Page 1

Weaverville Art Safari PG 10 Haywood Art Studio Tour

PG

11

67th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands PG 12 the Creative Craftsmanship of Jewels That Dance PG 19

Jonas Gerard

Paints Plein Air

PG

23

Lush Works

Opens New Gallery

PG

26

Wood-Block Prints at

BlackBird Frame & Art PG 27 Illustration of the Bride of Frankenstein by Al Ramirez PG 42

DINING GUIDE PGS

33-36

The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby • The Drop • Love is Strange • November Man • Skeleton Twins • Trip to Italy • Tusk

PGS

14-17


A FREE Self-Guided Driving Tour of Artists’ Studios in Weaverville and Surrounding Areas

Online Auction of Selected Works Preview and Bidding at

November 1 & 2

Ugly Monkey Auctions

www.uglymonkeyauctions.com

Studios Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Preview from September 28 to October 24 Bidding from October 24 thru November 2

Meander through the scenic mountains of WNC, visiting the studios of popular potters, painters, woodworkers, metalsmiths, jewelers, glass artists, and more!

View works in person at donating studios during the Safari. 2 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

Brochures, tour maps, accommodations, restaurant suggestions, and other information

www.weavervilleartsafari.com


C O T T O N M I L L S T U D I O S F E AT U R E D A R T I S T

R

Barbara Zaretsky

Oct. 16-19

Reflecting the stillness and simplicity of natural forms, BZDesign textiles are effortlessly stylish.

No two pieces are exactly alike, each the result of a process that starts with sustainably sourced materials crafted with mindful attention to detail and ends with an artistic, functional accessory to enhance the home or wardrobe. “I’ve always been fascinated with textiles and the influence they have on our culture. Inspired by the things around me—color, movement, light, nature, architecture and design—I am moved to create art for everyday use. Functional textiles can enhance our lives in subtle yet powerful ways— from expressing who we are to communicating emotion.”

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

U.S. CellUlar Center Downtown aSheville, nC thU.-Sat.: 10am-6pm SUn.: 10am-5pm aDmiSSion: $8; ChilDren UnDer 12 free

Becky and Steve LLoyd

www.bzdesign.biz

JUrieD artiStS Craft DemonStrationS live regional mUSiC

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

pg. 32

RC

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com pg. 20

15

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 3


pg. 20

2

pg. 24

WH

4 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Two

OCTOBER 2014 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Judy Ausley, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Susan Buser, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Susan Devitt, Amy Downs, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, John Horrocks, Nina Howard, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Michelle Miller, April Nance, Wendy H. Outland, Julie E. Peck, Steve Plever, Al Ramirez, Dennis Ray, Patty Smyers, Chris Stack, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com South and West Asheville Mary Lloyd (828) 712-0390 All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, October 2014, Vol. 18 No. 2

On the Cover:

The Bride by Al Ramirez. PAGE 42

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

6 Performance ACT – The Addams Family. . . . . . . 6 HART – Urinetown . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Gavin Geoffrey Dillard. . . . . . . . . . 31 The Mystical Arts of Tibet . . . . . . 32

10 Fine Art

The Mountain Twins

ONLY ONLINE

The Exploding Ravioli Incident

Vote for Your Favorite Classic Movie Monster. The monster with

written by Jason Hilliard written by Terry Ward

Are You Looking At Me?

the most votes will be recreated by Asheville artist Al Ramirez for our October 2015 issue.

My Sister and the Butterflies

Book reviews by Marcianne Miller. The Bees plus a few books for

written by Sandee Setliff

Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Haywood Art Studio Tour . . . . . . . 11 Southern Highlands Craft Fair . . . 12 Jewels That Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Satellite Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Village Potters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Blackbird Frame & Gallery . . . . . . 27 Al Ramirez. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Double Exposure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

13 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 13 W.H. Outland – Business of Art . . 13 Peter Loewer – Curmudgeon . . . . 18 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort 18 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 28 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 30 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 37 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 37

14 Movie Reviews

written by Nina Silver

From the Head to the Heart written by Phil Okrend

Bidding Farewell

written by RF Wilson

WE’RE A LOCAL & RESPONSIBLE PUBLISHER Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .14

29 Music War on Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Taj Weekes and Adowa. . . . . . . . . . 29

Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 8-9 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 19-21 River Arts District. . . . . . . . . pgS 22-23 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 24-25 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 41

Scandinavian crime enthusiasts and fans of coming-soon-to-the-movie-theatres female sociopaths.

Hike in Cataloochee: Pretty Hollow Gap Trail. On

Tuesday, October 14 join Friends of the Smokies for a hike led by hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein, followed by elk viewing. Monthly Schedules for the Asheville Film Society and the

Hendersonville Film Society.

Ecomusics 2014: World-renowned musicians and scholars perform at UNC Asheville, October 2-6. The Ideas and People Who Make This - A More Beautiful World. Imagine a new story. Written by Phil Okrend and Kathleen Colburn

33 Dining Guide The Black Forest Restaurant . . . . . 33 Brixx Wood Fired Pizza . . . . . . . . . 34 The Chocolate Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Mother Earth Produce . . . . . . . . . . 36

38 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 39 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 39 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 39 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 39 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 39

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 5


Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social! ❖ Area Restaurant Coupons ❖ ❖ Contests ❖

Keep up with Local Arts, Events, Performances, and Festivals. www.facebook.com/ rapidrivermagazine

R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

captivating performances They’re Creepy and They’re Kooky

A

Asheville Community Theatre is opening its 69th season with the WNC premiere of the musical comedy The Addams Family. Featuring an original story with both classic and new characters, The Addams Family is the perfect Halloween treat for the entire family. “The timing couldn’t be better to see The Addams Family. We think it’s the perfect show for October,” said Susan Harper, Managing Director of Asheville Community Theatre. “Plus, it’s wonderful to open a season with the energy that such a large cast brings to the building!” The creepy and kooky Addams family comes to devilishly delightful life in this new musical comedy. Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with Lucas, a young man from a “normal” family – or as Wednesday puts it: “We’re who we are, and they’re from Ohio.” When the families meet, what follows is strange and sweet!

Asheville Community Theatre’s production of The Addams Family is directed by Jerry Crouch who has helmed plenty of musical hits for ACT including recent productions of Cabaret, Hairspray, and Chicago. Musical direction is by Anne Schwabland, and choreography is by Tina Pisano-Foor. Bradshaw Call (Spamalot, Guys and Dolls) stars as Gomez Addams opposite Rachelle Roberts (Chicago, Oliver!) as Morticia. They are joined onstage by a cast of 27, which includes many ACT veterans (Dianne Chapman, Jacob Walas, Leslie Lang) as well as newcomers to the ACT stage. The set is designed by Jill Summers with costumes by Deborah Austin. “The cast sounds great and looks fantastic singing this Broadway blockbuster music,” said director Jerry Crouch. “That’s hardly a surprise, though, since the music is led by Anne Schwabland and the dazzling dancing is choreographed by Tina Pisano-Foor.” For more information about The Addams Family or about Asheville Community Theatre, please visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Morticia (Rachelle Roberts) and Gomez Addams (Bradshaw Call) are at their darkest for The Addams Family. Photo: Rodney Smith/Tempus Fugit Design

IF YOU The Addams Family opens October GO 3 and runs through October 26 with

performances Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 Adults, $22 Seniors/Students, $15 Children. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. For more details, call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

HART Presents the Tony Award-Winning “Urinetown”

U

“Urinetown” is one of the funniest Broadway musicals ever conceived, and, despite its title, a show suitable for the entire family.

The Tony Award winning musical opened at the Henry James Theater in 2001 and became a smash, poking fun at the legal system, capitalism, social irresponsibility, populism, bureaucracy, corporate mismanagement and municipal politics. It also parodies “The Threepenny Opera,” “The Cradle Will Rock” and “ Les Miserables.” The creators, Mark Hollman, and Greg Kotis were inspired when they were in Europe and encountered a pay toilet. They took the idea to its extreme creating a fictional town where water is so scarce every toilet has a fee and is controlled by the monolith UGC (Ur’in The musical score for Urinetown includes Good Company). The show opens with recognizable melodies from dozens of iconic Officer Lockstock (whose partner is OfBroadway musicals. ficer Barrel) addressing the audience and explaining the situation. He is interrupted show was a huge hit and won an off Broadway by a street waif, Little Sally, who asks if she can production that then was scheduled to open change the show’s title to something else. Offion Broadway on September 13, 2001. The cer Lockstock sadly says no. We’re stuck with it. entire city was still shut down at that point so Obviously a show with a title like the opening was delayed until September 20. It “Urinetown” is going to have an uphill battle became a favorite of every theater buff because getting produced. Originally no one wanted to its score contains recognizable melodies from touch it, no pun intended. Finally a small thedozens of iconic Broadway musicals. “Uriatre company agreed to produce “Urinetown” netown” became the little show that could, as part of the New York Fringe Festival. The running for nearly a thousand performances

6 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

and touring for nearly four years. A few other tidbits: The show starred Hunter Foster, who was nominated for a Tony. He didn’t win, but his sister, Sutton did for her starring role in “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” which also beat “Urinetown” out for the Tony as Best Musical. It is the only time in Broadway history a brother and sister have been nominated for leading roles in two different musicals. The Henry Miller Theater, which is now the Stephen Sondheim, had been abandoned for a number of years and was a complete wreck inside. “Urinetown” intentionally chose it because of its condition and turned the entire theater into its set. HART’s production has been designed by Tony Debernardo and is directed by Charles Mills. The cast includes some major talent, including Justin Slack, Cord Scott, Kier Klepzig, Zoe Manolas, Frances Davis, Tabitha Judy, Strother Stingley, Tom Dewees, Kristen Hedberg, Raymond Yarnutoski, Sean Bruce, Chelsey Gaddy, Jessica Savitt, Goerge Heard, Jacob Hunt, Italo Medelius and Garrett Funk. IF YOU HART presents URINETOWN the GO Musical. October 3, 4, 10, 11 at 7:30

p.m. and October 5 & 12 at 3 p.m. Tickets; Adults $24; Seniors $20; Students $12. $8 tickets for Students Sundays. Box Office Hours Tuesday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

captivating performances

M

A

AmiciMusic presents “Jazzy Jews”

A

AmiciMusic is the Asheville-based critically acclaimed group dedicated to performing chamber music in intimate spaces and non-traditional venues. AmiciMusic (www.amicimusic.org) was founded in 2011 by pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser, who has performed around the world in more than 15 countries and on great stages such as Carnegie Hall. Dr. Weiser talks briefly about each piece, creating an informal, relaxed atmosphere to listen to and better appreciate the music.

THE ASHEVILLE CLARINET QUARTET On Saturday, October 4 at 11 a.m., AmiciMusic presents another Saturday Classical Brunch at Isis in West Asheville at 743 Haywood Rd. This concert will be the debut of the Asheville Clarinet Quartet, a new group of top level clarinetists in the Asheville area including Jonathan and Anne Salter, Steve Loew, and Gary Spaulding. All have advanced music degrees from top end schools such as Juilliard and Indiana University and have performed extensively with such groups as the U.S. Marine Band, the

National Symphony Orchestra, and more. Their program includes an eclectic mix of genres including Classical, Jazz, Tango, and Klezmer. Cost is $15 for the concert and a delicious brunch ranges from $7-11. Reservations are recommended by calling Isis at (828) 575-2737. For more details please visit www. isisasheville.com

SONGS OF NATURE On Friday, October 17 at 7 p.m., AmiciMusic presents Songs Of Nature, featuring soprano Laura Dawalt and pianist Daniel Weiser. The concert takes place at the Trinity Presbyterian Church, 900 Blythe Street in Hendersonville. This is the first program in a new chamber music series that will help support the Hendersonville Community Music Center, based at Trinity under new Director Andrew Hiler. The center presents top quality music classes for both kids and adults. The concert will include songs about nature and love from countries around the world in five different languages, including German, French, Russian, Italian, and English. Composers include Grieg, Faure, Rachmaninoff, Gershwin, and more. Dr. Dawalt currently

Festival Pablo Casals Prades Collective

T

The Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) will present Festival Pablo Casals Prades Collective, Friday, October 17 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation.

By

MaRiLyNNE HERBERT

ville Amadeus Festival at Diana Wortham Theatre in March 2015, all other concerts in the 2014-15 season will be held at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in AsheMichael Lethiec, Artistic Director ville,” says Board President Polly Feitzinger. The Festival Pablo “Over the years, it has become a very popular Casals Prades Collective began in 1950, when venue for our audiences who appreciate its infriends, knowing his devotion to J.S. Bach, timacy for the enjoyment of chamber music.” urged Pablo Casals to celebrate the composer’s bicentennial. The first concert of Festival Pablo Casals took place in the parish church in THE PROGRAM Prades where the master had resided since his Milhaud: La Creation du Monde exile from Spain. Mozart: Clarinet Quintet Undoubtedly one of the oldest music festivals in existence, it remains among the most Prokofiev: Overture on Hebrew Themes innovative in its quest to expand repertoire and Faure: Piano Quartet No. 1 introduce new talents. Led by Artistic Director Michael Lethiec, the festival celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2012. The festival has continued IF to present chamber music concerts with an YOU Festival Pablo Casals Prades Collective, impressive roster of distinguished musicians GO Friday, October 17 at 8 p.m. at the from around the world, including, violinists, Unitarian Universalist Congregation, corner of Charlotte Street and Edwin Place in Koka Takezawa and Elina Vahala; violist, NoAsheville. Individual tickets are $38 and available buko Imai; cellist, Arto Noras, pianist, Itamar at the door, first come first served. For more Golan and clarinetist, Michael Lethiec. information please visit the ACMS website: “With the exception of the Brentano ashevillechambermusic.org. Quartet concert which will opes the Ashe-

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Jazzy Jews Performances Saturday, October 18 at 11 a.m. Classical Brunch at Isis in W. Asheville at 743 Haywood Rd. $15 for concert and $7-11 for brunch. Reservations are recommended by calling (828) 575-2737. For more details please visit www.isisasheville.com Soprano Laura Dawalt

Saturday, October 18 at 7:30 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain at 105 Montreat Rd in Black Mountain. $20 at the door or $15 in advance. Call (828) 669-0816 or visit www. whitehorseblackmountain.com to reserve.

Clarinetist Steve Loew and pianist Daniel Weiser.

teaches at Greensboro College. Suggested donation is $15 for Church members and $20 for others. Children are always free.

JAZZY JEWS AmiciMusic will also present Jazzy Jews, featuring clarinetist Steve Loew and pianist Daniel Weiser performing a fun mix of Klezmer-inspired music and Jazz, highlighting the links between those two styles through works by Jewish composers such as George Gershwin and Benny Goodman. Steve Loew has performed around the world as a member of the U.S. Marine Band and has also played with the New York Philharmonic and artists such as Johnny Mathis and Meatloaf.

K

Sunday, October 19 at 4 p.m. Unitairan Universalist Congregation of Asheville at 1 Edwin Place. $20 at door or $15 for Church members. Discounts available in advance online at www.amicimusic.org. Sunday, October 19 at 7:30 p.m. House Concert in Hendersonville at the home of Daniel Angerstein and Jerry Schultz. Fantastic 9 foot piano from 1892 and views for miles. Light food and drink included. Cost is $35 pp. Reservations are required. Call Dan at 802369-0856, e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org, or pay online at www.amicimusic.org.

Dueling Divas

Katie Cilluffo and Andrea Bailey will entertain patrons at the Art House Gallery & Studio.

Katie

Andrea

Katie and Andrea met in 2005 while performing Bizet’s Carmen at the Asheville Lyric Opera. Their appearances together include recitals, rock operas, chamber choirs, and even jazz trios.

The evening will be filled with Cilluffo Bailey opera and classical and contemporary duets. Tickets are $20 and include IF appetizers. 10% of the proceeds from this YOU Dueling Divas, Saturday, October 25 special event will go to Homeward Bound, GO at 7:30 p.m. The Arthouse Gallery & a multi-faceted organization dedicated to Studios, 5 Highland Park Rd., E. Flat ending homelessness in Western North Rock, NC. RSVP to (828) 595-9500. Visit Carolina. www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com.

@

Mountain Area Information Network

pg. 20

N

Local News, Views and Music on the Air at 103.7 FM

main.nc.us • • • • •

Wireless Internet VOIP Web Hosting Mail Services Dial-up

34 Wall Street #407, Asheville :: (866) 962-6246 :: (828) 255-0182 Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Historic Hendersonville & Flat Rock THE ARTHOUSE GALLERY Saturday Night Free Concert Series Presented by Michael Arrowood from 7-11 p.m.

October 4 – Emily Bodley with Wayne Bodley. Indie-pop, acoustic.

October 18 – Peggy

Ratusz & Johnathan Perlman. Blues, Jazz guitar and vocals.

October 25 – “Dueling

Divas” Sopranos. Katie Cilluffo & Andrea BaiPeggy Ratusz ley with pianist George Photo: Frank Zipperer Wilkins. Classical opera and contemporary duets. 7:30 p.m. RSVP.

The Arthouse Gallery & Studios

5 Highland Park Rd., E. Flat Rock, NC www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com (828) 808-3594 or (828) 595-9500

This Month in Hendersonville

O

October 1-24 – Bearfootin’ public art display featuring fiberglass outdoor bear sculptures decorated in different themes. Main Street, Hendersonville. (828) 233-3216. October 1-31 – Golden Age l & ll “Coming of the Railroad” exhibit. A replica of the Saluda Mountain Grade, the steepest main-line standard gauge railroad in the US, and the History of Laurel Park, when visitors crowded the area’s lakes and pavilions to swim by day and dance by night; and a replica of a general store; Henderson County Heritage Museum, Wed.- Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun. 1-5 p.m. Free. Hendersonville, (828) 694-1619. October 2-5 – Championship Walking Horse Show, WNC Agicultural Center, Fletcher. (828) 687-1414 or 919-681-4431.

October 2-26 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents the Tony Award winning musical comedy, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Wed-Sat 8 p.m.; Thurs, Sat & Sun 2 p.m. $40. Mild adult content. Flat Rock. (828) 693-0731 or 866-732-8008. October 4 – Farm City Day, Jackson Park.

THE GREEN ROOM CAFÉ Live Dinner Music Friday and Saturday nights Visit www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz for more details. Live music 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Friday, October 3

– Americana by Carrie Morrison, vocals & keyboard

October 11 – Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra presents “Fiesta, featuring Jorge Federico Osorio, Pianist.” Blue Ridge Community College Concert Hall. Tickets $35; $5 for students. Flat Rock, (828) 697-5884.

Julia. Donation: $12 Adults; $6 ages 6-17. Buses are not handicap accessible; no pets are allowed on the bus. Sponsored by Friends of DuPont Forest. Hendersonville, (828) 8776527.

October 11 – Train Show, WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher. (828) 685-2726

October 18 & 19 – Arts & Crafts Show. VFW Post 5206, 2nd Floor, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sponsored by Henderson County Crafters Assoc., Hendersonville, (828) 407-7159.

October 11 & 12 – Asheville Gun & Knife Show. WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher. (828) 687-1414 or 770-267-0989. October 16-19 & 23-26 – Flat Rock Play-

house Downtown presents Music on the Rock: John Denver. Tribute concert featuring the hits of the artist. 8 p.m., Hendersonville. (828) 693-0731 or 866-732-8008.

October 17-19, 23-26, 30, 31, November 1 & 2 – Hendersonville Little Theatre presents

the romantic-comedy Sylvia. Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays 7:30 p.m.; Sundays 2 p.m. Hendersonville, (828) 692-1082.

October 18 & 19 – Tour de Falls, DuPont State Recreational Forest, 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Buses will be available in the parking lot on DuPont/Staton Rd. to take visitors to High Falls, Triple Falls, Bridal Veil Falls, and Lake

A

An original musical revue of Broadway’s great love songs.

– Singer/Songwriter Aaron Coffin on acoustic Guitar

Friday, October 24

Sax by Olivier

Saturday, October 25 – Jazz & Pop, soft sounds on Sax by Olivier. The Green Room Café

536 North Main, Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

October 23-25 – Fall Harvest Days. WNC

Agricultural Center Fairgrounds. Crafters, demonstrations, farm tools, antique engines, antique tractor pulls & swap meet. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Adults $8, Children 12 & under free; 3-day pass $20. Held rain or shine. Sponsored by Apple Country Engine & Tractor Association, Fletcher. (828) 687-1414 or (828) 654-7901.

October 24-26 – Southeastern Animal Fiber

Fair. WNC Agricultural Center, 100s of animals, crafters, workshops & demonstrations. Fletcher. (828) 687-1414 or (828) 242-3446.

October 25 – Bearfootin’ Art Display Auction,

Auction of the Bears that have been on the sidewalks of downtown since spring. 2:30 p.m. - 5 p.m., Hendersonville. (828) 233-3216.

October 28 - November 1 – 2014 Golden

Let’s Fall In Love Musical Revue

Brooke McBride

Metal sculpture by Keith Berner, Art on Main participant.

October 11 – Historic 7th Avenue Bazaar, historic Depot Plaza. Street festival with a variety of art & crafts, entertainment, food and more. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hendersonville. (828) 674-3067.

Carrie Morrison

Saturday, October 18

– Jazz with Elise Pratt on vocals, Mike Holstein on guitar.

Craft Show. Historic downtown along Main Street, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. High quality show featuring the finest artists and artisans from the southeast. A judged and juried show produced by the Arts Council of Henderson Council. Hendersonville, (828) 693-8504 mobile dealers display their new 2015 models;

Saturday, October 11

– Lake & Moore, acoustic guitar duo. Folk & Americana

October 4 & 5 – “Art on Main” Fine Art/Fine

October 11 – Motorama, Main Street. Auto-

Saturday, October 4

– Country music by Brooke McBride, nominee of the Carolina & Charlotte Music Awards. Art on Main Festival, 5:30-8 p.m.

