Page 1

View new collections and watch artists at work in Weaverville and the surrounding areas. PAGE 10

Michael Hofman, along with Broken Road Studio and the Wedge Brewery, host the Green/Art Works Benefit. PAGE 24

The Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands features traditional and contemporary crafts, demonstrations, and entertainment. PAGE 19

Interview with

Artists in East Asheville, Swannanoa, Black Mountain, and Fairview invite you to visit their studios. PAGE 11

Bar & Grill.

Help to Blaze a Trail for the Cure of Cystic Fibrosis, Thursday, October 25 at TrailBlazers PAGE 34

Plus Interviews with: Leo Monahan PAGE 8 Catherine Vibert PAGE 9 Eileen & Marty Black PAGE 21 Ashley Membreno PAGE 21 Michael Hofman PAGE 24 Chef Jose Rosario PAGE 34

Enter our 16th Annual

Poetry Contest PAGE

14

Jeff Pittman PAGE

22

River Arts District Artists PAGES 21-25


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fine art ArtEtude Gallery Hosts Gala Grand Opening

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm Admission: $8; Children under 12 free Over 200 Juried Artists Craft Demonstrations Live Mountain Music

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

John Geci Glass

2012-2013 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

SATURDAY OCTOBER 13, 2012 s 8pm Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2 Takemitsu Strauss Brahms

Funeral Music from Black Rain Death and Transfiguration Piano Concerto No. 2 Valentina Lisitsa, piano

SPONSOR

Ms. Phyllis Patton CRS, GRI, Broker PhyllisPatton.com

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s downtown Ashville’s newest fine art gallery, ArtEtude Gallery Inc. has held off having a Grand Opening event until now. But, the wait is over and the event is planned for the weekend of October 19 through the 21. We chose this weekend after careful consideration, because it was our desire that our traveling friends and associates come to Asheville for a fun packed weekend during the city’s peak season. It is our goal to showcase the gallery and our artists as well as Asheville and the North Carolina Mountains in their peak season. The Southern Highlands Craft Guild Show and the majestic autumnal colors of the surrounding mountains are simply the icing on the cake for our invitees. This event is open to everyone and if you have not had the opportunity to visit our gallery this will be a perfect time to do so. The event itself will kickoff Friday, October 19, with an artist’s reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. All of our artists will be traveling to Asheville from all over the country for entire weekend-long event. There will be music and hors’derves along with some great libations. The main event will run from 2 p.m. until 9 p.m. on Saturday, October 20 with great jazz, food and drink. This will be a wonderful chance to spend time with your favorite artists from the gallery and have the artists add a personalized provenance to any work of art you choose to add to your collection. Sunday afternoon will be the cool down time for our traveling guests — they’ll be able to enjoy their latest ac-

BUY TICKETS TODAY

Celebrate Ocktoberfest with Symphony in the Park

Sunday October 14th, 2012 s6:30pm

FREE LAWN SEATING Reserved seating: $35 FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org 2 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

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BY

PERRY MAGEE

Photo: Erica Mueller Photography

quisition before they head home. In addition to enjoying the weekend and the wonderful artwork at the gallery, we will also be shedding more light on our joint initiative with the Mission Foundation called Contemporary Art on a Mission. We are pleased to have this association and look forward to a positive relationship that gives back to the health and well being of the Asheville family. We look forward to seeing many of our old friends and meeting all the new ones that chose to join the festivities of the weekend. So come on into the gallery and join us along with our artists for the ArtEtude Gallery Gala Grand Opening. IF YOU Artist’s reception Friday, October GO 19 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Great jazz,

food and drink Saturday, October 20, from 2-9 p.m. ArtEtude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave., Asheville. (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com.

CONTEMPORARY ART ON A MISSION

ontemporary Art on a Mission links a portion of Artetude Gallery’s art sales to the support of SECU Cancer Center programs. This new and innovative program supports the cancer programs at Mission Hospital. “We are proud to partner with Mission Healthcare Foundation as an important part of our commitment to support the cultural, social and physical health of our community,” said Margaret K. Of-

fermann, President of Artetude Gallery. Bruce Thorsen, President and CEO of Mission Foundation states, “We are delighted with our partnership with Artetude Gallery and hope others will follow their lead.” For more information visit Artetude Gallery, 89 Paxton Avenue in downtown Asheville; www.artetudegallery.com; or contact Perry Magee, Gallery Director, pmagee@artetudegallery.com, (828) 252-1466.


Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 3


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stage preview The Old Woman in the Basement

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ust like all of us - acaired on WLOS-TV. She tress, singer, storywent on to star in several teller, wife, and mother Asheville Community Gwenda LedBetter Theatre musical produccopes with the trials tions including South and tribulations of Pacific and Camelot. Camelot everyday life. But unlike “People recogmany, she deals with it nized me all over town,” creatively by writing poGwenda recalls. “I’d be ems, stories and plays. Her filling my car with gas and public performances give someone would say ‘Good voice to her joy and sorrow, story yesterday.’” frustration and fear and the Then in 1979, audience revels in it along Gwenda set off across the with her. mountains to tell tales to At age 82, Gwenda has thousands of people at written her second solo the National Storytelling Storyteller Gwenda LedBetter. work – The Old Woman Festival in Jonesborough, in the Basement scheduled Tennessee. Jimmy Neil to open at NC Stage the Smith, the creator of the “We’re a rare and beginning of November Festival called her, “a with David Novak directpioneer in the storytelling scary breed.” ing. It’s based on an all too movement.” The Festival common battle everyone brought in offers from all will face as we get older – losing things. over launched her career nation wide. In the play, the main character Mariah, In 2006, Gwenda wrote Friday’s tells a friend what it feels like to lose the Father about her childhood growing up on power she felt when she was younger. Virginia’s Eastern Shore with an alcoholic “You lose you looks, health, love, father. With David Novak as director, she friends, and the keys to the car. How can performed the one-woman play at NC you get all that back?” Mariah asks. Stage to standing ovations. That same year, Old Woman in the Basement was Gwenda was awarded the Oracle’s Circle inspired by the Sumerian myth Descent of Excellence by the National Storytelling of Inanna, the Queen of Heaven and her Network. In 2009 she received a Lifetime plunge into the Great Below. With each Achievement Award from North Carolina’s step the Queen loses more of her power as Storytelling Guild. does Gwenda’s heroine. Old Woman in the Basement follows Mariah Kincaid as she Visit www.oldwomaninthebasement.com deals with her new life in the cellar of her for more details on The Old Woman in the own home, dwelling in the past and shutting Basement and Gwenda LedBetter. out the present. In the basement, Mariah must face the inevitability of aging, loss of power and the dark shadows that bind her. IF In the myth, Inanna is reborn, regains her YOU The Old Woman in the Basement, power, and ascends the steps back up into GO part of the NC Stage Catalyst the light. Come to NC Stage and find out Series. Performances November what Mariah does. 2-11. Friday & Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; For more than 50 years, Gwenda has Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15. entertained audiences across America, startPlease call (828) 239-0263 for tickets or visit ing with her role as the Storylady at the Pack www.ncstage.org. NC Stage is located at 15 Library and on the Mr. Bill Show which Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

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ASHEVILLE PLAYBACK THEATER

mprovisational Theater based on audience members’ personal stories. At a Playback show you will encounter real life rather than a scripted production. The actors and musicians improvise, guided and inspired by true life/ personal stories provided by the audience. The spontaneous enactment of personal stories in Playback Theater builds 4 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

connection between people by honoring the dignity, drama and universality of their stories. This is potent, poignant, and down right amazing fun. You can come and just watch, or share a story.

IF YOU GO: Friday, October 5 at 8 p.m.,

$10. At the Altamont, 18 Church Street, Asheville. Visit www.myaltamont.com for tickets and more information.


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we love this place Zombie Pub Crawl

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Two

OCTOBER 2012 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Kimberley Adams, Judy Ausley, Doreyl Ammons Cain, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Beth Gossett, Steven R. Hageman, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Tracey Johnston-Crum, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Amanda Leslie, Peter Loewer, Perry Magee, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, Kathi Petersen, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, David Simchock, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Janelle Wienke. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, October 2012, Vol. 16 No. 2

2 Fine Art

ArtEtude Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Gallery 262 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Catherine Vibert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . 10 East of Asheville Studio Tour . . . . 11 Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Robb Helmkamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Eileen & Marty Black . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Ashley Membreno. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Jeff Pittman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Michael Hofman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Susan Stanton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

4 Stage Preview

The Old Woman in the Basement. . 4 NC Stage – The Midnight Area. . . . 7 HART – The Light in the Piazza. . . 7

6 Performance

Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 6 Amici Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville’s Dancing with the Stars. 32

8 Columns

Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 12 Ted Olson - Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 15 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 16 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 18 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 27 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. 37 David J. Simchock – Photo Tips . . 43

14 Music

got culture? The Light in the Piazza

Zombie Pub Crawl and Pre-Party starts at ZaPow Gallery on Sunday, October 14 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. This party is all ages. Face painting, palm reading, live music, art viewing, zombie makeup, a raffle, and as much fun as we can fit into that space. This event involves beer. If you are considering bringing the kids, just keep in mind that there will be drinking, and that it’s also in an art gallery. Bartenders will be checking IDs.

October 5-21, www.harttheatre.com

More details at http://blog.ashtoberfest.com. ZaPow! 21 Battery Park Ave., Suite 101, downtown Asheville, www.zapow.com.

October 18-21, www.theLEAF.org

Festival Dia de los Muertos Celebrate the Day of The Dead or All Souls Day. Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre hosts a celebration to remember loved souls in a performance with altars, sugar skulls, flowers, traditional food and drinks, and a costume contest. The event will be held Friday and Saturday, November 2 & 3. ACDT members will entertain with original “DEAD” choreography. Tickets: $15 and $10 in advance; $17 and $12 at the door. BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-2621 or visit acdt. org for more details.

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Asheville Symphony Orchestra Saturday, October 13 at 8 p.m. www.ashevillesymphony.org

East of Asheville Studio Tour October 13-14 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. www.eaststudiotour.com PG 11

LEAF’s Fall Festival PG

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Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands October 18-21; Thursday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. www.craftguild.org PG 19

ArtEtude Gallery Gala Grand Opening Friday, October 19 from 6-9 p.m. Saturday, October 20, from 2-9 p.m. www.artetudegallery.com

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Bard-a-Thon October 12-14, www.ncstage.org

Weaverville Art Safari October 27-28 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. www.weavervilleartsafari.com PG 10

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook –

Thomas Dolby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Ronny Cox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Nick Lowe at the Grey Eagle . . . . 17

Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

28 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 28

34 Restaurants

Chef Jose Rosario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

38 What to Do Guide On the Cover: Fine artist, Jeff Pittman.

Photo: Erica Mueller Photography PAGE 22

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

39 39 39 39 39

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 5


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performance ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY PRESENTS

Brahms Piano Concerto #2

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he Asheville BY STEVEN R. HAGEMAN Symphony Orchestra continues its moving tone poem 52nd season Tod und Verklärung, on Saturday, October Op. 24 (Death and 13 at 8 p.m., at Thomas Transfiguration) by Wolfe Auditorium in Richard Strauss. Meyer downtown Asheville. hears in the music “an The concert will consist old man looking back of works by Brahms, onto his life – with Takemitsu, and Richard cinematic scope and a Strauss, conducted by true master’s grasp of Music Director Daniel the rich powers of the Meyer, and featuring orchestra.” the renowned pianist After intermission, Valentina Lisitsa. the Symphony will Pianist Valentina Lisitsa The concert begins continue its exploration with “Funeral Music” of the major works of from the film Black Rain, by the Johannes Brahms with his Piano ConJapanese composer Toru Takemitsu. certo No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83. In Shohei Imamura’s film, the main “Grandeur, intimacy, and an energetic characters struggle through the spirit unite in this work,” says Meyer, aftermath of a destroyed Hiroshima, “to take you on a musical journey that devastated by the atomic bomb. This celebrates the human spirit as it can work, says Meyer, is “compact, highly aspire through great music.” expressive, and sears an indelible Valentina Lisitsa, who is sure to mark on our conscience.” take the “terror” in stride, was born The evening continues with the in Kiev, Ukraine and began playing

the piano at the age of three, performing her first solo recital a year later. Now a North Carolina resident, and with more than 30 million YouTube channel views, Valentina Lisitsa is one of the most watched classical musicians on the Web, using digital innovation to champion classical music. For a recent debut concert at the huge Royal Albert Hall in London, fans were invited to determine the program by voting online; the concert was then shown live on YouTube. A critic for London’s The Guardian was suspicious that Lisitsa would prove to be “a case of promotion over profundity,” but after hearing the concert he commented, “In everything she does, there seems to be a special combination of utterly self-assured virtuosity and real lyricism and communication too.” IF YOU Tickets are available through GO the Symphony office or the

Asheville Civic Center box office, and range in price from $58 to $20. Subscriptions are available for the entire season from $346 to $100, or on a “pick three” basis for $167 to $55. Significant discounts for students are available. For more details, visit www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046.

Free Concert Series at Pack Library And Other Performances by AmiciMusic

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miciMusic, the Horton, an Asheville nanew chamber tive, and baritone Roberto music organization Flores, who is a member will present four of Pastyme, the premiere free concerts in the a capella ensemble of downtown Pack Library’s the Western Carolinas. Lord Auditorium. AmiciMusic’s Artistic DiThis project, entitled rector, Daniel Weiser, will “Free Chamber Music collaborate on the piano for All” is designed to and also play a solo version bring in new and diverse of Gershwin’s “American Soprano Amanda populations who might not in Paris.” Horton otherwise attend a chamber AmiciMusic will also music concert. AmiciMuperform “American in sic’s goal is to make this exciting music Paris” at a house concert in Henmore accessible to everybody through dersonville on Friday, October 26 its more informal, participatory style of at 7:30 p.m. Seating will be limited performances that is both educational and by reservation only. Cost is $35, and engaging. which includes food and wine. ConThe first program of this free tact Dan Weiser at (828) 505-2903 or series takes place Saturday, October 27 e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org for at 2 p.m. “An American in Paris” will reservations. highlight several American composThe “American in Paris” program ers who spent time in Paris, includwill be performed at the White Horse ing Aaron Copland, Cole Porter, in Black Mountain on Saturday, and George Gershwin. The featured October 27 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 performers are soprano Amanda for adults and $5 for children and are 6 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

available at the door. Details at www.whitehorseblackmountain. com or call (828) 669Cellist Patrick Owen 0816. Catch AmiciMusic’s “Cello-bration,” featuring cellist Patrick Owen along with pianist Daniel Weiser on Saturday, October 20 at 4 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain, and Sunday, October 21 at 3 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Weaverville, 62 N. Main. Suggested donation $15.

IF YOU For more information on GO AmiciMusic concerts visit

www.amicimusic.org. To get on their e-mail list you can e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org or call (828) 505-2903.


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stage preview HART presents the Broadway Musical Smash

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The Light in the Piazza

here are very few places on earth more romantic and beautiful than Florence Italy and you probably couldn’t pick a more beautiful time than the 1950’s in that city. HART’s next production, opening October 5, is one of the loveliest musicals written in recent years. The Light in the Piazza tells the story of a woman, from Winston-Salem, NC, whose husband, a tobacco executive, sends her off on holiday with their daughter. Margaret Johnson takes her daughter Clara to Florence, a city Margaret once visited with her husband in happier times. Clara is learning impaired, having suffered a head injury as a child. Now twenty-six, her mother has sheltered her from harm and reconciled her to a life without romance. But Florence has other ideas. The city is alive with love and Clara is not immune. The score for this musical is unlike any you have ever heard. There is no percussion, or brass. The entire score is strings, more in the style of a chamber ensemble. The Broadway production was nominated for Best Musical and took home six Tonys including Best Score, Best Orchestrations, and Best Actress for Victoria Clark’s performance as Margaret. The show is based on a 1960 novel by Elizabeth Spencer, a native of Mississippi

who met her husband in Italy. She would go on to teach in Canada and finally at UNC at Chapel Hill where she still lives. A 1962 film version of the story stared Olivia de Havilland as Margaret, Yvette Mimieux as Clara and George Hamilton as Fabrizio, the young man she meets. The musical was created by Adam Guettel and Craig Lucas who is best known for his play “Prelude to a Kiss.” HART’s production is being directed by Charles Mills, with music directed by Chuck Taft. The cast includes Clara Burrus, Tierney Cody, Kristen Hedberg, Jonathan Cobrda as Fabrizio, Josh Jones, Dominic Aquilino, Susan Belcher, Mark Highsmith, Charles Marth, and Chris McClure. Performances October 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20 at 7:30 and October 7, 14, and 21 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $24 for Adults; $22 for Seniors; Students $10. Special $6 discount tickets for Students for Sunday Matinees. IF YOU HART’s production will GO run October 5-21. For ticket

information contact the HART Box Office at (828) 456-6322 or go online at www.harttheatre.com. Performances are at the Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

JUST IN TIME FOR HALLOWEEN, DARK HORSE THEATRE PRESENTS

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The Midnight Area

here is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. But beyond that, there is an even better dimension. The sixth dimension. The AWESOME dimension. The one we call. . . The Midnight Area. Join your host Rod, as he guides you through a world of psychics, zombies and demonic sock monkeys in six short plays by Dark Horse Theatre. The Midnight Area features tongue in cheek riffs on classic horror show themes and film styles, ranging from noir to late night infomercial. Odd, comical, creepy and ridiculous, each story is a sweet bit of brain candy just in time for Halloween. Dark Horse Theatre first produced their hit original play “Grimm,” at NC Stage in spring 2011, with a dark, delightful riff on “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” “Sleeping Beauty” and “Little Red Riding Hood.” Dark Horse Theatre’s previous production, 2010’s “Alice Underground” sold out two separate runs at BeBe Theatre.

BY

AMANDA LESLIE

The Midnight Area promises a hilarious take on classic horror, and a lucky ticket price of $13. The cast features Mandy Bean, Sarah Carpenter, Jeremy Carter, Rod Leigh and Ryan Travers. Written and directed by Emily McClain. For more information about Dark Horse Theatre, visit www.darkhorseasheville.com.

IF YOU The Midnight Area runs October GO 17-21, as part of the Catalyst Series

at NC Stage. Tickets are $13, with a $10 student ticket available. NC Stage is located at 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville, next to the Rankin Avenue parking garage. Call NC Stage at (828) 2390263 or visit www.ncstage.org.

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THE BARD-A-THON AT NC STAGE

C Stage selects 12 Shakespeare plays, to be read over a 48 hour period, from 8 p.m. Friday until 8 p.m. Sunday, October 12-14. Readers sign up for as many plays as they want, from one to 12. Readers pay a $15 registration fee and get a very cool Bard-a-Thon t-shirt. Once a reader has signed up, they ask their friends, family, co-workers and neighbors to sponsor them – just like a fun run or crop walk. The person or

team who raises the most money or recruits the most donors can win fabulous prizes. A fun way to support NC Stage!

IF YOU GO: Admission is free to watch

the Bard-a-thon readings. The entire 48hour event is broadcast live through NC Stage’s website, www.ncstage.org. For more details, or to read, contact Amanda Leslie at NC Stage (828) 239-0263. NC Stage is located at 5 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 7


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

BY

Leo Monahan

businesses, working in major industries. Over time, his fine art paper sculpture illustrations went from a few, to many, as well as from white to full color. He uses very basic art tools (X-acto knives, scissors, paint, brushes, airbrush and fine art papers ), and fueled by “memories, interests and desires” as inspiration for his concepts, Leo considers his works to be continually fluid, each one an experiment in shape and color.

