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David Kim

performs with the Asheville Symphony

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Two Outdoor Art Events

in Black Mountain

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Art on Main Festival

in Hendersonville

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Of Time and the River

Art Benefit & Sale

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Weaverville

Art Safari

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Elegant Jewelry at

Susan Marie Designs

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Haywood Art Studio Tour

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Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

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King Kong

– Then & Now by Al Ramirez pg 37 Local Dining Guide pgs 30-31 Movie Reviews pgs 12-15 What to Do Guide™ pgs 34-35


Explore Art in the Heart of the Blue Ridge

Minutes from Asheville

Preview Party & Fundraiser

Friday, October 23 7-9PM Maps, Details & More at

WeavervilleArtSafari.com

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It’s Alive!

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN – MEL BROOKS’ CULT CLASSIC

Asheville Community Theatre is opening its 70th season with the WNC Premiere of the musical comedy Young Frankenstein.

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4 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

BY JENNY

BUNN

pronounced FRONKen-steen!” Grandson of the infamous Victor Frankenstein, Frederick Frankenstein travels to Transylvania to handle the closing of This electrifyhis family’s estate. With ing musical adaptathe help of Igor, his tion of Mel Brooks’ David Fine as Igor, Calintha Briggs as Inga, hunchbacked side-kick, monstrously funny and Mark Jones as Frederick Frankenstein. and Inga, his leggy lab cult comedy film is Photo: Rodney Smith / Tempus Fugit Design assistant, Frederick scientifically-proven, finds himself in the mad scientist shoes of his monstrously good entertainment! Young ancestors. Though Frederick attempts to create Frankenstein opens Friday, October 2 and a more refined, more artistic version of his runs through October 25, 2015. grandfather’s monster (his creation sings and “It’s a lot of fun to have this show in dances!), mayhem inevitably erupts. house,” said Susan Harper, Managing Director Asheville Community Theatre’s producof Asheville Community Theatre. “We’re all tion of Young Frankenstein is directed by Jerry quoting the famous lines to each other … ‘Put the candle back!’, ‘He vas my boyfriend!, ‘It’s

continued on page 6


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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Two

OCTOBER 2015 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copy Editor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kimberley Adams, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Tyrone Brandyburg, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Max Hammonds, MD, Lauren Harr, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Tina Masciarelli, Al Ramirez, Dennis Ray, David Regan, Michelle Rogers, Patrice Tappe, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, David Whitehill, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, October 2015, Vol. 19 No. 2

SHORT STORIES

4 Performance

New stories are added each month!

Asheville Community Theatre . . . . 4 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

8 Music

ONLY ONLINE

It’s the Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of, written by Ashley English

Eliada’s 2015 Corn Maze WNC’s largest corn maze – 12 acres and four miles of corn!

The Fruit of Service,

written by Eddie LaShure

Patrick Sweany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Alison Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

The Train Man, written by Terry Ward

10th Annual Asheville Zombiewalk

The Buttons, written by Celia Miles

9 Fine Art

Paint the Town; Art on the Lawn . . 9 Art on Main Festival . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Of Time and The River . . . . . . . . . 16 Richard Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Susan Marie Designs . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Jane Desonier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 ZaPow!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Joyce Schlapkohl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Burr Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Haywood Art Studio Tour . . . . . . . 23 McLain Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 King Kong – Then and Now . . . . . 37 Hard Candy Christmas 2015 . . . . . 38

12 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

16 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

The Mysterious Disappearance of Phyllis Rivers, Part Three,

written by RF Wilson

It’ll Be All Right - Doncha Know, written by Tom Davis

Hiking the PCT - Breaking the 500 Mile Mark, written by John Swart Flash Fiction Contest! See page 28 for details. Short Story and Flash Fiction guidelines are available at rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copy editor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

SPECIAL SECTIONS Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 9 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-25

The living dead will gather in the heart of the city, Roger McGuire Green, on Sunday, October 11, beginning at 5 p.m.

LaZoom’s Haunted Tour Learn things about Asheville that might just keep you up at night... mostly giggling. Get on the big, purple bus!

Historic Haunted House Tour The Swannanoa Valley Museum hosts the fourth annual Historic Haunted House Tour on Friday and Saturday, October 23 & 24.

Orionid Meteor Shower Predicted to reach a peak of about twenty meteors per hour on Wednesday, October 21 beginning at 7 p.m. www.rapidrivermagazine.com

30 Dining Guide

Kathmandu Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Healthy Good Thoughts . . . . . . . . 31

34 What to Do Guide On the Cover:

King Kong, illustration by Al Ramirez. PAGE 37

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 5


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performance HART PRESENTS THE HIT COMEDY

The Fox on the Fairway

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If you’re a golfer, the spouse of a golfer, or are related to a golfer HART’s next comedy will have special resonance. If you are none of the above, that’s ok too. You will still enjoy the mayhem that ensues in Ken Ludwig’s The Fox on the Fairway. Two rival country clubs are preparing for their big face off, pitting their golf pros against one another. All is not on the up and up, however. Unbeknownst to Quail Valley, Crouching Squirrel has stolen their ace and they are left with no one except their newest employee, a young kid hired to run the stock room, to uphold the honor of the club.

The Weir

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Set in an Irish pub, this Broadway hit by Conner McPherson sets the proper mood for October. Three male patrons set out to tell ghost stories to frighten the new young woman who’s come to the village, but then it’s her turn and she tops them all. Directed by Frances Davis. Celebrate Octoberfest at HART, with a pre- and post-show Irish band and area beers on tap.

IF YOU GO: The Weir, Friday, October 16 through Sunday, November 1, 2015. Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets: Adults $24; Seniors $20; Students $11; ($7 matinees). Call (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.org.

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6 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

‘Young Frankenstein’ cont’d from pg. 4

Crouch who has helmed plenty of musical hits for ACT including recent productions of The Addams Family, Cabaret, and Chicago. Musical direction is by Chuck Taft, and choreography is by Shari Azar. Mark Jones (The Addams Family, Hairspray) stars as Frederick Frankenstein with Calintha Briggs (making her ACT debut) as Inga, David Fine (The Addams Family) as Igor, Carol Duermit (Bark!) as Frau Blucher, Nana Hosmer Griffin (Spamalot, Kiss Me, Kate) as Elizabeth and Waylon Wood (Kiss Me, Kate) as the Monster. They are joined onstage by a cast of 17, which includes many ACT veterans as well as newcomers to the ACT stage. The set is designed by Jill Summers with costumes by Ida. Opening weekend features the Monster Deal – all adult, senior, and student tickets for all three opening weekend performances are only $20. Other opening weekend perks include

The Fox on the Fairway is filled with mistaken identities and over-the-top shenanigans.

Ludwig has had numerous hits on Broadway, including Lend Me a Tenor and Moon Over Buffalo, as well as the musical Crazy for You. The Fox on the Fairway is a tribute to the great English farces of the 1930s and 1940s. The Fox on the Fairway takes audiences on a hilarious romp that pulls the rug out from underneath the stuffy denizens of a private country club. Filled with mistaken identities, slamming doors, and over-the-top romantic shenanigans, it’s a furiously paced comedy that recalls the Marx Brothers’ classics. A charmingly madcap adventure about love, life, and man’s eternal love affair with... golf. HART’s production is being directed by Judy Dybwad and will star Jeff Messer, Charles Mills, Chase Wells, Anna Denson, Kelli Mullinix, Holly Cope, Bryan Nicholls and Jackie Roberts. The Fox on the Fairway runs through Sunday, October 4, 2015. IF YOU HART presents The Fox on the Fairway, GO October 2, 3 at 7:30 p.m and October 4

at 3 p.m. Tickets: $24 for Adults, $20 for Seniors, Students $11(prices include sales tax). Special $7 discount tickets for Students on Sundays. Box Office Hours Tuesday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.org. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville.

complimentary champagne on opening night, complimentary chocolate on Saturday night, and a talk-back with the cast and crew after the Sunday matinee. Young Frankenstein; book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan; music and lyrics by Mel Brooks; directed by Jerry Crouch with musical direction by Chuck Taft and choreography by Shari Azar.

IF YOU Young Frankenstein, October 2-25, GO 2015; performances Friday and Saturday

evenings at 7:30 p.m., Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. Tickets: $25 Adults, $22 Seniors/Students, $15 Children. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www. ashevilletheatre.org


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THE ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS

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DAVID WHITEHILL

David Kim in Concert

Longtime Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster David Kim will join the Asheville Symphony and Music Director Daniel Meyer on Saturday, October 17, for a Masterworks performance of one of the most beloved violin concertos in the classical canon. “Bruch’s Violin Concerto with David Kim” will start at 8 p.m. at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The Asheville Symphony will also perform Golijov’s “Sidereus” in the first half and Schumann’s Symphony No. 2 in C major, Op. 61 in the second half. The Philadelphia Orchestra’s concertmaster since 1999, David Kim has performed as a soloist with numerous orchestras around the world and has appeared at international venues including the Brevard Music Center. Highlights of Kim’s 2015-16 season include teaching/performance residencies at Oberlin College, Bob Jones University, and The Boston Conservatory of Music, appearances as concertmaster of the All-Star Orchestra on PBS stations across the US and online at the Kahn Academy; and the launch of the first annual David Kim Orchestral Institute of Cairn University in Philadelphia. Max Bruch, who was a teacher to composers Ottorino Respighi and Ralph Vaughan Williams, finished the violin concerto in 1866. Renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, a Bruch contemporary, called it the “richest and most seductive” of the Romantic violin concertos. Golijov’s “Sidereus,” an overture which has been performed all over the world, was inspired by Galileo’s Sidereus Nuncius (Starry Messenger) in which the seventeenth-century astronomer and physicist wrote of his observa-

tions of the moon’s surface with the newly invented telescope and, more disturbingly at the time, the discovery of four of the moons of Jupiter. Golijov has said Galileo’s publication pointed to the duality of the moon: “… it is still good for love and lovers and poets, but a scientific observation can lead us to entirely new realizations.” “Osvaldo Golijov is currently one of classical music’s hottest composers, known for deftly incorporating popular dance styles with traditional forms,” said Asheville Symphony Music Director Daniel Meyer. “Inspired by Galileo, Golijov evokes the swirling of celestial bodies and the beautiful night sky of Patagonia in this colorful tango-infused work.” Schumann’s Second Symphony is noted for its memorable melodies, rich harmonies, and propulsive rhythms. Composed in 1845 at a time when Schumann was recovering from a nervous breakdown, the first three movements are characterized by slow, dark themes, while the fourth is much more joyous – reflecting Schumann’s improved mental state. The Asheville Symphony Orchestra performs and promotes symphonic music for the benefit, enjoyment and education of the people of Western North Carolina. The ASO presents concerts in the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in Asheville’s U.S. Cellular Center. Related organizations include the Asheville

ASHEVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES PRESENTS

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The Faure Quartett

The Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) will present the Fauré Quartett (Piano Quartet), Friday, November 6.

the Fauré Piano Quartet

“We are looking forward to our 63rd season this year with another incredible roster of outstanding musicians and the opportunity to present our series in the newly expanded setting of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation, our concert home,” says ACMS Presdent, Polly Feitzinger. “The newly designed sanctuary of the UU Congregation enables us to present larger ensembles and an expanded repertoire for the enjoyment of our audiences.” The Fauré Quartett met during their studies in 1995 in Karlsruhe for the 150 anniversary of Gabriel Fauré, they quickly realized that their unique interpretations offered new insights into undiscovered repertoire. In 2006, they signed a contract with Deutsche Grammophon. They

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Symphony Guild, Asheville Symphony Chorus, Asheville Symphonettes, and education initiatives such as the Asheville Buncombe Youth Orchestra, Music in the Schools, MusicWorks!, Spotlight on Young Musicians, Symphony Talk and pre-concert lectures. IF YOU Bruch’s Violin Concerto with David GO Kim, Saturday, October 17 at 8

p.m. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22-$62 (prices vary depending on seating); reduced youth and student tickets available. Tickets Available in person at the U.S. Cellular Center box office at 87 Haywood St., by calling (828) 254-7046, or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org.

BY

MARILYNNE HERBERT

made highly regarded benchmark-recordings with works by Mozart, Brahms and Mendelssohn. The ensemble was awarded the ECHO Classic for their album “Classic Beyond Borders,” their second after their recording of Brahms’ piano quartets (chamber music recording of the year in 2008). The program will feature: Strauss, Piano Quartet, Op.13; Fauré, Piano Quartet No. 2 in G minor, Op. 45; and Brahms. Piano Quartet No. 2 in A major, Op. 26.

IF YOU The Fauré Quartett, Friday, November GO 6 at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist

Congregation located at the corner of Edwin Place and Charlotte Street in Asheville. Tickets are $38. Tickets to the Friday, December 4 benefit concert featuring Gary Hoffman with Giles Vonsattel are $40. To purchase tickets or for more information, please contact Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427 and visit www. ashevillechambermusic.org.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 7


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sound experience Patrick Sweany at the Grey Eagle

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BY JAMES

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4th album became really famous and a song off that has ingrained itself in the internet radio algorithm, and eight years after release receives over 2.5 million plays a your journalistic assumpquarter. tion, there was a thriving and The new one is the diverse music scene. best thing I’ve ever done. I work hard to JC: I regret my assumption. make sure the records I put out are quality PS: I knew from going to experiences and that the folk festival that there the next one has to be were guys who were into Patrick Sweany better than the last. A fingerstyle country blues lot of that is a matter of the listener’s opinion, and delta stuff around there, so I wanted to but I make it a point to try to keep up my end learn and jam from them. There was a really of the deal. cool music scene in Kent back then. A lot of great local talent, some older blues guys that JC: Daytime Turned to Nighttime is your still played, a lot of punk rock and heavy music most recent release. As of this writing I’ve yet at clubs, lots of house parties. I played local to hear it, so can you talk a bit about making coffee houses at first, and then I started playing the album? Do you tend to go into the studio bars when I turned twenty one. with a bunch of finished songs or are you

Patrick Sweany describes himself as a musical omnivore, taking in as many styles as he can, swinging through blues, folk, soul, bluegrass, maybe some classic 50s rock, or a punk speedball, devouring every popular music sound of the last 70 years, and mixing them all together into his own stew. Yet, the one thing that most people notice about Sweany isn’t his ability to assimilate but rather the authenticity he brings to the table. Like his heroes, artists like Bobby “Blue” Bland, Doug Sahm, Joe Tex, Sweany somehow manages to blend all of these influences into something all his own. As a young man he immersed himself in his dad’s extensive record collection: 60s folk, vintage country, soul, and of course, blues. Patrick spent hours teaching himself to fingerpick along to Leadbelly, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and other folk-blues giants. It was a path he’d follow early on but his love of 1950s soul and rock lead him to embrace the garage punk revival that was happening throughout the Rust Belt and pushed him into forming a band. After six critically acclaimed records (two produced by longtime collaborator Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys), Sweany has expanded his touring radius to 49 states and Europe. He’s played premiere festivals (Newport Folk Fest, Merlefest, Montreal Jazz Fest, Telluride Blues & Brews) and supported international acts such as The Black Keys, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna, and others on tour. In support of his recently released Daytime Turned To Nighttime, Sweany and his band will be playing The Grey Eagle. Ahead of the show Mr. Sweany graciously consented to respond to a few questions.

James Cassara: Talk a bit about your upbringing. Did you come from a musical family? My understanding is you grew up in Kent, Ohio which, as far as I know, there’s not much of a music scene there. Patrick Sweany: I grew up in Massillon, Ohio. My father is a fingerstyle guitar player, and folk music fan. He played in the church folk group and would jam with the other guitar player after rehearsals. I only knew one other guitar player my age in school, and we’d jam a little but he wasn’t into the folky stuff I was listening to. Dad would take me to the workshops at the Kent State Folk Festival and to Bluegrass concerts at high school auditoriums in the neighboring towns, stuff that he liked, that you could take a kid to. I went to school at Kent State after high school because, despite

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8 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

JC: So like a lot of kids you get consumed by music, pick up a guitar and learn a few chords. Unlike a lot of kids you stick with it. So take the story from there.

PS: I was pretty mesmerized by my dad’s playing, and he liked Pete Seeger, especially the 12 string guitar stuff, which introduced me to Leadbelly, which revealed names like Lightnin’ Hopkins and all sorts of others. I just sought them out. I asked my dad if he thought I could learn to play and he was thrilled. Mom was supportive as well, but she didn’t like my grades dropping as I cared less about school and more about guitars. I was listening to records, taking a few lessons here and there, watching what I could watch, reading a lot of books. I always wanted to be a performer, entertain people. I loved this soulful country blues type of music that I thought was so much more exciting than what I heard around me. I knew it was entertaining and engaging if people were just exposed to it. So I kept doing that. An idol of mine told me that I had to tell my story instead of telling someone else’s, so I started writing songs. JC: You’ve released seven albums in about 15 years, all on the Nine Mile label. For those unfamiliar with your career can you chart the course of one album to the next? Give a brief overview of your discography? PS: As we are discussing an upcoming show, on an upcoming tour promoting the latest release, I am most concerned with the most recent album Daytime Turned To Nightime, but I’ve been putting out records of original music since 1999. The first one was a solo acoustic record and the subsequent albums have been more ensemble recordings. I’ve received a lot of attention recently because the producer of my

more likely to bring in ideas and flesh them out in the recording process?

PS: I worked very hard in a focused manner to show up to the studio with finished songs so that when it’s time to record we document the best performance possible. I don’t know anyone who can afford to do “write in the studio.” Studio time and musicians are expensive. This album has been a departure as I chose to reconnect with my roots in acoustic fingerstyle guitar and more laid back, self assured singing. I figured it was time after four shouting rock records in a row. I wanted to show what makes me unique. I’ve really been influenced by albums like Ode to Billy Joe by Bobby Gentry, Bobby Charles’ work with The Band, Brook Benton, Tony Joe White.... the relaxed but intrinsically Southern sound of those records.

