Page 1

Meet artists who live and work in Weaverville and the surrounding areas. page 20

More Than 20 Articles and Interviews with Local Artists! Artists in East Asheville, Swannanoa, Black Mountain, and Fairview invite you to visit their studios. page 18

16 Patton Fine Art Gallery presents new works by

John Mac Kah page

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2011 marks the 80th anniversary of the original Frankenstein starring Boris Karloff. page 14

Plus: Autumn Performing Arts Reviews BRAVO Concerts • Asheville Lyric Opera • Diana Wortham Theatre HART • NC Stage • Altamont Theatre

The Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands features traditional and contemporary crafts, demonstrations, and entertainment. page 17 Catch Regina Fernandez in HART’s The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. page 33

Catherine Vibert’s photographs explore color, light and texture. page 19

Interviews with: Karen Keil Brown Teresa Pennington Andie MacDowell Kim Shuford

page page page page

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stage preview New LOL Series Comedy Shakespeare On Trial

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Back by popular demand, and fresh on the heels of their 2009 sold-out show, the acrobats undertake astounding feats from gravity-defying balancing acts and spine-bending contortions to foot juggling, chair stacking and plate spinning.

Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011 @ 4 pm Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Tickets $15–$60 • Students 1/2 price • Tickets available at the Civic Center Box Office, ticketmaster.com or 828.225.5887 • AshevilleBravoConcerts.org

BMW of Asheville

bmwofasheville.com 828-681-9900

 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

iana Wortham Theatre’s new LOL “Laugh Out Loud” Series presents Shakespeare On Trial, an uproarious experience in “Shakespearian” theatre that asks the audience, the “jury,” whether writer William Shakespeare is guilty of irrelevance in a modern world. Audiences are treated to a buffet of hilarity as Shakespeare encounters four of his own most famous characters (Macbeth, Iago, Hamlet and Juliet) up-close, personal and tickedoff. Writer/creator Jeremy Webb plays the four Shakespearian characters along-side Simon Henderson who stars as the Bard. “Webb and Henderson are delightful to watch and play off each other with the same energy as Tim Conway and Harvey Korman,” (The Coast). In this highly energetic play featuring some of the Bard’s best quotes and speeches, an unwitting Bill Shakespeare must defend his own writing as the four characters challenge him to write in a more modern way, arguing that no one really understands his plays anymore. The audience helps make the case for Shakespeare’s lasting significance in the last fifteen minutes as Shakespeare calls upon the audience to help prove his point: “The play’s the thing…” The 2011/2012 Mainstage LOL Series continues with The Adam Growe Quiz Show (November 12, 2011), bringing the wit of Adam Growe, host of Discovery Channel’s hit show Cash Cab in Canada, in a blend of stand-up comedy and quiz show – where, with the right answers, audience members can win money right out of Adam’s pocket. In addition to the evening performance, Shakespeare On Trial performances are

also part of the Mainstage Young Audiences Series: 10 a.m. & 12 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 and 10 a.m. Thursday, October 27, 2011. Performances in the Young Audiences Series are open to school groups, homeschoolers, community groups, and families. The performances of Shakespeare on Trial are recommended for students in grades 6 and up. To obtain more information or to make reservations, contact Rae Geoffrey, Associate Director, at (828) 210-9837, or e-mail at rae@dwtheatre.com. www.offtheleash.ca/shakespeare-on-trial

If You Shakespeare On Trial, 2011/2012 Go Mainstage LOL Series. Thursday,

October 27, 2011 at 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. Tickets: Regular $25, Student $20, Child $12. Student Rush Day of Show (with valid I.D.) $10. Info/Tickets: For more information or to purchase tickets, call the theatre’s box office at (828) 2574530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com


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performance Asheville Bravo Concerts presents

the annual Arts in the Garden fundraiser on Sunday, October 9. The fundraiser includes complimentary food and wine, and will feature a silent auction filled with arts and dinner packages.

National Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China

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sheville Bravo Concerts, the area’s oldest arts non-profit organization, brings the National Acrobats of the People’s Republic of China to Asheville to kick off the organization’s 80th anniversary season on Sunday, October 23 at 4 p.m. “We’re very excited to be starting our season with the Acrobats. They put on a really astounding show that fascinates audiences of all ages,” remarks Tracey Johnston-Crum, Executive Director of Asheville Bravo Concerts. The Acrobats are returning to Asheville after performing for a sold-out crowd at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in 2009. Their program of aerial acrobatics, spine-bending contortions, plate-spinning, and even human pyramids stacked on moving bicycles is a not-to-miss performance this fall. Based in Beijing, the company has toured in more than forty countries on four

continents. They are recognized as the premier large touring acrobatic troupe in the world. Several of their acts including “Joyful Songs and Tunes: Plate Spinning” and “Crystal of White Snow: Contortionist with Cups,“ which will be featured in their Asheville performance, have won National Gold Prize awards and critical acclaim world-wide. The plate-spinning act features young acrobats with ten plates spinning in their hands, presenting a variety of seemingly impossible techniques like “backward bending on head,” a technique in which one actress stands on the other actress’s head and bends backwards with her hands still holding the spinning plates.

Asheville Bravo Concerts 2011-12 season Joshua Bell – Saturday, November 12 at 7:30 p.m. Soweto Gospel Choir – Sunday, January 29, 2012 at 4 p.m. The Moscow Festival Ballet in Giselle – Friday, March 9, 2012 at 7:30 p.m.

“The Acrobats will be captivating, awe-inspiring, and surely entertaining. They will be in Asheville for one show only, but Asheville Bravo Concerts has a fantastic line-up of shows this season, including the 2010 Instrumentalist of the Year, Joshua Bell, who will be performing next month,” adds Johnston-Crum. Bravo’s 80th celebration gets a head start even before the Acrobats’ concert, with

If You Tickets for the National Acrobats Go of the People’s Republic of China

are $15-$60. Available at the Asheville Civic Center Box Office, ticketmaster.com, or by calling Asheville Bravo Concerts at (828) 225-5887. Students’ and children’s tickets are half-price. All shows take place at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. For more information call (828) 225-5887 or visit www. ashevillebravoconcerts.org.

October 7& 8 at 8pm Diana Wortham Theatre Tickets: 828-257-4530 ashevillelyric.org

Upcoming Shows: The Asheville Christmas Show - Nov. 18 pg.

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Cosi Fan Tutte - Feb 17 & 18, 2012

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 


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Erin Jackson, Stand-Up Comedian

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NOVEMBER 11 8pm L.A. THEATRE WORKS

BY NORMAN CORWIN

Sponsor

NOVEMBER 16 & 17 8pm

www.dwtheatre.com

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stage preview riveting theatre

sensational Scottish vocals

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(828)257-4530

 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

tand-up comedian “Washington has been the Erin Jackson performs home of a number of very good October 21 and 22 at the comics and a few great ones Altamont Theater. Since (Wanda Sykes, Dave Chappelle, first making a name for Lewis Black, Martin Lawrence). herself at colleges and east Erin Jackson could be next in coast comedy clubs, Erin has line.” ~ The Washington Post garnered national attention with The Altamont theater has a performances on The Ellen growing reputation of one of the most intimate listening rooms DeGeneres Show and Comedy Central’s Live at Gotham. in Asheville, so catching some of Jackson was a semifinalist the top rising comedy stars will on NBC’s Last Comic Standcertainly be a fantastic treat. ing, and was a featured writer Kindergarten teacher and Photo by Roy Cox and performer for TBS’s BitLast Comic Standing semifinalcom Series. Erin has made ist Jason Weems opens. several appearances on The Bob and Tom Show, she was invited by HBO to open for www.erinjackson.net Bill Maher at the tapings for his latest HBO special. She’s armed with a megawatt smile and a pocket full of dreams, Erin Jackson is If poised to conquer the world of stand-up. You Tickets are only $15 (a $42 value). Go Altamont Theater, 18 Church In fact, she’d probably be well on her way Street, downtown Asheville. Call to superstardom by now if her friends and the box office at (828) 348-5327 or order family hadn’t spent so many years stealing tickets online at www.myaltamont.com. her joy.