Color and Concept

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oncept is EVERYTHING!” Leo Monahan exclaimed during our recent conversation. I had the distinct pleasure of hearing these words directly from the man himself recently at his Western North Carolina studio. We were surrounded by all stages of his colorful paper sculpture illustrations, and I noted to myself that I was also standing amidst all the elements of awesome works yet to be. I first became aware of Mr. Monahan in the 1980’s while in design school in Colorado. One semester, we were graced with visiting instructor Eugene Hoffman, who pushed us to notice, appreciate and feel strategic ideation. He also pointed out Good Stuff in the art world, including Leo’s paper creations, which leapt at the viewer off ad pages and magazine covers, reinforcing for us the notion that designing isn’t always a flat process.

Creekside Artists Retreat

Room and Studio Space For Rent • Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $650/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

GREG VINEYARD

A few select questions and answers:

Greg Vineyard: From whence does your

Via emails and in-person, Leo is personable, engaging, sharing, funny, humble and gracious. His favorite art has stories and connections and history. He’s a man with a sincere appreciation for the view from his porch. I’m reminded that an artist’s life involves engagement, endurance, commitment and making. I’ve now met yet another inspiring concept of who and what I’d like to be when I grow up.

For more on Leo Monahan and his art visit www.leomonahan.com. Or check his blog at www.leothecolorman.com

creativity flow?

Leo Monahan: My creativity flows from my experience and fear of poverty.

GV: Do you have a favorite zen-type moment during your creation process? Leo Monahan in his studio.

Designing isn’t always a flat process. Fast-forward to 2012 (Whoosh! Dizzy?). I’m in Asheville, a town of huge artistic talent and culture wrapped in a vortex of synchronicity. At an art event in Constance Williams Gallery, I was introduced to a “Leo Monahan,” and the name was... familiar. And then paper sculpture was mentioned, and it all started to gel. After getting past being a slobbering, fanatic idiot, I have now gotten the chance to learn more about Leo The Colorman’s take on things. Leo, a color expert, taught at Chouinard, CalArts, USC, and lectured worldwide. He opened and ran successful design

LM: Zen moments are few and far be-

tween... I write zen poetry, haiku, and zen is difficult.

GV: What in your art life makes you feel free or joyous?

G

8 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

view and for sale at Grovewood Gallery. His solo show, “Cut, Bend, Fold, ColorColorColor - Paper Sculpture & Collage in Dimension,” runs from October 6 through December 31, 2012. An opening reception will be held Saturday, October 6, from 4 to 6 p.m. More information available at www.grovewood.com.

LM: At my age, I feel joyous waking up on the right side of grass.

GV: What in your studio inspires you to keep working?

LM: Other artists’ work inspires me to keep working.

GV: Were there any pivotal moments in your life and work that altered what you make or how you make it?

LM: Every project with new content alters

Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. Find his clay works at Constance Williams Gallery in Asheville’s River Arts District and at Gallery 262 in Waynesville. His illustrations are at ZaPow Gallery in downtown Asheville. www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net

what I make, because I experiment on every new concept...sometimes successfully.

Surreal Appalachia: the Works of Michelle Walker and Bobbie Polizzi

allery Two Six Two features two area artists whose works encompass a side of the art world rarely showcased in this region – surrealism. “Surreal Appalachia: The Works of Michelle Walker and Bobbie Polizzi” is a show you will not want to miss! Michelle Walker, of Waynesville, blends oils with real life butterfly and moth wings to create mystical flying creatures and cold stark landscapes. Beautifully delicate yet dark, even bordering on morbid, Walker’s work is a unique blend of the classical and the apocalyptic, reminiscent of Salvador Dali, Hieronymus Bosch, and HR Geiger. Bobbie Polizzi, of Hendersonville, takes the discarded — antiquities, baby dolls, found objects — and combines them to create powerful sculptural works. Whimsical

IF YOU Leo Monahan’s fine art paper GO sculpture illustrations are on

yet undeniably bizarre, Polizzi’s pieces evoke a sense Victorian-era religious iconography, through the eyes of a Tim Burton or Bosch. The Opening Reception will be held Friday, October 5 from 6 to 9 p.m., in conjunction with Art After Dark. Both artists will be on hand to discuss their work. And as always, wine, beer, hors d’oeuvres, and good times will be served. Please join us and experience the “other side” of art here in the mountains! IF YOU Surreal Appalachia opening GO reception Friday, October 5 from 6

to 9 p.m. at Gallery Two Six Two, 142 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC. More details by calling (828) 452-6100 or visit www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Opening this Month Painting for the Cure, featuring dance inspired paintings by Adrienne van Dooren, opens Friday, October 5 from 6-8 p.m. at The Grand Bohemian Gallery, 11 Boston Way in Asheville, www.paint4thecure.com. The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Biennial Members’ Juried Show opens Friday, October 19 from 6-8 p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street, Black Mountain. Archaeology of Self opens Friday, November 2 from 6-9 p.m. at the ARTERY, 346 Depot Street. (828) 2580710, www.ashevillearts.com


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED BY

Catherine Vibert Fine Art Photography

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apid River Magazine: Last year

when the RR first interviewed you, you were exploring textured paintings and digital art. Now you seem to be focusing mainly on photography, what happened?

Catherine Vibert: Three major things hap-

Catherine Vibert

pened in 2012 that really caused a shift in my career focus: #1 - My business, Catvibe Creative Photography, opened for business in December 2011; #2 - In January, I began a sunrise photography 365 project; #3 - In February I was a part of The Click! Project show at the Conn-Artist Gallery in Hendersonville.

It’s been an amazing ride, running the gamut from portraits, weddings and event coverage to photojournalism, product photography and most recently to background movie set photographer and real estate and interiors photographer. I love all the diversity, and being flexible. Working with people and making art with photography is awesome; I’m glad I’ve chosen this path.

RRM: What is Catvibe Creative Photography? CV: In December 2011 I went professional

RRM: What is the sunrise 365 project? CV: I began the year with the idea that I

with my photography, covering the Jinglefest event in Asheville. In 2012, I decided to take any kind of photography job I could find, just to gain experience and seek out my niche.

would shoot the sunrise every day of the year. The area where I live is blessed with an amazing view of Little Pisgah Mountain in Fairview. Doing the project gave me some

DENNIS RAY

outstanding images, and I really learned a vast amount of respect for professional landscape photographers. It’s really all about being there when it happens, then knowing your camera well enough to capture it. I’m still taking a photo a day, but it isn’t always the sunrise. I needed to branch out to broaden my experience base in as many kinds of photographic situations as possible. I still go out and get the sunrise when the conditions are particularly amazing though. The sunrise field is also a great location to do portraits.

RRM: Has The Click! Project helped your career?

CV: Yes! One door opens another, it is so

fun to watch. For instance, I was able to be the official photographer for the River Art’s District Stroll in June. In addition, Click! just finished a run at the Hotel Indigo. Click! will have another show in 2013, stay tuned for details. And those doors will open other doors, and so on.

RRM: Thanks Catherine, it’s nice to watch your career progress!

Rejoice by Catherine Vibert

CV: Thank you Rapid River! IF YOU Catherine’s photography and GO Fairview studio can be seen on

the East of Asheville Studio Tour, October 13 & 14, 2012. View her online galleries at www.catvibe.com.

Catvibe Creative Photography Fine Art Photography, People, Places & Things www.catvibe.com, cat@catvibe.com (828) 628-1927

EAST of ASHEVILLE STUDIO TOUR Free Self-Guided tour

OCTOBER 13 & 14  Ą*ĄfĄĄ-*Ą!&)6

ARTISTS OF EAST ASHEVILLE, SWANNANOA, BLACK MOUNTAIN and FAIRVIEW INVITE YOU TO VISIT THEIR STUDIOS Tour maps are available at local businesses and on our website. Look for the yellow signs during the Tour! For information call 828.686.1011

EastStudioTour.com Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 9


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artist studio tours

W PG. 40

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PG. 40

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Upcycle: \ʼup-sī-kəl\: the environmentally driven process of converting discarded materials into useful products of better quality and value.

The place for upcycled goods. 92 Charlotte St, Asheville, NC 28801 828.255.2533 Free Parking Next to City Bakery

Weaverville Art Safari Showcases Vibrant Local Art Scene

hen autumn arrives in Weaverville, NC, residents and visitors have the opportunity to admire more than just gorgeous fall foliage. They celebrate the start of the Weaverville Art Safari, a magnificent celebration showcasing the area’s resident artists. Held October 27-28 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the two-day bi-annual event features 44 artists and the opportunity to visit with them in their studios. “Many visitors gush about how great it is to see where we all live and work,” says Tom Hoxie, co-chair of the Weaverville Art Safari and participating artist. “Also, our studio tours offer art collectors the opportunity to buy directly from the source and know more about the piece they are purchasing.” While the thrill of viewing new collections pulls guests in, the most popular aspect of the tour is the chance to watch artists at work. Several artists offer demonstrations during the Art Safari, providing a first-hand look at the creative process. “There is something extremely special about sharing your artistic techniques,” says Steven Forbes-deSoule, Weaverville Art Safari member and a creator of raku vessels and sculpture. “It’s a way of inviting the public to participate in the discovery process.” The event is a self-guided tour through the town and surrounding areas of Weaverville and nearby Barnardsville, which allows guests to tailor each day based on their interests and artistic tastes. Works of art showcased include pottery, handmade glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, paintings, fiber art, and more.

PG. 40

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10 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

Joy Moser

BY

STEVEN FORBES-DESOULE

Weaverville Art Safari October 27-28 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Thais Weiner

A special preview party at Reems Creek Golf Club on Friday, October 26, kicks off the event. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and includes door prizes, heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, and a cash bar. The highlight of the evening is a silent auction featuring art donated by each participating artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. All event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari events. Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information are available at greater Asheville-area galleries, restaurants and shops beginning in mid-September. Brochures will also be distributed from an Art Safari information booth located on Main Street in Weaverville during the show weekend. A downloadable brochure is also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

Warner Whitfield

About The Weaverville Art Safari The Weaverville Art Safari is an event staged twice each year – in the spring and fall -- by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art community on the northern

Marcus Thomas

outskirts of Asheville, NC. Since then, thousands of people have returned over and over each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience.

IF YOU For more information on GO the Weaverville Art Safari

and participating artists, visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com, or contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) 645-9065 or email forbes143@ charter.net


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Information on how to be an EAST tour sponsor can be found on our website, www.EastStudioTour.com

EAST OF ASHEVILLE STUDIO TOUR

Please help us support the following businesses whenever you are in the area.

don't miss our spring tour! may 4 & 5, 2013

erdant valleys, whimsical waterfalls, lyrical leafing, magical mountains — it’s just the right chemistry to produce one of the top climates for art in the world. On October 13 and 14, you are invited to get a first hand Alan Kaufman Zoe McElya Janice Keeler look at what goes on behind the scenes in Asheville’s wonderful world of art and craft. lya and Carly Owens. Carly The EAST of Asheville Owens is a student at Charles EAST of Asheville Studio Tour is happenD. Owen High School and a October 13-14 ing once again, and just student of Karen Jones. Carly in time for some crafty talks about her inspirations 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. holiday shopping. and future plans, “I am most This will be the inspired by people. I love to IF third year the tour is capture their unique personYOU East of Asheville Studio Tour, participating in the Ocalities and spirit in my work. GO October 13 & 14 from 10 a.m. to tober national celebraI hope to go to college for 6 p.m. both days. East Asheville, tion of American Craft design and fashion manageSwannanoa, Black Mountain, Fairview. Week. Throughout the ment.� Carly will be showVisit www.eaststudiotour.com for a country, celebrations ing her work at artist Lynette downloadable map. Phone (828) 686-1011 are being planned to Miller’s LC Miller Studios for more details. highlight and support in Black Mountain, stop B45 our handcrafting tradiduring the tour. tions. On the EAST of Zoe McElya is a student Asheville Studio Tour at AC Reynolds High School, Carly Owens stops, you will get to and a student of Mary Briden. see demonstrations by Zoe states, “I love to take an numerous nationally recognized artisans. image that would otherwise be relatively Studio stops encompass artists’ studios in ordinary and turn it into something magiEast Asheville, Swannanoa, Black Mountain, cal. I believe it’s not art unless it makes you and Fairview. feel something. It would be fantastic if I was Artists will have items for sale in all getting paid to do what I love. I’m going to price ranges. You’ll have the opportunity to carry on creating and see where it takes me!� buy tasteful holiday gifts while supporting Zoe will be showing her paintings in Fairthe artists who make the Asheville art scene view at Catherine Vibert’s Catvibe Creative so special. Keeping your holiday spending Photography Studio, stop F5 on the tour. dollars local this season helps the entire Come on out and see of these American Craftthe Weekwork is a nationwide celebration of handmade American crafts Asheville economy thrive. talented young students, celebrate American and the people who make them. Galleries, schools, museums,drive, artists, guilds and supThis year for the first time, the Tour Craft Week, enjoy the scenic and libraries across the country are holding events showcasing American craft. awarded scholarships to two outstanding port your local artists and crafters. www.AmericanCraf tWeek.com. The October 13 &Zoe 14 McEartists from local high schools, EAST of Asheville Studio Tour is proud to Special thanks to our sponsors for making this event possible!

love

is in the autumn air

WWW%AST3TUDIO4OURCOMs  

WELCOME TO E.A.S.T.!

east of asheville studio tour AMiPMDAILY

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This is a FREE self-guided tour... Look for the yellow signs!

This map is not to scale.

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be a participant in this nationwide event.

Mo rga nH ill Rd .

Che stn ut H ill R d.

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Visit our website and GPS friendly map by scanning this QR code.

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14k gold rings accented with diamonds and sapphires

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 11


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authors ~ books …To Be Continued…

REINCARNATION & THE PURPOSE OF OUR LIVES WRITTEN BY KAREN BERG

Custom Designed Jewelry Local Arts & Crafts Jewelry Repair

Autumn Maple #2 by Laura Sims

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Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building. PG.

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She came back to learn humility. Find out what you came back to learn...

Available at Malaprop’s Bookstore and booksellers everywhere. www.facebook.com/karenbergkabbalah

Save the Date: Author and Spiritual Leader Karen Berg will be speaking on Monday, October 29 @ 7:00 PM at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville, NC 28801

12 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

was walking down a REVIEW BY street in Los Angeles, MARCIANNE MILLER thinking about nothing but the beautiful weather. meditate and hold yoga poses All of a sudden, I heard a voice and listen to people who speak to me. I have no idea spoke casually about things where it came from, if it were like “karma.” inside my head or outside, Over the years, I—a male or female. All I know is scientist and a skeptic and a that its message came through Catholic—accepted reloud and clear: “You have been incarnation as fact, and it here many times before.” changed my life. ReincarnaGulp. I’ve been here tion offered explanations many times before? What for the flood of “strange” did that mean? As a devout memories I’d had as a child, Karen Berg, Spiritual Catholic, I’d never even Director of the Kabbalah as well as my curious pasthought about reincarnation Center in Los Angeles. sions and phobias. It gave until The Voice made its me insight into relationships pronouncement. both difficult and benign, and changed So began a decades-long journey to find my code of behavior from avoiding sin to out more about reincarnation and what it improving my karma. meant to me. My first stop was the Self-ReMy past life memories usually came in alization Fellowship Center, a garden retreat “flashes” of recognition, combined with a on Sunset Blvd. founded by guru Paramahvisual “memory” and a “knowing” that was ansa Yogananda, who had introduced Kriya Yoga to Westerners with his famous book continued on page 13 Autobiography of a Yogi. I learned how to

A Book of Wonder and Worry FROM TED OLSON, RAPID RIVER POETRY EDITOR/COLUMNIST

I

t has been quite an honor to serve for more than three years as poetry editor/columnist for Rapid River and to be part of such a vital arts and culture publication. My sincere thanks to publisher Dennis Ray for entrusting me with that role, to designer Simone Bouyer for finding perfect visual presentations for all the poetry, and to everyone who has read my columns. Throughout my 40month stint representing poetry for Rapid River I challenged myself to read, edit, and interpret poems by regional, national, and international poets as perceptively as possible. I also wrote my own poems on the sidelines. As the poems accumulated, and as connections between them became clear, I compiled a manuscript entitled Revelations: Poems. That manuscript, featuring 78 poems which explore a range of themes, is now a book. For anyone interested in knowing more about my new book (issued by Celtic Cat Publications), I offer the following blurb

written by a recent Pulitzer Prize finalist, poet Maurice Manning: “Revelations: Poems sweeps broadly, gathering family history, displaced people, the natural world, religion, small towns, solitude, and love into a single tide washing into shore. …This is a book of wonder and worry; it is for our time and against our time. And the poetry here is refreshing, almost old-fashioned in that it is truly verse—as we understood poetry a hundred years back—composed generously with rhythm and rhyme, and that antiquated quality makes the gravity of Revelations all the more subtle.” Anyone who might want to order a copy of Revelations: Poems (available in paperback and hardcover) may contact me at olson@etsu.edu

Thank you for caring about poetry! ~ Ted Olson


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so super-intense that it brooked no argument. I was a British sailor who drowned in the icy Atlantic, an American girl who died in childbirth alone in a log cabin, an Irish woman abandoned by my husband, knowing my children and I would starve to death, an Egyptian slave entombed with my mummified master, a lonely young monk in a dank monastery in Scotland. In this lifetime I am a dedicated religious pacifist, yet I’ve often been involved with military men—possibly because I’ve been a warrior so many times in my past that I have great sympathy for men who bear arms.

“You have been here many times before.” Hypnotized past-life regressions helped decipher the complexities of my fractious family. I learned my mother had been my child, my sister was my brother, one brother was my husband, another had also been my child. True? I don’t know, but the contemplation of possible previous relationships sure put a different light on who my family was today. And, as some teachers say, when you accept that you choose your parents, the whole dynamic between child and parent changes. Travel to other countries often leads to discovering past lives. When I went to Ireland, I felt I was home for the first time in my life. Every day presented an overwhelming déjà vu experience. I knew what was around the next corner before we got there, I found the family tombstones without

A Wrinkle in Time

GRAPHIC NOVEL BOOK SIGNING

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sheville native Hope Larson will celebrate the release of her new graphic novel adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic novel A Wrinkle in Time at Spellbound Children’s Bookshop on October 6. In 50 years of publication, the book has never been illustrated. Now, Larson takes the classic story to a new level.

anyone showing me. The most intense memory took place at the ruins of a castle in Kinsale. I saw myself as a knight from France, who rode through the smoking ruins, anguished that I had not been able to rescue my lady love. Through research I learned the history of Kinsale—in about 1649 the castle had been destroyed by Oliver Cromwell, who had indeed hired French mercenaries. Of the nearly 50 books I’ve read on reincarnation, the one I just finished is the most thought-provoking. …To Be Continued: Reincarnation & the Purpose of Our Lives, is the latest book by Karen Berg (God Wears Lipstick: Kabbalah for Women), who is the Spiritual Director of the controversial Kabbalah Center, headquartered in Los Angeles. Reincarnation, according to the Center’s teachings, covers every aspect of our lives. It’s not enough to know we had past lives, but we must use the knowledge of past lives to discover our purpose in this life. Every person we come in contact with is a person from a past life. As Berg says, “We are part of a circle that continues to form our environment from one life time to the next…”

The Saturday, October 6 event kicks off at 1 p.m. In addition to meeting Hope and getting a signed book, you can also participate in A Wrinkle in Time-themed activities and enter a door prize drawing for a Wrinkle in Time Hope Larson 50th Anniversary Photo: Bui Brothers poster. The winners of the student art contest held in September will also be announced. IF YOU Book release party with Hope GO Larson on October 6 at 1 p.m.