JC: Talk about The Grey Eagle show. Will you be with a band or solo? I don’t recall your having played Asheville before but correct me if I’m wrong. PS: The Grey Eagle is our home in Asheville. This will be a full band show. Jeff Whitworth has believed in us for a long time, and has really helped us cultivate a great audience in Asheville. Asheville audiences are always very good to us. Critical reviews have been great, and crowds seem to be increasing on the last few tours. We always do a great show at The Grey Eagle; it’s just a great American rock and roll club. IF YOU Patrick Sweany and his band (opening GO for Jerry Joseph and the Jack Morons)

on Wednesday, October 14. Tickets are priced at $15 advance and $18 day of for this all ages, 9 p.m. show. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com


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Black Mountain

October 31st on Town Square

Two Big Outdoor Events

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Public Art Rocking Chair Silent Auction 10am-5pm • Winners/Chair pick-up at 5pm

see our town through the eyes and skills of local artists as they capture the heart and spirit of this historic area. The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League will host a “Wet Paint” show and sale, plus a wine and cheese reception at 5 p.m. on Saturday, October 10. The plein air exhibit will be on display through November 1, 2015 at the Red House Studios & Gallery.

PAINT THE TOWN

Saturday, October 10 Watch talented artists capture the essence of life, culture, the mountains, and the scenic views of our awesome mountain town, en plein air, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Black Mountain. Visitors and residents can

Howl-O-Ween Pet Parade and Costume Contest Contest registration 1-2:30 Parade at 3pm followed by contest. Contest winners announced at 5pm

continued on page 38

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Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 9


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Carl Sandburg Home NHS invites all 4th grade students to visit the park as part of the White House’s new Every Kid in a Park program. Students can go to www.everykidinapark.gov to complete an activity and obtain a free annual entry pass to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas, including national parks. “During the National Park Service’s centennial celebration, we want everyone to get to know their national parks, and we’re offering a special invitation to fourth graders and their families to discover everything that national parks offer,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “We hope these free passes will introduce 4th graders, their classes, and families to our national treasures, places where they can run and play, explore and learn.” continued on page 11

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Featuring world renown Navajo Jeweler Calvin Begay

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Enjoy a guided tour of Carl Sandburg’s home.

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432 N. Main Street • Hendersonville, NC 828-595-9874

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The 56th annual Art on Main Fine Art/Fine Craft Festival takes place along Hendersonville’s historic Main Street, Saturday & Sunday, October 3 & 4. One of the region’s most popular outdoor arts festivals, Art on Main will feature fine arts and fine crafts from local and regional artists, as well as many

Family Ties by Harry Jarman, oil/acrylic

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artists from states beyond the southeast region. More than 75 artists will participate in this juried and judged festival presented by the Arts Council Reds in the Morning, of Henderson fingerpainting by County. Amy Perrier Among the new artists for this year is ceramic artist Bridget Fox. Bridget is a Southern Highland Craft Guild member from Micaville, NC. Bridget’s “biomorphic” designs invoke sea creatures of fantasy. She uses this imagery to make rattles, bowls and other vessels. Also new to Art on Main, local artist Kim McCrum makes silver jewelry with a contemporary edge and a touch of the southwest. Her perforated layers have

depth and pattern. Kristen Eisenbraun comes to Art on Main from Greenville, SC and the farms and ranches where she grew up. She is a painter of gentle realism often incorporating the human body. Although not completely new to Art on Main, Harry Jarman returns after a few years absence from the show. Harry’s paintings include still life and landscapes with fine detail. “Harry was an annual fixture at Art on Main for many years,” says Kim Adams, Event Coordinator, “and we are thrilled to see him return.” Hendersonville artist Amy Perrier, who was new to Art on Main last year, has had one of her paintings, “Reds in the Morning,” chosen as Art on Main’s marketing image for 2015. Her acrylic finger painting will be seen on postcards, posters and T-shirts promoting this year’s show. An awards reception to honor the artist vendors takes place on Saturday evening after the show. $3,000 in prize money will be awarded. In addition to the $1,000 Best of Show Award, first place ($500), and second place ($300) prizes will be awarded in both categories of fine art and fine craft.

Mandala by Bridget Fox, clay

Four Honorable Mentions of $100 each will also be awarded. IF YOU Art on Main Fine Art/Fine GO Craft Festival, Saturday &

Sunday, October 3 & 4 along Hendersonville’s historic Main Street. Festival hours will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. For more information, contact the Arts Council at acofhc@bellsouth.net or (828) 693-8504, and visit www.acofhc.org.

‘Every Kid in a Park’ cont’d from pg. 10

Carl Sandburg Home NHS offers children and their families the opportunity to enjoy a guided tour of the historic home and learn about the life of the “Poet of the People.” Families with the new pass will receive free admission to the house tour. In addition to seeing the home, a visit to Sandburg is never complete without stopping by the barn to meet the descendants of Mrs. Sandburg’s champion dairy goat herd, hiking the trails with the new Track Trail activity guides, earning a Jr. Ranger badge or patch, and of course enjoying a landscape that encourages relaxation and reflection. To receive their free pass, fourth graders can visit www.everykidinapark. gov and play a game to access their special Every Kid in a Park pass. Fourth graders and their families can then use this pass for free entry to national parks and other federal public lands now through August 31, 2016. The website also includes fun and engaging learning activities aligned to educational standards, trip planning tools, safety and packing tips and other important and helpful information for educators and parents. The goal of the Every Kid in a Park program is to connect 4th graders with the great outdoors and inspire them to become future environmental stewards,

www.thewrinkledegg.com • 828-696-3998

It’s a Great Day When You Get a Treat from the Wrinkled Egg

Chloe Byrd, the first fourth grader at Carl Sandburg Home NHS to receive the new Every Kid in a Park pass. Photo: NPS

ready to preserve and protect national parks and other public lands for years to come. The program is an important part of the National Park Service’s centennial celebration in 2016, which encourages everyone to Find Your Park.

Southern American Folk Art Eclectic Gifts & Accessories Great Stuff for Kids Antique Furniture Fine Reproductions Summer Camp Care Packages

IF YOU Carl Sandburg Home National GO Historic Site, a unit of the National

Park Service, is located three miles south of Hendersonville off U.S. 225 on Little River Road. The park is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. For further information, please call (828) 693-4178, or visit www.nps.gov/carl.

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Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Black Mass 

has certainly earned their praise. He plays Whitey with a ferocious, brewing intensity and REEL TAKE: I like Johnny Depp, even yet holds back when his career is in a slump, but I had with a steely some distinct reservations about Scott reserve. Depp, Cooper’s Black Mass, a biopic about the Johnny Depp as James ‘Whitey’ who looks rise of James ‘Whitey’ Bulger. Having Bulger in Black Mass. not a thing grown up primarily in the Boston area like Whitey I, like everyone else, was aware of BosBulger, was heavily made up for the part to the ton mobster (‘The Satan of Southie’) James point of distraction. The blue contact lenses ‘Whitey’ Bulger and his ‘Winter Hill Gang’. designed to convey Whitey’s ice blue eyes are He was renowned to most, feared by many just bizarre. Nothing about them looks real, and allegedly beloved by some. He was known but as the story goes on they do work to affect to support the IRA, but back in the day IRA Whitey’s persona. sympathizers marched in the St. Patrick’s Day The supporting cast, including Benedict Parade while rainbow flags were not allowed Cumberbatch as unlikely pick to play Whit(time does take care of many things). By the ey’s politician brother Billy Bulger, Peter time Whitey went off grid, living on the lam Sarsgaard as a sketchy small-time hoodlum, for 16 years, he was an urban legend. and Jesse Plemmons and Rory Cochrane Bulger’s capture in 2011 brought with it a as part of the Winter Hill Gang all deliver renewed interest and a slew of books about strong performances. him. I suppose it was only a matter of time unBlack Mass is another performance driven til someone made a movie and not just loosely film this month. If you like mobster movies based on him a la Martin Scorsese’s The Deand Dennis Lehane novels, it’s probably worth parted (2006). The selection of Scott Cooper your while. Is it the definitive story of Whitey (Crazy Heart) to direct was an unexpected Bulger? No. But personally I don’t think the choice, but he does a solid job. Black Mass world needs to see that story. Black Mass is starts in the early 70s and focuses on Whitey’s quite enough. rise in organized crime and his alliance with corrupt FBI agent John Connolly (Joel EdgerRated R for brutal violence, language throughton), a fellow Irish-American kid who came up out, some sexual references and brief drug use. on the streets with him in Southie. Review by Michelle Keenan Interestingly Black Mass doesn’t focus solely on Whitey. In fact he’s almost a subGrandma  character to the character of John Connolly. There’s good and bad to this. It keeps our Short Take: A grumpy, gruff, widowed knowledge of Whitey fairly superficial, but it lesbian helps her granddaughter secure makes the alliance between the Boston Irish money for an abortion. mob and FBI, who take down the Italian mob, REEL TAKE: Lily Tomlin’s Grandma is a very compelling story. For me it was this getting rave reviews and currently has a 93% element, and the quality of the actors, that fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. And while elevates Black Mass above standard biopic fare I too am giving a positive review, I do so with and mobster movies. caveats. Audiences give it a 75% fresh rating Australian actor Joel Edgerton, best known and I would say that’s pretty fair. Writer-directo American audiences for The Gift, Gatsby tor Paul Weitz (About a Boy) turns in a work and Zero Dark Thirty, is terrific as Connelly, that seems tailor made for Tomlin. The story, delivering just the right mix of bravado, cunin spite of its modern and topical context, is ning self righteousness and seedy underbelly. good but nothing new. It’s elevated by the He deserves as much critical acclaim as Depp. performances of Tomlin and supporting cast Whether Depp needed a comeback role, as members, including a superb Sam Elliott. the media has claimed, is questionable, but he Short Take: Biopic about the rise of Boston Irish mobster James ‘Whitey’ Bulger and his alliance with corrupt FBI agent John Connelly.

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You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The film is being promoted as a comedy, but it carries too many moments of wrenching sadness and hurt to be marketed as such. Its comedic moments, of which there are many, make the proceedings more palatable, without belittling the issues at hand (of which there are also many). At its essence Grandma is ostensibly a bittersweet character study. Lily Tomlin is Elle, a sharp-tongued, misanthropic poet and academic who is still grieving the loss of her longtime partner a year and half earlier. At the start of the film Elle is cruelly breaking up with her first girlfriend since the death of Violet. With her day off to a great start, it gets even better when her teenage granddaughter, Sage (Julia Garner), shows up on her doorstep needing $600, before the end of the day, for an abortion.

Julia Garner seeks the help of Grandma Lily Tomlin.

Elle, in debt for Violet’s medical bills and not one to be a slave to the system, cut up her credit cards and turned them into a wind chime. She doesn’t have the money, but she sets out with Sage to find the money and see her through her predicament. They climb into Vi’s old car (a 1955 Dodge Royal Lancer which Tomlin has owned in real life since 1975) and set off on a road trip of sorts, hitting up friends, acquaintances, old loves, and eventually family, for the cash they need. What ensues is a day of revelations and healing [of sorts]. Grandma clearly deals with some polarizing issues, but it is not a political movie. It, like most stories, deals with relationships and the human condition. In this case it’s also about the impact of the passage of time on life as is most profoundly played out in the scene between Tomlin and Elliott. This scene strikes a chord and lingers in the heart. Cinematically there’s nothing much on

display here, nor anything particularly new. But Tomlin’s performance is fantastic; its nuance is deceiving. She is powerful and unapologetic and yet full of pain and vulnerability. It’s great to see her in a lead role, and she deserves the accolades. However, if you like your Grandmas to have a little more Hallmark and a little less bite, this may not be the movie for you. Rated R for language and some drug use. Review by Michelle Keenan

Meet the Patels 

Short Take: Documentary meets romantic comedy in Ravi Patel’s journey to find his perfect match.

REEL TAKE: For most of us dating, in the hopes of meeting ‘the one,’ is never easy. It’s the source material for plenty a stand up comedian, romantic comedy, country western song and bad poetry. But throw in the elaborate processes of concerned and overly involved Indian-American parental units and now you also have the makings for – a documentary. Meet the Patels is one of the most charming documentaries you’re ever likely to see. Made by former Charlottean siblings Ravi and Geeta Patel, Meet the Patels is part documentary, part romantic comedy as it documents Ravi’s cross cultural journey to find love. Ravi, an actor, and Geeta, a documentary filmmaker, are first generation Indian-Americans. Their parents, Champa and Vasant, are proud Indian-American immigrants, but traditional Indians no less. On the verge of turning 30, with no apparent matrimonial prospects in sight, Ravi’s parents decide it’s time for a family trip to the motherland to find Ravi a wife. This is when Ravi and Geeta decide to film the experience. What Ravi’s parents don’t know is that he has just broken up with the only woman he’s ever dated seriously, a red-headed white girl from Connecticut. He dated Audrey for two years and never told his parents about her. Ravi always figured he’d settle down with a fellow Indian-American, someone who understood his family’s traditions, someone who understood what it was like to be him, or even more so, someone who knew what it means to be a Patel. Movies continued on page 13


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Ravi jokes that being a Patel in India is like being a Smith elsewhere, but really there’s so much more to it. This is where Ravi and Geeta excel. The siblings creatively, humorously, and lovingly illustrate cultural and generational differences in order to create cultural understanding. Using the matchmaking process as its backdrop, Ravi and Geeta manage to create a film that meaningfully touches on the issues of culture clash, assimilation, modern values and traditional values, all while delivering a thoroughly enjoyable film. They make smart use of the dating game footage, cutting away from it to return to a cleverly animated narrative and interspersing the film with interviews with other Indian-American couples and even a few mixed race couples a la When Harry Met Sally. As likable and enjoyable as this film is, there are [for me] two fairly petty grievances that work against it. The first is that they give up the punch line way too soon. This isn’t a huge flaw, but it would have made the reveal that much stronger if we hadn’t known exactly how it was going to end since almost the beginning of the film. The second thing is that I wondered how much of Ravi’s dedication to the matchmaking process was genuine and how much was done for the good of the film. It’s easy to dismiss Meet the Patels as being slight. But after thinking on it for a few days, it’s breeziness and delightfulness doesn’t make it any less of a film. Generational, cultural, and economic differences, along with social pressures, parental pressures, and issues of skin tone were all addressed within the context of this warm and humorous familial tale. Love wins. Rated PG for thematic elements, brief suggestive images and incidental smoking.

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I have frequently written articles in this publication concerning England’s Hammer Films along with reviews and DVD picks of some of their movies.

Meet the Patels – Ravi, Champa, Vasant, and Geeta.

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Now it is time to pay tribute to Hammer’s chief competitor in the 1960s and 1970s, Amicus Productions. The primary impetus behind this tribute is the release on Blu-Ray later this month of the company’s flagship production, Dr Terror’s House of Horrors in honor of the film’s 50th anniversary. Dr. Terror set the pattern for future Amicus releases with its multi-story format and outlandish title. In order to compete with Hammer who usually set their films in the 19th century and based them on classic horror literature, Amicus chose to copy a famous British film from the 1940s called Dead of Night. This film featured a portmanteau format (several different stories with a central framing device) and had a contemporary setting. This format had its origins in the German silent fantasy film Waxworks (1924) which told different stories based on figures in a wax museum. Although the Amicus movies were produced in England, the founders were American. Both Max J. Rosenberg (19142004) and Milton Subotsky (1921-1991) were New Yorkers who gravitated to England in the mid 1950s where they began by producing early rock and roll films. In 1960 they made their first horror film City of the Dead (U.S. title Horror Hotel) which was a modest success in England but a big hit in America. In 1962 they formed Amicus Productions (Amicus means friendship in Latin). In 1965 Rosenberg & Subotsky made Dr Terror’s House of Horrors. Five men on a train have their fortunes told by a

sixth with unfortunate BY CHIp KAUFMANN results. Although made on a modest budget, Dr. Terror was able to enlist the Tastes in horror films services of Hammer’s two were changing thanks biggest stars Peter Cushing to the worldwide sucand Christopher Lee as cess of The Exorcist well as a young up-andand Amicus’ old coming actor by the name school approach of of Donald Sutherland. It deliberate unreality was directed by Freddie presented in a theatriFrancis, a celebrated Britcal manner with wit A dead man (Peter Cushing) returns ish cameraman who would and style could not for revenge in Tales from the Crypt. go on to become a horror compete with the film auteur. graphic reality and The success of Dr. Terror encouraged intensity of the new school. Amicus to continue to pursue the anthology After one last anthology film From format and there would be six more films Beyond the Grave (considered by many to ending with From Beyond the Grave in 1974. be their finest), Amicus moved exclusively Those in the middle were Torture Garden into single story movies and had modest (1967), The House That Dripped Blood successes with a series of Edgar Rice Bur(1970) and Asylum (1972) both written by roughs prehistoric thrillers including The Robert Bloch of Psycho fame, and Tales from Land That Time Forgot which was noted the Crypt (1972) and Vault of Horror (1973) for its camp value and deliberately cheesy which were based on the subversive EC Horspecial effects. Their last official horror ror Comics of the 1950s. film was The Beast Must Die (1974) about There were single story features as well a werewolf in a Fantasy Island like setting. including The Skull, two Doctor Who films, In 1975 faced with declining revenues three science fiction films, and their one presand a changing horror audience, Subotsky tige production, Harold Pinter’s The Birthday & Rosenberg decided to call it a day and Party with Robert Shaw. They even took on Amicus Productions was disbanded after a Gothic Horror with And Now the Screaming 13 year run. Rosenberg continued to proStarts and I, Monster, an unauthorized version duce other types of movies but Subotsky of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde but they were not stayed with horror retreating to Canada to nearly as profitable as the anthology films. make The Uncanny (1977) and then back While the Amicus films were successful, to England for The Monster Club (1981). they were never quite as successful as the Both movies were pale imitations of the Hammer films with one notable exception. original Amicus anthologies. Tales from the Crypt, which boasted an allYet like any good horror protagonist, star cast including Ralph Richardson, Peter Amicus refused to die. Thanks to TV Cushing, Richard Greene, and a pre-Dynasty showings in the 1980s and the emerJoan Collins (urban legend has it that it was gence of home video, their films are still her appearance in this film that got her the Dyout there to be enjoyed. Now the film nasty gig), was a runaway hit in the U.K. and that started it all, Dr Terror’s House of especially in America where it took in millions Horrors, is 50 years old and about to be reat the box office, leased on Blu-Ray on October 27th joining A quick follow-up, Vault of Horror which Tales from the Crypt and Vault of Horror. was also based on 1950s horror comics, did not I cut my critical teeth on the Amicus movdo as well despite having a cast of bigger names ies and am happy to see them alive and including Curt Jurgens, Terry-Thomas, Glynis well in the 21st century. Johns, and a pre-Doctor Who Tom Baker.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Pawn Sacrifice 

Short Take: Edward Zwick’s biopic on Bobby Fischer and his 1972 World Championship chess matches with Boris Spassky is first rate in all departments and is a must see.

