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Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands..PG 11 Jonas Gerard..PG 13 • Julia Fosson..PG 14 Cathy Searle..PG 26 • Soli Deo Gloria Studio..PG 35 Blue to Black Art Stroll & Studio Tour..PG 36 Art After Dark in Waynesville..PG 40 Church Street Art & Craft Show..PG 46

Wolfman

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Downtown Asheville Map

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John Mac Kah’s

Aint Them Bodies Saints • The Family • Insidious • Riddick • Still Mine •

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U.S. CellUlar Center Downtown aSheville, nC thU.-Sat.: 10am-6pm SUn.: 10am-5pm aDmiSSion: $8; ChilDren UnDer 12 free

Susan Marie Phipps

200 Juried Artists CrAft demonstrAtions Live mountAin musiC

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www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928


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we love this place wncBARNAROO

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

The wncBARNAROO festival was created in 2009 by a local teenager’s desire to play music, but he lacked the venue. This teenager, Andrew Scotchie, is now a young man with a successful music career as the lead singer and song writer for The River Rats. His band travels locally and regionally. wncBARNAROO takes place November 1-3 at Franny’s Farm, and features more than 19 bands, camping, and vendors, all in support of the ROCK Academy and “Give to the Music.”

Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Two

OCTOBER 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Bernadette Bender, Cathey Bolton, Adam Z. Bowers, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Javier Folgar, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, John Horrocks, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Cindy Lidd, Kathryn Liss, Peter Loewer, Cappi Macsherry, Marcianne Miller, Kay S. Miller, Lindsey Mudge, April Nance, Teresa Pennington, Steve Plever, T. Oder, R. Woods, Alfred Ramirez, Dennis Ray, Jeannie Shuckstes, Jeannie Shuckstes, Patty Smyers, Chris Stack, Lori Theriault, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, October 2013, Vol. 17 No. 2

On the Cover: Painting of the Wolfman by John Mac Kah. PAGE 15

6 Performances

Classic Wineseller – Fall for Jazz . . . 6 HART – The Heiress . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Diavolo Dance Theater. . . . . . . . . . . 9

8 Noteworthy

Franny’s Farm Inc., 38 Came Sharp Rd., Leicester NC 28748. Phone the farm at (828) 515-0075, or visit www.frannysfarm.com

Building Bridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Remembering The Wolfman . . . . . 15

10 Columns

Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . .

10 20 29 30 31 32 34 34 39

10 Music

Serpentine Arborvitae . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Angel Olsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mountain Oasis Music Summit . . 33

11 Fine Art

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands 11 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Julia Fosson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Art on Main . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Cathy Searle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Blackbird Frame & Art . . . . . . . . . . 28 Soli Deo Gloria Studio . . . . . . . . . 35 Blue to Black Studio Tour . . . . . . . 36 Art After Dark in Waynesville . . . . 40 Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Church Street Art and Craft Show . . 46

16 Movie Reviews

A Journey of 2,000 Miles: The Appalachian Trail Throughout the month of October, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) will be showcasing the film Appalachian Impressions. Hear first-hand stories of the people who volunteer, maintain, hike, and protect the trail from guest speakers at each screening. Win great prizes; join the ATC! The Appalachian Trail: Celebrating America’s Hiking Trail explores the hiking path in detail and includes 300 contemporary photos and maps. www.appalachiantrail.org

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 12-14 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . PGS 21-23 Downtown Asheville . . . . . PGS 24-27 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 36-37 Weaverville + Northside . . . . PG 45 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 46-47

Screenings hosted at: Drake Educational Center, 210 Phillips Street (Carolina Mt), Franklin, NC. October 18, from 7-9:30 p.m. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m. Capitol Cinema, 105 N. Main Ave., Erwin, TN. October 20 from 6-8:30 p.m. The Chapel at Laughing Heart Lodge, 289 NW Highway 25/70, Hot Springs, NC. October 26 from 7-9:30 p.m. $30 suggested donation. Free admission for children 13 and under. For more information or to reserve your seat, visit www.appalachiantrail.org/journey. Enter promo code PRATC13 to receive $5 off each ticket.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social!

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 16

27 Unique Shops

Cafe 64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney . . . . .41 Sunburst Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

42 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 5


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captivating performances Fall for Jazz Series at the Classic Wineseller

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The Classic Wineseller invites you to enjoy four consecutive Saturday evenings of live jazz. The Wineseller’s second annual Fall for Jazz series features many of western North Carolina’s top jazz performers Saturday evenings from October 12 through November 2, 2013. The series kicks off on Saturday, October 12 with Eve Haslam and Satin Steel Jazz performing Bossa Nova, original compositions, and classic jazz tunes. On Saturday, October 19, think Frank Sinatra, Cole Porter, and jazzed up pop

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM Eve Haslam and Satin Steel Jazz (L-R): Brian Felix, Eve Haslam, Zack Page. Not pictured: Justin Watt.

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songs like Sting’s “Every Breath You Take” when the James Hammel Trio performs. On October 26 delight in the energetic and entertaining cool, bop, and post bop standards by the Wendy Jones Quartet. Closing the series on Saturday, November 2 is Centerpiece Jazz, performing classic jazz, swing tunes, and show tunes — everything from Armstrong, Ellington, and Ella to Coltrane, Miles, and Monk. Shows take place at 7 p.m. in the underground environs at the Classic Wineseller. Each performance is $39.99 per person, plus tax and gratuity, and includes a lavish fourcourse dinner prepared in the Wineseller’s kitchen. Purchase two or more series dates and save $5 per person. To reserve your table call (828) 452-6000 or email requests to info@classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited. The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premiere retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue, presents local, regional, or national talent each Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m.

AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

“Broadway Baby”

AmiciMusic’s October program will take listeners on a fun ride with arias, duets, and scenes from two great Broadway musicals, Irving Berlin’s “Annie, Get Your Gun,” and Lerner and Loewe’s “Camelot.” Included will be such favorites as “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better,” “They Say It’s Wonderful,” “If Ever I Would Leave You,” and “Camelot.” The featured artists are soprano Amanda Horton, an Asheville native who has thrilled audiences with many featured roles with the Asheville Lyric Opera, along with baritone Roberto Flores, who is a member of Pastyme. AmiciMusic’s Artistic Director, Daniel Weiser, will collaborate on the piano. There will be several venues for this performance. On Saturday, October 19 at 7:30 p.m., they will perform at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students/children. Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com for more details or reservations, or call (828) 669-0816.

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On Sunday, October 20 at 5, they will perform in Grove Park at the home of Will and Betsy Harlan. Amanda Horton $35 pp includes light food and drinks. On Monday, October 21 at 7 p.m., they will perform at the Sweet Biscuit Inn (www. sweetbiscuitinn.com), a charming B & B at 77 Kenilworth Rd. Light food and drinks served. $35pp. Reservations are Roberto Flores required and seating is limited for these two shows. Call Dan at 802-369-0856 or e-mail daniel@amicimusic. org. Pay online at www.amicimusic.org. AmiciMusic is a professional chamber music organization dedicated to performing the highest quality music in intimate venues and nontraditional spaces. Daniel Weiser, founder and Artistic Director of AmiciMusic

For more information please visit www.amicimusic.org

Wendy Jones Quartet. Wendy Jones (l), Steve Davidowski (r). Not pictured, Zack Page and Rick Dilling.

The Classic Wineseller kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. on weekend evenings serving freshly prepared small plate fare. Call (828) 452-6000 or visit www.classicwineseller.com for more information. IF YOU Fall for Jazz series, Saturday GO evenings at 7 p.m., October 12

through November 2 at The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street in Waynesville. Call (828) 452-6000 or visit www.classicwineseller.com for details.

I Pagliacci & Suor Angelica October 4 & 5 at 8 p.m. The Asheville Lyric Opera combines comedy, tragedy, and redemption all in one night.

I Paliacci, the tragic story of a roaming band of performers, is told in one act. Suor Angelica tells the story of a disgraced nun who finds salvation through unspeakable tragedy. Dr. Jon Truitt (director) and Daniel Meyer (conductor) craft the operatic double bill. Performances take place at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Purchase tickets through the box office at (828) 257-4530, or visit www.dwtheatre.com. A preview dress rehearsal on October 3 provides tickets to K-12 students in groups of 10 or more. For details contact the Asheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670 or email Adam Bowers at adam@ashevillelyric.org. Visit www.ashevillelyric.org


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performance HART’S OCTOBER PRODUCTIONS:

The Last Five Years & The Heiress

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The Haywood Arts Regional Theatre presents the off-Broadway musical hit, The Last Five Years beginning October O ctober 11 in the Feichter Studio. New York actor Tony Lance returns to the HART Stage for this special two week run which will benefit the HART Stage II building campaign. The Last Five Years explores a five-year relationship between Jamie Wellerstein, a rising novelist, and Cathy Hyatt, a struggling actress. The show uses a form of storytelling in which Cathy’s story is told in reverse chronological order, beginning the show at the end of the marriage. Jamie’s story is told in chronological order, starting just after the couple have first met. The characters do not directly interact except for a wedding song in the middle as their timelines intersect. Tony Lance, one of HART’s most popular musical theater leading men, appeared as Tony in West Side Story, as well as leads in My Fair Lady and Jane Eyre. He performed The Last Five Years off-Broadway last year with Gillian Bell, and is bringing it to HART as a fund raising event for HART’s new Fangmeyer Theater. Gillian Bell holds a degree in music from the Eastman School of Music, has performed in opera companies across the county, and with the Asheville Choral Society as a featured soloist. She has also appeared in professional productions of Les Miserables and Company. Company Jason Robert Brown is best known to HART audiences for his musical Parade. His newest work is a musical adaptation of The Bridges of Madison County County, opening on Broadway in January 2014.

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HART concludes its 2013 main stage season with the classic Broadway drama The Heiress, opening October 25 and running through November 3. The show is based on Henry James’ novel Washington Square, and tells the story of a middle aged women destined to inherit a fortune from her father, who is suddenly courted by a handsome, but penniless gentleman. The story is set in New York in the 1890’s. HART’s production will feature elaborate sets and costumes for the piece. The Heiress opened on Broadway at the Biltmore Theatre on September 29, 1947. Directed by Jed Harris the cast starred Wendy Hiller, Basil Rathbone, and Peter Cookson. The production then opened at London’s Theatre Royal, Haymarket in 1949 starring Ralph Richardson, Peggy Ashcroft and Donald Sinden. The 1949 film version starred Olivia d’Haviland, Montgomery Clift, and Ralph Richardson. HART’s production is being directed by Frances Davis and will feature Christy Bishop, Roger Magendie, Lise Hoffman, Ashleigh Millett, Shandee Trevino, Sean Bruce, Brooke Atwood, Michael Ottinger, and Holly Cole. IF YOU “The Last Five Years,” in the GO Feichter Studio, 250 Pigeon St. in

Waynesville, October 11, 12, 18, 19 at 7:30, and October 13 & 20 at 3 p.m. “The Heiress,” October 25, 26 and November 1 & 2 at 7:30; October 27 and November 3 at 3 p.m.. At the HART Theater, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville. Reservations can be made by calling (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com.

Annie Get Your Gun at ACT

Annie Get Your Gun is classic Broadway musical theatre at its best: exciting, vibrant, and altogether a wonderful experience to be shared with the whole family. When Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show comes into town, Annie Oakley quickly falls in love with the show’s sharpshooter, Frank Butler. When Annie, an amazing sharpshooter herself, joins the show so she can win Frank, the “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better” love story begins.

Annie Get Your Gun is directed by Jerry Crouch with musical direction by Lenora Thom.

IF YOU GO: The show runs

through October 13, 2013 with performances Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets range from $15-$25.

Frank Butler (Brandon Kersey) and Annie Oakley (Jackie Canney-Collison). Photo: Tommy Propest

Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

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noteworthy Cornel West to Speak at UNCA

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Cornel West, author of Race Matters and Democracy Matters, will discuss tthe he role of race, gender and class in American society in a public lecture at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 16 in the Kimmel Arena at UNC Asheville’s Sherrill Center.

Philosopher, author and activist Cornel West.

A leading political commentator, progressive activist and public intellectual, West is professor of philosophy and Christian practice at Union Theological Seminary, and professor emeritus at Princeton University. He graduated from Harvard University in three years and was the first AfricanAmerican to earn a Ph.D in philosophy from Princeton. West is co-host of the public radio program, Smiley & West. He has also appeared in and provided commentary for the Matrix films, has guest-starred on 30 Rock Rock, and he was once named MTV “Artist of the Week” for his contributions to spoken word and hip-hop albums. West’s most recent book, coauthored with Tavis Smiley, is The Rich and the Rest of Us: A Poverty Manifesto (SmileyBooks, 2012). He has written or contributed to more than 20 books and is an American Book Award winner. IF YOU Cornel West public lecture GO at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday,

October 16 in the Kimmel Arena at UNC Asheville’s Sherrill Center. Free and open to the public. For more details, call (828) 251-6674, or visit http://cesap.unca.edu.

Celebrating 20 Years of Building Bridges

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Sue Walton tells a story of meeting a Black woman who told her that what she learned from Building Bridges was that there actually were some good, caring White people. White people learn that Black people are so hurt that the little things we don’t even notice are daily grindings of the soul. Building Bridges turns 20 this fall. In 1993, Dr. Charles Blair, Susan Presson, Sue Walton and Rev. Jacquelyn Hallum receives the Charles Blair Award O.T. Tomes went to Brevard to at Building Bridges’ 10th anniversary celebration. experience the interracial dialogues The award will be given again at this year’s event. which were started there by Faye Walker at the Episcopalian church. Those people decided to start something years and served as co-chair of the steering similar based on the Sojourners reading committee. Mary Thompson says “He was materials: America’s Original Sin. This so welcoming, although later he joked about program has grown and developed over ‘What were all these white people doing in the years, involving thousands of people in his church?’” learning about racism and white privilege By the fifth session, the steering comthrough dialogue and presentations. mittee decided it needed reading materials The gatherings were originally held more closely tied to the Asheville/Bunin New Mount Olive Church where Rev. combe community. A grant was given by the Tomes was minister and Tyrone Greenlee Community Foundation to pay someone was the church secretary. Tyrone was the to write the manual and Doug Silsbee was person who handled registration for many hired. It has been the basis for many sub-

Orchid Ensemble World Music Concert

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The Orchid Ensemble, which blends modern and traditional Asian music with influences from all over the globe, will perform at UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Auditorium.

Using ancient Chinese instruments and Western percussion, the Vancouver-based Orchid Ensemble embraces a variety of musical styles, ranging from the traditional and contemporary music of China to world music, new music, jazz and creative improvisation. Ensemble members Lan Tung on Chinese violin, Yu-Chen Wang on Chinese zither, and Canadian percussionist Jonathan Bernard create new sounds that defy easy categorization. The Orchid Ensemble tours across North American and has performed at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and the SmithsoOrchid Ensemble members Lan Tung on Chinese violin, Yu-Chen Wang on nian Institution’s Chinese zither, and percussionist Jonathan Bernard. Freer Gallery.

8 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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KATHRYN LISS

sequent revisions and updates to focus on contemporary concerns. For two decades, the basic format has remained the same: 9 weeks of 2 hour meetings, the first hour is a presentation (film or speaker) and the second hour is small group meetings where folk get to know one another as they discuss the issues raised in the large group meeting and the readings. Many friendships and projects have come from these relationships. Over the years, hundreds of people have participated in Building Bridges, including at least 8 young women who have gotten scholarships from Building Bridges to go to college. Many participants have gone on to make significant contributions to eliminating racism in our community. IF YOU Building Bridges is celebrating GO their 20th anniversary and invite

you to join them at MAHEC on November 12 at 6 p.m. for a potluck and conversation with founders and presently engaged participants. RSVP to kliss@igc.org For more information about Building Bridges, call (828) 777-4585 or go online to www.buildingbridges-ashevillenc.org.

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STEVE PLEVER

IF YOU The Orchid Ensemble, Thursday, GO October 10 at 7 p.m. in UNCA’s

Lipinsky Auditorium. Tickets are $20; $12 for UNCA faculty, staff and alumni; $7 for Asheville-area students; $5 for UNCA students.

Purchase tickets at www.uncatickets.com or at the Highsmith Student Union front desk. For more details, visit http://cesap.unca.edu or call (828) 251-6674.

LISTEN TO THIS STORYTELLING SERIES “Welcome to the Terror Dome: True Tales of Being Truly Terrified,” October 31 at 7:30 p.m. in 35below. Stories and original songs from locals. Hosted by Tom Chalmers.

IF YOU GO: Tickets are $10. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.


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Pan Harmonia

LOCAL, AUTHENTIC, WORLD-CLASS CHAMBER MUSIC

In a rare local appearance, pianist Kimberly Cann presents solo works by Claude Debussy, Igor Stravinsky and Enrique Granados. Kimberly will be joined by special guest singer Mary Luna, performing newly discovered works for piano and voice by Vladimir Horowitz. Directed by flutist Kate Steinbeck, the artist collective, Pan Harmonia, brings professional chamber music performances to audiences of all ages in diverse settings ranging from traditional concert halls to homeless shelters and prisons.

Kimberly Cann

For more information on Pan Harmonia, visit www.pan-harmonia.org

IF YOU The sublime piano artistry of Kimberly Cann, Sunday, October 13 at 5 p.m. at the GO Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville. Tickets: $15 advance;

$5 for students; $20/$5 for students at the door. Available at www.pan-harmonia. org/shop. Visit www.myaltamont.com.

Diavolo Trajectoire Photo: Angela Weiss

Thrilling and Athletic Dance Company Diavolo Dance Theater

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With a wizardry all its own, With internationally renowned modern acrobatic dance company Diavolo Dance Theater incorporates thrilling stunts with incredible interactive props. Under Artistic Director Jacques Heim, Diavolo’s widely acclaimed dancers, gymnasts, athletes, and actors deliver a magnificent visual experience, exciting audiences with one powerful image after another. By employing oversized, surrealistic sets and props, Diavolo creates a sense of daring that juxtaposes human fragility and survival – and accomplishes its metaphors of the challenges of relationships, the absurdities of life, and the struggle to maintain our humanity in the shadow of an increasingly technological world. Audiences thrilled by Momix and Pilobolus will be blown away by Diavolo. In its October 8 & 9 performances, Diavolo performs two, large scale works. Transit Space explores themes of feeling lost, finding a sense of purpose, and coming together. Influenced by the documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys, Transit Space uses skateboard ramps as set pieces to represent an urban environment with ever-shifting physical and emotional spaces. In Trajectoire, a visceral and emotional journey through the ebb and flow of the human experience is on display. As the performers struggle to find their balance on a voyage of destiny and destination, Trajectoire shows the transcendence of the human soul against all odds.

BY JOHN

ELLIS

Diavolo’s members are an incredibly diverse group of performers – but above all, they are teammates. Under the guidance of Artistic Director Jacques Heim, they collaboratively develop works on massive sets and everyday structures. Heim’s childhood struggles and his journeys as a French-Jewish man shape his thematic choices within urban landscapes. Heim strives to propel the evolution of dance and entertainment through Diavolo, and to further integrate the arts into mainstream America. The company’s works explore the space between reality and imagination to create thrilling and abstract narratives about the human condition. They investigate the latent absurdities of contemporary human life while seeking to re-contextualize those absurdities through the body, exploring the influences of the environment, possessions and relationships. www.diavolo.org IF YOU Diavolo Dance Theater, GO October 8 & 9, at 8 p.m.

Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. Tickets: Regular $48; Students $43; Child $20. Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. To obtain more information or to purchase tickets, call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

The Escher String Quartet

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AND CLASSICAL GUITARIST, JASON VIEUX

For more than a half a century the Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) has taken it’s place as a valued cultural resource in Asheville, bringing world-renowned chamber artists to the city. On Friday, October 4 at 8 p.m. the ACMS presents the Escher String Quartet with classical guitarist Jason Vieaux.

PROGRAM Verdi: String Quartet in E minor Boccherini: Guitar Quintet No. 4 in D major

The Escher String Quartet

Giuliani: Grande Overture Op. 61 for Solo Guitar Castelnuovo-Tedesco: Guitar Quintet (String Quartet & Guitar) Op. 143 In 2011, the Escher String Quartet opened the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s 2011-12 season and the following year debuted in London’s Wigmore Hall after completing the BBC’s “New Generation Artists” recording project. Formed in 2005, the Escher has been called “The heir to the school of North American excellence in chamber playing (Review from Perth Festival, 2012). The quartet has received acclaim for its unparalleled artistry and unique cohesiveness, having also performed at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center and in festivals and here and abroad. Just this year were awarded the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant. Jason Vieaux has been named by Gramophone as, “Among the elite of today’s classical guitarists.” Head of the Guitar Department of the Cleveland Institute of Music and cofounder of the department at Curtis, Vieaux has performed with 50 orchestras around the world and has been acclaimed for “his uncommon communicative skills.” IF YOU The Escher String Quartet with classical guitarist Jason Vieaux, Friday, October GO 4 at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, at the corner

of Charlotte Street and Edwin Place. Tickets are $35. For more information call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427, or visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org.

