is located at the 5-points intersection where Depot St. meets Clingman Ave., across from the Clingman Café. Brochures and maps are available at the info booth and in all of the buildings. If You Visit the studios of the River Arts District Artists Go on Saturday, November 10 and Sunday, November

11, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. For special events, directions, and more information go to www.riverartsdistrict.com.

RS RC RC

20 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3


T

S

&

c

u

l

t

u

re

r Arts District

rt Local Creativity v Buy Local ession v Invest in Our Future The Grayline Trolley will provide free transportation around the River Arts District all weekend. Catch the free trolley at Riverview Station.

RE

RD

RD

RB

RN

RK

RE

RO

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 21


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R T

S

&

CUL T U

R

E

River Arts District ARTISTS RRM: Tell us a little about your painting

‘S. Janton’ continued from page 19

Lucian Michael Freud, (1922 –2011) was a German-born British painter. Known chiefly for his thickly impastoed portrait and figure paintings, he was widely considered the preeminent British artist of his time. His works are noted for their psychological penetration, and for their often discomforting examination of the relationship between artist and model.

process. Is everything already created and put together at least in your mind before the brush ever touches the canvas, or do you create and change things as you go along?

SJ: I do spend a lot of time and effort

on the composition so that there are minimal, if any, changes made during the painting process. Typically color values will be changed in the process but not the composition itself. Ideally the process would involve having the client sit for a photo session so they can then pick the best pose for the composition. The client would then sit for me for usually four sessions of about two hours each. Working from a live model always gives the best outcome. However, I have done posthumous portraits where the composition is created from a series of photographs.

RRM: How long usually does it take you to do a typical painting?

SJ: I work primarily in oils and a portrait RW

typically takes about two months. That can vary based on the size of the panel, if it is only head and shoulders, half the body or full body and if it is a single per-

For more information on the River Arts District call (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

son vs. more than one. The the composition creamount of background detail ated by the position also adds time to the process. of seven dancers. The I joke with fellow artists about dancers are conproductivity as I see some nected in a pulling artists producing works meamotion. One dancer sured sometimes in minutes is alone being pulled or days to my months. by the others. There I am a realist painter and is a line created by the fine detail is a hallmark of my dancer’s arms, dividing work. I chose Lucian Freud the painting. There as someone whose work I am is primarily a single drawn towards because he is light source which a realist but uses an intense helps create depth and concentration of the texture dimension. The comand color of flesh, and much position was inspired thicker paint, including imby the dance choreogPainting by Stephen Janton pasto. He tended to clean his rapher Travis Wall. brush between every stroke. In 2007 it took Freud sixteen months to complete a single painting. That makes my Janton Art Studio two months seem very doable.

RRM: What are you currently working on? SJ: I am currently working on a human

figurative piece that is 30” x 40” oil on gesso panel. The painting has a heavy tension in

191 Lyman St Suite 211 Asheville, NC 28801 (305) 588-4564 www.jantonart.com

Barbara Frohmader - Abbi’s Brush Lynn Smith Stanley - Silverpoem Studio

R

iver Arts District Artists Barbara Frohmader and Lynn Stanley have joined forces to create the community’s first studio whose major focus is the art of watercolor. Lynn’s art is influenced by both Asian Brush Painting and Western Impressionism. Her work now dwells in a spectrum from traditional ink paintings on rice paper to more complex experiments in color and form. Her work has been shown in the last several National Juried Exhibitions of the Sumi-e Society of America. Barbara loves to paint outdoors in Western North Carolina, Mexico and Italy — all of which also provide her with a treasure chest of memories and impressions. Barbara’s works are also at Marc Edwards Salon at the Grove Arcade. Barbara and Lynn are pleased to welcome you to their new space amidst the wonderful mix of artists at 375 Depot Street. Find them at No. 103.

RR

22 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

www.BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

River Arts District Studio Stroll, November 10-11

The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ strong, artist member collective, who, along with dozens of associate members and friends, provide a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art. Get the guide online go to www.riverartsdistrict.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living Healing Through Gratitude “Life is filled with many wonders, like the blue sky, the sunshine, the eyes of a baby... Awareness of the precious elements of happiness is itself the practice of right mindfulness… Wherever we are, any time, we have the capacity to enjoy the sunshine, the presence of each other, the wonders of our breathing. We don’t have to travel anywhere else to do so. We can be in touch with these things right now.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh “The Kingdom of Heaven is spread across the land, but people do not have the eyes to see it.” ~ Jesus

H

appiness and well-being are states of mind. True peace-of-mind, the feeling of completeness, of needing nothing more, is, as Buddhism offers, Nirvana, and as mystical Christianity offers, The Kingdom of Heaven. True happiness evokes, quite naturally, a sense of deep gratitude, and conversely, deep gratitude evokes a blessed sense of happiness and well-being. Happiness and gratitude are inextricably linked. Buddhism is quite unique among world religions in that it speaks of states and actions of mind such as gratitude, forgiveness, kindness, love, compassion, and empathy not as religious ideals, but as practical, psychological necessities for happiness and well-being, for peace-of-mind, for profound sanity. They are referred to as “virtuous” qualities in Buddhist teaching not because they make a person holy in a conventional religious sense, but rather, because without them, a person cannot be whole, and “whole” is the word that “holy” is derived from – as in, that which must be preserved whole or intact, that which cannot be transgressed or violated - in other words - to be one, to experience connection. And connection, wholeness is the true state of spiritual realization, which not coincidentally, is also the true state of profound mental health. They lead to the cessation of suffering and the enhancement of well-being and peace, of happiness. Jesus and Buddha were both teaching that virtuousness and “holiness,” to be one with the “Kingdom of Heaven,” were states of mind, ways of seeing and experiencing the world as connected and sacred. It is then natural that with seeing the sacred in all aspects of life, comes the experience of immense and overwhelming gratitude arising from the realization of wholeness and connectedness. This makes gratitude a kind of key that can turn the lock opening the door of mind, freeing us from prisons of fear, resentment, anger, dissatisfaction and despondency, into the vast field of grace and peace beyond, for it not only is clearly a state of mind, it is also an action of mind, available as a choice. Gratitude does not have to be an accidental

mind-state of circumstances; it can be a choiceful action of directed awareness, that, as Thich Nhat says, “is itself the practice of right mindfulness,” giving us the “eyes to see.” We are, however, accustomed to the experience of gratitude as being rather rare. It is a response to an exceptionally conscious realization that we have received an extraordinary gift. We wait for it to come to us, and so, it can be said that most people’s relationship to gratitude is passive. We receive it as the result of something very desirable occurring. Gratitude comes over us. However, generally from within our American cultural conditioning, “very desirable” doesn’t happen very often. Only occasionally is life experienced as desirable above some general neutral, or even unsatisfactory, ongoing evaluation. In fact, many, it can be noted, have a generally rather callous and unappreciative perspective, and more often than not, keep their attention on the difficult and less-than-desirable elements of experience much of the time. So, it is very unlikely that their general perspective will be one of sustained gratitude. We, as a people, it must be acknowledged, actually rather like to complain. Complaint is a major subject of our rumination and discourse, with the result that deep gratitude and happiness are rather rare. In Zen there is a most instructive teaching that asks about our various experiences, “what is this?” or “who is this?” So in this exploration, it behooves us to ask, “Who is this that likes to complain?” It certainly isn’t any enlightened aspect of us. And, just so, it is important to ask, “What is this?” In meditative exploration, it is discovered that it is the ego, that critical, judgmental voice in our heads that likes to complain. And to express it simply, ego is the one in us who likes to feel important, big, significant, and so, sadly, as it is easiest to feel big by making something or someone else small, we are all too often critical and judgmen-

by

Bill Walz

tal. Ego also wants to be right, and so it needs to make others wrong. So we complain, we belittle, we argue, are insensitive and unappreciative. We separate ourselves from others, life and circumstances. No wholeness here. No “holiness” here. Not much happiness either. However, we all know individuals who seem to be rather unshakeable in their general state of happiness. They are always looking on the “bright side.” We call them optimists. Sometimes we call then naïve. There can be no avoiding the realization, however, whether optimistic or naïve, they do seem happier than most people. Whether this sunny disposition is the result of genetics, conditioning, or just attitude, perhaps we would do well to realize there is something wise about such people. Asking, “What is this?” - If we would notice - such people also tend to be generally appreciative, even of small, seemingly insignificant, things. They are not ego-centric, their perspective seems to draw in the many small aspects of life and find union, connectedness with how “Life is filled with many wonders…” Again, as Buddhism teaches that happiness is a state of mind, one that can even be cultivated, we can appreciate then that a general perspective of gratitude that leads to happiness is therefore a perspective that is beneficial to cultivate with ever subtler, and more general, all-encompassing, focus. It could even be said, as Thich Nhat Hanh does, “Awareness of the precious elements of happiness is itself the practice of right mindfulness,” leading to healing us of our pervasive egoic dissatisfaction. We can, as a result, feel increasingly whole, complete, happy, and sane. “Wherever we are, any time, we have the capacity to enjoy the sunshine, the presence of each other, the wonders of our breathing… We can be in touch with these things right now.” This, however, is no Pollyanna perspective. Steeped in deep compassion for the suffering in this world, realizing the connectedness of all things, this gratitude is deeper than mere egoic satisfaction. It touches the very well of our being. Recognizing wonder, connection and sacredness in all things, we are able to realize a gratitude, happiness, and therefore, well-being, so thick it can even encompass the difficult, hurtful, and sad in this world. It is capable of healing us, as it gives us the strength to do what we can to heal the world. This was the path walked by

both Buddha and Jesus. It is the path they pointed to for all humanity’s salvation, and you don’t have to be religious in any conventional sense to walk it. Just live, and see in everyone and everything a preciousness that makes the world whole and holy.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Visit www.billwalz.com