REEL TAKE: Pawn Sacrifice begins by focusing on Fischer’s childhood. It shows the early seeds of paranoia sown by his mother, a Jewish intellectual with Communist sympathies who

was under surveillance by the FBI. The young Bobby was constantly asked to keep an eye out for FBI men. He started playing chess at an early age and by the age of 15 had participated in tournaments and was virtually unbeatable. He was briefly under the tutelage of William Lombardy, a former chess champion who had retired to become a Catholic priest. Most of the rest of the film takes place in Reykjavik, Iceland focusing on the Champi-

onship matches with Boris Spassky. Fischer loses the first game and forfeits the second because he is bothered by cameras and crowd noise. He insists on moving to a back room to play and Spassky, who doesn’t want to win by default, agrees. Fischer won that game and then was willing to go back to the main stage. Game 6, which ended with Spassky applauding Fischer, is considered the greatest chess match ever played.

This basic description of what occurs gives no idea of how skillfully director Edward Zwick makes the game of chess exciting on film. It reminded me of how pool, through great cinematography and crisp editing, became more than just a game in the Paul Newman film The Hustler. But there is way more to Pawn Sacrifice than technical accomplishment. The performances by everyone Movies continued on page 14

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Titles this month feature another one of our most requested films, one of the most popular movies from a few years ago, Rudolph Valentino’s penultimate film, and Deborah Kerr in an adaptation of The Turn of the Screw.

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involved, even the small parts, are exquisite. Tobey Maguire worked for 9 years to bring this movie to the screen and his commitment shows. He captures all of Fischer’s qualities most of which are extremely unpleasant. He’s brilliant, arrogant, obsessive, and clearly paranoid. He also screams at and bullies his friends while treating his opponents with disdain. To say he is unlikeable is an understatement. But Maguire captures the essence of the man in a remarkable performance where the actor disappears and Fischer emerges. However Maguire is not the whole show, far from it. Equally compelling, perhaps even

Boris Spassky (Liev Schreiber) and Bobby Fischer (Tobey Macguire) begin a World Championship match in Pawn Sacrifice.

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more so, is Peter Sarsgaard as Father Bill Lombardy who is Fischer’s mentor, aide at tournaments, and the closest thing to a friend Bobby has. He has nothing but admiration for the chess player but is ultimately appalled at the man’s behavior. Liev Schreiber is given little to do as Spassky but he really makes the most of what he’s given. Director Zwick, who is best remembered for Glory (1989), Blood Diamond (2006) and the TV series Thirtysomething (1987-1991), has turned in his finest work here as far as I’m concerned. He has crafted a remarkable movie that is technically accomplished while never losing sight of the human drama underneath. Movies continued on page 15

October 4: Lost Horizon (1937) Frank Capra’s adaptation of the once popular James Hilton novel about travelers stranded in the magical land of Shangri-La is one of classic Hollywood’s legendary films. This is the recently restored version which includes rediscovered long, lost footage. Ronald Colman stars along with Jane Wyatt and Thomas Mitchell. Directed by Frank Capra. October 11: The Night They

Raided Minsky’s

(1968) One of HFS’s most popular movies returns for an encore. In 1925 a young Amish girl (Britt Ekland) goes to NYC to become a dancer of bible stories but winds up in burlesque instead. The film co-stars Jason Robards, Elliot Gould, and Bert Lahr. Directed by William Friedkin. October 18:

Cobra

(1925) This was Rudolph Valentino’s penultimate film before his untimely death at the age of 31. In it he plays an impoverished Italian count who is brought to America to help run an antiques business. The owner’s wife then sets her roving eye on him. Joining Valentino are Nita Naldi and Gertrude Olmstead. Directed by Joseph Henaberry. October 25:

The Innocents (1961) Deborah Kerr stars in this chilling adaptation of Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw. A 19th century governess, engaged to teach two children, begins to suspect that they are possessed by malevolent spirits. Pamela Franklin and Martin Stephens star as the children, with Michael Redgrave as the absentee guardian. Directed by Jack Clayton.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Tales from the Crypt”

October DVD Picks

Tales from the Crypt / Vault of Horror (1973)

Actually it’s a Blu-Ray pick as the DVD of this double feature contains the TV print of Vault of Horror which is sloppily (and I do mean sloppily) censored. For those of you without Blu-Ray players, the DVD will have to do but at least Tales from the Crypt, which is the main attraction here, is unaffected. Amicus Productions (see article this issue) was a British film company that specialized in horror anthologies. While these are not the best of the lot, they make an ideal introduction to the world of Amicus for those unfamiliar with their movies. Tales from the Crypt, in fact, was the most successful film the company ever made. Crypt begins with 5 people on a tour of some catacombs who lose their way and find themselves in a stone chamber where a monk (the Crypt Keeper to those of you familiar with the source comics or the later HBO show) regales them with deep, dark secrets from their lives. Each person has done something wrong that leads to a bad end but that’s only the beginning. The Brits loved these multi-story horror films and had no qualms whatsoever about appearing in them. Crypt features an unusually strong cast that includes Joan Collins, Richard Greene, Peter Cushing, as well as British stage legend Sir Ralph Richardson as the Keeper. All of the stories are good but the third with Peter Cushing and his Valentine’s Day revenge is outstanding. Vault of Horror was an immediate follow-up trying to cash in on the success of Crypt. It too used the 1950s EC Horror Comics as the source of its stories and had another strong cast including Curt Jurgens, Terry-Thomas, Glynis Johns, and a preDoctor Who Tom Baker. While there were some good stories here too, Vault didn’t fare as well as horror fans’ tastes were

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changing thanks to The Exorcist. Unlike their chief competitor, Hammer Films, whose movies were very stylish, Amicus Productions were noted for their wit as well as their style and for committed performances no matter how absurd the plots or how low-tech the special effects were. Those who like their horror straight may feel as if they have strayed into the nether regions but Anglophiles and old school aficionados will find themselves in horror heaven.

Child 44 (2015)

Later this fall British actor Tom Hardy will star as London’s legendary twin gangster brothers Reggie and Ronnie Kray. Aptly named Legend, early notices are strong and it’s looking like Hardy may even nab a nomination. In the meanwhile I thought I’d recommend a film that Hardy starred in earlier this year, but went by with little notice, and was recently released on DVD. Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House and Easy Money) and based on the novel by Tom Rob Smith, Child 44 is a historical thriller based in 1950s Russia in the brutal days of Stalinism. Leo Demidov (Tom Hardy) is a war hero and MGB agent. On the surface he is the picture perfect exactor of Stalinistic Russia. Below the surface hides a Ukrainian orphan, a man who upholds the tenants of Stalinism as a means of survival only. Leo is terribly in love with his wife Raisa (Noomi Rapace), a school

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Child 44” teacher who seems to only thinly veil her contempt of Stalinism and her husband. When his best friend’s son (his own godson) is found dead near a train track, hushed rumors of murder swirl. When his wife is accused of being a traitor, he refuses to denounce her. Leo’s carefully crafted and curated world is turned upside down and they are exiled to a bleak industrial outpost run by General Mikhail Nesterov (Gary Oldman). There Leo discovers a series of deaths, all matching his godson’s. What ensues is the hunt for a serial killer, the desperate attempt to prove corruption among MGB officer ranks and the opportunity to win his wife’s love. Sounds pretty good – so what’s wrong with it? It’s a hot mess. As I watched the multifaceted story unfold, I thought, this must have been an amazing book. The difficult task adapting a book for big screen is streamlining a book for feature film. Here Espinosa and his screenwriters tried to include way, way, way too much of the book in the film. It’s too long, there way too many things going on, the pacing is off, and the accents are all over the map. But here’s the kicker, the fact that any of it worked, in spite of everything it had going against it, means it’s really quite good. It also had more staying power than the average film. The grim portrait it paints of that era in Russian history is fascinating to those of us that can’t imagine living in such a society. Hardy has worked with several of the other cast members in previous films, and this works well for the film, especially the re-teaming of him with Noomi Rapace (they starred in The Drop together – one of my favorite films of 2014). Their relationship is one of the many elements of story that makes Child 44 worthwhile and actually quite good.


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film reviews The performances by a cast of unknowns (especially DeJonge) are great and the screenplay is well written. The movie was made on a micro budget of $5 million and Shyamalan has talked about how liberating it was to focus only on story and character rather than technical things. Rod Serling would be pleased.

Movies continued from page 14

A highlight is his incorporation of period clips of the 1960s and 70s placing the Championship within the context of its time. The icing on the cake is a remarkably taut screenplay from Stephen Knight (Locke). Pawn Sacrifice is being marketed as an art house movie which it certainly qualifies as but it really deserves a mainstream release as it is tense and exciting and would play well to just about any type of audience. Come Oscar time I hope to see the film come out with numerous nominations. It’s already in my Top 10 list for the year and I don’t see it dropping out. It’s that good so go see it but do it quickly as I don’t expect it to be around very long which is a real shame. Rated PG-13 for brief strong language and some sexual content. Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Visit 

Short Take: M. Night Shyamalan returns to form with this low budget children-in-peril thriller which has its share of scares but is not a horror film.

REEL TAKE: I’ve never been one to jump on the let’s-bash-M.-Night-Shyamalan bandwagon. Shyamalan was unfortunate enough to have a monster hit early in his career with The Sixth Sense and ever since then, studios, critics, and audiences have wanted him to produce another. Once it became clear that he wasn’t going to, they abandoned him right and left. While his follow-up movies have been a mixed bag, I have always been able to find some merit in them whether it be in Mel Gibson’s performance in Signs or the central idea of Nature fighting back in The Happening. Until his last two big budget failures The Last Airbender and After Earth, the focus in Shyamalan’s films had been his writing, for he is the 21st century Rod Serling. Most of his films play like extended Twilight Zone episodes with twist endings and/or a moral to be drawn from the proceedings. The Visit marks a return to form and is the latest variation on the children-in-peril theme that goes all the way back to Hansel & Gretel. There is a twist, of course, but unlike The Sixth Sense, this twist is expected and it is that very expectation that makes the film as effective as it is. We can pretty much guess what it is early on but we just don’t know how it’s going to play out. In addition to Hansel & Gretel there are also elements of Little Red Riding Hood. The story is Fairy Tale 101. Two children go to visit their grandparents whom they have never seen. Once there, a series of events unfold that place them in greater and greater danger. Finally in a welcome reversal of roles, it is the girl rather than the boy who takes charge and tries to save them. Gifted 15 year old Becca (Olivia DeJonge) has decided that she is going to make a video documentary of the trip for their single

Rated PG-13 for disturbing content including violence and brief nudity. Review by Chip Kaufmann A frightened mother informs her children that things are definitely not what they should be in The Visit.

mother (Kathryn Hahn) who hasn’t seen her parents since she ran away from home when she was 19. Her 12 year old brother Tyler (Ed Oxenbould) is precocious, has a dream of becoming a rapper, and has serious germ issues. They are met with open arms by their grandparents (Deanna Dunagan & Peter McRobbie) who live in a small Pennsylvania town. At first everything is fine but you just know that that’s not going to last. Slowly the grandparents begin exhibiting some rather bizarre behavior and things go from good to bad to worse. We get to see Becca rise to the occasion as she tries to figure out ways to keep them safe and then find a way for she and her brother to escape. All the while she continues making her documentary, making The Visit a film within a film. This allows Shyamalan the opportunity to poke fun at the “found footage’ form of horror film which is currently so popular. There is a great deal of humor in The Visit which only adds to the tension when the serious parts return. While there are a few genuine scares, mostly of the old school variety (sudden loud noises, quick edits, ominous music), the movie is not a horror film but an old dark house thriller in modern guise.

October 6: A Man of No Importance

Coming Soon to a Theatre Near You! We think the following titles, on screens this month, may be of interest: Ridley Scott’s The Martian; starring Matt Damon; the drug war drama, Sicario, starring Emily Blunt, Benicio Del Toro, and Josh Brolin; Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies, starring Tom Hanks; Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson’s Peak; Joe Wright’s Peter Pan prequel, Pan; Barry Levinson’s Rock The Kasbah with Bill Murray; and, Suffragette, a story of the early feminist movement for the Masterpiece Theatre crowd, starring Helena Bonham Carter, Carey Mulligan, and Meryl Streep. The Asheville Film Society pays tribute to Wes Craven during its Thursday Night Horror Show with A Nightmare on Elm Street and The People Under The Stairs. The Hendersonville Film Society has a terrific lineup for October including one of Rudolph Valentino’s last films Cobra, Frank Capra’s Lost Horizons, and William Friedkin’s The Night They Raided Minsky’s. For its Halloween offering HFS will screen The Innocents, a chilling tale with Deborah Kerr.

THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW Free horror movies, every Thursday night at 8 p.m., at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. October 1: A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) Several people are hunted by a cruel serial killer who kills his victims in their dreams. Stars Heather Langenkamp, Johnny Depp and Robert Englund. Directed by Wes Craven. October 8: The People Under the Stairs (1991) Burglars break into a house occupied by a brother and sister and their stolen children and can’t escape. Stars Brandon Quentin Adams, Everett McGill and Wendy Robie. Directed by Wes Craven. October 15: The Brood (1979) A series of brutal attacks committed by a brood of mutant children coincides with

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the Society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special Members Only events and screenings.

a man’s investigation of his institutionalized wife’s unconventional psychologist. Stars Oliver Reed, Samantha Egger and Art Hindle. Directed by David Cronenberg. October 22:

Gojira (Godzilla) (1954) American nuclear weapons testing results in the creation of a seemingly unstoppable, dinosaurlike beast. Stars Takashi Shimura, Akihito Hirata and Akira Takarata. Directed by Ishiro Honda. October 29: The Sentinel (1977) A fashion model moves into an apartment, where scary occurrences turn into a much more frightening turn of events. Stars Christina Raines, Ava Gardner and Chris Sarandon. Directed by Michael Winner.

(1994) Alfie Byrne is a middle-aged bus conductor in Dublin in 1963. Gay, but deeply closeted, his hobbies are Oscar Wilde and putting on amateur theatre productions in the local church hall. Stars Albert Finney, Brenda Fricker and Michael Gambon. Directed by Suri Krishnamma. October 13:

Lonesome

(1928) Two lonely people in the big city meet and enjoy the thrills of an amusement park, only to lose each other in the crowd after spending one great day together. Stars Barbara Kent, Glenn Tryon and Fay Holderness. Directed by Paul Fejos. October 20: International House (1933) Assorted wacky characters converge on a Chinese hotel to bid on a new invention – television! Stars W.C. Fields, Peggy Hopkins Joyce and Rudy Vallee. Directed by A. Edward Sutherland. October 27:

The Ghost Breakers

(1940) A radio broadcaster, his quaking manservant and an heiress investigate the mystery of a haunted castle in Cuba. Stars Bob Hope, Paulette Goddard and Richard Carlson. Directed by George Marshall.

BUDGET BIG SCREEN FEATURE Tickets: $6 for AFS members, $8 general October 21: The Exorcist (1973) When a teenage girl is possessed by a mysterious entity, her mother seeks the help of two priests to save her daughter. Stars Ellen Burstyn, Max Von Sidow and Linda Blair. Directed by William Friedkin.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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Everybody loves a party, especially one filled to overflowing with creativity and entertainment, great food, enchanting libations, cool costumes, and amazing art and music! This year’s color theme is Onyx! From decor to cocktails and even the guests, the entire evening is saturated with the theme color. The Color Ball features live painting and performances like you’ve never seen before in Asheville! From musical and dance performances to acrobatics and face-painting, the excitement of this arts-filled event is palpable. The Onyx Ball will also present a special performance by local band Zansa! The Asheville-based ensemble melds modern afropop with African folk music, African drumming, and the fiery dance-oriented Ivorian street music called Zouglou. IF YOU The Onyx Ball, Saturday, GO October 31 from 6:30 p.m.

to 12:30 a.m. VIP Reception 5:45-6:30 p.m. Tickets: $35; $100 VIP. The Masonic Temple, 80 Broadway St., Asheville. For more information, visit www.ashevillearts.com

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A Sense of Weightlessness

2015 Onyx Ball

A Magical Masquerade

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AND THE SPECIAL IN THE EVERYDAY

I recently tore myself away from re-watching the Star Wars series (because I needed some power converters!) to join friends at the Buncombe County Fair, a venue I had not attended since I was a tourist. The 1950s timelessness of the fair is barely breached by 21st century clues, like how everyone’s holding a cell phone. Amidst the calliope music, there’s kids clutching ride tickets, people throwing round objects at small objects in order to win large objects, farm animal judging, food on sticks, kids shrieking on rides. And there’s a certain look to a Funnel Cake stand that is akin to the glow of a Vegas casino. Even though I associate these things with my childhood, it looked this way in my father’s time, too. All senses are engaged; one of my main visual takeaways are the rows of lights on everything. Around the words “Funnel Cake” are bulbs that look like they could direct planes landing on runways in heavy fog. The very few rides I could watch or be convinced to go on heightened my senses, as well. If you are like me – and by this I mean you are TERRIFIED of heights – even the simple Ferris Wheel is a Spinning Disc of Angst. However, because I ever-strive to be just slightly not That Guy, I got in line. You know that moment when it crests the top and you can’t see anything but the horizon?