Modern & antique farm equipment, old timey demonstrations & displays, live entertainment, crafts, competitions, children’s games, tractor pull, food & more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free family fun. (828) 697-4884 or (828) 697-4891.

antique and classic cars show. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sponsored by the Great Smoky Mountain Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America (828) 891-8299, and the Hendersonville Antique Car Club (828) 697-8344. For details on the New Car Show call (828) 693-9061.

This special evening features soprano Jacquelyn Culpepper, baritone Daniel Boye, and music director, DeWitt Tipton. Culpepper and Boye have been performing together since they were opera students at the Brevard Music Center over 30 years ago. Both singers are well known to regional opera and symphony companies. Mr. Tipton has extensive performance credits throughout the country. “This will be a very unique and enchanting evening,” said Francis Cullinan, Henderson County Arts Council Board Chairman. “The artists and the audience will examine the many aspects of love and romance in musical terms.”

8 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

Retriever Club of America National Specialty. Golden retrievers competing in conformation, obedience, and agility. WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher.

October 31 – Trick-or-Treat Street. Main By

paTTy SMyERS

Soprano Jacquelyn Culpepper, and baritone Daniel Boye.

For tickets and reservations, contact the Arts Council of Henderson County at acofhc@bellsouth.net or call (828) 693-8504. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Arts Council of Henderson County, located at 401 North Main Street in Hendersonville. IF YOU Let’s Fall in Love, Saturday, November GO 8, at 7:30 p.m., at Calvary Episcopal

Church Parish Hall in Fletcher. Tickets are $40 and include wine, coffee and Viennese desserts.

Street from Allen St. to 6th Ave. Merchants offer treats. Halloween costume contest and dance party. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Hendersonville, (828) 233-3216.

November 1-2 – Hendersonville Little Theatre presents Sylvia. When Greg brings home a stray dog named Sylvia (played by a woman), his wife Kate begins to feel their long-time marriage is being neglected. Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 2 p.m. Adults $20;; under 18 years $10. Hendersonville, (828) 692-1082. IF YOU Information is subject to change. GO Compiled by the Henderson County

Tourism Development Authority, 201 South Main Street, Hendersonville. Call (828) 693-9708, 800-828-4244, or visit www.historichendersonville.org


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock

S

R

E

for the

AMERICAN SURVIVOR

Arts & Culture in Hendersonville – Visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities.

HENDERSONVILLE - 28792

Y

F L E M M IN G S T

J U S T IC E S T

LO

CU

ST

ST SEV

AV E

E IG H T H

64

ST

ST HW

IN

ON

LE

MA

V IL

N.

HE

PA TT

AS

HS

ENT

HA

VE

64

S IX T H

HG

AV E

HC

Check our our Brand New Archery Equipment

VE F IF T H A F O RT H

HL

AV E

ELL ST

CASEW

N V IL L

ST

ST

E HW

W H IT E

OV

E

FLAT ROCK - 28726

ST

S PA R T

A N BU

FH RG HW Y

234 Main Street ~ Hendersonville 828.697.0025

176

Y

HS

GR

HR

D AV IS

HEBRON RD

ELL ST

GREE

S P R IN G S T

T W H IT T E D S

K A N U GA R D

D

ST

BA R N W

Made in America by Local Craftsmen

G ROVE

T K IN G S

T M A IN S

ON

N ST

LY P

ST

H ST

L IL

CHURC

VE

ALLEN

IN G T O

F IR S T A

W ASH

ST

D ST

E ST

NG

TTE

T IC

MMI

WHI

JU S

FLE

Over 90 Name Brands

HP

T H IR D AV E

225

www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

Hp

Blue Ribbon Framing Quality. Service. Selection. Since 1986 Owners: Bruce and Melissa Maurer

Professional Custom Framing for Your Pictures and Memorabilia HR FH

414-a Kanuga Road, Hendersonville Mon-Fri 9-5

Sat 9-3

(828) 693-7967

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

studio tours

A

R

T

S

Weaverville Art Safari Showcases Local Color with Free Fall Studio Tours

T

The arrival of fall in Western North Carolina signals more than the start of colorful autumn foliage.

pg. 41

MV

pg. 40

MB

By

STEVEN FORBES-DESOULE

It also marks the arrival of one of the most popular studio art tours in the area, the Weaverville Art Safari. Held on November 1 and 2 from 10 a.m. Leo Monahan to 5 p.m., this year’s tour boasts 47 local artists and was included in the Mountain Xpress Best of WNC awards. Lelia Canter The free event provides the exclusive opportunity to delve into the thriving artist enclave located in Weaverville and Barnardsville. Guests can see new art collections, interact with resident artists, and enjoy free art Joe Cagnina demonstrations. Some studios also offer door prizes. Newcomers to the tour often become regulars, or in the case of photographer Joe CagniSusan Lee na, they become a resident artist and join the tour. “I attended my first Art Safari in November of 2013 after moving to Weaverville from Berkeley, CA,” said Joe. “Having done a few shows in California, I was immediately attracted to the Art Safari concept because it made so much sense and the quality of art and craftsmanship was exceptional.” From local gems to artists who are lauded on a national level, guests enjoy studios showcasSteven Forbes-deSoule Ann Hord-Heatherly ing handmade pottery, glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, paintings, drawings, fiber art, and more. of art donated Bid on works The caliber of art involved also atby selected during the online tracted media figurative artist, Ann Hordparticipating live auction! Heatherly to be part of the tour this fall. artists. The auc“The first time I attended the Weaverville tion pieces can Art Safari, I was astounded at the wealth of be previewed at www.uglymonkeyauctions. talent in the area. Now, several years later, I com beginning September 27. Bidding starts am truly excited to be a part of the event that on October 24 and runs through November helped bring me here.” 2. Items donated will also be available for Founding artist Lelia Canter played an preview at donating studios both days of the integral role in the creation of the Weaverville Safari. All proceeds fund the Weaverville Art Art Safari and looks back on the early days Safari, a non-profit organization. with fondness. “Through the years, the growth Guests looking to plan their visit can pick and maturity of the Weaverville Art Safari has up Weaverville Art Safari brochures containbeen like seeing your child grow and mature,” ing maps and artist information at greater says Lelia. “It has become a great asset to the Asheville-area galleries, restaurants, and shops community it was created to benefit.” beginning in October. Brochures will also be Those unable to attend the tour can still distributed from an Art Safari information experience local art from the comfort of their booth located on Main Street in Weaverville home. For the first time ever, the Weaverduring the Safari weekend. A downloadable ville Art Safari will offer an online auction

continued on page 11

10 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

studio tours

A

R

T

S

Haywood Art Studio Tour 2014

E

Explore Haywood County and meet some very talented artists and crafts people during the self-guided Haywood Art Studio tour weekend.

By

NiNa HOWaRD

Haywood Community College professional craft students will also participate and the public is invited to view the new state of the arts Works by Crystal Allen at facility on campus. the Mahogany House. Some very talented and interesting artists are organizOctober 25 from 10-5 p.m. ing a self-guided driving tour Gayle Haney and Sunday, October 26, of artists’ studios and creative from 12-5 p.m. centers in Haywood County. Maps for the tour The intent is to introduce to can be downloaded from local residents and visitors the Haywood County Arts the depth of creative talent Council website www. in all media being expressed haywoodarts.org/, at Gallery in Haywood County and 86 on Main Street, The Mato benefit the artists in the hogany House Art Gallery county by adding another and Studio at 240 Depot venue for exploring the arts. Street, Waynesville, NC. The 2014 Haywood Art Party with the artists Studio Tour will include 41 and see some of their work artists and Haywood Comon Thursday October 23 at munity College Professional Cathey Bolton Frog Level Brewing from Crafts Program at 17 loca6-9 at 56 Commerce Street. tions in central and north-central Haywood Pick up brochures at Gallery 86 on Main County. The tour will include 10 clay artists, and at the Mahogany House at 240 Depot, and 3 fiber artists, 11 wood artists, 3 jewelry artists, the gallery Art on Depot, all in Waynesville. a glass artist, a corn shuck doll artist, 9 artist working on paper and canvas in watercolor, acrylic, oil and encaustic, and 3 mixed –media IF artists. YOU Haywood Art Studio Tour, Saturday, GO October 25, 10-5 p.m. and Sunday, A preview party and artist reception will October 26, noon - 5 p.m. Visit the be held at Frog Level Brewing Company at 56 Haywood Arts Council, www.haywoodarts.org Commerce Street, Waynesville on October for more information and a brochure. 23 from 6-9 p.m. The tour dates are Saturday,

pg. 40

DC

divine in-vention

‘Art Safari’ cont’d. from pg. 10

brochure with map and full details about participating artists is also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

About The Weaverville Art Safari

The Weaverville Art Safari is an event staged twice each year — the last full weekend in April and the first full weekend in November — by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art community on the northern outskirts of Asheville. Since then thousands of people have returned over and over each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience. Local B&Bs do a brisk business.

Tom Hoxie IF YOU Weaverville Art Safari, November 1 GO and 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more

information on the participating artists, visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com or contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) 645-9065 or forbes143@charter.net.

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

pg. 20

13

Oxidized silver and 18kt gold rings with gemstones

63 Haywood St. • Asheville, NC • 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10:30-6 Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 11


R

JOHN WESLEY WILLIAMS FURNITURE

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

pg. 44

gg

www.johnwesleywilliamsfurniture.com

Located inside Omni Grove Park Inn

Local and Regional Handmade Crafts Now in our 30th year of supporting American handmade pg. 40

gM

Pendant by Niki Fisk

Gallery of the Mountains

290 Macon Avenue TOLL - FREE

(800) 692-2204

Asheville, NC

(828) 254-2068

www.galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine Now iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly! www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

The 67th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

T

next to the Grove Park Inn 82 8 . 25 3.76 51

S

fine arts & crafts

The 67th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands takes place at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, October 16-19.

Sold Exclusively at the Grovewood Gallery

R T

By

apRiL NaNCE

and local economies while supporting artists working in the Appalachian mountains, and by spending a summer or fall weekend in Nearly 200 juried artists beautiful Asheville. of the Southern Highland In addition to proCraft Guild will be selling viding a retail market works of clay, metal, wood, for juried members, jewelry, fiber, paper, natural the Guild hosts craft materials, leather and mixed demonstrations during media. With styles ranging the Fairs. A strong part from traditional to contemof the Guild’s mission porary, the Fairs showcase the is to educate the public Collene Karcher rich talent, diversity and craft demonstrates stone carving about the history of mastery of Guild members. with hammer and chisel. crafts in this region, The Fairs began in 1948 various craft techas a way to provide a regional niques, and an appreciation for fine crafts. market for mountain craftspeople. Since Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete that time, the Craft Fairs have set the list of scheduled craft demonstrations. standard for fine craft shows across the Beginning on Friday during each country. Nearly 20,000 visitors to the Craft Fair, mountain musicians perform Fairs each year invest in the regional live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of the Craft Fair experience. From old time to bluegrass, this tradition is kept alive today. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of performances. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 with headquarters at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Kyle Carpenter

DEMONSTRATIONS OCTOBER 16-19

Dede Styles of Swannanoa, NC will demonstrate spinning and the traditional craft of using natural plant dyes to color yarn outside the US Cellular Center. Dede has been a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild since 2000 and is a frequent demonstrator during Fiber and Heritage Weekends.

12 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

Parkway in Asheville. The Guild region covers the mountain counties of nine southeastern states from Maryland to Alabama, representing over 900 craftspeople. The Craft Fairs are one of the ways in which the Laura Cardwell Guild fulfills its mission which is to bring together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. To learn more about Guild programs, visit www.craftguild.org.

IF YOU The Craft Fair of the Southern GO Highlands, October 16-19; 10

a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday – Saturday, and 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. U.S. Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 298-7928, or visit www.craftguild.org.

3 p.m. – Hot Duck Soup, zany tunes from the teens, twenties, and thirties!

Collene Karcher of Bakersville, NC, will be demonstrating the nearly lost art of hand-carved letters in stone – one tap at a time, with hammer and chisel. Pam Etheredge of Afton, TN, will demonstrate pine needle basket making. She has been a member of the SHCG since 2012 and is a frequent exhibitor at special event days at the Folk Art Center such as Fiber and Heritage Weekends.

Jim Sams

Saturday, October 18

11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass, traditional bluegrass standards. 1 p.m. – Split Rail, strong vocal harmony is their trademark. 3 p.m. – Moore Brothers, Americana, Blues, Newgrass, Grass, Country, Jazz & Gospel Flavors. Southern Crescent Bluegrass

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE OCTOBER 17-19 Friday, October 17

11 a.m. – Carol Rifkin and Friends, original and traditional mountain music. 1 p.m. – Cane Creek Bluegrass Band, bluegrass and bluegrass gospel.

Sunday, October 19

11 a.m. – Ric Ledford & Reems Creek Incident, wide variety of traditional, not-so-traditional and original bluegrass music. 1 p.m. – Mountain Friends, high energy American swing-grass. 3 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike, traditional and contemporary bluegrass to gospel and originals.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

fine art

U

L

T

U

R

E

Jumble, Tumble & Spin

I

A lot of my new thoughts stream-in at the laundromat while watching my stumbling clothes in the dryers. Even though most of the contents are the same every week – especially for those who have oh, say, five favorite outfits – I find it fascinating that the endless endover-end, colorful jumble within a giant metal cylinder is still a bit different each time. Thoughts like this lead me to believe I can connect visual aspects of drying my clothes to a topic like creative originality, and then relay it to you. Now, notice I didn’t say coherently. But let’s roll with it, for the very nature of Blue-Sky Brainstorming requires pushing forward far enough to see around the bend.

By

gREg ViNEyaRD

Developing ideas and producing creative output with unique intentions, style, expression and messaging is much like those spinning shirts: our personal choices are blended with societal influences and unknown factors that led to this particular basket of laundry. Studies, experiences, and unexpected things can change the parameters in slight ways, yet with exponential possibilities. And we’re always undergoing ever-changing sensory input. For example, at the laundromat, there are others shuffling about, competing blaring televisions, the smell and swish of a bleach-filled mop, cell phone conversations,

Weekly Spin Grid, 2014, photo by Greg Vineyard

THE BUSINESS OF ART Create or Improve Your Artist Statement

T

There are multiple elements every artist should have in their portfolio. The most powerful is the artist statement. (Other documents will be discussed in later issues.) Your statement should be an informative, yet concise description that tells the reader what you do, how you do it, and why you do it. If you haven’t already completed your statement, start now. If you do have a statement, and would like to improve it, read on! Why is an artist statement so important? Because, when properly written, it conveys to the reader important details about you and also your work. By thoughtfully addressing each of the three questions above, you can provide insight for the collector as to why your work is worth owning. You may find it easier to get started by just jotting down notes, then go back and flesh it out. In describing what it is you do, include the medium, style, subject, scale, and note any particular areas of specialization. Next, list the method and materials you use, mentioning any unusual process, technique, tools/equipment, time required, and/or work location. And finally, explain why the work has meaning to you. This portion of your statement is often the most compelling, as it helps the reader know more about you as an individual. Maybe you started drawing as a child, influenced by a family member, and later earned your fine arts degree. Or you took a class at a craft school on a lark, and then dove

By

WENDy H. OUTLaND

straight in, knowing deep in your bones that you had found what you were meant to be doing. Perhaps a particular insight influenced your choice of materials. Describe the feelings you have while you are creating your work. Some artists are introverted and uncomfortable beating their own drum. However, this is one time you must not hold back! Write, review, edit. Read it aloud. Ask a few close friends to read it and give helpful feedback. Finally, recognize that as you continue to grow as an artist, your statement may need to be updated. Any time you are preparing to submit to a new gallery, competition, or other opportunity, read your statement aloud slowly to yourself. It can be a very powerful asset, so take the time to make changes as needed. You won’t regret it! The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Life is dynamic and always fluctuating...

THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW IN THE UNIVERSE

I believe that connecting seemingly unrelated concepts generates fresh ideas.

M

and on and on. Nothing’s ever exactly the same, even within set routines. That phenomenon of widely ranging variables is always in play in our creative and working processes, too. For example, one may start to draw, and one’s cat may decide that it’s time to play a round of “Catch Every Mousie,” because one’s cat may be wacky like that. And yet, those interruptions – by felines or people – can generate new thoughts. Life is dynamic and always fluctuating, even on the seemingly most routine of days. The potential to create one’s own, original art and style is sky-high. Sometimes, though, a “copyist” can sneak in. The type who is perhaps stalled in the important early process of learned techniques, still awaiting a catalyst or just-right teacher to help them to the next level. But mostly, I see us as immersed here in delightful innovators, who pay homage to their

inspirations, and who then leap up, using the shadows of their heroes as wings, presenting us with unique offerings. So, I say it is entirely OK to be an advocate for the concept of originality, and to naysay the naysayers when they fall back on the atbest, tired, and at-worst, lazy, explanation for unoriginality: that there’s nothing new in the universe. It simply isn’t true. We, as thinking, decision-making, hands-on, praying, meditating, channeling, brilliant human beings have unlimited potential to generate something new. Ideation is key. Continuous effort is key. That very same universe some use as an excuse is the one the rest of us trust and look to for electric inspiration. Ideation and continuous efforts are key, and they work in concert with good ol’ sweat-equity, with results that can surprise and delight even ourselves. May you forever look at your laundry differently, and be reminded that every moment is unique, every idea has potential, and that bringing yourself to the party is the gift. Think of the universe as a giant, spinning dryer, tumbling us all around with some degree of containment, mixing, rising, falling, and seek some glint of a new idea in that. One that’s all warm and fabric-softenery. Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

Regional Artist Project Grant

S

Support is available to assist developing professionals in the advancement of their careers as artists.

The selection criteria include artistic merit, the potential of the project to contribute to the artist’s professional growth, and the feasibility of the project itself. The Regional Artist Project Grants range from $400-$1,200. Eligibility guidelines: Professional, individual artists as well as small unincorporated groups of collaborating artists of all disciplines may apply. May be either emerging or established artists. Must have a strong record of artistic accomplishment appropriate to the stage of their career. Must have been a resident of a participating county as of July 1, 2013. Must be at least 18 years of age. The relationship of the project to career achievement must be well defined. Applica-

tions should be written with a particular project in mind. The review committee is looking for diverse project proposals and exceptional talent and overall excellence of the artist’s work. Projects should demonstrate commitment to a career as a practicing professional artist. The feasibility of the project and likelihood of completion within one year will also be considered. An information session will be held on Monday, October 6 from 12-1 p.m. at the Asheville Area Arts Council, located in The Grove Arcade, 1 Page Ave., Ste. 144, in Asheville. Although not required for grant submission, the session will offer instruction for completing the application, as well as some advice on presenting a positive proposal. Grant applications are due Tuesday, October 14, 2014, by 5 p.m. Visit www.ashevillearts.com/ regional-artist-project-grant-program

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 13


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them  ½

Short Take: In the wake of tragedy, a young couple struggles to come to grips with life, love and their selves.

REEL TAKE: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is the debut film from writer/director Ned Benson. It’s been met with mixed critical reviews and has probably been getting more notoriety for how the story was executed than for anything else. It was actually made as two films: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her and The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him. Each version tells the story of a couple struggling with life and love in the wake of a

T

James McAvoy and Jessica Chastain in a good place before The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby.

THE MONTHLY REEL

Trick or Treat?