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 23


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

southern comfort Collected stories and prose of writer, Judy Ausley

Two Doctors Changed a High Country Community

S

o many years ago in 1909, a lone horseback rider wearing a floppy hat and tattered raincoat for warmth made her way along a mountain path into what is now Avery County. The woman, Dr. Mary T. Sloop, rode with determination and strength into a very primitive region where locals were suspicious of outsiders, and moonshine flowed faster than water from a well. The community and locals did not know what convenience meant. There had never been a doctor there or an educated person until the doctor arrived to establish a home there. Dr. Sloop’s mission was to create a Miracle in the Hills. She never wavered once or hesitated a minute to bring change to this little mountain cove. She established her first office in those early days in Plumtree near the river until some years later the Sloops were invited and urged to locate in Crossnore, because there was no doctor in Linville. Both Dr. Sloops covered so many miles, even going as far away as Jonas Ridge to see a sick patient. Of course, it was a time when doctors would go to homes to see the sick, but to get to these remote homes was treacherous. Shotguns, bottles of homemade ‘shine, and men dressed in coveralls with home-sewn cotton shirts, were part of the common style in the 1900’s life in the mountains. Women with worn faces wore bonnets and accompanied their husbands to the local

merchandise store to purchase hog meat for Sunday’s family dinner after church. Dr. Sloop once said, the folks eat a lot of grease in their diets. When Dr. Eustace Sloop and Mary Sloop arrived, they immediately began a mission of doctoring as many youngsters and women as they could see. She was already establishing that she was there to doctor and educate women and children. It was never easy, Dr. Sloop later admitted, because it takes a long time for a mountain native to trust people. But, when that friend status is established, it is a lasting friendship. Most mountain folks will tell you the same today in no longer primitive North Carolina. The area now known as Crossnore was built into a delightful community. The Sloops worked there as physicians until well into their ‘80s. In those early days the entire community grew up around the Sloops. The Crossnore School is still operating and is home to many youngsters who attend and live at the historic boarding school. Many of the children who live there have been adopted or gone home to their birth families, educated and emotionally better off than they were when they arrived. Crossnore is one of the more peaceful spots in the High Country, and during our fall season, a great place to pause and soak in the beauty of the region. I could never give enough praise or reverence to the late Dr. Mary

by Judy

Sloop and Dr. Eustace Sloop for all they did for Avery County. I have fond memories of my time writing there. I wrote many stories when I was working for the Charlotte Observer about Avery County. Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

House FOR SALE 2 bedroom, 2 bath town home close to town, university, Greenlife (Whole Foods), Lexington and Merrimon Avenues. Large screened porch and screened entrance. Home of writer. Special laminated floors, some carpet, all appliances. Complete garage underneath home. Call (828) 253-3655 for more details.

Tellabration! 2012

by Jane

I

t’s Time for Tellabration! when thousands of people around the world gather in small towns and big cities to celebrate storytelling during the last week-end before Thanksgiving. Since its inception in 1988, the annual observance has grown into one of the most impressive collective events in the history of the modern storytelling revival. Citizens from Asheville and surrounding areas join the global Tellabration! Spirit for the seventeenth year, as Asheville Storytelling Circle hosts the local event Sunday, November 18 beginnng at 3 p.m. at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway. The outstanding and diverse line-up once again showcases accomplished storytellers, and features nationally known Durham, NC, storyteller and author Donna Washington. The line-up also includes Asheville Storytelling Circle members: Vixi Jil Glen, Roy Harris, and Susa Silvermarie. 24 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Ausley

Sims

If You Go

Tellabration!, Sunday, November 18 beginnng at 3 p.m. at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Admission: $7; proceeds enable area storytelling events and activities. Tickets are sold on a firstcome, first-serve basis, and are available at the door on the day of the event. More details available by calling (828) 581-4603 or (828) 274-1123. Donna Washington


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

Chip Kaufmann is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. Michelle Keenan is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest reviews, theater info and movie show times, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

Brent Brown is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Argo ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Actor, Director Ben Affleck brings the now de-classified story of the covert operation to free six Americans during the 1980 Iranian Revolution to the big screen.

Reel Take: For those of us who remem-

ber the Iranian hostage crisis that began in 1979 and ended just as Reagan took office in 1980, one would not think a big screen dramatization of the story would hold much suspense (I mean, we know how it ends). However, Ben Affleck’s latest turn behind the camera turns the now declassified story of the extrication of six Americans, dur-

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

ing the Iranian hostage crisis, to safety and home, is nail bitingly suspenseful, crowd-pleasing entertainment. Argo and The Master are the first major film releases this year with Oscar buzz surrounding them. The Master no doubt will be nominated up the wazoo. In Argo’s case I don’t know if the buzz will hold up until Oscar season rolls around, and it matters not. Some will criticize the film for being too much of a crowd pleaser (something The Master could never be accused of) and Hollywood darling than Ben Affleck and Bryan Cranston present the best bad plan they have to extricate six a historical record. I see it as a film that Americans from Iran in Argo. successfully walks a fine line between true story and entertainment. liberties with the actual extrication of the Affleck plays Tony Mendez, a CIA agent Americans (it apparently wasn’t nearly as brought in to assist the US and Canadian close a call as it is in the film), but it works. governments. The tensions in Iran escalate Political observation of the Carter adminand six American Foreign Service workers esistration, and the role the Middle East has cape the American embassy (eluding capture come to play in our politics, is made plain, by Iranian revolutionaries) and are given refand this too works for the film. My one uge by the Canadian Ambassador to Iran. major complaint is that the characters, Mendez has what his boss (Bryan Cranston) even Mendez himself, are underwritten. calls, “the best bad idea we have.” Mendez His actors, however, all bring more to the proposes that they pose as a Canadian film characters than is written, and this certainly crew for a science fiction movie. To lend helps. In hindsight, perhaps this actually legitimacy to the cover he enlists the help of works to keep the film clean and sharp. a Hollywood makeup and special effects man I enjoyed Argo, as did the applauding (John Goodman) and a Hollywood producer audience members around me, after the (Alan Arkin). Hence “Argo” is born. Mendez credits finished rolling. It’s certainly new (under a different name) will serve as Execuground for Affleck, but I hope he won’t stray tive Producer in order to personally handle too far from his directorial roots. Personally the extrication of the Americans. I think Gone Baby Gone and The Town are A lot of time is spent on the set up of darker, edgier and better films over all, but the scheme and this offers the film unexthey are films that won’t win over and warm pected humor. This seems like it won’t to an audience the way Argo does. work in contrast with the rest of the film, but oddly enough it really does. It brings Rated R for language and some violent images. layer of comic relief and an unexpected Review by Michelle Keenan layer of humanity to the story. It’s also a nice counter to the later scenes in Iran of Atlas Shrugged 2: The Strike the almost too intense events and mo∑∑∑1/2 ments leading to their freedom. Affleck Short Take: This second installment of heaps the suspense on in layers, stopping Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged is not nearly just short of laughable. We know from the as bad as most critics would have you get go they make it out, so the fact Affleck believe. manages it at all (though just barely) is a feat in and of itself. Reel Take: Most of the reviews regardAffleck seamlessly integrates news ing Atlas Shrugged 2: The Strike (hereafter footage with the production, which looks referred to as Part 2) are vitriolic to the exas if it was indeed shot in the 70’s. He takes treme. This raises an important question. Is

it possible to separate political ideology from a work of Art? In classical music it’s done all the time in the case of the operas of Richard Wagner. But what about in movies? D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation and Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will both contain abhorrent political context yet both are considered works of art and their virtues are acknowledged along with their faults. The same cannot be said of the two Atlas Shrugged movies. I’m not trying to make a case for either movie as works of art, but I do feel that because they espouse Ayn Rand’s philosophy, they have been unfairly dismissed by most critics. In spite of some of the content, both are good examples of films that are well made considering their limited resources.

Dagny Taggert (Samantha Mathis) wondering what else can go wrong for her and her railroad in Atlas Shrugged 2: The Strike.

I liked Part 2 better than the Part 1 which is surprising. The middle film of a trilogy is usually the weakest but not this time. A lot of that has to do with the recasting (all the principal roles from the first one have been replaced). Special kudos to Samantha Mathis for creating and believably looking the part of a harried female executive who does all the work only to have her do nothing brother receive the credit for it. For those not familiar with Ayn Rand’s epic 1957 science fiction novel of a dystopian society in the near future, there are three primary characters: 1) Dagny Taggert, the harried executive in her father’s company. ‘Movies’ continued on page 26

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 25


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 25

2) Henry Rearden the free enterprise loving head of a series of steel mills. 3) John Galt, the mysterious underground leader who wants to “stop the motor of the world” so that he can fix it. Part 1 focuses on the building of a massive intercontinental train line (it’s too expensive to drive or fly) which is taken over by the government so that it can no longer provide competition. In the meantime prominent business leaders and artists are vanishing without a trace leaving behind the question “Who is John Galt?” The Part 2 has the government exerting more and more control over people’s daily lives while Dagny & Henry, two like minded people, begin an affair. After a railroad disaster and the disappearance of a crucial engineer, Dagny goes looking for John Galt and finds him. For Part 3 you’ll have to wait for the final installment or read the book. While Part 2 resembles a TV movie, it does so in the best sense of that much maligned designation. It doesn’t dawdle, tells its story in a compelling fashion (whether you agree with it or not) and is solidly performed. While not a great movie, I found Part 2 engaging without having to take its political message seriously. Rated PG-13 for brief language.

Review by Chip Kaufmann

Frankenweenie ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Tim Burton’s best stop motion animation film is beautifully executed and a loving tribute to the classic horror movies of old.