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It’s pretty awesome. And then there was… The Cyclops. My adventurism must have been bolstered by a huge, sugary, lemonade made by a person who lived and worked inside a giant, lidded lemon (“Citrus-ella”? “Hansel & Gretal-Ade”?). The Cyclops is a giant, 25-person-snaring, hovering claw that spins, swings and hits a spot in the stratosphere where, I’m pretty sure, planes try to avoid it. As it reached that point where I thought I was going to die (although I was admirably stoic), I suddenly entered that mental space somewhere between extreme anxiety and caring not a hoot, living a lifetime in a moment of floating weightlessness. As time froze for a second, I looked down toward the ground, and everything was crystal-clear, like an old snapshot. That zone is kinda the same space I go into when doing things I love to do. Many artists

Of Time and The River

Artists interpret the French Broad through drawing and painting, much of it from direct observation.

evolution of the creative process. It’s that theme, says RiverLink founder and executive director Karen Cragnolin, that closely parallels the recovery and growth of the RiverLink invites French Broad alongside you to a showing of this Asheville’s arts scene. artistic inspiration and exThe opening event Riverside Rail, by John Mac Kah clusive sale of the works. takes place Thursday, Featuring the work of area October 15, from 6-9 p.m. at Sol’s Reprieve, artists, including John Mac Kah, Christine a former church overlooking the river — the Enochs, Paul Blankinship, Mark Henry, same location as last year’s show. A portion of Dana Irwin, Nicholas Raynolds, Jason Rafproceeds from art sales will go to Riverlink. ferty, Julyan Davis, Caleb Clark, Matthew The art will hang from October 15-18 at Good, Robert Johnson, John Dempsey, Sol’s Reprieve, which is open to the public Roger Nelson, Deborah Squier, Skip Rohde, Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Bryan Koontz, Forrest Hogestad, Luke Allsbrook, and Alisa Lumbreras. Exclusively at the October 15 opening, there will be a display of historic art and IF YOU Of Time & the River opening gala, artifacts of the French Broad River. Enjoy GO October 15 from 6-9 p.m. Tickets heavy hors d’oeuvres donated by Whole Foods for the gala are $65; $50 for Riverlink Market, and refreshments by New Belgium Members. Visit riverlink.org for details. Brewing Co., and Biltmore Wine. Sol’s Reprieve is located at 11 Richland St., at Both the event and its title are inspired by the corner of Craven St. and Waynesville Ave., Thomas Wolfe’s 1935 fictionalized autobiograacross the street from the New Belgium Brewery phy that examines the passing of time and the in Asheville’s River Arts District.

16 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

Weightlessness, 2015, NC County Fair photo by Greg Vineyard

describe a loss of a sense of time, where one even forgets to eat (Although that part is rare for me. What can I say, I like snacks.). I believe this happens in any profession, hobby or passion. It’s like creative time travel. The fair reminded me that seeking stimuli can help us to push the edges a bit now and then, where we find these regions by being thrown (screaming) into them. Terror transforming into acceptance of one’s fate has a useful elegance: you tap into something fleeting, and special. Sometimes it takes a few gyrations of a crazy mechanical gadget to get to that point. Is the chasing of extremes worth it? Perhaps now and then, but since the fair only comes to town once a year, it’s also key to seek out the special in the everyday. Infrequent pinnacle experiences can accentuate the chasms between manufactured highs. So, finding joy in daily, small moments is important fuel, too. A cashiers’ friendly chatter, that weird rabbit that’s always in my driveway, seeing somebody doing a good deed… anything encountered in a day can trigger bliss and serenity that’s as thrilling a feeling as The Cyclops. They are the rides in our minds. The timelessness of the fair tells me we can transcend fixed points in time, and enter our creative worlds by leaning into sensememories as we gaze upon the next blank sheet of paper. But it does help to brave the Ferris Wheel once in a while. And, besides, you can see ALL the Funnel Cake stands from up there.

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com


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Richard Baker Fine Artist

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Observers of Richard Baker’s artwork cannot help but notice the masterful capture of light, atmosphere and detail. Besides portraits and figurative work, there are his landscapes depicting the radiant light, rolling landscapes and glistening waters of the southern Appalachian Mountains. With an unerring eye for detail, Baker paints air, light and water that move together. The air in his paintings breathes with the humid stillness of a summer day or the clear freshness of an autumn afternoon. The light mesmerizes – from streaming sun rays to soft moon glow, from campfire to fireflies. Light dances upon his

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water whether it be a mountain waterfall or the placid waters of the French Broad. A disciple of the Hudson River School Melrose Station, by Richard Baker art movement, Baker finds new Self-taught and an artist from a ways of challenging himself with every young age, he has earned the admirapainting. His is professionalism born out tion of fellow artists, art professors, of passion. “I paint to live,” attests the collectors and art-lovers alike. biographical statement displayed at his River Arts District studio.

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Still Standing, by Richard Baker

ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

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Radiant light, rolling landscapes, and glistening water.

Bear Camp, by Richard Baker

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More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

French Broad Artists

The Richard Baker Studio, open most days, is located in RAD’s Pink Dog Creative at 344 Depot St., Asheville. For more information about seeing, acquiring or commissioning a work of art, call (828) 234-1616 or visit RichardBakersStudio.com.

SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS FINE ART STUDIO IN THE

RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

Autumn Splendor - S&W Cafeteria, 14 x 18 in. watercolor by Sandra Brugh Moore

Exhibition of Fall Colors, paintings by Moore, Fakhoury, and Pendergrass, continues through October.

Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

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Riverview Station #216, South Entrance

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191 Lyman St • Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Local Color on Display at Weaverville Art Safari

Michael Hatch

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fine arts & crafts

Held October 24-25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., this bi-annual event is a treasured tradition among locals and tourists alike. Nestled among the Blue Ridge Mountains, various studios open their doors for an exclusive look at the artistic process. “Creativity abounds in our area, and our artists love to show off what they do and how they do it,” says Cindy Ireland, 2015 Art Safari President. A fresh break from the traditional art shows and studio strolls, this bi-annual event provides the unique opportunity to discover the inspiration behind each piece, meet acclaimed artists, and see the methods behind the final creation. A number of the exhibitors will give away door prizes and offer educational demonstrations for their visitors. “I love seeing visitors from previous Art Safaris and also newbies to the area, who are experiencing the Safari for the first time,” says ceramic artist, Steven Forbes-deSoule, who will exhibit at the Ox Creek Community Center for the first time. This year’s free event boasts 41 artists who specialize in handmade pottery, glass, photography, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, painting, drawing, fiber art, and more. Best of all, the structure of the event allows guests to explore the artist community at their own pace. Suggested routes are included in the tour map, but guests often pause along the way to admire fall color and experience the unique communities nestled outside of Asheville.

100 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

18 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

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When fall arrives in Western North Carolina, the town of Weaverville, NC, showcases local color with the Weaverville Art Safari.

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Carla Fillippeli

A special preview party and fundraiser at the Weaverville Town Hall kicks off the event on Friday evening, October 23, and is open to the public. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and includes live music, door prizes, hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, desserts, and more. The highlight of the evening is a silent auction featuring art works donated by each participating artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. Event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari tours, and promote the arts and community in the Weaverville area. The goal is to expose

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STEVEN FORBES-DESOULE

A Natural Rhythm by Darrell Copeland

Lamps by Leah Baker

Grande Pear #2 by Steven ForbesdeSoule

locals and visitors alike to some of the most talented artists in the area. Guests looking to plan their visit can pick up Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information at greater Asheville-area galleries, restaurants, and shops beginning in April. Brochures will also be distributed from an Art Safari information booth located on Main Street in Weaverville on October 24 and 25. A brochure with map and additional details is available at www. weavervilleartsafari.com. The Weaverville Art Safari is staged twice each year—the first full weekend in May and the last full weekend in October—by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001. Since then thousands of people have returned each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience.

IF YOU Weaverville Art Safari, October GO 24-25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both

days. Preview party and fundraiser at Weaverville Town Hall on Friday, October 23 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. Full details and maps available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com


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fine arts & crafts Tourmaline: October’s Traditional Birthstone

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As autumn descends and local mountains surge with radiant color, goldsmith and award winning jewelry designer Susan Marie Phipps is inspired to create some of her most beautiful work. talented, creative people and all the natural beauty. As an artist I am able to draw on so much positive energy here”, she relates. Susan’s primary focus as a jewelry artist is to create elegant contemporary designs which complement the fine natural colored gemstones she selects for her work. A GIA Graduate Gemologist, she has the technical training to know which stones have the best clarity, color and quality of cut available from around the world. “For me the stone drives the design,” explains Susan. “Whenever I find a gemstone I like I design for it. I am always at my creative best when I am most in awe of the materials with which I am working.” Carefully hand making each piece, she draws on classical principles of balance and proportion to perfectly Tourmaline Ring harmonize the colors, by Susan Marie Phipps shapes and textures of

Her love of the Blue Ridge Mountains dates from the early 1980’s, when she journeyed from Ohio to study metalsmithing at the Penland School of Crafts. Later settling in Asheville, she became a member of the Southern Highlands Craft Guild in 1996. Now in her thirty-fifth year as a goldsmith, Susan never stops being inspired by the local culture and splendid mountain scenery. “We’re lucky to live in such a wonderful area with so many

Pendant by Susan Marie Phipps

gold and precious stones. One of Susan’s favorite gemstones to work with is October’s traditional birthstone, Tourmaline. Found in more hues than any other gemstone, Tourmaline often displays two or more colors in the same crystal. Susan always has a wide variety of one-of-a-kind Tourmaline jewelry on display at Susan Elegant and colorful pendant by Susan Marie Phipps Marie Designs, her downtown Asheville gallery/stufor an engagement ring,” asks Susan. “You dio. Luscious mint and emerald greens, blues, can have a purple Sapphire! Sapphire is one teal, intense pink, red, yellow, and bi-colored of nature’s most durable substances, second examples may all be seen, many cut by award to Diamond in hardness, so they are ideal for winning stonecutters. An exceptional ring use where heavy wear might be a factor, such which Susan recently created features a rare as in rings. And of course Diamonds can still vibrant green Tourmaline mined in the Havey be used with them as accents. It’s nice to have Mine in Maine. something special that no one else has, that Another stone she loves using is Sapphire, found in nature in many colors in addition to continued on page 39 blue. “Who says you need to have a Diamond

Jane Desonier – Painting the Mountains

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“Mountains are a very powerful image for me. “They are my answer to the stress of modern life. Mountains are where I go for peace, and it is this overwhelming feeling of strength and calm that I want to express in my oil paintings. Other common themes in my art are roads and streams. They seem to be inviting the viewer to travel with the artist. Where is it leading? What is waiting around the bend?” “I live in a wonderful place and have the luck to have a panoramic view of the mountains and the changing sky above them from my home.”

Autumn Parade, painting by Jane Desonier

“It is a constant inspiration, and I want my work to convey the passion I feel for this natural world.” Before moving to the Colorful Parking, painting by mountains, Jane Colvin Jane Desonier Desonier lived in Louisiana where she earned a BA in Fine Arts from the University of New Orleans and later received classical training at the New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts. Jane has studied at the Scottsdale Artists’ School and is a member of the prestigious Oil Painters of America.

Jane Desonier currently shows her paintings at the Asheville Gallery of Art and the Carlton Gallery in Banner Elk, NC. Fine artist, Jane Desonier.

Her work can also be viewed at www.janedesonier.com.

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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

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16 College Street, Downtown Asheville 828.251.5796 • www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

JUDY RENTNER

OPENING

Friday, October 2 Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

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Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville, NC Northlight Studios, 357 Depot Street, Asheville, NC Seven Seve Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC

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Mahogany House Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville, NC

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Works on display at Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 Patton, Asheville, and at Twigs & Leaves Gallery, Downtown Waynesville View online at ashevillegallery-of-art.com • Judyart@bellsouth.net

Up Against the Wall Gallery 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

828-450-1104

www.Cher ylKeefer.com

JANE DESONIER

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On display at the Asheville Gallery of Art Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

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www.joycepaints.com

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joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

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Not the building, or the kitchen, but she is painting a canvas en plein air at Cafe 64, two Saturdays in October. Keefer’s luscious local plein air landscapes and rainy street scenes of Asheville, have been likened to the Impressionists who painted outdoors in Europe, and even here in the United States during the late 19th century. Taking oils outdoors became possible during that time with the technology that made paint available in tubes. Cafe 64, located at 64 Haywood Road in downPainting by Cheryl Keefer town Asheville, is a favorite breakfast and lunch spot for locals in the area. The food is fresh, delicious, and always served with the unique flair of owner Gary Taylor. Like many cafés in Paris, Venice, and Asheville, there are a few small tables out front for street-side dining. Keefer will be painting on Saturday, October 3 and Saturday, October 17. Keefer’s impressionistic oil and watercolor paintings have won awards throughout the country. Her

janedesonier@aol.com 828-281-3577

Featuring a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums, and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

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Cheryl Keefer is painting Cafe 64!

Works on display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Carlton Gallery, Banner Elk, NC pg. 21

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Cheryl Keefer Paints the Town, and Cafe 64

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Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Asheville Gallery of Art will feature the work of Judy Rentner during the month of October.

IF YOU GO: Opening reception Friday, October 2 from 5 to 8 p.m. On display October 1-31. Open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 4 p.m.

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Her show, titled “Fall Light,” will feature landscapes in oil using the palette knife. Says Rentner, “This exhibit reflects my excitement in painting the beauty of North Carolina, and I hope, through these creations, one can glimpse the creator Himself.”

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Zombie Unicorns

‘Cheryl Keefer’ cont’d from page 20

work en plein air includes weddings and events, cityscapes and landscapes from the Appalachian Mountains to the lowlands and beyond. Keefer holds degrees in art history and art education from the University of Alabama, with Graduate Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University. She currently lives in Black Mountain.

Saturday, October 17 BEER! Art inspired by the beer culture of Asheville as well as a label contest for Asheville Brewing’s forthcoming beer, Zombie Unicorn. Opening reception from 7-9 p.m. at ZaPow!, 21 Battery Park in downtown Asheville. On display October 17 - November 30, 2015. Pick the best Zombie Unicorn at zapow.com.

Visit www.CherylKeefer.com Find Cheryl Keefer’s work at: Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street, Asheville

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Northlight Studios 357 Depot Street, Asheville

v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts

Seven Sisters Gallery 117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain

v Jewelry Repair

Up Against the Wall Gallery 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

Illustration and Pop Culture Art

29 Biltmore Ave.

21 Battery Park • zapow.com

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

(828) 281-4044

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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Celebrating 17 Years! Representing 145+ Artists, Primarily from Our Region

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

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Joyce Schlapkohl

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Western NC provides such a variety of beautiful subjects to paint. It is always a wonderful decision deciding what to paint—landscape, animals, still life, or architectural subjects. Primarily I’m interested in how the light illuminates these subjects. Capturing the light brings out the color and gives movement and depth to any painting. My style in oil is about relating to the viewer, and the use of realism in a painterly approach. The desire and discipline to paint is an endless and gratifying pursuit that’s never ending. I hope you will come to my Deer Run Studio on October 23 or 24 during the Open Studio days in Waynesville. It’s a wonderful time to share with friends who are interested in art.

Featured Artist, Jenny Buckner Demonstration & Reception, 6-9PM during

Art After Dark, Friday, October 2 pg. 24

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

Rick’s Dahlias by Joyce Schlapkohl

DuPont Falls, painting by Joyce Schlapkohl

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com (828) 456-4600

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

Burr Studio

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Step through the bright purple doors of Burr Studio and you’ll find an array of unique art and craft. “We look for the unusual,” says owner MaryEtta Burr. Over half of the offerings are from local and regional artisans. Burr Studio is also committed to all American made items. Fun and funky, inspiring and tranquil, Burr Studio in downtown Waynesville truly has something for everyone. We welcome you to come in and say hello and enjoy your time surrounded by engaging and lovely works of art and craft.

Something for everyone!

Journals by artist Becki Kollat

Burr Studio 136 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC (828) 456-7400

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Studio Now Open at the Mahogany House Gallery

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A self-guided driving tour of artist studios and creative centers in Haywood County. The 2015 Haywood Art Studio Tour includes 38 artists at 22 locations in central and north-central Haywood County. A wide range of artistic enKaaren Stoner deavors in all media and many expressions within each media category will be available for the public to experience. The tour will include nine clay artists, two fiber artists, nine wood artists, three jewelry artists, two glass artists, and seven two-dimensional artists working in watercolor, acrylic, oil, encaustic, and gold and silver leaf.