In September, news outlets reported that Hollywood’s projections were down for 2014. Most of the mainstream movies this summer were certainly mediocre at best, and with the cost of a night at the movies these days, it’s no wonder folks are choosing to watch movies via any number of affordable, stay-at-home, on-demand options. While some of the mainstream titles may be a bit of a disappointment, Chip and I are still marveling at the offerings this year from the smaller end of the movie industry. We’ve been treated to a plethora of art house and indie titles of late. However, as effusive as Chip and I have been about many of these films, indies come with their share of duds too. I’m still rankled that I wasted two hours of my life on The Last Weekend. If you missed it [and I hope you did], it was a pointless family drama for the 1 percent. Local critics were treated to an advance screening of Kevin Smith’s Tusk, a bizarre satirical horror tale about a mad recluse who traps an annoying podcaster and proceeds to transform his captive into a walrus. While most of us were somewhat entertained, I’m not sure that

any of us know exactly who to recommend it to. Suffice to say Kevin Smith has out-weirded himself as only he could do. A master historian and fan of pulp horror films, the good Professor Kaufmann offers a few of his thoughts on page 17. On the plus list this month we’ve got The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby, The Drop, Love is Strange, The November Man, The Skeleton Twins, and The Trip to Italy. It should be noted that two quirkier titles, Michel Gondry’s Mood Indigo and Charlie McDowell’s The One I Love will have left by the time this issue comes out but are worthwhile celluloid dalliances. Getting us all in the mood for All Hallow’s Eve, the Asheville Film Society has a great line up for the month including its Thursday Horror Picture Show. AFS Creative Director Ken Hanke has also managed to line up a rare treat, a screening of Ken Russell’s Lisztomania with special guest presenter Lisi Russell. Meanwhile Chip has prepared a great line up for the Hendersonville Film Society this month, including A Stolen Face, one of Hammer Films’ early noir-style melodramas, a 1979 remake of Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps,

14 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

tragedy, one told from her perspective, one told from his. When the project was brought to Harvey Weinstein, Weinstein had Benson re-cut the film, ergo creating a third film: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them. The combined film was recently released and there are plans to do a limited release of the other two a little further down the road. For now let’s just focus on Them. Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) and James McAvoy (Atonement) are Eleanor Rigby and Connor Ludlow. Their marriage has disintegrated, she’s attempted suicide (which eerily fits when you’re named after the saddest character in the annals of Rock & Roll history) and now she’s ‘disappeared’ from his life. What

By

MiCHELLE kEENaN

and Dead of Night, a series of British ghost stories. Be sure to also check out Chip’s article about Terence Fisher, a recently rediscovered British director who directed some of Hammer Films’ best titles. In keeping with the theme and his article, Chip selected Fisher’s Horror of Dracula as his DVD pick for the month. I meanwhile selected Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive, a film which will most likely be on my Top Ten list this year and which was recently released on DVD. Finally, coming soon to a theatre near you: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl directed by David Fincher and starring Ben Afleck, David Ayer’s Fury starring Brad Pitt, The Judge starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Robert Duvall, Michael Cuesta’s Kill the Messenger based on reporter Gary Webb’s harrowing true story, My Old Lady, starring Kevin Kline, Kristen Scott Thomas and Maggie Smith and finally, Dracula Untold – after all, every bloodline has a beginning. We’ll be sure to tell you what we think of them next month. Until then, enjoy and Happy Halloween!

unfolds uneasily, yet elegantly, is the story of why and what happens next. I confess I didn’t expect to particularly like this film, let alone be drawn into it. The first twenty minutes were touch and go, but once I settled in I realized I was all in. First and foremost I cared. Credit for that goes to Denson’s writing and excellent lead performances from Chastain and McAvoy. The supporting cast is wonderful as well, including William Hurt and Isabelle Huppert as Eleanor’s parents, Viola Davis as a Professor, SNL alum Bill Hader as Connor’s BFF and chef, and Ciaran Hinds as Connor’s emotionally awkward father. There’s a realness to the dialogue and characters that is emotionally raw and evocative and [for me] transcended the film’s flaws. Part of the joy of watching this movie was in not knowing a lot about it and in its piecemeal telling. The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them stands just fine on its own. I don’t think the other two versions are necessary, but they don’t have to be, to be just as good. Rated R for language. Review by Michelle Keenan

The Drop  ½

Short Take: Based on a short story by Dennis Lehane, Tom Hardy delivers a quietly engrossing performance and leads a great cast in a not so run-of-the-mill crime drama.

James Gandolfini and Tom Hardy make The Drop.

REEL TAKE: Based on the short story “Animal Rescue” by Dennis Lehane (and adapted for film by Dennis Lehane), The Drop is a highly satisfying crime drama with a slightly Movies continued on page 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Movies continued from page 14

dented moral compass at its center. Bob Saginowski (Tom Hardy) is a quiet, seemingly dull-witted bartender at Cousin Marv’s, a Brooklyn watering hole and cash drop site for the Chechen mob. Marv (James Gandolfini) still runs the bar, but was muscled out of ownership by the Chechens. Together Bob and Marv run the place and navigate the tension in a neighborhood that seems to wax nostalgically for a bygone era and its glory days. Bob is the narrative voice and the story’s rudder. He is soft-spoken and reserved. He attends mass daily and lives alone in the house that was obviously his family’s home. When he finds a badly abused [but irresistibly adorable] pit bull puppy in a neighbor’s trashcan one night, it seems his loner routine is about to get sacked by man’s best friend and the pretty neighbor, Nadia (Noomi Rapace / Prometheus, Girl With The Dragon Tatoo). Soon, however, a neighborhood creep and apparent psychopath lays claim to the dog, to Nadia and to an unsolved murder from a few years back. Meanwhile the bar is robbed one night, leaving Marv on the hook with the Chechens for $5,000. With that, the wheels are in motion, building an intensely simmering drama. The Drop marks Belgian director Michael R. Roskam’s US debut. Roscam who most notably directed 2011’s Oscar-nominated Bullhead, sets just the right tone to the film. Adding a wonderfully disturbing level of suspense to the proceedings is Bullhead’s lead actor Matthias Schoenaerts as Eric Deeds, the aforementioned psychopath. Naomi Rapace is another unusual but solid casting call. Tom Hardy as Bob will be a revelation to many. Best known to American audiences as Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, Hardy will soon be known as one of the best actors of his generation. Fresh off his brilliant turn in Locke, he gives yet another performance (in an ever-growing list of wonderful projects) that shows the depth and breadth of his talent. In true Brit tradition he is a journeyman actor. Sadly, The Drop marks Gandolfini’s swan song. On the surface Gandolfini seems like just another version of Tony Soprano, but as with everything else in The Drop, the story isn’t about what’s on the surface. Marv is deceptively layered and vulnerable and [as always] Gandolfini brings deceptive nuance to the character. The Drop is a well crafted, ensemble effort. This was the first time Lehane adapted one of his stories for the screen, and I hope he will continue to do so. The direction, cinematography, editing are tight and effective. Unfortunately Roskam’s subtle directional reserve may have some thinking it’s not as great as it could have been, but it’s exactly that tone that made this movie work for me. Without a name at the helm like Eastwood, Afleck and Scorsese, The Drop didn’t garner the box office fanfare that other Lehane adaptations have, which is unfortunate. The Drop has warmth at its heart that the

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

film reviews

others lack. It’s a moody, slow burn that draws the viewer in. Give it time to unfold and it will quietly surprise you. Rated R for some strong violence and pervasive language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Love Is Strange 

Short Take: John Lithgow and Alfred Molina are pitch perfect as a pair of aging gay lovers whose marriage triggers an upheaval in their lives and those of their relatives.

T

U

R

E

crisis 101 with the distant father, the stressed out mom, and the rebellious teenage son. The other performances are good, just not up to the level of Lithgow and Molina. Marisa Tomei gives it her best shot and has several good moments but when the two leads aren’t there, I quickly lost interest. The “sensitive” Chopin soundtrack didn’t help either. Of course domestic dramas aren’t one of my favorite genres to begin with so this review is a reflection of that. Many people will likely find it more involving than I did and, if you do, then good for you. One thing that is beyond criticism is that the performances by Lithgow and Molina alone make Love Is Strange worth seeing. I give the film 4 stars because it deserves it. For tackling sensitive subject material and not making it preachy, writer-director Ira Sachs’ latest feature film deserves your support. Rated R for language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

The November Man  ½ John Lithgow and Alfred Molina are pitch perfect as an aging gay couple in Love is Strange.

REEL TAKE: While the title of the movie is Love is Strange, it’s actually familiar on a number of levels. Some of the more knowledgeable critics recognized a strong similarity to Leo McCarey’s powerful 1937 domestic drama Make Way for Tomorrow. The plot of that film concerns two aging parents who lose their home and are forced to live apart with their children who are not happy about it. Update that plot-line to the 21st century with the aging parents transformed into a pair of elderly gay men who have been together for nearly 40 years. When they are finally allowed to marry, one of them loses his job as a Catholic choir director and they are forced to give up their long time apartment and go and live with separate relatives who accept them happily…at first. It is to writer-director Ira Sachs credit that he doesn’t try to turn Love Is Strange into a statement about gay marriage. By treating his gay characters as regular human beings instead of victims, the gravity of what happens to them has a much greater impact. While important, the fact that they are gay is incidental to the story (which could happen to anybody) and that is how it should be. Alfred Molina and John Lithgow are simply sublime as long time partners Ben and George. Their portrayals are so honest and true to life that we forget about the well known actors up there on the screen and experience only their characters. Both are worthy of Oscar consideration and that should happen but it probably won’t. I wish I could say the same about the rest of the movie but I can’t. To be fair the problem lies in Ira Sachs and Mauricio Zacharias’ screenplay. This is domestic drama/family

Short Take: The familiar spy comes out of retirement for one last assignment. The November Man benefits from Pierce Brosnan’s charisma and solid work on both sides of the camera.

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

he trained (Luke Bracey) is ordered not to bring him in but to take him out. This leads to the old cat and mouse game between teacher and pupil. As in any good spy thriller there are a number of plot twists which, if they don’t surprise, do manage to be effective. The one involving the person responsible for all the subterfuge was well handled and scored points with me. Australian director Roger Donaldson who once upon a time gave us high caliber movies like The Bounty (1984) and Cadillac Man (1990), has been out of the big leagues for a number of years but he still knows how to put together a well made movie full of solid entertainment. He just needs to read his scripts before he signs on the dotted line. There’s nothing wrong with being a journeyman director (one who’s been around awhile and will take whatever assignment he’s offered) as long as you can still deliver the goods. Donaldson still can but I just wish that he hadn’t copied the Jason Bourne style of hand held chase sequences and the occasional gratuitous bits of slow motion violence. Brosnan still looks fine in a tailored suit and brings a fair amount of intensity to a well traveled role. He is more than ably supported by the other cast members including Olga Kurylenko, Bracey, and most notably Bill Smitovitch as his long time cohort in the CIA. It was interesting to note that, at my early Movies continued on page 16

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Pierce Brosnan is in fine form as a retired CIA agent back in the game in The November Man.

REEL TAKE: The November Man is another

movie in the time honored tradition of the star driven action-adventure film that has nothing more on its mind than showing off its brand name and keeping its audience entertained for a couple of hours. As a rule that’s all these movies are meant to be and November Man is no exception. It has no real staying power once you leave the theater but while I was there, it held my interest and I focused on it rather than my old school illuminated wrist watch (remember no cell phones during the movie). Pierce Brosnan is Peter Devereaux, a retired CIA agent now living in Switzerland who is brought back into the game to smuggle a key CIA witness out of Russia. The fact that she is the mother of his child gains added importance when she is killed by CIA agents. Brosnan’s character is then declared a rogue and, in a plot line lifted from Michael Winner’s Scorpio (1972), the young agent

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

The Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Movies continued from page 13

afternoon first day showing, the majority of the audience (and it was surprisingly well attended) were well over 40 and they thoroughly enjoyed it. So did I. Rated R for strong violence including a sexual assault, language, nudity, and brief drug use. Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Skeleton Twins 

Short Take: A dysfunctional family comedy-drama featuring SNL alums Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig.

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

(True Adolescents) took the Best Writing award at The Sundance Film Festival last January. The fact that Hader and Wiig spent years together on SNL is a distinct attribute. In sketch comedy, they know how to read each other and play off of one another. In this case that elevates the darkly comic moments, but it also transcends comedy, building a more meaningful and emotionally palpable drama. The Skeleton Twins is funny, sweet, sad and sometimes cruel, but ultimately satisfying. Now that Hader and Wiig have more than proven their comedic and dramatic acting chops, I’m really looking forward to seeing what’s next for both.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Horror of Dracula”

REEL TAKE: When long estranged twins Milo

(Bill Hader) and Maggie (Kristen Wiig) are awkwardly reunited following Milo’s recent suicide attempt, the two begin a journey of healing and self realization. Milo has unsuccessfully pursued the Hollywood dream for the past ten years, while Maggie has tried to build the ‘perfect’ life they never had as children with her husband Lance (Luke Wilson, The Royal Tenenbaums). When Maggie brings Milo back to their hometown they are forced to deal with some issues which will hopefully mend their relationship. Though suicide is more of a plot device than anything else in the film, mental and emotional health is at the core of the story. Milo doesn’t do much to conceal his flaws and shortcomings, but Maggie is a secret basket case. As we learn the damage and sorrows that have misshapen them, but ultimately bind them together, we also come to know the conflicts that separated them for so long. Modern Family’s Ty Burrell plays well in this plot point as a former teacher who had a profound influence on Milo’s life. The Skeleton Twins doesn’t break much new ground story-wise, but it is a shining example of how comedy-drama should be done. Screenwriters Mark Heyman (The Black Swan, The Wrestler) and Craig Johnson

Web Exclusive The Asheville Film Society & Hendersonville Film Society schedules are online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

U

L

film reviews

Rated R for language, some sexuality and drug use.

SNL alums Tom Hander and Kristen Wiig as The Skeleton Twins.

C

T

U

R

E

16 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

The Trip to Italy  ½

Short Take: British comedians Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan are reunited for another road trip of food, impersonations and romantic poets.

REEL TAKE: In 2010 Michael Winterbottom made a film for British television called The Trip which sent British comedians Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan (playing alternate versions of themselves), as they traipsed about the English countryside reviewing England’s finest restaurants, staying in posh boutique hotels and regaling in the poetry of Lord Byron. Along the way the two endlessly swapped improvised witty banter and non-stop impersonations of famous thespians and icons. If it’s your cup of tea, it’s hilarious. I was delighted to hear that Winterbottom had teamed up with Brydon and Coogan again

October DVD Picks

Horror of Dracula (1958)

Of all the movies to be found in Terence Fisher’s output (see article this section), none is more highly regarded than Dracula (Horror of Dracula in America to distinguish it from Bela Lugosi’s Dracula which had just been reissued in 1958). Everything is here from the preRaphaelite use of color (giving it the look of a painting come to life) to the masterly use of lighting effects, camera angles, and Fisher’s trademark tight-as-a-drum editing which is what gives the film it’s maximum impact. The movie made international horror stars out of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee (still alive and active at 92) who is considered by many to be the definitive screen Dracula. It’s also the ideal introduction to the Gothic style of England’s Hammer Films which influenced and dominated the horror market for the next 10 years. Like all movie versions, Horror of Dracula varies considerably from Bram Stoker’s novel. The screenplay by Jimmy Sangster is a benchmark in adaptation. Characters are eliminated or combined and the action never moves to England. It all takes place in a mythical German setting where everyone speaks perfect British English (also a Hammer trademark). What made this version of Dracula so shocking in its day was the use of color, the ferocity of Lee’s Dracula (he’s like a wild animal), and the undisguised sexual overtones when Dracula seduces a female victim before draining her of blood. Dracula’s demise (not the usual staking) has never been equaled. The film was restored in 2012 for its U.K. Blu-Ray release. Unfortunately that version isn’t available (yet) in the U.S.

M

In the meantime the Warner Brothers DVD release of a few years ago will do the trick. With the new Dracula Untold now in theaters, this is a chance to see where the modern film version of the character began.

Only Lovers Left Alive (2014)

The vampire flick I’m recommending this Halloween is a bit of a departure from the usual blood sucking fare. Only Lovers Left Alive may be writer director Jim Jarmusch’s best work yet. It may also be one of the best vampire films to date and is certainly one of the most unique. While Jarmusch’s work is always slightly offbeat, you can’t lump his films together stylistically, nor adequately describe them. You don’t so much watch his films as you do let them envelop you. He fires on all cylinders – script, actors, photography, music, pacing – all working together to create uniquely atmospheric films that defy categorization. Only Lovers Left Alive isn’t a vampire movie about two lovers. It’s a movie about two lovers who happen to be vampires. Taking it a step further it’s a movie about two people whose love not only spans the centuries, but whose observations about the world also span the ages. For all practical purposes Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and

Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan take another gastronomical road trip in The Trip to Italy.

for a sequel, The Trip to Italy. As with the first film, there really isn’t much structure, Movies continued on page 17

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Only Lovers Left Alive” Eve (Tilda Swinton) are a wonderfully comfortable, old married couple. At the film’s start Adam is a depressed musician living in Detroit (which, by the way, makes an inspired backdrop for a couple of vampires). Eve lives in Tangiers where she pals around with another immortal bloodsucker, Christopher Marlowe. While the film never discusses whether Adam and Eve are the Adam and Eve, Christopher Marlowe is the Christopher Marlowe and they do have fun at William Shakespeare’s illiterate expense. Worried about Adam, Eve travels to Detroit. They enjoy a blissfully, languorous reunion until it is unceremoniously interrupted by Eve’s younger sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska). While Adam, Eve and Christopher are very civilized vampires, who prefer to drink their blood as we would a fine port or sherry, Ava is still a neck biting, blood sucking, party girl. Trouble is sure to follow. Jarmusch’s script is absolutely delicious. Hiddleston, who is best known to American audiences as Loki in the Thor and Avengers movies, but is equally comfortable in a costume drama or doing a soft shoe a la Fred Astaire, is utterly transformed as Adam. Tilda Swinton is elegant and lovely as Eve. She is an excellent actress, but perhaps not as versatile as Hiddleston, as she only seems truly at home in a film like this or a Derek Jarman vehicle. Only Lovers Left Alive is wonderfully written. What surprised me about it was its warmth. This could easily be an esoteric Jarmusch expository, but for me it’s a much more beautiful, more elegant and ultimately more powerful statement because of its warmth and love. It’s wonderfully literary and appropriately tinged with sadness and occasional flashes of humor.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Movies continued from page 16

just the fun of watching the trip. The scenery is phenomenal, the food is gorgeous, and they still manage to follow the trail of romantic English poets. Coogan is somewhat broody at the start of the film, but that theaterssoon fades away as Brydon begins a muffled one-man conversation between Christian Bale’s Batman and Tom Hardy’s villainous Bane from The Dark Knight Rises. Coogan, who is best known to American audiences for Philomena and the Night at the Museum franchise, is a comedic zeitgeist in the UK. Brydon, who is lesser known to Americans, is also a wildly popular comedian and mimic in his mother land. His Michael Caine and Hugh Grant impersonations and ‘small man in box’ voice will make you laugh until your sides hurt (and all are featured here). The Trip to Italy may not be quite as fresh as the first trip, but it’s actually the better of the two films. Though the confines of the story are slight for the altered versions of themselves, both characters are dealing with professional and personal issues. Even amongst the gastronomic and bucolic bounty of Italy, they share an edge of human fallibility and angst. One doesn’t need to have seen The Trip in order to see The Trip to Italy, but it certainly helps. Unfortunately The Trip to Italy may be gone from theaters by the time this issue is out. If that’s the case and The Trip to Italy sounds like your cuppa tea, watch for it on DVD soon. Not Rated Review by Michelle Keenan

Tusk  ½

Short Take: An incredibly bizarre offering from Kevin Smith that is full of creativity and dark wit but only about 1 in 100 will probably be willing to sit through it.

REEL TAKE: Of the group of reviewers that I saw it with at an advance screening, I can safely say that I enjoyed Tusk more than the rest of them which is interesting as they went in with higher expectations than I did. I am not a huge fan of Kevin Smith’s early efforts like Clerks (1994) and Dogma (1999) but his later efforts such as Zach & Miri Make A Porno (2008) and Red State (2011) did make more of a positive impression… the former for its characterizations, the latter for its dialogue. Red State in particular featured Michael Parks, one of my favorite performers for many years, in a key role. In Tusk he is virtually the whole show as a melancholy, articulate madman whose main objective is to turn a human into a walrus. The human in question is obnoxious podcaster Wallace Bryton (Justin Long) who makes Howard Stern seem positively genteel. He also treats his long suffering girlfriend (Genesis Rodriguez) like something you occasionally step in. Wallace has gone to Manitoba to interview a young kid who cut his leg off with a sword

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

film reviews

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Terence Fisher: the Poor Man’s Hitchcock

W

When I refer to British director Terence Fisher as “the poor man’s Hitchcock,” I do not mean that in a disparaging way.