Reel Take: Of all the movies I reviewed

this month, Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie easily earns the title of “top dog”. Burton’s full length expansion of his 1984 short film is a remarkable achievement that is not only his best stop motion animated film but one of his best films period. Here Burton’s visual creativity is at its purest as he doesn’t have to try and make the real world conform to his singular vision. The story is lifted straight from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and in particular from James Whale’s 1931 film but with a Burtonesque twist. This time around Victor Frankenstein is a schoolboy living in the town of New Holland. When his beloved dog Sparky is killed by a car, a science experiment at school, gives Victor the idea to bring Sparky back to life with electricity. Of course the resurrected Sparky is misunderstood by Victor’s parents and the townspeople but that’s only the beginning. Victor’s classmates (including Edgar “E” Gore) decide to follow his example and resurrect their pets after stealing Victor’s formula. Their experiments go unbelievably awry and create a bizarre menagerie of monsters that only Burton could have

Sparky, the titular character in Tim Burton's animated comedy-thriller, Frankenweenie.

imagined (the Gamera turtle one is particularly amusing). The monsters threaten the town and Victor and Sparky, along with his friends, must save the day. This leads to a climax inside a burning windmill just like the original Frankenstein. Burton loads Frankenweenie with numerous references to classic horror films as well as several of his own. He shot the film in black and white which may have hurt its performance at the box office, but he couldn’t have made it any other way. Watching it not only made me think of the Universal horrors but also of The Addams Family (the original cartoons not the TV show). Imagine Edward Scissorhands as animated and in black & white and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what to expect. In addition to the astonishing stop motion animation work, the vocal cast was absolutely perfect. In addition to the new to Burton Charlie Tahan as Victor, Tim utilizes a bevy of old friends including Winona Ryder, Catherine O’Hara, Martin Short, and Martin Landau who steals the show as the voice of the science teacher. While it may be underperforming at the box office now, the film has rental and streaming favorite written all over it, so that it will be here for many years to come. Different than ParaNorman and richer and more sophisticated than Hotel Transylvania, Frankenweenie is a film that defies easy classification and if you dismiss it just because it’s in black & white (like some people dismissed Hugo as a kid’s movie or The Artist as a silent film), you’ll be denying yourself a quality cinematic experience. Rated PG for thematic elements, scary images, and action.

Review by Chip Kaufmann

Liberal Arts ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: When a just jilted 35 year old college admissions officer returns to his old alma mater for a beloved professor’s retirement party, a brush with romantic idealism and a journey of self discovery awaits.

Reel Take: How I Met Your Mother’s

Josh Radnor delivers an agreeable sophomore effort as writer, director and star with Liberal Arts. It’s smart, thoughtful and articulate

26 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

without falling prey [as so many indie films do] to thinking it’s smarter than it is. However, its intelligence alone is not enough to deliver any major epiphanies, which leaves it somewhat flat and ‘so what’ in the end. Jesse Fisher is a newly single, uninspired 35 year old admissions officer, going through a bit of an existential crisis. When his second favorite professor (Richard Jenkins) invites him to attend his retirement party, a trip to his old alma mater is idyllic opportunity. Afraid that his best years are behind him, Jesse waxes nostalgic for his college days - days of books, parties, poetry and romantic idealism. Once there, he’s drawn immediately back in to the culture of talking about books and music and ideas. There he also meets Zibby (Elizabeth Olsen), a precocious 19-year-old with whom he shares and immediate chemistry.

just experiencing life and love for the first time and Jesse is not. I’m really not spoiling anything by telling you about these storylines as there is really only one way for Liberal Arts to go. The only truly unexpected element of the film comes from its least angst filled character. Nat (Zac Effron) is a pothead philosopher who apparently just hangs out on campus. While all of the conversations Jesse has with the other characters are of a more intellectual caliber, his conversations with Ned are ‘out there’ in a cliché and vaguely annoying sense of the term, but they are the most cathartic moments of Jesse’s existential crisis. Liberal Arts is nice, in fact everything about it is nice, but for me it ultimately fell a little flat. Radnor’s script is remarkable in parts; the correspondence sequence between he and Zibby is particularly appealing. His actors are excellent. I think in the end it just doesn’t pack enough punch, but in the end I also think it’s exactly the story Radnor set out to tell. Rated PG-13 for sexual content including references, mature thematic material, and some teen drinking.

Review by Michelle Keenan

The Perks of Being a Wallflower ∑∑∑∑1/2

Elizabeth Olsen and Josh Radnor are kindred spirits with an age gap in Liberal Arts.

Short Take: Based on Stephen Chbosky’s popular novel by the same name, a shy and troubled high school freshman if befriended by a pair of seniors, and life changing bonds are formed.

Hand wringingly aware of the difference Reel Take: I didn’t have any familiarin their ages, Jesse approaches their flirtation ity with the novel The Perks of Being a with caution. Having recently discovered the Wallflower, but seeing as the film is directed world of classical music in an introductory by the author himself, one presumes it class, Zibby burns a disk (today’s equivalent does the book justice. The film takes place of making a mix tape) for Jesse and asks in the early 1990’s, though based on the him to let her know what he thinks. The music, I’d have placed as being several years music [of course] rocks Jesse’s world, and earlier. Regardless of when it takes place its they begin a correspondence. The letters are emotional appeal is universal and timeless. I wonderfully florid by 21st Century standards, confess I was genuinely moved by this film, which is a complete aphrodisiac for bookish, by the friendships, vulnerability and honesty romantic, academic types. of its characters. The Perks of Being a WallOver the course of several visits Jesse flower is an unexpected gem of a movie and realizes his nostalgic view of college world is not to be missed. is just that; it is the real world for those who live there and it is fraught with as many difficulties as his own. He befriends a suicidal loner (John Magaro) who can’t understand why Jesse misses college so much. Like a convict who can’t live in the real world, the professor who couldn’t wait to retire, realizes he’s not ready for life on the outside. And the professor of romantic literature, who forever altered the course of Jesse’s bookish life, turns out to be a most Emma Watson, Logan Lerman and Ezra Miller are miserable, jaded and unromantic best friends in The Perks of Being a Wallflower. person. And then there’s Zibby, a soul mate of sorts perhaps, but she’s ‘Movies’ continued on page 27


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 26

the movie is not a downer. If anything, it is a testament to the friendships that help us through life and is refreshingly affirming. Part of what makes the film universal is its connection to music. In Liberal Arts (see review on page 26), Zibby burns CDs of classical music. In this one, it’s all about the art of the mix tape, an essential element for those of us who came of age in the mid 1980’s (a la High Fidelity). The music is astoundingly good and figures prominently, adding color and tone to the proceedings. But it is our three young leads who really deliver. Logan Lerman (known to some for the Percy Jackson movies) and Emma Watson (known by everyone as Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter films) both prove they’ve got more acting chops than perhaps previously thought. Ezra Miller (We Need to Talk about Kevin) is the show stopper. He pours his heart and sole into Patrick, a young gay man in love with the closeted captain of the football team. I don’t know much about Stephen Chbosky, and haven’t had a chance to read up on him. To my knowledge this is his only film. How an unproven filmmaker came to direct his own book, I have no idea, but who gave him the green light made a good call. There is a dignity and honesty to this story that, in the wrong hands, could easily have been lost. The Perks of Being a Wallflower may not rock your world, and it may not even be a particularly important film, but I dare you not to be moved by it. Rated PG-13 on appeal for mature thematic material, drug and alcohol use, sexual content including references, and a fight – all involving teens.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Seven Psychopaths ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: When a struggling screenwriter has a great title for his next film but no story, his friends give him plenty of source material for Seven Psychopaths.

Reel Take: Irish playwright, screenwriter

and director Martin McDonough has done it again – walking the fine line between blood splattered macabre and brilliant comedy. It’s something he does like no other, and I am in awe of his wit and talent. As a fan of the trilogy of plays that brought him to notoriety, The Beauty Queen of Leenane, A Skull in Connemara, and The Lonesome West, his entre into feature films with In Bruges was less startling to me than it was to many. If you know and like his work, you will no doubt enjoy Seven Psychopaths. If you don’t know his work, perhaps this review will help you determine if this one is up your alley. If you didn’t like In Bruges, chances are Seven Psychopaths isn’t going to

a great title for his next screenplay, “Seven Psychopaths” but no story. Billy (Sam Rockwell) is Marty’s best friend, an unemployed actor, part time dog thief and, unbeknownst to Marty, Psychopath #1. Billy wants to help Marty write his movie and help him beat his battle with the bottle. Hans (Christopher Walken) is Billy’s partner in the dog thieving business. (They steal dogs and return them to their owners for the reward.) When Billy and Hans steal the beloved Shih Tzu of a psychopathic gangster (Woody Harrelson), who loves this dog more than anything else Colin Farrell, Christopher Walken and Sam Rockwell in the world, Billy and Hans get more are three of Seven Psychopaths. than they bargained for, and Marty gets all the source material he could possibly ever be your cup of tea either. want for his story, though it may just drive Marty (Colin Farrell) is a struggling him to drink in the process. writer and burgeoning alcoholic who has

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Best Years of Our Lives”

November DVD Picks

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) A few weeks ago I caught part of William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives on Turner Classic movies, and it has stuck with me since. It’s a film I’ve seen a few times over the years, but not in a while and it’s a film worth revisiting or discovering for the first time. So, in honor of Veteran’s Day and all those who have bravely served our country at home and away, The Best Years of Our Lives is my DVD pick of the month. The Best Years of Our Lives took the Oscar for Best Picture that year (and seven additional Oscars, including an honorary Oscar for Harold Russell) and was, at that time, the second biggest box office hit (behind Gone With the Wind). The country was just emerging and beginning to heal from World War II. This film tells the stories of three men returning home from the war, all damaged in different ways, to resume their pre-war lives in a post-war America. Al Stephenson (Frederic March), in his 40s, was an infantryman and is now returning home to his now grown family and his cushy job at the bank where he worked. Fred Derry (Dana Andrews) was a bomber pilot and is now returning to a wife he barely knows and life as a soda jerk. Las but now least, Homer Parrish (Harold Russell) was Navy man who has hooks for hands after losing his hands during the war. The three men didn’t know each other before the war or even during the war; they meet on the transport plane on their way home. Al and his wife of

Sounds straight forward enough, right? Add in a ‘Jack of Hearts’ killer, a Vietnamese monk bent on vengeance, and a psychopathic killer of killers who walks with a white bunny rabbit cradled in his arms, and well, it’s just getting interesting. The story does circles within circles, comes close to chaos, but manages brilliance, originality, great comedy and suprising tenderness. Billy is bat shit crazy, but surprisingly and ernestly devoted to his friends. Hans is a religious man with a mysterious and violent past. His wife is now dying of cancer but he is pretty much at peace with the world and he’s right with God. Ironically, Marty wants to encourage peace through his writing and is seeking a non-violent path for his story. A better ensemble you’d be hard pressed to find for these rich characters. Far‘Movies’ continued on page 28

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Edward Scissorhands” take a more sobering look at the affects of war. It’s direct, it’s honest and its appeal is universally American.