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Celebrating WNC’s Fine Arts & Crafts Established in 1997 • Volume Fifteen, Number Two

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Liza Becker Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Proofreader: Mary Wilson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray Contributing Writers: Patti Bell, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Rae Geoffrey, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Cherry Hart, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Philip Marschall, April Nance, Ted Olson, Dennis Ray, Katie Anne Towne, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Joe Zinich. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St. Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, October 2011 Vol. 15 No. 2

On the Cover: Shelly’s Avatar by John Mac Kah, 18x24", oil on canvas. Full size archival prints available on canvas. Original is $4,500, available for purchase from Long Branch Studios. Article on page 23

Correction:

In our September issue we neglected to list Michael Parker as our wine columnist. Please check back in November for Mr. Parker’s wine column.

Gallery Two Six Two

Appalachian Craft Center

John Mac Kah

16 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC (828) 236-2889, www.16patton.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

October 2011

16 PATTON Fine Art Gallery

2DianaStage Preview Wortham Theatre . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Erin Jackson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

3BRAVO! Performance Concerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Area Piano Forum . . . . . . . . 6 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

7GregColumns Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . .

7 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Eddie LeShure - Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Joe Zinich - Beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Ted Olson - Poetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Peter Loewer - Thoreau’s Garden . 30 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 31 Max Hammonds, MD - Health . . . 33

10 N. Spruce Street, Asheville, NC (828) 253-8499 www.appalachiancraftcenter.com appcraft@bellsouth.net

Appalachian Crafts Too

Renaissance Asheville Hotel, 1 Thomas Wolfe Plaza, Asheville

Patti Best

www.mountainbrushworks.com

BlackBird Frame & Art

365 Merrimon Avenue, Asheville (828) 225-3117, www.blackbirdframe.com

Karen K. Brown, KB Art Studio

10 Beaver Creek Lane, Asheville, NC (828) 231-0617, kcaabrown@gmail.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Blue Ridge Artists & Crafters

October 8 & 9 & October 15 & 16 Haywood County Fairgrounds Lake Junaluska, NC, www.bracaorg.com

Ray Byram

566 McGuire Rd., Pisgah Forest, NC (828) 877-6509, www.raybyram.com

9TheMusic Flaming Lips at MoogFest . . . . . .

Catherine Vibert

11 Movie Reviews

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

17 Fine Art Southern Highlands Craft Fair . . . . .

October 16 and 17, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (828) 686-1011, www.eaststudiotour.com

9 TV on the Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Frank Southecorvo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

262 Depot Street, Waynesville, NC (828) 452-6100, www.gallerytwosixtwo.com Cotton Mill Building, 122 Riverside Drive (828) 225-5000, www.jmackah.com

Studio 375 Depot

Corner of Haywood St. and Battery Park

Studio B

171 Weaverville Hwy. (828) 225-5200, www.galleryatstudiob.com

Ten Thousand Villages

10 College Street, Asheville, NC (828) 254-8374 asheville.tenthousandvillages.com

Teresa Pennington

15 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786 (828) 452-9284, www.tpennington.com

True Blue Art Supply

30 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville (828) 251-0028, www.trueblueartsupply.com

Twigs & Leaves

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC (828) 456-1940, www.twigsandleaves.com

Weaverville Art Safari

October 29 & 30 www.weavervilleartsafari.com

Photographer and Painter, www.catvibe.com

COOP

25 Carolina Lane, downtown Asheville www.coopashevile.com

Women in the Moon

163 South Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-4558

Asheville Civic Center, October 20-23. (828) 298-7928, www.craftguild.org

Chip Kaufmann & Michele Keenan . 11

Appalachian Craft Center . . . . . . . . . . EAST Fall Studio Tour . . . . . . . . . . . Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Mac Kah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blackbird Fine Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ray Byram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Women in the Moon . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gallery 262 in Waynesville . . . . . . . . . Studio B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

17 17 18 20 23 24 26 26 32 32

Karen Keil Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Teresa Pennington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andie MacDowell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kim Shuford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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19 Interviews Catherine Vibert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 What to Do Guide Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . .

EAST of Asheville Studio Tour

Catch works by Maureen Hoxie during the Weaverville Art Safari.

Rapid River Magazine Follow us online for the latest events. www.rapidrivermagazine.com

35

Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . . 35

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 


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performance An Integrative Picture:

Madame Butterfly at Asheville Lyric Opera

T Special Free Book Offer! —Pat Boone

Crashing the Dollar: How to Survive a Global Currency Collapse by Craig R. Smith was written to help save American families from the economic death spiral of a falling U.S. dollar and rising inflation. To help prepare Americans for the dollar’s demise now, I have been authorized to offer a FREE copy of Crashing Special Free Book Offer! —Pat Boone

Call 1-866-709-3643 today!

he Asheville Lyric Opera will open its 13th season with a flourish on October 7 with a sophisticated rendition of Giacomo Puccini’s timeless Madame Butterfly. International soprano Jennifer Davison will grace the Diana Wortham Stage for the first time in the title role, while Jon Truitt returns to the director’s chair to reprise his deft handling displayed in last year’s Magic Flute. Puccini’s heartrending Butterfly will be brought to life in a way that has not previously been seen on the ALO stage. The company wishes to grow by attempting a more challenging level of artistic work, requiring countless hours of work and greater collaboration by the myriad artists involved in the performance: set and costume designers, singer actors, orchestral musicians, and the chorus. These plans are set to come to fruition in what will surely be a rewarding experience for all present. The performances will take place on October 7 and 8 in the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville. All performances will be sung in Italian, with English supertitles. Set in early twentieth century

by

Philip Marschall

Japan, Madame Butterfly traces the heart-breaking life of Cio-Cio-San, a beautiful young geisha known as Madame Butterfly. A U.S. naval officer, Lieutenant Pinkerton, is arranged to take Cio-Cio-San as a wife while on a tour in Nagasaki, but while they sing of love, he has no intention for it to last. Even after a three-year absence, Cio-Cio-San remains optimistic that her love will return to Japan, but this hope only leads to tragedy upon Pinkerton’s eventual return. Madame Butterfly grapples with complex themes of love, devotion, loss, and collision of two cultures. Jennifer Davison, as Cio-Cio-San (Butterfly), will be joined onstage by Brian Cheney as B.F. Pinkerton. Dawn Pierce plays the maid, Suzuki, and Mark Owen Davis plays the US consul, Sharpless. Goro, the marriage broker, is played by Scott Joiner; Yamadori, a suitor to Butterfly, is played by Elias Notus; and Roberto Flores is the Imperial Commissioner. The coming-into-its-own ALO is creating a breathtaking and beautiful production for this season’s opener.

To meet the company’s artistic goals, the new staging features collaborations between many artists and designers. An integrative picture of historic Japan, more artistic and less literal, will be painted through scenery, lighting, and costume designs. A more refined version of the musical piece will be performed, as well, with longer orchestral numbers, lead by Maestro Robert Hart Baker, that require not only great musicianship on the part of the orchestra, but also great acting on the part of the singers. The organization is confident in a wonderful performance of a very polished Madame Butterfly. “I have been working on Madama But­terfly consistently five days a week since June,” says Associate Artistic Director Kristen Hedberg. “It has been inspiring and exciting; like climbing uphill, but being in better shape this time around.” Ticket prices range from $30-$53 for adults and $17$35 for students. To purchase tickets, call the Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office at (828) 257-4530, or visit www.ashevillelyric. org. If You Go

Asheville Area Piano Forum’s Fall Benefit Concert

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ne of the highlights of the fall musical offerings in Asheville is the annual benefit concert presented by the Asheville Area Piano Forum. These concerts are a showcase of the extraordinary pianistic talent within the Piano Forum. The Piano Forum’s 11th Fall Benefit Concert, held October 30 at Diana Wortham Theatre, will again feature outstanding professional pianists from Western Carolina and upstate South Carolina, as well as guest artists. This year’s concert will illustrate the various ways the piano is featured: In addition to solo and two piano classical and jazz repertoire by the Forum’s professional pianists, there will be several works featuring the piano in a collaborative partnership with other instruments. For example, husband and wife duo Kimberly Cann, pianist, and Aaron Brown, double bassist, will perform a rousing arrangement of Bizet’s