I mean it as a compliment, for while Fisher made his movies pretty much the way Hitchcock did, he never had the kind of budgets that Hitch had in America. Terence Fisher made all but one of his 50 movies in England over a period of 25 years (1947-1972). Thirty-seven of them were for the same studio. That studio was Hammer Films and Fisher helmed their most successful movies during the late 1950s and early 1960s. These movies turned Hammer into an international phenomenon and made them very successful financially. This despite the fact (or perhaps because of it) that Fisher’s movies were roundly condemned upon their release as being “violent, vulgar, and vomit inducing.” Today it’s hard to imagine what all the fuss was about as movies have gone way beyond anything to be found in Fisher’s work. Now they are “classics” that can be appreciated for their superb craftsmanship and for the performances of their primary stars, Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. Terence Fisher was born in 1904 and died in 1980. He began in the British film industry when Hitchcock was England’s number one director. He started off in menial positions but quickly worked his way up to becoming a film editor. He made his first film in 1947 and was finally given a chance to direct something of substance in 1949. So Long at the Fair (1949) starring Jean Simmons and Dirk Bogarde was set during the Paris Exhibition of 1889 and it

The first stage of Justin Long’s transformation into a walrus in Kevin Smith’s satirical horror film Tusk.

and then posted it online making him an internet sensation. Unfortunately when he gets there, the kid has committed suicide so he’s

showed his flair for handling By CHip kaUFMaNN a period setting. The film impressed Hammer enough to hire him. They put him to number one director at work grinding out a series of Hammer. After making 31 British-style film noirs using films in 10 years for the fading, or up-and-coming company, he would only American stars. make 6 in the next 8, retirIn 1953 he made his first ing for good in 1974. masterpiece for Hammer, a A serious accident doomed love story with a sciin 1968 (he was struck by ence fiction background called a car while crossing the The Four Sided Triangle about street after the premiere Fisher on the set of a scientist cloning the woman of The Devil Rides Out) Frankenstein Must Be he loves because she loves certainly had its effect on Destroyed (1969). someone else. This showed him, but so did the changthat Fisher could handle a laboratory setting ing times. That same year Rosemary’s which was essential for whoever would direct Baby and the original Night of the Living the planned remake of Universal’s FrankenDead were released and Hammer Horror stein. Hammer had recently scored with a was now seen as tame and outdated. The successful series of sci-fi thrillers which tied Exorcist (1973) was the final nail in the up their other directors so Fisher was free to coffin. helm The Curse of Frankenstein. In order to compete, Hammer tried Viewing it from the start as a Gothic fairy exchanging the pre-Raphaelite look for tale, Fisher made sure that the film’s look the Playboy approach but it was too late. would be artistic as opposed to realistic. The Fisher’s last two films reflected this change. acting was theatrical, the lighting operatic, The “good shall prevail but at a cost” manthe Technicolor vivid with a dominant use tra from his earlier films was now replaced of primary colors, the camerawork fluid, and by a bleak nihilism that can be seen in Franthen the whole thing was tightly edited (in the kenstein Must be Destroyed (1969). camera) for maximum impact. The success Happily, he did live long enough to was immediate and overwhelming. Shot on a see his films, which had gone from being budget of less than $300,000, Curse grossed an critically reviled to being considered “dull astounding $8 million worldwide, and this was and hopelessly old-fashioned.” They in 1957. Hammer Films was off and running. become regarded as prime examples of suThey went to work adapting all of preme craftsmanship on a modest budget Universal’s classic monsters and Terence and studied as examples of how to use the Fisher directed them all. Dracula (1958), The various tools of moviemaking to enhance Mummy (1959), The Curse of the Werewolf the story you are telling. (1961), and The Phantom of the Opera (1962). Fisher may be no Hitchcock, but few All were very successful except for Phantom have succeeded in capturing such a consiswhich was the first of Hammer’s films to lose tent look in their films or in consistently money. This cost Fisher his position as the achieving what they set out to do.

stuck without a story. After responding to one of those homemade ads that you tear the phone number off of, he’s on his way to meet Howard Howe (Parks) who has this thing for walruses. After drinking a cup of drugged tea, Wallace passes out and wakes up minus a leg but that is only the beginning. He is then surgically transformed into a human walrus (sort of an Island of Doctor Moreau in reverse) while Howe explains in eloquent language and flashbacks why he has this thing for one particular walrus he named “Mr. Tusk”. In the meantime, Wallace’s girlfriend and his on-air partner (Hayley Joel Osmont) are trying to track Wallace down with the aid of a spaced out former police inspector from Quebec played by a big name star in heavy makeup and using an alias. He’s funny for the first

few minutes but quickly becomes the movie’s biggest liability as the movie stops dead in its tracks to allow him to do his thing. I enjoyed it because it reminded me of drive-in rubbish like Flesh Feast (with Veronica Lake!) and 2000 Maniacs – films I used to see back in the 1970s – and it brought back memories of such 1940s mad scientist schlock as Devil Bat with Bela Lugosi, only with better dialogue and higher production values. If this sounds like your kind of movie, then go for it, but hurry. You can just imagine the unlimited commercial possibilities. Rated R for disturbing violence/gore, language, and sexual content. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 17


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

S

“The other day,” said Mr. Storekeep to Mrs. Storekeep, “I attempted to do The New York Times crossword puzzle for Monday and—”

“That’s the easiest one of the week, right?” asked Mrs. Storekeep. “If,” he replied with as much dignity that one can possess when their intellectual stature is called into question by a close member of the family, “you wish to impugn my abilities at puzzles, and you certainly know your way to the heart of the matter, not to mention that that was the puzzle I was filling in!” “No, I just meant to be sure I knew what path you were wandering down this morning.” “Well,” he answered with all the depth

A

R

T

S

artful living

THE CURMUDGEON Superior Brain Power

R

&

BY PETER LOEWER

C

U

L

T

U

R

brain power. Yet she couldn’t resist the following barb that hit home like an arrow shot from the bow of The Lone Ranger (the old radio hero not the idiot partner of Johnny Depp in the latest Hollywood mishap): “I knew when I went to choir practice last night you snuck in and watched another chapter of House of Cards on

of expression that Jack Benny once used when confronting his butler on the old radio show, “it had to do with definitions and with slang expressions revolving around exactly who was Illustration by Peter Loewer the Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby who wrote a farewell to his troops back in the days when Netflix!” South Carolina had a history that fell short “Well, why shouldn’t I?” he asked. of North Carolina, but was far better than in “Why shouldn’t you what?” said The evidence today.” Curmudgeon as he entered the store with the Now Mrs. Storekeep was a highly speed of Wiley Coyote trying to run circles educated woman, far above the reaches of around the Road-Runner. the average shopper at the general store, and, “Watch House of Cards without Madame obviously, far above the intellectual abilities of being in presence,” answered Storekeep. Mr. Storekeep—although those in attendance “It is,” said Curmudgeon, “a grand treat at these gatherings in the rear of the store were for TV watching and only those who have kindness personified and if there was a fire all passed time in the land surrounding Asheville, would call for the help of Storekeep because especially for the last ten years—and were of his manly prowess and superior physical able to watch the sudden decline of our great strength but never for anything to do with ‘North State,’ when compared with the shenanigans of our close neighbor to the South, would ever understand our and their precipitous decline.” “Who’s to the south?” asked City-Fella, bringing the shards of Georgia thinking into BY JUDY AUSLEY the fray.” “We were talking about that program on Netflix called House of Cards that deals with internet with us and politics in that state that we share a division others and teach us line with,” said Mrs. Storekeep. what you know.” “I keep trying to figure out just who is For me, considplayed by Lindsay Graham on that show,” said ering my depression City-Fella, “but I cannot fathom whom.” and lack of meaning in “I don’t think he’s included in the cast,” the recent months, it said Mrs. Storekeep, “But while you were all was just like a shot of talking I went to the store computer and found adrenaline. out two items of fact. First, John Mosby died This simple conversation with this in 1916 at the age of 82. Of his exploits in the woman hundreds of miles away just proves war, he wrote ‘It is a classical maxim that it is there are millions of young people who truly sweet and becoming to die for one’s country; do care about the world and other people and but whoever has seen the horrors of a battleall that they do. No mention of any political field feels that it is far sweeter to live for it.’” reason was necessary. Lin asked me about the “Those are heavy words,” said Curmudterrorist war the USA is in now. I told her I geon. believe in peace and justice. “And second,” she continued, “according She told me she is interested in what is to Wikipedia, around 1998 in an article from going on in her country now since it was so the Congressional daily newspaper, The Hill, devasted by the incredible storm of last year. Senator Graham was describing himself on Without any question from me, she commenthis website as an Operation Desert Shield and ed that she is so grateful to the USA for all the Desert Storm veteran, but, in reality, he never help that came in after the storm. left South Carolina. When queried, Graham Lin said her people are trying their best to answered: “I have not told anybody I’m a rebuild and introduce new ways of construccombatant—I’m not a war hero, and never tion in homes and in crops they grow and feed said I was. I never intended to lie. If I have lied themselves. When she described the agriculabout my military record, I’m not fit to serve ture and crops there, the picture she created to in Congress,” further noting that he was never me on the phone was truly beautiful. Low land deployed.” with natural black and rich dirt, rows of cab“I think I will go for a long walk,” said bage, rice and other native crops. She told me City-Fella, “and while walking I’ll muse about they were able to save some of the farm crops the statement made by Colonel Mosby.” during the storm. I just let her talk and I listened intently. I thanked her for her interest in me and that I Peter Loewer has written and illustrated was going to think about the website. I thought more than twenty-five books on natural

SOUTHERN COMFORT

C

Communication Reveals Connection

Last evening, during another conversation with Dish satellite TV regarding my service, I was connected on the telephone with one of their reps in the Philippines.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

It was a wonderful sudden opportunity to learn about their native countries and how life is with them. The woman I was talking with was 20 years old, fluent in English and on her way to college. She told me her given name is Linn. It turns out she is a poet and writer. She was so joyous that she was speaking with me, another writer. I was so impressed and I was happy to talk with her as just another person in America, a place she has never seen or visited in her young life. I could sense the connection with her when I told her that I am a writer in the USA. She told me of a special writer’s program in the Philippines where she and other writers in her country send their poetry and prose to be critiqued at no cost to the young writers. I told her I wished that I, now in retirement, could connect with more young writers who are struggling to have their work published in this country. She said to me, ‘’why don’t you create a website so you can connect on the

18 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

E

continued on page 32

history over the past thirty years.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

J

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Jewels That Dance

Jewels That Dance is a fine jewelry store with heart and soul. Established in 1983, the first jewelry gallery/design studio of its kind in historic downtown Asheville, Jewels That Dance was on the forefront of the current arts renaissance in Asheville. During the past 31 years, Jewels That Dance has grown from humble beginnings as a tiny studio for designer goldsmith Paula Dawkins to the thriving fine jewelry store you can visit today. Custom design has always been at the core

of Jewels That Dance. Customers seek out Paula Dawkins’ designs for every occasion. Until the mid-eighties, all the jewelry sold in the showroom was made in the studio by Paula and her talented staff. As Asheville and the store grew, Paula elected to expand her inventory to include hand-picked selections from an array of other fine jewelry designers. Today Jewels That Dance boasts a stunning collection of fine jewelry in all the precious metals as well as a wonderful collection of wedding jewelry. Custom design work and limited edition pieces are crafted on site. The studio is state of the art. Paula has

transitioned from hand sketching and carving her designs to designing on a CAD program and milling the waxes on site. The next step is casting and finishing each piece, also on site, and setting the gemstones and diamonds. Looking through the glass partitions into the studio, customers can watch parts of the process as their special piece of jewelry is created. Today, in addition to an amazingly loyal local customer base, people travel from different states to pay a visit to Jewels That Dance. Dawkins has been recognized and awarded many times for her fine jewelry designs, and the store itself has been featured in many publications as an example of one of the most interesting and unique stores in America. The owners of Jewels That Dance are humbled in continued on page 27

pg. 20

pH

ZaPow Artist GROUP SHOW OCT. 4 - NOV. 30

ZaPow.com Downtown Asheville pg. 20

19

pg. 20

5

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 19


R A P I D

C

M

O

R I V E R

Downtown

U L B

Shops, Galleries & Restaurants E

It Was Another Day, It Was Another Time

S

N

W

T

When asked recently about inspiration for his upcoming show at The Satellite Gallery, artist Geza Brunow, had this to say:

PH

There was a time when I sipped coffee and hard cider in various public haunts and watched the world go by. After awhile, the people and things I observed started to shimmer and tell me stories, like heat signatures rising

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 15

ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY MASTERWORKS SERIES

Dream State by Geza Brunow continued on page 21

2014-2015 SEASON DANIEL MEYER, MUSIC DIRECTOR

BRAHMS PIANO CONCERTO NO.1

ORDER BY PHONE 828.254.7046 20 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

www.ashevillesymphony.org


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

naturally gifted

Fabulous Downtown Asheville More of What Makes Asheville Special

‘Another Day’ cont’d from pg. 20

up from a hot desert road — stories of the past, present and future. I sketched what I saw without censoring anything that came to me. It was important that I didn’t alter what emerged, the narratives had a life of their own. I felt like Obi-Wan Kenobi using the force to guide an ink lightsaber. Some of these images also came from dreams I had where I saw them as relics from the far future. Ancient graffiti was uncovered under a highway overpass that was now as old as Herculaneum and Pompeii: sketches and paintings of our once contemporary culture. Old plaques showed that the graffiti artists had turned into gladiators sponsored by the likes of Clemson and Emory.

Lustrous alabaster set in richly grained wood, designed as a homage to nature— humbly beautiful, profoundly meaningful, like the simple act of sharing a meal.

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

At first I thought these sketches could be blueprints for larger paintings, but then I realized that many of them stood up in their own right. It was a challenge to put everything down in permanent ink without erasing but it was also thrilling to watch things unfold like a movie in front of me. This show embodies what was revealed.

IF YOU “It Was Another Time, It Was Another Place” GO the new works of Geza Brunow. Opens Friday,

October 3 with an artist reception at 7 p.m. The Satellite Gallery, 55 Broadway St., downtown Asheville. (828) 505-2225, www.thesatellitegallery.com

pg. 20

T

10 College St. in Asheville 828-254-8374 www.tenthousandvillages.com

Use this logo for reductions only, do not print magenta. Do not reduce this logo more than 35%. Magenta indicates the clear area, nothing should print in this space. You may reduce the logo to 30% without the tag and strap lines. Color of Wood Block Motif critical match to Pantone 1805. Letters print Pantone Process Black.

Bring in this ad to receive 25% OFF one item. Offer valid at participating stores until 10/31/14. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs or Traveler’s Finds.

“After the Storm” Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade pg. 20

14

L

U

Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

MtnMade807@aol.com

pg. 20

pg. 20

www.MtnMade.com

Jce Schlapkohl Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown 5. 20 pg

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

pg. 40

MS

Cedar Hill Studios, . 24 Waynesville pg

WC

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 21


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Village Potters Selected as Finalists for Martha Stewart ‘American Made’ Awards

T

The Village Potters have been selected by Martha Stewart and her panel of judges as Finalists for the nationally acclaimed American Made Awards in the Crafts category.

RP RB

pg. 20

5

RF

RS

pg. 41

MS

RC

RP RG RJ RT

RB

RL

RV

RD

RS

22 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Martha Stewart’s American Made Awards spotlight the maker, support the local, and celebrate the handmade. The program is made up of people and communities that have turned their passion for quality craftsmanship and welldesigned goods into a way of life. For more than 20 years, Martha Stewart has celebrated this spirit Sarah Wells Rolland of innovation in the pages of her magazines and on her television shows. Now, through American Made, Martha Stewart and the editors of Martha Stewart Living are spotlighting the next generation of great American makers, entrepreneurs, artisans and small-business owners. A panel of judges will select nine winners for the American Made Awards, and the public will select the Audience Favorite via an online vote. Online voting continues through October 13, 2014. Votes may be cast every day, and the winners will be announced on October 17. Winners will receive cash prizes to help grow their business, an opportunity to attend the annual American Made Event in New York City, and will be featured on www. MarthaStewart.com. To view the Village Potters American Made Profile and cast a vote, visit www.marthastewart.com/americanmade/nominee/96285/crafts/the-village-potters The Village Potters are Sarah Wells Rolland, Judi Harwood, Melanie Robertson, Cat Jarosz, Lori Theriault, Karen Dubois, Bernie Segal, and Dearing Davis. They comprise an intentional collective of potters who share a commitment to nurturing each other’s success. They are a fully equipped pottery housing each of their working professional studios. The Village Potters includes three showrooms exhibiting and selling the collective’s fine, contemporary ceramic art. The Village Potters Teaching Center offers ongoing classes for adults, demonstrations, and hands-on workshops. The Village Potters is located in Riverview Station, in Asheville’s historic River Arts District at 191 Lyman Street, #180. Visit www.thevillagepotters.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

Unique Fine Arts & Crafts

Jonas Paints Plein Air

pg. 22

RJ

P

Jonas Gerard paints landscapes inspired by the beauty of Western North Carolina.

Plein Air is French for “open air” and is commonly used to describe the art of painting outdoors. Natural light was an important inspiration for the impressionist artists, and the charms of outdoor painting have also influenced other styles of art such as the Barbizon school. When Jonas Gerard paints plein air, the outcome is very different than these traditional styles. In fact, the results are not nearly as important as the process. Inspired by the living presence of raw nature, his paintings take a journey into the abstract landscapes of his imagination. Whether electrified by vibrant sunlight or soothed by a cool morning fog, he channels the outdoor world into his own unique expression of reverence for the universal creative force. While many plein air painters favor small, easily transported canvases, Jonas practically brings his whole studio with him, creating everything from intimate vignettes to majestic vistas so large they appear life-size. This fall Jonas brings the outdoors indoors. Jonas Paints Plein Air highlights his new collection of landscapes inspired by the natural beauty of Western North Carolina. It all starts with a light-filled opening reception at Jonas Gerard Fine Art on Friday, October 24.

by

Chris Stack

IF YOU Opening reception, Friday, October GO 24 from 6-9 p.m. On display through

November 22, 2014. Jonas Gerard Fine Art, 240 Clingman Ave., in Asheville’s River Arts District. Two locations in Asheville’s River Arts District: Jonas Gerard Fine Art, 240 Clingman Avenue Open every day 10-6 p.m. Jonas Gerard at Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St. #144 Open 10-6 Monday-Saturday; Sunday by appointment. (828) 350-7711 www.jonasgerard.com


Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 23


~ FROG LEVEL ~

R

A

P

I

D

R

I

WILD ABOUT

V

E

R

A

R T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

WAYNESVILLE

Art After Dark

F

Fall is in the air and The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present the October edition of Art After Dark!

Art and music beckon you to join us for our art stroll, Friday, October 3. Galleries and restaurants’ stay open late, including working studios on Main Street, Depot Street, and Frog Level. Festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries, such as the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios,

R

and the Village Framer. Don’t miss Historic Frog Level, with the beauty contained in The Mahogany House, and Art on Depot! With over 12 galleries participating, everyone is sure to find inspiration through the beauty of art! The Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86 will host a return exhibit of The Master Artists. Jo ridge Kelley, Sarah Wells Rolland, Terrance Painter, Desmond Suarez and Diannah Beauregard will be joined by Sondra Dorn and Marty Libman. The show will run October 1 through November 15, 2014. Jack Stern, renowned Western North Carolina oil painter, will be demonstrating at Twigs and Leaves Gallery during Art After Dark, Friday evening, October 3, from 6-9 p.m. Jack is known for his ability to capture autumn’s color and light, making his canvases captivating to the viewer. continued on page 25

WD

WS

Yoga & Pilates Classes Massage & Bodywork Therapy

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WELLNESS

BRANNER, DEPOT & FROG LEVEL

Movies

$6 Adults $4 Kids $3 Matinee

Movie Showtimes

WM

Friday: 7:45pm Saturday: 2pm, 5pm, 7:45pm Sunday: 2pm

WN WD WS

Self-Improvement Workshops Nutritional Support

WC

WR

245 Depot Street Waynesville, NC

Lynda Saffell

in the Historic Frog Level

813-629-1835

WT

LMBT #9861

WB WM WP

WAYNESVILLE

Custom Engineered Sound System for True Movie Sound – Better Than Your Home Theater System! Serving Local Craft Beer & Wine, Local Ice Cream from The Hop, Organic Popcorn, Local Sodas.

HOURS:

Tues-Wed 11-6pm Thurs-Sat 11-10pm Sun 1-5pm

828-283-0079 www.38Main.com WV

MOVIES Oct 3-8: How to Train Your Dragon Oct 24 & 25 (afternoon only), 26, 28, 29: Young Frankenstein Oct 31, Nov 1, 2, 4, 5: Psycho (Hitchcock)

38 N. MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN WAYNESVILLE

24 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

WG

WH

MUSIC

Oct 2: Chris Minick Oct 23: Buddy Mondlock Oct 25: The Dupont Brothers Oct 30: Flea Bitten Dawgs

E

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R T

WAYNESVILLE

S

A RTIST

‘Art After Dark’ cont’d from pg. 24

Join us in celebrating the gallery’s 16th anniversary. As you stroll through the gallery, which features 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Waynesville’s Dr. Bill Stecher, and delight in savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, located at 98 North Main Street in Waynesville, is open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30 and Sunday 1-4. Call (828) 456-1940 or visit the website at www. twigsandleaves.com. While in Waynesville, stroll down to Frog Level, by way of Grace Cathey’s sculpture garden. Grace will be available for ideas on a custom home and garden sculpture”… bring pictures! The Mahogany House art Straight Fork by Jack Stern, gallery and studios is celebrating their featured artist for October at one year anniversary with entertainTwigs & Leaves Gallery. ment by Ben Wilson, on vocals and guitar, with music of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Meet the 9 studio artists and many of our gallery’s artists during the evening. Eighteen artists has grown to 80 participating regional fine artists! Be sure to walk through the French doors to the back of our historical building to see artists’ at work! continued on page 27

pg. 24

WT

OF THE

BLUE RIDGE

“Lake Santeelah” oil on canvas by October’s featured artist Jack Stern Demonstration on Friday, October 3 from 6-9pm during Art After Dark

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

“Into the Smokies”

LIVE MUSIC AT BOGARTS Waynesville’s favorite steakhouse offers the best steaks in town, as well as sandwiches, fresh salads, homemade soups, and a wide variety of desserts combined with exceptional service geared towards true customer appreciation. They also feature live Old Time and Bluegrass music on Thursday nights at 6:30 p.m. featuring local favorites and a few travelers. This month they’ll also offer live music on two special Sunday nights.

IF YOU GO: Eddie Rose & Highway Forty, 5-Piece Bluegrass, Sunday, October 5 & 12. Bogart’s Restaurant & Tavern, 303 South Main St. Waynesville. For more details call (828) 452-1313, or visit bogartswaynesville.com

A colored pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington. 30th Anniversary Commemorative Drawing.

Forty-one artists and Haywood Community College Production Crafts department at 17 locations.

Woods

Allen

DePaolo

pg. 24

Burnette

Wp

Bolton Phillips

McKinney

Link Palmer

Howard Cathy

A self-guided driving tour of artist studios and creative centers in Haywood County, NC Sat. Oct 25, 10a-5p Sun. Oct 26, 12n-5p

Brt

Preview Party & Artist Reception: Thurs Oct 23, 6-9p. Frog Level Brewing Company, 56 Commerce St, Waynesville

Maps: www. haywoodarts.org; Gallery 86, Main St, Waynesville; Mahogany House, 240 Depot St, Waynesville.

pg. 24

Wg

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 25


L

Stunning Latin American Gallery Opens Downtown

Lush Works is a film production company with a new photography gallery located on Battery Park Avenue in downtown Asheville. A short walk up the stairs leads you to a scenic and colorful space full of images from Latin America including: Chile, Honduras, Ecuador, Peru, and the United States.

Photos of Peru

These images are custom displayed on a variety of mediums, such as sustainably harvested bamboo panels, white aluminum, and watercolor giclée to name a few. Lush Works is also currently in production of “Libertad” a documentary about a small Honduran village that survives unemployment, malnutrition, and the plague of their most valuable crop, coffee, through family, community, and each other. Midwives are illegal in Honduras, and it is a long and rugged commute to the nearest hospital. A goal of the documentary is to provide the community with an ambulance, which they currently are without. We will also be selling high quality coffee beans by the pound from the village beginning in November. Our work consists of commercials, documentaries, promotional and instructional videos, music videos, and more. We also provide high quality photography tailored to any clients’ needs. Please stop by anytime and visit our website for more information.