Edward Scissorhands (1990)

twenty years (Myrna Loy) are nervous as newlyweds and he feels uncomfortable at home. Feeling skittish he talks Milly and his daughter Peggy (Teresa Wright) into going to Butch’s, a local watering hole. Fred can’t find his sexy bride (Virginia May), who works in nightclubs and enjoys the highlife and soon heads to Butch’s. Homer, unable to deal with the sympathetic looks from his family and his girl Wilma (Cathy O’Donnell) and also heads to Butch’s. There the trio meet, make merry and begin the transition to life on the home front. It should be noted that Hoagy Carmichael plays Butch, so with Hoagy tickling the ivories and pouring the drinks, it’s bound to be a good place to recuperate from war. In one of the most profoundly poignant and famous scenes, Fred has decided to leave town in search of work. While waiting for his flight, he walks through a graveyard of warplanes. Like him, the planes, once vital and important, are no longer needed. More than six decades later The Best Years of Our Lives stands the test of time and still feels modern. After years of flag waving patriotism, this was one of the first films to

Having reviewed Tim Burton’s latest effort, Frankenweenie, for this issue, it’s appropriate that my DVD pick be Burton’s Edward Scissorhands (1990). It was the first film that fully allowed Burton to introduce direct biographical elements into his work and the movie that really introduced Johnny Depp to the world. It also gave Vincent Price his last significant film role. Edward Scissorhands is set in a fairy tale suburban neighborhood of pastel houses and a Gothic castle at the end of the street. The story concerns the titular character (Depp), a young man created by a lonely old inventor (Price) who dies before giving him a pair of hands leaving him with only scissors for appendages. He is taken in by a cosmetic saleslady (Dianne Wiest) and her family (which includes Winona Ryder and Alan Arkin) where he tries to fit in. After a successful beginning he is eventually rejected by the neighborhood because of his differences and he leaves them to go back to the castle to live alone. Every detail from the colors of the neighborhood to Depp’s black body suit, to the performances by an ensemble cast, are right on the money. If you’ve never seen Edward Scissorhands, you should. If you’ve seen it before, you need to see it again, especially if you’ve just seen Frankenweenie.

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 27


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews Asheville Film Society Screenings Films are shown on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Screenings are free. November 6 –

Ruggles Of Red Gap

An English valet brought to the American west assimilates into the American way of life. Directed by Leo McCarey (1935) November 13 –

Monkey Business The Marx Brothers stowaway on an ocean liner bound for New York. Directed by Norman Z. McLeod (1931) November 20 –

I Heart Huckabees

A husband-and-wife team play detective, but not in the traditional sense. Directed by David O. Russell (2003) November 27 –

Charlie Chan at the Opera

‘Movies’ continued from pg. 27

rell, who also starred in In Bruges, is perfect fit for probably most any McDonough vehicle. Rockwell and Walken have never been better. In fact, I’d pay the price of admission just to hear Walken deliver the line, “No” towards the end of the film. He has a way like no one else and his talent is on display here in a beautiful way. Harrelson plays the mad dog crime boss to great aplomb. And last but not least, Tom Waits turns in a disturbingly hilarious performance as the psychopath with the bunny rabbit. Seven Psychopaths is drenched in blood spatter, but it is delivered with humor, heart, and some of the best dialogue to come down the road in a long time. If you can handle that, you’re in for a total treat. Rated R for strong violence, bloody images, pervasive language, sexuality/nudity and some drug use.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Sinister ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Well made horror film incorporates a number of stylistic techniques but the storyline, especially the ending, left me cold.

A dangerous amnesiac escapes from a mental hospital. Directed by Bruce Humberstone (1936)

Carolina Cinemas is located at 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Hendersonville Film Society Films are shown every Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Lake Pointe Landing Retirement Community (behind Epic Cinemas) in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. November 4 –

Silent Movie

Features Marty Feldman, Dom DeLuise, and Bernadette Peters. Directed by Mel Brooks (1976) November 11 –

The Green Room

Stars Francois Truffaut and Natalie Baye. Directed by Francois Truffaut (1978) November 18 –

Folkes

Stars Roger Moore, Anthony Perkins and James Mason. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen (1980) November 25 –

The Greatest Show on Earth Stars Charlton Heston, Betty Hutton, and James Stewart. Directed by Cecil B. DeMille (1952)

tells him the story of an ancient demon that “feeds on children’s souls” by controlling the children and then having them murder their families. Oswalt awakes one evening to find a group of children in the attic watching the movies when the demonic presence appears before him. He destroys the films and quickly moves his family out of the house and to a new location only to discover that the films are there unharmed but with a new addition. I won’t reveal anything further but it’s really not difficult to guess where this is going although there may be a surprise or two for some. Evil children are nothing new to movies going as far back as The Bad Seed (1956) and continuing through such movies as Village of the Damned (1960), The Omen (1976, 2006), The Good Son (1993), and Orphan (2009). Writer-director Scott Derrickson (The Exorcism of Emily Rose) and co-writer C. Robert Cargill don’t really offer us anything new on that theme but their reworking of themes from earlier movies and a clever use of “found footage” are the most admirable aspects of Sinister. What I found less admirable is the overall tone of the film which I found to be increasingly unpleasant with an overall edge of cruelty that really put me off. After 110 minutes of this, I couldn’t wait to get out of the theater and back home where I could cleanse my cinematic palette with something a little less unsavory. The ultimate litmus test regarding any movie as far as I’m concerned is how well it stays with me after it’s over. Not only did Sinister not stick with me, but I can’t think of any reason why I would ever want to see it again. Rated R for disturbing, violent images and some terror.

Review by Chip Kaufmann One of the many unpleasant images that permeate the new horror thriller Sinister.

Reel Take: Sinister is yet another in the

seemingly endless line of recent films which I have seen that I can admire critically for the quality of the filmmaking yet as an audience member I find their content appalling. Taking its cue from The Amityville Horror and The Shining, the plot of Sinister has true crime novelist Ellison Oswalt (Ethan Hawke) who hasn’t had a successful book in years moving his family ( a wife and two children) into a house where the previous owner and his family were found murdered. Once there he discovers a series of Super 8mm home movies that depict various other family murders. He consults a local specialist in the occult (Vincent D’Onofrio), after he begins to see a demonic face in the movies. The more he watches the films, the more details he discovers. This portion of the story for me recalled Antonioni’s Blow Up and Coppola’s The Conversation. The expert then

28 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Taken 2 ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Entertaining sequel has Liam Neeson back in action after his family is threatened once again by the relatives of the kidnappers from the first film.

Reel Take: Not every film can be an

artistic triumph like Citizen Kane or an out and out turkey like Gigli. The vast majority of them fit right in the middle as entertainment and nothing else. A clever director or a skillful screenplay can insert social commentary or irony into the proceedings but escape from everyday life for a couple of hours is most people’s primary concern and in that Taken 2 succeeds admirably. For those of you who didn’t catch the first Taken, here’s a brief recap. A former CIA operative Bryan Mills (Neeson) has his daughter kidnapped in Paris by an Albanian human trafficking ring. He goes to Paris and after several complications and numerous heroics where he kills virtually everyone

What happens to you when you get Bryan Mills (Liam Neeson) angry in the tense new sequel, Taken 2.

he comes into contact with, he rescues his daughter and returns home. The events in this film take place shortly after those of the first film. After a cancelled trip to China, Bryan’s ex-wife (Famke Janssen) and daughter Kim (Maggie Grace) decide to join him in Istanbul. Earlier we have seen the Albanian relatives of the dead kidnappers swear vengeance and they set out to find Mills and kill him and his family. Istanbul is much closer to Albania than Paris and so they quickly kidnap his ex-wife forcing Mills to give himself up where he is left chained to a pole. Before turning himself over to the Albanians, Mills instructs his daughter on how to evade them and how, with the aid of his briefcase, to be able to help him to escape. She follows his instructions, he then escapes, and catches up with the bad guys. He rescues his wife and then dispatches them one by one. The film ends with the family celebrating in an outdoor café. This rather glib assessment showcases both the film’s strengths and its weaknesses. As in many films of this nature, the improbability factor is huge but if the movie is skillfully made then we get caught up in the action and don’t think about it. The major problem for some is the ethnic nature of the villains who although described as Albanians, could be any dark haired, olive skinned stereotype of terrorists or people up to no good. Director Oliver Megaton (Transporter 3) directs the film in the style of Don Siegel or Michael Winner and that’s a good thing. Keep things moving and allow us moments to find out a little more about the people that we’re supposed to care about. Although Taken 2 ultimately lacks Siegel’s editing mastery or the depth of Winner’s screenplays, it is still a crackerjack action flick despite a 21% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action and some sensuality.