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Angel Olsen Helps Kick Off the Mothlight

The Mothlight, West Asheville’s newest addition to a growing entertainment scene, is set to open early this month. The music club, located at 701 Haywood Rd., across from Ingles Grocery, should be up and running by mid October, offering a selection of music and mingling. A private club (visitors are welcome), their stated goal is “to provide a home for local and traveling musicians alike who value creative artistic expression and intellectual freedom. As a music venue first, complete with a high quality sound and light system, we will have shows at least three nights a week, and will be open every evening as a neighborhood bar spinning good music and pouring tasty beverages.” Singer/songwriter Richard Buckner kicks things off with an October 11 show, but it’s the next day’s performance, by the Missouri born, Chicago based chanteuse,

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Angel Olsen, that has this music writer most excited. Perhaps best known for her work with Will Oldham (aka Bonnie “Prince” Billy) Olsen began performing in St. Louis coffee shops in her teenage years, eventually branching out and tapping into a network of similarly minded artists. She later worked with Californian musician Emmet Kelly as part of his collective, the Cairo Gang, and sang harmonies on Oldham’s 2010 album The Wonder Show of the World, as well as its 2011 follow-up Wolfroy Goes to Town. 2012 saw the release of Half Way Home. It’s Olsen’s first proper solo album, following the release of an EP and a handful of sold-at-shows cassettes; a gorgeously spare album with understated arrangements and a homespun approach somewhere between ‘50s country crooners and her indie contemporaries. The album echoes

such iconic voices as Patsy Cline and Roy Orbison but does so in ways which reflect reverence rather than replication. Olsen beautifully constructs a landscape so striking as to be almost surreal. Half Way Home is replete with concealed moments and the wounds of chances missed and love lost, combining strands of Americana with Fairport Convention styled British folk. The album’s mix of complex vocal arrangements, built around a subdued bass/drum anchor, seems ideal for intimate stage performance. That is precisely what the Mothlight brings to the already rich musical landscape that is Asheville. IF YOU Angel Olsen, October 12, with GO opening act Jaye Bartell, at the

Mothlight, 701 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. For more information visit their still evolving website at www.themothlight.com.

WNC Jazz Profiles: Serpentine Arborvitae

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“Playing with Serpentine is such a treat. She’ll often start a tune in a very unassuming manner, then silently click into some unseen gear to take it somewhere unique and special. She’s a singer who has obviously done the work, honed her natural talents, and has the jazz idiom DOWN! She is first class all the way…and a sweetheart!”

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Serpentine Arborvitae, a name that conjures images from the biblical Garden of Eden, is an award-winning singer and composer. A grant recipient of the National Endowment for The Arts and Meet The Composer, Serpentine has created music for stage and television, including Erick Hawkins Dance Company and Lifetime Television Intimate Portraits. Born and raised in New York City, Serpentine was first introduced to jazz through the films of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. “A teacher in my junior high school gave me my first two jazz recordings: “Mingus, Mingus, Mingus, Mingus” and Dave Brubeck’s “Take Five”. I listened to them every day non-stop and would imagine that I was playing every note of every instrument. Music is the language of my soul – it’s been the major force in my life since infancy. I experience music as audible, visual and kinetic!” Serpentine developed her jazz voice in clubs and lofts working with esteemed musicians including pianists Fred Hersch, Anthony Davis, Kenny Barron and was eventually discovered and taken under wing by jazz master Ornette

~ Guitarist Mark Guest

Coleman. Her vocal improvisational skills have won her critical acclaim in “Downbeat” and “Musician” magazine, and she has been a featured vocalist on recordings by dance pioneer Gabrielle Roth, bassist Trey Gunn and drummer / composer Bobby Previte. “Fred Hersch and I met at a tiny jazz club on the Lower Westside of Manhattan. We were both sitting in with the house band. Fred was absolutely adorable, playing way beyond his very young age. From that night on we were a team. We worked together, hung out together and went to all the night jams together. It was one of the best times in my life! I loved practicing, loved learning, loved sitting in and listening to so many great artists like Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone and Morgana King. Betty Carter and Abbey Lincoln I got to see live! With my recent return to singing jazz, I’ve started listening mostly just to learn new songs, and I’m still blown away by the talent and heart in all the great ones. I hope that will change in the future and that I’ll have more time to just sit back and absorb again.” Serpentine has produced six CD recordings of original world electronic music, described by Alan McRae of Sunrise Enter-

10 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Angel Olsen performs October 12 at the Mothlight.

Serpentine Arborvitae Photo: Frank Zipperer

tainment as “an enchanting bridge between East and West, ancient and modern, spanning Mediterranean, Vedic and Celtic sacred traditions. Serpentine’s mesmerizing stage presence and spiritually empowering lyrics lift listeners into heaven’s secret garden.” Serpentine has performed her original music in spiritual centers and music festivals across the country including the Omega Institute, The Open Center, Symphony Space Theater, Merkin Hall and St. John the Divine in NYC. Her most recent recording project “Human Angel” explores the mysteries of human consciousness and the new archetypes emerging within our collective mind. “Human Angel” has been performed at Asheville’s Masonic Temple, Black Mountain Sanctuary and the United Research Light Center. Why WNC I asked her? “I came here at

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the suggestion of friends. I’d never heard of Asheville before and fell in love the moment I got off the plane. I took one look around at the mountains, inhaled a few times and heard my body say, ‘Yes! This is Home!’” This past spring Serpentine returned to her roots in jazz performing along with some of Asheville’s finest musicians at St. Matthias Church, Isis Music Hall and The Monte Vista Hotel. Upcoming performances this fall include Black Mountain Center for the Arts, and on October 18th, Serpentine will headline in the Cabaret Jazz Series at the White Horse Black Mountain with the Bill Bares Trio. “Serpentine, in addition to always sounding fresh and spontaneous, is a captivating performer, a fearless improviser. She commands attention!”

~ Bassist Zack Page www.serpentinejazz.com Find Serpentine-Arborvitae-Music on Facebook.

Eddie produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.


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fine arts & crafts MUSIC OF THE MOUNTAINS Friday, October 18

11 a.m. – Sherri Lynn and Mountain Friends. High energy swing-grass. 1 p.m. – Hot Duck Soup. Kazoos, slide whistles, banjos, guitars; old tunes like you’ve never heard ‘em played. 3 p.m. – Timberline. Smooth folk harmonies, with guitarist Gene Holdway.

Whitetop Mountaineers, Jackson Cunningham and Martha Spencer

Saturday, October 19

11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass. Led by Tommy Thompson, traditional bluegrass standards. 1 p.m. – Split Rail. Strong vocal harmony and a great continuity of sound. 3 p.m. – Moore Brothers Band. Young brothers play bluegrass and gospel. Sunday, October 20

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The 66th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

Join us for the 66th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, October 17–20.

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In addition to providing a retail market for juried members, the Guild also hosts craft demonstrations during the Fairs. A strong part of the Guild’s mission is to educate Nearly 200 juried artists of the public about the history of the Southern Highland Craft crafts in this region, various Guild will be selling works craft techniques, and an apof clay, metal, wood, jewelry, preciation for fine crafts. fiber, paper, natural materials, Cindy Riccardelli This October visitors leather and mixed media. With have the opportunity to see artists using styles ranging from traditional to contempotraditional methods of handmade craft like rary, the Fairs showcase the rich talent, diGeorge McCollum weaving a white oak basversity and craft mastery of Guild members. ket, beginning with splints he has harvested The Craft Fairs have a proud tradition from the tree, Betsy Morrill’s innovative and history of excellence by representing the deconstructed screen-printing on fabric, and Southern Highland Craft Guild, a non-profMichael Lalone at the potters wheel. it organization formed in 1930. The Fairs Outside the U.S. Cellular Center visibegan in 1948 as a way to provide a regional tors will be greeted by natural dyeing and market for the mountain craftspeople. Since blacksmithing demonstrations. that time, the Craft Fairs have set the stanVisit www.craftguild.org for a complete dard for fine craft shows across the country. Each year in October, craft collectors and gallery owners from across the country come to Asheville to see the show, knowing it is an ideal destination for shopping and inspiration.

To learn more about Guild programs, visit www.craftguild.org. IF YOU The 66th Annual Craft Fair of GO the Southern Highlands, October

17–20 at the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. Thursday – Saturday 10-6 p.m.; Sunday, 10-5 p.m. Admission: Adults $8; children under 12 free. Group discounts available. Additional information: www.craftguild. org. or (828) 298-7928

Celebrating 30 years in downtown Asheville

11 a.m. – Whitetop Mountaineers. Martha Spencer and Jackson Cunningham; traditional Southwest Virginia oldtime music. 1 p.m. – Carol Rifkin and Paul’s Creek. Old timey style. 3 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike. Original songs by bandleader Tom Godleski; banjo picking by teenage sensation Seth Rhinehart.

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list of scheduled craft demonstrations. Beginning on Friday during each Craft Fair, mountain musicians perform live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of Q Evon the Craft Fair experience. From old time to bluegrass, this tradition is kept alive today. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of performances.

Alan Daigre

14k gold with citrine, topaz and garnet

Tree of Life pendants from our designer/goldsmith Paula Dawkins

THE ART OF CRAFT October 17-20 Demonstrations

Mike Lalone: Pottery – throwing,

trimming and assembling clay in the ceramic process.

14k gold

George McCollum: White oak baskets. From harvesting splints to weaving.

Betsy Morrill: Deconstructed screenprinting on fabric. Surface design techniques.

Dede Styles: Natural dyeing and spinning; using natural plant dyes. (Thurs – Fri).

Lenny Moore: Blacksmithing. George McColllum, White oak basket demonstration.

Transforming metal into art outside the U.S. Cellular Center.

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

PG. 44

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+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 11


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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTICT RS

The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios

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12 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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Confluence

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A NEW SHOW AT THE MEETING OF ARTISTIC STREAMS

own paths, and the art that emerges is imbued with that spirit of flowing Confluence: noun, a coming or flowing freedom. together, meeting, or gathering at one With this point, the flowing together of two or show we celebrate more rivers or streams the Confluence of these two When multiple currents of creativity move powerful curin the same direction, their meeting point rents. When flow becomes a nexus from which something greater painting meets flows. For some time now two such currents large canvases, the have been gathering in Jonas’ artistic headwaters: spirit of freedom is the urge to create very large paintings and the given the space to desire to further explore flow painting. be free. Large canvases are where Jonas’ creative This liberty spirit soars best. Reminiscent of his early days has re-energized as a dancer, his abstract, gestural style is in peak and refined Jonas’ form when his brush has plenty of space to work in all sizes. roam, not confined by the canvas’ edge. When Small and midhis recent sized works will creation Jonas Gerard with works from Confluence. be on display of two 12 alongside the ft. triplarger paintings whose creation was their inspiration. tychs (on display The Flow technique will be demonstrated at the paintat the Asheville ing performance. Area Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center), rekindled IF his passion for the YOU Opening reception Saturday, October 12, GO following the Live Painting Performance, at grand scale, his Jonas Gerard Fine Art, 240 Clingman Ave. course was set. The other The Painting Performance begins at 2 p.m.; the reception creative current starts at 3:30 p.m. Confluence will be on display through Opposites Attract II, November 11, 2013. propelling him painting by Jonas Gerard has been a call to return to the flow Jonas Gerard Fine Art is located at 240 Clingman painting techniques he first explored in his 2011 Fluid Avenue, in the heart of Asheville’s River Arts District. Poetry show. Working with fluid acrylics takes him deeper Studio and Gallery are open every day from 10-6 p.m. than ever into his philosophy of “letting go.” Forgoing For more information, visit www.jonasgerard.com expectations and control, he allows the colors to find their

The Emerald Ball

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The Emerald Ball promises to be a gem of an evening with a VIP pre-party, entertainment featuring local artists and a DJ, auctions, local foods, and cocktails featuring Troy & Sons moonshine and whiskeys. The event will be held at Pink Dog Creative, in the heart of the River Arts District, spreading the evening’s events between businesses decked out in scenes from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Entertainment includes a fashion installation of human statues featuring local designers, performance from Dr. Sketchy’s, fire dancing by Found World Bellydance, dance performance with Terpsicorps Theatre of Dance; you can even get a tarot card reading by special guest Professora Marvel. Other festivities include a silent auction, a live art

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auction, an interactive art project, and of course dancing! Guests will not want to miss out on opportunities to bid for getaways to Kiawah Island Resort, Wild Dunes Resort, and a week’s vacation in Mexico. Additional items for auction will be fantastic artwork made and donated by local artists and two VIP tickets to Art Basel, the international arts festival held in Miami this December.

IF YOU GO: The Emerald Ball, Saturday, October 5, from 7 p.m. to midnight. VIP pre-party at 6 p.m. Tickets are $50; VIP tickets are $100. Purchase tickets online or stop by the AAAC at 346 Depot St., in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more details, call (828) 258-0710, or visit www. ashevillearts.com

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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

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THE VILLAGE POTTERS

The Village Potters, located in the historic Riverview Station, will join artists across the country to celebrate American Craft Week from October 4-13. Daily demonstrations in wheel throwing, sculpture, hand building, and decoration will take place October 7-11 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. On Friday, October 11 from 10 a.m. to noon, they will provide area school children with hands-on activities along with information about class and workshop opportunities. There is no cost to attend. The Village Potters, 191 Lyman Street, #180, in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more details, phone (828) 253-2424 or visit www.thevillagepotters.com

INTERVIEW WITH ENCAUSTIC ARTIST

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INTERVIEWED BY

Julia Fosson

Rapid River Magazine: What first drew you to encaustic art as your media of choice?

Julia Fosson: I was an oil painter and

another artist said “your work is so much like encaustic.” I quickly responded by saying, “what’s encaustic.” After researching encaustic painting and finding there was a company in New York, not far from where I lived at the time, I visited and took a workshop. I immediately fell in love, but realized it was an investment to get started, so I sat on it for a year. I couldn’t stop thinking about the medium and signed up for a more intensive, multiple day workshop. That was it, no turning back. I then began to define myself as an encaustic painter. After several months I

DENNIS RAY

thought if I had to go out of state to learn I should write some grants to get enough money for equipment and supplies to teach. I applied for two grants, got both, and started teaching.

RRM: What artists

have been major influences over your lifetime?

JF: Being a self taught artist I was nurtured by great artist out of Connecticut, Patricia Carrigan.

Julia Fosson, fine artist. Photos: Keli Keach Photography

RRM: Tell us a little about encaustic art. JF: Encaustic is a term from the greek

It wasn’t until I moved to Connecticut that a patient talked me into being juried into an arts community. At word Enkaustikos, which means to heat that time 13 years ago I was working in or to burn. It is an ancient form of paintevery medium landing dating back more ing on encaustic in than 2,000 years. En2001. I draw my work caustic is the term for from what is rattling the medium I use, it’s around in my head. I beeswax with damar. use chairs and simple Damar is a resin prohouse structures in duced by the Dipteromy work. carpaceae family of People often trees in Indonesia. ask why chairs and Encaustic art I tell them its about is painting with conversations as well beeswax, damar and there are many styles pigment. The wax, of chairs like there damar and pigment are personalities of are heated to approxipeople. Painting lets mately 200 degrees. me communicate With each layer that through a visual is applied fusing must conversation. I am inoccur to adhere the spired daily and hope top layer of wax to the Encaustic painting that the viewers enjoy by Julia Fosson layers below. Fusing listening visually. can occur with a heat gun or a blow torch. Most of my works have 15-25 layers of wax.

RRM: Tell us a little about yourself as an artist. RJ

JF: I went to school to become an Oc-

cupational Therapist, I then went on to be certified hand care working primarily with hand surgeons treating traumatic and surgical patient for 18 years. I painted as a release starting probably in the early 80’s.

14 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Artist Julia Fosson

Hatchery Studios in Asheville’s River Arts District 1 Roberts Street, Studio #201 (860) 930-8166 www.juliafosson.com Studio Hours: Tues., Thurs., Fri. & Sat. 11-4 p.m.


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fine art + culture Remembering The Wolfman

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“Even a man who is pure in heart….” Our Halloween cover is homage to Long Chaney Jr’s portrayal of Larry Talbot in the classic horror film The Wolfman. It was released in December, 1941, as World War II menaced, with a modest budget of $180,000. Directed by George Waggner, the movie was a success and raised Chaney’s rank as an actor, but continuing a family tradition. He was son of Lon Chaney (Sr), who was known for his stagecraft and called ‘the man of 1,000 faces’. Chaney Sr. was known as lead role in Phantom of the Opera. Audiences continue to be drawn to the drama of transformation, whether from masking, make-up, or digital. As we line up to see Iron Man or Avatar, we are still fascinated by exploraAvatar tion (and exploitation) of the source and consequence of extra-ordinary physical or psychological change to otherwise ordinary individuals. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, written in 1818, was among the first to be made into film in the silent era, and continues to influence and draw us, both as audience and creators. The Wolf Man was not the earliest film to take on lycanthropy. The Werewolf of London (1935) from a story by Robert Harris was first and starred Henry Hull and costarred Valerie Hobson, fresh from her role

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as the infamous doctor’s wife (The Bride of Frankenstein, 1935). Based on the 1933 novel, The Wolf of Paris by Guy Endore, it was adapted by French screen writer, Robert Florey, who was the first to use the term ‘wolfman.’ It was Curt Siodmark, a Jewish émigré, born in Dresden, 1902, who developed and created of the complexities of the wolfman character. Larry Talbot, though born into privilege and wealth, is transformed into a lycanthrope, having been fatefully bitten by the gypsy werewolf Bela (played by our Hungarian friend, and vampire extra-ordinaire, Bela Lugosi). Talbot is increasingly confused by his black-outs, tries to resist, and then horrified by his response to those want to help. He snarls and turns on them like a trapped beast, beginning with the policeman who finds him in an alley, then his father (Claude Rains) who tells him it’s all in his mind, a superstitious fantasy. His girl-friend (Eveylyn Ankers) insists, despite his resigned protest, that she can save him. Finally, he kills the woman he loves. In the moonlit mist, as Wolfman, he is shot by two rather suave, dispassionate hunters. He dies with the gypsy witch Maleva, beside him, enigmatically intoning a werewolf-begood charm. Nature over nurture, it seems, is his unhappy ambiguous end. Siodmark, a writer in Berlin, saw the coming Nazi juggernaut and decamped

Painting of the Wolfman by John Mac Kah

to London where he worked on the set of Metropolis. He then landed among the community of European talent that fled to the USA to contribute their skills to cinematic industry. Among them were Fritz Lang (Metropolis), Peter Lore (Maltese Falcon), James Wales and Boris Karloff (Frankenstein), Bela Lugosi (Dracula), and his brother Robert Siodmark, a director. By 1937 he became the Gene Roddenberry of his day, writing stories and screen plays for horror/sci-fi including: Black Fri-

Dracula: a Brief Cinema History

Like most iconic figures there is always a transformation that takes place with the telling of a story to each new generation. The story of Dracula is no exception. Bram Stoker was not the first to come up with a vampire story, for the legend of vampires have shown up in many cultures through out the ages to create the same results. Sim-

Well Duh! Please take note of these corrections to the September 2013 issue of Rapid River Magazine. No Depression magazine declared Brian Wright’s 2011 label debut House on Fire to be darn near perfect. John Badham directed Saturday Night Fever. The title of his new book is John Badham on Directing: Notes from the Set of Saturday Night Fever, War Games and More.

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ALFRED RAMIREZ

ply to scare the bejesus out of us. sion and was well received. So let me touch on a brief history of the In 1931 the vampire horror film story of this famous vampire, Dracula, and Dracula staring Bela Lugosi as the title its evolution through the eyes of the cinema. character was released. (At the same time The film, Nosferatu, released in 1922, a spanish version was being shot, by night, was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram using the same sets.) These films was based on the stage adaption which was based on Stoker’s Dracula. Since they couldn’t obtain the rights from Stoker’s estate they rewrote the story to suit their needs. Consequently they where sued and the courts ruled that all copies of the film to be destroyed. One print managed to survive and is regarded as a masterpiece of cinema. The version Nosferatu the Vampyre staring Klaus Kinski, was released in 1979. This film was directly adapted from Illustrations of Count Dracula and the Frankenstein monster the original 1922 verby Alfred Ramirez.

day, Donovan’s Brain (he wrote the novel), The Invisible Man Returns, Son of Dracula and many of the Frankenstein franchise films of the 40’s. In 1943 he co-wrote one of the classics of the genre: I Walked with Zombies. His career ended with Creature with the Atom Bomb (1956). In a 1993 interview by Kevin Shnick and Terry Pace, published in genre fan magazine Scarlet Street Street, Siodmark explains, “…The Wolf Man represents the beast in all of us. His fate is both tragic and escapable. …I had borrowed from the basic structure of Greek tragedy. The hero cannot escape his fate…” With a cast that includes Claude Raines, Ralph Bellamy, Patrick Knowles, and the seemingly immortal Maria Ouspenskaya as Maleva, the gypsy witch who explains and tries to help him understand the curse. The Wolfman remains in distribution and is rated as high as the latest remake with Anthony Hopkins, and Del Torro in 2010. From early years of Fritz Lang to James Whale to the fright films of the 1950’s, they all had were grounded in art and stage-craft, creating or putting to use new technology. Writing, production and special effects seem to be balanced in the making of these films, like any other art form. And, when the moon comes up in the fall of year, they still make good the goal entertainment. “Even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night may become a wolf when the wolf bane blooms and the autumn moon is bright.”