We craft masterful imagery that bonds us to our neighbors and the world we live in.

Lush Works, LLC • 26 1⁄2 Battery Park Avenue • Downtown Asheville info@ lush-works.com • www.lush-works.com S pg. 20

26 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

TWO NEW ARTISTS AT BLACKBIRD FRAME & ART

A

By JOHN

HORROCkS

Many Western artists of the period were heavily influenced by the Japanese styles. Colored woodcut prints continued to experience a revival for several decades, and Spring Woods, original woodcut today wood-block prints print by Laura Wilder. are often incorporated into decor of the Arts & Crafts style. BlackBird been unusuFrame & Art is pleased to introduce Andrea ally positive Starkey and Laura Wilder, two contemporary as it resoartists making original woodcut prints in this nates with tradition. the interests Homage No. 1, original and tastes of Soul Sanctuary woodblock reduction print so many local Laura Wilder is known to area colon mulberry paper by residents. lectors for her presentation of period-style Andrea Starkey. Andrea’s pasworks at the Grove Park Inn’s annual Arts & sion for her Crafts Conference. Inspired by artists of the craft is evident in every print she makes. early 20th century, her prints evoke a longing Fine art prints like these are surprisfor simpler times, but she says, “Although ingly affordable. At Blackbird, Laura Wilder’s my work might seem like a nostalgic look original prints are priced $160 to $210 and backward, it’s really a wish for the present and giclee reproductions for $35 to $75. Andrea future. It inspires us to do meaningful work, Starkey’s work ranges in price from $30 to and to connect and care for our natural world $150, all original prints. Several works from and each other. It also strives to provide a bit each artist are displayed in custom frames of soul sanctuary.” from BlackBird.

Moku Hanga

Andrea Starkey employs the traditional Japanese wood-block, or moku hanga, technique of hand-pulling her prints on handmade Japanese papers with water-based inks. The method and materials produce a texture and colors that are harmonious with her subjects, mostly of nature, portrayed with reverence and sensitivity. Initial reaction to her work has

‘Jewels That Dance’ cont’d from pg. 19

recognizing that the store has been voted best jewelry store in Asheville for over ten years running. The owners, Paula Dawkins and Carol Schniedewind, have been fortunate to find a wonderful and knowledgeable staff that is passionate about fine jewelry design. In addition to providing a stunning showroom full of finished fine jewelry, Jewels That Dance provides professional customer service, stellar jewelry repair services, all in a comfortable and casual

C

U

L

T

U

fine arts & crafts

In the Arts & Crafts Tradition

Accompanying the Arts & Crafts movement of the late 19th century was a surge of interest in Japanese art, particularly the ancient art of woodblock prints.

&

BlackBird Frame & Art is an independent gallery and custom frame studio owned by Pat and John Horrocks and located at 365 Merrimon Avenue in north Asheville. Hours are 10-6 weekdays and 10-3 on Saturdays. For more information please call (828) 225-3117.

environment. The combination of a great staff, creative craftsmanship and wonderful customers insures that the rhythm of Jewels That Dance will continue for many years to come. Next time you are in downtown Asheville, stop in, be dazzled.

Jewels That Dance 53 Haywood St., Downtown Asheville (828) 254-5088 www.jewelsthatdance.com

L

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

American Craft Week

Local and regional artists will fill Pack Square the first three Saturdays in October.

Asheville Art in the Park is proud to be part of the national effort to support local craft artists. Come join the celebration. 10% of profits at the market go to support the Asheville Art in the Park Arts and Community Grant.

CELEBRATE THE ARTS

T

Tryon, NC is a town with deep roots in the arts, as well as an amazingly large and diverse arts community.

“Celebrate the Arts,” which takes place Saturday, October 25, from 10-5 p.m., is intended to be a showcase for all that the Tryon Arts community has to offer: a chance to see all of the arts organizations in one location and to enjoy everything from musical performances to poetry readings to blacksmithing. Join us for a full day of performances, art exhibitions and art and local mountain craft sales. Designated as an official Southern Highlands Craft Guild Education Center, Tryon Arts & Crafts School seeks to preserve and teach traditional mountain crafts, as well as instruct students in contemporary fine craft. The school offers classes and workshops year-round in blacksmithing, sliversmithing, pottery, fiber arts/weaving, woodworking, enameling, precious metal clay, and lapidary.

The American Craft Week celebration kicks-off on Friday, October 3 at 5:30 p.m. with a keynote by Mayor Esther Manheimer at the Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, 67 Broadway St. in downtown Asheville. The event is followed by the Downtown Asheville Art District’s first Friday Gallery Stroll. Asheville Art in the Park takes place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, October 4, 11 and 18. Located in Pack Square in the center of downtown Asheville, the event features works by local and regional artists. On Saturday, October 11 from 5-6 p.m. Karen Fowler, Executive Director of ArtFields, will speak at HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave. Come hear about the ArtFields initiative to enrich and bring life back to the small town of Lake City, SC through a major arts program every spring. For a listing of aditional events happening in support of American Craft week visit www.americancraftweek.com/participants

For more information call (828) 859-8323 and visit www.TryonArtsandCrafts.org,

‘Art After Dark’ cont’d from pg. 25

The Village Framer will remain open during Art After Dark, to take care of your framing needs. Located in the heart of Downtown Waynesville, the Village Framer provides beautiful custom framing based on a tradition of fine carpentry, aesthetics, and interior design. Established in 1985, the gallery also represents many fine artists and craftspeople of the southeast. Their small gallery and frame shop proudly boasts 30 years in business. Reach them at (828) 452-0823.

IF YOU Call Twigs & Leaves Gallery, (828) GO 456-1940 or visit the Waynesville

Gallery Association’s website at www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com for more information.

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 27


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

S

Haven’t Got the Blues Yet 429 Records

After more than thirty albums and nearly a half century of making music, you’d think that Loudon Wainwright III would be happy, or at the very least have some understanding of how loved he is. But contentment has always been a fleeting apparition for Wainwright, a brief hiatus from the gloom that helps sharpen his satirical knife while giving a contrast to the inevitable bitter of the sweet. Having met him, I can attest that he’s actually a pretty cheerful guy, but he’s smart enough to keep it mostly under wraps. Haven’t Got The Blues Yet is the latest chapter in his ongoing efforts to tap into the

A-1 MUSIC WAREHOUSE 1408-B Patton Ave. ~ West Asheville, NC

Ha

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

I’m again limiting my reviews to around 150 words each, attempting to cover as much music as I can. There’s just so much good stuff out there worth mentioning! As always buying your music from one of our many fine independent record stores is the way to go.

Loudon Wainwright III

pg. 40

&

We Carry NEW and Used Vinyl Mention this Ad and Receive 15% Off Rock & Roll Jewelry and Accessories Records • CD’s • Tapes • Posters T-Shirts • Stickers • Sweatshirts & more

Americana lexicon, fusing blues with roots, folk, country, and (a rarity for him) a touch of swing jazz. It’s Wainwright at his adventurous best, taking much deserved swings at the NRA (“I’ll Be Killing You This Christmas”), religious intolerance (“God and Man”) and obsessive psychoanalysis (“Depression Blues”). But mostly Wainwright skewers his own failings and foibles, being at times both merciless and forgiving in equal amounts. Again paired with longtime producer David Mansfield, and supported by a bevy of excellent guest players, Wainwright sounds relaxed, rejuvenated, and as ornery as ever. At nearly 70 years old you’d think he’d lighten up, or at the least take it easy on himself but that’s never been the way of Loudon Wainwright III. Which is fine because the artist, and we, are all the better for having born witness to his neurosis. ****

Eileen Rose

Be Many Gone Cadiz Music

Rose’s much anticipated (at least by me) follow-up to 2009’s Luna Turista, is a considerably more diverse affair, indicating a desire on her part to extend beyond the wistful country balladry that dominated her earlier work. There’s certainly a healthy dash of such sentiments but for the most part Be Many Gone hints at a direction that does Rose well. “She’s Yours” has a lovely jazz swing to it—one that belies the seriousness of the narrative—while the rest of the record glides from rockabilly strut to more contemporary Nashville country pop. It’s a break up album with heart, soul, confidence, and the sort of real life stuff that in an era past, would have made the classic country radio waves. It’s also impeccably played and sung, loose when it needs to be but never imprecise or tentative. As such it’s one of those discs that, despite the abundance of music that arrives in my mailbox, I keep returning to time and again. ****1/2

Cowboy Mouth Go!

Elm City Music

828-575-9333 www.mymusicwarehouse.com • If we don’t have it, we can find it! 28 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

I’ll admit to never being a big fan of this widely acclaimed New Orleans based quartet but based on the fervent recommendations of friends I’m giving them a second chance. Go! seems to be a good jumping back point, a new album cut in the classic CM mold, continuing to straddle a line between

A musical cornucopia… electric blues, rock, funk, and more than a bit of rockabilly. what drummer/lead vocalist Fred LeBlanc describes as “the wild offspring of the Neville Brothers and the Clash.” I’ll admit that’s as good a descriptor as any; in fact they even have a song titled “Joe Strummer” which certainly scores points in my book. Given the raucous nature of their shows, Go! may be a tad too restrained for my tastes, but it’s a finely crafted genre effort that should please their fans. It’s a solid, musical cornucopia, readily mixing electric blues, rock, funk, and more than a bit of rockabilly that screams New Orleans. New listeners might begin by sampling the title track, but for a more exploratory side of the band the funk laden tango of “Mardi Gras by Moonlight” is a sheer delight. ***1/2

Various Artists

Beck Song Reader Capitol Records

The notion of Beck creating a paper version of an album he never actually recorded was, even by his standards, a bit of a stretch. A love letter to a time when actual artifacts were rare and sheet music was the primary means for sharing songs, Song Reader was a pivotal move for him. Finding himself in a self described creative funk, Beck hoped to rekindle his creative spark by composing material and letting others interpret it as they might. It made for an interesting concept and encouraged hundreds of unknown performers to post You Tube versions of their favorite Beck offerings. In turn that’s the obvious inspiration for this release, as artists as varied as Norah Jones, Jack White, Jack Black, and Spanish-language superstar Juanes join in the fun. Some play it fairly close to what Beck himself might have done while others, most notably Juanes’ crazed Latin spin on ‘’Don’t Act Like Your Heart Isn’t Hard” and Norah Jones’s cagey kitten purring on ‘’Just Noise” take things in a very different direction. Much like his own fabled Record Club series, in which he recreates his own versions of mostly well known albums, it’s intended largely for the hard core fans. Yes it’s another diversion along the Beck Hansen highway but it’s also one heck of a fun ride. ****


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

sound experience

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Bringing Righteous Love and Rocking Reggae to Asheville

R

Right up front, Taj Weekes, the St. Lucia born Reggae master and social advocate makes it clear: Rasta love is not about homophobia and herb is not about smoking marijuana.

“For true Rastafarians, One Love is much more than a song. It’s a creed, one which governs our lives and commands us to do better. And for me it is the way I choose to live this life.” As an advocate for the LGBT community, as well as one committed to protecting the rights and uplifting the circumstances of people everywhere, Weekes exhibits a social passion and commitment that rivals his love of music: He has formed his own children’s charity, They Often Cry Outreach (TOCO), as a United States based not-for-profit entity, an organization dedicated to improving the lives of Caribbean children through sports, health and enrichment programs. As artist and educator, Weekes hopes to raise awareness of the often desperate economic conditions experienced by children in that part of the world. “People see travel brochures of beautiful beaches and smiling children, and while that does exist it’s not the whole picture” he tells me. “There is a lot of suffering down there.” Last November he was named as a UNICEF Champion for Children to campaign for the rights of children and raise awareness of a wide

By JaMES

CaSSaRa

range of issues such as access to health care, education, equal protection against physical and sexual violence (sadly, the Caribbean remains a hub of the international sex trade). As such he is a regular visitor to area schools, promoting his message of love and acceptance. “I speak about how reggae means more than music, but I speak even more about the concept of love. I am my brother’s keeper. It’s my responsibility; it is everyone’s responsibility, to love others as you love yourself, to think not just as an individual but as a member of our collective society.” Yet make no mistake. For all his charitable works and advocacy Weekes is first and foremost a musician. He grew up in a musical family — common for his part of the Caribbean — and those traditions have shaped his life. As a youngster he and his three older brothers would line up at night in their St. Lucia home, singing to their parents the ‘70s music that was on the radio. “We’d have a good laugh and my dad would sing to us. But at that time I didn’t yet realize this was what I was going to do with my life.” That came later, after his brothers became Rastafarians and Weekes followed in their footsteps, learning about Rasta philosophy, much of which he feels is grossly misunderstood. “There was a reverence to it, this focus

The Ongoing War on Drugs

L

Listening to the Philadelphia based band The War On Drugs you’d be hard pressed to guess Bob Dylan as one of their spiritual and musical inspirations.

But founding members Adam Granduciel and Kurt Vile — who met at a 2003 party and, over a few drinks, discovered their shared fascination with the Bard of Hibbing, Minnesotaare adamant about their passion for him. While their own records might more readily recall the wholesale guitar assault of Sonic Youth or Rage Against the Machine, it’s Dylan’s melodic sense and lyrical perspective — particularly during the years he “went electric” — they find most intriguing. Highway 61 Revisited was a favorite, a record that both Granduciel and Vile cite as “life altering, one of those albums that changes your whole perspective.” Within weeks of that initial meeting the two began working on songs together. It was a slow and tentative process but by 2005 they had enough material assembled to begin Adam Granduciel, founding member of The War On Drugs Photo: Andreas Terlaak forming a proper band.

on love. All I saw and heard was love with them, even when they were being brutalized by the government and the people. They taught me about the “I and I: That of the spirit and of the body.” It’s the idea that informed his life ever since. For Weekes, that means spreading Taj Weekes and Adowa unite a true social consciousness with an the message of unforgettable reggae groove. love in his music. Weekes, the third — as one might expect — is “In the last 10 years a new breed of reggae herb; but not just marijuana, which is so often has come along, one that’s moved away from associated with the life of Rasta. “We’ve gone the ideals of non-judgmental love. They deride past that,” Weekes insists. people who love a different gender or person. “That’s just a sensational story, one to We’ve been preaching One Love forever, grab headlines. When I grew up with them, the yet there are still too many people pointing Rastas used fresh herbs in everything, in tea, in fingers. That’s NOT how it should be. One meals… all kinds of herbs. Hemp, and parsley love welcomes and unites, it doesn’t dictate and sage, thyme… everything that will make or divide. I love everyone, but for too long I you better. I work with a hemp business, Good was silent about it. Everyone’s welcome at my Seed Hemp. We’re doing something right for table. Who am I to define love? We don’t need the planet — hemp used to be a huge crop. to be good for God’s sake; we need to be good “Now some people (mostly politicians) for goodness’ sake.” think it’s bad, but it’s not. It has so many uses, So, if love and reggae are twin pillars for as paper, clothing, and even building material. And with the hemp movement, we are finding sustainable ways to make things that do not destroy the land or our bodies.” By JaMES CaSSaRa Back again to the music, Weekes will be performing material from his upcoming album Love Herb Reggae, a mix of self penned Thus, The War On Drugs was formed. material that reflects the diversity of his Early on, a variety of accompanists drifted companions. With his band members, dubbed in and out of the lineup but by late 2006 the Adowa, coming from all over the Caribbean, band settled on an established lineup of Granfrom Jamaica to Dominica and Barbados to St. duciel on vocals, guitar, and keyboards; Vile on Lucia; it’s a pan-Caribbean sound. “All of us guitar and vocals; Charlie Hall on organ and grew up listening to our own native music and drums; Dave Hartley on bass, and Kyle Lloyd we bring those experiences to the mix. I see on drums and percussion. myself as a singer-songwriter but I understand While the five were hesitant to quit their that my subject matter — that gospel of love jobs and begin touring extensively, the band and living in harmony — isn’t typical of reggae became a frequent presence on the Philadelphia these days.” music scene, gathering a strong local followThe conscious lyrics he writes are a reing and impressing out-of-towners with their minder of the message reggae used to contain, occasional forays into New York City. In 2007, even if his lush sound is completely Weekes’s the band completed its debut EP, a five-song own. “When I started out I just wanted to set called Barrel of Batteries that they posted put a poem over a riddim. Now I’ve found online as a free download. It was a gutsy move my voice. To me, Reggae is a verb. Whatever at the time, but one that immediately paid off. comes from it, I want to be true to the art form Positive press for both the EP and the group’s I’ve chosen.” commanding live shows caught the attention of the noted independent label Secretly Canadian, which swiftly signed the band. IF YOU Taj Weekes and Adowa, Thursday, The War On Drugs released its first GO October 2, doors open at 8 p.m., show full-length album, Wagon Wheel Blues (the starts at 9 p.m. $12 advance/$15 day of. title itself is a sly Dylan reference) in June of All ages show, standing room only. The Grey 2008. However, by the end of that year, Vile, Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Attendees Hall, and Lloyd all departed the band, with are encouraged to get up and groove! Call (828) continued on page 32

232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com.

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 29


COPYEDITING &

R

A

PROOFREADING SERVICES A sharp eye for the big picture and the small details. Books • Websites Short Stories • Cookbooks Assistance with Self Publishing

C

P

I

D

R

I

www.aptitudeforwords.com

828-581-9031

One Apple at a Time Evan Williams, a seventh generation apple grower has written and released One Apple at a Time, an historical narrative spanning more than 200 years of family settlement in the Henderson County area. Dr. George A. Jones, Director of the History Center and President Emeritus of the Henderson County Genealogical and History Society, describes the book as, “well written and a valuable contribution to both genealogy and history… We recommend this book as one of great interest.” Not only is Evan Williams a native son, the book’s illustrator, Jessica Blackwell, is his daughter, and a local resident. One Apple at a Time, is published by Grateful Steps Foundation, located in Asheville. Grateful Steps is a nonprofit, charitable foundation established by Micki Cabiniss Eutsler, to provide a vehicle for emerging authors to get their books in print and on bookstore shelves. One Apple at a Time is available at the Fountainhead Bookstore, 408 North Main Street, Hendersonville.

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

COCK-A DOODLE

The roosters made me do it.

Kathleen Colburn

V

Before “the cream of my brain has risen to the top” (as Virginia Woolf put it) my nest of pillows still warm, come the strangled cries. No one taught this bird the complete tune. It is “cock-a-doodle-do.” This rooster’s cry is like shouting “Hallelu” without the “jah.” He’s short a syllable, something a poet notices. He could be hollering “Hap-py birthday, or Mer-ry Christmas!” The Pavarotti of Bent Creek’s boasts are blatantly Biblical. “Sleepers wake!” These are cocks with a mission. If only they crowed three times. If only. If only one wasn’t answered by another, a teenaged rooster, midpuberty. with stupid eyes while from their beaks there rise the uncontrolled, traditional cries.

By

each screaming “this is where I live! each screaming Get up! Stop dreaming! You don’t need to write a rooster poem. (I was thinking of a haiku…) Elizabeth Bishop set the standard. Roosters is forty-four three line stanzas. These quotes above are hers. Read the poem intact. You’ll hear roosters in your dreams, early morning dreams, afternoon nap dreams, all day long. From verse ten and eleven of Roosters:

over our beds from rusty iron sheds and fences made from old bedsteads.

Piano Lessons

N

The book, based on McPherson’s award-winning screenplay, is now available in bookstores and at Amazon.com. In 1950’s rural Alabama, shy, sixteen year-old Junior Jordan falls for his new piano teacher, handsome and popular high school senior, Conrad. Upon losing Conrad to Angel, a diva homecoming queen who’s jealous of Junior’s and Conrad’s close relationship, Junior finally meets the boy of his dreams: the moonshining son of a Pentecostal preacher who comes to help when Junior is drawn into a confrontation with bullies out behind the high school one day. Mark is impressed by Junior’s bravery in standing up for himself and he and Junior form a friendship that seems about to turn into something more when they find themselves defending Mark’s still against a gang of rival bootleggers. Shots are fired, Mark is injured and Junior’s life is thrown into complete chaos. Junior flees to New Orleans where he discovers a new world of possibilities and a more tolerant and inclusive community, but knows he’ll never find peace until he’s reunited with Mark. Piano Lessons is an adaptation of McPherson’s screenplay, which was previously a first place winner of the One-in-Ten

30 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

R

E

With apologies (sort of) to fowl lovers. I’ve got roosters on the brain. You would too if you lived here. If only they weren’t majestic… as Ms. Bishop wrote: glass-head pins oil-golds and copper greens, anthracite blues, alizarus If only they weren’t splendid. If only they weren’t vain. If only they weren’t so loud! Edward Thomas, little known modern English poet (died 1917 at age 39) had his “darkness cleaved with a silver blow.”

COCK-CROW Out of the wood of thoughts that grows by night To be cut down by the sharp axe of light Out of the night, two cocks together crow, Cleaving the darkness with a silver blow: And bright before my eyes twin trumpeters stand, Heralds of splendour, one at either hand. Each facing each as in a coat of arms: The milkers lace their boots up at the farms.

NEW GRAPHIC NOVEL ABOUT GAY TEENS IN THE 1950’S RURAL SOUTH

Nevada McPherson’s new graphic novel Piano Lessons is a gay teen romance set in 1950’s Alabama and New Orleans.