Review by Chip Kaufmann


R A P I D   R I V E R

A R T S

film festivals Asheville International Children’s Film Festival

We’ve got the beat.

T

his year’s festival, held November 2-11, includes an opening night rollicking pajama jam with “Neo - Acoustic Folk/Funk” performer Jacob Johnson and many other cinematic delights for the whole family. Children can also participate in the festival jury. T-Bone Productions is pleased to announce the 4th annual Asheville International Children’s Film Festival to be held November 2 through November 11 at six venues to include Asheville Pizza & Brewing, The Lab, Posana Cafe, My Little Gym, AB Tech and Earth Fare (westgate) and Cinebarre theater. The largest children’s film festival in the Southeast, Asheville International Children’s Film festival, celebrates the best and brightest in international children’s cinema with a 10-day extravaganza of more than 70 films from almost 25 countries. This year’s edition includes a mind-blowing blend of programs that include live performances, animation, features, shorts, and historical films. Don’t miss the opening night Pajama Jam, the Annual Pancake Breakfast, and Dinner and a Movie at Posana Café and much more! Many screenings sell out — parents and caregivers are encouraged to avoid disappointment, tears and tantrums, and get their get their tickets in advance.

Check out our new inventory of headphones & earbuds from

ÒApple Specialist

252 Charlotte Street, Asheville — 828.225.6600 300 Airport Road, Arden — 828.651.6600

pg. 36

WG

If You The 4th Annual Asheville Go International Children’s

Film Festival, November 2-11. Admission to most festival programs is only $5 for kids and adults. Tickets to all events may be purchased at the AICFF website, www.aicff.org.

pg. 36

WV

Asheville Cinema Festival November 1-4

T

he Asheville Cinema Festival takes place November 1-4 at venues throughout Asheville. The festival opens with Silver Linings Playbook (a big hit at the Dustin Hoffman directs Quartet, Toronto Film Festival in closing night film of the September) at the Biltmore Asheville Cinema Festival. Regal Grande and closes with Dustin Hoffman’s directorial debut Quartet (also at Biltmore Regal Grande). Both will be award contenders on the road to Oscar this year. The festival will also feature dozens of award-winning films from around the US and World. Filmmakers will be attending for Q&As after screenings. Workshops, with topics including editing, digital filmmaking, viral hit films and lighting, are free and open to the public.

Tickets are $7 per film and are available online and at the door. For all the details and a complete festival guide please go to www.ashevillecinemafestival.com

A^oV7ZX`ZgE]did\gVe]n

If You Go

.(.#-')#*'*-

pg. 36

PA

a^oVWZX`Zge]did\gVe]n @ \bV^a#Xdb mmm$b_pWX[Ya[hf^eje]hWf^o$Yec Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 29


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

fine art

N

Nicholas M. Raynolds

icholas M. Raynolds was born on December 25, 1967 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. As a child he gained his first inspiration to become a painter from his Grandfather who was visiting from Germany. It was under this influence that he acquired the fundamentals of seeing and drawing. Raynolds began his formal studies in art at the age of 15 in Vancouver, Canada where he later received his BFA. He continued his studies in Düsseldorf, Germany and in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In pursuit of the mastery of his craft, he attended the Gage Academy of Art (formerly the Seattle Academy of Realist Art). In January of 2001 Raynolds moved to New York to study at the Water Street Atelier and at Studio 126. Raynolds is represented by the John Pence Gallery in San Francisco and the Eleanor Ettinger Gallery in New York City. He has also shown at the Forbes Galleries, the Meredith Long Gallery in Houston, Texas, APEX Gallery in Washington DC, the Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor NY and Cavalier Galleries in Greenwich CT/Nantucket, Ma. His work can be found in numerous national and international collections, most notably, The Forbes Collection, NY and the TIA Collection. Artwork by Nicholas His work has M. Raynolds

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

pg. 36

B

Wireless Internet Access!

30 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

Oops! We’re Sorry In our October 2012 issue we featured “Window of Opportunity” in our article on the Weaverville Art Safari. We mistakenly attributed the work to another artist. The work was created by fine artist William Asman.

Artwork by Nicholas M. Raynolds

been published in American Artist’s Drawing, The Artist’s and Art Collector magazines, and his painting appears on the cover of John Updike’s novel Seek My Face. Raynolds’ teaching experience includes classes, workshops,demonstration and lectures at The National Academy School of Fine Arts, NY; The Art Student’s League of New York; Penland School of Crafts, NC; and as an adjunct professor at Queensborough Community College in New York City; The Gage Academy of Art in Seattle Wa.; The Long Island Academy of Fine Art, NY and as a guest instructor at Studio Incamminati in Philadelphia PA. He has taught figure drawing and painting and other classes at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. Raynolds has worked and traveled extensively throughout North America and Europe, to Mexico and the Middle East often working as a scenic and decorative painter for film, theatre and residential and commercial projects. Most notable of these projects was assisting in the decoration of the palace and residence of His Highness Sheik Hamdan Bin Zayed Al Nahyan in Abu Dhabi, UAE. In 2002 he was among a group of artists in residence with the Forbes Foundation in Balleroy, France. He also worked as an assistant painter to Jeff Koons in New York City. Nicholas Raynolds lives in Asheville, NC with his wife and daughter. You can see more of Raynolds works at: www.nicholasraynolds.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

asheville shops Apple Announces New Products for Fall 2012

A

pple has announced by Jennifer Mayer many exciting updates to their existing line of products, most notably the 13" MacBook Pro with Retina Display, a thinner and lighter iMac, and a 4th generation iPad, all of which will be available within the next two months — just in time for the holiday shopping season. “Apple just announced some really exciting updates to its product line. We can’t wait to have the 13" MacBook Pro with Retina display or the new super-thin iMac in our stores. We’re sure they will be flying off our shelves in the next few weeks,” says Charlotte Street Computers Director of Business Solutions, Andy McPherson. The 13" MacBook Pro with Retina Display features a high resolution display similar to that of the 15" version, but with a lower price tag ($1,699). It also features an SSD (Solid State Drive) for fast startup times and much thinner and lighter design. Also introduced is the new iMac which features a slimmed-down design that is 5mm thin at its edge and up to eight pounds lighter. Charlotte Street Computers is a multi-location computer repair company founded in 2002. Today the company has grown to a staff of twenty four team members, including twelve of the top service technicians in the area. CEO Jennifer Mayer operates the company with a continued focus on customer satisfaction and philanthropic marketing. Charlotte Street Computers provides upgrades, networking, troubleshooting, and repairs for home computers and small business systems for both Macs and PCs. The company also provides one-on-one tutoring and rental computers for customers who are having their systems repaired. Charlotte Street Computers is a one-stop shop for exceptional repair and retail, and sells the full line of Apple computers at both of its locations along with daily computer classes.

Grand Opening of the Updraft Fine Art Gallery

T

he Updraft is a Fine Arts Gallery in the heart of downtown Asheville, directly across the street from Zambras, and right around the corner from Malaprops. The Updraft is run by artists for artists, and features exhibitionary glass blowing and pottery throwing. Additional works of art offered are functional fine woodwork, jewelry, encaustic, mixed media and oil painting, photography, metal, and leather work. All exclusively from local area artists. Owners of the Updraft Fine Art Gallery, Andrew Montrie, Matt Christie, Minne Kane, and William Hunter, are still seeking work from local artists. Interested artists should contact the gallery with pictures of available work and pricing.

pg. 36

WJ

Wine, and Tapas Bar Piattino Ristorante

20 Church Street, Waynesville 828-452-6000

www.classicwineseller.com

If You Grand opening Saturday, November 3 from Go 6 to 8 p.m. The Updraft Fine Art Gallery, 84

Walnut Street in Asheville, (828) 582-2112.

Rapid River Magazine Now iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly! www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

pg. 36

NB

Charlotte Street Computers is located at 252 Charlotte Street in Asheville, with a second location at 300 Airport Road in Arden. Both stores are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The Charlotte Street location is open on Sunday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more information please call (828) 225-6600 or visit www.charlottestreetcomputers.com. To find out about contests, giveaways, and the latest computer trends and products, become a fan on Facebook.

pg. 36

WM

pg. 36

PA

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 31


R A P I D   R I V E R

A R T S

local favorites interview with

Maria Pressley

Owner of Maria’s Mexican Pueblo in Waynesville, NC

Give the Gift that Everyone Loves for the Holidays

CHOCOLATE The Finest Assortment of Chocolates Special Orders & Shipping Available

170 North Main Street

pg. 36

Waynesville, NC

WB

pg. 36

WC

Simple Food in a Complicated World

Let Us Cater Your Next Event! • Paninis • Salads • Soups • Desserts • Seasonal Drinks

828.452.6844

F

or more than 28 years, we’ve been perfecting our family’s secret, homestyle recipes and bringing them right to your table. Everyday, all our dishes are made from scratch – packed with the freshest ingredients and centuries of tradition.

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

about what you’re offering for Thanksgiving.

Maria Pressley: We’re

now taking orders for Cajun Fried Turkey Maria Pressley, serving home-style for Thanksgiving and dishes for more than 28 years. Christmas. We fry a whole turkey or boneless turkey breast, using only vegetable oil because of all of allergies to peanuts — traditionally this recipe calls for peanut oil. This recipe has been handed down through the generations with the promise that I will not share with anyone the actual recipe.