Spellbound Children’s Bookshop, inside ZaPOW!, 21 Battery Park Ave., Suite 101, downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 319-1907, visit www.zapow.com, or www.spellboundchildrensbookshop.com for more details.

“To learn our purpose in life… use angels, kabbalistic astrology, and the lines in your face and palms.”

OCTOBER

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

The purpose of our repeat incarnations, Berg says, is simple—we come from God, The Light, and we keep reincarnating until we correct our mistakes and learn the lessons we’re supposed to learn so we can return to the Light as perfect beings. Our lives are a collection of puzzle pieces and learning to fit the pieces together is how we handle life’s challenges. Adversity is what teaches us what we need to know Some of Berg’s specific teachings on reincarnation are radically different from traditional views. For example, she indicates that we can reincarnate into animals and even rocks if doing so will serve our cosmic purpose. She cautions against woman-on-top sex because, she believes, a boy conceived during sex in this position could attract a female soul, thus resulting in a homosexual child. Like many other people, Berg is convinced that everything happens for a reason. For example, a child might be born with a birth defect because it needs to right a wrong it did in a previous life. I do not believe everything happens for a reason, though I do believer we can give reason to everything that happens. For me, a child with birth defects is not an act of karmic debt, but an accident of nature and a chance to grow in courage and compassion Berg writes at length about three tools that are part of the kabbalistic wisdom that can help us learn more about our purpose in life. They are the use of angels, kabbalistic astrology, and the lines in the face and palms. I’m curious to hear Ms. Berg elaborate on these unique tools in her presentation at Malaprop’s. Author’s website: The Kabbalah Center, www.kabballah.com

IF YOU Karen Berg discusses her GO book “…To Be Continued:

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, October 2 at 7 p.m. Recipes for Simplicity in The Heart of Your Home with SAMANTHA POLLACK, ADRIEL MCINTYRE. Thursday, October 4 at 7 p.m. MARYANN MCFADDEN, The Book Lover; Erika Marks, The Mermaid Collector. Saturday, October 6 from 2-4 p.m. STAR WARS READS DAY. Come in costume, sharpen your trivia skills, and win prizes! Wednesday, October 10 at 7 p.m. Mountain Chefs: JOHN BATCHELOR and local area chefs, talk and booksigning. Sunday, October 14 at 3:00 p.m. AMY CORTESE, Locavesting: The Revolution in Local Investing and How to Profit from It. Monday, October 15 at 7 p.m. JOE INGLES, The Inferno: A Southern Morality Tale. Wednesday, October 17 at 7 p.m. JUDY GOLDMAN’S memoir, Losing My Sister. Thursday, October 18 at 7 p.m. MEG CADOUX HIRSHBERG, For Better or for Work: A Survival Guide for Entrepreneurs. Tuesday, October 23 at 7 p.m. DEBORAH LLOYD discusses Chakra Balance. Wednesday, October 24 at 7 p.m. MARY STEWART ATWELL, Wild Girls. Friday, October 26 at 7 p.m. The Tree of Forgetfulness, with PAM DURBAN. Saturday, October 27 at 7 p.m. ALEX SANCHEZ, Boyfriends With Girlfriends. Sunday, October 28 at 3 p.m. WENDY WELCH, The Little Bookstore of Big Stone Gap: A Memoir of Friendship. Monday, October 29 at 7 p.m. KAREN BERG, To Be Continued: Reincarnation and the Purpose of Our Lives.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 40 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Reincarnation & The Purpose of Our Lives.” Monday, October 29, 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Café/Bookstore, downtown Asheville. For more information: 1-800441-9829; (828) 254-6734; or visit the website, www.malaprops.com. Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 13


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sound experience Thomas Dolby IS Moog Fest!

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lthough largely forgotten by today’s audiences there was a time when no one better epitomized the synthesizer driven production sounds of the 1980’s better than did Thomas Dolby. While he had only a few hits Dolby became one of the most recognizable figures of the synth pop movement of the 1980s, and while never short of creativity Dolby would be the first to admit that much of his early success was due to his skillful marketing. He promoted himself as a kind of mad scientist, an egghead who had successfully harnessed the power of synthesizers and samplers and used them to make catchy pop and light electro-funk. Born Thomas Morgan Robertson in Cairo-the son of a British archeologistDolby’s interest in music arose through his fascination with computers, electronics, and synthesizers. He originally attended college to study meteorology (weather phenomena is a recurring theme of his songs) but was soon sidetracked by an obsession with musical equipment; by the time he was eighteen Dolby had begun building his own synthesizers. Around the same time, he began to learn how to play guitar and piano, as well as how to program computers. Eventually, his schoolmates gave him the nickname of “Dolby,” which was the name for a noise-reduction technology for audiotapes; he would eventually assume it as a stage name. In his late teens, Dolby was hired as a touring sound engineer for a variety of post-punk bands, including the Fall, the Passions, and the Members; on these dates, he would use a PA system he had built himself. In 1979 he formed the arty post-punk band Camera Club with future production

Rapid River ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

16th Annual

Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Tickets to the theatre; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

wunderkind Trevor Horn. The pair, along with Hugh Padgham and Steve Lillywhite were perhaps the few superstar producers of their time. Dolby initially worked as an in demand studio musician, technician, and songwriter; most notably for Lene Lovich. He also wrote the 1979 hit “Magic Wand” for the band Whodini, which gave him both the exposure and financial security to stake out on his own. His 1982 debut The Golden Age of Wireless became one of the seminal releases of its era, spawning the hits “She Blinded Me with Science” and “Europa and the Pirate Twins”. Both songs became staples of FM radio and early MTV, buoyed by the joyfully idiosyncratic nature of their lyrics and collision of electronica and pop. In many ways they can be viewed as a reaction to punk, which was itself a reaction of the pompous arena rock that preceded it. The Flat Earth followed two years later, a glorious concoction tapping into the same zeitgeist as Roxy Music and Berlin era David Bowie. While not containing any hits (at least in this country) it remains the most cohesive and enduring of Dolby’s albums. Though the album cracked the top forty Dolby’s momentum was already beginning to slow. Nevertheless he remained in demand as a collaborator, working with Herbie Hancock, Howard Jones, Stevie Wonder, George Clinton, and Dusty Springfield. In 1985 he produced albums by Clinton, Prefab Sprout and, most notably, Joni

BY JAMES

Thomas Dolby

Mitchell’s Dog Eat Dog. He also was briefly a member of David Bowie’s touring band. His greatest success was in film. Beginning with 1985’s Fever Pitch Dolby immersed himself into the lucrative world of soundtracks, composing scores for films as diverse as Howard the Duck and American Gothic. Aliens Ate My Buick, Dolby’s long-delayed third album, appeared in 1988 to poor reviews and weak sales, even though the single “Airhead” became a minor British hit. For the rest of the decade he continued to score films while designing, producing, and marketing his own computer equipment. His fourth album, Astronauts & Heretics, was released in 1992 on his new label, Giant. Despite the presence of guest stars like Eddie Van Halen, Jerry Garcia, and Bob Weir it too sold poorly. The following year Dolby founded the computer software company Headspace,

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which occupied most of his time and energy for the next 15 years. Dolby reemerged as a recording artist with the 2003 live album Forty. Originally issued as a 1000 limited-edition, home-packaged, signed and numbered release it was later reissued as a readily available CD. A tour of America would be documented on The Sole Inhabitant Live Concert, released in 2006. In 2009 expanded reissues of the first two albums were released, generating a new level of interest in Dolby’s artistry. A new studio album, A Map of the Floating City, followed in 2011, with guest appearances from Mark Knopfler, Regina Spektor, and others. Buoyed by the positive response to it Dolby has again begun performing live. Which makes the return of Dolby to music, and his appearance at Moog Fest, all the more exciting: It would be difficult to name any one artist who has more exemplified the restless spirit of creativity and wide eyed technological wonder that was Robert Moog. It is indeed a perfect match! IF YOU Moog Fest 2012, the weekend of GO October 26 and 27. Thomas Dolby

will be performing on Saturday, with the exact times and location still to be announced. Stay tuned to Moogfest.com for more information.

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band

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CELEBRATES 35 YEARS AT THE 35TH LEAF

EAF is excited to announce the Dirty Dozen Brass Band as this Fall’s Sunday festival closer. Born and bred in New Orleans’ social and pleasure club scene, DDBB’s storied 35-year career embodies the cultural mélange of The Big Easy, melding elements of jazz, R&B, funk, soul, and tried-&-true

Any unpublished poem 35 lines or less is wanted! Deadline January 15, 2012. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2012 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems. For more information please call (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

14 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

NOLA second line. “It ends up being like a pot of gumbo – you drop in a little okra, drop in a little shrimp, you drop in some crabs. Before you know it, you’ve mixed in all these different ingredients and you’ve got a beautiful soup. That was our approach to music early on and it still is today.” ~ trumpet player Gregory Davis Beyond the Dirty Dozen, there are several other additions to the Performing Arts lineup for Fall LEAF 2012. Surprising fans at festivals and music rooms across the country as one of music’s most recognized “Artists at Large,” the Lee

Boys’ Roosevelt Collier will bring the sacred steel tradition to LEAF for sit-ins to span every genre. Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys will add zydeco to Brookside’s hoppin’ dance lineup of contra, salsa, waltz, and swing. LEAF also welcomes The Moog Foundation back to The Barn for Dr. Bob’s Interactive Sonic Experience, allowing LEAFers of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore theremins, synthesizers, effect pedals, oscilloscopes and more. IF YOU LEAF’s fall festival takes place GO October 18-21. The Performing

Arts schedule, subject to change, is online, visit www.theLEAF.org. LEAF, Lake Eden Arts Festival, 377 Lake Eden Rd., Black Mountain, NC 28711.


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sound experience Ronny Cox returns to the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse Stage

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hile his name BY JAMES CASSARA might not be readily familiar his face, His musical career at once both may not be as well known pugnacious and comfort— not to mention lucraing, is instantly recogniztive — as his acting but it is able to millions. Beginobviously just as important ning with the classic film to him. Growing up in Deliverance – an auspicious New Mexico listening to start by any measuring stick Texas Swing on the radio – and through his seminal Cox was always drawn to roles in Beverly Hills Cop the sound. While in high and last year’s Captain school he of course played Ronny Cox performs Sunday, America (not to mention rock and roll (didn’t everyOctober 21. numerous television apone?) but, inspired by his pearances), Cox, with more than 125 roles, guitar playing dairyman father, Cox always has helped expand and redefine the notion loved songs that told a story. The one thread of character actor. But while he has earned that binds together both aspects of his career his trade primarily in front of a camera, Cox is the commitment to craft and genuine is equally at home standing before a microwarmth he brings to the table. Cox’s musical phone with guitar in hand. style is as diverse as are his tastes, and he

confesses that he has no set-in-stone criteria for picking or writing songs. But while he has written and performed music for more than forty years it is only in the past decade that he has evolved from being an “actor who sings” into a “singer who has had a pretty fair career acting.” Part of that is the natural evolution of an aging actor—Cox is now a spry 74—who finds the offers fewer and further between. The deeper and more personal reason is the 2006 death of his beloved wife Mary, to whom he had been married since 1960. The two had meet when Cox was but 14 years old, and he readily confesses that music is one of the ways he has dealt with his loss. The result is his 2009 album Songs with Repercussions, a studio collection of handpicked material and a trio of originals. Much to Cox’s surprise and delight the album made it to the #1 spot of the Folk DJ list. Sometimes good things do happen

WNC Jazz Profiles: Eve Haslam

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“Eve’s singing comes from deep down in her heart and spans the spectrum of human emotion. She chooses gorgeous songs to sing and makes them her very own. Listening to Eve is a beautiful experience, and I’m so lucky to get to play for her.”

~ Trumpeter Rich Willey

Eve moved to Asheville in 2007, bringing with her great ambitions for positioning her career in business and music. The following years have taken her through a journey of unprecedented struggle, (see www.wncwoman. com/2012/01/02/homeless-with-dogsMatt Getman, Eve Haslam, Mike Holstein, and how-i-found-grace-while-losing-evBrian Felix. Photo: Frank Zipperer erything). Today she’s the visionary for the newly launched Satin Steel Jazz Creek Recording with musicians Brian FeEnsemble (SSJ), which started in 2008 with lix, Zack Page, Andy Page, Justin Watt, Bill the desire of capturing the organic sounds of Bares, Rich Willey and Byron Hedgepeth. an all-acoustic group. Typically, SSJ is Eve I asked Eve how she picks her songs. with Brian Felix on piano and Zack Page “It’s a mind-body connection. If I hear on bass, yet can also be a fluid, hand-picked something, even briefly in a movie that representation of many of the finest jazz moves me, I’ll search it out to learn it. I’ve musicians in this region, plus male vocalist never been able to sing just anything I’m Jesse Earl Junior. told to sing — I have to feel the story in the tune, it’s always personal.” “Eve’s extensive background in the world of jazz has helped her to create a repertoire that’s both unique and satisfying. This is a difficult task in today’s jazz world. Eve delivers this repertoire powerfully, drawing on her deep musical and life experience.”

~ Pianist Brian Felix Eve’s debut album, “Beginning To Sing Like Me,” will be released in 2013 and features several Bossa Novas, some standards, and a special introduction to compositions by her father, Herb. It’ll be done at Big

IF YOU Ronny Cox and friends at the GO Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

series on Sunday, October 21 at 7 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville tickets priced at $12/$15.

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“Jazz was always around my life, along with classic rock and Broadway influences, which is why I’m basically a belter.”

he problem, for years, was I became so focused on singing correctly and emotionally, it was more of a release than art! I only attempted jazz later on and now I’m gloriously coming into my full voice.” New York born and bred, even in early childhood Eve Haslam was the vocalist for her Juilliard-grad composer and dad Herb Haslam. In the fifth grade they co-composed a four-part piece for the school chorus, performed at graduation. By senior high she was exempt from her music studies and was selected with five other class members for an a cappella group called “The Minstrels”. Later on, she studied the famous Bel Canto technique under the renowned opera coach James Partridge. It is a very specific method of warms ups established in Italy that is practiced by some of the greatest crooners and opera singers in the world.

to the nicest of guys. Like Cox, the songs are eclectic, funny, touching, insightful and compelling. “The songs that I write and choose reflect that I pride myself in being able to find great songs and record them, not as covers, but as extensions of what I do as a performer.” Ronny Cox tours regularly with his band and at times solo or with Jack Williams. His last Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse show was among the highlights of that series, a well attended performance that turned more than a few heads. Look for Ronny Cox to again do the same.

“While Eve has been in the midst of recording at my studio, I’ve been able to witness a unique view of her artistry. She encourages the musicians to thrive and create, while keeping everyone focused on a common musical vision.”

~G Guitarist Bruce Lang Eve resides just outside of Asheville with her three loving dogs: Kaya, Sampson and Shannon. Along with her music career, she’s also a published writer and strategist for business owners. Her vocal style is col-

EDDIE LESHURE

lectively influenced by Sarah Vaughan, Shirley Horn, Etta James, Anita O’Day, Elis Regina, Nancy Wilson, Bobby Darin, Tony Bennett, and Keely Smith. Asked about writing music, she commented, “All I did throughout my teens and early twenties was ride horses and compose! For endless hours I’d be at the piano playing and singing. I’ve only recently decided to return to composing. My musical growth is hungry for some freshly composed material, and I think I’m ready!” “Eve works tirelessly to promote the WNC jazz scene! She can always be seen out enjoying and supporting local talent, and is, in her own right, a fine jazz vocalist.”

~ Saxophonist Matt Getman For gigs, samples, and more about Eve, visit www.evehaslam.com/fr_home.cfm Upcoming performances for SSJ include the October Fall Fest, The Smoky Voices Project, and her debut CD Release.

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently off-the-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 15


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Love This Giant 4AD Music

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For anyone who saw St. Vincent Annie Clark’s stunning performance at last year’s Moog Fest the prospect of her collaborating with David Byrne is nothing short of exhilarating. Clark, the genre blending songstress, and Byrne, one of the late 20th century’s most artful musical alchemists, join forces to see what sparks fly. At first glance it’s a perfect pairing of cerebral pop. But, has the end product lived up to expectations? The answer is a resounding yes! Boldly constructed around brass band instrumentation, they manage to avoid the self conscious excess that occasionally thwarts Byrnes’ own post Talking Heads work. Instead, such delights as “Weekend in the Dust,” “Dinner for Two,” and the roustabout shuffle “Lightning,” are given a rhythmic slink that straddles funk, Afro beat, and cool Philadelphia soul. Recorded at Water Music in Hoboken, close enough to the Manhattan turf both artists inhabit, Love This Giant is buoyed by the presence of ace producer John Congleton and members of the Dap-Kings. But it’s Byrne and Clark’s unique vision that guides the album, while Byrne in particular seems rejuvenated by the collaboration. The result may not be a concept album per se, but the pair explore such themes as individuality, community, love, and death with a thoroughness and cohesion that demonstrates how each helped guide the other into creative spaces they might not have otherwise explored. Given the density of Love This Giant, it’s a remarkably catchy exploration, and one of the most fun projects to which Byrne has ever been attached. Given the glorious run of Talking Heads that is indeed remarkable. *****

Bob Mould Silver Age Merge Records Penning his memoir (See a Little Light: the Trail of Rage and Melody) seems to have put the former Husker Du front man in a decidedly wistful mood, as Bob Mould’s return to recording spews forth with the sort of kinetic urgency that he 16 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

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As fall beckons we are greeted with a number of new and interesting releases. Don’t forget that given two stars or five, everything covered here offers something for someone. Be sure to continue supporting our fine, locally-owned record stores, letting them know with your dollars how glad we are to have them.

David Byrne and St. Vincent

PG. 40

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hasn’t displayed since the days of Sugar. Last year Mould revisited his glorious past by performing the album Copper Blue – easily his fiercest and most metal laden work – on stage and in its entirety. Here he takes things a step further by reuniting with bassist Jason Narducy and drummer Jon Wurster to crank up the amps and deliver a searing sixty minutes of power trio rock. There’s little here that would qualify as finesse – the acoustic guitars seem to have been locked away in a vault – but what we do get is lean and clean muscle, the sort of rapid fire bursts that made Husker such a liberating alternative to arena rock. With rare exception The Silver Age (a coy reference to Mould having entered his 50’s), is in constant motion, seesawing between the tense energy of “The Descent” and the classic power pop of “Round the City Square.” The material is as lean and tuneful as any Mould has ever written, but mistaking The Silver Age as some mere journey to the past would be a mistake: instead it’s the work of an artist looking ahead, with both eyes on the road and a clear picture of where he’s going.*****

Ian Hunter and the Rant Band When I’m President Slim Style Records Unlike his label mate and fellow 1970’s Brit darling, Nick Lowe, Ian Hunter has never felt the need to redirect his music to reflect changes in temperament and physiology. He’s the same cantankerous bastard that fronted Mott the Hoople, and, if time has taken its toll on the 73 year old rocker, you’d be hard pressed to tell from this record. Coinciding with the upcoming elections, When I’m President is part protest record and part full blown rock out. Last year’s brief but successful Mott reunion likely gave Hunter an opportunity to pause, reflect, and reload. As such, When I’m President is replete with the same sort of skewed humor that marked 2007’s Shrunken Heads. Heads But, while that comeback disc showed Hunter at his most expansive, the new album takes him (and us) back to his glory days of three chord boogie. Backed by the rant band, the music is an earthy mix of slowly cooked blues, Stones fashioned rockers, and even a bit of gospel. By interspersing one among the others Hunter deftly emphasizes the strengths of

each; the slow numbers make the up-tempo bit seem a bit livelier. As in his past few albums, there’s a couple of throwaway numbers as well as tossed-off references to his advancing years. But Hunter is too keen a figure – he’s surely done and seen it all – to spend much time dwelling on such matters. He mind is clearly in the present, and that offers more than enough to keep him and his audience happy. ***1/2

Chip Taylor and the Grandkids Golden Kids Rules Matching Mole Records Since his 1996 return to recording (following a two decade hiatus), the composer of “Wild Thing” and “Angel of the Morning” has been on a tear, releasing a whopping 19 albums of new material. His last few albums were largely a nostalgic look back at the roots of country and rock – early years of which Taylor was an important (although somewhat inconspicuous) part. And while Taylor has written hundreds of songs in virtually every imaginable genre, yet Golden Kids Rules marks his first album of children’s songs, (earlier this year he released F**k All the Perfect People, an album decidedly not for kids). Golden Kids,, recorded with his three granddaughters, promises to be part of a Smithsonian Folkways series celebrating Taylor’s long career. According to the liner notes, penned by Taylor’s brother and actor Jon Voight, the notion of adults singing with the kids is a longstanding family tradition. The last three songs on the album were written specifically for his son’s wedding, and Taylor, realizing he was onto a good thing, just kept going. They are among the best things here (especially “The Possum Hunter”), while the other tunes straddle a musical line between shuffling folk, country, and roots rock. In other words not much different from Taylor’s usual offerings. The songs deal with the importance of common sense rules (“Golden Kids Rules”), compassionate ways of dealing with death (“Quarter Moon Shining”), and the importance of goals (“Big Ideas”). “Kids Save the Planet” is an environmental anthem that seems a bit forced, while the paean to generosity, “You Can Come and Play with Our Toys,” belabors an obvious point. Well, ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience Nick Lowe at the Grey Eagle

BY JAMES

There are few stories in modern pop as compelling as the reinvention of Nick Lowe.