U

CaROL pEaRCE BJORLiE – THE pOET BEHiND THE CELLO

There are two morning heralds in my neighborhood. Two. The tenor from Hell, full of it, head back, chest high, and countertenor, preening, strutting, begging for applause –

Deep from raw throats a senseless order floats all over town. A rooster gloats

T

Screenwriting Competition, dedicated to the positive portrayal of gays and lesbians in film, and of the Honolulu Film Awards Feature Screenwriting Competition. Piano Lessons has also placed in various other screenwriting competitions, including Austin Film Festival, Canadian International and Gay Charlotte and was a selected project at the Squaw Valley Community of Writers Screenwriting Program. There McPherson rewrote the screenplay under the mentorship of screenwriter Tom Rickman (Coal Miner’s Daughter, Everybody’s All-American). So why adapt the screenplay? “When I story-boarded my first short film, I liked that process so much that I decided to apply it to some of my feature scripts,” explains McPherson. “My first graphic novel, Uptowners, was an adaptation of an earlier script of mine set in contemporary New Orleans. It enabled me to portray my favorite places, to bring my characters to life visually and to tell my whole story in pictures.” McPherson was a creative writing major at Louisiana State University-Baton Rouge, and received her MFA in creative writing/ screenwriting there as well. She taught English and literature at Nunez Community College for eighteen years and screenwriting and film

~ Edward Thomas Feel a need to address the chanticleer? Is a rooster rant on your “to do” list? Send me yours. I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

at the University College and School of Continuing Studies at Tulane University, where she was a faculty fellow. She recently relocated to Asheville, North Carolina. As to why she chose to make Piano Lessons and the subsequent book a period piece, McPherson says that’s just the time period in which these characters belong. “In my experience, reading about people and events from the past is an inspiration to persevere through difficult current events, so even though Piano Lessons is set in the 1950’s, many of the things that happen could just as easily happen now. Even though things have changed tremendously for the gay community since the 1950’s, one look at today’s headlines, such as the state-by-state fight for gay marriage, reveals that there’s still a long way to go,” says McPherson. “Gay teens like Mark and Junior blazed a trail for the generation that followed, and I believe today’s teens will one day know equality in all areas of life for gay Americans as the norm.” continued on page 32


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

authors ~ books ~ readings INTERVIEW WITH

iNTERViEWED By

Gavin Geoffrey Dillard

G

Gavin Geoffrey Dillard is an iconic and internationally celebrated poet in both the gay community and the world of music and theatricals. On Thursday, October 30, Mr. Dillard will read from his own works, and baritone Roberto Flores will sing songs by the poet accompanied by David Troy Francis on piano. This promises to be a spectacular and rare evening with Mr. Dillard presenting his unique, thoughtful and provocative perspective on life, love and existence, at the White Horse Black Mountain. Gavin Dillard, a native of Asheville, has published eight collections of verse, two

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

N

NEW! Web Exclusive Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is managing the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by sending an email to shortstories@ rapidrivermagazine.com

Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects.Visit her website: www. aptitudeforwords.com

POETRIO Sunday, October 5 at 3 p.m.

Monthly series of readings and signings by three poets at 3 p.m. Featured poets for October are Marjory Wentworth (New and Selected Poems), Barbara Hagerty (Twinzilla), and George Ella Lyon (Many-Storied House).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe,

55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www. malaprops.com.

U

R

E

DENNiS Ray

Unique, thoughtful and provocative.

anthologies, and his infamous Hollywood tell-all, In the Flesh: Undressing for Success. My biggest influBranded by the Los Angeles ences have been the mystical Times “The Naked Poet” for poets: Rumi, Hafiz, Ono no his standing-room-only, inKomachi, Francis, Claire, and the-buff poetry readings, his a number of the “Catholic” poems have been recorded by saints (I spent some time at James Earl Jones and published the Holy Cross Abbey in Virin anthologies and periodicals ginia and read everything). I’m worldwide and his songs perPoet and performer also a big fan of Dickinson and formed at Lincoln Center. He Gavin Geoffrey Dillard Whitman. Oh … and early has written comedy with and Van Morrison! for Dolly Parton, Joan Rivers, Lily Tomlin, and is the co-author of Bark! The RRM: You have, we understand, returned to Musical, which has played throughout North Asheville, land of your birth. and South America. GD: I have lived in New York, Los Angeles, Rapid River Magazine: Reading your memoir, San Francisco, Seattle, Yosemite, and most it seems like you met and hobnobbed with just recently 12 years on Maui. Maui was aweabout everybody. Who have been your biggest some, but it was never home. I looked around, influences? and there is no finer place happening on this continent than Asheville. It has everything I Gavin Dillard: I have encountered and dated want and need. Actually, I bought a small farm many a famous person. Tom Hulce was a in Black Mountain, where I am raising tea, classmate in high school (NC School of the chestnuts, and a plethora of rescued kitties, Arts), Pee Wee Herman (Paul Rubenfeld) was bunnies and chickens. It is as close to heaven my suite mate at California Institute for the as one can get in this world-on-the-brink. Arts. My first apartment in Hollywood was just under Bette Davis’s balcony—wheelchairIF bound, she would daily watch me gardening. YOU Nocturnal Omissions, an evening I spent much time with some of my GO of poetry and song featuring Gavin literary heroes—Christopher Isherwood, Ian Geoffrey Dillard, Thursday, October 30 Young, Deena Metzger, Ginsberg, even Dolly at 7:30 p.m. $15 in advance/$20 at the door. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat and Lily Tomlin, both of whom I ended up Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit writing comedy for (I also wrote quips for the www.whitehorseblackmountain.com late Joan Rivers).

Robert Ebendorf, Jeweler BOOK SIGNING & TRUNK SHOW

P

Pop-up exhibit celebrates American Craft Week.

Robert Ebendorf’s groundbreaking work as an art jeweler for more than 50 years has established him in the top tier of the American studio craft movement. The Life and Times of Robert W. Ebendorf: Jeweler and Metalsmith is a new book and exhibition produced by the Racine Art Museum. Asheville contemporary jewelry gallery Mora will host Robert Ebendorf for an artist reception, pop-up exhibition, and book signing. The event is free and open to the public. Robert Ebendorf is a Fulbright Scholar, Tiffany Foundation Grant Award winner, and a founding member and Lifetime Achievement Award winner of the Society for North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). Says Marthe Le Van, owner of Mora, and author of more than 50 books about jewelry,

“Robert Ebendorf opened the door to art jewelry for me, illuminating a rich and rewarding field. His zest for life, his generosity, and his passionate interest in building community Master Jeweler amazes me.” Robert Ebendorf Ebendorf’s 52-page book is available online for $30 plus shipping (www.ramart.org), or by calling the Racine Art Museum Store at (262) 638-8200.

OCTOBER

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS October 2 at 7 p.m. W. SCOTT POOLE, Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror. October 4 at 6 p.m. BECKY CANNON, Grow Healthy. Grow Happy. The Whole Baby Guide. October 6 at 7 p.m. WILL PYE, Blessed with a Brain Tumor: Realizing It’s All Gift and Learning to Receive. October 7 at 7 p.m. BETH REVIS, The Body Electric, YA novel. October 8 at 7 p.m. SARA BENINCASA, Great, YA novel. October 9 at 7 p.m. MARK SCHIMMOELLER, Slowspoke: A Unicyclist’s Guide to America. October 12 at 3 p.m. TOMMY HAYS, What I Came to Tell You, middle grade novel. October 15 at 7 p.m. TIFFANY REISZ, Original Sinners, erotica; ANDREW SHAFFER, How to Survive a Sharknado, humor. October 16 at 7 p.m. MARGARET BRADHAM THORNTON, Charleston, love, loss, memory. October 21 at 7 p.m. JULIA ELLIOTT, The Wilds, collection of short stories. October 23 at 7 p.m. CHARLES E. COBB, JR., Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible. October 25 at 7 p.m. YA Event with Natalie Parker, Tessa Gratton, Julie Murphy, Bethany Hagen & Amy Tintera. October 26 at 3 p.m. SHARYN MCCRUMB, Nora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past. October 26 at 5 p.m. Shakespeare Salon: The Winter’s Tale with Professor Susan Harlan. October 30 at 7 p.m. JAKE BIBLE, Little Dead Man, conjoined twins, one alive, one undead.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

pg. 20

M

IF YOU Robert Ebendorf, Saturday, October 11 GO from 2-5 p.m. at Mora, 9 West Walnut

St., Suite 2A, in downtown Asheville. Open Monday-Saturday 10-6, Sunday 12-5. Call (828) 575-2294.

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 31


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

noteworthy

T

U

R

E

Sacred Music and Dance Performance and Mandala Sand Painting Exhibition

U

UNC Asheville presents a performance by monks of the Atlanta-based Drepung Loseling Monastery.

The performance is part of “The Mystical Arts of Tibet” tour, endorsed by the Dalai Lama to promote world peace and healing by sharing Tibet’s sacred arts with modern audiences across the globe. During their weeklong residency at UNC Asheville, the monks will offer public lectures on Tibetan culture and religion, and create a mandala sand painting. They will also train students to work with members of the campus and the public to create a community mandala sand painting designed by UNC Asheville students. For their Wednesday, October 22 performance, which begins at 7 p.m. in Lipinsky Auditorium, the Drepung Loseling monks, garbed in magnificent traditional clothing, will

By

perform ancient temple music and dance using traditional Tibetan instruments and vocal techniques. The monks are particularly renowned for their multiphonic chanting known as zokkay, or overtone singing. Each of the main chantmasters simultaneously intones three notes, individually creating a complete chord.

Mandala Sand Painting Opening Ceremony – Construction of the mandala sand

painting begins with a ceremony of chanting and music before drawing the design. Monday, October 20 at 1 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith Union, lower level.

Mandala Sand Painting Live Exhibition

The monks will pour millions of grains of colored sand in place over many hours and days. After the opening ceremony, this work begins Monday, October 20 at 2 p.m. and will start at 10 a.m. daily and until completion on Friday, October 24, in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union, lower level.

Community Mandala Sand Painting

PARTY TOO HEARTY? Call a taxi! Don’t let friends drink and drive. In Asheville, call: • Beaver Lake Cab, (828) 252-1913 • Checker Cab, (828) 254-1155 • Metro Cab, (828) 254-1155 • New Blue Bird, (828) 258-8331 • Red Cab, (828) 232-1112 • Yellow Cab, (828) 253-3311

UNC Asheville students and interested members of the community will work alongside the monks to construct their own mandala sand painting, designed by UNC Asheville students. This begins Monday, October 20, at 2 p.m. and continues from 12 p.m.-5 p.m. daily until completion on Friday, October 24, in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union, lower level.

“Death and Dying: The Tibetan Tradition”

Lecture Monday, October 20 at 11:25 a.m. in UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Auditorium.

Mandala sand painting October 20-24 in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith Union, lower level.

“Meditation: A Tool for Conscious Living”

Lecture Tuesday, October 21 at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Humanities Lecture Hall.

“Symbolism of the Sand Mandala”

Lecture Thursday, October 23 at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Humanities Lecture Hall.

Mandala Sand Painting Closing Ceremony and Procession – As a metaphor for the

impermanence of life, sand mandalas are traditionally deconstructed shortly after completion. Some of the sand will be distributed to the audience, and some will be ceremonially dispersed in Reed Creek as part of a healing blessing. Friday, October 24 at 1 p.m. in Highsmith Union, lower level, through Mullen Park to Reed Creek. Accessibility shuttles will be available. IF YOU Sacred Music, Sacred Dance for World GO Healing. Wednesday, October 22 at 7

p.m. in Lipinsky Auditorium Tickets are $22; $13 for UNC-A faculty, staff and alumni; $8 for students; $6 for UNC-A students. Tickets available at www.uncatickets.com. Details at cesap.unca.edu or call (828) 251-6674.

(800) 829-4872 | www.1800taxiusa.com

‘Piano Lessons’ cont’d from pg. 30

Plenty of Parking!

Let Asheville Brewers show you how affordable, enjoyable and delicious homebrewing can be!

Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-4

712-B Merrimon Ave

• Asheville, NC • (828) 285-0515 .AB. • S’ F • S 

pg. 40

MW

32 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

‘War on Drugs’ cont’d from pg. 29

STEVE pLEVER

ADDITIONAL FREE EVENTS

M

Would the response to events in the book by parents, friends, clergy and the law be much different today than in the 1950’s? “In some cases yes and in some, no. Either way, certain characters’ refusal to accept the status quo helps to push the story line in a more positive direction, which is something real people who care about tolerance and acceptance today are doing every time they speak up, reach out and stand up for what’s right.” For more information about Piano Lessons, upcoming book signings, and to find out more about McPherson’s other projects, visit www.nevada-mcpherson.com.

Vile soon making a name for himself as a prolific and highly successful solo artist. Drummer Mike Zanghi joined Granduciel and Hartley to record 2010’s Future Weather. Multi-instrumentalist Robbie Bennett joined the fold for 2011’s Slave Ambient, the band’s second proper album, which is generally regarded as the record best defining their sound. While touring in support of Slave Ambient, Granduciel, who has assumed primary songwriting duties for the band, set about writing and recording their third album. While it took nearly two years to complete-in part due to both Granduciel and Hartley being active in various side projects — Lost in the Dream (which received a rave review in Rapid River Magazine) was finally released early this year. As of this writing I’ve received a copy of the band’s upcoming live album, which will be reviewed in depth in our November issue. Initial listens indicate it fittingly captures the excitement and intensity of their shows. But why wait? Check out for yourself why The War On Drugs ranks so highly among obsessive and well-informed music lovers. It’s been well over a year since they’ve played Asheville — where they obviously have a strong following — so now is your turn to discover what the talk is all about. IF YOU The War on Drugs with opening GO act Peter Matthew Bauer (of the

Walkmen), Wednesday, October 15, doors open at 8 p.m., show at 9 p.m., $20 advance/$23 day of. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 398-1837, or www.theorangepeel.net

‘Communication’ cont’d from pg. 18

silently that I would like nothing more than giving young new writers a place to write their creativity for the first time. I am not in favor of critiquing writing. I think it is better to listen and get to know the writer and perhaps understand better what, where and how their creativity is being presented. It is communication at its best. Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L T

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

The Black Forest Restaurant

L

Let’s agree that Asheville has a world-class food scene.

By

SUSaN DEViTT

impressive menu offers so much more. Constant entries in new restauFor example: Pecan Encrusted WNC rants, new trends in food and newMountain Trout; Black Forest Chicken wave cocktails. When it comes to food, (chicken schnitzel topped with red wine Asheville is vogue, and we love it. cherries and sour cream); Spinach and But if you’d like to take a side step Roasted Garlic Ravioli. The menu offers to a slower pace with an old-world feel German, Italian and fresh seafood; steak, then head to South Asheville to the roasted duck, sandwiches and salads. Black Forest. From the moment you I loved the distinct flavor combinawalk up the steps you’ll be charmed tion of the Wild Mushroom Salad: greens by a long-ago nostalgia. This family and Gorgonzola, apples and candied walowned German restaurant opened in nuts, cooked mushrooms, then drizzled with 1983 (now with its second owner), is a warm, fresh balsamic vinaigrette. I sampled still in the original old stone house, several small dinner entrees from the menu that and has managed to maintain the feelnight starting with a Rham Schnitzle — pork ing of an old German village home. topped with sautéed mushrooms and a paprika 40 years later, they’ve grown cream sauce. Tender, rich and surprising, it from the original little house into a was a favorite. Also Sauerbraten — a deeply meandering restaurant that takes you marinated beef, braised and topped with a far away from Asheville. It now has six tangy ginger sauce and sour cream (no knife dining rooms — from large for events, required). There was a slow-roasted tenderloin to small for more intimate occasions — pork chop reminiscent two kitchens, a pretty patio of a Sunday dinner, and for dining outdoors and a menu sides of German separate lounge with beaupotato salad, red cabbage tiful vaulted ceilings. The and sauerkraut. décor is rich in warm wood With Shawn as the and collectables. Original guide I was lucky to try hand-painted German musome extraordinary wines rals decorate every room. It (remember? He knows all comes together to create his wines, when you a layered tapestry that sets go, trust him!), but the the stage for a different evening wouldn’t have dining experience. Extraordinary wines and beers been complete without a I spent an evening compliment the rich decor. German Riesling, and it with the manager, Shawn was the best I’ve ever had. The meal ended with Penland, who spun the history of a fabulous scratch-made Carmel Custard for the people and food that makes The dessert, similar to a Brule. Excellent. Black Forest. George Ettwein, the The next time you head out and are consecond and current owner, started as sidering trying a new restaurant, why not try a a dishwasher when it first opened… he was just a kid! Listening to tales that went back many years, this is truly a family owned business – one that consistently wins for Best German . 40 Food in the yearly Mountain Xpress, BX Best of WNC.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Enjoy your lunch or dinner entree on the pretty patio.

restaurant with decades of staying power — an original ‘local’? I promise you’ll enjoy an evening that won’t feel ‘trendy’, but rather the history of recipes’ past, in a time-gone-by atmosphere.

Gourmet Sandwiches & Wraps • Desserts Homemade Soups Salads • Kids Menu Seafood • Steak Chicken • Pasta Pork Tenderloin Vegetarian

Espresso • Coffee Teas • Beer • Wine

Daily Food Specials Outdoor Dining

The Black Forest Restaurant 2155 Hendersonville Rd. Arden, NC 28704 (828) 687-7980 Mon-Thur, 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri-Sat, 11:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. Sun, 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Wed-Sat 5:30-9 pm • 828.692.6335

pg. 9

Hg

Live Dinner Music Fri & Sat Nights

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

Susan Devitt is coowner of Asheville food company BelloLea Artisan Kitchen, which makes delicious, fun Pizza Kits. She and husband Tom are confessed foodies and therefore won’t be leaving Asheville, unless they’re dragged out, kicking and screaming. Contact her at SusanBelloLea@gmail.com

Organic, Locally-Grown Produce Fruit & Vegetables, Meat, Fish, Eggs, Coffee, Butter, Cheese & Meal Kits

pg

Year-Round Delivery No Upfront Fees or Contracts

But on to the food!

The Black Forest is run by a very tight crew that prides itself on from-scratch original recipes. There’s nothing like homemade bread, and my meal started off with an assortment of freshly baked breads. About the time the bread arrived I was sampling an excellent red Spanish Grenache wine. It was clear that Shawn knew his wines and enjoys picking the best for a unique and wide assortment — it’s not a typical wine list. For authentic German food such as knackwurst, bratwurst, schnitzel and braten, don’t go anywhere else, but the

Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

Monday-Friday only. One coupon per check. Pizza of least value is free. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. Asheville location only. Expires 10/31/2014.

Use the Code RIVER and Get 10% Off Your First Order

828-275-3500 website

www.motherearthproduce.com

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 33


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

B

Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Offers Gourmet Pizza’s and Family Fun

Brixx Wood Fired Pizza is a fun, friendly, neighborhood restaurant serving the best brick oven pizza, pasta and salads.

145 Wall Street

Downtown Waynesville

828.550.3610

pg. 24

WM

FREE BEER OR WINE

WITH PURCHASE OF ENTREE OR APPETIZER

Boiled Crawfish Saturdays

Dishes to Suit Every Palate Spicy & Non-Spicy Dishes

First Beer or Wine is on the House with any Entree Purchase of $6 or More Mon-Fri 11-9PM; Sat 9-10PM Sun Brunch 9-2:30PM Closed Tuesday

67 BRANNER AVE WAYNESVILLE

Former Maria’s Mexican Location • 828-246-0885

pg. 24

WN

Free WiFi

They adapted the oldest and best method of cooking pizza with a combination of superior ingredients and a wood fired oven, which adds the final flavor you cannot get just anywhere. You may also enjoy one of 24 great micro-brewed beers on tap or 14 wines by the glass. The centerpiece of this wonderful restaurant is its wood-burning oven that enhances the natural flavors of the restaurant’s pizzas, roasted chicken and roasted veggies. Brixx serves a variety of gourmet pizzas, as well as appetizers, salads, pastas and sandwiches served on bread baked on-site daily. For those with a unique diet, Brixx also offers vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options. Each pizza is delicately assembled by their trained staff and then kissed by roaring flames until golden brown. Here is the perfect place to treat the family or for taking your date out on a special evening. Brixx succeeds in offering made-to-order menu items while placing you in a fun, colorful and friendly environment. Speaking with customers one afternoon at Brixx it didn’t take long to discover that they have an extremely loyal clientele who view it as a neighborhood hangout – somewhere they want to visit on a weekly basis. And, as one young woman, Sarah Daniels of South Asheville says, “We always know we’ll get a fantastic meal at a reasonable price.” Brixx offers great outdoor dining, something to certainly take advantage with these stunning autumn afternoons, and they serve late into the night (until 1 a.m.). Brixx is in Biltmore Park Town Square, close to the 15-screen stadium cinema. Also take advantage of their

pg. 20

By

DENNiS Ray

The wood-burning oven enhances the natural flavors of the restaurant’s pizzas.

“Two for One Pizzas & Appetizers” Sunday - Thursday after 10 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays after 11 p.m.

“We always know we’ll get a fantastic meal at a reasonable price.” ~ S. Daniels

Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Biltmore Park Town, 30 Town Square Blvd. (828) 654-0046 Mon-Sat 11 a.m. - 1 a.m. Sun 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.

pg. 40

C

BC

Thai Fusion Bistro

a Culinary Gi Shop 8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com 34 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

Experience the Excitement of Flavor

342 N. Main St. Hendersonville, NC

Open 7 Days A Week Mon-Sat 12-9:30 Sunday 12-9 .9 pg

HL


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L T

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

U

R

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

Limited Edition Chocolate Shoes at The Chocolate Fetish

T

1st

Visit

IN HONOR OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH

frEE DEssErt! With Purchase of Entrée

2nd frEE appEtizEr!