 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

As a 501-C not-for-profit organization, the general meetings of the Piano Forum are open to the public. These meetings feature outstanding lecturers on topics of interest to piano enthusiasts. Visit www.ashevillepiano. org for a listing of the season’s programs as well as a listing of local piano teachers, performers, piano technicians, and music stores which cater to the needs of pianists and other musicians.

Dan Weiser, pianist, and Elizabeth Gergel, cellist. Photo by Carrie Turner

Carmen Suite. And there will be a mother and daughter collaboration with Dr. Hwa-Jin Kim performing with her daughter Grace, an awardwinning high school flutist. Other collaborations include an arrangement of several popular classics with Vance Reese’s Opera Creations ensemble joining jazz pianists Brian Turner and Scott Camp.

The Asheville Area Piano Forum’s 11th Fall Benefit Concert, October 30. Concert begins at 3 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 South Pack Square. Tickets: Adults $25; Patron ticket: $50; Students 13-21: $3. Children 12 and under admitted free. Tickets available through the AAPF website, www.ashevillepiano.org, by calling Soli Classica (828) 277-4111, or at the Diana Wortham Box Office. (828) 257-4530. If You Go


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fine art Asheville: Attractive & Alive From Leaf Peepers to Shop Keepers – the Art of the Keepsake

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sheville and by Greg Vineyard environs has a really interesting art as opposed to some of economy... and the other categories by interesting, I mean I in my head, such as have to admit I gener“Gift-Seeking� (which ally can’t predict from also has sub-categoday to day or season to ries like “I’m-Hereseason how art sales are For-A-Wedding� and for-sure going to be. “Panicked- AnniverIn Star Trek, sary -Shopping-Guy�), everything’s predict“Home-Decorating� able: everyone goes to and, simply, “The ColStarfleet Academy and lector�. then works on a starCatering to a ship and meets aliens. specific anticipated (Some of you missed audience is a useful my usual science strategy... but in the fiction reference last hand-made art and Fall Art Shopping month, didn’t you? It’s craft world, a total foOK to admit it, even cus on a seasonal look if just to yourself.) Here on Earth, things can result in excess hard-wrought inventory vary. I do know that folks come here from that may not display as well year-round. It all over for art! And I’ve noticed that while makes sense to focus on price point differI need to watch my projections based on entiation within one’s quality offerings, thus past reports, any day really can turn out to allowing our leaf season friends to be able to be THE day for a great sale. take something affordable home as an artistic keepsake from their trip that is as perfect an example of an artist’s work as any other being offered. Plus our other shopper types Any day really can turn are still mixed-in with the tourist waves, out to be THE day for a making their price points equally important. The River Arts District Studio Stroll great sale. next month (November 12-13) is a perfect example of how this mix of consumers converges. Locals making purchases for their In 2010, my July was fairly slow. This homes mingle with early holiday gift buyers, July, people walked in to Constance Willate-season leaf peepers and those looking liams Gallery as if driven by an invisible for large signature pieces. The perfect owner force and picked up my work like it was for each work of art is out there, just waiting candy. I wasn’t marketing much differently to either be reminded to come back again, or from 2010 to 2011, so, why the sales? My alerted for the first time that Asheville’s got best guess: Asheville continues to grow as great art — everywhere! Art keepsakes can a cultural hot-spot, with increasing local, be big or small, in any season. regional and national attention. Our City, What’s important is that visitors feel Chamber, Convention & Visitors Bureau the one they take home is a perfect rememand many individuals continuously promote brance of their time in our fabulously artistic art in lots of ways every day, keeping Asheregion. Perhaps something made by you! ville attractive and alive. Every effort big and small helps — especially if we each share the Greg Vineyard is an responsibility for bringing fans in. artist and creative And now our annual Leaf Season is consultant in Asheville’s upon us! I have observed that many artists River Arts District. count on our orange, red and yellow-enHe and his Ceramics tranced tourists. It’s probably similar in for Contemplation & Vermont and other areas where the leaves Connectivity can be found are a bit extra-spectacular, as compared to, at Constance Williams Gallery, (the middle say, Southern California. Or Antarctica. At building in CURVE), 9 Riverside Drive in this time of year, reaching out to visitors Asheville. Open every day 11 a.m. to 4 can be about “The Art of The Keepsake�, p.m. Visit www.CURVEstudiosNC.com.