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rom his earliest days as the leader of the seminal pub rockers Brinsley Schwarz, Lowe-both as a producer, band leader, and solo artist-has held considerable sway over a generation of artists attracted to both his self-determining nature and respectful assimilation of the music with which he surrounds himself. In many regards he is among the earliest DYI artists. Lowe greatly influence the then nascent punk movement, helped pioneer a number of production techniques still in use, and later shifted his sound to better reflect the concerns of a man now well into his 60s. From the start Lowe embraced a back-tobasics movement that planted the seeds of late 1970s punk. As the house producer for Stiff, he nurtured many seminal records by such artists as the Damned, Elvis Costello, and the Pretenders. His rough, ragged production style established the amateurish, do it yourself aesthetics of punk, yet Lowe himself never fit in with the movement. He was far more concerned with bringing back the tradition of three-minute pop singles and hard-driving rock and roll, while subverting his inherent melodic knack with an acerbic sense of humor. His early solo singles and albums Jesus of Cool and Labour of Lust overflowed with hooks, bizarre jokes, and a compulsive energy that made them some of the most durable pop records of the time. As new wave began to fade away in the early ‘80s, Lowe began to explore roots rock, eventually becoming a full-fledged country-rocker in the ‘90s. While he never had another hit after 1980’s “Cruel to Be Kind,” his records, however uneven, found a devoted cult audience. The son of a British Royal Air Force officer, Lowe spent part of his childhood stationed in the Middle East before his family settled in Kent. As a teenager, he played in a variety of bands, eventually teaming up with his friend and fellow guitarist Brinsley Schwarz. In 1965, the pair formed the guitar pop band Kippington Lodge, which landed

‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

perhaps obvious to some. But those are minor quibbles. The kids sing as well as any other their age, and Taylor clearly enjoys their company. It’s no enduring classic, but for spending an afternoon of quality time, one could do far, far, worse. ***

a contract with Parlophone Records the following year. Over the next four years, the group released five singles, none of which received much attention. As the 1970s arrived the band evolved into what would be Brinsley Schwarz, securing a record contract with United Artists the following year. After an aborted start up, the group slowly built a following as the leading exponents of pub rock, a back-to-basics movement of good-time rock and roll that earned a niche in the early years of the decade. With their unassuming appearance and unpretentious music, pub rockers set the stage for punk rock in the late ‘70s, not only by relying on three-chord rock & roll, but also establishing a circuit of pubs to play. Of all the old-guard pub rockers, Lowe was the most significant in the development of punk rock. By the time they broke up in 1975, he had already gained a reputation as an excellent, eccentric songwriter, and he was beginning to produce artists as Graham Parker and Dr. Feelgood. Meanwhile his songwriting was moving quickly away from country tinged blues rock and towards infectious and inventive pop. Lowe wanted to leave United Artists, but the label refused to let him go, so he proceeded to record a series of deliberately unmarketable singles in hopes of getting kicked off the label. The first was “Bay City Rollers We Love You,” a tongue-in-cheek tribute to the teen pop sensations credited to the Tartan Horde. Inexplicably, the single became a hit and the label kept him as an artist. However after “Let’s Go to the Disco” predictably bombed, he and United Artists were more than happy to part ways. After leaving UA, Lowe became the first artist on Jake Riviera and Dave Robinson’s fledgling independent label Stiff Re-

Nick Lowe in concert Wednesday, October 10.

cords as well as the label’s in-house producer. Recorded for just 65 pounds and released in the summer of 1976, “So It Goes”/”Heart of the City” became the first British protopunk single of the late ‘70s, earning glowing reviews if not sales. Lowe began producing records at a rapid rate, helming the Damned’s debut-widely considered the first British punk album- and Elvis Costello’s My Aim Is True. Lowe would go on to become Costello’s go to guy, producing the first half dozen albums while simultaneously producing records for Wreckless Eric, the Rumour, and most of Graham Parker’s early albums. Meanwhile he toured with Rockpile and began making plans for a solo career. Lowe released his debut album, Jesus of Cool (renamed Pure Pop for Now People for its American release), in 1978, which featured his first British Top Ten hit, “(I Love the Sound Of) Breaking Glass.” The album cover pictured Lowe in a variety of rock and roll attire, ranging from hippie, folkie, greasy rocker, and new wave hipster. The not-sosubtle implication being that this guy can do anything. After scoring a hit by producing the Pretenders’ debut single, “Stop Your Sobbing,” Lowe recorded Labour with the support of

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Rockpile. The album featured Lowe’s one big American hit, “Cruel to Be Kind,” which was a reworked version of an old Brinsley Schwarz song. Between the recording and touring in 1979, Lowe married Carlene Carter, the stepdaughter of Johnny Cash; he would produce her first and most successful albums. Lowe and Edmunds toured with Rockpile but the tensions between band members-worsened by their notoriously drunken antics-virtually ensured their demise. From there on Lowe largely focused on his solo work. After a period of uneven records-during which Lowe confronted and contained his alcoholism-he made a comeback with 1994’s The Impossible Bird. Steeped in pure country it was hailed as his finest effort in years, dovetailing nicely with the burgeoning Americana movement in the U.S. In 1998 Lowe again reinvented himself as a suave and sophisticated crooner with Dig My Mood. It was followed by a series of three albums for the North Carolina based label Yep Roc, music which further evinced the cool vibe that Lowe does so well. They may sound nothing like his early proto-punk records but in truth the independent attitude that governs them is reflected in his current music. He’s reached a point where he is clearly comfortable with his place in the world and the solid sales of his recent records indicate that his followers are ready to embrace This Year’s Model. There is simply no denying his lofty position in the goldfish bowl world of rock and roll, and the opportunity to see such a vital musical figure in a small and friendly setting is not to be missed. IF YOU Nick Lowe with special guest GO Chuck Prophet at the Grey Eagle:

Wednesday, October 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets are priced at $20 in advance or $25 day or show for this general admission all ages show.

USAF HERITAGE RAMBLERS: DIXIELAND JAZZ

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ome join YOUR United States Air Force for a fun night of great Dixieland music by the Heritage Ramblers Dixieland music group. From the Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia, this 6-member ensemble performs the music of such legends as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, Jack Teagarden, and Bix Beiderbecke, bringing jazz to life in each performance. The USAF Heritage Ramblers were formed in 2010. Under the leadership

of Sgt John Garcia, the group’s mission is to preserve and present the rich heritage of traditional jazz. Concerts are open to the public and free of charge.

IF YOU GO: Monday, October 15 at 7:30

p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, located at 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain, NC. Call (828) 669-0930 for additional details. Wednesday, October, 17, 8 p.m. at the Altamont, 18 Church Street in Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

The USAF Heritage Ramblers are a part of the Heritage of America Band.

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 17


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southern comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Will Abe Lincoln Story Ever Be Validated?

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olks who prowl the flea markets on weekends can get lucky, as Gerald Arrowood believes he did several years ago when he bought an old chest one day in Burke County. He lives in Morganton and has made visiting yard sales and some old furniture sheds on many rural roads into “an historic journey.” The chest he carried home is so unique

he believes it might have belonged to Abraham Lincoln during his childhood in North Carolina. This is where the mystery begins for many, because whether or not Lincoln was a product of western North Carolina has never been validated. No one could, at the time, prove where the chest came from. Some folks around here believe and allege that Lincoln was born out of wedlock to a young woman in Rutherford County, NC. Many are proud if it is true; however, other’s in this area just turn a deaf ear when

folks try to inquire. On a national level, most people who have done research believe that Illinois was his home state and that his rumored birth in North Carolina just did not happen. When I heard of this story around 15 years ago, I wondered at the time, where is the proof? People in North Carolina have bragging rights if this turns out to be true one day. Or was it just a story between antique and flea market owners looking for recognition? Living in North Carolina as long as I have, I know the story of President Abraham Lincoln. Arrowood at one time was an antique dealer in Morganton. He believes his chest dates back to about 1863. Arrowood found out from the Illinois State Historical Library that there was really not much left in Lincoln’s estate. Curator Thomas Schwartz was not much help to Arrowood when he called to ask questions; apparently Schwartz didn’t have any information or documentation. Arrowood was,

American Craft Week Events

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andMade in America, joining more than 200 retailers and art institutions nationwide in celebration of American Craft Week, is holding special events to celebrate Western North Carolina craft October 5-14. Sunday, October 7, from 6-8 p.m. Craft lab: How to Get Your Work Seen. Panel with Sherry Masters, Manager/Buyer from Grovewood Gallery, Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Curator of Craft and Design at the Mint Museum, and Marthe LeVan, former Art Editor with Lark Books and current owner of Mora Gallery. This event is free and open to the general public. The panel will be held at 125 S. Lexington Ave. Suite 101 in Asheville. On Wednesday, October 9 at 7 p.m. come to UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center for a lecture by authors Janet Koplos and Bruce Metcalf who will share their experiences during the making of the Makers textbook, the significance of the craft movement in the region, and thoughts on the direction

Web Exclusive

BY JANELLE

WIENKE

of craft in America. This lecture is free and open to the general public. Friday, October 12, beginning at 5:30 p.m.: Anna Fariello, Director of the Craft Revival Project at Western North Carolina University, will give the lecture Southern Craft: A Revival in the Mountains followed by From Hand to Hand: Functional Craft in WNC exhibition reception. This event is free and open to the general public at 125 S. Lexington Ave. Suite 101 in Asheville. IF YOU For more information about the GO American Craft Week celebration

at HandMade in America, call (828) 252-0121 or visit www. handmadeinamerica.org. For a complete list of American Craft Week public events taking place locally, go to www. americancraftweek.com/wnc.

Art for Art’s Sake Benefit Reception Thursday, October 11 from 6-9:30 p.m.

Visit our website for Healthy Lifestyles and Dr. Max Hammonds article on Sleep Apnea. www.rapidrivermagazine.com 18 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

Free admission. All art sales during the reception benefit the Asheville Art Museum’s ongoing expansion and capital campaign, Art WORKS for Asheville. Hosted by the Historic Cotton Mill Studios, 122 Riverside Drive in Asheville’s River Arts District. Visit www.ashevilleart.org for more details.

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

at the time, planning to make a trip to Illinois to conduct more research on Abe Lincoln. “Doing this is great fun,” Arrowood said. “I may make the trip up there soon to try and find some sense of who owned this chest.” Whittled on the inside of the chest is the inscription, ‘a Lincoln.’ That was Arrowood’s documentation, all he had left to do was make the trip to Illinois. Some other local flea market collectors who saw the old chest told Arrowood that they think it came from a dealer in Tennesse who brought it down to Burke and Rutherford counties and sold it in the early days of collecting used furniture for resell. It is a traditional way to make a living that many farmers, who once owned rural homes, walked away from. Arrowood bought the chest for $100 from a flea market manager near Rutherford College just inside Burke County line. Arrowood said at the time, “I guess it just depends on who you are talking about the chest with around here. The chest may not be truly authentic, but won’t it be fun trying to find out.” After I did this story for the Charlotte Observer, I never heard another word from Observer Arrowood about the chest. I do not know if the mystery about where Abe Lincoln was born was ever resolved. Remember, one man’s junk may be another’s treasure. That’s true!

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

HOUSE FOR SALE 2 bedroom, 2 bath town home close to town, university, Greenlife (Whole Foods), Lexington and Merrimon Avenues. Large screened porch and screened entrance. Home of writer. Special laminated floors, some carpet, all appliances. Complete garage underneath home. Call (828) 253-3655 for more details.


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fine art 65th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

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or 65 years the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands has set the standard for fine crafts shows across the Southeast and the nation. The finest craftspeople working in the Appalachian mountains come together in Asheville to share their love of craft and sell their work. Collectors come from all across the country to be inspired and support the creative economy. Join us October 18-21 for the Fall edition of the Craft Fair at the newly renovated US Cellular Center (formerly the Asheville Civic Center). All Craft Fair exhibitors have become members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild through a rigorous jury process, insuring the finest quality of work will be showcased. Exhibitors are residents of the southern Appalachian region, representing nine states from Maryland to Alabama. Craft media featured are: clay, jewelry, fiber, wood, glass, paper, metal, mixed media, and natural materials. Styles range from traditional to contemporary. With something for everyone, the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands is the perfect venue to kick off your holiday shopping.

John Turner

BY

APRIL NANCE

PG. 40

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Becky and Steve Lloyd

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, October 18-21

Joan Bazzel

Founded in 1930, the Southern Highland Craft Guild has a rich history which continues to thrive through markets such as the annual Craft Fairs. The Fairs are not only a place to purchase fine crafts, but with education as an important factor of the Guild’s mission, craft demonstrations are a key element of the shows. In addition, beginning on Friday of each Fair weekend, mountain musicians share their love of old time and bluegrass on the arena stage. Asheville, nestled within the Blue Ridge Mountains, provides the perfect backdrop for the Craft Fair. Long known as an arts and crafts destination, Asheville offers architectural charm, eclectic restaurants and a wide variety of lodging. For a complete listing of exhibitors, craft demonstrations, and entertainment scheduled for the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, visit www.craftguild.org.

Patte Vanden Berg

IF YOU The 65th Annual Craft Fair of GO the Southern Highlands takes

place at the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. October 18-21; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ThursdaySaturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. Additional information by visiting www.craftguild.org or phone (828) 298-7928. Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 19


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oodworker, furniture maker, and sculptor Robb Helmkamp added boxes to his repertoire this year. Along with contemporary tables, mirrors and cabinets for your home the designer is busy making exquisitely crafted wooden boxes to hide your most secret treasures. Robb has tapped into an intimate and personal space which he was reluctant to explore in years past. During his schooling at the Haywood Cummunity College’s Professional Crafts program Robb built a beautifully dovetailed, mahogany box and told himself that he would never make another. The scale of box making did not appeal to Robb early on, however last year he decided to put his own spin on these small creations, paying the same attention to every last detail as he does with his furniture. When Robb was young, his mother gave him a couple of wooden boxes that she had stumbled upon while participating in numerous craft shows. Cramming these boxes full of his own treasured belongings, he realised the unique quality that boxes

hold as containers. What can be contained? We all have secrets, pasts, and histories we might like to contain along with any number of trinkets and things we hold dear. Why not hold them in an elegantly designed and unique work of art? Robb has shown his work at Susan Marie Designs, primarily a fine jewerly gallery, since 2010, so he decided to try his hand at jewelry box making. Since he had been commissioned in 2009 to make a large jewelry armoire, why not take the next step and make small jewelry cabinets and boxes? He appreciates the small, intricate details of this kind of work, the change of scale from larger furniture pieces, while maintaing his contemporary style and excellent craftsmanship. Images of flowers and gears are burned on the boxes using a technique called pyrography. The linear aspect of the imagery he chooses stands out as it wraps itself around the edges of the three-dimensionality of the box. Robb sees these images as wearing a badge on his sleeve, inviting one to be captivated by it and wonder what more is hiding in the box.

Small Cherry box by Robb Helmkamp

Medium Maple and Walnut box by Robb Helmkamp

Find out more about Robb and upcoming shows at www.kampstudio.com

IF YOU Robb Helmkamp is the featured artist at GO Susan Marie Designs for the October 5

artwalk. The gallery is located at 4 Biltmore Avenue in downtown Asheville. Robb also shows his work at Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Craft, and the Asheville Art Museum’s Gift Shop.

Maple box by Robb Helmkamp

FALL GALA SHOW • Art, Artists, Food, Drink, and Live Music

Contemporary Fine Art Downtown Asheville

Friday, October 19th 7-9pm • Saturday, October 20th 2-9pm

Photo: Erica Mueller

FROM LEFT: “Knife Raku Vessel #1,” Leonid Siveriver, Raku Fired Clay with Copper and Gold Leaf, 22" tall “Tony Seated #1,” Leonid Siveriver, Terra Cotta with Acrylic Patina, 8.5" tall

89 Patton Avenue

Monday - Thursday 10-6 20 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

Asheville, NC •

828-252-1466

Friday & Saturday 10-7

ArtetudeGallery.com

Sunday 12-5

PG. 40

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RIVER ARTS DISTRICT ARTISTS INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Eileen & Marty Black

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Owners of The Potters Mark

love of the Asheville area and the mountains surround and protect us.

apid River Magazine: Tell

RRM: You’re a husband

us a little about The Potters Mark.

Eileen Black: I started work-

ing with pottery while in New York City’s Queens College in the mid sixties. I specialize in wheel thrown, high fire stoneware. My philosophy is to produce pottery than can both be viewed and used. When my husband, Marty, retired from

engineering in 2000, he joined me in my (now our) pottery business and we moved to Asheville’s River Arts District where Eileen & Marty Black we purchased the Cotton Mill Studios and set up our pottery studio. As both walk-in and Internet business increased in our studio, we gradually reduced the number of gallery accounts from twenty-one down to two ( New Morning Gallery in Asheville, and It’s By Nature in Sylva).

RRM: Tell us a little about your glazes. EB: We specialize in a Copper-Red glaze formulated by Marty. This hard to produce glaze is often called “The Jewel of All Glazes” Along with our red, we have other glaze combinations which are different from the norm. The colors of the glazes reflect the

Photo: Erica Mueller

INTERVIEW WITH

Ashley Membreno

Owner of Asheville Art Supply

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apid River Magazine: Tell

us a little about the Asheville Art Supply store?

Ashley Membreno: Asheville

Art Supply is an independent fine art materials retailer. We try to fill the void for professional-quality art supplies, while reaching out to new and student artists with product demonstrations. We also work with local artists and entrepreneurs to sell their art and products.

RRM: What are some of your most popular products you carry?

AM: We are most proud to carry art

supplies made by artisans here in Asheville. These include Blue Ridge Oil Colors paints and dry pigments, Asheville Bookworks Micropulpery handmade papers, Pipo’s Drawing Chalk, Tami-Lu one-of-a-kind journals, Artwood birch panels, Cara

Mae’s Potter’s Skin Butter, and more.

RRM: Do you sell

supplies for the beginner as well as the professional artist and do you offer any classes?