The Chocolate Fetish® has joined a nationwide movement to bring attention to domestic violence with the creation of Limited Edition Chocolate High Heel Shoes and a unique partnership with Helpmate.

Each Limited Edition Chocolate High Heel Shoe boasts a unique purple ribbon pattern that has been specially designed for this promotion. The purple support ribbon represents courage, survival, honor and a dedication to ending domestic violence. Chocolatier Jessica Lied enjoys the opportunity to make the shoes saying, “I know that my creativity will have a The proceeds from the sale of positive impact on the lives of others.” each Limited Edition Chocolate Shoe Available in milk or dark chocolate, each will be donated to Helpmate, a local shoe is carefully decorated by hand with organization that provides support to colored chocolates and is about the size of survivors of domestic violence. a women’s size 5 shoe. The chocolate shoes will be available exclusively through the month of October at The Chocolate Fetish’s downtown Asheville shop and on their website for $32.95. Ten years ago The Chocolate Fetish began a partnership with Helpmate when they began offering a Helpmate Assortment, the proceeds of which are donated to Helpmate. Adorned with a purple ribbon, it contains chocolate covered caramels and butter crunch, sells for $16.95, and is still available year round. At a fundraising event in September The Chocolate Fetish donated more than $2,000 to Helpmate. Ann Flynn associate director of Helpmate had this to say about their partnership, “We are so grateful for the generous long term support we have received from Bill, Sue and Chocolatier Jessica Lied enjoys the opportunity to make the shoes, which are Elizabeth Foley at The Chocolate available in milk or dark chocolate. Fetish. Not only have they made

Visit

3rd

With Purchase of Entrée

1/2 Off EntrEE!

Limited Edition Chocolate High Heel Shoes

Visit

financial donations to us through the years but they get their staff involved in different ways such as bringing holiday presents for the women and children in our emergency shelter at Christmas.” Chocolate lovers have been enjoying quality, award winning, handmade chocolates from The Chocolate Fetish since 1986. All of their signature products are made on site in small batches to assure maximum freshness. The Chocolate Fetish has been named one of the country’s “Best Chocolatiers and Confectioners” by The International

One coupon per table. Coupon must remain intact. Expires 12/31/14

Equal or Lesser Value, with Purchase of Entrée

2155 Hendersonville Road pg. 40

HB

Arden F 828.687.7980

continued on page 36

www.blackforestasheville.com

Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800 Open 7 Days a Week

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC pg. 20

B

Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Delicious Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones Wireless Internet Access!

777 Haywood Road, Asheville

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

pg. 40

HW

(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 35


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

Advertise in Our Dining Guide

R

T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

I

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

Mother Earth Produce to Turn Three

It’s no surprise that a couple of educators are behind a local company’s quest to help Upstate and Western North Carolina residents learn about the bounty of our local fields and farms.

Graham and Andrea Duvall, the owners of Asheville-based Mother Earth Produce (MEP), combined to turn their background in instruction—hers in the classroom and in curriculum, his “dug in” to the State Botanical Garden of Georgia—into a company that is dedicated to spreading the good news about the best Mother Earth has to offer. As the company is poised to turn three, it’s on the cusp of a growth curve that will allow the Duvalls and staff to spread the good word about organic and locallysourced produce to a rapidly expanding customer base. “We moved to Asheville from Atlanta, both exhausted and ready for a change, and promptly fell in love with the local farmer’s and tailgate markets—but with our schedules, we just couldn’t get to them,” Andrea Duvall says of the company’s origins. “We thought there had to be a deliv-

‘Chocolate Shoes’ cont’d from pg. 25 pg. 24

WB

Chocolate Salon and Taste TV for two years. The Chocolate Fetish is located at 36 Haywood Street in downtown Asheville. For more information or to order online visit their website at www.chocolatefetish.com. For over 30 years, Helpmate has served as Buncombe County’s primary provider of crisis-level services for victims of domestic violence and their children. Helpmate’s services include emergency shelter, a 24 hour hotline, counseling, court advocacy, and preventive education. More information about Helpmate can be found at www.helpmateonline.org.

The Chocolate Fetish 36 Haywood St., downtown Asheville (828) 258-2353 www.chocolatefetish.com Nationwide shipping

36 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

By JULiE

Mother Earth Produce makes it easier to eat local and organic food.

ery service in the area, so we searched, and we couldn’t find one. “At that point, we went all in. We largely modeled our business and concept on Washington DC’s Hometown Harvest, we both left our jobs, I cashed in my 401K, and Mother Earth Produce was born!” Nearly three years later, MEP has more than doubled its customer base each year, and conservatively projects at least 30% growth going into year four. “We are honored to be a part of a community that works together to support greater awareness of sustainable values and steps to help each other grow as well as to heal the environment,” Duvall says. “Unfortunately, just as with what happened with us, sometimes hectic schedules and geographic loca-

GREAT JEWISH FOOD! Got a craving for homemade matzo ball soup or maybe a nice corned beef on rye? Perhaps a potato knish or a kosher hot dog? Choose from more than twenty mouth watering traditional Jewish foods! Head to downtown Asheville on Sunday, October 19 for the twelfth annual HardLox: Asheville’s Jewish Food and Heritage Festival, in Pack Square Park from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be lots of delicious homemade Jewish foods, Israeli dancing, crafts, a Kids Zone, klezmer music and lots more! Every Jewish organization in the Asheville area will be represented with many providing interactive educational opportunities. For more information contact Marty Gillen at (828) 253-2282 or visit www.HardLox.com. The HardLox Jewish Food and Heritage Festival is hosted by Congregation Beth HaTephila and co-sponsored by the City of Asheville.

E. pECk

Local and organic produce and edibles delivery company rides a wave of expansion tion prohibit many people from visiting farmer’s markets and supporting their local producers. Mother Earth Produce emerged out of a desire to make it easier to eat local and organic food from our neighbors who are producing it—and our intentions have been met with a truly gratifying response.” “I’ve been so pleased to put my extensive background in horticulture to bear in growing something brand new…a company,” says Graham Duvall. “With Americans’ increased interest in knowing the origins of the food they eat, it’s a great privilege to be able to convey the values of sustainable and responsibly-farmed produce, meats, fish and other edibles, by providing consumers with a choice that offers the ultimate in both convenience and variety. We’re very proud of what we’ve done to date, and of where we’re going.” Mother Earth Produce currently delivers to customers in Asheville, Arden, Biltmore Lake, Black Mountain, Candler, Fletcher, Swannanoa, and Weaverville, North Carolina; and Greenville, Boiling Springs, Greer, Lyman, Moore, Simpsonville, Spartanburg, and Traveler’s Rest, South Carolina. Routes run Thursday – Sunday, depending on location.

Based in Asheville, NC, Mother Earth Produce (MEP) delivers to customers throughout Western North Carolina and Upstate South Carolina. For more details on MEP, contact Julie Peck at (864) 237-4302, email jpeckmktg@gmail.com, or go to www.motherearthproduce.com


R

A

T

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

A

R

T

S

&

It is an extremely helpful insight into the journey that will be experienced by those who take up a meditation practice and as what will be encountered by those who live in sincere intention for a more evolved and enlightened life. Here is the tale: One day a prince, named Siddhartha, of the kingdom of Shakya in northern India, ventured beyond the palace walls of his privileged and sheltered life where he encountered suffering that he had never known existed. Even more than the people’s physical suffering caused by poverty, disease, hunger, cruel treatment and death, Siddhartha was struck by the mental suffering. He was so moved and saddened by what he saw that he vowed to dedicate his life to understanding the source of this suffering and to finding a way to liberation from it. In his quest, he at first took up the life of an ascetic for this was a widely accepted path in the world of ancient India for one who sought religious enlightenment. He learned to master his own body, thoughts, emotions, fears and desires. He learned to meditate deeply, to transcend the sense of isolated self and to merge with and unlock many secrets of the Universe. His fervor, however, was so great, and the rituals of his practice so extreme, that he had brought himself to near death with fasting and exhaustion. He had mastered many spiritual techniques, but the

Doctor Bob folded up his stethoscope and put it in his pocket.

“Is there anything else I should know, Ken?” He stood at the counter, entering his findings of the yearly physical for this retiree. “No, don’t think so.” Ken buttoned his shirt. “Marie’s home packing. We’re going to the Caribbean for two weeks.” Ken smiled at the thought. “Some friends are arranging the trip. Marie likes to pack early.” “Oh?” Doctor Bob looked up, suddenly interested. “Do you know where you are going?” “The itinerary’s not totally arranged yet,” Ken said absently, adjusting his belt. “And what have you and Marie done about your health on this trip? What preparations have you made?” “What do you mean?” Ken looked up quizzically. “We’re just going to the Caribbean.” Doctor Bob sat back down on his stool. “The United States has for the most part eliminated many health risks in our environment – water, food, infectious diseases. Other

U

L

T

U

R

By

knowledge he sought eluded him. In a moment of insight, he realized this withdrawal from and rejection of the world, along with the extremity of the practice, could not be of help to ordinary people - that, in fact, this asceticism was a kind of arrogance. For how could one learn the secrets of mastering the suffering in the world by being in rejection of the world? Following this realization, he cleansed himself in a river, accepted his first meal in many days, a simple meal of rice milk from a young woman who was passing by, and vowed to sit in meditation until he found the answers he sought. He understood intuitively that he must find a “middle way,” a path that was neither the materialism and conventional religious practice of his youth, nor the extremity of his recent asceticism. He sat beneath a fig tree, later to become known as the “Bodhi Tree,” and settled into meditation to contemplate his challenge. He sat for many days, and as he settled into perfect equanimity and stillness he began to see and understand the total balance of energy and form that is the Universe and he began to experience a vast clarity of mind capable of realizing the answers he sought. The legend then tells that the god Mara, the god of darkness and destruction, who can be understood as a mythic representation of the dark side of human ego, became jealous of Siddhar-

Traveling Health

C

artful living

Buddha and Mara

The legend of Buddha’s journey to enlightenment, generally experienced as a quaint religious story, is, in fact, a powerful parable that deserves our serious examination.

D

R

By

MaX HaMMONDS, MD

countries have not been so fortunate. About 8% of people return from a trip outside the United States with an illness that they picked up in a foreign country, especially a third world country. You need to be prepared.” “Prepared? In what way?” “Be aware,” Doctor Bob said firmly. “Be aware of what diseases are endemic in the country you are visiting. Be aware of what vaccinations you need. You don’t know for sure yet where you are going?” Ken shook his head. “Some countries require yellow fever shots. Some need Hepatitis B or Dengue or Typhoid. Dengue is much more common than we once thought.” Doctor Bob was thoughtful for a moment, organizing his thoughts. “Be aware of the potential health risks you face – in the water, in the food, insect bites, sunburn potential, just the emotional stress of being in a foreign country. You might want to put together a travel health kit – sun screen, insect repellant, hand wash. If you’re going hiking, I might even suggest a water filter. Are you going to be out in the bush, out in the jungles?”

E

BiLL WaLZ

tha’s growing perfect peace and presence. He sent his five daughters, the spirits of pride, greed, fear, ignorance and desire in the appearance of seductive young women to distract and tempt Siddhartha out of his search. They danced and sang and beckoned to Siddhartha, but Siddhartha was looking beyond the world of physical desire and they had no effect on him. This enraged Mara and he conjured a ferocious storm filled with wind, thunder, and lightning-bolts to batter at Siddhartha. But Siddhartha was unmoved, his perfect stillness unshaken. Mara then sent the illusion of legions of soldiers marching toward Siddhartha who loosed flaming arrows at him. But as Siddhartha sat in perfect equanimity and composure, the falling arrows were transformed into flower petals that gently drifted down at his feet, and the sky cleared. In a last attempt to corrupt Siddhartha’s journey to enlightenment, Mara appeared before him disguised in Siddhartha’s own visage and challenged Siddhartha, demanding to know what right Siddhartha had to be free of suffering. Mara challenged him to present a witness who would vouch for Siddhartha’s right, and in answer, Siddhartha touched his fingers to the Earth and answered, “The Earth is my witness that I and all sentient life have the right to be free of suffering.” And with this, Mara was defeated and faded away. Siddhartha continued meditating until dawn and with first light, his enlightenment

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

was complete. He understood perfectly this dilemma of suffering. He was now The Buddha, The Awakened One, and his mission soon commenced with his first teaching of the Four Noble Truths on the Nature and Cessation of Suffering to a group of his former fellow ascetics in the Deer Park nearby the holy city of Benares. These ascetics, realizing the perfection of his vision, became Buddha’s first disciples. A beautiful story. If we look closely, however, we can recognize in the teaching allegorical parallels to our own experience that can be very helpful in the development of our meditation practice and in our journey into more conscious living. We all want to be happy, to be without unnecessary suffering in our life. This is an important truth. But we have no idea of how to achieve it. We generally come to a meditation practice with a sense that the life we are living and the lives of those around us are not as peaceful, compassionate and wise as they might be. We have all looked to materialism for happiness, for as was Siddhartha, we were born into a materialistic world. Never in human history has material pleasure and comfort been so readily available to even ordinary people. It is quite continued on page 40

“Don’t know yet.” Ken looked worried. “When you know, have Marie call the office. If you’ll be eating outside of big cities, you should have Hepatitis A gamma globulin. Also, I’ll have a prescription for anti-malaria meds, if you’re going to be exposed at all. And a small supply of antibiotics, in case you get into a bad diarrhea situation. Usually taking along some over-the-counter antidiarrheal medicine is enough – sometimes not. “Oh, and be careful on the beaches, in the sand. There’s a parasite that lives in the sand – an animal hookworm. Nasty little guy that can make little tunnels under your skin. Itches like the devil.” “I had no idea. Do you suppose we shouldn’t go?” “Of course, you should go,” Doctor Bob said reassuringly. “Just be aware, be prepared. If you have more questions, go on-line to the CDC website and look at the Yellowbook. It’s on the menu list on the left. The first three chapters are good on awareness and there’s specific information about specific countries. You and Marie can look at it when you know where you are going. “It’s the old saying, Ken,” Doctor Bob arose to go. “An ounce of prevention.”

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 37


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

October 3 & 5

#OUCH! (An Accidental Comedy)

Die Fledermaus: An Appalachian Party

October 3-11

Live Art Demonstrations

Every Friday and Saturday 11-4 p.m. Mountain Made Art Gallery, 1 Page Ave., in the Grove Arcade. (828) 3500307, www.mtnmade.com/blog.

Friday, October 3

Asheville Lyric Opera presBeth Truitt ents a fresh new adaptation of an operatic masterpiece. October 3 at 8 p.m. October 5 at 3 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre. (828) 257-4530, www.ashevillelyric.org

Saturday, October 4

Appalachian Pastel Society National Exhibition

Free demonstration by Stan Sperak, at 2 p.m, reception 5 to 7 p.m. On display through January 4, 2015 at the Bascom Center, 323 Franklin Road, Highlands. www.AppalachianPastelSociety.org

Carolina Colors

Saturday, October 4

Friday, October 3

9 p.m. - 3 a.m. Featuring DJ Stratos, DJ Deanna, and DrewG. Drag show at 12:30 a.m. 3 Dance Floors, 4 Bars, One Price, $12. Ages 18+. 11 Grove Street, Downtown Asheville (828) 505-1612, www.scandalsnightclub.com

Opening reception 5-7 p.m. at the historic Red House Gallery, 310 W. State St., Black Mountain. Call the Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League, (828) 669-0351 or go to www.svfalarts.org

Give and Take

Collaboration of Asheville artists and Washington DC area artists exploring the effects of technology on the artistic process. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. at the Asheville Area Arts Council’s Gallery, 1 Page Ave., in the Grove Arcade. www.ashevillearts.com

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Blue Ridge Pride Celebration

Saturday, October 4

True Nature Country Fair

8th Annual celebration features local, organic, and sustainable products, exhibits and demonstrations. $12 Adults; $3 Children 12 and under. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Highland Lake Cove in Flat Rock. www.truenaturecountryfair.org

Saturday, October 4

Hops & Crafts

Mugs, Steins & Tankards by regional artists. Opening reception 2-5 p.m. at the Grovewood Gallery, Erik Haagensen adjacent to the Grove Park Inn in North Asheville. (828) 2537651, www.grovewood.com

Saturday, October 4

ColorFest

Dillsboro Fine Arts & Crafts Fair features six full hours of entertainment, beginning at 10 a.m. (828) 631-4587 or www.spiritofappalachia.org

Saturday, October 4

Crimson Laurel Gallery

Opening reception for three exhibits: ceramics by featured artist Lynn Duryea; figurative sculptural work by Lisa Clague and David Robinson; ceramics by Shadow May and Jerilyn Verden. Bakersville, NC. (828) 688-3599, www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com

October 4-5 Barnaroo

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide

October 2-5 and 9-12 Features Maryedith Burrell, (Seinfeld, SNL). Produced and directed by Steven Samuels. At the BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce Street. Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 3 p.m. www.themagnetictheatre.org.

R

More than 10 local/regional bands, craft beer by Hi-Wire, sake from Blue Kudzu, cyclocross race by Youngblood

bicycles, silent auction, local food, vendors, and camping. Franny’s Farm,

38 Came Sharp Rd., Leicester. (828) 515-0075, www.frannysfarm.com Sunday, October 5

Noam Pickelny and Stuart Duncan

Preeminent banjoist performs with master fiddler. 8 p.m. $35; $30 in advance. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. (828) 270-7747, www.myAltamont.com

October 6-7

Auditions for A Charlie Brown Christmas

R

E

M

Saturday, October 11

Second Saturday

Demonstrations, refreshments, music, and a showcase of ceramic arts. The Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville.

Saturday, October 11

Fiesta Latina

Traditional, contemporary and folk music, dance, art, tantalizing ethnic food. Family oriented free event. Noon to 8 p.m. Roger McGuire Green in Pack Square, downtown Asheville.

Saturday, October 11

Heroes for Hope

Tuesday, October 7

1-6 p.m. Coxe Avenue on downtown Asheville’s south slope.

Eight-week class begins October 7 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Asheville Parks & Recreation Harvest House, 205 Kenilworth Road, Asheville. For beginners and intermediates. $80; limited to eight. (828) 350-2051.

Tuesday, October 7

Ceramic Art Show

Ceramic art of Reiko Miyagi, Elaine Lacy, and Barbara Quartrone as well as 25 other gallery members. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Ave. in Asheville.

October 9-12

Dead Man’s Cell Phone

Directed by Stephanie Hickling Beckman. October 9-11 at 7:30 p.m. October 12 at 2 p.m. UNC-A’s Carol Belk Theatre. $12. (828) 232-6610, or http://drama.unca.edu

Thursday, October 9

Paula Poundstone

One of Comedy Central’s 100 Greatest Stand-up Comedians. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets: $40; Student $35; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, October 11

Norbury Books & Café Grand Opening

Reception, 2-6 p.m. Live music, refreshments, wine tastings, and children’s arts and crafts. Used bookstore features Spanish-Language, children’s, and mystery books. Norbury Books & Cafe, 62 C North Main Street in Weaverville. (828) 484-1542

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Features a cast of 11 adults. Must sing 16 bars of music and bring sheet music in your key. Accompanist provided. No singing to a CD or other recording. Directed by Eric Mills. Musical direction by Brad Curtioff. At Asheville Community Theatre. For more information visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Beginning Clay Sculpture

A

10K Walk, Run, Roll 10K at A-B Tech on Victoria Road in Asheville. 9 a.m. to noon. Registration is $20 in-advance or $25 the day of; includes lunch. Register at www.eblencharities.org

Saturday, October 11

Oktoberfest

Saturday, October 11

Art on the Green

Biltmore Park Town Square. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. On display through November 20, 2014.

Friday, October 17

stephanies id

Noir-pop band along with multiinstrumentalist Dep. $12; $8 adv. Ages 21+. 9 p.m. at the Mothlight, 701 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 252-5433, www.themothlight.com

Friday & Saturday, October 17 & 18

Paul Taylor Dance Company

Modern dance. Diana Wortham Theatre. 8 p.m. Tickets: $45; Student $40; Children 12 and under $20; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10. (828) 2574530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, October 18

History and Legacy Tour

10 am. Burnsville. Asheville Preservation Society and Yancey History Association present area history. “Tragedy of Frankie and Charlie” lecture with museum and downtown tours. Details at www.psabc.com.

Friday, October 24

Pan Harmonia

Showcase of fine art paintings from noon to 6 p.m. Rain date October 12. On the Green by Dobra Tea in Black Mountain. Paint while you exhibit your art. Music and other art-tea entertainment. $20 to reserve a 10’x10’ space. Contact Marilyn Owens at marilyndesigns@charter.net or (828) 232-7954

Featuring the Opal String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 337 Charlotte in North Asheville. $16.50 in advance; $22 at the door; $5 for students. www. pan-harmonia.org

Saturday & Sunday, October 11 & 12

Friday & Saturday, October 24 & 25

October Leaves Craft Show

Fine handmade crafts, food, a raffle, and a food drive. Saturday 9-5 p.m., Sunday 9-4 p.m. at the Maggie Valley Festival Grounds. Free admission. Details at (828) 497-9425 or (828) 7363245 or visit www.mvcraftshows.com

Tuesday, October 14

Jazz Demonstration and Concert

Jamey Aebersold presents a free demonstration and concert from 6:30 to 8:30. Performers include Bill Gerhardt on piano, Mike Holstein on bass and Sonny Thornton on drums. Cummings Memorial United Methodist Church, 1 Banner Farm Rd., Mills River.