2 0 1 1 - 2 0 1 2 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director

Call for tickets today!

SATURDAY OCTOBER

15 • 8pm

SORCERER’S APPRENTICE

Dukas Sorcerer’s Apprentice Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2 Jason Posnock, violin Debussy PrÊlude à l’après-midi d’un faune Britten Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Purcell Jason Posnock SPONSOR

NOVEMBER 19, 2011 upcoming MAHLER’S “RESURRECTION� SYMPHONY

.T1IZMMJT1BUUPOt$34 (3* #SPLFS PhyllisPatton.com

DECEMBER 18, 2011 HOLIDAY POPS 3pm Matinee

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 


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Back again for another round of music mutterings; this time the focus seems to be on artists too long out of the limelight. Everything here is worth a listen, and worth buying at any of the fine independent record stores Asheville is so fortunate to have.

by James Cassara

Duncan Sheik Covers 80s Sneaky Records Given that his debut record was released in 1996 it should be obvious what period Duncan Sheik clamors for; he’s an unapologetic fan of the MTV era, and while your own fondness for the “big hair” decade may vary there’s no denying the passion and precision Duncan brings to the table. For his stroll down memory lane Sheik bets (and it’s a safe bet at that) on his fans loving the music as much as he does. Nearly all the songs covered were huge hits in their time. Of course that was a time dominated by synthesizers and studio effects, so what does Sheik do? He pays “homage” to the songs by stripping them down to bare bones, often removing any elements that made them catchy to start with. Sheik’s own signature sound – gently strumming guitars, plunked piano, and subdued harmonies – may be perfectly suited for his material, but seems ill fitted for the tunes found here. It’s a bit like reconstructing heavy metal as bluegrass (a trend I despise), and while Sheik’s folksy takes of songs by New Order, The Smiths, and Tears for Fears may eventually reveal the inherent charms of that decade, in the here and now Covers 80s seems but marginally worth the effort. **

Garland Jeffreys The King of In Between On the second track of his new album, Garland Jeffreys sings, in hyper-kinetic fashion, “I’m alive, I’m alive, I’m alive, not dead” – a mantra that, given this is his first release in 13 years, seems wholly appropriate. At this point it’s a safe bet to assume most ‘80s fans have likely forgotten him, in part a result of the sporadic nature of his output, which is a real shame. But the truth is that despite critical praise and a solid body of work Jeffreys has never quite lived up to the promise of his first two records. Much like Lou Reed his music is anchored to his beloved NYC; but where Reed has expanded his boundaries with a certain flair for the outrageous (think Berlin) Jeffreys has looked inward, exploring universal themes of broken romance,  October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