AM: We sell supplies for everyone from be-

ginner to professional. Because of where we are located, in the heart of the professional artist’s district, we have to be competitive in offering the best quality products. I firmly believe that beginners will also have a better experience using and learning about good materials.

RRM: Tell us a little about your background

and why you chose to open your business in the River Arts District?

AM: I have lived in Asheville for more than 10 years, and have always been looking for an opportunity to use my unique background in business and entrepreneurship to connect with the community. As I begin

Photo: Erica Mueller

and wife team; how has this helped the creative flow of your work, and what strengths as artists do you each bring to this business?

EB: I have been doing wheel work for many years and Marty decided to concentrate on hand-building. These two techniques actually complement each other. I apply the glazes and Marty fires the kilns. The most important thing Marty does is doing everything I don’t want to do (or so he says). Being together all the time, there is a synergy and flow of ideas which enhances our pottery and well being. RRM: Through some research, I learned

that it was not until around 2600 BC that the Mesopotamians began using a rudimentary version of the modern potter’s wheel. Gradual improvements upon the turntable have sped up the process of coiling – or vertically layering coils to build the clay

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

to reach out with the seed of an idea for an art supply store last year, the doors just began to fly open. Connections I had made many years ago became integral to getting the business off the ground. I certainly had a lot of help from friends in the artist community. I can’t imagine wanting to have the store be anywhere but in the River Arts District! The RAD is such a dynamic area to both work in and visit. I encourage everyone in Asheville to visit and discover how much this unique community of artists and businesses has to offer.

For more information on the River Arts District call (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

body – as well as have led to its mass production. Can you describe your style and approach to pottery?

EB: I was very lucky and, after gradu-

ating college, with a major in arts I was able to work with some of the best potters in the world. My functional style and glazing was influenced by them, and many people say my pottery has a hint of the Orient. My production of pottery by working on the wheel is a form of meditation and I focus on transforming a lump of clay into an attractive functional item.

RRM: What do you find most exciting about being an artist?

EB: An old cliché is “Doing some-

thing you love isn’t work” Marty and I are experiencing the joy of pottery and meeting so many visitors from around the world. It’s an ideal life, both living and working together 24/7. We must be doing something right, since we will be celebrating our 47th anniversary.

RRM: Is pottery an investment? EB: Marty says “ after I die, my pot-

tery will be worth a lot of money and I’m really not feeling that well now.” Seriously, our pottery is an investment in joy. Our dinnerware sets can be passed down from generation to generation and can be considered an heirloom. Many people told us that holding a hand-made mug for that morning coffee is a comfort knowing that it was made with love. As far as monetary value...who knows? We don’t sell our pottery as an alternative to the stock market, but rather concentrate on the enjoyment one receives when using or viewing our pottery.

RRM: What future projects are you

working on or towards that you can share with us?

EB: Marty working two new items,

a locking canister with a poured-in silicone rubber seal an a threaded ceramic urn type vessels. We are always open to suggestions for new items from our visitors.

Asheville Art Supply

The Potters Mark

Located at Pink Dog Creative in the River Arts District

Located in the Historic Cotton Mill Studios in Asheville’s River Arts District

344 Depot Street, Asheville (One block south of the Soapy Dog)

122 Riverside Drive, Studio A

(828) 231-3440 www.ashevilleartsupply.com

(828) 252-9122 Monday - Saturday 10-4 p.m.

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 21


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ABOUT THE RIVER ARTS DISTICT

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Jeff Pittman

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The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ artist member strong collective, who, along with dozens of Associate Members and Friends, provides a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art for any aspect of their lives. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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Fine Artist

apid River Magazine: How did you get into painting?

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Jeff Pittman: Well, my dad’s an artist, so I watched him paint as I was growing up, though I never gave it a try until moving here to Asheville in the late 90’s. I remember some failed attempts when I was younger, mostly drawing or sketching, but it wasn’t until I added color that things seemed to come together. Shortly after moving here to the mountains, I picked up a Jeff Pittman Photo: Erica Mueller basic set of acrylics and gave it a half hearted try. A few years later, I took an oil painting class at AB Tech. I really liked the way oils blended, and the colors I could achieve in this medium, and my work began to improve. I’ve been at it ever since. RRM: What does color mean to your work? Do you use it symbolically?

JP: I really just like eye catching color. I’ve always enjoyed the brilliant skies we get here in the mountains. The late afternoon or early morning sun shining on the buildings downtown also lend themselves to bold, colorful paintings. RRM: What is your daily painting routine? I understand that often much time is needed before you’ll consider a painting finished.

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Asheville Skyline from Town Mountain Road by Jeff Pittman

However, your paintings never seem overworked. Can you tell us something about your painting process, especially with how you keep the painting fresh over time?

JP: First of all I don’t paint every day, which is nice, so I don’t get

burned out. I’ve got a busy family life with three school-aged children to keep up with, too! But on the days I do get to paint, I try to go to the studio with a clear plan so I can start painting right away. That is, have my idea sketched, and canvas primed and ready to go. I like to be efficient while I’m there. Sometimes I’ll be close to finishing a piece but have to leave soon, so that makes me hurry a painting along, and that can actually add to the spontaneity of a piece. But sometimes, the hardest thing about a painting is knowing when it’s finished.

RRM: What are you working on in your studio right now? JP: I’ve got a couple of projects going right now; one is a triptych

landscape that I just prepared the canvases for. It’ll be a large mountain vista of some sort, but I haven’t quite figured out what view yet. I’m hoping to get up on the parkway soon and scope out some new vantage points. The other is a commission project, two vertical 40x60" paintings that will flank the entryway in a newly remodeled home out in Fairview. We’re still in the planning stages, but once a clear direction is set, I’ll be busy working on those; maybe I’ll paint them side by side at the same time!

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RRM: Can you describe your studio space and how, if at all, that affects your work?

JP: I’m in a fairly large and open studio space with a warehouse

door that opens right onto Roberts Street. Its nice to get some painting done while also being open to the public. I’m getting used to talking people and painting at the same time. I used to paint in a garage studio space at home and could only work on a piece in small increments of time, but now being at my studio in the River Arts District, I’m able to concentrate on a painting for longer periods at a time, which helps me complete a piece usually while the paint is still wet. I much prefer the wet on wet method as opposed to painting in layers, which is another reason why oil paints suit me best.

Jeff Pittman Studio 140-D Roberts Street, Asheville In the Heart of the River Arts District Across from the Wedge Brewery Hours: By Appointment (828) 242-8014 www.jeffpittman.com

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RIVER ARTS DISTRICT ARTISTS INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Michael Hofman

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This kind of setup is what makes coming to the River Arts District such a unique experience.

Handbuilt Porcelain and Other Beautiful Things apid River Magazine: Your

name has become very popular lately here in Asheville. Yet you seem to personally keep a low profile. Who is Michael Hofman?

Michael Hofman: Well I’m not sure

that is the case, but if people read it in the paper maybe they will believe it anyway. As far as a low profile, that’s simple, I’ve been told I’m a work-aholic. I’m usually either in the studio or working on the farm. I’m attempting to start a flower farm, but that’s another story.

in college and grad school, but that was because the ceramicist had the best parties. I became a potter late in life and quite by acMichael Hofman cident. Some friends of mine were moving and convinced me to take over their studio. I don’t know what I was thinking but I love what I do and have never looked back.

RRM: Tell us a little about your store. MH: I have a 2000 sq

RRM: So when

did you make up your mind to be a potter?

MH: I took

pottery classes

Photo: Erica Mueller

foot studio and gallery where my apprentice, Tiffany and I make and sell lace embossed handbuilt porcelain. About 30% of the space is dedicated to displaying finished work in a comfortable home setting and the rest of the space is our working studio.

RRM: Tell us a little about porcelain and how it differs from clay pottery.

MH: Porcelain is clay, but it is a man made mixture of different clays and materials. Porcelain was invented by the Chinese thousands of years ago and reinvented by Europeans hundreds of years ago. Porcelain is valued over other clays because of its strength. A stronger clay body means we can work thinner therefore lighter.

Photo: Erica Mueller

RRM: I have heard porcelain is a very dif-

ficult clay to work with. What made you want to work with something that is so hard to handle?

MH: Porcelain can be a little finicky to work

with, but again, because of its strength we can make things thinner. A beautiful thin plate is worth a little extra effort on our part.

RRM: Although it is generally called “white

porcelain,” I see there are varieties of white

INTERVIEW WITH

Broken Road Studio & Michael Hofman Studios

Hosts of the Green/Art Works Benefit

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reen/Art Works is a benefit to create awareness and raise money in support of the great work that Green Works is doing in our area. The event, hosted by Broken Road Studio (Philip DeAngelo, Karen Weihs, and Stephen St. Claire), and Hofman Studios (Michael Hofman) will be held Saturday, October 13 in Asheville’s River Arts District.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about the upcoming event with GreenWorks.

Philip DeAngelo: We wanted to help

create awareness and financial support for Asheville Greenworks. Asheville GreenWorks, is a volunteer-based organization working to achieve a

clean and green Asheville and Buncombe County through community organizing, educating and environmental stewardship.

RRM: How did this relationship between everyone (Broken Road Studio, Michael Hofman Studio, the Wedge brewery and GreenWorks) come about?

Michael Hofman: The Wedge Brewery

and Michael Hofman Studios.

PD: Broken Road

Studio is made up of artists Philip DeAngelo, Karen Weihs and Stephen St. Claire, while Hofman Studios is made up of, well…Michael Hofman. We are four friends with a shared passion for art, food and all things Asheville. Our two studios are separated by two purple doors that when opened up, make for a wonderful combined event space.

RRM: Will there be special artwork for sale at this event?

has supported GreenWorks with other events and I think we all share a passion for preserving our natural local resources. The River Arts District is a totally unique area and has become home to over 200 professional artists. We are proud to be a part of RADA and want people visiting to have the opportunity to see us at our best.

PD: Each artist has donated a special piece

RRM: Tell us about Broken Road Studio

River Arts District on Depot street and they

24 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

to be raffled off with 100% of the proceeds going to Asheville GreenWorks. Also, a percentage of all additional sales during the event will go to GreenWorks as well.

RRM: What does GreenWorks offer The

River Arts District (RAD) and Asheville?

PD: GreenWorks makes its home in the

For more information on the River Arts District call (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

such as snow white, bluish white, ivory, etc. How do you create the variations?

MH: The colors come from a thin

layer of glaze which envelopes each piece. Most of the work in the gallery is dipped in one glaze and left to dry overnight and then dipped in a different glaze, which accounts for the variations of color within a single piece.

RRM: What are you most proud of as a potter?

MH: Becoming a potter has afforded

me the opportunity to become part of a wonderful community known as The River Arts District. I have forged many friendships with other artists that will last a lifetime and have had the privilege to know, if even for a few brief moments, thousands of people who walk through my door each year.

Michael Hofman Handbuilt Porcelain and Other Beautiful Things 111 Roberts Street, Asheville Tuesday - Saturday 10-4 p.m. (828) 232-1401 www.hofmanstudios.com

take genuine pride in keeping our neighborhood clean and green. Their “Green the RAD” program is a direct benefit to all of us in the River Arts District and the surrounding communities. From the door of my studio I have watched them spearhead the transformation of our area. The weeds and the litter have been replaced with new trees and mulch. I love to kayak on the stretch of the river by my studio and I have noticed a big difference due to their constant cleanup efforts on the French Broad.

RRM: Do we need to buy tickets for this event?

MH: No tickets necessary. It is a free

event and we would like as many people as possible to come out in support of Asheville GreenWorks and the fantastic work that they do.

RRM: Tell us a little about the live music and food?

MH: Well for music, we have Zack

Bier and friends playing a mix of acoustic swing tunes. Zack is a strong continued on page 43


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Mesmerized by Nature

usan Stanton is one of the area’s best known nature photographers, her work being showcased in galleries and magazines across the region. Specializing in images of the Blue Ridge Parkway from Linville to Cherokee, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and WNC’s national forests, her love of nature coupled with her passion for photography and artistic vision creates images that capture the mood and rustic charm that is known as the Southern Appalachians.

Autumn on the Parkway by Susan Stanton

Western NC is spectacular in so many ways.

P.H P.H. H Best Appalachia in Oils

Evening Glow

Aidan’s Walk Accepted Original Oil Paintings • Giclee Prints • Commissions

www.mountainbrushworks.com • 828-734-9304 26 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

Autumn at the Mill by Susan Stanton

October’s Grace by Susan Stanton

Stanton’s photographs are often mistaken for paintings. She shoots her subjects in very selective lighting conditions, lending her photographs rich brilliant colors and deep natural textures — it’s as if you can step right into them. Having endured back limitations and hip surgery, Stanton truly appreciates her mobility. She travels deep into our national and state forests — where some cannot venture — to discover the hidden beauty that lies therein. She carefully photographs it and then reproduces it in the form of a photograph for others to enjoy. “I know what it’s like not to be able to hike,” Stanton explains, “so if I can take the viewer on a visual journey to some of the area’s most treasured places, then I am fulfilled. Western NC is spectacular in so many ways — I am mesmerized by her subtle nuances and humbled by her grand vistas. I never take her beauty for granted and consider myself blessed for the opportunity to capture her portrait.”

Stanton is often asked why she doesn’t open her own gallery. “I am fortunate enough to have several wonderful, knowledgeable people representing my work at their beautiful galleries. Why would I choose to be inside when I could be outdoors following my passion?” And, for her, that is grabbing her hip waders and backpack and setting off on another adventure. Locally, Stanton’s work can be found at Woolworth Walk in Asheville, Earthworks in Waynesville, 32 Broad Gallery in Brevard, Hand in Hand Gallery in Flat Rock, Cherry Street Gallery in Black Mountain, and Jim Gray Gallery in Gatlinburg. Stanton is happy to show and discuss her work through a virtual slide presentation at local retirement communities and nursing facilities. She is passionate about sharing the region’s beauty with those who are unable to see it firsthand. For more details you can contact Susan via her website, www.SusanStanton.com, or phone (828) 808-1414.


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artful living A Non-Dualistic Political Paradigm

BY

BILL WALZ

as sharing common problems, that recognizes that we are all “We must be aware “Our world and our lives together on this great “Spaceof the real problems have become increasingly ship Earth,” a term coined of the world. Then, interdependent, so when our by the ecological visionary Buckminster Fuller in 1967, with mindfulness, neighbor is harmed, it affects us along with all the animal we will know what too. Therefore we have to abandon and plant life in a codeto do and what not outdated notions of ‘them’ and ‘us’ pendent state of what to do.” and think of our world much more the Vietnamese Zen Master Thich Nhat in terms of a great ‘US’, a greater ~ Thich Nhat Hanh Hanh calls “interhuman family.” being,” we are unable to ““be aware of - Dalai Lama the real problems of the world. world.” The rom a Buddhist perspective, humanSuccessful human “mindfulness” ity suffers from a mass delusion, in a progress requires overthat Thich Nhat sense, a kind of mental illness, and it coming the dualistic thinking Hanh references is seeing is called dualism. We don’t recognize that separates individuals, genders, races, the non-dualistic context of existence as the it as a kind of insanity because to us classes, sexual preferences, regions, political larger frame in which the small frame of it is normal, but normal is always relative. parties, religions, and nationalities from the dualistic interest must operate in order to Most people today would call the idea of truth of our mutual value, interdependence truly and skillfully “know what to do and one race making slaves of another race an and common needs and problems. It also what not to do.” insane idea, but of course, 250 years ago, requires the realization of humanity’s interAn inherent limitation of dualistic the concept was considered quite sane and connectedness and interdependence with thinking is that it organizes our perception normal by many leading persons in Amerithe non-human natural world, a non-dualand choices as “either – or.” We almost can’t can society. istic realization that has barely scratched the help approaching life with its challenges and Dualism is a state of mind, a way of surface of human consciousness. problems from the limited perspective of looking at the world based on the experience When the world is perceived as divided “this way” or “that way.” of separateness in a world made up of sepainto the very highly valued “me” and “us, If I consider myself “right” in my aprate objects, in which these objects have only with “you” and “them” having lesser or even proach to something (and who doesn’t) and a utilitarian relationship to each other. This negative value, and “it” as having no value you have a different approach, then you means that I (the primary and most imporother than how I and we can use it, we have must be “wrong.” Reality is not this simple. tant object) look at the world and see objects set in motion the consciousness at the root Reality is made up of all perspectives, and (including other people) as having beneficial of much of the harm and suffering caused perhaps the most underappreciated small use to me, as detracting or harmful to me, or by humanity. word in the English language is “and.” Life as irrelevant to me. While it is true that dualism is essential is seldom this or that, but rather, this and We then organize these objects into a for the particularly human characteristic that, and that, and that, ad infinitum. hierarchy of relevance ranging from what of material productivity, inventiveness and There is probably no area of human life we believe to be the most detracting and creativity, it is remarkably short-sighted. more locked into dualistic consciousness dangerous, to the most enhancing and benIt tends to look for immediate solutions to than politics, and since politics is the arena eficial. We make a grave error in believing problems in isolation as they arise, and is in which decisions about how the elements these assignments of relevance reflect true largely incapable of seeing problems within of human society interact with each other, and accurate assessments of the way things their larger context. and eventually, with the natural world, it is really are. This is why dualistic thinking ofimperative that we find a way beyond ten leads to delusions, both small and great. dualist thinking in politics. We are one species sharing The institution of slavery was the prodWe must understand the inherent uct of dualistic thinking that made people a planet with each other, limitations of either-orthinking. We of the African race into objects of utility in must be able to see, for example, that regardless of surface differences. the most debased way to people of the White the arguments between individual-librace. Today we recognize this as crazy, as erty/free-enterprise capitalism and supdelusional. The point is that slavery is only It also looks for solutions within port-for-all-socialism are false. We must see an extreme example of dualistic thinking. parameters of possibility limited to already that our problems can only be resolved with What is important is that dualistic thinking is accepted ideas, sometimes the very ideas a non-dualistic political perspective that synas alive and well today as it was two hundred that have created the problems. It is typically thesizes the best of capitalist/libertarian and years ago, only operating at subtler levels of blind to the insight that ultimately humanisocialist/collectivist political and economic discrimination. ty’s problems arise from the inability to see philosophies. Dualistic thinking was extremely that we are one species sharing a planet with A dynamic system that skillfully balancdestructive two hundred years ago, and each other, regardless of surface differes protections for the liberty and enterprise it is perhaps even more dangerous today ences, as well as with many other species, all of individuals, while guarding against exbecause the stakes for the future and quality interdependent and necessary for the quality cesses by the powerful at the expense of the of survival for the human species are now existence of each. vulnerable, is essential. Creative individualmuch higher. “We must be aware of the real Without a counterbalancing non-dualism and all-inclusive supportive community problems of the world.” istic perspective that recognizes all humanity has to be the goal.

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In such a system, government is democratic in a quite pure sense with built-in protections against undue influence and control by special and powerful interests, while guided by an overarching non-dualistic philosophy. Education that trains citizens not only in traditional information and skills, but also complementary non-dualistic wisdom, must be open, available to all,and the highest societal priority. A wise society serves as the protector of basic human rights and entrepreneurial dynamism. Commercial monopolies and colluding cabals must be particularly guarded against, as dynamic human-scale commercial and creative interests arefostered. The provision of basic human needs such as food, water, healthcare, civic protection, housing, education, old-age security, etc. ought never be monopolized by commercial interests to the exclusion of any person. Personal expression, meaningful vocation and activity, along with safety from exploitation and harm by excesses of the powerful (individual, corporate or state) must be absolute priorities. We need a system that continued on page 37

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 27


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Arbitrage ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Tense, well made character study of a charming but duplicitous financier whose perfect life suddenly spins out of control.