Wednesday, October 15

Hand-Crafted Book Exhibit

Handmade bound books created by Mary Carol Koester on display at the Beverly-Hanks Discovery Center in

Annual Book Sale

Thousands of good-condition used books. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place. (828) 254-6001.

Saturday, October 25

Runner of the Woods

Featuring Nicolas Beaudoing of the Doc Marshalls. $5 show at 10:30 p.m. Jack of the Wood, 95 Patton Ave, Asheville. Details at (828) 252-5445, or visit www.jackofthewood.com

Saturday, October 25

The Pure Heart Ensemble

Piano, vocals, cello, flute and crystal bowls. 8 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, (828) 669-0816. $18; $15 in advance.

Wednesday October 29

Trigger Hippie

Band created by Black Crowes drummer Steve Gorman features Joan Osborne on lead

OCTOBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

vocals and Jackie Greene on vocals/guitar/organ. All ages. $20; $15 adv. 8 p.m. at the Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide

Best in Show

R

E

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

by Phil Juliano

Live Music at Bogarts Waynesville’s favorite steakhouse offers the best steaks in town, as well as sandwiches, fresh salads, homemade soups, and a wide variety of desserts. Live Old Time/Bluegrass music on Thursday nights at 6:30 p.m. featuring local favorites and a few travelers.

Thursday, October 30

Listen to This

Stories and original songs from locals. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $15. 7:30 p.m. in 35below. 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Thursday, October 2 – The Freight Hoppers, Old time string band

Thursday, October 30

Autumn Garden Journaling

10-4 with Mary Alice Ramsey. Create images from dried seed pods, late summer vegetables, flowers and autumn leaves. Cost: $125 plus $25 for materials. Register online at gallery@310art. com or call Fleta Monaghan at (828) 776-2716.

M

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Thursday, October 9 – Darren Nicholson w/ The Sweet Lowdown, Canadian Bluegrass accompanied by Darren Thursday, October 16 – Ragtime Hawks, Old time/ Rag time string band Thursday, October 23 – The Freight Hoppers, Old time string band

Friday, October 31

Thursday, October 30 – Ragtime Hawks, Old time/ Rag time string band

Alayo Dance Company

Award-winning company perform an innovative fusion of AfroCuban modern, folkloric and popular Cuban dance. 8 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre. (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

Bogart’s Restaurant & Tavern 303 South Main St. Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313 www.bogartswaynesville.com

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Friday, October 31

Zansa Halloween Party

With Reggae band Bruckshot. Wear a mask inspired by the spirit world, ancient legends, or human-animal amalgamations. Best Mask Contest. 9 p.m. $15; $10 advance. Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., West Asheville. www.isisasheville.com.

October 31 - November 2

Other Desert Cities

Contemporary family drama. October 31 and November 1 at 35below at Asheville Community Theatre at 2:30 p.m. November 2 at the Reuter Center at UNCA at 2:30 p.m. $6. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, (828) 254-1320.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for more details.

Ivy Rowe

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Medical Guardian

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS?

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800867-6028.

Deadline: January 15, 2015 First Place: $1,000. Second Place: $250. Third Place: publication in the Asheville Poetry Review, and a featured reading at Malaprop’s Bookstore. All submissions considered. Send three poems, any style, any theme, any length, with a $20 entry fee (payable to Asheville Poetry Review) to: William Matthews Poetry Prize, c/o Asheville Poetry Review, PO Box 7086, Asheville, NC 28802. For full details visit www.ashevillepoetryreview.com

Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League

Friday, October 31 - November 2 Stars Barbara Bates Smith. Feisty mountain woman’s life of “livin’ on love.” Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m. Musical accompaniment by Jeff Sebens. Tickets: $12, $18, $24. NC Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in Asheville. (828) 239-0263 or www.ncstage.org.

William Matthews Poetry Prize

The Tax Doctor

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 39


R

Find It Here

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps A-1 Music Warehouse www.mymusicwarehouse.com

Jonas Gerard Fine Art www.jonasgerard.com

Amici Music, www.amicimusic.org Andrew Charles Gallery (828) 989-0111

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

Appalachian Survival Gear www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

Lime Leaf Thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com

Ariel Gallery, arielcraftgallery.com The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Lush Works, www.lush-works.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Art on Depot, (828) 246-0218

Mellow Mushroom, (828) 236-9800

Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Mountain Made, www.MtnMade.com Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610

Kirk’s Collectables,(770) 757-6814

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com

Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com

Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us

Black Forest www.blackforestasheville.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Satellite Gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com Soapy Dog, www.thesoapydog.com

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Brixx Pizza www.brixxpizza.com Grace C. Bomer Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

The Strand, www.38main.com Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Taste of New Orleans, (828) 246-0885 Ten Thousand Villages Asheville www.villagesasheville.org

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

TMAMP, www.tmamp.org Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com Great Smokies, (828) 452-4757 The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz HART Theater, www.harttheatre.com Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com VaVaVoom, www.vavavooom.com Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

TC

DC

BILTMORE VILLAGE BG

WEST ASHEVILLE

BX HA

MERRIMON AVE.

HW

MW

GROVE PARK INN

Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com

GG

MB

GM

PATTON AVE.

WNC OVERVIEW

NORTH ASHEVILLE

PA

(828) 646-0071

R

T

S

&

artful living

REYNOLDS VILLAGE

TUNNEL ROAD

John Wesley Williams Furniture johnwesleywilliamsfurniture.com

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

A

clear, however, that materialism is not a certain path to peace and happiness. Often, in fact, it is a major source and cause of much emotional suffering. And most people have had some sort of experience with conventional religion, and while it can be an important source of community and emotional comfort, only a very few find deep, unshakeable and lasting peace in conventional religion. And, as it is with materialism, many people find in their experience with religion much confusion and pain. Some people, not having found what they seek in either materialism or conventional religion, will turn to esoteric and extreme spiritual practices. Some will turn away from the world into severe practices not unlike the young Siddhartha. Many more, however, will dabble in ritualistic and arcane practices while their lives remain, on the whole, very materialistic. And while they may find moments of self-transcendence in rituals and devotion to some guru, when the rituals are over, they are left with the sense that the true peace they seek, a peace that can be brought into everyday life, still eludes them. We hear of Buddhism, the so-called “Middle-Way,” and of its emphasis on meditation and a simple ethical life as a way to quiet our restless minds, as possibly a way to find peace and increased sanity. Perhaps, we hope, we will find a respite from unsettling thoughts and emotions and the reactive and impulsive behavior that is driven by these thoughts and emotions. We hear that there is a minimum of emphasis on ritual, particularly in Buddhism’s Zen manifestation. It seems to be free of what we in the West would associate with theology; it is more a psychology, and while

Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com

Zapow, www.zapow.com

R

‘Buddha and Mara ’ cont’d from page 37

TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com Tryon Arts & Crafts School www.tryonartsandcrafts.org

E

C

U

L T

U

R

E

Perfect peace, wisdom and compassion are inherent in every human being. practiced by millions in the world as a religion, it does not have to be. We hear that its figure-head, The Buddha, did not claim to be either a god or a prophet of some god, but rather a human being who taught that perfect peace, wisdom and compassion are inherent in every human being. So we take up the practice of Buddhist meditation and its ethical teachings as a path to overcome our own emotional turmoil and the suffering that comes with it. At first, there is some reinforcing gain. For most who bring any serious intention and time to it, the practice of simple sitting meditation brings a measure of respite from the tension and mental busyness of ordinary life. However, bringing the practice deeper and into our everyday lives turns out to be extremely challenging, and here is where Buddha’s own story is very relevant. Just as we begin to settle into a quiet mind, we can expect to experience our own personal Mara, our egoic mind, challenging us with busy and insecure thoughts, parading “pride, greed, fear, ignorance and desire” through the field of awareness. The pull of our psycho/ social conditioning, ego’s realm, will come in the form of boredom and restlessness. It will call us back to our very busy lives telling us to stop wasting time sitting, doing nothing. The very important teaching that perfect peace and oneness with Life is our own basic nature, and so certainly attainable, will not really register, because the face of our ego, our personality, cannot believe such things – for it would mean we were someone other than whom we are accustomed to. We find it nearly impossible to conceive that who we really are is the face of infinite balance, compassion and peace that is the vast Universe of Nature. We do not know to call on our own Nature, as Siddhartha called on the Earth, to be our witness that we have the right to this peace and wisdom. Likewise, as our meditation practice begins to open into brief glimpses of Buddhism’s promise of “peaceful abiding,” “insight,” and “oneness” (Shamatha, Vipassana, and Samadhi), it will seem inconceivable that these states of consciousness could be our “everyday mind.” The pull of our habits of egocentricity, distractibility, hurriedness, judgment, emotional reaction and for seeking happiness and significance outside ourselves will be too strong. Like with Siddhartha, Mara will challenge us, and because of strong identification with our own personality, we will find it very difficult to open to the amazing possibilities for clarity and presence that can be the fruit of our practice. What Buddha’s story tells us, however, what Buddha’s teaching (Dharma) promises, and the line of those who precede us into discovering the truth in Buddha’s teaching (Sangha) gives proof to, is that if we hold steadfast in the face of these challenges, if we find and hold our center, our balance, our stillness, our equanimity, our true Nature, Mara will be defeated. We will find the truth, we will awaken to the realization that Buddha’s mind is our mind and it can be our everyday mind, when we release clinging to our conditioned egoic mind. We will see that suffering is not the necessary result of difficulty and pain. We will see, we will experience, that peaceful abiding, wisdom and insight, along with the true vastness of our existence in unity with all things is the truth of who we are. This was Buddha’s story and likewise it can be yours.

NF

V

M

HENDERSONVILLE RD.

RC A

HF HB

BD

RIVERSIDE DRIVE RB

WA H

HK

40 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

BLACK MOUNTAIN SWANNANOA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESENT

THE CHAMBER TOURS Tours open to the public. Great Britain & Ireland Tour

May 9-18, 2015 • $2078 per person London, Stonehenge, Bath, Chester, Grasmere, Gretna Green, Edinburgh, York, Stamford, Cambridge

Black Mountain Events

O

October 4 - Fall by the Tracks 5K. For information

or to become a sponsor contact J. Griffin, grif6701@ bellsouth.net, or visit www.carolinarunner.com

October 4 - Fall By The Tracks Festival 10 a.m. - 4

p.m. Family fun day on Sutton Ave. Activities include craft demonstrations, face painting, pumpkin painting, cake walk, beanbag toss, storytelling. Model train display, Caboose open. Bake sale. Hot dogs, hamburgers and drinks for sale.

October 4 - Old Toll Road Caravan to Camp Alice on

Mt. Mitchell. Drivers with 4WD high-clearance vehicles who can carry three paid passengers attend free. $75 members, $100 nonmembers. Contact the museum to register to drive or ride. Swannanoa Valley Museum, (828) 669-9566, www.swannanoavalleymuseum.org

October 11 - 2nd Saturday Studio Show & Sale. Featured artists, art demo, refreshments. 10% sales. 11-5 p.m. at Red House Studios & Gallery, 310 West State St., Black Mountain. October 11 - Fall Festival. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on main campus. Silent Auction, pumpkin patch, children’s games, car show, BBQ, live music, fire trucks and more. Black Mountain Home for Children, (828) 686-3451 October 11 - Live Mission Auction & BBQ Lunch. $10. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Blk. Mtn. United Methodist Church, State St. Fundraiser for SVCM and Ministry of Hope Chaplaincy Fund. October 16-19 - L.E.A.F. Lake Eden Arts Festival at

Camp Rockmont. Purchase tickets in advance at www. theleaf.org

Romantic Rhine River Cruise

October 24

Sept. 19-27, 2015 • $3871 per person

- Museum and Historic Haunted Hours Tour at In-TheOaks. Easy, some stairs. Museum and Historic Haunted Hours Tour $20 memat In-The-Oaks. bers, $25 nonmembers. Tours at 6, 6:30, 7, 7:30 and 8 p.m. For more details contact the Swannanoa Valley Museum, (828) 669-9566, or email info@swannanoavalleymuseum.org

Amsterdam, Cologne, Rudesheim, Mainz (Heidelberg), Strasbourg, Breisach (Black Forest), Basel

For more information, contact Black Mountain Travel

(800) 393-7804 or (828) 357-8335 susan.donnelly@avoyatravel.com Black Mountain Travel is an Independent Affiliate of Avoya Travel

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

October 25 - Howl-O-Ween Pet Parade & Costume Contest. Great family event. Free. Parade at 3 p.m. followed by contest. Small fee to be in contest. Registration for the contest begins at 1 p.m. next to Gingko Tree Gallery on Broadway St. Prizes for three best costumes in pet and human categories, plus grand prizes. Benefits local animal rescue organizations. Contact June at Visions of Creation, (828) 669-0065 or Bone-AFide Pet Boutique, (828) 669-0706.

MA

MV

Creative Mountain Food Tours – All tours begin at 2 p.m. Call

MS

(828) 419-0590 or visit www.creativemountainfoodtours.com for information and registration. October 3 & 31 - Pub and Grub Crawl October 10 & 24 - Dessert Tour October 11 & 25 - Ultimate Foodie Tour

MB MK

Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

MR

201 E. State Street, Black Mountain • (828) 669-2300 Toll Free: (800) 669-2301 • www.blackmountain.org

LEARN TO MAKE YOUR OWN JEWELRY

T

Taught by designer, Roberto Vengoechea.

Hand fabricate a sterling silver ring in our fully equipped studio. You will go home with your hand crafted ring. No experience necessary. Classes are small (two students in each), enabling you to master skills and techniques. Students will learn Create a sterling a variety of jewelry and metal silver ring. working techniques including but not limited to forming, sawing, piercing and stone setting. This class can be completed in one full day or two half-days. Course fee of $350 per person includes all supplies plus one colored stone; Amethyst, Blue Topaz, Citrine, Garnet, or Peridot. $100 deposit reserves your seat. To schedule your class call (828) 669-0065, (828) 2757835, or visit www.visionsofcreation.com.

Ma

Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 41


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

W

Filmed in 1935, this is a timeless, masterful American horror classic starring Elsa Lanchester as the Bride and Boris Karloff as the Monster. After its first showing, The Hollywood Reporter called Bride of Frankenstein “a joy for those who can appreciate it.” The iconic image of Elsa Lanchester as The Monster’s companion is immediately recognizable. Skunk stripes writhe up her conical hair-do, a wildly wonderful permanent wave

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

C

fine art

A 21st Century “Bride”

When Dennis asked me to create a creepy Classic Movie Monster cover for Rapid River Magazine’s October issue, I immediately thought of Bride of Frankenstein.

&

By

U

aL RaMiREZ

made over a wire frame. Originally based on the hairstyle of Egyptian Queen Nefertiti, this upright “do” also reminds us of Marge Simpson’s vertical blue coiffure, don’t you think? Again, superbly iconic. So, how to go about re-creating a new image of the “old“ Bride? There exist only a finite number of photos of Elsa with her flowing robe and wrapped arms. As I looked through different movie stills of Elsa, I thought of how to approach recreating an icon that could be instantly known, yet was my own… perhaps I could combine Pop Art, comic book art, and traditional fine art, or some other combination of different styles and techniques, all individually hand drawn and then combined within Photoshop. That was it! It came alive! Just like Doctor Frankenstein created the Bride, I would take available photos and then use my own renditions of Elsa to start to re-assemble her, piece by piece. The cover artwork that I created is my own – I incorporated, combined, cut, assembled, and adapted the many images I sourced in order to craft an original piece of art. I used

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

a combination of physical art work (pencil, pen, inks, paints) and digital art (a scanner and Photoshop). This digital technique is by no means new, but I’ve found that the more hand drawing and painting you can do, the less computerized and mechanical it looks. One of the great advantages to this is that a great amount of detail can be achieved at a very large size, then reduced down to fit any image size, creating the kind of detail found only in engravings. So, just like the Bride and the Monster, the artwork is one of a kind, never to be repeated. As far as the American horror movie genre goes, the Bride of Frankenstein takes the proverbial cake. If you haven’t already, I encourage you to see the original version, hopefully on a dark and stormy night.

ASHEVILLE ARTIST AL RAMIREZ From 1984-1992 Al Ramirez was a comic book illustrator, finisher, and colorist for Marvel and D.C. comics. After that came The X Factor Graphic Novel, Action comic books, and Acclaim comic books. Al recently completed a series of 12 original oils of native birds of the Southern

A

Z

I

N

E

The Bride by Alfred Ramirez

Appalachian Mountains, now reproduced as giclees and available at Gallery of the Mountains, a fine American craft gallery located in Asheville, specializing in local and regional artists. If you’re in downtown Asheville, drop by The Dog Door on Broadway to see all of Al’s posters of various dog breeds, commissioned by nationally known animal behaviorist Kim Brophy. You can meet up with Al at most of the Asheville Comic Expo’s, hosted and presented by Comic Envy. Contact Al via email to lindsayram1@gmail.com

Your Jersey and Shadowbox Custom Framing Experts

Wild Card #3, from the Wild Card graphic novel published in 1990.

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

Gallery of the Mountains

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC 1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway

1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com . 40 Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6 Hk

pg. 20

O

pg

42 October 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 2

290 Macon Avenue Asheville (828) 254-2068 galleryofthemountains. blogspot.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

fine art

Double Exposure: Change

F

For the past 14 years, my life has been immersed in my passion for fine art reproduction – first with ColorWorks, and for the past seven years as the proprietor of Double Exposure.

Creating opportunities for artists to have extended avenues for selling their work beyond their original paintings or drawings, as well as for our community to have more access to affordable artwork, has been my labor of love. But I now find myself immersed in something else… a life change. Having spent so much wonderful time with the incredibly talented art community of Western North Carolina and being exposed to such amazing and beautiful work over the years, has helped me to rekindle my love and passion for my own creative selfexpression as an artist. It’s time for me to take the next step; to reconnect with the true nature of my soul as an artist, which means leaving behind my role with Double Exposure. So yes, I have made one of the biggest life decisions of my less than 50 years on the planet, and have sold Double Exposure. While I will no doubt have a lengthy period of moving on from this chapter of my life, there is absolutely every reason for you - the artist communityto consider maintaining your relationship with Double Exposure. The new owners are Sally and Randy Frazer, and I can with absolute confidence, assure you that everything that you have come to expect from Double Exposure, you will continue to receive under their new leadership. Shannon and I will be staying on as consultants and will be available to help whenever we’re needed. They will operate under the name Double Exposure Art, LLC. Part of the package was buying both our

house and the studio, so coming to Double Exposure will be the same as it ever was, and of course, the phone number remains the same as well. Both Shannon and I are fully committed to working with Randy and Sally Frazer, the new owners Sally and Randy of Double Exposure, and Michelle and to insure that Shannon Miller. they know the business inside and out. We will remain onboard with them in a training capacity until we are absolutely convinced that the very same quality of work that you expect from Double Exposure has become embedded in everything that they do. We love working with Sally and Randy and can report that not only are they wonderful people, but they truly understand artists and are catching on so quickly to every aspect of the fine art printmaking process. They are the perfect “next step’ for Double Exposure, and I have no doubt that they will take this company to the next level and create opportunities for the Western North Carolina art community that we have yet to see. It’s a very exciting time! As for me… well, Shannon and I have purchased 12 acres of land an hour west of Asheville and are excited about building our new home, reconnecting with nature, and developing an artists’ retreat that overlooks Fontana Lake and the Great Smokies National Park. www.FontanaLakeandParkViewCabins.com opening summer 2015! Double Exposure has been nothing short of a gift for me, and I have loved my time learning, growing and hopefully being of service to you. I have no idea how to say thank you to each of the artists and photographers who I have worked with over the years. You have given me far more than you could ever realize.

U

L

T

U

By

R

E

MiCHELLE MiLLER

Your work and your friendship has opened my eyes, enhanced my awareness, and certainly expanded my heart. Thank you. Over the next several months, you will still be seeing me at Double Exposure, and also have the opportunity to meet your new partners — Sally and Randy. We all look forward to your next visit.

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Double Exposure (828) 299-8180 www.DoubleExposureArt.com Michelle can be reached at michellebydesign@hotmail.com For Double Exposure orders and inquiries email info@DoubleExposureArt.com

DOT EDITIONS FINE ART PRINTING

PHOTOGRAPHY OF 2D AND 3D ARTWORK

828.275.7028 pg. 40

RB

pg. 40

pa

Archival Pigment Prints Custom Framing & Stretchers

828-575-5534

www.doteditions.com

Asheville’s Full Service Fine Art Studio

2004 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, UNIT W. ASHEVILLE, NC 28804 Vol. 18, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2014 43


pg. 20

E

®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com pg. 40

36 Haywood Street

HF

Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

Great Chamber Music in Intimate Venues and Non-Traditional Spaces Contact Daniel Weiser, Artistic Director, (802) 369-0856, or e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org for performance details.

www.amicimusic.org

Celebrate�Unity,�Inspire�Every�Voice! with Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn,Talib Kweli Live Band Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Nahko and Medicine for the People MarchFourth Marching Band, Rising Appalachia, Delhi 2 Dublin Mystical Arts of Tibet & more!

39th

LEAF FESTIVAL

OCTOBER 16th-19th

At Magical Lake Eden close to Asheville & Black Mtn NC

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

Music Festival •� •�#1 Festival for Kids • �#1 Festival for Camping Music. Dance. Handcrafts. Healing Arts. Kids Villages. Lake Sports. Local Brews & Eats. Camping & Cabins.

pg. 40

TC

October 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
October 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: The Bride of Frankenstein by Al Ramirez..p42; Inside: HART presents “Urinetown”..p6; Weaverville Art Safari..p10; Haywood Arts...

Advertisement