Bram Stoker’s novel. One scene which survived from the Nosferatu version, wasn't in Stoker’s novel is the finger pricking scene in which Dracula almost attacks his victim but is turned away when he sees a crucifix. Several versions of this scene appears in at least five movies which come to mind. As you may have guessed by now, I could go on and on about vampire movies, but alas I’m limited to time and space. I will go on to say that our blood thirsty friend, or fiend, has appeared in many adaptations through out the century. Here are a few other adaptations you may be interested in seeing: Dracula with Christopher Lee 1958; Dracula: Prince of Darkness with Christopher Lee 1966; Dracula with Frank Langella 1979; Bram Stoker’s Dracula with Jack Palance 1973; Bram Stoker’s Dracula with Gary Oldman 1992. The list goes on with adaptations of adaptations from authors such as Steven King, and Anne Rice; that list goes on as well. I can only hope that I’ve peaked your interest and that you research the story of Dracula and his many versions.

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 15


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Monthly Reel

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October already?!? I confess I am stymied and mystified by the rapid passage of time of late. With the pace most of us are keeping these days, time is precious. When I watch a movie that wastes my time, you can be sure I’m going to let tell you about it. So if there’s one thing you take away from the section this month, let it be this – The Family is not worth your time.

In one of his final screen performances, James Gandolfini shines with Julia Louis Dreyfus in Enough Said.

Rest assured however, there’s plenty to recommend at the cinema and on DVD. The Asheville Film Society and Hendersonville Film Society continue to offer an interesting array of titles (see pages 29 & 30). Also getting into the spirit of the season, the good Professor Kaufmann has a special feature about three previously lost Hammer films. October marks the onslaught of the race to Oscar. Be on the lookout for some promising releases that were not yet available at press time. On our hot list: Prisoners, Rush, Gravity Runner Runner ity, Runner, 12 Years a Slave, The Fifth Estate, Counselor, Counselor Captain Phillips, All is Lost, and one of James Gandolfini’s last screen appearances, Enough Said. November will be here before we know it, but until then enjoy the show!

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

It’s obvious right from the start that this is a story that isn’t going to have a happy ending, but that’s not to say it doesn’t end well. There is a melancholy cast over the whole film and at times it’s even palpably sad. At first blush it’s a very simple story, but the layers of each character make it wonderfully absorbing. Billy’s single-minded Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara are star crossed lovers in devotion to and love for Ruth is the atmospheric Aint Them Bodies Saints. beautiful and tragic, as his blind faith that he will live happily ever after with Aint Them Bodies Saints Ruth and his daughter. Affleck’s slightly ∑∑∑∑ peculiar voice and cadence seem perfect for Short Take: After a robbery gone wrong, Billy and he seems to revel in vehicles a man takes the rap for shooting a like Saints. Mara’s intensely focused cop and is robbed of a life of with the performance in Girl with the Dragon woman he loves. Tattoo was earnest and solid, but here we get to see a different side of Mara’s REEL TAKE: David Lowery’s Aint Them range and it works. Bodies Saints is tailor made for the art house Ben Foster gives a refreshingly norcircuit. The film is deeply atmospheric, mal performance as the officer who fanbeautifully photographed, somewhat abstract cies Ruth. Nate Parker as Sweetie, Billy’s yet accessible. It was developed at the Sunonly ally, gives a reserved performance dance Institute, but it is likely to get Lowery with a quiet strength. But the person noticed far beyond the indie film scene. who gives the best and most intriguSet somewhere in Texas sometime in ing performance (IMHO) is Carradine. the 1970s, Billy Muldoon (Casey Affleck) He gives away just enough to peak your and his wife Ruth (Rooney Mara) are a curiosity but leaves you wondering. couple of small town thieves. The film One gets the feeling Lowery didn’t have opens with a soft focused sun-drenched to say much to Carradine, just let him field. They are having a lovers quarrel. Ruth deliver. tells Billy she doesn’t want to go to jail. In Lowery’s direction and vision is wonthe next breath she tells him she thinks she’s derfully nuanced and somehow timeless. pregnant. So ends the pretty prelude. He has drawn understandable compariSoon a botched robbery ends in a sons to Terrence Malick, especially The shootout. A cohort in the crime is fatally Badlands. Like Malick’s work, Saints has wounded and Ruth shoots a sheriff’s deputy. a poetic quality to it, a tone poem of sorts, Billy takes the rap for shooting the officer complete with a Texas twang. Saints is and Ruth gives birth to a beautiful baby girl. strangely abstract in the sense that there’s a Fast forward four years, Ruth is living a lot of background story of which we know quiet life with Sylvie. She is well protected nothing. and provided for their deceased cohort’s faI have since learned that Lowery created ther (and apparent surrogate father to Ruth a graphic novel prequel. I have also since and Billy), an enigmatic town shopkeeper learned that the film’s curious title doesn’t named Skerrit, richly played by Keith Carraactually mean anything; guess it just sounds dine. Billy writes Ruth love letters, promgood, and it does somehow suit it. ising to return to her and their daughter. Meanwhile, the cop who was shot has takes Rated R for some violence. quite a shine to Ruth. REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

16 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Insidious: Chapter 2 ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Follow up to the 2010 surprise hit Insidious is even more accomplished than its predecessor although the convoluted plot threads are sometimes hard to follow.

REEL TAKE: I cannot believe that the James

Wan who gave us the first Saw movie is the same James Wan who directed Insidious, The Conjuring, and now Insidious: Chapter 2. It just goes to show that it is possible to adapt your style to something different and, in the case of these films, something better. To be fair the first Saw is a lot better than those that followed it but it’s a far cry from what the Malaysian born director is turning out now.

One of the evil presences tormenting the Lambert family in Insidious: Chapter 2.

Insidious: Chapter 2 and its two predecessors show that it is still possible to terrify an audience by not showing them everything. I prefer this approach because it’s more about the craft of filmmaking where you have to use different elements such as lighting, sound, and editing to produce the desired results. It also leaves the audience anticipating more rather than leaving them with nowhere to go once you’ve shown them everything. For those of you who saw Insidious, this picks up where that one left off and answers the questions raised by the ending. If you haven’t seen the first one, here’s a brief summary. The Lambert family’s oldest son inexplicably lapses into a coma. Paranormal investigators are called in and discover that the boy can astral project himself into ‘Movies’ continued on page 17


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film reviews troduced the Richard B. Riddick character, was basically a ripoff of 1979’s Alien which was itself a ripoff of 1958’s It, The Terror a spirit region called “The Further” Once From Beyond Space. There’s nothing wrong there he is subjected to demonic forces but with that, it’s done all the time in the movie eventually finds his way back. Once back business. As I said last month, it’s not what however, it appears that the father has issues. you do but what you do with it that counts. Chapter2 goes into the father’s story Pitch Black was an effective, modestly which is a good bit more complicated and at budgeted sci-fi thriller that combined astimes hard to follow. When he was younger pects of the “be afraid of the dark” school of the same thing happened to him but to a filmmaking with gruesome alien creatures much deeper extent. As the investigators that give you good reason to be. A spaceship from the first film delve into his past, it carrying dangerous criminal Riddick (Vin unlocks an incredibly evil presence which is Diesel) crashes on an alien planet where he growing in strength and starting to control escapes but when the ship and its crew are the events of all involved. This requires a attacked, he returns to help them. Riddick’s return trip to “The Further” which results signature ability is that he has Village of the in several horrific discoveries and a life and Damned eyes that glow and he can see evdeath encounter. erything even when it’s pitch black outside To say any more would give too much (hence the title). away so I’ll stop here but the film is so well The sequel called The Chronicles of crafted that it would still be effective on Riddick (which is now the name for the repeat viewings even when you know what’s franchise) appeared in 2004 and was a big coming. In fact repeat viewings may be budgeted affair with lots of CGI and even necessary to sort it all out. If the movie has Dame Judi Dench in a small role. In this a weakness it’s that there’s a little too much installment Riddick is taken to a planet where plot here to digest at one time. In fact the he leads a rebellion that overthrows the tyrant tie-in with the first film is so well integrated ruler whereupon he is named the new ruler that you feel it was all one story that had to in his place. Vast and ambitious compared to be turned into two films. the first film, Chronicles lost millions. Everyone is back from the first film. In Nine years later, and with the recent addition to co-writer/director Wan and cosuccesses of the Fast & Furious sequels bewriter/actor Leigh Whannell, there’s the cast hind him, Diesel is back with a third installof Lambert family members Patrick Wilson, ment because he likes the Riddick character. Rose Byrne, Barbara Hershey, and Ty SimpHe even mortgaged his house to help fund kins as well as investigators Steve Coulter, the $38 million dollar budget. While more Angus Sampson, and surprisingly Lin Shaye. than the first one, that’s 2/3 less than the seAlthough I concede that Chapter 2 is quel and a small budget for this type of film the better film, I prefer the first installment which writer-director David Twohy (who as it’s easier to follow. Actually I can’t wait did the first two) makes the most of. for the home video release so that I can There’s really no reason for this movie watch both films back to back. except as a vanity project for Diesel. In fact Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of terror and for most of its 2 hour running time Riddick violence, and thematic elements. seems like a remake of the first film. Of REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN course that was 13 years ago and today’s media saturated moviegoers have short attention spans but still… Plot summary: Left for dead on an alien planet, Riddick develops a plan to get bounty hunters and their spaceships there so he can hijack them. Once the ships arrive they’re attacked by alien creatures and everyone must fight to stay alive. Sound familiar? I didn’t hate Riddick but after awhile I felt like saying “and your point is?” two hours of battling CGI Vin Diesel's Riddick is back for his third go round creatures against a Dune like backand he's very dangerous when he gets angry. ground narrated in faux film noir style just didn’t do it for me but if you like Riddick ∑∑∑ the character it could be a different story. Short Take: The third installment of Oh, and for the record, the part of the film Vin Diesel’s The Chronicles of Riddick with Riddick and his alien “dog” didn’t work series lacks the mainstream ability of for me either. Can you say Castaway? Castaway ‘Movies’ continued from page 16

the sequel and the fighting trim of the original.

REEL TAKE: 2000’s Pitch Black, which in-

Rated R for strong violence, language, and some sexual content

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

The scenes that worked best for me were the ones that depict a refreshing real couple. Now in the twilight of their years, having spent a lifetime with one another, they’ve loved and they’ve fought, they’ve succeeded and struggled. We empathize for both of them. James Cromwell is a tour de force as the stoic James Cromwell and Genevieve Bujold star as a devoted and Craig Morrison. Genevieve determined couple in the autumn of their lives in Still Mine. Bujold is luminous and brings playful light to the film. Their chemistry palpable and together Still Mine ∑∑∑∑1/2 they elevate this film to a better level. Short Take: A salty, independent 80The film sort of glosses over the ugly something year old man sets out to side of dementia, but like a suspensebuild a suitable house for his bride of ful thriller versus a gory horror film, one 61 years as dementia begins to threaten doesn’t have show it all, merely alluding the life they’ve known. to it can be more powerful and certainly REEL TAKE: Still Mine is a wonderful more dignified. Still Mine can be summed little film that will certainly appeal to the up in three words – dignity, determination older end of the art house cinema crowd. and love. Based on a true story, James Cromwell plays PG-13 for some thematic elements and some Craig Morrison, a salty octogenerarian, who brief sensuality/partial nudity battled Canadian bureaucracy while building REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN a new and safer house for his bride of sixtyone years. ‘Movies’ continued on page 18 Craig and Irene (Genevieve Bujold) are hardy self sufficient New Brunswick stock (I guess the equivalent good old Yankee stock in this country). They have a farm and small sawmill. It’s made quite clear early on that they are out of step with the modern world. Craig is old school and doesn’t have any use Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company for the petty coddling and micromanaging Movieline (828) 254-1281 of current society. www.ashevillepizza.com When Irene begins exhibiting signs of Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) dementia (or Alzheimer’s as the case may Movieline (828) 298-1234 be), Craig decides to build a new one-story home on their property where they’ll be able Biltmore Grande to live out their years. At 85 years of age he 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 begins selecting trees, milling the lumber, www.REGmovies.com and building a fine crafted home. The Carmike 10 (Asheville) problem is he doesn’t have plans, permits Movieline (828) 298-4452 or rubberstamped lumber. He doesn’t start www.carmike.com out looking to break the law, but when the red tape gets out and Irene grows worse, he Carolina Cinemas becomes defiant. (828) 274-9500 Still Mine is meant to be a moving and www.carolinacinemas.com uplifting movie, the kind that could easily Cinebarre (Asheville) drift into schmaltzy territory. Fortunately www.cinebarre.com for us it was not made for the Hallmark Channel. Equally fortunate however is The Falls Theatre (Brevard) that Canadian writer/director Michael Movieline (828) 883-2200 McGowan filmmaker didn’t make another Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Amour (Michael Haneke’s deeply depressMovieline (828) 232-1536 ing but critically praised film from last www.fineartstheatre.com year). Still Mine is uplifting but bittersweet at the same time. Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Craig’s devotion to Irene is beautiful. Movieline (828) 697-2463 His resolve to protect their way of life and www.flatrockcinema.com care for her is Herculean. That they are still Four Seasons (Hendersonville) in love with each other is never in doubt, Movieline (828) 693-8989 but but their relationship isn’t presented as perfect, nor placed on a pedestal. Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Theatre Directory

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 17


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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. This month HFS will showcase Laurence Olivier’s signature role, a drama about an ambitious World War I flying ace, a behind-the-scenes look at a modern dance company and a multi-story horror movie for Halloween. October 6:

Hamlet

(1948) Laurence Olivier’s legendary film version of Shakespeare’s greatest play contains the role he is best remembered for. Hamlet was the winner of four Academy Awards in 1948 including Best Picture and Best Actor. The film also stars Basil Sydney, Eileen Herlie, and Jean Simmons as Ophelia. Directed by Laurence Olivier. October 13:

The Blue Max (1966) This vivid adaptation of Jack Hunter’s novel about an ambitious and duplicitous World War I pilot who will do anything to receive Germany’s highest military award features solid performances and spectacular flying sequences. Stars George Peppard, James Mason and Ursula Andress. Directed by John Guillerman. October 20:

The Company (2004) Robert Altman’s fictional behind-the-scenes look at the Joffrey Ballet takes a fly on the wall approach as we see members of the company and their tyrannical director get ready for a difficult world premiere. Stars Neve Campbell, James Franco, and Malcolm MacDowell. DIR: Robert Altman. October 27:

The House That Dripped Blood (1971) Don’t let the lurid drive-in title fool you, this is Masterpiece Theatre meets Alfred Hitchcock Presents. It’s a multi-story film about an English country house and the fates of four different people who inhabit it. Based on stories by Robert Bloch, the film is full of delicious twists and turns. Stars Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, and Denholm Elliot. Directed by Peter Duffell.

‘Movies’ continued from page 17

The Family ∑ Short Take: A violent and repulsive film that wastes the talents of its actors and can’t decide whether it’s a wants to be a campy, quirky dark comedy or an unrepentant Mafioso blood bath.

REEL TAKE: Going in to The Family I expected to be entertained, if nothing else. I did not expect to hate it – and Boy Howdy did I! The Family is one of the singularly worst movies I’ve ever had the displeasure of sitting through. I wanted my money back and I didn’t even pay to see it. If you get one thing out of this month’s issue,

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Twins of Evil”

it’s this – The Family is not worth your time. Rotten Tomatoes says is supposed to be an off-beat action-comedy. This indicates that ultimately the film will be funny. The Family is very deliberately intended to be an ‘off-beat’ [dark] comedy. However its scattered comic moments are lost to a body county the size of the population of Normandy. The whole thing is ill-conceived, ugly and simply just not funny.

Maybe De Niro is uttering a prayer to get out of The Family.

October DVD Picks

Twins of Evil (1971) Now that the three missing Hammer Films titles from the early 1970s have finally arrived on Blu-Ray/DVD (see related article in this issue), I have chosen one of them, Twins of Evil, as my October pick. After all a movie about vampires makes for ideal Halloween viewing and in this instance the protagonists are real life twins. Mary & Madeleine Collinson graced the October 1970 issue of Playboy magazine where their talents and their wealth (their assets are noteworthy) made quite an impression. Although forgotten today, it was a big deal at the time and it led to a brief career in the movies ending with their largest roles in 1971’s Twins of Evil. By 1971 things were really changing over at Hammer. The creative forces behind most of their big successes were no longer involved for a variety of reasons and so the company turned to independent producers and directors to help provide them with new material. One of these producers was Fantale Films who had scored a big hit for Hammer with the previous year’s The Vampire Lovers. This led to a so-so sequel Lust for a Vampire and then this film. All 3 films had a literary pedigree, 19th century Irish writer Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s novella Carmilla about the adventures of a lesbian vampire which predated Dracula by 25 years. As is usually the case with sequels to sequels, Twins bore the least resemblance to the source material telling the story of twin sisters (one good, the other bad) who go to live with their puritanical uncle (Peter Cushing) and their involvement with a decadent nobleman. The success of Vincent Price’s film

18 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Witchfinder General 3 years earlier led scriptwriter Tudor Gates (yes, that’s his real name) to add witch hunting scenes to the vampire plot. The film was directed by John Hough who later did Escape from Witch Mountain for Walt Disney. It’s beautifully photographed, sumptuously scored, and is also well acted by everyone (including the twins) with Cushing a standout in an unsympathetic role. Although tame by today’s standards, Twins really delivers the S&S (Sex & Sadism) goods in true 1970’s fashion. Violent, erotic, and atmospheric, what more could you want from a horror film and in Blu-Ray it looks stunning.

Rear Window (1954) With Halloween just around the corner I considered more pointedly ghoulish and ghostly fare for my DVD pick this month, but somehow I kept going back to Hitchcock. We’ve been on a bit of a Hitchcock kick at my house of late, most recently enjoying Rear Window Window. Hitchcock called Rear Window his ‘ultimate Peeping Tom story.’ Jimmy Stewart plays Jeff Jeffries, a photo journalist with a penchant for live on the road and high adventure. Sidelined by a badly broken leg, Jeff finds himself wheelchair and homebound bound, holed up in his small Greenwich

‘Movies’ continued on page 19

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Rear Window” Village apartment. His only source of entertainment is spying on his neighbors through a courtyard facing window. Hidden behind the safety of his telephoto lens he becomes intimately acquainted his neighbors and the rhythms of the apartment building. The only two visitors to his apartment are his masseuse, Stella (Thelma Ritter) and his sort-of girlfriend, Lisa (Grace Kelly). Lisa is the typical Hitchcock beauty – an elegant, cool blond. She’s a fashion model and NY socialite. She’s crazy about Jeff, but the feeling isn’t reciprocated. It seems Jeff uses his camera to hide from a lot things, including commitment. Soon Jeff transitions from voyeur to detective when becomes convinced that the one of his neighbors (Raymond Burr) has murdered — and possibly dismembered — his wife. As Stella and Lisa are won over to his theory, they become the legs of his investigation and the suspense builds. Almost every frame of the film is told from the point of view from the rear window of Jeff’s apartment. What Jeff sees we see. What Jeff suspects, we suspect. The concept is extremely simple and its execution is brilliant. Part of that brilliance is the set. In designing the apartment building and courtyard on the soundstage, Hitchcock had seven actual apartments built, equipped with running water and electricity, and fully furnished, creating an even more voyeuristic experience for Jeff and the viewer. Last but not least, the snappy dialogue is quite fun but easy to overlook; my advice is to take another look (or for some a first look) at Rear Window Window. They don’t make ‘em like this any more.


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film reviews Hammer Films Revisited

T

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY

THE THREE LOST 1970’S TITLES

Two years ago in a previous edition of Reel Takes, I wrote an article oonn England’s legendary Hammer Films to celebrate the company’s rebirth and the upcoming release of The Woman in Black with Daniel Radcliffe. That film opened in February 2012 to mostly positive reviews and went on to gross over $100 million making it the most successful movie in the company’s history. A sequel The Woman in Black: Angel of Death, set during World War II, is already in production and will open in early 2014. However I’m not here to talk about the new Hammer Films. I’m here to revisit the last years of the old company which made its final film, a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes with Cybill Shepherd and Elliot Gould, in 1979. After reinventing the horror film in the late 1950s and 60s with a series of Gothic films in color based on Dracula & Frankenstein, the company’s fortunes began to decline by 1970. More explicit sex and violence in films from Europe and America made Hammer seem old-fashioned. Audiences wanted stronger stuff and, in order to stay afloat, Hammer decided to give it to them.