RRM: How did you get the recipe? ‘M. Pressley’ continued on page 33

D a i ly S p e c i a l S M OnDay -F riDay 11 aM

tO

3 pM

D ine -i n :: C arry -O ut

389 walnut Street Waynesville, NC 828-273-2635

Limited Delivery ~ Call for Details pg. 36

WA

www.villagegreencafe.com

pg. 36

WS

pg. 36

H

32 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

restaurants & wine

A

Stone Soup at the Manor Inn

sheville has become one of the most acknowledged progressive communities and culinary scenes in the nation. This did not come about by accident. One of the earliest and most significant influences was the founding in the mid-1970s of a worker-owned restaurant collective called “STONE SOUP.” The worker owners of Stone Soup continue to play meaningful roles in this community and beyond, and will share their recollections during the program. Please RSVP so we’ll have ample soup! By phone at (828) 254-2343, by email to directorpsabc@gmail.com.

‘M. Pressley continued from page 32

MP: A dear friend who I had helped some

years ago gave this recipe to me. It had been in her family for generations. And it is simply to die for. She said I could use the recipe any way I want as long as I do not give out the recipe. It is in my head so when I die the recipe dies with me. We have been doing this for 18 years. Order now and call for more information and pick-up dates.

RRM: You are also doing a yearly traditional Cajun turkey meal as well. When does this happen?

Special Events at The Weinhaus

If You Stone Soup Returns to The Go Manor Inn, Saturday, November

3. Presentation at 11 a.m., lunch, a variety of home-made soups, special breads (including gluten-free), beverages and desserts served at 12:30 p.m. The Manor Inn, 265 Charlotte Street, across from Unitarian-Universalist Church, opposite end of Edwin Street. Donations accepted, payable to The Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County. For additional information contact Deborah Miles, dmiles@unca.edu, (828) 232-5024.

RRM: How did this meal come about? MP: Last year I decided to offer our first

Cajun meal. Something different. It was a huge success, having sold out in two hours, with many of my customers requesting I put it on my menu. I had to say no because I like to keep it as a once a year tradition.

Friday, November 2 Our annual customer appreciation inHaus soiree. Our vendors will be on hand with tables full of wine for your sampling pleasure. Deep discounts are available for the wines that suit your fancy. We ask that you bring a covered dish that feeds the equivalent of four people as the price of admission. Time 6-8 p.m. Place: The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Ave., Asheville. Price: Covered Dish. Tuesday, November 13 Join us for a wine dinner at the Marketplace. Chef/Owner William Dissen selects quality ingredients. The kitchen staff’s food preparation and presentation is exquisite. His dining room is well appointed, and the service is excellent. This attention to detail makes for a sumptuous evening from start to finish. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $65. Call the Weinhaus for reservations.

Friday, November 30 Our Holiday Favorites tasting will give you the opportunity to sample a selection of wines from our newsletter and take advantage of the savings. Stock your cellar for the holidays. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus. Friday, December 14 Biltmore Winery Tour and Tasting with winemakers Bernard Delille and Sharon Fenchak. After the tour we will adjourn to Cedric’s Tavern Loft for a six course small plate dinner and wine pairing. Biltmore Winery at 6 p.m. Price: $65. Call the Weinhaus for reservations.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

Sample Menu Items

Turkeys average 12-14 lbs., $38; Breast of turkey is 5 1/2 lbs. before cooking and is boneless, $30. Cajun Meal, $15 for adults; children under 12 only $7.99; children 5 and under are free.

MP: December 14, starting at 4 p.m. I

should say that reservations are requested but not necessary.

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

RRM: Tell us a little about the meal. MP: Cajun fried turkey served with dirty

rice, dirty gravy and mashed potatoes —made fresh from fresh whole potatoes— some greens, and we top it all off with Mexican Corn Bread (Maria’s personal recipe).

67 Branner Ave, Waynesville, NC 28786 Hours: Mon-Fri 11:30-3 p.m. Evenings 5-until. Sat. 12 noon-9 p.m. Closed on Sunday. All ABC permits

Great values & styles Free Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500 Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 33


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide November 1-3

November 2-11

What Teachers Make

Asheville International Children’s Film Festival

Andrew Hampton Livingston performs some of Taylor Mali’s best-known poems at the Fernihurst Annex (Carriage House Theatre) on the campus of A-B Tech. All tickets are Pay-What-You-Can, available at the door at 7 p.m. For directions or more information visit www1.abtech.edu or call (828) 329-2166.

Friday, November 2

Sara LeVan: Optimistic New collection of watercolor paintings. Opening reception 6 to 8 p.m. On display through Friday, November 30, 2012. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For more information, (828) 251-5796 or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

November 2-4

Asheville Antiques Fair The Bascom Lamar Lunsford Folk Music Collection at Mars Hill College will be a beneficiary of the fair, which will be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Admission to the fair is $10 (ticket covers all three days). For more information, go to www.ashevilleantiquesfair.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Admission to most programs is $5 for kids and adults. Tickets to all events may be purchased at the AICFF website, www.aicff.org.

Saturday, November 3

Archaeology of Self Artists Lisa Abernathy and Melissa Nelson use the ancient art forms of papercutting and clay sculpture to explore the hidden depths of self. Opening reception from Lisa Abernathy 6-9 p.m. On display through November 25, 2012 at the ARTery, 346 Depot Street in Asheville. Phone (828) 258-0710 or visit www. ashevillearts.com

November 3

Inaugural Time Travelers’ Masquerade Multiverse Asheville will host Sirius.B and The Extraordinary Contraptions at Asheville Music Hall for a costumed, historically-themed event celebrating the end of Daylight Savings Time. Guests will don the fashions of their chosen era to celebrate the windingback of the clocks at 2 a.m.! Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 the day of the show. This is an 18+ event with a $2 surcharge for attendees under 21. More details at www.multiverseavl.com

Sunday, November 4

The Haywood Community Band Free concert honoring the memory of founding director, Bob Hill. The band’s four directors will each direct music to include Armed Forces Salute, Lassus Trombone, Tribute to Mancini, and Hymn To The Fallen. For additional information, call Rhonda Wilson Kram at (828) 456-4880, or visit www. haywoodcommunityband.org.

Wednesday, November 7

Lil’ Brian and the Zydeco Travelers Get ready to dance! Lil’ Brian is a virtuoso of both the large piano note accordion and the old-style diatonic accordion. Tickets $15. Show begins at 8 p.m. at the Altamont, 18 Church Street in Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

Wednesday, November 7

Odyssey Community School Open House From 5:30 to 7 p.m. for pre-k through high school. Meet the teachers, administrators, and parents, and tour

the beautiful, six-acre campus. 80 Zillicoa Street, Asheville, NC. For more information call (828) 259-3653 or visit www.odysseycommunity.org.

R

E

M

A

November 9-18

August Osage County By Tracy Letts. November 9, 10, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, November 11 and 18 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $20 for adults; $18 for seniors; students $8. For reservations call (828) 456-6322 or go to www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC 28786

A Celebration of Earth and Sky Using a variety of materials artists Fleta Monaghan, Betty Carlson, Bob Martin, and Mark Holland and the Fleta Monaghan, 310 ARTists Nightside share their vision of the universe. Opening reception from 10-6 p.m. On display through March 31, 2013. 310 Art Gallery, Riverview Station North (ground floor), 191 Lyman Street, Asheville. Call (828) 776-2716 or go to www.310art.com for details.

Saturday, November 17

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra The concert will consist of works by Bizet, Rachmaninoff, and Beethoven, conducted Joyce Yang by music director Dan- Photo: Oh Seuk Hoon iel Meyer, and featuring pianist Joyce Yang. At the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Tickets are available at the U.S. Cellular Center Asheville box office. For details call (828) 254-7046 or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Saturday, November 17

Book Signing for Raising Indigo

Saturday, November 10

5k Walk/Run/March Fundraiser for the Asheville High School Band. Begins at Carrier Park on Amboy Road. More information at www.ashevillehighbands.com.

Saturday, November 10

Appalachian Pastel Society Meeting from 10 a.m. to noon with a free demonstration of plein air style of painting with pastel by Deborah Squier at Black Mountain Library, 105 N. Dougherty St. in Black Mountain. Join the group afterwards on a plein air jaunt with Deborah as she shares her approach to her work. Attendees should bring lunch, easel, and pastels. For more information call Miriam Hughes at (610) 389-0058 or visit the website, www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.

E

Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League’s Biennial Juried Show

Saturday, November 10 Author Tawney Sankey reading and booksigning from 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Grateful Steps Bookshop, 159 South Lexington Avenue in Asheville.

N

through November 21

November 13 & 14

Experience the dynamic energy and superb musicianship of Mountain Heart. 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: Regular $30; Students $25; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10. Phone (828) 257-4530 or go online to www. dwtheatre.com.

I

River Arts District Studio Stroll

Kin

Mountain Heart

Z

Saturday & Sunday, November 10 & 11

Friday, November 9

Friday, November 9

A

From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free and open to the public. For special events, directions, and more information go to www.riverartsdistrict.com.

An exhibition of paintings by Ursula Gullow based on photographs taken of her and her five siblings during the mid 70’s. Artist reception from 7 to 10 p.m. On display through January 8, 2013 at PUSH Gallery and Skate Shop, 25 Patton Avenue in Asheville.

G

The Kruger Brothers Celebrate the best of what music can be with the Kruger Brothers as they perform their fresh acoustic compositions. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30; Students $25; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-theshow $10. Phone (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, November 17

Roller Derby Double-Header Asheville’s Blue Ridge Rollergirls will take on the Tallahassee A-team during the first bout, followed by BRRG’s French Broads against Sumter Fly Girls from Sumter, SC. Doors open at 4 p.m. First bout at 5 p.m. Second at approximately 7 p.m. Tickets $10 in advance or $12 at the door. Kids 12 and under are free! Purchase tickets at BrownPaperTickets. com. Bouts take place at the WNC Agricultural Center, 1301 Fanning Bridge Rd., Fletcher, NC 28732.