REEL TAKE: Time was when a new film

by Richard Gere would have garnered a major release by a major studio and been surrounded lots of publicity. While there has been a press junket featuring Gere and co-star Susan Sarandon, their new film Arbitrage has only been given a limited art house release by the Weinstein Company. This strategy seems to have worked as the in-house take of Arbitrage was second only

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

All of the performers hit the right notes with Sarandon, Roth and Stuart Margolin (remember him?) being outstanding. The direction by first time writer-director Nicholas Jarecki is refreshingly uncluttered although director Jarecki should have told screenwriter Jarecki to simplify things just a little. The biggest problem with the movie from my perspective is that it’s more complicated than it needs to be making it occasionally hard to follow. It’s also extremely cynical in tone and I can’t say I liked the ending. Nevertheless Arbitrage is an above Susan Sarandon and Richard Gere are about to average movie with a good cast who see their “perfect” lives go straight to hell in the know what to do with the material and tense financial thriller Arbitrage. effortlessly elevate it by their very presence. Gere has aged well and is ideal for to The Master which is poised to be the the role of the magnate (much better than indie darling of the year. original choice Al Pacino would have been). After watching the film I wondered As for Susan Sarandon (we won’t mention where the title came from as it’s not menher age), she’s still a knockout and plays her tioned once during the course of the movie. part to perfection. This is a film that, like its Colleague Michelle Keenan came to the restwo stars, will age very well and that is what cue by looking the word up (that’s why her good movies do. name is first in the byline). Arbitrage – the simultaneous purchase and sale of the same securities, commodities, etc in different markets to profit from unequal prices. Now both you and I know (thanks Michelle!). As it turns out, that’s a perfect description of the plot of the film for that is exactly what Richard Gere is attempting to do. He’s a very successful, widely respected financier who seems to have it all. A still beautiful wife (Sarandon), a loving family, palatial surroundings, and enough money to give a lot of it away to worthy charities. If that were really the case then we’d have no movie. Of course with a story like this he has a mistress (Laetitia Casta) who wants to be an artist, trouble within his company, and a serious cash flow problem. Borrowing illegally from one of his hedge funds is just the start of his problems. In a scene similar to one in Bob Rafelson’s Blood & Wine (1996), he’s involved in a car crash where his mistress is killed and he’s injured. He calls on the son of an old friend (Nate Parker) to help him out. All seems well until the investigating officer (Tim Roth) smells a rat and comes after Gere and then the s**t really hits the fan.

28 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

Rated R for language, violent images, and drug use.

for those who enjoy darkly twisted humor, sudden bursts of violence, and a bit of sexual perversion, Killer Joe is right up your alley. Chris (Emile Hirsch) is a 22 year old petty drug dealer in nowhere Texas. When his own mother steals his stash, he needs to come up with $6,000 in a jiffy or he’s dead. Not feeling any love loss for his mother, Chris hatches a plan with this father, Ansel (Thomas Haden Church), to have her knocked off so they can collect $50,000 in life insurance. Ansel’s now wife, Sharla (Gina Gershon) also wants a cut of the action so, in a rare moment of familial harmony, they agree — the bitch no one likes will be gone, they collect the insurance money, and all their problems will be solved. Ansel and Chris attempt to hire Detective ‘Killer Joe’ Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), but can’t afford his retainer fee. However, after catching a glimpse of Chris’ younger sister Dottie (Juno Temple), Joe agrees to do the job if they’ll put Dottie up as sexual collateral. Seeing as they’re all dumber than a bag of hammers and have the moral sensibility of a gnat, no one seems to give this transaction a second thought.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Killer Joe ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: When a morally derelict, dysfunctional family hires a hit man to take out the only family member with a life insurance policy, all does not go according to plan.

REEL TAKE: Killer Joe will

no doubt have left first run theatres by the time this issue goes to press. Those that have seen it will be few and those that actually liked it will be even Mathew McConaughey is part sociopath, part gentleman caller in Killer Joe. fewer. The folks at KFC will also be glad to see it gone too (but we’ll get to that later). Killer Joe is one Dottie, appropriately named, is the inof the most singularly disturbing, yet darkly nocent character (albeit slightly demented), comic films to come down the pike in a long at the center of the story. Her naive, simple time. It is not a film I can easily recommend ways make her seem almost angelic. But to many, and I would even caution some ‘Movies’ continued on page 25 people away from it. On the other hand,


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then again we are dealing with a story where the hit man is the least morally reprehensible character. That things don’t go as planned is a foregone conclusion, but how far they go, and how bad they go, are not. The film culminates in a spectacular blaze of Jerry Springer-like deep-fried, demented dysfunctionality. You will not have the opportunity to see an ending as brazenly unsettling as this very often, and rest assured, you will never look at a fried chicken leg the same again, if ever. Playwright Tracy Letts adapted his own play for the big screen. Director William Friedkin (The The Exorcist Exorcist, The French Connection) seizes every layer of Letts’ story with the audacity and tenacity of his earlier work. The cast is disturbingly good as this band of derelicts. Hirsch is the least impressive, but that may not be so much about his performance as it is that his character is written with a puny-ness that belies his tough talk. Thomas Haden Church gets most of the film’s laughs as a rather unwitting dupe. Gina Gershon is mean as a snake as Ansel’s wife and deserves everything she gets. Juno Temple almost steals the whole show, and is second only to McConaughey, who turns in a seamless performance as the titular character, navigating between sociopath, sexual aggressor and gentleman caller. Killer Joe is brutally fascinating, unflinchingly unapologetic, and impossible to forget, even if you want to. Rated NC-17 for graphic disturbing content, involving violence and sexuality, and a scene of brutality (involving a chicken leg).

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Lawless ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Gangster goes Appalachian in this true story of a bootlegging band of brothers in prohibition-era Virginia.

REEL TAKE: Lawless is a gritty, stylish,

genre-bending gangster tale, served Appalachian-style. It was inspired by Matt Bondurant’s novel, “The Wettest County in the World, which tells the tale of his grandfather Jack Bondurant and his grand uncles, who ran a moonshining operation, during prohibition-era in the mountains of Virginia. Directed by John Hillcoat (The The Road Road)) and adapted for the screen by writer/musician Nick Cave, The film aims high, but tries to pull off too many things to be truly great. Instead, it delivers moments of greatness couched between pops of humor and unsettling violence. Lawless is not an easy film to watch, but it is engaging throughout. As the story goes, the Bondurant brothers – Forrest, Howard and Jack — were successful bootleggers in Franklin County, Virginia during prohibition. The narrative

Tom Hardy plays Frank Bondurant, the toughest bootlegger in Viriginia in Lawless.

voice of the story is Jack Bondurant (Shia LaBeouf), the youngest of the Bondurants. He lives in shadow of his two older brothers, especially the eldest brother Forrest (Tom Hardy), the head of their moonshining operation. Jack tells us that Forrest is a bit of a legend on the merit of his toughness and his apparent gift for eluding the grim reaper, even when death seems inevitable. It’s business as usual until special deputy Charley Rakes (Guy Pearce) arrives on the scene. Rakes demands a cut of the action or they’ll be shut down. While other moonshiners in the area are intimidated and cave to the deputy, the Bondurants do not. Meanwhile Jack tries to prove himself to his older brothers by making a run to Chicago to impress a mobster, Floyd Banner (Gary Oldman). Banner remembers Jack, who quietly witnessed Banner killing a rival in cold blood, and he is impressed. The Bondurant’s bootlegging business soars, which only fuels Rakes’ fury. It’s war on the Bondurant boys. On the surface Lawless sounds like the ultimate Americana antihero movie – gangsters, moonshiners, bootleggers and cops, complete with an Appalachian backdrop. What’s really there is something far more violent and disturbing. There is an undercurrent of brutality that damn near usurps anything worthwhile from the film. For me, this falls squarely on the shoulders of Hillcoat and Cave. The duo seem better suited to magnifying the more brutal and bleak elements of the story than elevating heartfelt emotion. The flecks of humor speckled throughout diffuse the darkness, but the moments of lightness and romance are never quite in balance with the rest of the film. Hillcoat does achieve fine performances from his cast. Even LaBeouf stretches his chops in this one, and everyone surrounding him gives exceptionally strong performances. Oldman proves the adage that no part is too small. As Rakes, Pearce becomes one of the most singularly repulsive characters to ever hit the silver screen. That he is at once foppish and evil makes him even more fun to despise. Hardy as the sullen, brutish eldest Bondurant is believable, likeable and emotionally vulnerable, in spite of his hulk-

ing physical demeanor. He also delivers some of the most comic moments of the film with his mumbling and grumbling. Best of all, he seems to believe in his own myth and invincibility as much as everyone else. Cave creates the ideal musical backdrop, with surprising bursts of modern alt rock thrown in for good measure. This element gives a beautifully filmed period piece a contemporary and relevant edge. Bottom line, Lawless is not flawless, but it is certainly worthwhile.

Rated R for strong violence, profanity, sexual content, nudity, and smoking.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Master ∑∑∑ Short Take: Paul Thomas Anderson’s 2 ½ hour look at a violent sociopath who becomes involved with a Scientology like cult features an Oscar worthy performance from Joaquin Phoenix but founders on its lack of sympathetic characters and a story that goes nowhere.

HENDERSONVILLE The MasFILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more informacall (828) whotion wants to sit 697-7310. through a 141 minute film October 7:

The Aviator Martin Scorsese’s award winning biopic on the life of billionaire Howard Hughes and the women in his life has an Oscar winning performance from Kate Blanchett as Katherine Hepburn. The film also features Kate Beckinsale, John C. Reilly and Alan Alda. Directed by Martin Scorsese (2004) October 14:

Hell’s Angels After The Aviator it seems only fair to screen the movie that launched Howard Hughes’ and Jean Harlow’s Hollywood careers. Basically a sound version of Wings, this epic story of World War I with its incredible aerial footage, has recently been restored to its full glory. Ben Lyon and James Hall also star. Directed by Howard Hughes (1930) October 21:

Without A Clue Disciple Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman in Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest magnum opus The Master.

REEL TAKE: Paul Thomas Anderson’s

name is on a short list of great filmmakers (and the only living one) whose films I admire as a critic but as an audience member, they make me want to ask for a refund. Being in the company of Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick, and Michaelangelo Antonioni sounds like high praise and it is but ultimately I want something more from a filmmaker than art with a capital A. All the elements are here for a great movie. The subject of a Scientology like cult and its charismatic founder (Philip Seymour Hoffman) circa 1950 is rife with possibilities and Anderson gets a lot of it right. His actors give flawless performances most notably Amy Adams and Joaquin Phoenix. If Phoenix doesn’t get the Best Actor Oscar or at least a nomination, than the director will have no one to blame but himself. ‘Movies’ continued on page 30

What if Dr. Watson were really the great deductive mind and Sherlock Holmes only an actor playing a part? That’s the premise behind this comedy-mystery that features solid performances from Ben Kingsley (Watson) and Michael Caine (Holmes). Directed by Thom Eberhardt (1988) October 28:

Night Gallery Rod Serling wrote all three episodes of this multi-story film which served as the pilot for the famous TV series. The stories concern a painting that changes, a blind woman (Joan Crawford) who undergoes an eye transplant, and a Nazi war criminal (Richard Kiley) hiding out in Argentina. Roddy MacDowell and Ossie Davis are featured in the first story. Directed by Boris Sagal / Steven Spielberg / Barry Shear (1969)

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watching a day in the life of these people for far too many days. There is a beginning, a middle, but no end. If PTA’s intention is to alienate the audience then he succeeds with flying colors. Most of the almost full house I saw this with left the theater saying mostly unkind things (to put it mildly). That’s really too bad as there is much in The Master to admire. The period recreation is outstanding and the soundtrack of modern chamber music and pop standards of the day is remarkably effective. The photography and editing are up to PTA’s previous high standards with unusually long takes interspersed with intense close-ups. The quality performances by his large ensemble cast recall the movies of one of his favorite directors, Robert Altman. The story, just so you know, concerns a violent sociopath (Phoenix) who becomes involved with a cult of regressive time travelers (past lives) headed up by a charismatic leader (Hoffman) whose wife (Amy Adams) is the driving force behind him. Hoffman sees Phoenix as a test case to be cured by his theories but Phoenix remains unresponsive. They eventually part company with nothing having been accomplished. The End. Instead of becoming more accessible, Paul Thomas Anderson’s movies seem to becoming more enigmatic and little more than a cinematic exercise. That may be great for some critics but it’s certainly not great for most audiences. If this sounds like your kind of movie, then by all means go for it but others beware. Rated R for sexual content, graphic nudity, and language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Robot & Frank ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Similar to Driving Miss Daisy except with a robot, Robot & Frank is essentially a one man show and Frank Langella is more than up to the task.

REEL TAKE: After watching this movie, I

was reminded of a Time magazine review from years back talking about actor James Mason. The review concerned a stage play that Mason was appearing in and it remarked that he had been a beautiful young man and that now he had become a beautiful old man. The same can be said for Frank Langella and this movie is the proof. Langella plays the appropriately named Frank, a retired jewel thief in the near future who is in the early stages of dementia. His son (James Marsden) purchases a robot companion (voiced by Peter Saarsgard) to keep an eye on him and to help him with daily tasks. Naturally Frank can’t stand the robot at first especially when it tries to teach him gardening. Once he discovers

Retired jewel thief (Frank Langella) and local librarian (Susan Sarandon) look over a rare copy of Don Quixote in the touching futuristic drama Robot & Frank.

that it can’t distinguish legal from illegal activities (they are just tasks to be performed), he begins to open up. First he teaches the robot how to pick locks. This enables him to steal a copy of Don Quixote from the town library. This is

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Blood & Wine”

to impress the local librarian (Susan Sarandon) who’s distressed because the library is being converted into a community center by a wealthy developer (Jeremy Strong) since books and newspapers are becoming obsolete. Later Frank and the robot steal jewels from the developer and when the police question him, he pretends his memory is worse than it is. Frank also has a daughter (Liv Tyler) who returns from a philanthropic trip in Asia to ask him to give up the robot which she doesn’t like and to which Frank has now become attached. This, along with the jewel theft, forces Frank into making a decision that will affect how both he and the robot will continue to function. As I mentioned at the outset, this is essentially a one man show with Langella easily taking center stage. Marsden is good as the concerned son and Sarandon equally good as the librarian with a secret although it’s a role several actresses could have played. Liv Tyler continues to unimpress me since Lord of the Rings but then there

October DVD Picks

Blood & Wine (1996) Seeing the new Richard Gere movie Arbitrage (reviewed in this issue) brought back memories of this 1996 modern noir that features Jack Nicholson, Michael Caine and a young Jennifer Lopez. Nicholson plays a successful wine merchant whose life suddenly spins out of his control and the more he tries to fix it, the worse things get. He enlists the aid of a seriously ill thief (Caine) to steal a valuable diamond necklace which will help to cover his financial losses. His mistress (Lopez) becomes involved with his estranged son (Stephen Dorff) and his wife (Judy Davis) finds out about the necklace and wants it for herself. Similarities between the two movies abound including a serious car accident and its aftermath which is a key plot element. Things go from bad to worse for Jack. He double crosses Caine and then goes after his son and wife. This leads to a remarkable ending which was much more dynamic and satisfying than the one in Arbitrage. Nicholson’s long time friend and collaborator Bob Rafelson (Five Easy Pieces, The Postman Always Rings Twice) is at the helm while Caine and Judy Davis give ferocious performances. The film is beautifully shot and edited and proves that you don’t have to have wet streets in L.A. or black & white pho-

30 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

tography to make a film noir. If you like your crime thrillers dark and with a few twists, than Blood & Wine is a potent mixture.

Thunder Road (1958) After seeing Lawless I was tempted to offer the Coen brother’s Miller’s Crossing as my DVD pick for the month – as an example of a film that definitely achieves the balance that Lawless lacks. But as I thought about it, I kept going back to the 1958 classic Thunder Road,, another Appalachian tale of moonshine and bootlegging. It also still amazes me how many people I know who have never seen the film, a film shot right here in Asheville, starring Robert Mitchum. Unlike Lawless, Thunder Road doesn’t take place during prohibition. Mitchum, who wrote, produced and starred in the film, Lucas Doolin, a Korean War veteran who returns home to the family business of making and peddling illegal hooch. The goal is to make, transport and sell the stuff

isn’t a lot for her to do either. The screenplay is about more than just Frank and his robot. It has a few things to say not only about one character’s dementia, but on what it sees as the collective overall dementia being brought about by the disappearance of print media. There is a significant plot twist at the end involving Sarandon which I won’t mention here but it adds an additional emotional resonance to the film. Take away the futuristic setting and there really isn’t anything new about Robot & Frank. It’s Driving Miss Daisy with the robot in place of Morgan Freeman. There are many other movies with similar plot lines but what keeps this film a cut above them is the avoidance of sledgehammer sentimentality and Langella’s captivating performance. A small film, to be sure, but one that is “memorable.” Rated PG-13 for language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN ‘Movies’ continued on page 31

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Thunder Road” without the treasury men catching up with you. By the 1950’s moonshiners were also hot rodders, tearing down winding mountain roads with a bootful of shine. In fact running shine gave birth to NASCAR. Armed with those sleepy eyes, contempt for authority and tough guy bravado, Mitchum was the perfect actor to tackle this territory. Like the Bondurants, Lucas Doolin and his family refuse to cower to the heavies attempting to take over his family’s operation. It’s worth noting that Mitchum’s son James Mitchum co-stars as Lucas’ little brother Robin. Like Jack Bondurant, Robin emulates his big brother longs to prove himself in the family business. An indie film ahead of its time, Thunder Road was low budget wonder that scored in the box offices and played forever on the Southern drive-in circuit. Today it looks dated and is almost campy, but look closely and you can spot some of the locations where it was filmed (The Log Cabin Motel in Woodfin features quite prominently in the film.) Listen closely and you’ll also hear Robert Mitchum singing the ballad “The Ballad of Thunder Road.” Locally Thunder Road is available at Rosebud Video and Orbit DVD, as well as through online outlets.