In Twins of Evil Madeleine Collinson reveals her true nature when confronted with a cross.

BY

CHIP KAUFMANN

Between 1970 and 1974 the company made 17 horror films most of which were dismissed by critics and fans at the time. Now that more than a generation has An eminent Victorian physician (Eric Porter) attempts to passed and with their availability cure Jack the Ripper’s daughter (Angharad Rees) of her in a digital medium, I decided to murderous impulses in Hands of the Ripper. revisit as many of them as I could. It turns out that I just finished watching all 17 (twice!) and discovered that Hands of the Ripper, Twins of Evil, and there were a surprising number of gems Vampire Circus are marvelous examples of hidden away including titles that I, as a what can be done with limited resources. devoted admirer, did not see at the time of Ripper incorporates Freud’s theory of the their release. unconscious with the story of Jack the Part of the reason for this was that by Ripper as his daughter commits a series of 1970, Hammer had lost their American gruesome murders. funding and distribution as U.S. studios Twins of Evil (this month’s DVD pick) were busy reinventing themselves after the features Playboy’s first twin centerfolds and success of the youth oriented Easy showcases Peter CushRider. That meant that outside of ing in one of his most the major cities, the only way to intense performances as see a Hammer film was at the local a 19th century relidrive-in theater usually playing gious zealot. Vampire second fiddle to a far inferior headCircus (Rapid River liner. It also meant that far fewer Magazine’s DVD pick of them made it down to South for July 2012), mixes Carolina where my local drive-ins vampires and Felliwere located. niesque surrealism. Hammer made 10 films in For years it was 1971. Almost all of these were assumed that the later What evil lurks behind the made by independent producers Hammer films were mask of a circus clown (Skip that Hammer invited in. They not up to the standards Martin), in the deliriously were allowed to do whatever they of their predecessors. surreal Vampire Circus? wanted so long as they didn’t exThat is not the case. ceed their budget limitations. While different in content, the style (what Of the 10 films, three have never been makes a Hammer film a Hammer film) available in the digital format in America remained the same. until now due to a question of ownership. These new combo releases prove They are the only “Hammer Horrors” that beyond a shadow of a doubt that when they were never officially released on Region One were good, the newer films were very good DVD. Now they have been given the deluxe indeed and they hold up very well especially Blu-Ray / DVD combo treatment by Synwhen you consider what constitutes a horror apse Films and the results are eye popping. movie today.

The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings.

DOUBLE FEATURE October 1:

Private Detective 62 (1933) A discredited diplomat accidentally finds work with a seedy private detective. Stars William Powell, Margaret Lindsay and Ruth Donnelly. Directed by Michael Curtiz. October 1:

Penguin Pool Murder

(1932) When a well-known New York businessman is found dead in the penguin pool of a local zoo aquarium, Inspector Oscar Piper is called in to investigate the murder. Stars Edna Mae Oliver, Robert Armstrong and James Gleason. Directed by George Arcahinbauld. October 8:

Dirty Pretty Things

(2003) An illegal Nigerian immigrant discovers the unpalatable side of London life. Stars Chiwetel Ejiofor, Audrey Tautou and Sophie Okonedo. Directed by Stephen Frears. October 15:

Follow The Fleet

(1936) A Navy sailor tries to rekindle a romance with the woman he loves while on liberty in San Francisco. Stars Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Randolph Scott. Directed by Mark Sandrich. October 22:

Kinky Boots

(2005) A drag queen comes to the rescue of a man who, after inheriting his father’s shoe factory, needs to diversify his product if he wants to keep the business afloat. Stars Chiwetel Ejiofor, Joel Edgerton and SarahJane Potts. Directed by Julian Jarrold. October 29:

‘Movies’ continued from page 16

A former mobster-turned-informant (Robert De Niro) and his family are sent to France on the witness relocation program. Instead of being grateful that Daddy got a get-out-of-jail free card for being a snitch, they are unappreciative and hate France. This actually could have been funny, but it’s not. They play off rather out-moded, stereo-typical uppity French jokes, which actually only serve to make them look like ugly Americans. Really, the only awful people in France seem to be the Manzoni’s.

Offend one of them or displease them in any way and they’ll kill you or beat you to a pulp. Again, this is supposed to be funny, but it’s not. Assigned to protect them, in what’s got to be the worst role of his career is Tommy Lee Jones. While Jones’s character tries to keep the whole family from destroying Normandy and blowing their cover, the mob boss Giovanni sent up the river learns their location and sends his hit men after them. Meanwhile there’s a weird subplot involving underage sex, attempted rape and suicide. Don’t ask...

Robert De Niro does his best to make the most of the material, but it’s a lost cause. Michelle Pfeiffer also tries her darnedest to steady the sinking ship, but to no avail. The less we say to even acknowledge that Jones is in the movie the better. Great actors, great potential, totally shot to hell. Maybe Tarantino could have pulled it off, but writer-director Luc Besson did not. The Family should be buried in cement shoes. Rated R for violence, language and brief sexuality.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Old Dark House (1932) Seeking shelter from a storm, five travelers are in for a bizarre and terrifying night when the stumble upon the Femm family estate. Stars Boris Karloff, Melvyn Douglas and Charles Laughton. Directed by James Whale.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 19


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fine art

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Creative Swimming

Attitude and perspective are so important...

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR IDEAS?

Every now and then, we dip our toes into some career-path pool or other to test the waters, and perhaps dive in. Some jump eagerly, while others sort of quasi-slip on the tile and end up dog-paddling, yet still willing to go along. Either way, at some point we’re each wet and swimming. Despite these necessary plunges, it is also useful to move back to the edge sometimes and double-check that our goals, aspirations and inspirations are still on-track. Some of us rise up out of the pool smoothly, with a model-esque, minimally-splashing little “kerplunk!”, while others kind of sputter noisily to the surface, eyes blinking from the chlorine, wondering where the last five years went.

Fall Craft Labs HandMade in America is offering a comprehensive curriculum of two-hour classes on business subjects, industry-specific skills, creativity, and access-to-market courses that are tailored to meet the unique needs of our artists in today’s economy. Craft Labs are geared toward the unique business challenges faced by local artisans and arts entrepreneurs. Class topics have a wide range, from Cultivating Collectors, Defining and Reaching Your Target Market, Sales Techniques, How to Get Your Work Seen, Creating Your Artist Statement, and Social Media for Beginners, to Practical classes How to Tell Your Story, Pricing and for creative Budgeting, Pay entrepreneurs. Yourself: A Craft Artist’s Guide to Profitability, Critiquing Your Work, Approaching Galleries, How to Sell from Your Booth, and more. Thanks to a few local organizations and Small Business Centers, HandMade is able to offer free Craft Labs in select areas. All other locations offer discounted rates to HandMade in America members and participating Arts Council members. IF YOU To register for Craft Labs contact GO (828) 252-0121 or lmudge@

handmadeinamerica.org. For more information please visit the website, www.handmadeinamerica.org/ clschedule.html.

BY

GREG VINEYARD

My most recent stepping-back and thinking moment was triggered by a simple question from a fellow artist at ZaPow Gallery: “Where do you get your ideas?” It’s a perfectly valid question, and any artist – or anyone in any business- should be prepared to answer this at any time. But what came out of my mouth that night was, essentially: “I don’t know, they just sorta come to me.” Not the best answer one can muster for one’s self-promotional and marketing efforts (and it doesn’t help your friends’ efforts to sell you, either). Since my answer was so… unhelpful, I realized it was time to sputter (er, I mean, rise elegantly), out of my pool, and assess. My inspirations are varied, and not atypical: family, teachers, artists, and society. I grew up surrounded by art and art books and art supplies. I’m still swayed by my high school art teacher, who, with her lively and loving views on creativity and our world, was like a lifeguard. And I’ve always been influenced by Picasso, Warhol, Klee, O’Keeffe, Matisse, Dali, Kandinsky, Diebenkorn, Van Gogh, Chagall, Basquiat and so many more. (Ask any artist for their “list,” and it’ll be a long one.) Light years ago, when I was a tour guide at the Denver Art Museum, three small Georgia O’Keeffe studies were part of the “Masterworks” tour, and seeing a retrospective at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. three years ago brought

Lifeguards, pastel by Greg Vineyard.

her back to the forefront of my mind. Seeing her later works — via my now older mindset — deepened my connection and understanding. Our world — loaded with people, cultures, thoughts, drama and humor — affects me deeply, and much of what I call my stream-of-consciousness outpouring is merely a reaction to all this continually swirling information. Attitude and perspective are so important: I think the universe is a place of beauty and hope and possibility, and I think things are ultimately good. My art, often like my writing, trends toward the inspirational, that “rah-rahyou-can-do-it!” messaging. Even on a “bad” day, I can write or draw 51% good

things going on in my view. I may also capture the other 49%, because life is a 100% formula, but I try to do so from my own unique angle. Which often requires much yellow. And some cats. I’m grateful that ideation “flows” for me… every day I have words and pictures in my head, and I have to sketch them out. However, possessing gifts from the ether doesn’t give me a free pass to not explain myself. It’s part of the current in which we must swim. Understanding my history, my influences, and a bit about how I observe and absorb the world, helps me come up with an answer as to how I got a concept from my head and onto paper. Communicating one’s message is a huge part of staying in business. As you jump back into your career pool of choice, don’t forget your swim floaties to help you tread along as you ponder perfect answers. And an acknowledging nod to the lifeguards you meet along the way couldn’t hurt – after all, they’re here to help us navigate the waters. Sometimes simply by asking useful questions.

Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville (www.zapow.com), carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com.

Through the Future, Brightly

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The Bender Gallery presents Through the Future, Brightly, an exhibition of works by acclaimed Korean born glass sculptor Eunsuh Choi and rising star Adam Waimon. The exhibition examines how limitations must be surmounted on the path to artistic expression and celebrates the artists’ future aspirations and accomplishments. Choi’s work is influenced by her experience as a young woman emigrating to the United States. She states, “I am interested in portraying the human aspiration in life with organic forms from the new perspective I had about myself in a foreign country.” The flameworked sculptures juxtapose grid-like structures consisting of clear thin rods of borosilicate glass which enclose imagery of ladders and puffy clouds. Choi’s rigid structures represent the barriers that

20 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

we face all around us, while images of clouds represent our aspirations and goals in life. Just thirty years old, New England artist Adam Waimon’s career is taking off at lightning speed. His blown and intricately carved glass forms exhibit a technical mastery that belies his years. The Carved series consists of sculptural groupings inspired by such diverse themes as botany, microbiology and Art Deco. The minimalist groupings are saturated in rich monochromatic color capitalizing on the negative space created by multiple pieces. The Channel series is an “abstraction of transition and experience of life. The clear fluid forms mark the subtle but constant continuation of time,” says Waimon. The use of texture pays homage to our unspoken moments and feelings while the incorporation of lenses provides the viewer with a voyeuristic view into the interior.

Blue Birds of Paradise by Adam Waimon Blown and Carved Glass, 10.5" x 15" x 16"

IF YOU Through the Future, Brightly GO opens with an artists’ reception

on October 4 from 5-8 p.m. and continues through December 31. Bender Gallery, 12 S. Lexington Avenue. Monday through Saturday, 10:30-5 p.m.; Sunday noon until 5 p.m. More information is available at www.bendergallery.com.


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Culturally Rich HENDERSONVILLE HENDERSONVILLE - 28792

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Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;City of Four Seasons,â&#x20AC;? a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes.

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Welcome to Hendersonville

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Henderson County is nestled atop a 2,200-foot scenic mountain plateau between the Great Smoky and Blue Ridge Mountains, just a short distance on the Blue Ridge Parkway from Mt. Mitchell, the highest peak east of the Mississippi. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. We hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take the time to get to know us a bit better.

LOST HIGHWAY The spectacular musical biography of Hank Williams, legendary singer/ songwriter, Lost Highway is an honest and mesmerizing portrait of the drifting cowboy from his beginnings on the Louisiana Hayride, to his triumphs on the Grand Ole Opry, to his eventual self-destruction at twenty-nine. Along the way we are treated to over twenty of Hank Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best-loved songs like Your Cheatinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Heart Heart, Move it on Over Over, and Hey, Good Lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. If you like The Buddy Holly Story Story, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll love Lost Highway!

IF YOU GO: Lost Highway, October 2 - November 3.

Tickets are $40. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy., Flat Rock, NC 28731. Phone 1-866-732-8008 or visit www.flatrockplayhouse.org

Art ApprAisAl services of the

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Personal Appreciation

(828) 551-3278

www.artappraisalcarolina.com 22 October 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vol. 17, No. 2


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Culturally Rich HENDERSONVILLE Art on Main Fine Art/Fine Craft Festival

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One of the region’s most popular outdoor arts festivals, Art on Main will feature fine arts and fine crafts from local and regional artists October 5 & 6 along Hendersonville’s historic Main Street. More than 70 artists, including many artists from states beyond the southeast region, participate in this juried and judged festival. Among the new artists for this year is Nate Barton, an artist who works in several different media including design and illustration, pottery and woodwork. This year he will present his finely detailed watercolors. Karin Connolly, a photographer from Orlando, FL, is a fine art nature photographer who has learned to take her time in order to record the ideal time when nature “comes together in perfect harmony.” Her work includes scenic, floral, and digital imagery. Kathy Oda, of Ladys Island, SC, has been working in kiln formed glass for over 15 years. She endeavors to reveal the illusion of texture and movement found in glass. Other new artists will include Michelle Petelinz of Raleigh, NC. As a mixed media artist, Michelle uses acrylic paint, pigment inks, handmade paper, oil pastels and polymer clay in her ongoing design process. Her work includes shadow boxes, masks, clocks, and wall hangings. Walter Stanford, pastel artist from Kannapolis, NC, began his artistic career as a free lance artist providing editorial, humorous, and conceptual works for his clients. His pastel works still reflect that humor. Fiber artist Sandra Vasanto has been working with fiber since learning to knit as a teenager. She now uses Merino and Alpaca Sandra Vasanto wool, as well as silk, in her hand felted hats and scarves. “We are excited to have these talented individuals, along with so many other exceptional artists, as part of Art on Main this year,” says Kim Adams, co-chair of Art on Main. The Art on Main committee has also gathered a diverse group of artists for live arts demonstrations Wall hanging by Michelle Petelinz

BY

Serenity by Kathy Oda

PATTY SMYERS

Dandy Lion by Walter Stanford HS

which will be interspersed throughout historic Main Street this year. Demonstrations will include raku pottery, journal crafting, calligraphy, weaving and fiber arts, blacksmithing, basket making, pastels, scrafitto, duck carving, and pochoir painting. Artists will take time to explain their processes and motivation and many will have finished work for sale. Rhino by Nate Barton Three distinguished judges will be judging the artist’s work and booths to determine winners for more than $3,000 in prize money. In addition to the $1,000 Best of Show Award, first place ($500), and second place ($300) prizes will be awarded in both categories of fine art and fine craft. Four Honorable Mentions of $100 each will also be awarded. Art on Main will be joining the national celebration of American Craft Week, when artists, galleries, craft organizations and schools across the nation will raise awareness of the many benefits of crafts to our lives and to our economy. Shirley Palmer-Hill of WICKWIRE fine art / folk art will sponsor an American Craft Week Award of $100. American Craft Week will be observed from October 4-13. The Arts Council of Henderson County is located at 401 North Main St., 3rd floor, Hendersonville, NC 28792. Entrance on Fourth Avenue West.

IF YOU The Arts Council of Henderson County GO presents the 54th annual Art on Main Fine

Art/Fine Craft festival October 5 & 6 along Hendersonville’s historic Main Street. Festival hours will be 10–5 p.m. both days. For more information please contact the Arts Council at (828) 693-8504, or visit www.acofhc.org. HM

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 23


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

GUESTS ON EARTH

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When troubled, brilliant young Evalina Toussaiant, orphan child of an exotic dancer from New Orleans, ends up at Asheville’s Highland Hospital in 1936, she finds herself amidst a wild cast of characters including Zelda Fitzgerald. As piano accompanist for all hospital programs, Evalina gains privileged insight into the lives and events which transpire until the still unsolved 1948 fire that took the life of Zelda and nine other women. Among Smith’s acclaimed works are: Mrs. Darcy and the Blue-Eyed Stranger, 2010; On Agate Hill, 2006; Stranger The Last Girls, 2003.

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IF YOU Lee Smith reading and GO booksigning, Tuesday,

October 8 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 2546734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

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GREAT JEWISH FOOD IN ASHEVILLE

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Got a craving for homemade matzo ball soup or maybe a nice corned beef on rye? Perhaps a potato knish or a kosher hot dog? On Sunday, October 20 the 11th annual HardLox Jewish Food and Heritage Festival takes place in Pack Square Park from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Homemade Jewish foods, Israeli dancing, crafts, a Kids Zone, klezmer music, and lots more! Have your name written in Hebrew. Discover the Torah. Learn about Jewish holidays and festivals. Join in the singing and dancing. IF YOU HardLox Jewish Food and GO Heritage Festival, Sunday,

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October 20 in Pack Square Park from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more details visit www.HardLox.com.

24 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Support Local Artisans – Purchase Handmade Items During American Craft Week, October 4-13

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071

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Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 25


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

INTERVIEWED BY

Cathy Searle

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Cathy Searle is an artist on a mission.

PG. 44

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PG. 44

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WZQJYMJXHMTTQ Apple® MacBook Air® starting at $999

Having just retired from a career as a partner with her husband in a publishing house business College Administration Publications, the paint brushes, gesso, and 12 x 12 canvasses are reappearing. Cathy calls this ‘nesting” for an artist, bringing together all the tools necessary to unleash a wellspring of inspiration to be the prolific artist she has been known to be. As a founding member of The Asheville Gallery of Art on College Street she has lent her energy to the explosion of the Asheville art scene. Her work is included in the corporate collections of Westinghouse and First Union National Bank, and Mission Hospital.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a The new MacBook Air is thin, light, and durable enough to take everywhere you go - and with all-day battery life* you may even have power to spare. Battery life varies by use and configuration. See www.apple.com/batteries for more information. Apple, the Apple logo, and MacBook Air are trademarks of Apple, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

252 Charlotte Street | 828.225.6600 300 Airport Road | 828.651.6600

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little about yourself and what lead you to becoming an artist?

Cathy Searle: There’s something

very satisfying about the simple act of creating. From my earliest projects as a brownie scout, to my immersion in arts and crafts, to the painter that I’ve become today, pouring myself into a project and coming up with something tangible and beautiful is a really gratifying pursuit.

RRM: Your work is very bold and powerful. It demands attention. How did your style come about?

CS: The character of my work has

gone through a huge transformation

since I began painting in watercolor. Translucent color and fluid lines projected a very different, softer voice in my work. As I grew more proficient, and more confident, I began to experiment with new media and techniques. I discovered Gesso—and I was hooked. The opaque, textural quality of Gesso lends itself to pure, bold color and simpler shapes. It’s a good fit with my flair for basic design. I also found that the new approach required me to spend more time with the painting up front, planning and sketching, before I’d even pull out a brush. It’s added a new challenge to my work that I find exciting and rewarding.

RRM: What is the purpose of art? CS: The purpose of my art is to

please me. I don’t attempt to convey a certain message or fill a niche. I paint because I love the process. Of course, it’s an incredible feeling when others find personal meaning and fulfillment in one of my works, as well. I really enjoy hearing peoples’ different interpretations.

RRM: What inspires you to paint every day?

Cocktails Anyone by Cathy Searle

26 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

CS: Actually,

I don’t find myself at the canvas every day. I prefer to carve out a block of time in which I can immerse myself in the whole diverting, exhilarating process of

DENNIS RAY

Cathy Searle, fine artist

Photo: Keli Keach Photography

creating a piece. The discipline of painting daily is just not as productive or as enjoyable for me. And more than anything else, art should be fun! IF YOU The Asheville Gallery of GO Art’s Silver Anniversary

Celebration and reception takes place Saturday, October 19 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Asheville Gallery of Art. The public is cordially invited to attend. Works by Cathy Searle are on display at the Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. Gallery Hours: Mon. - Sat. 10-5:30 p.m.; Sun. 1-4 p.m. For more information, call (828) 251-5796, visit www.AshevilleGallery-of-art.com, or www.artbycathysearle.com


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

INTERVIEW WITH GARY AND MARCELLA TAYLOR, OWNERS OF ASHEVILLE'S

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More of What Makes Asheville Special INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Cafe 64

Rapid River Magazine: I'm sitting here this morning with

Gary and Marcella Taylor, the owners of Asheville's Cafe Gary 64. First of all, I would like to congratulate both of you on the one year anniversary of your cafe. That seems to be an important benchmark in the restaurant industry, so tell me, how did the first year go for you?

Gary Taylor: Well Dennis it's been an educational year

for both of us. We've spent a lot of time working with our team and vendors to create the best possible experience for our customers. We've worked with our head chef Randy Boyd to maintain a well balanced menu that offers a variety of healthy options for everyone.