Pottery, Beginner Wheel Throwing Classes, WU Demonstrations

pg. 24

240 Depot Street • Frog Level • Waynesville, NC

MOOSE CROSSING’S  

BURL WOOD GALLERY CUSTOM ~ LIVE EDGE ~ FURNISHINGS

AWARD WINNING Designs in AMERICAN Burl Wood Bench by Gernandt

Four mixed-media artists use a wide range of materials including wood, steel, leather, gourds, natural materials, paper, encaustic and clay. Two sculpture artists complete the roster making large scale steel sculptures and surrealistic construction incorporating found objects. Brochures of the tour, including maps, may be picked up at Haywood County Arts Council Gallery & Gifts on Main Street, and Art on Depot and Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden on Depot Street in Waynesville.

184 N. Main St.

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828-452-2550 www.burlgallery.com

October 2015 featured artists

ZOLTAN KOLLAT cold wax painter

BECKI KOLLAT journal artist

O n display through October

IF YOU Haywood Art Studio Tour, Friday, GO October 23, 10 to 5 p.m., and

Saturday, October 24, 10 to 5 p.m. Phone the Haywood County Arts Council for more information, (828) 452-0593. Maps are available at www.haywoodarts.org. Studio Tour Show on display October 1-29 at Haywood County Arts Council Gallery & Gifts, 86 North Main Street, Waynesville. Opening reception Friday, October 2 from 5 to 9 p.m. during Art After Dark. Gallery hours: Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Downtown Waynesville

Meet the artists during Art After Dark, Friday, October 2 from 6-9PM

Burr Studio

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GALLERY OF AMERICAN ART & CRAFT

136 N. Main Street • Waynesville • 828-456-7400 Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 23


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McLain Pottery

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Veterinary Hospital

Dan McLain is an up and coming ceramic artist from Bakersville, NC.

• • • • • • •

Wellness Care Laser Therapy Digital Dental X-Ray Surgery Pain Management Boarding for Cats and Dogs Day Camp with Supervised Group Play for Dogs • Grooming

He started working with his hands in the medical profession, then changed gears once he found his love for making pottery. Dan McLain is now opening a studio at the Mahogany House in Waynesville. Says McLain, “I had been working in the surgery department for the past thirty years and began making pots for stress relief. I realized that this was what I wanted to do. I was soon training under some of the finest potters in Western North Carolina. I was making more pots than I had room for and began selling them. After many years of participating in a festival here or there, because the hospital schedule always took priority over anything else, I just didn’t have time to balance the two. “After moving to Clyde, I met Teri at the Mahogany House and she made me an offer I couldn’t refuse — studio space. Now I can give my pottery my full focus. “I studied with some fine potters in the early years. I

Dr. Brian H. Birthright, DVM

Pottery by Dan McLain.

was able to take some of their styles and modify them to become my own. I like to take plain cylinders or bowls and alter their forms to give life and character to each pot. I apply the glazes with a brush so I can layer different colors and designs that you wouldn’t get by dipping your pot into a bucket of glaze. When asked about his plans for the future, McLain shared, “One thing I am excited about is teaching classes. I hope to share with my students the satisfaction you get from creating pottery with your own hands. I hope that they will find joy making their own style of pottery.” IF YOU McLain Pottery demonstration, Friday, October 2 GO from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Mahogany House Gallery, 240

Depot Street, Frog Level, Waynesville.

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www.mapletreevet.com

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Joyce Guyer in Concert

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On Friday, October 23, BY LINDSEY SOLOMON renowned soprano and Waynesville resident, Joyce Guyer will perform a benefit concert at Grace in the Mountains Episcopal Church for the Haywood County Arts Council.

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Open Monday - Saturday • 828-452-5211

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Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

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Kathy Geyer McNeil, wellknown local pianist, will be the assisting artist. The program will be a celebration of song, with an Oktoberfest Liederabend theme, including not only German songs, but French, Italian, Spanish and American song selections. Joyce Guyer is known for her versatility on both the operatic and Joyce Guyer, concert stage throughout the U.S. Soprano. and in Europe. Tickets are available for $25 each, and benefit the Haywood County Arts Council. IF YOU To purchase tickets, please call (828) 452-0593 or GO visit the Haywood County Arts Council Gallery

& Gifts on Main Street in downtown Waynesville. Visit HaywoodArts.org.


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The nights are getting cooler, and in the air an anticipation of celebration, making it a perfect time to visit our beautiful mountain town. The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present the October edition of Art After Dark on Friday, October 2. Art After Dark transforms downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center, making it a perfect night to explore downtown’s galleries, restaurants and gift-shops. Festive Art After Dark flags designate participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery & Gifts, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, the Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, the Mahogany House, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing’s

Works by Jenny Buckner are on display at Twigs & Leaves Gallery.

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Join Becki and Zoltan for refreshments from 6-10 on Friday, October 2. Burl Wood Gallery. OcThe Jeweler’s tober offers a wonderful Workbench will be variety of artists and mehosting Q Evon, diums to explore, includa local artist from ing demonstrations. Weaverville, as their Twigs and Leaves featured artist. Stop Gallery will be featuring by for complimentary renowned painter, Jenny wine and live music. Buckner. Known for her Moose Crossing fanciful animals, magiBurl Wood Gallery cally captured with oil is expanding to 180 on canvas, Waynesville’s N. Main with the Jenny Buckner will be addition of a Custom demonstrating at Twigs Design Studio: Burl, and Leaves Gallery during The Songs of Christmas. Live Edge, FreeArt After Dark Friday, Prints, cards, puzzles, and form Furniture and October 2 from 6-9 p.m. ornaments available at Accents. Let them As a unique and popuT. Pennington Art Gallery. design a “green” lar artist, Jenny’s presence piece of furniture for in the gallery is highly anyou. Hand crafted of American salvaged ticipated. Come join in on the celebration wood. They source the “best of the best” of the gallery’s 17th year on Main Street. American figured wood, since 1972. Friday evening, as you stroll through the The Village Framer presents the work gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, of Sylvia Cabrera, skilled in multimedia, enjoy piano music and indulge in the fluid acrylics and oil and wax. Sylvia savory hors d’eurves. Twigs and Leaves explains that her paintings “reflect my Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesreactions to my life’s experiences as they ville. Open Monday through Saturday affect my inner feelings. I paint from the 10-5:30; Sundays, 1-4. (828) 456-1940. imagination. I like to portray feelings of www.twigsandleaves.com. peace, fun and a colorful world.” Surely a T. Pennington Art Gallery is introfeast for the senses! ducing the 2015 St. Nicholas drawing, titled “The Songs of Christmas.” The image is available in puzzles, Christmas IF cards, ornaments and prints, framed YOU Art After Dark, Friday, October and unframed. GO 2, downtown Waynesville. For more details call Twigs and Leaves Burr Studio will feature journal artat (828)456-1940 or find us online at ist Becki Kollat, and cold wax painter, www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com. Zoltan Kollat, for the month of October. BY JEANNIE

SHUCKSTES

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09 One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

pg. 24

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Agritourism in Haywood Blooms with Fall Color!

Just when you think the growing season in Haywood can’t possibly get any more delicious, along comes fig season at Wildcat Ridge Farm in Clyde. Don’t recall seeing “fig season” listed on your calendar or Farmers’ Almanac? Just try telling that to fig lovers and see how far your argument goes! Higo (in Spanish), Figue (in French), Feige (in German), and Fico (in Italian)—figs are appreciated around the world for their delicate flavor while also providing “edible shade” for gardens (both formal and informal). Commonly considered a fruit, figs are actually a flower that is inverted into itself. They have been cultivated for thousands of years. Today, figs are grown to be enjoyed fresh, preserved, baked into cakes or

BY

TINA MASCIARELLI

delicate pastries. Many varieties produce their succulent fruit in the early fall. In Haywood County, no one knows figs better than Chef Ricardo Fernandez and his wife Suzanne, who own and operate Wildcat Ridge Farm in Clyde. Fernandez cultivates and retails a wide variety of gourmet fig trees in containers ranging in size from 4 to 7 feet. Trees can be purchased directly from the farm by appointment. Pick up a FREE copy of our Find Your Adventure! 2015 Agritourism Guide for agritourism locations, including Wildcat Ridge. The Guide also includes a recipe for Grilled Sirloin with fresh Fig Salsa, courtesy of Chef Ricardo Fernandez. Visit BuyHaywood.com for more details.

Fresh figs grown in the Buy Haywood garden from a Kadota tree purchased from Wildcat Ridge Farm.

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Buy Haywood Market Development Project, c/o Haywood Advancement Foundation, 28 Walnut St., Suite 4, Waynesville, NC 28786. (828) 456-3737 www.BuyHaywood.com

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CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Ode To Thinking COMPASS RECORDS

Every once in a while an artist with whom I am unfamiliar comes along and knocks my socks off. Bobby Long is such a voice; brilliant song craft, understated but powerful arrangements, and a clear vision of what it should be, makes Ode To Thinking the disc I’ve most listened to this month. Producer Mark Hallman provides the textural backdrop while Long immerses the listener in a series of vivid portraits of long gone hard, the down and out striving to escape, and the subtle victories that keep us going. “Cold Hearted Lover of Mine” is the standout track but there’s not a song here that isn’t deeply moving and powerfully strummed. And despite its themes of desperation, Ode To Thinking is a remarkably upbeat and hopeful journey. This is what Nashville should be all about, making Bobby Long’s latest an essential purchase. *****

The Blackberry Bushes Stringband

Three Red Feathers

We’re Hyper Local & Super Social! Discount Coupons ✿ Contests

Keep up with Local Arts, Events, Performances, and Festivals. www.facebook.com/ rapidrivermagazine

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In order to whittle down the ever growing stack of discs, I’ll be keeping my reviews to around 200 words, which is much harder than it sounds. Everything here is worth getting, and worth buying at any of our wonderful independently owned record stores. They continue to be part of what makes Asheville great. So off we go!

Bobby Long

Like Us on Facebook

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A charming collection of fiddle/bass/mandolin/banjo and guitar songs that breeze along as gently as a mountain stream, Three Red Feathers is a solid entry into the “old time music by millennial generation musician’s field.” It might lack the punch of the Avett Brothers but Jes Raymond’s lovely voice caresses in all the proper ways while the arrangements are precise yet expansive, giving the songs ample room to breathe while staying on track. The harmonies are simply gorgeous and bassist Forrest Markowitz’s occasional leads provide a bit of welcome vocal muscularity. The title track immediately jumps out but don’t underestimate the delightful “Lady of The Mountains” or “Out on The Western Plains” (one of the album’s two covers.) I’ll admit a bit of indifference to stringband music but Three Red Feathers held my attention throughout repeated listens. Definitely a band to watch. ***1/2

Mr Sun

the people need light

COMPASS RECORDS

A string band super group of sorts, Mr Sun is a collaboration between Turtle Island String Quartet fiddler Darol Anger, vocalist and mandolin wizard Joseph Walsh, Grant Gordy (best known for his extended work with various Dave Grisman

26 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

assemblages), and bassist Ethan Jodziewicz. Given that the band represents three generations it’s no surprise that the collective musical influences are so broad; bluegrass, jazz, gypsy folk, and classical all mixed into one upbeat musical melting pot. The result is an album that is not only impeccably performed but surprisingly playful, as the four bounce around traditional delights such as “Dry & Dusty” and “After You’ve Gone” interspersed between a fine set of originals. Some might consider this as background music, and to be sure it works fine as such. But aspiring musicians would do well to study this with intent, learning a bit about arrangements that entice without encroaching and the importance of placing chemistry before showmanship. ****

Shemekia Copeland Outskirts of Love

ALLIGATOR RECORDS

While the advantage of good DNA should never be underestimated Shemekia Copeland—the daughter of legendary blues guitarist Johnny—has worked her hardest to move beyond her father’s admirable shadow. Seventeen years after her debut she’s established a career that has rightfully placed her as an artist in her own right, one that remains mindful of her achievements while refusing to be constricted by them. Outskirts of Love, her return to Alligator Records after a two album hiatus, is also a return to form, eschewing the jazz/folk experimentations of her recent work and focusing again on contemporary blues. Her sturdy voice and assertive guitar work are well matched to the material herein while producer Oliver Wood—certainly among the most sympathetic collaborators she’s worked with—knows how to best play to Copeland’s strengths. Drawing from a wide range of composers, Copeland and Wood shade each song to the singer’s style without compromising the material’s integrity. She can handle Jesse Winchester’s “Isn’t That So” as deftly as John Fogerty’s “Long as I Can See the Light” and Albert King’s “Wrapped Up in Love Again.” Few singers would have the confidence to interpret such diverse voices and fewer still, the skill to pull it off. With guest appearances by Robert Randolph, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Will Kimbrough, and ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons (on his own 1973 hit “Jesus Just Left Chicago”) Outskirts of Love is sort of a Great American Songbook for the times. It’s also a reminder-if any be needed-that Shemekia Copeland is one of the most fascinating voices of her day, an artist whose resilience and creative spunk has few rivals. ****

Kevin Gordon

Long Time Gone

Nashville based roots rocker offers up one of his strongest albums yet, a Kickstarter funded collection that should make every supporter (and I was one) know their money was well spent. Gordon certainly takes his time making records-this is only his sixth in a twenty year span-but his near obsessive attention to lyrical nuance and meticulous sonic texturing makes them worth waiting for; and given that his songs have been covered by such luminaries as Lucinda Williams, Buddy Miller, and Slaid Cleaves you have to figure there’s something going on. Neatly divided into electric and acoustic movements—with the subdued unplugged songs taking up the middle portion—Long Time Gone tenders a fair representation of Gordon’s versatility. “GTO” is a nice chug along Chuck Berry homage that gets the engines revving while the swamp funk of “Church on Time” and “All in the Mystery” showcase the Louisiana born artist’s lineage. Much in the vein of J.J. Cale Gordon’s approach tends to be more compelling than commandeering—the electric tunes are not substantially different in tone than the acoustic ones—which makes Long Time Gone the sort of slow burn effort that requires and deserves repeated spins. Replete with geographical and cultural references to his home state (“Johnny Horton on the radio/ you don’t hear that no more”) it’s as much travelogue as fiction, but Gordon is expert at melding the two into a seamless and timeless pair. 2006’s Cadillac Jack’s # 1 Son might be the Kevin Gordon album I wish to be buried with but if I get to pick two, here’s the other. ****1/2

Gary Clark Jr.

The Story of Sonny Boy Slim WARNER BROTHERS

Continuing a lineage that includes Stevie Ray Vaughn, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, and a host of others, Texas born guitarist Gary Clark, Jr. (whose mentors include Eric Clapton and Jimmie Vaughn) is widely recognized as one of the best axemen of a new generation. But from the start he’s made it clear his ambitions go further than that; his 2012 debut Black and Blue marked him as a neo-traditionalist and while The Story of Sonny Boy Slim demonstrates his six string prowess (jeez can this guy shred!) it’s a concept album in a genre that rarely explores such. Ingredients of hip hop, folk, rock, funk, and gospel all intermingle with blues, set to swirlcontinued on page 27


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ing rhythms of drums and guitars in staggeringly creative fashion. It also delves into issues of racial struggle (“Hold On”) love and betrayal (the acoustic street show “Church”) and infidelity (“Can’t Sleep”) with a depth of perception and swagger that is rarely found today. Those hoping for the second coming of Johnny Winter might be disappointed but Gary Clark Jr. refuses to be bound by conventional Blues idiom in ways that true artists push the margins and continually look forward. This is pretty heavy stuff, a different direction for Clark but one that bodes well for his already bright future. ****

Joe Ely

Panhandle Rambler

RACK ‘EM RECORDS

In a career that has spanned the better part of four decades Lubbock born and raised Joe Ely has remained the consummate Texas Troubadour, an itinerate artist who has played around the world yet remained steadfast to his roots. Panhandle Rambler, his 14th studio album, is a 12 song reflection of that life spent on the road, the “what ifs” of a restless spirit. More sparingly arranged than his last few albums-the stripped down presentation beautifully reflects the austere Lone Star landscape-Texas Panhandle explores a world of broken promises, run down dreams, and the resilient nature of the common class. It’s at once eerie and beautiful, a sweeping sonic panorama of strummed guitars, accordion, and muted drum/bass. Focusing on narrative over affectation, Ely paints portraits of poverty but he does so with grace and compassion. Both the forlorn “Wounded Creek” and “Coyotes Are Howlin’” tell stories as evocative as those of Raymond Chandler while the fiery “Southern Eyes” allows Ely and his band to stretch out a bit. “Here’s to the Weary” name drops some of Ely’s more famous friends, including Guy Clark who’s “Magdalene” Ely covers in fine fashion. As a cohesive entity Panhandle Rambler works on a number of different levels. It ranks high among Joe Ely’s achievements which-for an artist who has always set the bar impossibly high-is as strong a praise as one can give. *****

Clark Patterson

The Final Tradition

Kansas farm boy relocated to Nashville musician Clark Patterson spent years backpacking the world and in the process, by his own words, was “robbed, beaten, and deported.” And while he doesn’t overly dwell on those hard scrabble times, they certainly influence the tone and touch of this first rate collection of what he calls “Grindhouse Country” vignettes. A perceptive witness to the world around him, Patterson is