mortality, and parenthood with a certain detached fascination. On King of In Between he wisely teams with ex-Dylan guitarist and producer Larry Campbell and jettisons the strings and bloated arrangements that occasionally drag down his music; the result is a much leaner sound that reminds us just how darn good a songwriter Jeffreys is. The styles range from classic ‘70s funk/ soul (“the ambitious “Streetwise”) to straight ahead rock and roll (best exemplified by the razor sharp “Coney Island Winter”). There’s even a bit of ska (“Roller Coaster Town” sounds all for the entire world like a lost Specials track) to round things out. Like all his best records it’s a collage of diversity with all the right pieces in place. For his part Jeffreys sounds like a man given a new lease on life, retelling the stories of his youth with renewed passion and certainty. On “The Contortionist” he reminiscences about his youth in the rough and tumble streets of Harlem, but it’s an unflinching look at his mistakes with nary a bit of remorse or false melancholy. It’s just what it is, and the doo wop background vocals, courtesy of Reed, add a lovely and subtle touch. Jeffreys expands his range on a bit of John Lee Hooker-styled boogie (appropriately titled “Til John Lee Hooker Calls Me”) whose lyrics get right to the heart of the matter. “Not gettin’ any younger/and I’m not feelin’ very old” he tells us, and with unguarded honesty. The closing, “In God’s Waiting Room,” further explores his own mortality, but while some singers might take a cautious approach Jeffreys sounds almost giddy. All in all he’s led a damn good life and he’s not the least bit afraid to celebrate it. Nor should we, and while fifteen years is far too long to wait for a Garland Jeffreys album I’m delighted this one is here. The King of In Between suggests his best work might well lay ahead of him, and I for one plan to be along for the ride. ****

The Zombies Breathe In and Breathe Out AIS Records Aside from the Beatles and the Beach Boys no mid-60s rock group concocted melodies as shimmering and generous as those of the Zombies. Dominated by Colin Blunstone’s breathy vocals, choral backup harmonies, and Rod Argent’s spotless jazz/classical influenced organ and piano, the band

sounded completely unlike any other of their time. Indeed, their material, penned primarily by either Argent or guitarist Chris White, featured unexpected key and cord shifts that would have made even the Fab Four envious. Unfortunately their albums were too adventurous for a market still dominated by 45 rpms: Even now the Zombies are known primarily for an influential trio of hit singles, “She’s Not There” (1964), “Tell Her No” (1965), and “Time of the Season” (1969). That’s a shame, as the band maintained a remarkably high quality of work deep into the decade. After they drifted apart Blunstone embarked on a solid but unspectacular solo career while Argent eventually joined the Kinks. Now 50 years later the pair have reunited, pulled in other musicians of similar stripe, and released their first new studio album in more than four decades. It’s an admittedly mixed bag but one whose virtues – the knack for melody, intriguing instrumentation, and Blunestone’s unlike any other voice – far out-distance the relatively light weight nature of the songs. Certainly there’s a challenge in trying to maintain that endearing Zombies’ sound while not seeming to be stuck in a time warp, and for the most part Breathe In and Breathe Out keeps a fair balance. Part of the problem lies in the album’s sequencing. The three most “classic” sounding Zombies songs close out the album. In a sense Breathe is two distinctive sides of a coin, with neither side quite matching the other. The title cut is among the weakest – a bit of lounge music that goes nowhere – while such tracks as “Any Other Way” (buoyed by some absolutely gorgeous keyboards) and the Beatles-like “Play it for Real” sound wonderfully fresh and alive. The melodic but overly sweet “Shine on Sunshine” is a lovely nod to post Beatle McCartney, a throwback tune that is both nostalgic and contemporary. Blunestone’s best moment is the soulful “I Do Believe”; perhaps not the strongest track here but the one that best matches his amazing voice. In what seems eons ago The Zombies asked the immortal question “What’s your name? Who’s your daddy? Is he rich like me?” They’re now the granddads of this generation, and whether or not anyone still remembers or even cares about them is a fair question. But with fictional zombies all over television and movies, and seeming to be making one heck of a comeback, why not the genuine articles? ***1/2 ‘CD’s’ continued on next page


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what’s happening It’s MoogFest Time!