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film reviews Meanwhile both of these previous tales are being told by Clay Hammond (Dennis Quaid), a successful writer at a book readThe Words ∑∑∑ ing and signing. As his narrative evolves Short Take: When a talented but what is truth and what is fiction isn’t clear. struggling young novelist stumbles What is clear is that, while thoughtful and across a brilliant unpublished romantic, The Words thinks it’s far more manuscript, scruples are tested and clever than it actually is. truth may be stranger than fiction. Its vanity is its downfall. If it had been just a romantic drama without such emphasis on superficially outwitting its viewer (this is not a Christopher Nolan film after all), the result would have been more moving and elegant and ultimately more literary. Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal codirected — multiple directors for multiple stories, perhaps? The cast turns in fine performances, although Quaid is downright creepy and almost pained in moments where that just doesn’t Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana star in The Words where sit right. Cooper and Irons on the truth may just be stranger than fiction. the other hand seem to truly enjoy their parts. Some have REEL TAKE: Most critics, if they are resaid Irons phoned in the part, but I disagree viewing it at all, have crucified the layered with that sentiment. romantic melodrama The Words. In fact, Ultimately The Words is a layered last I checked it had a 17% fresh rating on literary drama that plays out like a book for Rotten Tomatoes, which makes it not only people who don’t read. rotten but pretty darn stinky. As with any Rated PG-13 for brief strong language and other movie, audiences will decide the film’s smoking. worth and it’s fate. While I’m not going to REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN sing its praises, I’m not going to dish up a snarky dissection of the movie (although I Trouble with the Curve ∑∑∑∑ concede there are parts where it’s tempting). Short Take: Although billed as a Clint Rory Jansen is a talented young Eastwood picture, this movie is really novelist who receives praises from literary Amy Adams’ vehicle and she makes the agents who won’t publish his book (it’s most of it. too elegant for this economy or some such thing). While on his honeymoon in Paris, REEL TAKE: Don’t let Clint Eastwood’s he finds a battered old valise. Once home recent shenanigans at the Republican Nahe discovers an old manuscript, a love story tional Convention keep you from seeing that keeps him riveted, a story he wished this movie. No matter how you feel about he’d written. Eastwood it should be noted that he is only Longing to know what it would be like a part of this movie. A key part to be sure to feel those words coming from himself, but Trouble with the Curve is really about he begins to type until he has copied the and truly belongs to Amy Adams. In fact manuscript letter for letter, typo for typo. she is so good that she elevates this film When his wife (Zoe Saldana) sees it, she close to the level of Bull Durham and Field thinks it’s his and thinks it is the best thing of Dreams. he’s ever written. She makes him promise It bears a closer resemblance to Bull to show it the publisher where he works as Durham in that the story takes place a mail clerk. One thing leads to another and among the minor league baseball teams before he knows it, he has a best seller on of North Carolina. No real minor league his hands. teams are used (the principal team is called Enter ‘the old man’ (Jeremy Irons). the Swannanoa Grizzlies) in this story of The old man is author of the long lost an aging baseball scout (Eastwood) and his story. After ominously trailing Rory he estranged daughter (Adams) who is one confronts him in the park one day. He tells step away from becoming a partner in an the story behind the story. As he does the Atlanta law firm. film becomes a story within a story. Ridden Knowing that his eyesight is deteriowith guilt, Rory tries to come clean, at the rating, Eastwood’s boss with the Atlanta risk of losing his wife, his credibility and his Braves (John Goodman) sends him on one newfound fame and fortune. last assignment to scout out a hot young ‘Movies’ continued from pg. 30

prospect in North Carolina. The prospect, Bo Gentry (Joe Massingale), can hit the ball a mile and has no small opinion of his abilities. Goodman asks Adams to tag along to confirm Eastwood’s observations. Once there, they run into a former pitcher (Justin Timberlake) whose career was cut short by bad management. After getting together, father and daughter try to reconnect. While there is nothing new or original about Trouble with the Curve, it IS possible to follow familiar formulas and have performances and/or script and direction that keep it from being just another paint-by-numbers offering. Every principal performer hits all the right notes with a special tip of the baseball cap to Matthew Lillard (Shaggy in the Scooby Doo movies) as an oily young upstart in the Braves organization. First timer Robert Lorenz directs with a sure hand and the script by Randy Brown keeps it interesting. This is a movie about baseball for people who love baseball but others shouldn’t have too bad a time of it. It captures what minor league baseball is really like from the look of the countryside to the feel of the tiny ballparks and the communities they serve. It’s also a movie about reaching the end of the line and finding the love that all of us need but that some of us rarely receive.

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY SCREENINGS The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free. Become an AFS member for just $10. Membership gets you into special members-only events and screenings. October 2:

Lonesome

Two lonely people in the big city meet and enjoy the thrills of an amusement park, only to lose each other in the crowd after spending a great day together. Will they ever see each other again? Stars Barbara Kent and Glenn Tryon. Directed by Paul Fejos (1928) October 9:

Last Holiday

When a lonely, unappreciated farm equipment salesman discovers he has only weeks to live, he withdraws his savings for a final holiday at a ‘posh’ resort. Stars Alec Guinness and Beatrice Campbell. Directed by Henry Cass (1950) October 16:

Dishonored

The Austrian Secret Service sends its most seductive agent to spy on the Russians. Stars Marlene Dietrich and Victor McLaglen. Directed by Josef von Sternberg (1931) A former pitcher (Justin Timberlake) and a veteran baseball scout (Clint Eastwood) wonder why his daughter (Amy Adams) is always on her cell phone in the charming comedy-drama Trouble with the Curve.

I can already predict the mostly negative reviews that this movie will get. Those few that I have read seem to miss the point. Trouble with the Curve is extremely well made and deserves credit on that account. Sometimes first class swill can be more satisfying than the latest craft brew (see my review of The Master in this issue). It’s also a movie that’s unashamedly made for an older target audience. In fact it’s the first movie I’ve been to in many, many years with a sizable audience where I was the youngest member there. That certainly doesn’t happen every day. Rated PG-13 for language, sexual references, and for smoking.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

October 23:

Richard III

The classic Shakespearean play about a murderously scheming king staged in an alternative fascist England setting. Stars Ian McKellen and Annette Bening. Directed by Richard Loncraine (1995) October 30:

You’ll Find Out

The manager of Kay Kyser’s band books them for a birthday party bash for an heiress at a spooky mansion, where sinister forces try to kill her. Stars Kay Kyser, Peter Lorre and Boris Karloff. Directed by David Butler (1940)

Carolina Cinemas is located at 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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Dancing With The Stars of Asheville

sheville’s own Dancing with the Stars event will celebrate its 5th anniversary this year with an all-star cast of local celebrities and community leaders. Modeled after the hit television show, the evening will include an intense elimination-style competition

October 2012 Events at The Weinhaus Tuesday, October 2 Tuscan Wine dinner held with the Weinhaus and Chef/Owner Anthony Cerrato at Strada. He has designed a Tuscan inspired menu that centers around fresh, local, seasonal foods that are prepared simply and artfully. We are excited about Anthony’s new downtown location and menu. Pairing wines with Italian cuisine comes naturally, as they have evolved together through time. Please join us in this new venue. Event begins at 7 p.m. at the Weinhaus Price: $65. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations, (828) 254-6453. Friday, October 26 Friday Night Flights presents the A Bloody Red Halloween. In honor of the Celtic meat harvest, we present an evening of deep, dark red wines. From lush fruit to big structure, we will cover the gambit of the dark end of the wine spectrum. As always, we look forward to pointing out the differences between diverse wines. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Event takes place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

BY

TRACEY JOHNSTON-CRUM

Rockell Scott, Buncombe County Clerk of Court; and Jesse Ray Jr., Ray and Allen Funeral Services. The Dancing with the Stars Gala will be held on Saturday, October 20 at 6 p.m. at the Doubletree – Biltmore. Tickets are available at a price of $50 each or $90 per couple. Each ticket includes a complementary beverage, heavy hors Asheville Mayor, Terry Bellamy and APGF former board d’oeuvres, and plenty of time president, Geoff Ferland, get ready for Dancing with the for you to take to the dance Stars at the ribbon cutting for the Reed Creek Greenway. Photo: Micah Mackenzie floor with your date to one of the best local DJs around. Asheville Parks & Greenways Foundaheld to reveal Asheville’s top dancing pair. tion (APGF) invests in the quality of life in Coordinated by the Asheville Parks and WNC by supporting the City of Asheville’s Greenways Foundation, this event serves as special projects, greenway development a fundraiser to make Asheville a healthy and & community programming. APGF is a active place to live, work and visit through 170(b)(1) Public Charity organization and support of parks, recreation, cultural arts and direct monetary donations are tax deductible. transportation greenways. Proceeds from For more information about Asheville’s this year’s event will go directly to conDancing with the Stars visit The Asheville struction of a splash pad (a water recreation Parks & Greenways Foundation on Facefeature) at the new Dr. Wesley Grant Sr., book, www.facebook.com/AshevilleParks. Southside Community Center This year’s competitors will include Terry Bellamy, City of Asheville Mayor; David Bailey, CEO/President, United IF Way; William Anderson, City of Asheville YOU The Dancing with the Stars Gala GO will be held on Saturday, October Police Chief; Hank Dunn, President, 20 at 6 p.m. at the Doubletree Asheville Buncombe Technical Commu– Biltmore. Tickets are available at a price nity College; Leigh Ruhl, Mission Founof $50 each or $90 per couple. dation; Dana Davis, Financial Development Director, YMCA of Western North Tickets are available: on line at Eventbrite, Carolina; Jim Williams, Roberts & Stevens; dancingwiththestarsasheville.eventbrite.com; The Black Cat Ballroom, 3724 Sweeten Kristen Weaver, Community Healthy Creek Rd.; The Doubletree Biltmore, 115 Living Director, YMCA of Western North Hendersonville Rd.; Dr. Wesley Grant Sr., Carolina; Daryl Hart, Vice-President and Southside Center, 285 Livingston St. in the General Manager of Hart Funeral Services; River Arts District.

Great values & styles FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

32 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

In Pack Square Park Asheville Art in the Park Saturday, October 6, 13, and 20 From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Local and regional artists donate 10% of their sales at Asheville Art in the Park to local area non profits. This year the event is working with the Asheville Area Arts Council to create grants for local artists. 10% of every dollar spent at the market will go to fund this new grant opportunity. You can donate to the fund directly by contacting the Asheville Area Arts Council.

For more information or to apply to become a member of the market visit www.AshevilleArtinthePark.com

Free Symphony Concert Sunday, October 14 The Asheville Symphony Orchestra will present a free concert in Pack Square Park. Members of the Symphony will perform on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Stage in front of the County Courthouse and City Hall. Sunday’s activities will begin at 1 p.m. Asheville’s popular food trucks and beverage vendors, including beer and wine, will be conveniently located near the park. Starting at 6:30 p.m., the Asheville Symphony will fill the park with music for 90 minutes. Conductor Daniel Meyer will lead the Asheville Symphony orchestra with music from The King and I, A Chorus Line and Star Wars. This free pops concert includes familiar music for all ages. Lawn seating is free. Concertgoers are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket. Tickets are available for reserved seating in front of the stage for $35. Tickets must be purchased by October 12. Only 425 reserved seats are available. Visit the Symphony website at www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046 for more information about the concert and to purchase tickets.


Simple Food in a Complicated World

Let Us Cater Your Next Event! • Paninis • Salads • Soups • Desserts • Seasonal Drinks

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Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 33


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restaurants INTERVIEW WITH

Chef Jose Rosario

Owner, TrailBlazers Bar & Grill

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PG. 40

WJ

Wine, and Tapas Bar Piattino Ristorante

20 Church Street, Waynesville 828-452-6000

www.classicwineseller.com

apid River Magazine:

INTERVIEWED BY

Tell us a little about TrailBlazers.

DENNIS RAY

Chef Jose Rosario: We are a family restaurant located in Pisgah Forest. The food we serve is prepared by skilled Chefs in house so you will taste the difference in freshness. Quality food is very important to us and so is affordability. We want people to enjoy healthy and delicious options that all can afford to enjoy together. One of the greatest compliments to a wonderful meal is simply the people you enjoy and share the experience with. We have an amazing staff who not only care about the guests experience, but truly love what they do and the people they work with. We are all great friends and family here. RRM: Why did you change the name to TrailBlazers Bar & Grill?

JR: We fell in love with the area we live in and the culture

of the people that reside in Pisgah Forest. The locals were so supportive of us as new business owners. They became the focal point of our vision for the restaurant. We had a contest to rename the restaurant and so many entries came, all of which highlighted aspects of the Pisgah Forest and the type of things people do out here for recreation. TrailBlazers seemed to speak to everyone and ended up being the perfect choice.

RRM: What made you

decide to be an activist for Cystic Fibrosis?

JR: There wasn’t a ques-

tion in my mind as to whether we would support it or not. I was never personally confronted with this illness, but my family has seen many others, and it took the support of great people to get through it. This event is a great opportunity to for us to give back in the same way. Being that we live in an amazing community, many businesses jumped at the chance to donate for this event. At the event we’ll have giftcards and prizes from local stores such as Brighter Day Coffee, Belk, Looking Glass Outfitters, The Hub, Elements Spa, Healthy Harvest, and Sycamore Cycles just to name a few. It’s going to be so much fun! IF YOU Help to Blaze a Trail for the Cure of Cystic GO Fibrosis, Thursday, October 25, 5-9 p.m. at

TrailBlazers Bar & Grill. Join us for fun and food! Live music by Moon Shine Babies. Win great raffle prizes. Silent auction benefitting Cystic Fibrosis. Food and drink specials. Beer specials. Introducing the brand new local brewery “Oskar Blues.” Please help us find a cure for Cystic Fibrosis. Contact us for donations or to volunteer. Call Ray Byram, Cystic Fibrosis Activist (828) 877-6509, or Barbara Kreager, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Member (828) 553-1327.

TrailBlazers Bar & Grill

RRM: Tell us about your new interior decor. JR: The decor of the restaurant features a cave/mountain

PG. 40

NB

theme. We are bringing the ouside... inside. It’s alot of fun and is becoming more popular. The warm tones on the walls give a comforting, cozy feel against the cave’s cold rockwork and stalagtites which surround you. We also love lighting candles at the tables and bar at night, it adds a sort of camping inside effect.

Formally the Gate Keeper’s Table at BiLo/WalMart Plaza 83 Forest Gate Drive, Pisgah Forest, NC 28768 Phone: (828) 877-2200 Open Everyday! Serving Breakfast 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Lunch & Dinner menu 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.

The BIG Tasty A Contest to Find the Next Best Food Business Idea in NC

H PG. 40

WM

PG. 40

WS

34 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

ave an idea for the next big food business sensation? Be a trend-setter and enter The BIG Tasty. Whether it’s a newfangled flavor for a timeless classic or an inventive new concoction altogether, the next big food product is just waiting to be discovered. That’s the aim of “The BIG Tasty,” a new contest organized by Asheville-based agribusiness incubator Blue Ridge Food Ventures The grand prize winner receives a $2,500 cash award and 100 free hours at Blue Ridge Food Ventures, which includes use of the commercial kitchen space and equipment, and mentoring from food business pros. Two runners-up receive $1,000 each and 50 business incubator hours. All winners receive a free Foundations of Business Planning course from co-sponsor Mountain BizWorks.

For more information, or to enter, go to www.blueridgefoodventures.org


Rapid River Magazine presents a day of Helping to

(Formally The Gate Keeper’s Table at BiLo/WalMart Plaza)

83 Forest Gate Drive, Pisgah Forest, NC

introducing Brand new Local Brewery “Oskar Blues” Live Music by Moon Shine Babies

• Win Great Raffle Prizes Silent Auction Benefitting Cystic Fibrosis Food & Drink Specials • Beer Specials ~ Thank You! ~

Please help us find a cure for Cystic Fibrosis. Contact us for donations of cash, prizes, or to volunteer. Call Ray Byram, Cystic Fibrosis Activist (828) 877-6509; or Barbara Kreager, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Member (828) 553-1327

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 35


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performance Stand-Up at the Altamont!

H

enry Cho has developed routines that work as well at the dinner table as they do at comedy clubs. Henry’s TV and film credits include appearances on NBC’s The Tonight Show, CBS’s The Late, Late, Show, and NBC’s Young Comedians Special. He served two years as host of NBC’s Friday Night Videos and had many guest roles on various network sitcoms. Henry’s one hour Comedy Central Special, “What’s That Clickin Noise?” is currently running. Catch his new routine at the Altamont in Asheville this November.

The Finest Assortment of Chocolates. Over 30 Kinds of Truffles. Special Orders & Shipping Available.

IF YOU GO: Henry Cho performs Saturday, November 3, PG. 40

at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $18. At the Altamont, 18 Church Street, Asheville. Visit www.myaltamont.com for tickets and more information.

WG

“not your ordinary...confectionary”

170 North Main Street Waynesville, NC

828.452.6844

PG. 40

WC

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36 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

PG. 40

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the curmudgeon

I

Back and Forth and Forth and Back

t was about 11 in the morning when the Breadman came into the general store and tripping over the Shoe-man—who had spread his catalogs with abandon over all the newspapers—dropped an armload of thin-sliced bread and six packs of Twinkies at the feet of the notions salesman. Who in turn was engaged in a fierce discussion with Curmudgeon. “What’s the matter Fred,” asked Notions, “Never saw you do that before?” “Yes,” echoed the Shoe-man, as he began to sort through the Twinkies thus arranging them in a neat stack. “Well,” answered the Breadman, “I’m a tax-payer like the rest of you but what I just saw made me so mad I already squashed two cakes before I came in here.” He paused to straighten up the loaves, stepping back from the shelves to take in the full artistic effect of his arrangement. “I was driving down the road and noticed right away that the DOT had painted new yellow lines down the center and a nice job they did.” “Always wonder just how they got them exactly in the center of the road,” said the show salesman, sotto voce. “And,” continued Breadman, “when I got to the four corners and crossed over to our road, I saw that some dang fool had taken his truck and driven back and forth over the fresh paint just to mess it up, and I got mad. It’s so bad in some spots that the bright yellow looks like an army had marched over it and sure as shootin’, it’ll have to be repainted and that’s go-

‘Bill Walz’ continued from page 27

recognizes that unlimited gain by some leads to shortages of basic necessities for others, while a totally socialistic system stifles the freedom, creativity and innovation of the individual upon which the dynamism and productive creativity of the society depends. Over and over, dualistic “eitheror” thinking cripples our cultural and political sphere. Non-dualism recognizes that polar positions are only the end points of one continuum, and that wisdom lies in recognizing that solutions exist in the spacethat connects the poles. Individualism and collectivism

BY

PETER LOEWER

You fellows don’t know what you’re complaining about.

ing to cost me—and all of you—more money in taxes! Just so some Illustration by Peter Loewer Oh, he was busy a-going dumb cluck can prove back and forth and forth and back . . .” to the rest of the world that he’s alive.” Shoe-man began straightening up “Couldn’t agree with you more,” his catalogs. said Notions. “. . . and the next morning,” “Bad,” said Curmudgeon, “but Curmudgeon paused to brush a crumb you fellows always think that evoff his knee, “when Albert drove down erything is going to wrack and ruin the road and fell asleep just after leavtoday and that yesterday was a barrel ing the corners, he never knew nuttin’ of roses. Well, let me tell you the until—with a great blast of noise and only thing different today is we got mud—he drove straight into the ruts more fools. Did you ever think of the made by the tractor. He just couldn’t problems we had with ne’er-do-wells get the power to go over ‘em and with when there weren’t no paved roads the steering wheel taken right out of his but just dirt?” Curmudgeon thumbgrasp drove full force into the bank on pumped his pipe and paused for the other side of the ditch. It took three dramatic effect. men, two horses, and old man Rudy “Why I remember when the road driving the tractor to get him out—and between here and the four corners Albert wouldn’t eat at Rudy’s for two was just mud and ruts every spring, years, he was so mad. and Albert, the produce man, use to “So you see,” finished Curmudtry and drive through the same ruts geon, “you fellows don’t know what every day just so he wouldn’t get stuck you’re complaining about,” and with a being forced into the ditch that lined tug at his overall suspenders he walked each side. It was a truly amazing feat out the door. but he did it. Day after day his truck “Oh, well,” said the Shoe-man. wheels made the grooves a bit deeper “This is how the day begins,” said so that by mid-May he never even had Notions. to steer—except at the bad turn just Breadman said nothing. above Papa Rudy’s Restaurant—and could sleep all the way to the store.” The Breadman looked at Shoeman. “Till one night,” continued CurPeter Loewer has written and mudgeon, “young Billy Rudy came illustrated more than twenty-five out and took his old man’s tractor and books on natural history over the drove back and forth over those ruts past thirty years. right at the biggest bend in the road.

are not irreconcilable. Science and religion are not irreconcilable. Pro-life and pro-choice are not irreconcilable. Nationalism and internationalism are not irreconcilable. Personal incentive and social security are not irreconcilable.Industry and environmentalism are not irreconcilable. Human rights and animal rights are notirreconcilable. The quality expression of each is dependent upon the quality expression of the other. We are all in this together. We are one species together with all other species on one limited planet, and a quality future for all requires the recognition of the connectedness of the needs and rights of each.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, individual personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 2583241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com Visit www.billwalz.com

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what to do guide Tuesday, October 2

Planned Parenthood Benefit Singers of the ‘70s featuring Condom Couture. The event will take place from 7-9:30 p.m. at Jubilee, 46 Wall St. in downtown Asheville. Tickets are $15 online at www.pphsinc.org/cart or $20 at the door. Beverages available at the event, including a cash-only wine bar.