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Alison Brown likes to tell people she “doesn’t play the banjo, but rather plays music on the banjo.” It’s a subtle distinction but one that marks a different approach between Brown and others: While her mastery of the instrument is unchallenged she understands that unless the playing is in servience to the song it’s all for naught. On the instrumental food chain the five string banjo is a wild beast: defiant, impetuous, and damn near impossible to tame but it’s an instrument that in the hands of the right owner-and Earl Scruggs long ago set the standard-can do wondrous things. Since the days of Flatt And Scruggs thousands of three-finger style banjo players have made their marks, but none has cut such a path or moved so far along it as has Alison Brown. She’s acclaimed as one of today’s finest progressive banjo players, but you’ll rarely find her in a conventional bluegrass setting. Rather she’s known for challenging such conventions, leading an ensemble that successfully blends: folk, jazz, Celtic and Latin into something uniquely hers. With her latest project, The Song of the Banjo (Compass Records) the Grammy Award-winning musician/composer/producer/entrepreneur moves further along her restless journey of sonic exploration. As one might expect from a Harvard-educated MBA and co-founder of the now 20 year old label for which she records, little of what Alison Brown does is randomly designed. The title of her first album since 2009 was carefully considered, emanating from a poem by Rudyard Kipling. Brown chose it for more aesthetic reasons; “It points to the lyrical side of the banjo, which is the side I’m drawn to and one that is often ignored.” Wanting something singular for her first project in six years Brown and her bassist/husband Garry West (who co-founded Compass) assembled an all-star cast, including some of Nashville’s most adventurous session players, as well as special guests Indigo Girls, Keb’ Mo’, label mate Colin Hay, ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, legendary drummer

a terrific songwriter, forceful singer, and one heck of a bandleader. Backed by a quintet of seasoned vets and produced by Eric McConnell-best known for guiding records by Will Kimbrough, Todd Snider, and the legendary Loretta Lynn-Patterson lays out the real deal, songs of unapologetic drinking, stupid choices, and willingness to take his lumps and do it all over again. “Hillbilly Sh*t” is a straight ahead rocker about a war vet who cannot get his act together (and doesn’t seem to care) while “Sweet Baby” has some of the most wry and laugh out loud funniest ruminations (primarily of his own foibles) as you’re likely to hear. Ten solid tunes, not a weak link among

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Steve Gadd, fiddler Stuart Duncan, resophonic guitarist Rob Ickes, upright bassist Todd Phillips and, on guitar and bouzouki, Irish phenom John Doyle. Of the 12 tracks on The Song of the Banjo seven are Brown originals, ranging from the melodic, pop-flavored title track to the piano/banjo duet, “Musette for the Last Fret.” “Stuff Happens,” written by Brown and West, plays wry tribute to Gadd’s old band of studio aces, Stuff, which helped set the bar for ‘70s pop-funk-jazz fusion. There’s that sense of genre hopping and Brown is brashly unapologetic. Her choices for cover songs are equally coy, including Orleans’ soft-rock 1978 hit “Dance With Me” and Cyndi Lauper’s hauntingly beautiful “Time After Time”. There’s even a duet with former Men At Work leader Colin Hay, as the two reinterpret-to great successthe Burt Bacharach penned Dionne Warwick classic “I’ll Never Fall In Love Again”. Brown’s unique cover versions work two very different kinds of magic, revitalizing rock and pop classics while stripping away stereotypes of what a banjo can or can’t do. “Familiar music allows folks to understand an instrument that they may not be overly familiar with” she says. “The banjo is a complex and oft misunderstood instrument, with melodic ideas normally surrounded by rapid fire arpeggiated chords, but when you play a familiar tune it allows the audience to more clearly hear the voice of the instrument, and to understand how the playing style is integrated into, and around, the melody.” That’s the sort of attitude that might distance Bluegrass purists but Alison Brown has never been one to worry about such things. She’s made a career out of challenging the status quo-both artistically and commerciallyand so far it’s worked out pretty darn well. When she and her fabled quartet visit the Diana Wortham Theatre for an October 6th show you can bet she’ll bring along that same

them, and a poignant reminder that for every bit of puerility that emanates from Nashvilleand lord knows there are plenty-there’s an album such as this just screaming to be deservedly played again and again. ****

The Salad Boys Metalmania

TROUBLE IN MIND RECORDS

Hailing from Christchurch, New Zealand the Salad Boys revel in a combination of Kinks styled Brit beat and REM inflected jangle pop. Steeped in off the cuff dynamic songwrit-

Alison Brown Photo: Rich Gastwirt

commitment to excellence and adventurous spirit that has sustained her for a quarter century of professional musicianship. IF YOU The Alison Brown Quartet at the Diana GO Wortham Theatre on Friday, November

6 at 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $32; Student $27; Child $20. For more information, call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

JamGrass Tribute to Jerry Garcia Colorado’s Whitewater Ramble will perform a full set of originals followed by a set of music spanning Garcia’s career.

IF YOU GO: Friday, November 6, Doors open 9 p.m. 21+, $8 adv., $10 DOS. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave, Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com.

ing, gorgeous melodies, and an unerring knack for irresistible hooks, Metalmania easily adds up to far more than the sum of its obvious influences. The knockout “Dream Date” has a nice Flamin’ Groovies timbre while “Daytime Television” incorporates lovely electronic effects reminiscent of The Church. The brisk electric guitar driven songs (“I’m A Mountain” and “Taste Bomber”) work best but for a band that is still finding itself, Metalmania has plenty to offer. ***1/2

IF YOU GO: The Salad Boys are playing Tuesday,

October 6 at Tiger Mountain – a great chance to see an up and coming band. Tiger Mountain, 112 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. (828) 407-0666.

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COPYEDITING &

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FLASH FICTION CONTEST

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Announcing the first ever Rapid River Magazine Flash Fiction contest! Writers! Paint a picture, tell a story, with 500 words or less. This is a family friendly contest and modest prizes will be awarded. Finalists, semi-finalists and honorable mentions will be announced in the December print edition, and will appear on RapidRiverMagazine.com.

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2015. Hardcopy submissions should include your email address and phone number. Submissions not in strict compliance with the guidelines will not be read or considered. Detailed guidelines on RapidRiverMagazine.com.

Send hardcopy only, by mail, with a $5 reading fee to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, Attention: Flash Fiction Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716. Contest is curated by Rapid River Magazine copy editor and Short Story editor, Kathleen Colburn.

Here’s a small list: • joy • cerulean • cumulus • luminous • slide • persevere • light • endure • solemn • luscious

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In his book, Negative Blue, Charles Wright uses his lexical energy to write of tracing our words upon the air in his poem China Mail. He states, “I think of landscape incessantly.” A verse from his poem, “The Writing Life.”

Give me the names for things, just give me their real names, Not what we call them, but what They call themselves when no one’s listening At midnight, the moon-plated hemlocks like unstruck bells, God wandering aimlessly elsewhere. Their names, their secret names.

~ Charles Wright

My gratitude list includes poets, musicians, family, health, community, mountains, rivers creeks, and the list goes on. I began to search for poems of gratitude. e.e. cummings came to mind immediately; a poem I quote at any and all occasions: “i thank you god for most this amazing day.” This is as good as it gets. I sign my books, “With Gratitude.” What else is there to say? Someone’s going to read my words and I am grateful. What does a writer need, other than to be read? I am grateful for the sound of words. Read this aloud. Listen to the sound of Annie Dillard’s poetic voice from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. “Today is one of those excellent January partly cloudies in which light chooses an unexpected part of the landscape to trick out in gilt, and then shadow sweeps it away. You know you’re alive.” Esther De Waal, in her book, Lost In Wonder, writes about gifts. “When we fail in wonder we fail in gratitude. The response to wonder is calling attention to the world in order to praise it… When I am fully alive, I look around me with eyes that are open, astonished, and ears that are attentive, and as a result I experience all of life as a gift.”

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For these gifts, we are grateful. I believe our poetry, letters, columns in magazines like Rapid River Magazine, are statements of gratitude. It is a gift to be read. It is a gift to find our voice. Voice? Write as a listener. Read your work out loud. It makes a difference to me whether I read out loud to myself, or someone else. Our authentic voice is our gift. Listen to Robert Frost read his work. Your library most likely holds Poetry Speaks, narrated by Charles Osgood, edited by Elise Paschen and Rebekah Presson Mosby. Hear the voices of Sandburg Yeats, Plath, Eliot, Millay, Whit-

POETRIO Sunday, October 4 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: Sally Keith (River House), Rose McLarney (Its Day Being Gone), and Debra Kaufman (Delicate Thefts).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

man. Each voice is a gift of authenticity. It’s what we writers search for. It is a reason to be grateful. One of my favorite voices belongs to poet, William Stafford. He never lets me down. This poem is for those who persevere. Find a red thread. Wrap it around your wrist or ankle as a token of gratitude.

The Way It Is There’s a thread you follow. It goes among things that change. But it doesn’t change. People wonder about what you are pursuing. You have to explain about the thread. But it is hard for others to see. While you hold it you can’t get lost. Tragedies happen; people get hurt or die; and you suffer and get old. Nothing you do can stop time’s unfolding. You don’t ever let go of the thread. With gratitude, Carol IF YOU How to Love This World: Time GO Together – Saturday, October 24.

This creative group will explore Mary Oliver’s words from Spring – There is only one question: How to love this world. We will read from Aldo Leopold, John Muir, Barbara Kingsolver, the Book of Romans, Evelyn Underhill, Mary Oliver, and Hopkins — writers whose work centers on wilderness, ecology and wonder. We will deepen our connection to the earth as we consider it’s cycles, man’s disruption and desecration, and our memories. We will write, sketch, and photograph during our day together from 11 - 4 at Calvary Episcopal Church, 2840 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, 28732. Call (828) 684-6266 to sign up, or show up at Calvary! Cost: $20 for the day; $5 for Calvary members. The old gingkos are waiting for you!

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

~ Esther De Waal

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Short Stories, a Web Exclusive Contribute to Rapid River Magazine’s online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works in more than 20 genres. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. For submission guidelines and special editing rates visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Please contact Kathleen Colburn with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

28 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

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Elizabeth Gilbert Reading

Elizabeth Gilbert, the beloved author of Eat, Pray, Love, The Signature of All Things, and The Last American Man, returns to Asheville! Gilbert’s newest book, Big Magic, explores the eons-old question: Where does inspiration come from? And how can we put our ideas into action to change our lives? Gilbert jumps headfirst into these topics in this wonderful, vibrant book, written in her signature sparkling, conversational prose. With sections on how you can access and

direct your creativity, it’s an inspirational work with universal relevance that will move you “to dream of a life without limits.”

IF YOU GO: Elizabeth

Gilbert, Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m. at the Asheville High School Auditorium. Tickets are $35 and include a pre-signed copy of the book. Purchase tickets at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.


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Above the Waterfall

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WRITTEN BY RON RASH

Spare and taut, Ron Rash’s work is always a pleasure. He is able, in a few well chosen words, to simultaneously create devastation and awe. His new novel, Above the Waterfall, may be his most lyrical yet. Rash, a poet and teacher as well as a fiction writer, puts poetry in prose form as he gives voice to Becky, a park ranger who has had a violent and difficult past. The darkness lends her sharp observational powers: “On a maypop vine a caterpillar clings. Acharia stimulea. Oarlike legs, whitebristled body, green and brown back. Soon it will sleep in its self-spun shroud, winter-dreaming as spring’s moth-wings slowly sprout.”

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One Year After

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WRITTEN BY WILLIAM R. FORSTCHEN

William R. Forstchen is the New York Times bestselling author of One Second After, among numerous other books on diverse subjects ranging from history to science fiction. Forstchen holds a Ph.D. in history from Purdue University, with specializations in military history and the history of technology. He is currently a faculty fellow and professor of history at Montreat College, near Asheville. One Year After is the thrilling follow-up to the smash hit, One Second After. Months before publication, One Second After was cited on the floor of Congress as a book all Americans should read. The novel tells the story of how a small town copes immediately following an attack against the United States by an electromagnetic pulse weapon. The small town featured

is none other than Black Mountain, NC. One Year After picks up a year after One Second After ends, two years since the detonation of nuclear weapons above the United States brought America to its knees. After suffering starvation, war, and countless deaths, the survivors of Black Mountain are beginning to piece back together the technologies they had once taken for granted: electricity, radio communications, and medications. They cling to the hope that a new national government is finally emerging.

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LAUREN HARR

Intermixed with Becky’s story is the worn voice of Les, a county sheriff whose retirement is weeks away. His sections are more curt, his voice less lovely, but his observations no less keen. He deals with a meth bust and its consequences as well as a frought situation involving a local resort and an old-timer named Gerald, to whom Becky is very attached.

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A hint of mystery and the possibility of romance between Les and Becky keep the plot intriguing, but the real lure here is Rash’s gorgeous language and his own keen-eyed gaze at the tangled webs within communities and how near the edge all life hovers. IF YOU Ron Rash reading and book signing, GO Saturday, October 17 at 11 a.m. at

Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. For details, call (828) 456-6000, or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Then comes word that most of the young men and women of the community are to be drafted into an “Army of National Recovery” and sent to trouble spots hundreds of miles away. When town administrator John Matherson protests the draft, he’s offered a deal: leave Black Mountain and enter national service, and the draft will be reduced. But the brutal suppression of a neighboring community under its new federal administrator and the troops accompanying him suggests that all is not as it should be with this burgeoning government.

IF YOU Reading and discussion with William R. GO Forstchen, author of One Year After, on

Saturday, October 10 at 3 p.m. at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St. Waynesville. For more details, please call (828) 456-6000, or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com

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Anthony Guidone searches for answers in his book, The Face of War, A Soldier’s Lament. War has impacted the way Guidone defines it. He uses the art of photography juxtaposed, literally, under his own musings, his own poetry and a few quotes by famous people to pay homage to fellow soldiers. Each turning Go rest in peace… Tell the fallen we do weep, We know not your names No, you did not fall in vain. ~ Anthony Guidone

of the page leads to a different story, and each photo with its own verse will evoke a different reaction from the reader. Guidone puts his artistic talent to good use. His verses often sit astride the photographs like a child’s open-eyed assessment, poignant and poetic. There are multiple messages, not just those of pain, death, suffering and despair—all of which are negative (and expected) towards war. Guidone invites the reader to consider war in less negative fashion and to quietly reflect on war’s aftermath. Many of the most poignant and revealing moments are Guidone’s photography, visual moments that reveal the shape of a world, a point of view, an argument about life and war. Guidone’s accompanying poetry then remains

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, October 5 at 7 p.m. S.C. GWYNNE READING, Rebel Yell, Stonewall Jackson. Tuesday, October 6 at 7 p.m. JEANNE CHARTERS, Shanty Gold, series. Wednesday, October 7 at 5:30 p.m. SHEILA TURNAGE, The Odds of Getting Even. Thursday, October 8 at 7 p.m. DAVID LEVITHAN, Another Day; WILL WALTON, Anything Could Happen. Sunday, October 11 at 5 p.m. GINGER GRAZIANO, See, There He Is, memoir. Wednesday, October 14 at 7 p.m. KATHLEEN DRISKELL, Next Door to the Dead, poems. Thursday, October 15 at 7 p.m. TODD MAY, A Significant Life: Human Meaning. Friday, October 16 at 5 p.m. CORBAN ADDISON, The Tears of Dark Water, novel. Monday, October 19 at 7 p.m. MICHAEL McGREGOR, Pure Act: Life of Robert Lax. Tuesday, October 20 at 7 p.m. PETER LOEWER, Solving Deer Problems. Wednesday, October 21 at 7 p.m. PETER MURPHY, And is There Honey Still for Tea? Thursday, October 22 at 7 p.m. ELIZABETH GILBERT, Big Magic, inspiration. Friday, October 23 at 7 p.m. SPOOKY STORES with Nathan Ballingrud and others! Tuesday, October 27 at 7 p.m. TISHA MORRIS, Five Elements of Feng Shui. Wednesday, October 28 at 7 p.m. LEONARD PITTS, Jr., Grant Park, Civil Rights era. Friday, October 30 at 7 p.m. CATHERYNNE VALENTE, Radiance. Decopunk celebration. Costumes enthusiastically requested.

The Face of War, A Soldier’s Lament

What is the meaning of war?

OCTOBER

PARTIAL LISTING

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829

REVIEWED BY

pATRICE TAppE

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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somewhat at the margins, like an echo through a mountain valley, sonorous and fleeting. To place an order for The Face of War, A Soldier’s Lament , you may send an email to soldierslament@gmail.com. Include your name, address, and telephone number. The Face of War, A Soldier’s Lament, by Anthony Guidone, hard cover, self published, 2014. ISBN #978-o-615-98456*8

Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 29


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Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

A Visit to Kathmandu Cafe

Near Pritchard Park along Patton Avenue is a traditional Nepali restaurant committed to bringing Asheville the best recipes of the Himalayas.

BY

MICHELLE ROgERS

ately transported into another country. There was a fountain in the entry way and the dining room was filled with oranges, reds, greens, and many other vibrant Bone-in, local trout. colors. Fabric hung near the entrance lent a ceremonial and sacred feel to the room. Tok Tamang came out of the kitchen to greet us — we would later meet his wife, Tejaswi Malla, who is a relative of the owners, Manoj and Sushila Lama, who also started the retail shop, Himalayas Import. To start things off, I ordered Tulsi tea and my partner ordered the Mango Lassi, just as I hoped she would, so that I could have a taste. The Tulsi tea was earthy and light, bright but not acidic. The Mango Lassi was a thick, lightly sweet yogurt drink served in a stemmed glass with a straw. Our water cups were steel on the inside and hammered copper on the outside and fit nicely in the hand. These details, in addition to the lighting, warm lively colors, and music, felt like we were in someone’s home. There was an air of familiarity and formality in the same breath. Our server brought us tastes of their signature non-alcoholic drinks to try. The sweet rose beverage was a blend of lemon and pomegranate juices with cardamom and freshly ground rose petals. The

They grind their own spices, which is one of the keys to the development of flavor in their dishes, along with the duration of cooking and variation in temperature, giving each dish distinction. These high altitude herbs and spices are also high in nutrition, placing an emphasis on balance and health. We walked into Kathmandu Cafe and were immedi-

cont’d on pg. 39

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128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

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30 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2


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Healthy Good Thoughts

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I’ve been thinking about simple sweet foods. I have found something new to love. Coconut butter. Also called coconut cream concentrate and coconut manna. It has a little natural sweetness to it and an amazing texture. And it’s a very nutritious whole food, as it contains healthy oil and fiber from the flesh. You can make simple and quick “candies” that need no cooking. To get the right texture for trufflelike candies, use raw, solid honey for sweetening. Here’s a peppermint patty type of candy – combine a dash or two of peppermint extract, a pinch of salt, a little raw honey, and about half a cup of coconut butter. Form them into small discs onto a parchment paper lined cookie sheet and leave them in the freezer for about ten minutes. When they’re good and solid, dip them in melted chocolate chips and leave them in the freezer again for ten minutes. Enjoy. And share! You have to try Lemon Drops! It’s simply coconut butter, honey, lemon zest and a little lemon juice, all to taste. Mix, form into drops on parchment paper and put in the freezer for a few minutes to harden. They can be a little messy to eat since they soften quickly, so you could roll them in cocoa powder, or ground nuts or seeds. Both of these can be stored in the refrigerator once hardened. There are so many great uses for coconut butter. These are just two of my favorites.