Cafe 64’s Gary Taylor Photos: Kelsey Jensen Photography

Marcella Taylor: Yeah, our goal is to of-

fer great food that's healthy, affordable and quick from kitchen to table. Everything we serve is hand prepared to order and many of our customers are regulars so consistency is very important.

GT: We also spent a lot of time and en-

ergy redoing the kitchen, adding a more efficient ventilation system and relocating some of the appliances to improve the work flow. We also just finished a facelift in front of the house so we think we're in really good shape to start off the second year.

RRM: Wow that sounds great. So, what are some of your most popular breakfast and lunch items?

Cafe 64 64 Haywood Street, Downtown Asheville 828-252-8333, www.cafe-64.com

GT: The Huevos Rancherous and Skillet are certainly

two of our most popular breakfast items and of course the Salmon Scramble is very popular as well. For lunch I would have to say the Tempeh Avocado Sandwich and Walnut Crusted Goat Cheese Salad get very high ratings.

MT: All of those are great meals. My favorite breakfast is

the Cafe 64 with a couple slices of our super thick bacon and of course I'm totally addicted to our lattes.

RRM: Yes, you've always been known for great coffee and

tea. So do you have any other changes in store for the immediate future?

GT: Yes there are a few goals we would like to achieve in

the months ahead. We would love to round out our menu by adding beer and wine along with a variety of revolving specials. And of course evening hours with a limited menu is something we're talking about.

MT: We would like Cafe 64 to continue being a vital part

of the downtown Asheville scene offering good morning, midday and evening dining.

RRM: Well thanks so much for giving me the scope on

Cafe 64. It sounds like you have some great things in store and I would like to wish you the best of luck.

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Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 27


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fine art Who Are You?

BRAINSTORMS AND OTHER MAGIC FROM ABSTRACT PAINTER GAYLE PAUL

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In nearly 50 years as a professional artist, Gayle Paul has never been accused of complacency with the creative process. “Painting for me has been a continuous, fascinating and evolving exploration of color and line,” she says. So true, that when she Framed miniature (untitled), by Gayle Paul, once walked into BlackBird with 4.5" x 4.5" on 10.5" x 10.5" paper. yet another in a series of surprisingly fresh work, unlike any other she had produced before, An intimate glimpse into Gayle owner Pat Horrocks smiled and Paul’s studio and mind. asked, “Who are you, Gayle?” The answer is, “all of the above,” as Gayle paints today posed color and shape with the addition of with all the spontaneity and enthusiasm that line work and inscriptions form the strucshe did in art school (Drake University) tural elements of her paintings. in the 1960’s. That dedicated playfulness “Who Are You?” attempts to answer and willingness to break the rules is on full the question by revealing a seasoned artist display in this show. who is defined only by the wisdom and willingness to follow her own creative path wherever it may lead, sometimes in several directions at once. In addition to the miniatures (all available individually), several new larger paintings and others not previously shown will be offered. An artist’s reception will be hosted at Blackbird Frame & Art from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m., Friday, October 11. Guitarist Doug Paul (yes, closely related), will entertain with live and lively music. IF YOU “Who Are You?” Brainstorms GO and Other Magic from Abstract

Four Miniatures (untitled) by Gayle Paul, 4.5" x 4.5" each on 10.5" x 10.5" paper.

For the first time in her career, Gayle has elected to present works that are not a connected body, providing instead a more intimate glimpse into the studio, and into the artist’s mind, with an assortment of new inspirations. Anchoring these is a collection of recent miniatures, best described as “brain storms,” about 60 pieces, wideranging in form and color, representing an outpouring of her creative thought. According to the artist, “I have often been asked where I get my ideas. I dream paintings… they clutter up my head and I imagine them until I paint them.” Juxta28 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Painter Gayle Paul. Opening Reception Friday, October 11 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at BlackBird Frame & Art. On exhibit from October 1 through November 2, 2013. BlackBird Frame & Art, 365 Merrimon Avenue in north Asheville. For more information call (828) 225-3117 or visit www.blackbirdframe.com.

BlackBird Frame & Art is an independent custom frame studio and gallery owned by Pat and John Horrocks and located at 365 Merrimon Avenue in north Asheville. They are celebrating their 10th year in Asheville, and 23rd year in business together. Gayle Paul paints in her home studio in Weaverville.


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artful living Forgiveness

BY

BILL WALZ

sickness, pain and death. We must let go of the stories of our injuries, of our pain, of our grievances and our victimization, ~ Jesus and we do this not for the benefit of those who inThere is a story about the Dalai Lama jured us, or to make peace in which he is asked whether he hates the with God, but first and Chinese. His answer was, to paraphrase, that foremost, for peace with since the Chinese had taken his homeland ourselves. and his people from him, “should I let them We must let go of pertake my mind as well? No, I don’t hate the sonalizing injury and loss. Chinese.” It is not about us, no He goes on to say the Chinese responmatter how personal sible for the crimes against Tibet are people it seems and feels. It just like you and me who only want to not is Life and the husuffer, but they are mistaken in believing man condition, and they will find happiness by taking what does it is our argument not belong to them and disregarding the with Life and the rights and needs of people they see not like human condithemselves. tion that is the In other words, the Dalai Lama forgives culprit. the Chinese “for they know not what they There is do,” and in the paradoxical turn typical of a Zen story of a the Buddhist perspective, to forgive, to not man who, on a fine hold resentment and hatred, is compassionand beautiful day, having rowed his boat ate not only of the person who has harmed to the middle of a calm and serene lake, you, it is compassionate toward yourself. decided to take a nap. He slept peacefully and deeply for a time when Whap! Another rowboat bumped into him, WE are the principle benefactor of jolting him awake. He arose, angrily, shouting: “What’s the matter with our forgiveness and compassion. you!? Look where you’re going!” In a WE are the principle benefactor of our moment, as full orientation came to him, he forgiveness and compassion because we do realized the other rowboat was empty. It had not give our minds over to that which vexes become unmoored and had been steered, and harms us by polluting our experience just as had the sleeping man’s rowboat, only with toxic thoughts and emotions toward by the wind and the currents. There was those people and toward Life. Our freeno one steering either boat. He, of course, dom to be peaceful and happy in our lives felt foolish at his outburst, and his anger requires forgiveness. evaporated. In the course of my work, people tell This story is a parable that is teachme of life-experiences that are meant to give ing “they know not what they do,” for context and explanation, to give justification, the teaching continues in Zen koanic as to why they suffer with significant anger fashion: “And the rowboat is always and resentment. They tell stories of abuse, empty.” As long as we live our lives betrayal, loss, trauma, injury, exploitation, unawakened to the truth of who we are, debilitating illness, all the ways a person can and the nature of conditioning as the source come to feel that others and life are handing of our suffering, we are the rowboats, unthem a raw deal. moored, drifting through life, the currents With genuine caring and sympathy, I and winds of our conditioning causing us to will typically respond in a manner as to say, collide with each other, not by true con“Yes, that must be very hard. You are indeed scious choice, but rather through unconjustified in your feelings. I want to know scious drives to assert our egoic self. though, justified as those feelings may be It is our ego that wants to shout: - how is that working for you?” “What’s the matter with you!?” We have After the person opens and acknowlbeen taught, conditioned, to be aggressive, edges that it really isn’t working very well thoughtless, selfish, manipulative, comfor them, which is why they are seeking my plaining, negative, dishonest, lazy, irresponcounsel, I will share that there is another sible, all the panoply of sins. As Buddhism way, and though it is truly very challenging, teaches, this is not who we are. Steering our it is the only way for a person to really get boats are conditions and conditioning, like their life back. We must forgive the injury, the waves and the wind, and we will collide whether the source is another person, group because there is no real conscious person of persons, agencies, institutions, or the steering our lives. seemingly cruel finger of Nature bestowing We are unmoored from the truth of

“Forgive them; they know not what they do.”

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who we and others are. For our tendency to anger and blame, that which serves as cover for our egoic excesses, to evaporate, we must realize this. What is the purpose of screaming at the wind and currents? It does not really make us feel any better, nor give steerage of our lives back to us. The essence of Buddhist compassion is the recognition that as human-beings we all share in this enslavement, this prison of conditioning and identity in ego. We are taught through Buddhist instruction and meditation to ask of our own and others’ harmful or thoughtless behavior, what is its source? Is a person the source of their own behavior, or do we need to look to conditioning factors - their parents, their communities, culture, their experiences? Are they, and we, really steering our boats, or are a whole matrix of conditioning factors streaming back into the unfathomable past actually at the helm? Compassion also teaches us that as human-beings we all share in common our essential beingness, our “original mind,” as Buddhism calls it. “Show me your face before you were conceived by your mother and father,” instructs a famous koan. We are pure and perfect beings, and we are human persons who are defiled and betrayed by the conditioning of our egoic identity. You and I are exactly the same in this way.

Compassion for others is only truly possible when it is first applied to ourselves. conditioning with its prejudices, resentments, fears, judgments, anger and hatreds, as well as our biases for what and who we like and favor only because they are familiar. Yes, of course, we and others are responsible for the harm we do, and are to be held accountable, and like a fair legal arbiter, we can, when awake and honest, pronounce the needed amends-making appropriate to the transgression. Now, however, we know it is not personal. It is not about me, nor, in truth, others. We are getting closer to living in conscious discernment and acceptance of what is. Yes, even for the most heinous of acts, we can create boundary, take action to stop the harm, hold the person (including ourselves, if it be the case) responsible, all without anger and hatred, because we compassionately understand the truth of the continued on page 39

To release false judgment of ourselves and others allows us to own our mind. Our conditioning is different, but the fact of being imprisoned, of being asleep inside of conditioning, is the same. We know not what we do – until we awake and become conscious of this human-being dilemma and tragedy, and through contemplative, meditative examination take true responsibility for who we are, and realize that who we are is Life, the full Yin-Yang of birth and death, happiness and sorrow, triumph and tragedy, and there is no one or anything to blame, nor should we want to blame, for blame only distracts us from effective living and the celebration of the full mystery. With this wise and natural mind at the helm, forgiveness then, comes naturally. And it is a great liberation. To release false judgment of ourselves and others allows us to own our mind, to not be owned by our Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 29


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poetry & performance

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The Poet’s Voice

NESTING DOLLS

Oksana, my Russian daughter-inOksana, law gave me a set of nesting dolls last Christmas. There are five of them. They nestle inside one another, enveloped by the largest doll. I take them out and line them up. I put them back together inside their large outer shell. This week it occurred to me that they are a metaphor for my poetry writing and reading life. While an epiphany of ideas was rising, I read The Asheville Poetry Review, year 2010. Near the end is an interview with poet, Michael S. Harper. (His most recent book is Use Trouble, 2009. Winner of Guggenheim, NFA fellowships, The Frost Medal for Lifetime Achievement from the Poetry Society of America, numerous national book awards, Pulitzer in 1993, and professor at Brown University.) The interviewer, John Hoppenthaler, asks, “How has your poetry changed during your forty-year journey?” Michael Harper responds by telling how he began with a rhyming dictionary given to him as a child, how he had to learn everything the hard way. He tells about neighborhoods loved and lost, studies, (including pre-med), and “biding time.” He mentions musicians and writers who have mentored him. What I learned from this interview is that nothing we learn or do is irrelevant. Harper says, “For myself poetry still burns in the residue, for I have still failed of a certain parlance, a certain elegance and tonality of phrase and nuance; to add what musicians knew: “Don’t Explain” and don’t fear being too personal, too idiosyncratic, too bizarre, too (Monk) “straight, no chaser,” too rigorous to modify impeccable phrasing, genetic inheritance.” Reading about Michael Harper’s life and musing over my nesting dolls, I discovered a synthesis. Michael Harper’s writing life, like my fifty-two-year writing life can be put in order when I discover the hollows

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

17th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline January 31, 2014. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2014 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

inside myself where poems and writing reside. My love for words started with my tiniest self. In utero, I heard my mother sing. With the light that followed, I listened to my father read and quote English Romance poets. When he died I was sixteen. I began to write. Over the years, poems have found me: “Dover Beach,” by Matthew Arnold, was one of the first to claim me, especially the line, “Ah love, let us be true to one another.” T. S. Eliot’s “Four Quartets” enriches my life. When I play Bach Suite No. 1, I hear “Burnt Norton.”

FROM POEM V Words move, music moves Only in time; but that which is only living Can only die. Words, after speech, reach Into the silence. Only by the form, the pattern, Can words or music reach The stillness, as a Chinese jar still Moves perpetually in its stillness. Liesl Mueller’s book, Alive Together Together, and her poem, “Brendel Playing Schubert,”

is a revelation that someone else understands what it means to make music. Not only the audience, but the players retreat into a “nowhere where the enchanted live.” I discovered this poem after I left a 30 year career in a symphony orchestra. These poems live in doll #3.

BRENDEL PLAYING SCHUBERT We bring our hands together in applause, that absurd noise, when we want to be silent. We might as well be banging pots and pans, it is that jarring a violation of the music we’ve listened to without moving, almost holding our breath. The pianist in his blindingly white summer jacket bows and disappears and returns and bows again. We keep up the clatter, so cacophonous that it should signal revenge instead of the gratitude we feel for the two hours we’ve spent out of our bodies and away from our guardian selves in the nowhere where the enchanted live.

by Lisel Mueller

THE NATIONAL STORYTELLING FESTIVAL

Words, Music, and Memories

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Anyone who shares an appreciation for the telling of stories should note that the world’s oldest and largest festival dedicated to celebrating that ancient art will take place a short drive from western North Carolina on October 4-6, 2013. Held each autumn since 1973 in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and produced by the Jonesborough-based International Storytelling Center (ISC), the National Storytelling Festival — called by USA Today “the leading event of its kind in America” — will feature compelling performances by some of the world’s most interesting and entertaining storytellers. People at the Festival will be privileged to sit and listen to the magical word-weaving of Bil Lepp, Syd Leiberman, Ed Stivender, the legendary storyteller Donald Davis, and storyteller/ballad singer Sheila Kay Adams. While they have developed markedly different performance styles, all five storytellers have in common an uncommon ability to entertain large audiences with stories that are at the same time deeply personal and profoundly universal.

30 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

BY TED

OLSON

Other acclaimed masters of the spoken word scheduled to appear at this year’s Festival include David Novak, Minton Sparks, Joseph D. Edgecomb Bruchac, Milbre Burch, and Jackson Gillman. Each year the Festival seeks to represent storytelling from a range of cultural traditions, and this year is no exception. Rev. Robert Jones and Diane Ferlatte will present stories and music Charlie Chin relating African American experience, while Festival attendees may also see and hear performances by Yiddish storyteller Shonaleigh, Chinese American storyteller and musician Charlie Chin, and Brazilian performance artist Antonio Rocha. Several special events will be held in

Where I live influences what I write. My Minnesota poems fill Doll #4 with snowstorms, clouds and sky. My North Carolina poems reside in the largest doll. In this space, mountains become choirs, clouds, shrouds, and October, an Appalachian tapestry. This morning my nesting dolls are contained in their proper spaces. They don’t fit any other way, like poems that claim me in time, some written by me, most written by others, belong to me in their time. I take out old poems, and am “there.” I read the oldies. I read them in order. They remind me of two things: 1. My writing is a testament of survival; 2. “i am not done yet.” (lucille clifton, from good woman: poems and a memoir, BOA 1987.)

Web Exclusive Read the poem “Dear John, Dear Coltrane” by Michael S. Harper online right now by going to www.rapidrivermagazine.com

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

Jonesborough just before or during the Festival. On Wednesday, October 2, Donald Davis will present a pre-Festival evening perforDonald Davis Photo: FreshAirPhoto mance, sharing stories about growing up in western North Carolina. The next evening (Thursday, October 3) will feature musicians Tim O’Brien and Nora Jane Struthers. On Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 p.m., Joseph Bruchac Festival attendees can hear ghost stories in a memorable setting — Jonesborough’s Mill Spring Park. Other activities include showcasings Diane Ferlatte of amateur storytelling talent at the Story Slam, the Exchange Place, and the Swappin’ Ground. continued on page 38


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authors ~ books ~ readings Four Good Books to While Away the Hours

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The only good thing about being sick for a long time is that you get to read a lot. Here are a few of the non-fiction books that helped me while away the hours recently while I couldn’t do much of anything else.

ENVIRONMENT Tom’s River: A Story of Science and Salvation By Dan Fagin, read by Dan Worren, Books on Tape (2013), 18-1/2 hours, 15 CDs.

I chose to read this book because I figured it would be so boring it would put me to sleep. Boy, was I wrong! Once I started reading Tom’s River, I had to stay with it to the end. Tom’s River is a small town on the New Jersey coast that turned out to be the site of the largest legal settlement in the annals of toxic dumping. It’s an example of investigative journalism at its best, combined with spellbinding storytelling that tells a sprawling whodunit. It’s also a study of cancer epidemiology that makes science accessible and exciting. The villains are spread out over the world, some of them lurking behind loopholes, others hiding in the ivory tower of their corporate offices, but the heroes and there are many of them, come from the ranks of Everyman. It was a great read, and one I think was enhanced by being on audio, since Dan Worren’s voice projects the right mix of newspaper reporter gravitas and emotional drama.

NATURE Gardening for Birds: How to Create a Bird-Friendly Backyard By George Adams, Timber Press (2013), 444 pages.

Being sick at any time of year is a drag, but if you’re a gardener, you know that being sick in the summer is the total pits. Plants dry up from lack of water, tomatoes go unpicked, bad bugs destroy all the squash blossoms. Dreadful. I had no choice but to embrace The Frustrated Gardener’s motto: “When You Can’t Plant, You Plan.” So I piled new gardening books up high on the bedstand and started digging in. The most wonderful book in the pile turned out to be Gardening for Birds by George Adams, a 444-page tome that tells you everything, I mean everything, you want to know about bringing birds to your garden. Better than that, it was lavishly illustrated with color photos of birds and bird-friendly plants and lovely black-and-white illustrations—an absolutely gorgeous book that is as informative as it is inspiring.

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

MUSIC Wild Tales: A Rock and Roll Life Written and narrated by Graham Nash, Random House Audio (2013), 12-1/2 hours, 10 CDs.

My two favorite songs are “Teach Your Children” and “Our House,” written by Graham Nash, the British transplant who became one-quarter of the legendary American folk-rock super band Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (CSNY). I was thrilled to find his autobiography, Wild Tales, narrated by him on audio. The book starts with Nash’s horribly poor childhood in post-war Britain, through his youthful glory days with Britain’s pop group The Hollies. Then Graham goes off to America where he falls in love and lives in Laurel Canyon with Joni Mitchell, who introduces him to David Crosby (formerly with The Byrds), who will be his closest friend for decades, and Stephen Stills and Neil Young--co-founders of Buffalo Springfield. The endless decadence gets boring, but Graham’s behind-the scenes tales of his political awakening, making music, and the many people who inspired him, was fascinating. Nash was in America, developing his photography skills, when he saw a 1962 Diane Arbus photo “Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park.” He wrote the song four years later and it was recorded when Neil Young joined the group on their Déjà Vu album in 1970. Also on that album was “Our House.” It was inspired when Joni Mitchell bought a beautiful vase in an antique shop and came home to fill it with flowers and grasses from her garden. Other musicians constantly drop into the story: Phil Everly, John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendryx, Mama Cass, Laura Nyro, Rita Coolidge—a long, long list. Even with all their internecine battles, the group never broke up. At age 72, Graham Nash is still performing with Crosby and Stills. You can see their concert schedule at www.csny.com

SOUL Soul Retrieval: Mending the Fragmented Self By Sandra Ingerman, Harper San Francisco (updated 2006), 22l pages.

While I was sick, there was a time when I thought I was going to die. Nothing dramatic. No tearful revelations to anyone. Just this message inside my head, “I’m going to die.” When I started recovering, it was a few days before I fully accepted that I hadn’t died. One of my health providers, acupuncturist Whitney Madden at The Source in Black Mountain (www.sourceforwellbeing.com), was concerned that even after three weeks of treatment, I had not re-gained enough chi (energy) from the wallop of pneumonia, for her to deal with the chronic pain I had originally sought her out for. She mentioned that shamanic healers would say that part of me did die, and part of my soul had indeed fled my body. My continually low chi perhaps (nothing’s for sure here) could indicate I needed to get that part of my soul back. At first it’s a pretty far-out idea, but frankly, when I read this book, I felt author Ingerman had written it directly to me. I was struck by how much logic the seemingly ancient technique of shamanic healing could have for someone like me, who had gone through several soul-shattering shocks over the years. (And haven’t we all?) Soul Retrieval’s foreword was written by Michael Harner, who my own studies have shown is the country’s most reputable shamanic teacher. If you are curious about how shamanic soul retrieval can be combined with modern psychology methods, I highly recommend this book.