For more information call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.blackmountainartsorg. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street, Black Mountain, NC 28711

Saturday, November 24

Akira Satake & Duncan Wickel in Concert Akira Satake, composer and master banjo player, and multi-genre violinist Duncan Wickel, perform an evening of original music combining World, Jazz, Celtic and Appalachian traditions. 8 p.m. at the Whitehorse in Black Mountain. $15 door. More information by visiting www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

November 24 - December 16

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare A fast-paced romp through the entire Shakespeare canon. Performances are Wednesday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Bonus matinee Saturday, November 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $16-$28, $10 for students. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 239-0263 for more details, or visit www.ncstage.org

Thursday, November 29

Listen to This Storytelling Series Features stories and original songs from locals. Tickets are $10. 7:30 p.m. at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street in Asheville. For information phone (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

David Holt and the Lightning Bolts

Saturday, December 1

Shindig on the Green Fundraising Concert Traditional bluegrass and mountain dulcimer music at 7 p.m. in the Upper Anderson Auditorium at Montreat Conference Center. The event features David Holt and the Lightning Bolts, plus mountain dulcimer virtuoso Don Pedi. Tickets: adults $20; children 12 and younger $10; For tickets call Judy Miller at (828) 685-8313. To reserve tickets e-mail info@folkheritage.org. Visit www.folkheritage.org or call the Folk Heritage Info Line (828) 258-6101 x345 for more details.

November Events ~ Announcements ~ openings ~ sales 34 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

what to do guide December 7

Native Intelligence

Best in Show

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

by Phil Juliano

Opening reception for artist Geza Brunow from 6-9 p.m. at The ARTery, 346 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more information phone (828) 2580710 or visit www.ashevillearts.com.

Greek Luncheon & Bake Sale Sunday, November 11

Saturday, December 8

Asheville Chocolate and Arts World Music Festival

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Luncheon hours are 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. and will be served cafeteria-style. The menu will include traditional Greek dishes like Souvlaki, baked lamb shank with orzo, baked chicken with rice pilaf, pastichio, moussaka, spanakopita, green beans, dolmathes (stuffed grape leaves), homemade Greek bread, and Greek salad. The dessert table will have baklava and other scrumptious Greek pastries. There will be Greek music and the youth dance troupe will perform throughout the event. There will be a special take out cafeteria line in the back of the hall beginning at 10:30 a.m. or orders may be called in ahead for pick-up. Call the church office Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at (828) 253-3754, or the Hellenic Hall the day of the luncheon, (828) 254-7424.

This multicultural arts event will feature performers, musicians and dancers from Asheville and beyond. From noon until 7 p.m. at the Asheville Civic Center. Local chocolate tasting by Asheville’s finest chocolatiers and dessert-makers. Tickets are $22. Free for children under 10. More details atsacredcelebrationsproductions.com

Hellenic Center of the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 227 Cumberland Ave. in the Historic Montford District of Asheville.

through December 31, 2012

Late Bloomer, A Celebration of Color An exhibition of floralinspired oil paintings by Dorothy Buchanan Collins is on display at Mica Gallery in downtown Bakersville, NC. Phone (828) 688-6642 or visit www.micagallerync.com.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Thursday, November 29 – Black Mountain Arts

Center. Michael Jefry Stevens on piano and featuring Rockell Scott on vocals. Great jazz standards with music by Gershwin, Porter, Kern and more. 7:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation

Potluck at Phil Mechanic Studios

Sunday, December 9 – Art of Jazz featuring Michael

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Jefry Stevens on piano and Geary Moore on Guitar. Hendersonville, NC. Space is limited. Show starts at 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $35. Email mjsjazz@mac.com for information. www.michaeljefrystevens.com

Gospel Recording Artists, IV Christ

Call for Artists for Postcard Show

Friday, November 9 at 7 p.m. Concert held at The Branch, 1787 Dana Road in Hendersonville, NC. Kornerstone, feauring vocalist Lora J. Ray, will also performing. IV Christ is a contemporary Gospel group with roots in both traditional gospel and R&B, creating a truly unique and spiritual sound. This is a free concert. Visit www. IVChrist.com for more informtion.

Deadline: February 15, 2013 In April 2013, the Madison County Arts Council will host the first opening of small one-of-a-kind postcards. The exhibit will travel for one year to Arts Councils in Madison, Ashe, Avery, Yancey, Cherokee, McDowell, Iredell and Burke Counties.

Tueday November 6 – The Alamont Theatre.

Original music by Michael Jefry Stevens with special guest. 8 p.m. By donation.

Every Wednesday If you’re not already a regular, please consider joining us lunch. Open to anyone who wants to come down. Between noon and 12:30 p.m. at the Phil Mechanic Studios building, 109 Roberts Street, in Asheville’s River Arts District. More details by calling (828) 254-2166, or visit www.floodgallery.org.

Michael Jefry Stevens Jazz Events

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Create one or two pieces of two-dimensional art on a 3.5" by 4.5" watercolor paper. Your artwork will be framed under glass in a 12" by 12" black shadow box. The pieces will be for sale for $70. A percentage of the sale goes to the arts council.

Ascension – Paintings by Katie Linamen Opening Reception Friday, November 9 This exhibition of paintings, in which the artist tries to “capture the power, vitality and finesse of the female body in motion,” is the culminating exhibit of UNC Asheville senior Katie Linamen’s work toward a bachelor of arts degree. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Owen Hall, second floor gallery. Reception and exhibit are free and open to the public through November 20. More details at art.unda.edu or call (828) 251-6559.

Watercolor paper will be available at the MCAC office in Marshall. Details at (828) 649-1301, or visit www.madisoncountyarts.com www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

Classes ~ auditions ~ Arts & Crafts ~ Readings Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 35


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

find it here

Help fuel America’s economic innovation and prosperity – Buy Local! The holiday shopping season is just around the corner. Your choices this year could make a dramatic impact in Asheville!

Waynesville

AboutColor www.aboutcolor.net

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Guitar Trader www.ashevilleguitartrader.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

Amici Music www.amicimusic.org

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

HART www.harttheatre.com

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

David J. Simchock www.vagabondvistas.com

Asheville Art Supply (828) 231-3440

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Kathmandu Cafe cafekathmanduasheville.com

Mountain View Appliance

www.mountainviewappliance.com

The Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248

Mark A. Henry www.naturalviewsinc.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

Fast Lane Electric Bikes www.FastlaneEbikes.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

Stereo Innovations www.stereoinnovations.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Foundry www.digfoundry.com

Jeff Pittman Art www.jeffpittman.com

Niche www.NicheOnline.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Studio 375 Depot BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Jonas Gerard www.jonasgerard.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Canvas www.paintandmingle.com

Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

R Bruce Brennan Fine Art RBruceBrennanFineArt.com

Chifferobe chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Waynesville - 28786

WG

When you buy from a local business you’re keeping money in the community.

HC

Black MOuntain

WM

NB

BC WC WD WK WE

Low Weekly & Monthly Rates

hendersonville Rd. NA

HG Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

CC

BA

WA

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

West Asheville

Charlotte St.

BREVARD ROAD

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmphippsdesigns.com

Downtown Biltmore Ave.

CF

River Arts District

DA

Patton Ave.

DB

WJ PA

WAynesville

DD

DC

Waynesville WS

WB

Downtown Asheville - 28801

RC WH

Waynesville – Great Smoky Mtn. Expy. WV

B

RE

D RH

RD

M

RB

E

A

Get On The Map, Call

G

(828) 646-0071

H

RK

RS WL

36 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

RL

L

J

C

K


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

asheville shops

el

,S uy

ra l, T

de

B

Barbara Kingsolver The Flight Behavior Tour

B

arbara Kingsolver will present her new book, read an excerpt, answer questions and sign books. Tickets are $35. A copy of Flight Behavior is included in the ticket price! Tickets are available in person at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, or can be purchased Barbara Kingsolver online at www.malaprops.com. Flight Behavior is a brilliant and susFlight Behavior is arguably Kingsolver’s penseful novel set in present day Appalachia; most thrilling and accessible novel to date, a breathtaking parable of catastrophe and and like so many other of her acclaimed denial that explores how the complexities we works, represents contemporary American inevitably encounter in life lead us to believe fiction at its finest. in our particular chosen truths. Kingsolver’s riveting story concerns a If young wife and mother on a failing farm in You Barbara Kingsolver reading rural Tennessee who experiences something Go and booksigning, Wednesday, she cannot explain, and how her discovery November 28, beginning at energizes various competing factions — re7p.m. at Lipinsky Auditorium, UNCA ligious leaders, climate scientists, environCampus. Tickets are $35. Stop by mentalists, politicians — trapping her in the Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood center of the conflict and ultimately opening St in Asheville, call (828)254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com. up her world.