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Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

KATHLEEN COLBURN

Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

Kathleen Colburn is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects. Reach her by email: rrshortstories@gmail.com.

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885 pg. 21

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$44.99 per person

Includes 4-Course Dinner with Live Jazz. All shows at 7 p.m.

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www.greatamericandog.net Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 31


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The 68th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands takes place at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, October 15-18. Nearly 200 juried artists of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be selling works of clay, metal, wood, jewelry, fiber, paper, natural materials, leather and mixed media. With styles ranging from traditional to contemporary, the

Jim Sams

Fairs showcase the rich talent, diversity and craft mastery of Guild members. The Fairs began in 1948 as a way to provide a regional market for mountain craftspeople. Since that time, the Craft Fairs have set the standard for fine craft shows across the country. Nearly 20,000 visitors to the Fairs each year invest in the regional and local economies while supporting artists working in the Appalachian mountains, and by spending a summer or fall weekend in beautiful Asheville. In addition to providing a retail market for juried members, the Guild hosts craft demonstrations during the Fairs. A strong part of the Guild’s mission is to educate the public about the history of crafts in this region, various craft techniques, Jason Green and an appreciation

for fine crafts. Visit www.craftguild. org for a complete list of scheduled craft demonstrations. Beginning on Friday during each Craft Fair, mountain musicians perform live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of the Craft Fair experience. From old time to bluegrass, this tradition is kept alive today. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of performances.

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 with headquarters at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville. The Guild region covers the mountain counties of nine southeastern states from Maryland to Alabama, representing over 900 craftspeople. The Craft Fairs are one of the ways in which the Guild fulfills its mission which is to bring together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation.

Jen Swearington’s booth.

To learn more about Guild programs, visit www.craftguild.org. IF YOU The Craft Fair of the Southern GO Highlands, October 15-18; 10 a.m. - 6

p.m. Thursday – Saturday, and 10 a.m. 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. U.S. Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 2987928, or visit www.craftguild.org. You may also visit rapidrivermagazine.com for the full schedule of demonstrations and performances.

Artists Interpret the French Broad River Exclusive Sale & Benefit

Of Time and the River

Thursday, October 15

Art sale proceeds benefit

Opening Reception 6-9PM Sol’s Reprieve, 11 Richland Street in Asheville’s River Arts District

Refreshments donated by Biltmore Winery, New Belgium Beer, and Whole Foods Featuring the work of: John Mac Kah Christine Enochs Paul Blankinship Mark Henry Dana Irwin Nicholas Raynolds Jason Rafferty Julyan Davis Caleb Clark Matthew Good Robert Johnson John Dempsey Roger Nelson Deborah Squier Skip Rohde Bryan Koontz Forrest Hogestad Luke Allsbrook Alisa Lumbreras

Exclusively on October 15 – Historic Images & Artifacts of River History on Display

Riverside Rail, painting by John Mac Kah

Tickets available at www.riverlink.org • 828-252-8474 ext 16 • information@riverlink.org 32 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

Three Days Only! October 15-18


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A Wave on the Ocean A wave on the ocean has a beginning and an end, a birth and a death. But the wave is empty. The wave is full of water, but it is empty of a separate self. A wave is a form which has been made possible thanks to the existence of wind and water. If a wave only sees its form, with its beginning and end, it will be afraid of birth and death. But if the wave sees that it is water, identifies itself with water, then it will be emancipated from birth and death. Each wave is born and it is going to die, but the wave is free of birth and death. ~ Thich Nhat Hanh

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Zen challenges us to empty our experience of separate self to realize our infinite connectedness and fullness. Like the wave, our mortal existence has a beginning, duration, and qualities that are caused by conditions much like how the weather affects the waves, and then ends. Does it, like the wave, however, all lead to new beginning? Can we feel that we are never not an expression of that which is unchanging, much like the waves are never not the water? Can we intuit that for us, as for all life, the eternal constant is the Universe-as-Beingness within which and, as which, we manifest? Can we know that we are the wave and the water, that we are a form made possible by infinite Beingness out of which we arise and to which we return like the wave and the water? To only see, hear, touch, and think of the world as separate objects is not enough. It haunts us with an unquenchable insecurity. We are compelled to seek more and more sig-

nificance of some, any sort. It causes us to fear our ending. In the Buddhist context, it is suffering – the inescapable feeling that something is missing causing us to cling and grasp for more. Like the peak and trough of the wave, this insecurity pushes us between frothy action and depressed inaction. We cannot see that our true creativity is, like the oceans, the vast quiet source of life itself. A natural instinct to manifest and create is a wonderful expression of the creative Universe happening through us, but a need to make more of our separate self out of insecurity concerning our essential meaning and worth is tragic. No peace can be found in it. No wonder we are drawn to sit by the sea.

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“The food that we grow is no longer nutritious. Either we must build up our soils or we must add supplements to our diet to make up for this nutritional deficiency.”

Is this true? How can we tell? The fruits and vegetables, the grains and nuts and seeds that we eat every day are the source of our nutrition. They contain all of the vital elements that we need to make the cell walls, the hormones, the blood cells, the mitochondrial energy factories, the messenger and operational proteins, the DNA and RNA sequencing and replication functions that happen by the millions in our bodies every day. Vitamins (water and fat soluble), minerals, and phytochemicals (over 30,000 identified) are essential to body health. Our bodies are not able to manufacture some fats and some amino acids. These also

must be obtained from the plant-based diet that God designed for our health. Are these no longer available from our fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts and seeds? Are the soils of our land not feeding the plants sufficiently for them to manufacture and concentrate these vital elements for us? News flash! Guess what the plants need in order to be healthy? What makes the apple so firm and juicy? What makes the string bean pods green, firm-skinned, and fill out fully? What makes the tomato smooth and brightly colored and firmly filled out? What makes the wheat stand up tall and its head fill out fully? The plants need the nutrients they are producing – for their own health. A tomato is not a bag of nutrients for our consumption. In order to be healthy, the tomato itself needs the Vitamin A (betacarotene and lutein zeaxanthin), niacin, vitamin C, vitamin K, magnesium, manganese, potassium, lycopene, and other phytochemicals that it produces and concen-

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As the waves and surf come and go, the sleeping memory of who we are, deeper than what comes and goes, sometimes awakens. We are drawn to sit by the vast and deep nature of the sea that never comes and goes, and with it comes some sense of comfort, ease and peace. We can sit for hours watching the rolling waves, sensing that what lies beneath resonates with that which is our deepest core. Often we go to the sea for what we call a vacation – a get-away from our hurried and stressful lives. Struggling in the choppiness of the waves of contemporary life, going up, going down, going up, going down, we have no sense of that which, even in the midst of the stormiest of times, is deeper, calmer, constant, and peaceful. We have no knowing that as the wave is always the water, we are always the vastness and constancy of awareness, that which is witness to the storm or tranquility on the surface of our lives. We do not know how to take ourselves deeper to where the flowing currents of calm and peace are the natural environment of our essence. To breathe the moment as it is, to feel,

A Tomato Is Not a Bag of Nutrients

“Everyone knows that our soils are more and more depleted.”

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We are always the vastness and constancy of awareness. hear, and see the moment, not only in its surface manifestation, but in the underlying currents of consciousness out of which what is felt, heard, seen, and even thought arises - this is awareness. This is the vast sea of our existence without beginning and without end. The awareness that experiences you sitting reading this column is the same awareness that experiences every occurrence of your day. It is the constant presence in your life, just as the sea is the constant presence for every wave upon it. So too, we must ponder, as every moment is a wave on the sea of your life, could it not also be true that the span of your life is but a wave on the sea of eternity? Not only are the seas of our planet vast and connected, creating one true encircling sea having no beginning or end, the action of evaporation transmutes the water into clouds that then releases as rain that refills the seas creating an endless cycle. And so too, there is deep within us, an intuition of the endless transmutation of form within infinite consciousness that gives rise to the universal intuition of deity and afterlife. We are born with this sense of infinite intelligence and life beyond our individuality. It is archetypal, universal to every culture, but continued on page 36

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

trates for human and animal consumption. If the tomato were not making and concentrating these in appropriate quantity, the tomato itself would look sickly and wasted and deformed. You can tell how well the soil is providing the appropriate nutrients by how healthy the plants look that are growing in the soils. Do soils get worn out? Yes, they do when the same crop is grown in them season after season. That’s why crop rotation is recommended. Different crops use different soil resources. And some crops actually put back in the soil the nutrients that future crops need. That’s also why fertilizer, mulch, compost, and manure are mixed into soils. Do not obsess over the nutritive value of food. Do not think that you need a special measuring device to test your food. The food itself contains its own testing laboratory. If the food looks sickly and deformed, the plant is not getting the nutrients that it needs to live healthfully. And the resultant foods will not have sufficient nutrients for humans. But if the plant is healthy and the produce is thriving, the nutrients are there. The plant itself guarantees it.

Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 33


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Saturday, October 3

Tuesday, October 6

Saturday, October 10

Art After Dark

ColorFest

Of Mind and Music

Jon Stickley Trio

Saturday, October 3

Vessels of Merriment

Handcrafted drinking vessels by 25 artists from around the country. Sake Set by Opening reception 3-6 Reiko Miyagi p.m. On display through Sunday, December 31, 2015 at Grovewood Gallery. (828) 2537651, grovewood.com.

Saturday, October 3

All Creatures Great and Small

Asheville Choral Society concert and benefit. 7:30 p.m. $25. Central United Methodist Church, 27 Church Street, Asheville. (828) 232-2060, www.ashevillechoralsociety.org.

Saturday, October 3

The Passing Zone Saves the World!

Using stun guns, chainsaws, and capes, they will attempt to save us all from the mundane. Family-friendly. 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: $38. (828) 257-4530, www. dwtheatre.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Dillsboro’s annual fine arts & crafts fair. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Art, entertainment, and food. www.spiritofappalachia.org.

October 3, 10 & 17

Asheville Art in the Park

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free. Pack Square Park, Asheville. Fine, handcrafted art. www.ashevilleartinthepark.com.

Drama set in New Orleans. Presented by the WNC Film Society at 7 p.m. at Grace Centre, 495 Cardinal Rd., Mills River, just west of Asheville Airport. Tickets: $12 or $10 online. (828) 885-5354, www.wncfilmsociety.com.

October 8, 9, 14, 15, 16

Fefu and Her Friends

October 3-24

The Employee Handbook Revision Committee

Lucia Del Vecchio’s dark office comedy. Magnetic Theatre, 375 Depot Street, Asheville. Performances at 7:30 p.m. $18 adv.; $21 d.o.s. (828) 2399250, www.themagnetictheatre.org.

Sunday, October 4

Chamber Music Concert

Works by Clara Schumann and Mozart performed by Sue Yingling, piano, Brent Yingling, violin, and Ron Lambe, cello. 3 p.m. By donation. St. Matthias Church, 1 Dundee St. in Asheville.

Sunday, October 4

Amy Andrews

Rising singer/songwriter – dynamic voice, heartfelt lyrics. 7:30 p.m. $8. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sunday, October 4

The Claire Lynch Band

Written by Cuban-American playwright Maria-Irene Fornes. Performances at 7:30 p.m., in the historic Homewood house in Montford. UNCA student production. Details at drama.unca.edu/theatre-unca

Thursday, October 8

Urban Loft + Art Tour

Asheville Art Museum hosts tours beginning at 4:30 p.m. Reception 6-9 p.m. $55; $50 for members. Call (828) 253-3227, stop by 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville, or visit www.ashevilleart.org

Thursday, October 8

Billy Constable Memorial Jam

Saturday, October 10

Take Two Jazz

Pianist Dr. Bill Bares and singer/drummer Russ Wilson. $12. 7:30 p.m. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Tuesday, October 6

Bach’s Lunch Organ Recital

Monthly series of half-hour concerts featuring organist Tate Addis. 12:05 p.m. at First Baptist Church, downtown Asheville. Box lunch available for purchase. Free admission.

A celebration of the endless opportunities that are presented to us. On display though December 31, 2015. Opening reception from 3-5 p.m. at 310 Forgotten New York City by ART, 191 Lyman Nadine Charlsen Street #310, Asheville. (828) 776-2716, www.310art.com.

Thursday, October 8

Sunday, October 4

Monday, October 5

Openings

World-class chamber music by Pan Harmonia musicians, Kate Steinbeck, flute, and Amy Brucksch, guitar. Tea and treats at 3 p.m.; music at 3:30 p.m. Haen Gallery, 200 King Street, Brevard. $15 adv.; $20 d.o.s. Purchase tickets at www.panharmonia.org

Bluegrassy, jazz-infused Americana. Cataloochee Ranch, 119 Ranch Dr., Maggie Valley, NC. Details at www.cataloocheeranch.com

A dramatized, intellectually thrilling conversation between Sigmund Freud and C.S. Lewis. 7 p.m. at The Cathedral of All Souls Parish Hall. A discussion will follow. $8 Suggested donation. caroldec25@gmail.com

Saturday, October 10

Sunday, October 11

Celebrating the life and music of the much loved WNC bluegrass musician who lost his battle to cancer. Suggested donation is $10. 7:30 p.m. at Isis, 743 Haywood Rd., West Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com

Freud’s Last Session

Rapid-fire flatpicking guitar, melodious, sultry and wild violin, and deep groove drums. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., West Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com

St. Claire Art

Grand opening of the artistic home of Asheville painter Stephen St. Claire 7 to 9 p.m. Pink Dog Creative, 344 Depot Street, #104 in Asheville’s River Arts District. Contact stclaireart@ gmail.com or call (828) 505-3329.

Ceramic Arts Show

Works by Anna Koloseike, Christine Sams, and other gallery members. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue. Call (828) 285-9700, or visit www.odysseyceramicarts.com.

Saturday, October 10

Oktoberfest 2015

Beer tastings, bratwurst, pretzels, and traditional sides from food vendors. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Woodfin Street in downtown Asheville.

Saturday, October 10

Red Baraat

The acclaimed Brooklyn band plays a mixture of pop, bhangra funk, big-band jazz, Balkan wedding music, and New Orleans brass. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com

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Regional Artist Project Grant Application Deadline: Thursday, October 15 at 5 p.m. Provides financial support for committed, accomplished artists by funding a project pivotal to a career. Details at www.ashevillearts.com

Now through October 15

Hispanic Heritage Month Art Exhibition

Works by local artists Victor Verde, Chris Corral, and Victor Palomino. UNC Asheville’s Highsmith Art and Intercultural Gallery. (828) 251-6577, intercultural@unca.edu.

Thursday, October 15

Michael Menert

Release party for Michael Menert and the Pretty Fantastics. Unique indierock. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com

Arts, 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. (828) 669-0930, www. BlackMountainArt.org.

Friday, October 16

Broken Road 2.0

Philip DeAngelo has expanded his gallery space. Display of metal sculptures and furniture by Ray Charnell. Reception 5:30-8 p.m. Broken Road Studio, 115 Roberts Street, Asheville.

Saturday, October 17

David Kim Performance

Performance of Bruch’s virtuosic Violin Concerto No. 1. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22 – $62. (828) 254-7046 or www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Sunday, October 18

Fantasy Live Figure Drawing

Strengthen your anatomy drawing skills from 6-9:30 p.m. with Kristilyn, Zombie Romance. $25 Advance; $28 Door. Reservations: Lauren@ZaPow. com. Held at ZaPow!, 21 Battery Park in downtown Asheville. ZaPow.com

Sunday, October 18

HardLox Festival

Asheville’s Jewish Food and Heritage Festival. Delicious homemade Jewish foods, Israeli dancing, crafts, a kids zone, klezmer music, and more! Pack Square Park, downtown, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.HardLox.com.

Call for Artists Artwork accepted October 19-24 Submit works for It’s a Small, Small Work show. $20 entry fee. Art must be no larger than 12 x 12 x 12 inches. Haywood County Arts Council, 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville. (828) 4520593, www.HaywoodArts.org.

October 21-23

Battle of the Brushes 2015

Call to artists, paint in Plein Air in Old Fort. Pick your subject – anything within five miles of the Old Fort Town Hall. Ribbons and cash prizes will be awarded. Show opens October 24. Details at www.arrowheadart.org.

October 23 & 24

October 15-18

Fall Leaf Festival

Celebrate the Spirit of New Orleans. $40 for the day or $177 for the weekend. Kids under 10 free. Lake Eden, Black Mountain. www.theleaf.org.