OCTOBER

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, October 1 at 7 p.m. BILL PENLEY, A Smoky Mountain Odyssey. Wednesday, October 2 at 7 p.m. TYLER CAPPS, Cooking Comically. Thursday, October 3 at 7 p.m. RICK MCDANIEL, Asheville Food: A History of High Country Cuisine. Friday, October 4 at 7 p.m. SUSAN GREGG GILMORE, The Funeral Dress. Saturday, October 5 at 7 p.m. DENI BÉCHARD, Empty Hands, Open Arms. Tuesday, October 8 at 7 p.m. LEE SMITH, Guests on Earth. Thursday, October 10 at 7 p.m. WENONAH HAUTER, Foodopoly. Friday, October 11 at 7 p.m. MINDI MELTZ, Lonely in the Heart of the World. Saturday, October 12 at 7 p.m. LAURA GARREN, The Chattooga River. Sunday, October 13 at 3 p.m. JEFF HIGH, More Things in Heaven and Earth. Wednesday, October 16 at 7 p.m. JOHN MILLIKEN THOMPSON, Love and Lament. Thursday, October 17 at 7 p.m. MARK PINSKY, Met Her on the Mountain. Sunday, October 20 at 3 p.m. TOMMY HAYS, What I Came to Tell You! Monday, October 21 at 7 p.m. CATHY HOLT, HeartSpeak. Tuesday, October 22 at 7 p.m. KEN ILGUNAS, Walden on Wheels. Thursday, October 24 at 7 p.m. CAROL PEPPE, Financing Our Foodshed. Friday, October 25 at 7 p.m. CHARLES MCNAIR, Pickett’s Charge. Sunday, October 27 at 3 p.m. ALL HALLOW’S READS, all ages.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 44 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

www.sandraingerman.com/soulretrieval.html The Foundation for Shamanic Studies, (Michael Harner), www.shamanism.org You can find and/or order any of these books from your local bookseller, including Malaprop’s.

Marcianne Miller is a local film and book critic. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 31


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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The first hints of fall and the shortening of days seems to bring with it more evening time for music listening. Thus I am back again with a wide range of discs worth paying attention to. As always, I recommend supporting your local independent music store and all they add to our city.

Van Dyke Parks Songs Cycled Bella Union Music There isn’t much that Van Dyke Parks hasn’t done. One of pop music’s greatest Renaissance men, Parks collaborated with Brian Wilson on some of the Beach Boys most beloved (and misunderstood) songs, composed dozens of soundtracks, worked with Frank Zappa, and arranged and produced more than a hundred albums, including recent efforts by Joanna Newsome and Silverchair. Parks is one of few who have earned the title living legend, but, despite the accolades of his peers and historians, even the most well educated music lover might know the name but not the details. He’s had a deliberately low key, bordering on the obscure, solo career which has encompassed a scant nine releases over more than four decades. So any Van Dyke Parks album is going to be, by nature, something special. Songs Cycled follows his last studio release by a mere 18 years – a drop in the bucket in Parks universe – and in typical Parks fashion, doesn’t even offer up all new material. The earliest songs date back two decades while the rest were released over the past decade as a stream of 7” singles that no one, outside of his immediate family and record label, likely even knew existed. But no matter, because here they are and they’re uniformly brilliant, a mixture of world Caribbean beat and baroque layered pop as only Parks could serve up. The songs are elaborate, at times fastidious, and employ everything from steel drums to strings to woodwinds and ukulele. They’re also highly topical with Parks addressing such concerns as post 9/11 paranoia (the ragtime piano driven “Wall Street”) or “Missin’ Mississippi”, quite possibly the most moving post Katrina song yet, in which Parks’ throaty intonation is starkly set against jubilant accordion and brass. It’s the sort of audacious arrangement that few musicians would attempt and even fewer can pull off. “Hold Back Time” (originally found on the Brian Wilson collaboration Orange Crate Art), ), reveals a romantic warmth not found in the original, while the clarinet (seriously, clarinet!) driven “Sassafrass” is a tongue in cheek bit of seduction. It all adds up to a record that only Van Dyke Parks could have made. Now 72, Parks, who has been in show business since age 10 (starring in several 32 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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early television productions), remains one of our most idiosyncratic and brilliant musical lights. His records have at times confounded and exasperated me, but not once have they ever left me anything other than grateful for the man who made them. Songs Cycled is another chapter in a saga that in so many ways demonstrates the best of American music. *****

the old Trent Reznor would have lingered in such shadows, the 2013 version pays it a visit and moves along. That balance of light and dark makes Hesitation Marks a richly rewarding experience, one that lingers long after the luminosity has faded. *****

The Rides Can’t Get Enough 429 Records

Nine Inch Nails Hesitation Marks Columbia Records When Trent Reznor announced he was putting NIN on hiatus, with an eye towards leaving music altogether, I doubt anyone took him seriously. A perfectionist whose work ethic borders on compulsive, Reznor hardly slowed down. He scored several film soundtracks (earning an Academy Award for The Social Network), dabbled in video production, and Network quickly teamed with his longtime amigo Atticus Ross to form the industrial rock trio, How to Destroy Angels. The third part of that equation, Mariqueen Maandig, soon after became his wife and mother of his two children. So, it’s into the relatively bucolic circumstance that Reznor, now clean and sober for the first time in years, brings back Nine Inch Nails. Thankfully, while he a very different person than he was a decade ago, Reznor has lost none of his edge. In fact, Hesitation Marks,, which builds nicely upon two NIN Marks previous releases, is as good as it gets. It engages many of the same danceable grooves of Pretty Hate Machine while exploring the subtle underpinnings of Downward Spiral, Spiral doing so in ways that are both startling and entirely logical. Reznor has long been enamored by the art rock affectations of such bands as The Talking Heads and Tusk era Fleetwood Mac, so why not bring Adrian Belew and Lindsay Buckingham on board? And if you’re wanting to really pump up the bass lines, who better than Pino Palladino? The end result is the most optimistic record NIN has ever made, from the nearly giddy throes of “Everything” (who would have thought NIN capable of such chirpy power pop?), to “Find My Way”, a surprisingly uncomplicated roadmap of what lies ahead. Reznor sings with a deliberate confidence that indicates a singer that has finally embraced his abilities. Sure there are moments of doubt and darkness – the somber “Came Back Haunted” would have fit nicely on a number of earlier albums – but while

Forty five years after the original Super Session, Stephen Stills, Barry Goldberg (both of whom played that gathering, though not on the same tracks), and Kenny Wayne Shepherd try to rekindle that magic moment in time with this loosely constructed collection of originals, covers, and remakes. While it has all the elements (Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, guitar wunderkind, and grizzled veteran of the blues), Can’t Get Enough doesn’t quite succeed: But not for lack of trying. The Rides do offer up some stunning six string fireworks, jubilant piano playing and a rhythm section that knows when to hold fort and let the big boys play their toys. With the exception of an electrified take on Muddy Waters’ “Honey Bee” the cover tunes stay a bit too close to the originals, and the shortage of new material feels like a missed opportunity. But this is an album built around great grooves rather than solid songs, and in that regard Can’t Get Enough might not enhance the reputations of those involved but neither does it tarnish them. The fun that Stills, Goldberg, and Shepherd must have had in making this record is evident and that sense of camaraderie is infectious. It may not be the trend setting epic that was Super Session, and I doubt we’ll be singing its praises 45 year hence. But for what it is – three consummate artists spending a week in the studio making a record and having a heck of a good time – this is one Ride worth taking. ***1/2

Beware of Mr. Baker (DVD) Insurgent Media Flamboyant and intense, mercurial and brilliant: all of those adjectives describe drummer Ginger Baker, whose work with the rock trio Cream earned him fortune, fame, groupies galore and a nasty drug habit. This documentary of the scarlet haired madman is alternately illuminating and infuriating. ‘CD’s’ continued on page 33


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sound experience LEAF’s 37th Festival October 17-20 A range of world performers: funk, rhythm & blues; psychedelic rock and Creole roots; Belgian polyphonic Afrobeat queen Zap Mama; and Western North Carolina’s own folk rockers, Acoustic Syndicate, perform a record release show. The twice-annual four-day cultural music and arts festival takes place at Camp Rockmont, in Black Mountain, NC. For more information phone (828) 68-MUSIC (828-686-8742) or visit www.theLEAF.org.

‘CD’s’ continued from page 32

Even as you marvel at the unbridled talent that Baker so boundlessly exudes, you’re equally saddened by his ability to so casually toss it all aside, doing him and his loved ones irreparable harm. Director Jay Bulger manages to gain almost unheard of access into Baker’s notoriously private life, visiting him on his South African compound (whose grim warning sign gives the film its title), and interviewing former wives (of which there are four) and aggrieved children (of which there are three). Beware of Mr. Baker is an alternately haunted and hysterical portrait of rock’s first truly great drummer, and Bulger wisely lets his subject tell his own story, even when that story results in Baker bloodying Bulger with a sharp right to the snout. Footage of his amazing journey, from bombed out London to continent hopping superstar, adorns the film with an authenticity that makes the viewer almost feel as if they know the man: Except you wouldn’t want to. Interviews with Steve Winwood, Eric Clapton, Johnny Rotten, Charlie Watts, Carlos Santana, and others paint a portrait of a gigantic talent whose personal demons, fueled by four decades of heroin addiction, have made him both revered and reviled. “I’d love to work with him again” says Jack Bruce, who Baker seems to despise with intensity well into wickedness. “But I wouldn’t want to be in the room with him for more than a few minutes.” ****

The Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit

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INTERVIEW WITH ASHLEY CAPPS

In the weeks following the 2012 edition of MoogFest rumors began swirling that big changes were in store for what had, in three short years, become one of Asheville’s premiere music events. While attendance for the two day festival had been down — exact numbers are difficult to come by — MoogFest 2012, with headliners Primus 3-D, Black Moth Super Rainbow, and The Magnetic Fields, clearly delivered the goods. I certainly heard grumblings along the lines of “last year was better,” but such comments are part and parcel of any such large scale event. You’re not going to satisfy everyone’s tastes, and by catering to the masses you’ll likely alienate those that really do care about the music. Still, when MoogFest and AC Entertainment, who has shepherded the Asheville version of MoogFest since its inception, parted ways, many were blindsided. Within weeks, Ashley Capps, whose initials adorn the Knoxville based management company he founded, announced plans for a three day event largely akin to MoogFest. Same time of year, many of the same venues, and the same types of artists MoogFest attracted. To further complicate matters, MoogFest has announced it will return, sans AC Entertainment, in 2014. How that will shape out is anyone’s guess. To his credit Mr. Capps has been upfront regarding the division between MoogFest and AC Entertainment, and has remained an unfailing professional. So, while anyone looking for an “inside scoop” of dirt might be disappointed, Rapid River Magazine greatly appreciates his willingness to answer a few of our questions.

James Cassara: Thanks for taking some

time to talk about the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit. I fully appreciate if you’d rather not discuss the split that occurred between MoogFest and AC Entertainment. However, if there’s a side of the story you’d like to make known, feel free to do so.

Ashley Capps: It’s pretty simple really.

When we started exploring the idea of presenting a festival in downtown Asheville, we wanted to honor the creative legacy of Bob Moog. Our discussions with the Bob Moog Foundation and Moog Music led to our agreement to license the name “MoogFest” for the event. We programmed, booked, marketed, produced and staffed all aspects of the festi-

BY JAMES

CASSARA

be many fun surprises during the weekend for everyone.

JC: The list of performers is pretty

far reaching and diverse. Stepping for a moment outside your industry shoes and into those of a rabid music fan: What are the “must see” acts for you?

val, and we were 100% financially responsible for it. After three years, Moog Music notified us that they did not want AC: This is always a tough question, to continue to license because we really work to curate our Ashley Capps, owner of the name to us. We festivals — carefully selecting each were very proud of what AC management company. act for artistic reasons, and offering Photo courtesy of WUOT 91.9 FM we had created and a variety of options and musical exwanted to build upon periences for the fans. So, all of the our years of work and effort, so we chose to artists have a special place in the festival mix. christen our festival, “Mountain Oasis ElecOf course certain things stand out tronic Music Summit,” and continue on. because they offer a rare opportunity to see an artist perform, or a band is returning JC: So let’s talk about this year’s event. In after an absence, or an artist has released an philosophical terms what do you anticiespecially captivating new record. pate for the Summit? Be it someone who Obviously, we’re honored to have Nine attended MoogFest or a newcomer, what Inch Nails headline our festival, (along with might they expect? Bassnectar and Pretty Lights), during their AC: We are continuing to develop the return this year. I believe Mountain Oasis concept that we produced for the past three will be the most intimate show that they will years. The core footprint of the festival is play this year, so it’s certain to be a standout. the same — we’re presenting concerts in the Then, having Neutral Milk Hotel on Arena, the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, the the bill – with Jeff Mangum curating his Orange Peel, the Diana Wortham Theatre, evening – is a dream booking after their 15 and the Asheville Music Hall. And there will year absence from the music scene. And be panels and talks, along with educational having the reformed Deltron 3030 is amazand interactive experiences as well. ing… and then Tricky’s back… there’s so But we’re expanding further. Ashemuch that we couldn’t have predicted a ville is such a remarkable setting for this year ago. festival, and the local community has really We had Disclosure play in the Asheville embraced us. This year, there are so many Music Hall last year and they blew minds. exciting things happening outside the core So, as they’ve evolved and exploded this venues. Local entrepreneurs, like the Emeryear, we had to bring them back. And the ald Lounge, The Asheville Pizza and Brewfabulous chanteuse Jessie Ware, (a sometime ing Company and their new venue, The collaborator with Disclosure), released her Mill, the gallery space, Apothecary, the Lab, debut record this year that we can’t stop and others, are all offering exciting shows listening to. and events for Mountain Oasis attendees Darkside – the collaboration between and the community as a whole. Nicolar Jaar and Dave Harrington – has We’re working with many of the key rarely been heard in the USA and have just players in Asheville’s amazing and explodreleased their debut. Then there’s Godspeed ing food and brewery scene to highlight You! Black Emperor, and did I mention their offerings. The Asheville Brewing Gary Numan? Are you sorry you asked? I Company has also created an official festihave to stop now! val beer, the Electric Pale Ale. Plus, we’re JC: No apology needed, it’s great to know engaging with local artists and performyou’re a music lover first and foremost. Afers to create surprises for fans and others ter last year’s MoogFest there was some talk, throughout the weekend. and I’m not sure where it originated, that JC: It sounds like you’re integrating more of the event might be permanently abbreviated a down home feel. Logistically, are there any to two days. Obliviously that didn’t happen. changes we should know about? Are you pretty confident that the Asheville market can support this large an event? AC: In addition to expanding our festival footprint, there will be fun activities AC: Well, we did have to shorten last year’s throughout downtown Asheville during the festival from three to two days, but that was weekend, some of which will be free and primarily due to delays in planning that were open to the public. Others will be offered beyond our control. For a while, it looked for a small fee if you aren’t officially attendlike there might not be a festival in 2012. ing Mountain Oasis – pass holders will get continued on page 40 free or discounted admission. There will Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 33


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Greedy & Trendy

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Days remained hot and nights cooling down, so that on the higher mountains one began to see smoke from hidden chimneys. Mr. and Mrs. Storekeep had noticed a run on small packages of cocoa mix and special soaps usually employed in washing woolens. It was a Monday morning, and after opening the store, Mr. Storekeep sorted the area newspapers for their eventual lineup on the counter space, where folks who were checking their mail and buying those papers usually lined up, almost as if in a cue at a bus-stop. Suddenly the door flew open, allowing an especially watery amount of rain to enter from the great outdoors. The droplets, propelled by an unusually fraught wind, accompanied The Curmudgeon, his eyes slanted against the rain he was escaping from, his mouth with definite downturn at each lip-edge. “I just don’t understand about greed,” he announced to nobody in particular, since the only folks in the store remained the Storekeeps, Mr. and Mrs. “What is the problem?” they both asked in unison.

“You know, those very slick magazines dedicated to practically nothing.” “You might remember my wife’s Uncle Federal—that’s right, that’s his name because his father was a postal employee and his mother worked for the local branch of a federal bank in Atlanta. They are here for a visit and brought along a pile of specialty magazines that they subscribe to. You know, those very slick magazines that are all pictures with soul-less captions, printed on thick glossy pages and dedicated to practically nothing.” “Well, those pages might have been dedicated to nothing,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “but that nothing was enough to send you off on a stormy tangent.” “There is,” Curmudgeon said, “a page of trendy items to purchase from trendy shops all found in trendy cities like London, Paris, or New York. And the items pictured just sent me off in a tizzy!” “Name a few,” said Mr. Storekeep. “Well,” he answered, “how about a straw hat that closely resembles those hats hanging over in the farmer end of the store,

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Southern Comfort

the curmudgeon The weather of late had been rainy, windy, and generally unseasonable, especially for a touristy area like that which surrounded the The General Store.

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COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

PETER LOEWER Illustration by Peter Loewer

only here they’re called raffia hats and sell for $178 apiece. Or, a gold-plated warthog skull brought to you by one shop owned by Eduardo Garza — He paused for emphasis and continued, “Or a ladies gladiator boot that is one of the ugliest things I have ever seen, without a price but simply a stated ‘price on request.’ “What really got me was a Paula Rubbenstein wool blanket priced for $2,000, not to mention a Berluti calfskin suitcase for a mere $8,650, or a pair of well-used Boj Décor German Navy binoculars for $400, or a Brunello Cucinelli leather shirt for ladies than comes in at $3,995. “This is insane and especially bad because the Congress is trying to cut back on food-stamps for the American citizens who have had no luck in finding jobs!” “I think,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “they are doing that because of so-called welfare cheats.” “Seriously,” continued Curmudgeon, “I heard about the swinging surfer from California I saw on Fox News who was using stamps to buy lobsters or prawns or something like that for his table. But you and I both know that the number of such cheats are so far down in the minority, their numbers probably match the voters cheating at the polls who no need photo ID’s before using their constitutional right to vote. “I am appalled that the free market place is a-foul with over-priced goods for sale to the great American public while millions cannot find enough to eat without food stamps.” “Curmudgeon,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “speaking for both of us, I dare say we basically agree with you. But never forget this is the one country in the world that allows freedom of speech, and also never forget that while given to free-thinkers like you, it’s also given to ill-educated people, the likes of which now roam the malls and shop the stores for much of little worth.” “You are right,” he answered, “and I’ll try to remember same in the future.” The rain fell with more power and climate change continued to rear its ugly head.

$$$ Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

34 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

Novelist Harper Lee Brings Back Memories

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I think I may be the illegitimate daughter of Harper Lee and the late Truman Capote. I wish! But, I think it must have been a dream I had last night. Capote and Lee grew up in the same town and were best friends who became great writers. My dreams are always packed with interesting figures, and often, noted writers from those tender days of the 1950’s. I happened to find a younger photo of Lee recently, taken on the front porch of her family home Monroeville, Alabama in the Old South summer days of our lives. I was there for those innocent days, only in another state. I do look a little like her photo in the magazine article. Dream or not we were connected through the great writing of that era. She was a writer to watch. (Harper Lee is 87 years old now and lives in Monroeville in the home where she was raised.) She only wrote one unforgettable novel, but her notoriety prevails today. (Lee was in the CNN news regarding a lawsuit over items being sold in her town museum.) Those days were quiet and sometimes slower depending on what you were doing or where you were at the time. Time was new, sanitary and blatantly honest for those of us who were already very different from most of our peers. We all owned a secret that would be inside of us until most of us left for college and universities far from home. I always wondered if Lee was like Capote, who was out in those days and “flaming around in many social circles in New Orleans.” Both wrote best-selling books almost at the same time. Capote wrote the vicious, “Cold Blood” and Lee became famous when she wrote, “To Kill A Mockingbird.” Lee won the Putilizer in 1961. It did not take me long in college to learn that I was not very naïve after all. I knew and had read all the great writers of that era. I talked to everyone like I was a friend of these famous people because I knew I wanted to become exactly like them. I was making a plans for my future. I had already announced to my parents that I was going to New York after graduation and work for a publishing company. I was going to live in Greenwich Village where all the writers and artist lived in that day. “Where Bohemia reigned.”