The Guitar Trader ❖ 732 Haywood Rd. (828) 253-2003 Open 7 days a week until 7 PM

pg. 36

HG

www.AshevilleGuitarTrader.com Like us on Facebook

9dNdjLVciid Add`<ddYVcY =Zaei]Z :ck^gdcbZci4 8koWdoe\ekh>ofe#7bb[h][d_Y;Ye<h_[dZbo MeeZ[dMWjY^[i\ehedbo.)WdZh[Y[_l[ *%D[[ekh[dj_h[i[b[Yj_ede\c[hY^WdZ_i[$

MeeZ[dMWjY^[i -&*$,,.$----

mmm$[Whj^imWjY^$Yec :Vgi]hLViX]@:Vgi]hLViX]#Xdb

A^`ZJhdc;VXZWdd` [VXZWdd`#Xdb$:Vgi]hLViX]& ;gZZH]^ee^c\i]gdj\]dji Cdgi]6bZg^XV

<gZVi<^[ih[dg i]Z=da^YVnh 6YY^i^dcVaLddYZcLViX]Zh########## ),#%% :Xd7VbWddHjc\aVhhZh################# '*#%% GdhZlddYLddYZc7gVXZaZih############ +#%% LddYZc7Zaih################################### &.#%% IZmVh-%NZVgDaY7diiaZHideeZgh##### ,#*% 6g^odcV:Vgg^c\$CZX`aVXZHZih##### K6G>:9 AVg\ZLddYZc=VcYh####################### &'#*% HbVaaLddYZc=VcYh######################## ,#*% BV]d\VcnCZX`aVXZh####################### &'#%% BV]d\VcnB^ggdgh############################# -#%% *E^ZXZ8adi]EdjX]Zh##################### &%#%% BZci^dc8dYZGGB*%9^hXdjci

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 37


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Photography Tips & Tricks Photographing Waterfalls

H “Cabin Tree” by Olga Dorenko

v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts

ave you ever seen photos of waterfalls and wondered, “How do they make the water look so smooth?” Well, that soft “cotton” look to the flowing water isn’t all that difficult to achieve, but you do need to understand the basic exposure controls of your camera (and, it does help to have a digital SLR model). The effect that you see is achieved by leaving the shutter of the camera open for what amounts to a slow-ish speed (slow by photography measures). By allowing the scene to be recorded over a longer period of time, the movement of the water records on your digital sensor as a “blur”. This is what gives the water its smoothness in the image.

v Jewelry Repair

29 Biltmore Ave.

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044 pg.

36

DC

www.vandykejewelry.com

Photo by David Simchock

In addition to having good control of your shutter speed (usually set between 1/15 sec and one second), it is essential that you use a tripod in order to steady your camera for the duration of the exposure. This handy accessory is essential for quality waterfall results. A cable release or remote control will also help to minimize camera shake (which can occur by the simple act of pushing the shutter release button – even if you are using a tripod!). If you don’t have either, no problem, just use the self-timer on your camera (and set it to the two-second setting). Another accessory that could be useful, if not essential, for this type of photography is a “neutral density filter” or, at the very least, a polarizing filter. Both will help with exposure in preventing too much light entering the camera during the long exposure. As for other camera settings, be sure to set your ISO at its lowest number (e.g., ISO 100). Manual exposure mode works best, but there is no reason why you couldn’t use the Shutter Priority mode as an alternative (and set the shutter speed as noted above). Finally, if you have vibration reduction or image stabilization on your lens and you are using a tripod, then turn the VR / IS “off” for best results. Once you have your composition set, it is best to experiment with different shutter speeds, perhaps starting at 1/15 sec and slowing down to a full second (or longer). Setting a shutter speed that is too long can

Images of Bliss Around Appalachia

P

hotographs by Rachael Bliss taken over the last two years in Appalachia will be on display from November 3 to 30 at Grateful Steps Book Store. Shoppers and visitors can meet the photographer and her daughter/farmer whose farm and animals in Tennessee provided much of the inspiration for the photographic images at a reception at Grateful Steps. Refreshments will be served. Bliss is donating a portion of her profits from her exhibition to Appalachian Voices, an environ38 November 2012 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 16, No. 3

by

David Simchock

Photo by David Simchock

lead to an over-exposed image and/or loss of detail in the highlight areas of the image. Shooting waterfalls is one of the most enjoyable forms of landscape photography, and it can produce stunning results. Even if you don’t have easy access to a full-fledged waterfall, you can still practice the technique on any flowing water, be it a local stream or a fountain. With over 500 waterfalls in North Carolina, there is no shortage of opportunities to practice this technique, and have a lot of fun in the process. Looking for more insight? Check out the “Got f-Stop?” photo blog at www.gotfstop.com

David Simchock is a professional photographer and instructor based in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more about David, including his popular Vagabond Vistas Photo Tours, visit www. DijonCreative.com.

mental non-profit committed to protecting the land, air and water of the central and southern Appalachian region. Bliss, a mother of five and grandmother of four, has lived in Tennessee and North Carolina since 1973. She has displayed her works in Asheville at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, Rosetta’s Kitchen, Old Europe Cafe, and The Hop. She uploads photos regularly to her Blissingstoyou Facebook page.

If You Go: Opening reception, Saturday,

November 17 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Grateful Steps Book Store, 159 S. Lexington Avenue in Asheville. For more information, call (828) 277-0998. Photo by Rachel bliss


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

outdoor fun and adventure Laurel Mountain A Little Bit of Pisgah in One Ride

T

he Laurel Mountain/Pilot Cove/ trails are some of the best in Pisgah. You get a little of everything Pisgah National Forest has to offer. The starting point of this ride begins just above the North Mills River Campground. Follow Hwy 280 to North Mills River road. Once you get to the campground, keep going straight. The road turns to gravel, parking for the ride is at the top of the gap right before the Laurel Mountain trailhead. Before heading out on Laurel Mountain, remember that this ride is remote and will require some decent skills to have fun. It is far from an easy ride, but well worth the effort. Once you have arrived, head down Yellow Gap (FR1206) road to the first trail on the right. It is marked, this is Laurel Mountain. Laurel Mountain is pretty much a continuous climb for almost 7 miles. One landmark along the way is Rich Gap, make sure

by

pg. 36

NA

Best Selection of Bikes & Accessories in Western North Carolina.

Sam White

to stay left here. This is just over 2.5 miles into the climb. It is pretty obvious to stay left. Also, at almost the 5.5 mile mark, there is an unmarked trail to your left. Make sure not to take this unmarked trail. The easy way to know that your climbing is almost over will be that you will be walking your bike. On your left will be Pilot Rock connector trail. After a little more climbing, you will see Pilot Cove Trail. At this point, be ready, a very steep boulder strewn descent is coming. This trail is tons of fun, but be prepared, the first stretch in particular is very steep and rocky. Use your judgment, many choose to walk the first stretch of this descent. Follow Pilot Rock until it intersects back in with Yellow Gap Rd (FR1206). At this

point, turn left and follow the gravel road back to your car. This trail is challenging, but well worth the effort. Along its course, you will see boulder fields, streams, ravines, wildlife and as you probably guessed lots of mountain laurel. If you want to see the laurel in bloom, go in late May to early June. Do keep in mind that the riding in WNC is quite diverse. If this trail seems to be more than you are ready for, we will be glad to help you find a ride that is suited to your skill level. Information and maps for this and many local trails are available at Liberty Bicycles or any local bike shop.

Top-Notch Service Dept.

1378 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-274-2453 libertybikes.com WNC’s Favorite Bicycle Shop!

32 Years of Supporting and Promoting Bicycling in Western North Carolina!

The Appalachian Trail – Coming to Theaters This Fall

S

tretching from Maine to Georgia, the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) is approximately 2,180 miles in length, making it one of the longest, continuously marked footpaths in the world. America’s Wild Spaces: The Appalachian Trail explores the natural beauty and splendor of the Trail and provides viewers the opportunity to discover the remote, and often unknown, corners of this 5-million-step journey. The screenings, presented by The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC), are being shown in celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the completion of the A.T. Attendees will have the opportunity to hear real-life stories from the people who have hiked the Trail as well as those who volunteer to protect and maintain it. Guest speakers at the Charlotte, NC showing include Trevor “Zero Zero” Thomas, accomplished blind long-distance hiker, author and motivational speaker. His trail name, “Zero Zero,” refers to his eyesight and was given to him by companions he met during his 2008 thru-hike. Richard Daileader, ATC Board Member and thru-hiker, will also speak at the showing in Charlotte,

by Javier Folgar

NC. Daileader completed his thruhike in 2009. Since then, he has made it his lifelong goal to give back to the Trail in order to preserve it for his children and future generations. Guest speakers at the Raleigh, NC showing include Randal Inman, A.T. section-hiker and Javier Folgar, marketing and communications manager for the ATC. Raffles and prizes will be awarded throughout the event. In addition, the winning submission from the ATC’s “Why Do You Love the Appalachian Trail?” summer video contest will be revealed. With a suggested donation of $30, attendees can reserve their seats by

visiting www.appalachiantrail.org/ discover. Each ticket includes a new membership or gift membership to the ATC. Children 12 and under will receive free admission. All proceeds go towards the protection and management of the Trail. The organization hopes to gain 750 new members in honor of 75 years of the Trail’s completion. The ATC will be visiting a total of 10 theaters across the country to raise awareness and garner support for the Trail. Every dollar raised will help the ATC’s efforts to preserve and manage the A.T., ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow and for centuries to come.

Social Ambassador Wanted Do you love Music? Theatre? Art? Festivals? Be a representative for Rapid River Magazine. Attend a different event every night of the week. Help us build awareness. Earn referral fees. We’ll provide you with everything you need. Interested? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

If You The Appalachian Trail Go Conservancy presents the

National Geographic film America’s Wild Spaces: The Appalachian Trail (A.T.) Wednesday, November 7 at the Charlotte Crownpoint Theater in Charlotte, NC at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, November 8 at the Raleigh Grande Theater in Raleigh, NC at 7:30 p.m.

Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine (828) 646-0071

Free web links • Free ad design • Easy monthly billing

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 16, No. 3 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — November 2012 39


pg. 36

WL

pg. 36

WD

Tradition. Vision. Innovation. Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center MP 382 Blue Ridge Parkway Asheville, NC Open Daily 9am-6pm 828-298-7928

Featuring Jewelry by Molly Dingledine For more fine crafts visit:

Guild Crafts

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70 Asheville, NC Open Mon.-Sat: 10am-6pm With Sunday Hours Thru Dec.: 10am- 4pm 828-298-7903

WWW.CRAfTGuIlD.ORG

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

Rapid River Magazine November 2012  
Rapid River Magazine November 2012  

On the cover: Stephen Janton, photo by Erica Mueller Photography. Inside: Asheville Symphony..p3; AmiciMusic..p7; Asheville Contemporary Dan...

Advertisement