Thursday, October 4

Paintings by Brennen McElhaney Opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Gallery at Studio B, 171 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville. For more details visit www.galleryatstudiob.com or call (828) 225-5200.

October 5-21

The Light in the Piazza For tickets call the HART Box Office (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com. Performances are at the Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

October 5 & 6

La Traviata Asheville Lyric Opera presents Giuseppi Verdi’s tale of love and redemption, starring Soprano Elizabeth Caballero. 8 p.m. at

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

the Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets at (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com. For more details call (828) 236-0670, or visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

13 pieces will be accepted. Tickets $5 at the door. For more details call (828) 257-4003, visit www.magneticfield.com

Friday and Saturday, October 12 & 13

Friday, October 5

Downtown Gallery Walk Vaquera in the Grove Arcade presents the latest paintings and prints by Rick Hills. The artist will be demonstrating his painting from 5-8 p.m. Historic Grove Arcade, (828) 575-2151. Monday-Saturday 10-6; Sunday 12-5.

Saturday, October 6

Silent Auction/Fundraiser To help with MariJo Moore’s medical bills. Bid on American Indian art from well known native artists, hand carved flutes, autographed books, and more. Beautiful one of a kind artwork, hand made jewelry, as well as gift certificates. Email marijomoore@gmail.com if you have any questions or have something to donate. Fundraiser from 2 to 6 p.m. at Crystal Visions, 5426 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville, NC 28791.

Saturday, October 6

Blue Ridge Pride Stop by the WNCAP booth at this year’s LGBT festival in downtown Asheville at Pack Place Park between noon and 7 p.m. Great giveaways and a chance to win a $200 gift certificate to Freaks-n-Geeks Tattoo Sideshow. www.wncap.org.

Thursday, October 11

Swamp Cabbage North Florida fatback boogaloo blues and trailer park funk. Swamp Cabbage’s songs are featured on Man vs Food, My Big Redneck Wedding; and they’re the writers and performers of the theme song for the popular Discovery Channel show American Guns. Cost: $12. Show at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain, 105C Montreat Road. Phone (828) 669-0816.

Friday, October 12

The Book of Ernest Book signing and discussion from 7-8:30 p.m. Ernest Clement discusses the divine framework undergirding humanity’s shift into a new era of unified consciousness. Refreshments provided. Grateful Steps Bookshop, 159 South Lexington Avenue, Asheville. Contact Micki Cabaniss (828) 277-0998.

Friday, October 12

Magnetic Midnight Magnetic Late Night presents a monthly open mic event for artists of all types. Submit pieces of theatre, music, dance, poetry, or performance art at 10 p.m. Show starts at 11 p.m. The first

Sleeping Beauty National Marionette Theatre’s clever rendition is told from the prince’s point of view. The production combines beautifully crafted marionettes with the timeless music from Tchaikovsky’s ballet. Recommended for family audiences ages 4 and up. Friday, October 12 at 10 a.m. for school groups; Saturday, October 13 at 11 a.m. for the public. Diana Wortham Theatre. For more information visit www.nmtshow.com.

October 12-14

Bard-a-Thon 12 Shakespeare plays are read over a 48 hour period. Admission is free to watch the Bard-a-thon readings. The entire 48-hour event is broadcast live at www.ncstage.org. For more details, or to read, contact Amanda Leslie at (828) 239-0263. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville, www.ncstage.org.

Saturday, October 13

Green/Art Works A benefit to create awareness and raise money in support of the great work that Green Works is doing in our area. Enjoy food, drink and live music. The Wedge, 115 & 111 Roberts Street in the River Arts District. Contact: Phil DeAngelo, (828) 989-5464.

Saturday, October 13

Asheville Symphony Orchestra Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Featuring the renowned pianist Valentina Lisitsa at 8 p.m. Tickets are available at the Asheville Civic Center box office, and range in price from $58 to $20. For more details, visit www.ashevillesymphony. org or call (828) 254-7046.

October 13 & 14

East of Asheville Studio Tour From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. East Asheville, Swannanoa, Black Mountain, Fairview. Visit www.eaststudiotour. com for a downloadable map. Phone (828) 686-1011 for details.

Sunday, October 14

Dragon Tales Asheville Storytelling Circle with Gwenda LedBetter, Debbie Gurrier, Sherry Lovett, and Lloyd Arneach. Admission $5. 3 p.m. at the UNCA Reuter Center. Sponsored by the Asheville Storytelling Circle and UNCA Reuter Center. Information: (828) 4679955 or (828) 581-4603.

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Asheville Quilt Guild Explore machine quilting when Art Quilter Patsy Thompson demonstrates “Thread Power” at 7 p.m. at the Folk Art Center, Blue Ridge Parkway, Milepost 382. More details at www. ashevillequiltguild.org

October 20, from 2-9 p.m. ArtEtude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave., Asheville. Phone (828) 252-1466, visit www. artetudegallery.com.

Friday and Saturday, October 19 & 20

The Legend of Tommy Hodges Outdoor Drama

Kiln-fired pizzas, heavy hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, live music, and art, from 5 to 8 p.m. 100% of ticket-sales benefit earlier.org. Hofman Studios and Broken Road Studio, 111 & 115 Roberts St., in the River Arts District. Contact Michael Hofman at (828) 232-1401 or livelifeartfully@gmail.com to reserve one of the one-hundred $25 tickets!

An intriguing tale of a missing Biltmore Forest School student. Walk from scene to scene and meet characters from the historic Pink Beds community. Hear stories based on student diaries from 1903-1907. Warm clothing, walking shoes, and flashlights are recommended. $6 adults; $3 ages 4-15. The Cradle of Forestry in America, Pisgah National Forest near Brevard. Call (828) 8773130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org for show times.

October 17-21

Sunday, October 21

Wednesday, October 17

Breast Cancer Month Event

The Midnight Area Psychics, zombies and demonic sock monkeys in six short plays by Dark Horse Theatre. Part of the Catalyst Series at NC Stage. Tickets: $13; $10 students. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 2390263 or visit www.ncstage.org.

October 18-21

LEAF’s Fall Festival The Performing Arts schedule, subject to change, is online, visit www. theLEAF.org. LEAF, Lake Eden Arts Festival, 377 Lake Eden Rd., Black Mountain, NC 28711.

October 18-21

The Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands At the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Collene Karcher Asheville. ThursdaySaturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: Adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. Additional information by visiting www.craftguild. org or phone (828) 298-7928.

Friday, October 19

The Disclaimer Comedy Showcase The Magnetic Field hosts this monthly event featuring local comedians. Show at 10 p.m. The Magnetic Field, 372 Depot Street in Asheville. For tickets and more details call (828) 257-4003, or visit www.magneticfield.com

Friday and Saturday, October 19 & 20

ArtEtude Gallery Grand Opening Artist’s reception Friday, October 19 from 6-9 p.m. Great jazz, food and drink Saturday,

Evaluate Your Antiques Richard Hatch Auctions will evaluate your antiques and offer an appraisal. Admission $25. You are invited to bring three items for appraisal. No large furniture and no jewelry appraisals. $10 for each additional item. All proceeds will go toward the Asheville Lyric Opera Guild Emerging Artist Fund. From 3 to 6 p.m. at the Biltmore Park Hilton, 43 Town Square Boulevard. For more details go to www.sprawls.org/aloguild

Thursday, October 25

Blaze a Trail for the Cure of Cystic Fibrosis 5-9 p.m. at TrailBlazers Bar & Grill. Join us for fun and food! Live music by Moon Shine Babies. Raffle, silent auction, food and drink specials. Introducing new local brewery “Oskar Blues.” TrailBlazers Bar & Grill, 83 Forest Gate Drive, Pisgah Forest, NC 28768. Phone (828) 877-2200 for details.

Thursday, October 25

Project Handmade Fashion Show Contemporary garments with handcrafted details. Doors open 6:30 p.m. Show at 7:30 p.m. $7 museum members and students; $15 non-members; standing room only. $25 VIP / reserved seating. Asheville Art Museum, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. For more details visit www.ashevilleart.org

Saturday, October 27

An American in Paris AmiciMusic presents a free concert at Pack Library’s Lord Auditorium at 2 p.m. For more Dan Weiser information call (828) 505-2903 or visit www.amicimusic.org.

October 27-28

Weaverville Art Safari 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information on the participating artists, visit www.

OCTOBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2


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what to do guide weavervilleartsafari.com, or contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) 645-9065.

Best in Show

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Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Circo Aereo + Gandini Juggling, a dazzling collaboration of two internationally acclaimed performance groups. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 8 p.m. Tickets: $35; students $30; child $15; Student Rush day-of-theshow $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

The Old Woman in the Basement

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Auditions are open to all, no previous experience required. Audition material provided at the auditions. Storytelling series Listen to This. October’s theme is “Saints Be Praised: Stories of Surprising Saviors and Unexpected Samaritans.” October 25 at 7:30 p.m. Stories and original songs. Tickets are $10.

2012 Urban Loft + Art Tour Thursday, October 11 from 4:30 - 8:45 p.m.

by Phil Hawkins

Pre registration required - call (828) 253-3227. $50 Members; $55 non-Members. Asheville Art Museum, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Visit www.ashevilleart.org

The Regional Artist Project Grant

The Asheville Chamber Music Series presents a concert at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place at Charlotte Street, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $35. Students free of charge. For more information visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org or call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427.

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Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. Box office: (828) 254-1320. For more details visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Corgi Tales

The Jupiter Quartet

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Auditions for Light Up the Sky, Anton Chekhov’s classic (translated by Brian Friel). October 23 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Uncle Vanya will be performed as reader’s theatre. Directed by Anita Chapman.

Awards reception from 5 to 7 p.m. On display October 18 through December 14, 2012. The School is located at 360 Asheville School Road, 28806. For more information call (828) 254-6345 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.

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Auditions for The Santaland Diaries, David Sedaris’ one man comedy. October 9 from 6-8 p.m. Directed by Betsy Puckett.

The Appalachian Pastel Society National Juried Exhibition

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November 1 & 2

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Deadline: October 16, 2012 at 5 p.m. Annual grant program that provides financial support to developing arts professionals by funding a project pivotal to the advancement of their careers as artists. Artists working in all disciplines are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be at least 18 years old and have been a resident of Avery, Buncombe, Madison, Mitchell or Yancey County as of July 1, 2011.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Performances Friday & Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane, Asheville. Call (828) 239-0263 or visit www. ncstage.org.

Individual grant requests may range from $400 - $1,200. Applications are available through the Asheville Area Arts Council (828) 258-9525, ext 102, www.ashevillearts.com; the Avery County Arts Council (828) 733-0054, www.averycountyartscouncil.org; the Madison County Arts Council (828) 649-1301, www.madisoncountyarts.com; or the Toe River Arts Council (828) 765-0520 or (828) 6827215, www.toeriverarts.org.

Now through November 9

Reclamation & Form

Call for Artists

Work of Morganton, NC artist Phil Jablonski on display through November 9, 2012. MESH Gallery, 114-B West Union Street in Morganton, NC.

Saturday, November 10

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

5k Walk/Run/March Fundraiser for the Asheville High School Band takes place aat Carrier Park on Amboy Road. The cost per runner is $25, with a youth run for children 10 and under for $10. All contributions are tax deductible. Checks may be made out to AHSBA and mailed to PO Box 1945, Asheville, NC 28802. More information at www.ashevillehighbands.com.

The Waynesville Public Art Commission is currently seeking an artist for its fourth outdoor public art project. To be located in the Mini Park at the corner of Main and Depot Streets, the theme of the piece is Wildflowers of the Smokies to honor the historic connection between the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Town of Waynesville. The call is open to all professional artists, or teams of artists, over the age of 18, residing in the 25 North Carolina Counties that comprise the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area. The selected artist will receive $12,500 for proposal development, fabrication and installation. Complete application instructions and additional information are available at the www.townofwaynesville.org or by calling the Town of Waynesville at (828) 452-2491.

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 39


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find it here Amici Music www.amicimusic.org

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

ArtEtude Gallery www.ArtetudeGallery.com

Broken Road Studio (828) 989-5464

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Stereo Innovations www.stereoinnovations.com

Asheville Art Supply (828) 231-3440

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Fast Lane Electric Bikes www.FastlaneEbikes.com

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Foundry www.digfoundry.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Studio 375 Depot BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

EAST Studio Tour www.eaststudiotour.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Michael Hofman www.livelifeartfully.com

Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Mountain View Appliance

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

HART www.harttheatre.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Mark A. Henry www.naturalviewsinc.com

P.H. Best Fine Art www.mountainbrushworks.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Jeff Pittman Art www.jeffpittman.com

R Bruce Brennan Fine Art RBruceBrennanFineArt.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

Jonas Gerard www.jonasgerard.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

David J. Simchock www.vagabondvistas.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Place Your Classified Ad on www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

Studio B www.galleryatstudiob.com Susan Marie Designs www.susanmphippsdesigns.com TrailBlazers (828) 877-2200

Low Weekly & Monthly Rates

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com

WEAVERVILLE

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

NE

WildWater www.wildwater.info

NORTH ASHEVILLE

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40 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071

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fall festivals Art on Main Festival

Brasstown 39th Annual Fall Festival Saturday and Sunday, October 6 & 7 Now in its 39th year, the Fall Festival will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festival features exhibitors and activities for visitors of all ages: 200 fine craft exhibitors, including Folk School instructors and regional artists; 40 artisans offering traditional and contemporary craft demonstrations; 30 music and dance groups performing on two stages; children’s activities including wagon rides, pony rides, and a drum circle; a dozen local food vendors offering a variety of options. John C. Campbell Folk School, 1 Folk School Rd., Brasstown, NC 28902. Phone (828) 837-2775, 800-365-5724, or visit FolkSchool.org

Colorfest: Art & Taste of Appalachia Saturday, October 6 Talented “hidden” Artwork by artists, traditional Doreyl Ammons Cain foods and wines. Dillsboro, NC. Close to 30 artisans will descend upon Dillsboro for one day, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., where you can find them and their easels underneath colorful umbrellas strewn throughout the small historic town. For more information, contact the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce at (800) 962-1911. To learn more about Dillsboro visit www.visitdillsboro.org.

Saturday and Sunday, October 6 & 7

Blue lidded vase by Doug Dacey

The Arts Council of Henderson County presents the 53rd annual Art on Main fine art/fine craft festival along Hendersonville’s historic Main Street from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. both days.

One of the region’s most popular outdoor arts festivals, Art on Main will feature fine arts and fine crafts from local and regional artists, as well as many artists from states beyond the southeast region. More than 70 artists will participate in this juried and judged festival.

Brevard Storytelling Festival Saturday and Sunday, November 2 & 3 At Transylvania County Library. Features national favorites, Heather Forest and Len Cabral, and three NCSG regional tellers. Headliners present a concert on Friday evening at 7:30 p.m. Saturday sessions begin at 9 a.m. and include workshops and concerts. All concerts, workshops, and events are free and open to the public. Information: (828) 884-3151, ext. 3 and (828) 274-1123, or online at North Carolina Storytelling Guild, www. ncstoryguild.org.

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Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 41


42 October 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 2


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outdoor fun and adventure Five Essential Steps for Photographing Fall Foliage

I

t’s that time BY DAVID SIMCHOCK of year again.. Time to don Oranges. Yellows. And, yes, (ever) the hiking boots, grab the Nikon, greens. Color contrast: This is what and capture the beauty of the fall makes autumn such a special time of leaf season. Of course, it helps to live year for photography! in a place like Western North Carolina where the peak colors span a full 2. Morning / Evening Light month depending on elevation. It In order to maximize the brilliance also helps if you understand all of the of the fall colors, it is usually best nuances of autumn shooting, and the to shoot in the techniques required morning hours to optimize your and evening hours. creative efforts. This holds true 1. Color Contrast any time of year, but is of particular Sure, the views from importance in the the Blue Ridge Parkfall when the magic way are awe-inspiring light makes the any time of year, but magic colors more.. have you ever tried well.. magical! to photograph one of the many roadside 3. Using Filters vistas in the spring In the digital age, or summer months gone are the days when there is only where one needs one dominant color accessories like in the foliage (i.e., specialty filters. But, green)? Visit the same if there is one filter place in the peak that all photogracolors of autumn and phers should still it becomes difficult to have in their bags, take a bad shot. Reds. Photo by David Simchock

‘Green/Art Works’ cont’d from page 24

supporter of GreenWorks and has been featured at past events. For food, we will be having an assortment of delectable munchies provided by the artists, Beer from the Wedge Brewery, and in true Asheville fashion we will have the Venezuelan Food Truck parked out front serving up their yummy fare. Though they offer meaty fare like arepa burgers, arepas, empanadas and hot dogs, everything can also be had as vegetarian at this truck.

RRM: How long has this event been in

the planning, and why did you choose?

PD: We have admired the work that

Asheville GreenWorks has been doing for years and started planning the event back in April when we relocated our studio from the second floor of the Wedge building to our new space next to Hofman Studios. We paint trees and

they plant trees, it’s a perfect fit.

RRM: Is this something you hope to hold annually?

PG. 40

NA

Photo by David Simchock

it’s a polarizing filter. Why? Because true polarization is something that cannot be replicated digitally. A polarizing filter can be a great way to deepen color saturation and/or remove glare from shiny leaves.

Best Selection of Bikes & Accessories in Western North Carolina. Top-Notch Service Dept.

1378 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-274-2453 libertybikes.com WNC’s Favorite Bicycle Shop!

32 Years of Supporting and Promoting Bicycling in Western North Carolina!

4. Lens Selection Chances are, you are carrying at least one zoom lens in your bag — one that ranges from wide-angle to telephoto. The leaf season is a better time than any to get the most out of the focal length range on your zoom lens. While there is often a tendency to “go wide” to include a myriad of elements in the frame, one should never forget the other end of the spectrum: go tight. That may call for zooming in on part of a scene, or getting physically closer to the subject (or both).

5. Understand Exposure Finally, like any other time of year, if you want to take your photography to higher levels, it is absolutely essential that you understand exposure: 1) aperture; 2) shutter speed; 3) ISO. And, don’t forget about your light meter — the brains behind your exposure. Looking for more insight? Check out the “Got f-Stop?” photo blog at www.gotfstop.com

MH: Yes Asheville GreenWorks, an affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, is a volunteer-based organization working to achieve a clean and green Asheville and Buncombe County through community organizing, educating and environmental stewardship. IF YOU Enjoy food, drink and live GO music at the Green/Art Works

Benefit, hosted by Broken Road Studio (Philip DeAngelo, Karen Weihs, and Stephen St. Claire), and Hofman Studios (Michael Hofman). October 13 at The Wedge, 115 & 111 Roberts Street in the River Arts District. More details by calling Phil DeAngelo (828) 989-5464 or visit www.ashevillegreenworks.org.

David Simchock is a professional photographer and instructor based in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more about David, including his popular Vagabond Vistas Photo Tours, visit www.DijonCreative.com.

Web Exclusive Visit our website for a list of links to upcoming cycling events. www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 16, No. 2 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — October 2012 43


PG. 40

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October 2012 Issue  

ArtEtude Gallery..p2; Gallery 262..p8; Catherine Vibert..p9; Weaverville Art Safari..p10; East of Asheville Studio Tour..p11; Craft Fair of...

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