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

That dream did not happen exactly that way for me, because while taking journalism courses in college, I knew immediately that I wanted to be a news Novelist Harper Lee reporter. Those of us who are still here from those days remember how incredible it felt to land a job at a wellknown newspaper. I was lucky, I always managed to get myself in a place so I could learn even more. It was all I ever wanted to do. The unique reporters and editors I worked with in the 1960’s enhanced my life in many ways. They taught me to be tough on an assignment, and how to write the story into news. They also taught me to walk the walk and talk the talk; how to drink and how to stay out of trouble. It was a love affair that remains in my system today. I never plan to stop writing. For the writers I idolized in the early days, their books and their private lives influenced me. I always wanted to drink as hard as Ernest Hemingway did. I tried. I was at times like Harper Lee, withdrawn, moody and alone in my thoughts. Now I hold on to my privacy as fierce as she does to this day. I can go for days without talking with anyone. As long as I have my books and my cats, I am content. Selection from a memoir Judy Ausley is currently writing.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH GRACE

CAROL BOMER OWNER OF

Soli Deo Gloria Studio

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Grace Carol Bomer’s work seeks to evoke both image and impression, the tangible world and the spiritual world.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

I live and paint in the ordinary and habitual. But I paint the ordinary, what I see, in metaphors and mystery. All of life is glorious subject matter. Her work has been called “a silent I have painted portraits, landscapes, form of poetry.” She views her work and still-life paintings in my lifetime. as “a form of play rejoicing before the All have value. But my central focus face of God” (Rookmaaker). This is and concern is “the human condition reflected in the name of her Asheville surprised by the grace of God.” We are studio, Soli Deo Gloria Studio, located fallen and broken people. I want my at 140 D Roberts Street in Asheville’s expressionist work to offer hope and River Arts district. healing. We all share in the human Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little condition. We are all “Incurables” but about your work. for the grace of God. I have explored Grace Carol Bomer: many media, from There is a tangible world printmaking to pastels I can see and paint either and most recently oils, realistically or abstractly. encaustics, and cold And there is also a wax. I layer and embed spiritual world that is various papers and text, unseen, apprehended by graphite, gold leaf and faith. Both are real, and other detritus into my I attempt to bring them work to create mystery together in my work. It is and allow my mind and labeled Abstract Expresmy imagination to work. sionism, but it is my faith Technical excellence in God’s word which and design are imporexplains my union of tant, but they are servant realism and abstraction, to expression and biblithe seen and unseen. cal narrative. The Incarnation of My pairing of text Christ brings together and image also referthese seeming dichotoences the Incarnation. mies: God / Man, Spirit Jesus is Word and ImThirsting by / Flesh, and Word / Grace Carol Boomer age of God. Words have Image. We live on the meaning and the Story edge of this extravagant is important. Words are necessary for mystery, this amazing earthshaking communication and narrative. They event, the union of the Seen and also can be manipulated for power, Unseen, The Incarnation, but we see because we live in a broken world. as in a mirror, dimly.

APPALACHIAN PASTEL SOCIETY EXHIBITION The Black Mountain Center for the Arts will host the 2013 Juried Member Exhibition of the Appalachian Pastel Society from October 18 until November 25, with an opening reception from 6-8 p.m., Friday, October 18. Marsha Savage will conduct a studio workshop October 18-20, at the Red House Studio, Black Mountain, NC. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 West State Street in Black Mountain.

IF YOU GO: For more information

please call (828) 669-0930, visit www.blackmountainarts.org, or www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.

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The Weight of Glory by Grace Carol Bomer. Oil and wax on panel.

You may be familiar with the phrase,“The world is a text,” which not only refers to the importance of words, but implies that they are to be manipulated for power. I believe there is a foundational Word, eternal and established in the heavens. And yes, the world was created by The Word, but a world that rejects the Word of God. My Global City Babel Series (see Babel and the Baby), addresses this conflict between God’s Word and man’s words. My faith, as everyone’s, influences my work. And I hope my work allows the viewer to glimpse the transcendence of an eternally relevant story.

RRM: What inspires you to create? GCB: As an English major, my paint-

ings are inspired by poetry, great writers like Tolstoy, CS Lewis, and most recently, Michael O’Brien’s Island of the World. But most important, my work is inspired by the Scriptures, the Word of God. The Hebrew word damah refers to a metaphor that transforms, an art form that starts with a commonly accepted way of looking at the world and adds an unexpected twist that results in a new perspective. We are surrounded by metaphors that point us to the unseen world of faith and an eternally relevant story.

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RRM: You were born in Alberta,

Canada, and went to college in Iowa. What brought you to Asheville?

GCB: Yes, I am a native of Alberta Can-

ada but have lived in Asheville since the early 1980s when my husband’s job brought us here from Kansas. LOVE these mountains!

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Soli Deo Gloria Studio 140 D Roberts Street, in Asheville’s River Arts Distsrict Twins XIV by Karen Chambers.

(828) 545-2451 www.gracecarolbomer.com

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 35


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Three Cheers for Indian Summer!

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Someone just came in the shop looking for Christmas gifts. Wait a minute people! Let’s give FALL a chance. Let’s just slow down, enjoy these balmy days of Indian Summer, and have a cup of tea. Terrell Miller, the delightful folk artist from Hickory, brought Face Jug by a truck load of whimsical stuff: Jim McDowell furniture, bird houses, and other oddities. He uses 100% found objects and recycled materials to create his work. On Friday, October 4 from 5-7 p.m. we host a gallery opening of the face jugs and other work by Jim McDowell.

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Colorful chair by Terrell Miller

Chifferobe, 118 Cherry Street in Black Mountain. Open M-Sat 10:30-6, Sunday 1-5 www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Blue to Black Art Stroll & Studio Tour

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Visit studios and shops in east Asheville, Black Mountain, Swannanoa, Fairview, Ridgecrest, and Old Fort. More than 40 artists, studios and art venues from the BLUE Ridge Parkway at Hwy 70 heading east to BLACK Mountain and beyond will be open to the public for the Blue to Black Art Weekend Art Stroll & Studio Tour. Studios will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, November 16-17. The two-day event, sponsored by AnTHM Gallery, Greybeard Realty, Seven Barb Rogers Sisters Gallery, and The Inn on Mill Creek, is a chance to visit working artist studios and downtown Black Mountain art venues, and to take part in demonstrations, workshops, studio tours, children’s crafts and live entertainment throughout the weekend. Weekend activities are free and open to the public and include an antique spinning wheel in Black Mountain, a glass blowing studio in Fairview, a 3D found-object art sculptor’s studio in East Asheville, a photographer’s studio with demonstrations in Old Fort, and tours of acrylic and pastel painters’ studios in Black Mountain as continued on page 37

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‘Blue to Black’ cont’d. from pg. 36

well as a Blacksmith’s workshop. Spinning wheel demonstrations, handspun yarns, art quilts, earthy ceramics and Arts & Crafts handmade chairs can be discovered during the two-day event. “Our Blue to Black Art Weekend Art Stroll & Studio Tour is a wonderful way to step inside a working studio or downtown art Alan Kaufman, venue and see how works of art are 3-D Found Object made. Thousands of people have Folk Art toured the studios since 2006 when the first studio tour started (formerly known as E.A.S.T—East of Asheville Studio Tour), and we are pleased to continue this event bi-annually — always the first weekend in May, and now, the third weekend in November, to kick-off the holiday, gift-giving season,” said Cappi Macsherry, executive director of Blue to Black Art Weekend. David Kaylor This November’s Blue to Black Art Weekend fundraiser will benefit Black Mountain’s Community Garden. Macsherry says the art scene is hot in the Black Mountain region and includes artists working with fabric, collage, thread, paint, paper, wood, glass, metal, photography, fiber, wood turning and clay. These artists paint quilts, stitch books, coil baskets, mold found-art sculpture, build fine furniture, throw bowls, design and make fine jewelry, carve wood and knit sculpture.

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Curious travelers can find one-ofa-kinds from handspun yarns, blown glass ornaments, handmade sterling earrings, hand-molded ceramic mugs to fine, folk and outsider style art, along with other handmade collectibles in addition to experiencing craft demonstrations, working studios, or Sarah Vekasi making a teapot at art venue offerings Sarah Sunshine Pottery. firsthand. In addition to the weekend’s events and Community Garden fundraiser, on view at the Monte Vista Hotel November 1 through December 31 is “Fabulous Fakes”: Interpretive Paintings from the Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League of Master’s works—a favorite annual show put on by the art league. A ‘Meet the Artists’ reception will take place Friday, November 15 from 5-8 p.m., along with a sampling of artworks and handmades being shown on the Blue to Black Art Weekend Art Stroll & Studio Tour. The public is invited to attend and to help kick off the full weekend.

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IF YOU An interactive tour map is available at www. GO bluetoblackartweekend.com, where you will also

fine driving directions, map markers, web links and contact information for each site. For more details call (828) 707-7615.

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 37


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unique shops

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‘Storytelling Festival’ cont’d. from pg. 30

Points of Light crystal and mineral gallery, located just two minutes north of Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, is a wonderful source for fine crystals, gems, minerals and living art. The gallery, which boasts an amazing collection of huge Quartz crystals, as well as a seven-foot tall Agate geode, is much more than just another rock shop. Points Of Light's collection includes many unique Quartz clusters and Amethyst Geodes in

addition to healing stones, mineral specimens and a wide variety of books on stones. They specialize in breathtaking interior design pieces and one-of-a-kind pieces for decorators, collectors and healers. Every single item on display has been carefully and lovingly handpicked for quality, beauty and Points of Light carries a variety of Quartz clusters energy. The galand Amethyst Geodes. lery works with a renowned a result carries some of the finest cut and group of internationally polished pieces available anywhere in the acclaimed crystal and United States. Rare Bolivian Amethyst Clusters. mineral artisans, and as Points Of Light is also home to one of the largest selections of crystal singing bowls on the east coast, as well as a comprehensive and truly beautiful group of crystal healing wands, including cuts by world-famous lapiBring in this Ad dary artist, Lawrence Stoller. From museum and We’ll Take pieces weighing more than a ton, down to the smallest of their tumbled stones, the quality and scope of their inventory is unsurpassed. Points Of Light is a “must see” destination in Asheville!

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

Points of Light Crystal and Mineral Gallery 391 Merrimon Avenue, downtown Asheville (828) 257-2626 Shop online! Visit www.pointsoflight.net

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38 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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At 10:30 p.m. on Friday, October 4, Elizabeth Ellis will tell stories at a “Midnight Cabaret” performance, while the next night at that same time Kim Weitkamp and the Broken Bucket Band will present a program combining storytelling and music. Annually attracting approximately 10,000 audience members from across the United States and around the world, the National Storytelling Festival is among the most beloved regularly staged cultural events in the U.S.; devotees return year after year to hear stories told in large tents situated along the streets of one of Appalachia’s most picturesque towns. If you do attend the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough this October, be prepared to enjoy stories regardless of the weather. And be prepared to be both charmed and, in some sort of quiet way, transformed. IF YOU The National Storytelling GO Festival takes place October

4-6 in Jonesborough, TN. For more information, call the International Storytelling Center at (800) 952-8392, ext. 221, or visit www.storytellingcenter.net.

From 2009 through 2012 Ted Olson served as poetry columnist and poetry editor for Rapid River Magazine. His most recent book is Revelations: Poems (Celtic Cat Publishing).


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healthy lifestyles All Diabetes is Not Created Equal

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Type I diabetes and Type II diabetes are not the same disease. Both are caused by an imbalance between the glucose in the blood and the insulin that facilitates glucose entering the body’s cells. The devastating effects of elevated glucose are identical in both diseases. But here the similarity ends. Type I diabetes is caused by destruction of pancreatic cells which produce insulin, resulting in little or no insulin available to do its job. Type II diabetes is caused by an imbalance between amount of glucose in the blood stream and the effectiveness of the insulin to push it into the cells. Chronic overeating (too many calories), high intake of easily absorbed carbohydrates (high glycemic index carbs), and saturated fats (especially transfats) and cholesterol in the diet all contribute to a high blood glucose level. High blood fat levels (triglycerides and saturated fat), low omega-3

The Best of Free Planet Radio Multi-instrumentalist Chris Rosser, Grammy Award winner Eliot Wadopian, and global percussionist River Guerguerian, will sonically illuminate their quantum talents and exquisite collaborations, while embracing a jazz-fusion flare. Special guests include Persian born violinist Farzad Farhangi from the popular band TURKU, and a multimedia Mandala in Motion accompaniment by artist/photographer Taylor ‘Taz’ Johnson.

IF YOU GO: The Best of Free

Planet Radio Concert, October 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Jubilee! 46 Wall St., downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 252-5335. Tickets: $15 at the door; also available at Malaprops. For reservations call (828) 225-3232.

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

fatty acids, high levels of fructose (read – fruit juice concentrates and high fructose corn syrup), and being overweight cause the body’s cells to not respond to the insulin in the body – called insulin resistance. High levels of cortisone (stress), meat consumption, sedentary life style, and low Vit. D can all make the insulin resistance worse.

Many of these conditions exacerbate the insulin resistance and the elevated glucose levels, making the problem grow and worsen. What’s the answer? How do we stop this form of diabetes which accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes? Almost 100% of Type II diabetes can be totally eliminated by lifestyle change. A well-balanced diet (consisting of an abundance of low glyceA well-balanced diet should mic index foods and the eliminabe coupled with a half-hour of tion of high fat food) designed for losing down to and maintaining cardiovascular exercise. normal weight, should be coupled with a half-hour of cardiovascular The resulting combination of exercise five days a week. elevated glucose levels and ineffective The evidence for these two efinsulin causes too high blood sugar fective interventions has been docuand too little effect of insulin – Type mented in multiple studies. These II diabetes. two are more effective than any of the The chronic overeating results anti-diabetes medicine given individuin excess weight gain which leads to ally or in combination. It only remains further medical problems – hypertenfor the patient to actually do them. But sion, heart disease, liver dysfunction, if you do them, it actually works. See, and decreased response to leptin (an that’s not hard. molecule that stops people from eating to excess).

‘Forgiveness’ cont’d from pg. 29

multiplicity of conditioning factors that are the true culprit. Then, even, as with Jesus on the cross or the Dalai Lama in exile, when there is no boundary that can be enforced, no stopping the injury, no amends received, we can remain the owners of our own minds, free of anger and resentment, possessors of a “peace that surpasseth understanding,” through the very radical act of forgiveness that goes beyond the personal into forgiveness based in clear understanding of the human condition. Importantly, compassion for others, with its commensurate ability to forgive, is only truly possible when it is first applied to ourselves. We must realize our original face. We must be “nobody” who neither gives nor takes offense, for giving and taking offense is the domain of ego. To have the ability to genuinely extend compassion and forgiveness to others and to Life, without it being just another egoic one-up, a way of indulging in moral superiority, we must fully forgive ourselves our conditioning. We must humbly and courageously own our own minds and know what we are doing, and then naturally, we will be able to follow

the spiritual instructions ubiquitous to all religious traditions to forgive who and whatever challenges and harms us, to forgive those who would be our enemies, most particularly when the enemy turns out to be ourselves. As Jesus and Buddha both taught: through this radical wise and compassionate forgiveness we can learn peace within ourselves, in our relationships and eventually with Life and all the world.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 39


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We were eager to advertise our new ownership of Bogart’s Restaurant. While we kept all the original menu items, we were excited about trying out new, homemade original dishes as well.

Rapid River Magazine has been a great resource for getting our message out to readers. After running a coupon, we were pleasantly surprised at how well it was received. A big THANK YOU to all of our awesome Bogart’s customers and to Rapid River Magazine!

~ Shelly Sneed, Co-Owner of Bogart’s Restaurant 303 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313, www.bogartswaynesville.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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Wednesday, October 16

Friday, October 25

Weinhaus wine dinner in the newly renovated Isa’s Bistro, at the corner of the Haywood Park Hotel. We are excited to join Chef Duane Fernandes, who is renowned for his work at Gabrielle’s at Richmond Hill, for a downtown feast. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $75 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

Friday Night Flights presents Ghoulish Grenache. Please join us for a wonderful evening in our new Cork&Keg bar area. The price is $10 for four tasting pours. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $6 Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus • 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC • (828) 254-6453 40 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2

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noteworthy Art After Dark in Waynesville

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The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present Art After Dark, on the first Friday of every month. Enjoy a stroll through working studios and galleries on Main Street and Depot Street. Festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Main Street Artist’s Co-op, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, the Village Framer, and Cedar Hill Studios. With beautiful weather upon us, it is a perfect night to explore the open air and delights of Main Street. A vibrant community of art galleries stay open late and a handful of fabulous restaurants all within walking distance make for a fantastic evening. What’s not to love? Waynesville resident and multi-talented artist Margaret Roberts will be demonstrating at Twigs and Leaves Gallery for Art After Dark, Friday evening, October 4, 6-9 p.m. With Margaret’s unique watercolor collage technique her vibrant colors create a vision of beauty that will radiate in her show “Appalachian Autumn.” Join Margaret in making a collaborative collage to be displayed all month in the gallery. Margaret is a permanent exhibitor in the gallery with seasonal work. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Bill Stecher , delight in the savory hors d’eurves and help us celebrate 15 years on Main Street. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786. Open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30 and Sunday 1-4; (828) 456-1940, www.twigsandleaves.com. Find us on Facebook.

‘Mountain Oasis’ cont’d from pg. 33

OCTOBER EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS

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By the time things were worked out, we were very late in the planning stages, so we had to scale it down. But, we’re back to the three day model. And, yes, we believe in Asheville. People are coming to Mountain Oasis from all over the country and from many other countries as well. Most of the tickets are sold outside of Asheville.

JC: How about closing with a few “do’s and don’ts” for the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit?

AC: Do: Experience the city, see a show

at the Diana Wortham, check out a band you’ve never heard of, try some local craft beer, have a coffee at Izzy’s, eat a meal in one of Asheville’s great restaurants, stop by

BY JEANNIE

SHUCKSTES

Margaret Pennington Roberts, featured artist at Twigs and Leaves.

Gallery 86 presents “The Master Artists” from October 2 through November 9. Members of this group include Desmond Suarez, a second generation furniture designer and maker, potters Terance Painter and Sarah Wells Rolland, and jewelry designer Diannah Beauregard. Rounding out the five artists showing will be Jo Ridge Kelley, a painter. The Art After Dark reception on October 4 will feature a wine tasting with wines from Stony Knoll Vineyard. Jo Ridge Kelley designed the labels on the three bottle gift packages which will be offered for sale to reception guests. Cedar Hill Studio represents “Glass n Class” beautiful fused glass pieces created by Lisa Bradley and her sister Celeste Love. Lisa will be demonstrating and explaining the process of how they create these wonderful, usable, art objects during Art After Dark, October 4. Fascinating! 196 N. Main St. in Waynesville. (828) 421-6688.

Harvest Records, come in costume, have fun, take care of one another, and pace yourself!

JC: I’ll second the part about pacing yourself. The weekend can be overwhelming, even for us locals.

AC: Don’t: Forget to register your wristband to enhance your Mountain Oasis experience and be eligible for awesome prizes, including a pair of passes to the 2014 festival! IF YOU Mountain Oasis Electronic Music GO Summit takes over downtown

Asheville October 25-27. VIP weekend passes are now sold out, but general admission weekend passes, and daily tickets, are still available for purchase at www.mountainoasisfestival.com.


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fine arts & crafts INTERVIEW WITH BOB

ORR OWNER OF

Black Mountain Stove & Chimney

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Black Mountain Stove & Chimney, formerly Your Fire Source, established in 1979, provides sales, service, installations, and repairs of new and used wood and gas burning stoves.

Rapid River Magazine: Having been around

lent advertisement through word of mouth.

RRM: How much space is required in any

RRM: Tell us about

Bob Orr: Satisfied customers who give excel-

room to have a fireplace or stove?

BO: Usually 100 to 200 square feet for a small wood stove.

RRM: Tell us a little about some of your most popular brands.

BO: Jotul, Mendota, Morso,

Hearthstone, Lopi, Vermont Castings, Buck, Peterson, Regency, Dutch West, Monessen, Fireplace Xtrodinair, Thelin and Scan are some of the brands we carry and have in our showroom. We also carry all types of venting products.

RRM: What are some of the ben-

efits to having a fireplace or stove added to your home?

Art on Depot Celebrates 5 Years

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Art on Depot – A Pottery Studio and Fine Arts & Crafts Gallery will be celebrating five years in business this November! A celebration will be held Friday, November 1 from 6-9 p.m. Cathey Bolton, ceramic artist and owner, opened Art on Depot in November of 2008, which is nestled in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level district in Western North Carolina. Cathey had a vision of a working studio where visitors could watch her create pottery and shop the gallery at the same time. The gallery is lined with an assortment of Cathey’s colorful and unique functional pottery and jewelry. A couple of her signature items are her faceted canister series, custom designed dinnerware and her Grater Dish & Cruet Sets. “I wanted a studio where customers could watch me work, ask questions and learn about the process while shopping a gallery of finished pieces, and I did, it is truly a dream come true” says Cathey. The gallery also carries contemporary works of art from about 20 local and regional artists. Normal business hours

BO: Tremendous

savings on your electric costs, and the ambiance is always a bonus.

for over 35 years, what do you attribute most to your ongoing success?

BY

CATHEY BOLTON

are Tuesday thru Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information on Art on Depot and Cathey’s studio you can find her gallery on Facebook or visit www. artondepot.com IF YOU Art on Depot anniversary GO celebration, Friday, November

1 from 6-9 p.m. Art on Depot, 250 Depot Street in Waynesville. For more details call (828) 246-0218, or visit www.artondepot.com

average maintenance and annual costs of owning a wood burning fireplace or stove vs. gas or electric.

BO: Usual mainte-

nance for a wood stove that is properly used would be an annual chimney cleaning and inspection. Gas stoves and fireplaces should be cleaned and inspected annually as well.