Friday, October 16

The Appalachian Pastel Society’s Juried Show Reception from 6-8 p.m. On display October 16 through November 25. The Black Mountain Center for the

Art on the Lawn

Fine art show and sale in front of the beautiful Monte Vista Hotel and the Red House Studio, 310 W. State Street, Black Mountain.

Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24

Tender Lady

Womansong’s fall concert is a benefit for Our Voice and Helpmate. Warren Wilson Presbyterian Church, 701

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Warren Wilson Rd., Swannanoa. Friday at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 3 p.m. Tickets: $15; $8 for children under 12. www.womansong.org.

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Best in Show

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Callie & Cats

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Saturday, October 24

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Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.

Diana Wortham Theatre 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

John Mac Kah Studio Classes, Workshops, and Private Fine Art Instruction.

Deborah Henson-Conant

Grammy nominated, one-woman orchestra – electric harp, voice and a looper pedal. “The Jimi Hendrix of the harp.” At the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. (828) 348-5327, thealtamont.com

Still Life Skill Building – Oils/Acrylics. Mon., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. After School Artists with Alisa – Tuesday & Wednesday, 4-6 p.m. Children 10 and up.

Saturday, October 31 10th Annual Mail Art Exhibition. Create or decorate something, put some stamps it and send it to: Carlos Steward, PO Box 9907, Asheville, NC 28815. Postmark deadline: October 17, 2015. Opening reception at the Flood Gallery Fine Art Center, 109 Roberts St., Asheville.

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Thursday, October 15 at 7 p.m. Exclusive premieres of the best climbing and adventure films. Tickets are $17.

Sunday, October 25

Anything Goes, Everything Shows!

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Songs of Love and Loss

Opera Creations performs works by William Grant Still, Korngold and traditional Appalachian folk songs. Suggested donation, (L-R) Randall Outland, $35. 5:30-7 p.m. at Orton Vance Reese, Academy, 6 Colonial Simone Vigilante, Place, Asheville. RSVP and Karen Svites. to AshevilleOperaCreations@gmail.com by Saturday, October 17.

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Gardening expert Peter Loewer shares his wisdom in Solving Deer Problems, which has just been reissued. The book includes comprehensive chapters on safe chemical deer repellants, plants that can withstand damage done by deer, how to create fences to keep your garden safe, deer/car collisions, and even how to protect yourself and your pets against deer-borne diseases.

Presentation by award-winning architect Arne Emerson. 12-1:30 p.m. $7. Free for BMCM+AC members & students w/ID. The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, 56 Broadway in downtown Asheville.

Thousands of good-condition used books. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place. (828) 254-6001.

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Ideas Without Walls / In-Between the Spaces

Annual Book Sale

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Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24

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Studio Demos – Thurs. 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Sept. 3, Underpainting; Sept. 10, Atmosphere; Sept. 17, Fall Color; Sept. 24, Composition. Studio Painting – Thurs. 6-9 p.m. Plein Air – Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., weather permitting. On location. 122 Riverside Dr., Studio H, Asheville (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

Thursday, November 12

Heart Works, Survivors Arts Show

Visual and performance art created by survivors of sexual assault. Public viewing at 5:30 p.m. Performance art at 7 p.m. YMI Cultural Center, 39 S. Market St., Asheville. Deadline for submissions is October 30, 2015. More details at ourvoice.nc.org.

310 Art Classes

Classic Wineseller

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes

Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and children’s classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort, NC.

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain?

Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-408-9017. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 35


Find It Here

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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps All Nations Trading www.SpiritFeather.com

Henderson County Studio Tour www.openstudiotourhc.com

Alzheimer’s Association alz.org/northcarolina

Ichiban (828) 252-7885

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Jane Desonier www.janedesonier.com

Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Asheville Percussion Festival www.AshevilleRhythm.org

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Judy Rentner Judyart@bellsouth.net

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burl Wood Gallery www.burlgallery.com Burr Studio facebook.com/burrstudionc CA’s Cheesecakes www.cacheesecakes.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Faces of War, Anthony Guidone www.soldierslament.com Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com HART Theater www.harttheatre.com Haywood Art Studio Tour www.haywoodarts.org Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814 Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com The Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Maple Tree Vet Clinic www.mapletreevet.com McLain Pottery coldcove@gmail.com Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us

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‘A Wave on the Ocean’ cont’d from pg. 33

rather than it being the beautiful principle that unifies humanity and its world, human ego creates dogma and religions that separate us and set us against our inner and environmental nature. This is suffering. We live afraid of life and death. We are afraid our life and death will not be significant. We struggle to give our life and death significance. With this fear, our lives become tossed about by stormy waves, and we long for peaceful waters, when the peace we seek is always present - only deeper than we know how to go. Zen asks us to stop struggling against drowning in the waves and learn to enter the depths where, empty of the insecure separate self, we cannot drown. Zen asks us to realize our face before we were conceived – a realization not to be believed because it is said by those we consider holy – but because we already know it. It is a knowing realized when we learn to go beneath the choppy waves of our surface existence to explore the clear, peaceful currents of deep consciousness in the most profound of meditations. Here we can find the face eternal, not with nose and mouth, but the smile of galaxies in the dance of the cosmos. This is Buddha’s smile, the smile he promised is within us all. This smile is the morning sunrise, the song of the birds, a baby’s smile, given without discrimination. It heals suffering. Perhaps the awareness that is the unchanging witness to a person’s life can be said to experience birth and death but is not born and does not die. Rather, it exists as the eternal consciousness that is the primordial essence of awareness. To enter the quiet, deep stillness of the ocean of consciousness, aware of awareness, and sit watching the passing forms in the mind called thoughts, emotions and sensations, no matter how stormy, as they appear and pass like waves, is the genius of meditation. Awareness is felt as our true unchanging and deep compassion-

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Awareness is felt as our true unchanging and deep compassionate presence. ate presence and we can intuit that our existence, like the water of the sea and waves and clouds and rain, is endless. Be not afraid. Breathe and know the breath of life, sink into the quiet currents and know the life that continues beyond the breath in the peaceful stillness of awakened awareness carried along, wave after wave, moment after moment, that is ultimately one moment, called eternity. “If you are the wave and you become one with the water, looking at the world with the eyes of water, then you are not afraid of going up, going down, going up, going down… I have seen people die very peacefully, with a smile, because they see that birth and death are only waves on the surface of the ocean.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

PATTON AVE.

WNC OVERVIEW

MERRIMON AVE.

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

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Seven Sisters Gallery sevensistersgallery.com

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Stephanie Grimes www.artist-f.com

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Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Red House Studios and Gallery www.SVFALarts.org

(828) 646-0071

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Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

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TUNNEL ROAD

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

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Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

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HENDERSONVILLE RD.

WAYNESVILLE

GROVE PARK INN

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Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com

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Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com The Wrinkled Egg www.thewrinkledegg.com Zapow www.zapow.com Zest Jewelry www.zestjewelry.com

CLYDE

NORTH ASHEVILLE NF

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The Face of War ~ A SOLDIERS LAMENT ~

King Kong – Then and Now

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When a classic movie like King Kong gets remade, fans of the original want to know why because they feel it was done right the first time and couldn’t get any better.

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NEW BOOK!

AL RAMIREZ

the damsel in distress characters. Both damsels are blonde and beautiful, but their attitudes toward the “beast” differ greatly. In the 1933 version Ann Darrow, played by Fay Wray, is terrified of King Kong Like most things in Holand screams hysterically lywood it’s almost always throughout the movie. It about the money, but there is implied that she feels have been a few cases where threatened physically, the remake was done well. emotionally and perhaps Both the 1933 and 2005 vereven sexually by him. sions of King Kong have a Illustration of King Kong In the 2005 version, great deal to offer, but I’ll go by Al Ramirez Ann Darrow, played by right out on a limb now and Naomi Watts, is an unemployed vaudeville say that the 2005 remake definitely got it right. actress who finds herself swept up into this I know some of you are thinking, “But what adventure not by her own choosing. She too about the 1976 version of King Kong by Dino fears for her life, but she gains an understandDe Laurentiis?” This production is also known ing of King Kong and begins to recognize that to me as The Jessica Lange Show or how to he is the one who is terrified and that she is make a full size King Kong animatronic appear the only one he feels safe with. Her character real without making it look and move like a even goes so far as putting her life in harm’s 25 cent pony ride. Rick Baker who created the way as she tries to divert the biplanes from make up for the ape always seemed to have their final strike. In short she overcomes this look on his face like “How in the hell did her fear and is more concerned about King I let them talk me into wearing this monkey Kong’s survival. suit?” (And those are just some of the nicer The original version has the character of things I can think of to say.) Denim, played by Robert Armstrong, obsessed The 1933 version was a true adventure with the pure adventure, capture and exploitamovie. It was written, produced, and directed tion of the creature. In the end he truly believes by Merian C. Cooper who was quite an “It was beauty who killed the beast.” In the adventurer in his own right. The character of new version Jack Black portrays Denim as a Carl Denim was loosely based on Cooper and man who goes to any means and does whatever the movie goes so far as to introduce Denim it takes to create his fortune. He is willing to as the film maker who is trying to get fundtake any risk, even putting those who work ing for a great adventure movie. Note: The for him in great peril, without any concern for boxed collector’s edition of the original movie their safety, always promising great fame and contains documentary footage of Cooper’s fortune. Ultimately he too says, “It was beauty film exploits. who killed the beast.” He refuses to take any Peter Jackson of Lord of the Rings fame, responsibility for the destruction of King Kong. along with his wife Fran Walsh, was credited Perhaps the reason we love this movie with writing the King Kong script. Jackson, so much is that it is far more than a mere who also produced and directed the 2005 veradventure story. It is an allegory that strikes sion admits he was totally influenced by the deep in our hearts at a time when humans are 1933 King Kong and says he decided to become responsible for the demise and suffering of so a filmmaker after seeing the movie as a child. many species of animals on the planet. In the One big diffinal analysis we may more accurately state, “It ference in the was not beauty who killed the beast, it was us.” two versions is

by Anthony Guidone

The intent of this work is to honor and acknowledge the physical and mental hardships imposed upon the individuals engaged in armed conflict.

Illustrations and Prints by Al Ramirez

Rocket Racer

The dragon illustration is from a book I’ve been working on for the past couple years. Last year I illustrated a Kindle children’s space adventure, Star Ropers, written by local author Ariel Lucas. Look for it on Amazon. The toy shelf still life illustration at left, “Rocket Racer,” is available as a print by request. Email lindsayram1@gmail.com to order. Visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com to view other prints.

Available for $15.98 each at

soldierslament@gmail.com Include Your Name & Address Visit www.soldierslament.com Dragon

Vol. 19, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2015 37


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fine arts & crafts

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ART ON THE LAWN Come stroll along under a canopy of fall leaves and colorful trees as you sip hot apple cider. This month you can discover new art in Black Mountain during Art on the Lawn. The outdoor fine art show and sale will feature original paintings, photography, pottery, plus unique and creative renderings from a variety of artists. Art on the Lawn takes place Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24, in front of the beautiful Monte Vista Hotel and the historic Red House Studios & Gallery. Fine art prints in various sizes, cards, unique and decorative sculpture, and many hand-crafted and one-of-a-kind jewelry designs are just a few of the items displayed and offered for sale at this outdoor event. Want to see more great artwork in one location? Venture inside the Red House Studios & Gallery and enjoy the “Carolina” exhibition, a favorite among locals and visitors for many years. The Monte Vista Hotel, located next door to the Red House Gallery, is hosting the “New Horizons” exhibit in the restaurant and lobby. There is something here for everyone’s

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Stanfield also invites attendees to get inspired by the energy and creativity of those exhibiting, and to become active members of the league. “We appreciate all the support Black Mountain residents, and those visiting from surrounding areas, have given us over the years, and we want to continue offering them beautiful, original art.”

‘Black Mountain Events’ cont’d from page 9

Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24

BACK PAIN Try it now!

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Sponsored by Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League, both events offer free parking and admission. For more details about the Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League, visit SVFALarts.org. Art on the Lawn takes place in front of the beautiful Monte Vista Hotel and the historic Red House Studios & Gallery.

artistic taste, all within a few steps of the other. “Our goal,” said artist and special events coordinator for the Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League, Johnnie Stanfield, “is to make our gallery and artists’ works available to everyone in the Western North Carolina area to see and appreciate. We want them to select our artist’s works to be a part of their new or existing art collections. We would love to have someone start an art collection because they fell in love with a piece of art at the event.

IF YOU Paint the Town takes place Saturday, GO October 10. The “Wet Paint” show

and sale, plus a wine and cheese reception begins at 5 p.m. On display through November 1, 2015 at the Red House Studios & Gallery in Black Mountain. Art on the Lawn takes place Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., both days, rain or shine. The art show and indoor events are located on 310 West State Street in front of the Monte Vista Hotel, just 1 block from downtown Black Mountain. Contact the Red House Studios & Gallery at (828) 669-0351 for more information.

Hard Candy Christmas 2015

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The 28th Annual Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts Show is a mountain Christmas tradition.

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38 October 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 2

Held the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving , this year’s show takes place November 27-28 from 10 a.m to 5 p.m. The event is held inside the spacious Ramsey Center on the Western Carolina University campus in Cullowhee. This year’s featured artist is North Carolina craftsman William McKinnis of the Country Tin Shoppe in Winston Salem. He has been preserving the vanishing art of tin smithing for 12 years. His custom pieces include a variety of handcrafted lanterns, candleholders, and ornaments that would have been found in early American homes. He also creates ‘strip art’ that portrays holiday themes. 100 other craftsmen and artists will be joining Bill for this much anticipated art and craft show. Customers looking for handcrafted gifts at great prices are always happy to see what their favorite potters, woodcrafters, and glass artists have created for the year. They come early looking for knitted winter wear and something snuggly for the new grandchild. There will be plenty of stocking stuffers, speciality sweets, and designer jewelry. Ornament collectors can always find a unique santa, Wreaths from the snowman, or angel. A&E Tree Farm.

Featured artist William McKinnis of the Country Tin Shoppe.

The A&E Tree Farm will be selling fresh evergreen wreaths and table arrangements, as well as trees. The mountain bee keeper has candles, ornaments, and farm fresh honey. Ronnie Evans will be strumming the favorite carols we grew up with and selling his cd’s for holiday listening. IF YOU Hard Candy Christmas Arts & Crafts GO Show, November 27-28 from 10 a.m

to 5 p.m. Admission is $4.50 for adults. Children under 12 free. Concessions will be available. Free, convenient parking. Held at WCU’s Ramsey Center in Cullowhee. For more details call Doris Hunter, (828) 524-3405, or visit www.MountainArtisans.net.


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‘Kathmandu’ cont’d from pg. 30

refreshing ginger lemonade contained squeezed ginger juice, cloves, nutmeg, and fennel seed. The green and earthy Jaljeera was an herbal blend of lime juice, honey, cilantro, cumin, ginger, coriander, lemon zest, salt, and asafoetida, which is known to be good for digestion. All were quenching and delectable. While we enjoyed our drinks, the server brought out Papadum — thin rice-based crisps with mint chutney, given to all diners near the start of the meal. We were next given a plate of various starters, served with a tamarind sauce. It included Aloo Tiki — potato patties seasoned with cumin, fresh ginger, and garlic. The triangular, nicely crusted Samosas were spiced mildly with turmeric. And the Vegetable Pakora consisted of chopped mixed vegetables dipped in spicy chickpea batter and fried. All three were so different from one another, yet made of similar ingredients. Next, we tried their signature dish, Vanta Bhatra — eggplant slowly roasted in a clay oven and served with rice. This is an amazing vegetarian option. The eggplant was creamy, spiced with garam masala, and like no other eggplant dish I have tried. We also sampled the local bison curry as well as the goat curry, which I recommend if you like rich, tender, mildly spiced curry. Some of the meat was still on the bone, which I attribute to fresh, hand-cut meat. Tejaswi Malla mentioned that goat is traditionally served at ceremonies and festivals in Nepal. One such festival, Dashain, is a 15-day national festival, this year taking place October 12-26. Momos are another delicacy served during Dashain, which are hand-made Tibetan steamed dumplings with Nepali spices. Cafe Kathmandu offers momos stuffed with bison, lamb, or spicy spinach and

‘Susan Marie’ cont’d from page 19

uniquely fits your personality and style.” Susan also works with many other fine quality natural colored gemstones including fancy iridescent Tahitian Pearls, Opals, Tanzanites, multicolored Garnets, Aquamarines, Peridots and Zircons. Always practical and with a passion for quality, Susan makes each piece to be as comfortable to wear and as durable as possible. “My ultimate goal is a satisfied customer, who will enjoy wearing my work for many years and then maybe pass it on as a treasured heirloom”, she affirms.

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local food

served with tomato chutney. Bison is the closest meat to water buffalo, the traditional meat of Nepal. We next tried the Garlic Naan, which according to our server, is the most popular naan they offer. It was delicious, buttery, and warm. I also recommend the bone-in local trout. The fish was beautifully presented on a bed of onions and garnished with julienned zucchini and carrots. This dish was nourishing, light, and fresh. I was overwhelmed with Tok’s and Tejaswi’s generosity in letting us sample so much of their menu. The experience felt like I had been invited into their home for the evening. This family-owned and operated restaurant has an intimate dining room and they serve local ingredients when possible. We left that night carrying two boxes of leftovers and while walking down the street I was stopped by a homeless man who asked if I could spare any food. In the Asheville spirit, I gave him one of our boxes. How could I not when I had just been treated myself. I only hope he enjoyed and was as nourished by the food as I was that evening.

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Susan invites you to visit her booth at the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, October 15-18, held at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville.

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October 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
October 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: King Kong by Al Ramirez..p37. Inside: David Kim and the Asheville Symphony..p7; Of Time and the River..p16; Weaverville Art Sa...

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