Photos: Keli Keach Photography

Black Mountain Stove & Chimney 201 Black Mountain Avenue Black Mountain, NC 28711 (828) 669-9000 www.blackmountainstove.com

American Craft Week October 4-13

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This fall, Americans in all 50 states will be celebrating the art of handmade craft. From October 4 to 13, American Craft Week will feature hundreds of diverse events in galleries and artist studios, museums and schools, as well as at fairs and festivals. “American Craft Week shows us how craft enhances our lives, makes us feel good and brings people together,” said Diane Sulg, co-chair of American Craft Week. “By taking part in the celebration, people are joining in on the trend of buying products made in America while shopping locally.” Since its inception in 2010, American Craft Week has grown from 240 to nearly 1,000 participating events. “Many regions have found American Craft Week an excellent way to connect with fall tourists,” said Sherry Masters, co-chair of American Craft Week. “The celebration brings together individuals, small businesses and organizations, while providing an opportunity to learn a craft or acquire that one-of-a-kind work of art.” Western North Carolina sponsors of the national American Craft Week 2013

Fluted vase by Julie Wiggins

celebration include The Southern Highland Craft Guild, Alexander and Lehnert Fine Jewelry, John C. Campbell Folk School, Q Evon Design, Mountain Made Gallery and the River Arts District Artists, Inc. To begin the 2013 American Craft Week celebration in Western NC the public is invited to the newly opened Southern Highland Craft Gallery, 26 Lodge Street, in Biltmore Village. For more information, visit www.Americancraftweek.com, or www.craftguild.org

Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 41


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what to do guide Tuesday, October 1

King’s Mountain: A Ballad Novel Sharyn McCrumb will discuss her new book. Reserved seating with the advance purchase of the book. 6 p.m. at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. (828) 456-6000, visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Thursday, October 3

Mountain Standard Time At Pisgah Brewing Company in Black Mountain, 8 p.m. Tickets: $7 adv.; $10 day of show. Visit www.mstband.com.

Friday, October 4

American Craft Week Kick–Off 6 p.m. in Biltmore Village at the newly opened Southern Highland Craft Gallery, 26 Lodge St., Asheville.

Friday, October 4

CSA Artists Opening reception 6:30-8:30 p.m. at HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville. CSA shares available at www.handmadeinamerica.org.

Friday, October 4

Visual Capture Figurative and abstract works by Hal Boyd. Opening reception 5:30 to 8 p.m. On display October 1-31, 2013. The Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 Col-

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

lege Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 251-5796, www.ashevillegallery-of-art. com, or www.halboyd.com.

West Asheville. $15 advance/$20 door. For more details call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

Friday, October 4

Friday, October 11

Chardonnay with Monet Class from 2-4 p.m. We supply the paint and canvas. Cost is $37.50. The Art House, 5 Highland Park Rd., E. Flat Rock, NC 28726. (828) 595-9500, www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Friday, October 4

The Stray Birds Charles Muench, Maya de Vitry, Oliver Craven dePhoto: Scott Bookman liver outstanding three-part harmony. Isis Music Hall in west Asheville, www.isisasheville.com.

Saturday, October 5

ColorFest Art & Taste of Appalachia from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dillsboro is located in Jackson County at the intersection of US Hwys. 19/74 and 441. For more information call (828) 631-4587.

Saturday, October 5

Dia de Los Muertos Reception Meet the artists and see the debut of new art 7-9 p.m. FREE local beer, and Live Latin Gypsy Swing Music. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. www.zapow.com.

Sunday, October 6

Down on the Farm

60’s Folk Revival Intersections Sing Together with Beth and Jim Magill. 6 p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. Adults, $10. (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Friday, October 11

AMS Faculty Jazz Concert: Two sets: 7 & 8 p.m. Asheville Music School Performance Loft, 126 College St., Asheville. $5; free for Asheville Music School families and teachers.

Friday, October 11

A Study on Beauty Paintings & Drawings by Renee Whisnant. Reception 6-8 p.m. On display October 7 - November 15 at MESH Gallery, 114-B West Union Street, Morganton, NC. (828) 437-1957, www.meshgallery.com

Saturday, October 12

Hey Day Fall Family Festival

Photographs by Rachael Bliss. Coffee hour 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. On display through October 30, 2013. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 20 Oak Street, Asheville, (828) 252-8729.

Annual fall festival features special animal encounters, face painting, crafts and pumpkin painting, and fall-themed activities and games for kids. Live music and dance, refreshments. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free with admission. WNC Nature Center, 75 Gashes Creek Rd., Asheville, NC 28805.

Sunday, October 6

Saturday, October 12

Chamber Music Concert

Sandra Bernhard: SandyLand

3 p.m. Sue Yingling, piano; Brent Yingling, violin; and Ron Lambe, cello. By donation. St. Matthias Church, in Asheville just off South Charlotte Street at Max Street, 1 Dundee St.).

Theatre, rock-n-roll and stand-up comedy with a little burlesque and cabaret. Explicit language and adult themes. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $45, Student $40; Student rush dayof-show $10. (828) 257-4530 or www. dwtheatre.com.

Tuesday & Wednesday, October 8 & 9

Diavolo Dance Theater Movement, athletics and daring. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets: $48, Student $40, Children 12 and under $20; Student rush day-of-show $10. (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre. com.

Saturday, October 12

Raise Your Hand Auction

Thursday, October 10

Fundraiser Comedy Show For 2-year-old Xander Valentin who’s been fighting leukemia and going through chemo. Featuring Mo Alexander, the show takes place at 9 p.m. at Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., in

Gazelle by Daniel McClendon

Fundraiser for WNCAP. Tickets are $125. Bid on dinner packages, antiques, fine wines, vacations, and local art. 6 p.m. at the Doubletree Hotel-Biltmore. Details at (828) 252-7489, or www.wncap.org/ryh.

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October 12 - November 2

Fall for Jazz Festival Saturdays at 7 p.m. at the Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. $39.99pp. Buy two or more dates, save $5 per. Reservations required, call (828) 452-6000.

Sunday, October 13

Pan Harmonia Pianist Kimberly Cann with special guest Mary Luna. 5 p.m. at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, downKimberly Cann town Asheville. Tickets available at www.pan-harmonia.org.

Tuesday, October 15

Book Discussion Group

Cracked Southern Belle. 7:30 p.m. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street. (828) 254-1320, www. ashevilletheatre.org

Monday, October 21

Educational Informance LEAF Festival and LEAF Schools & Streets present Vieux Farka Touré at The Orange Peel. Musical performance demonstrating the guitar style of Mali. Doors open at 10:30 a.m.; Show at 11 a.m. $3 students; $5 adults. Tickets: www.theorangepeel.net, or visit www.theLEAF.org.

October 22-24

EMErgence: Electronic Music Experience

Tuesday, October 15

LEAF and the Bob Moog Foundation present hands-on activities, workshops and lectures from professional electronic musicians and producers. Workshops for young emerging artists. To participate contact Samantha Sax (910) 789-9744, or visit www.theleaf.org.

Fall Color Hike

Friday, October 25

Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver. 6:30 p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. Free. (828) 2109837, www.dwtheatre.com

Along Chasteen Creek. Led by hiking expert, and author Danny Bernstein. 7 miles. Moderate in difficulty. Day ends with shopping at the Oconaluftee Visitor Center in Cherokee. $10/members; $35/non-members. To register call (828) 452-0720.

Friday, October 18

The Very Hungry Caterpillar Recommended for Pre-K (ages 2 and up) to Grade 3. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. 10 a.m. and 12 noon. Tickets $6-$7. (828) 257-4530, www. dwtheatre.com.

Friday, October 18

Chic Gamine Motown rhythm and soul with hip, modern sensibility and grit. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30, Student $25, Children 12 and under $15; Student rush dayof-show $10. (828) 257-4530, Www. dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, October 19

Art Reception 6-8 p.m. featuring artists Nathan Bertling, Mary Gardner, Heidi Mayfield, and Kate Thayer. The Art House, 5 Highland Park Rd., E. Flat Rock, NC 28726. (828) 595-9500, www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Saturday, October 19

Susan Reinhardt: Uncensored Novelist and columnist Susan Reinhardt shares readings and recollections. Tickets: $20; $30 includes a copy of Chimes From a

Asheville Playback Theatre Actors and musicians improvise, guided and inspired by personal stories provided by the audience. 8 p.m. at Jubilee Center, 101 Patton Ave., Asheville. $10; $5 for children. (828) 273-0995.

October 25-27

The Jungle Book Kids Performed by students ranging in age from 8 to 15. Friday at 7:30 p.m; Saturday and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. $5. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. (828) 254-1320, www. ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, October 26

Country star Kacey Musgraves Homecoming weekend concert at Western Carolina University. 9 p.m. at the Ramsey Center. Visit ramsey. wcu.edu, or call (828) 227-7677.

Saturday, October 26

Howl-O-Ween Face painting, Halloween-themed arts and crafts, activities and games for kids, and hot apple cider and snacks. Dress in your best costume for the contest! 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free with admission to the WNC Nature Center, 75 Gashes Creek Rd., Asheville, NC 28805.

Sunday, October 27

Asheville Community Band 34th Annual Fall Concert, 3 p.m., in the Auditorium of Asheville High School on McDowell Street. $8; students admitted free. Season tickets $18 for three concerts. Call (828) 254-2234.

OCTOBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 42 October 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 2


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what to do guide Water Media Workshop

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Painting, Drawing Classes Studio of John Mac Kah in the River Arts District

Saturday, October 26 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with Lorelle Bacon. Create three small paintings using watercolor, inks and acrylics. For all levels, beginners through advanced. We will use a variety of techniques. You will take home finished paintings. All supplies are furnished; bring a lunch. Bring a friend for more fun. $95 includes all materials.

Children’s Art Classes – Tues and Wed, 3:30 - 5 p.m. Draw and Paint with Alisa Lumbreras.

Get Started Drawing: Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Building skills for better painting. All levels welcome.

Studio Painting: Thursdays, 7-10 p.m.

River’s Edge Studio 191 Lyman Street, #310, Asheville (828) 776-2716 • www.310art.com

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Still-Life and More. Ongoing.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Landscape: Saturdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Draw and paint on location.

Long Branch Studios 122 Riverside Drive, Studio H, top right www.johnmackah.com • (828) 225-5000

Tuesday, October 29

Auditions for Hobson’s Choice Lighthearted comedy performed as reader’s theatre. Audtions from 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. No experience required. Material provided at audition. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

Soto Zen Meditation Training and practice programs for everyone. Tuesday Study Group 3:30 - 5. Reading, discussion, meditation. Weekly through December.

Friday & Saturday, November 1 & 2

Brevard Storytelling Festival 2013 Friday night concert, storytelling workshops and performances. FREE and open to the public. Transylvania County Library, 212 S. Gaston St., Brevard, NC 28712.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

October 4-9 November 1-6 November 29 - December 4

Ann Patchett Talk and Book Signing The author of State of Wonder, Run, and Bel Canto, examines her deepest commitments to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband in This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. Held at UNCA’s Lipinsky Auditorium. Tickets available at Malaprop’s, call (828) 2546734 or www.malaprops.com

Live Body Painting Performance

Great Tree Zen Temple 679 Lower Flat Creek, Alexander, NC www.greattreetemple.org • (828) 645-2085

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www. classicwineseller.com.

5-9:30 p.m. Georgette Pressler creates a living work of art before your eyes on Asheville native, Ken Krahl, Director of Multiverse & GeekOut. Tasteful and beautiful imagery combined with dynamic and fluid motion. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. www.zapow.com.

Medical Guardian

Fiction and Memoirs The Writers’ Workshop of Asheville is sponsoring two contests. $25 entry fee. Visit www. twwoa.org for details. The Writers’ Workshop, 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville, NC 28805.

Sunday Sangha; Yoga; Family Meditation; Thursday Morning meditation.

Upcoming Sesshins

Tuesday, November 5

Saturday, November 9

Monthly Programs

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month. 800-892-4631

SAVE on Cable TV

Adult Hip Hop Classes

Internet-Digital Phone-Satellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-871-6180

With Dustin Phillips. Pat’s School of Dance, 1256 N. Main St., Hendersonville, NC. (828) 692-2905, www.patsschoolofdance.com.

Blue Ridge Rollergirls

Get Paid!

October 12 at the U.S. Cellular Center. November 16 at the WNC Agricultural Cen-

Fonx Co is offering to pay you for driving your own vehicle. Drive around with our specially designed AD and get paid for it. Interested parties should contact Stevenfox31@hotmail.com

ter. www.blueridgerollergirls.com

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2013 43


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find it here Art Appraisal Services, LLC

Cathy Searle Fine Art

Glass Onion Restaurant

John Mac Kah

North Carolina Stage Company

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro

Arts Council of Henderson Co. www.acofhc.org

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe

O’Charley’s

Sunburst Market

The Art House

Chifferobe

HART Theater

Points of Light

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Susan Marie Designs

Art MoB - www.artmobstudios.com

The Chocolate Fetish

www.chocolatefetish.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Mangum Pottery

On Demand Printing

Town Hardware & General Store

Asheville Salt Cave

Common Ground

Hey Hey Cupcake

McCarter Gallery

Octopus Garden

TPennington Art Gallery

Cottonmill Studios

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Mine & Yours Consignments

Potter’s Mark

True Blue Art Supply

Double Exposure Giclee

Isis Restaurant & Music Hall www.isisasheville.com

Morning Sky Pottery (828) 273-5317

Satellite Gallery

Twigs and Leaves Gallery

Earth Guild

Jewels That Dance

Mountain Top Appliance

Soapy Dog

Weaverville Art Safari

Faison O’Neil Gallery

Julia Fosson Fine Art www.juliafosson.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Southern Highland Craft Guild

The Wine Guy

Frugal Framer

Just Ducky

Nancy Silver Art

The Spice & Tea Exchange

Zia Taqueria

GD Whalen Photography

Karen Keil Brown

Newbridge Cafe

The Starving Artist

www.artappraisalcarolina.com

www.artbycathysearle.com

www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com www.ashevillesaltcave.com

(828) 458-1566

BlackBird Frame & Art

www.blackbirdframe.com

Black Mtn. Iron Works

www.BlackMountainIron.com www.blackmountainstove.com

www.earthguild.com

Blue to Black Art Weekend

www.bluetoblackartweekend.com

www.faisononeil.com

Bogart’s Restaurant

www.bogartswaynesville.com

www.frugalframer.com

Cafe 64

www.cafe-64.com

www.gdwhalen.com

www.gracecarolbomer.com

www.twigsandleaves.com

www.thesoapydog.com

www.weavervilleartsafari.com

www.craftguild.org

www.spiceandtea.com

www.nancysilverart.com

www.karenkbrown.com

(828) 251-0028

www.thesatellitegallery.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

www.justduckyoriginals.com

www.tpennington.com

www.pottersmark.com

www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

www.ziataco.com

TUNNEL ROAD

CHARLOTTE ST.

MERRIMON AVE.

BH

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com

(828) 693-3191

www.thenewbridgecafe.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN

www.susanmariedesigns.com www.townhardware.com

www.theOG.us

www.mccarter-gallery.com

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www.ondemandink.com

www.mangumpottery.com

www.stormrhumbar.com

www.sunburstmarket.com

www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

www.pointsoflight.net

www.jewelsthatdance.com

NORTHSIDE NEIGHBORS

www.ocharleys.com

www.malaprops.com

www.harttheatre.com

WEAVERVILLE +

HAYWOOD ROAD

www.ncstage.org

www.johnmackah.com

www.heyheycupcake.com

www.doubleexposureart.com

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney

www.glassonionasheville.com

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

BILTMORE VILLAGE

(828) 646-0071

HENDERSONVILLE RD.

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WAYNESVILLE

WAYNESVILLE 28786

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Weaverville Art Safari Showcases Regional Talent

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While Western North Carolina is heralded for its magnificent autumn beauty, those in the art community know the best local color is found at the Weaverville Art Safari’s fall studio tour.

Mike Lightcap

Tom Hoxie

Held on November 2 and 3, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., this year’s weekend show boasts more than 40 artists, which includes the addition of eight new artists. The collection of nationally and regionally known talent provides a unique opportunity to explore the local art scene on an intimate level. Guests have a chance to meet the artists in their studios, hear the stories behind their collections, and

learn more about the creative process. “It’s always a rewarding experience to be able to share your art with the public,” says Tom Hoxie, Chairman of the Weaverville Art Safari and designer of contemporary Asian tansu furniture. “The Weaverville Art Safari is special in that it lets the community and artists meet and interact in a casual and fun setting.” The self-guided tour allows guests to tailor their studio visits based on their interests and artistic tastes. “The opportunity to create a personalized experience makes the Weaverville Art Safari a gem in terms of regional art tours,” says Steven Forbes-deSoule, Weaverville Art Safari member and a creator of raku vessels and sculpture. Works of art showcased include handmade pottery, glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, paintings, drawings, fiber art, and more. Many studios provide art demonstrations and door prizes. A special preview party at the Weaverville Town Hall kicks off the event on Friday, November 1. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and includes live music, door prizes, heavy hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, desserts, and more. The highlight of the evening is a silent auction featuring art works donated by each participating artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. All event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari events. Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information are available at greater Asheville-

BY STEVEN FORBES-DESOULE

area galleries, restaurants, and shops beginning in John Craig mid-September. Brochures will also be distributed from an Art Safari information booth located on Main Street in Weaverville during the show weekend. A downloadable brochure and full details about participating artists are also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

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About the Weaverville Art Safari The Weaverville Art Safari is an event staged twice each year—the last full weekend in April and the first full weekend in November—by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art community on the northern outskirts of Asheville, NC. Since then thousands of people have returned over and over each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience.

IF YOU For more information on the Weaverville Art GO Safari and a list of participating artists, please visit

www.weavervilleartsafari.com, or contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) 645-9065.

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30th Annual Church Street Art and Craft Show

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The Church Street Art and Craft Show’s debut was held in a small parking area just off Church Street in Waynesville in 1983. The fledging festival was the brainchild of Teresa Pennington, a colored pencil artist, and Richard Miller, a property owner who wanted to offer a venue for high quality artists and craftsmen to sell their creations. Requiring more space, the juried show was moved to Main Street in 1984, however, the name was kept to remain true to its heritage. In two years the size of the show doubled again to 120 booths of some of the best artists, potters, jewelers, weavers, etc., from around the southeast as well

as highly regarded local talent. Adding to the show’s success is an attractive and lively, renovated downtown featuring spectacular mountain views, unique shops, galleries and restaurants. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, the Church Street Art and Craft Show promises to be the best ever, offering an amazing slate of artists, great food, live Bluegrass music and entertainment. IF YOU Church Street Art and Craft Show, Saturday, GO October 12 from 10 to 5 p.m.

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INTERVIEW WITH KATIE

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The Sunburst Market is moving to 142 N. Main Street in Waynesville.

This October, owner Katie Hughes celebrates the two year anniversary of their retail shop, currently located on Montgomery Street. The market specializes in Sunburst Trout products, as well as an array of other local artisanal goods and sustainable products. By moving to the new location on Main Street, the market will have a great opportunity to fill a lot more space with new products.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little bit of the history of Sunburst Market.

Katie Hughes: Sunburst Market is a child company born

of Sunburst Trout Farms, LLC. It was a longtime dream of my mother’s, Sally Eason, CEO of Sunburst Trout, to open a small retail store in downtown Waynesville where we would sell all of our trout products and have a physical full time presence in town. When such an opportunity became available in 2011, we felt the timing was right and we jumped on it. Since opening, we have added 30 additional products to our inventory. It has been such a wonderful experience thus far experimenting with products and shaping this little store. And now, I have a vision for Main Street.

RRM: What do you plan to do with all that extra space to fill in the new building?

KH: Great question! I have had so much fun research-

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

There is a great space in the back of the store where we will invite vendors to come in and demo their products. Who better to talk about a product than the grower or creator of it?

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RRM: Seems like local gifts

are just becoming more and more popular. Is that something that you will offer?

KH: Absolutely! Our farm, Sunburst Trout, has been

offering gift boxes for several years now. They are hugely popular, especially around the holidays. Now that we will have more space to work with, we will offer that same service right in the Market. You will be able to choose from several varieties of gift boxes and place your order and pick up directly from us if it’s a gift for someone local, or you can place an order and have it shipped anywhere in the country.

RRM: When will you be open for business in the new location?

KH: We will be open for business at 10 a.m. on Friday,

October 18. Then, that evening from 6-9 p.m., we’ll have a little re-grand opening party with food and drinks and some fun giveaways. We’re incredibly excited about the opportunity and just feel so blessed to have so much support from our community!

ing all the new products we will offer. My vision is to be Waynesville’s neighborhood one-stop-shop specialty food and beverage market focusing highly on our local brands. And items that can’t be local will still be very sustainable, conscientious food and beverage choices.

Sunburst Market 142 N. Main Street in Waynesville www.sunbursttrout.com

Elegant Interiors Bringing Your Home Together in an Elegant Manner Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

39 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC WF

828-452-3509 • Monday-Saturday 9-5

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October 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
October 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Painting of the Wolfman by John Mac Kah..p15; Inside: Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands..p11; Hendersonville Art on Main..p...

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