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Lindsay Buckingham Seeds We Sow Mind Kit Records Having long ago made more money than he could possibly spend, Lindsay Buckingham has since divided his career into distinct halves: the occasional – and predictable – Fleetwood Mac reunion tour (kaching!) and a string of low key but wildly inventive solo discs. Following 2008’s excellent Gift of Screws he embarked on a brief tour (which included a stop here in Asheville) before returning to the shadows. Three years later he reemerges with a new album, and while Buckingham hasn’t changed all that much, the landscape in which music is made is vastly different. After Screws Buckingham left the major Warner umbrella and created his own label, Mind Kit Records, leading him to record Seeds We Sow at his home studio. The result is an album that sounds vastly different from anything we’ve heard from him before, even if his musical and lyrical signatures are all over it. In fact the closest comparison might well be the demos and rough takes that accompanied the 1990 deluxe reissue of Fleetwood’s Tusk. It sounds like a self-made recording, which is a very good thing; Buckingham’s first class songwriting and guitar playing are trademarks, but so is his ambition as a record producer. Seeds We Sow is discordant in all the right ways, a rag tag collection of songs that threatens to derail but never does. “When She Comes Down” has a bass line that’s so distorted as to be almost painful, but it perfectly matches the exuberance of the elegant melody and blissful lyrics, while “In Our Own Time” is a maze of guitars, percussion, and who knows what else that sounds like Brian Wilson dropped in for a toke. “That’s the Way Love Goes” – the only track here with other musicians – is classic Fleetwood, an explosive number with crazed Baroque pop touches. And least we forget he can also write stripped down snarling rockers, Buckingham effortlessly tosses in “One Take”. The lone cover tune, an acoustic angle on the Rolling Stones’ “She Smiled Sweetly” brings the album to a close. It’s about the least likely Stones song you’d expect to be remade, but then again Lindsay Buckingham has never followed a conventional path. For all his fame and wealth Seeds We Sow reminds us that at the heart of things Buckingham is, and will always be, a distinctive singer/songwriter with a singular indie bent. ****

The private world of The Flaming Lips

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ven within the insular world of alternative rock, few bands are so daring and audacious – not to mention flat out brilliant – as The Flaming Lips. From their humble beginnings as Oklahoma outcasts, to their mid-90s pop culture breakthrough, to their status as one of the most respected groups today, the band rode one of the more surreal and unpredictable career trajectories in pop music. And while their history is well documented, for the newcomer a brief summary might well be in order. The Flaming Lips formed in Oklahoma City in 1983, when founder and guitarist Wayne Coyne enlisted his vocalist-brother Mark and bassist Michael Ivins to “gather in the garage and bash out some noise.” Dubbing themselves the Flaming Lips (a nonsensical name whose origin is variously attributed by Coyne to a porn film, an obscure drug reference, or a dream in which a fiery Virgin Mary seduces him in the back seat of his car), the band made its live debut at a local and infamous transvestite club. After stumbling through a series of what they admit as dreadful performances (made worse by a revolving cast of drummers), they eventually settled on percussionist Richard English before recording their self-titled debut. Released on green vinyl on their own Lovely Sorts of Death label in 1985 the music’s acid-bubblegum affectations, coupled with lyrics of uncommon emotional depth and bizarre back stories, firmly established them as true originals. Soon afterwards Mark Coyne left the band, leaving Wayne to assume full control of the group; in addition to remaining its lead guitarist, he also became the primary singer and songwriter. Continuing on as a trio, the Lips released 1986’s Hear It Is, followed a year later by Oh My Gawd!!!...The Flaming Lips. While touring in support of the Butthole Surfers, they met concert promoter Jonathan Donahue, whose own band was sharing the bill. Donahue and Coyne became close friends, and Donahue eventually signed on as the group’s sound technician, a role that would become increasingly important to the band’s evolution. After the release of 1989’s Telepathic Surgery, English exited, reducing the Lips to the core duo of Coyne and Ivins. After adding drummer Nathan Roberts, Donahue adopted the name Dingus and became a full-time member. With a fresh line up now in place, the four recorded In a Priest Driven Ambulance. Released a year later it

led to their signing with Warner Brothers. Their oft-delayed 1992 major-label debut, Hit to Death in the Future Head, appeared to critical acclaim but commercial indifference. Donahue soon exited to focus his full energies on his own band, followed soon after by Roberts. Once again Flaming Lips were pared to a duo. With the addition of guitarist Ronald Jones and drummer Steven Drozd, the group cut 1993’s sublime Transmissions from the Satellite Heart, which they supported by playing the second stage at Lollapalooza and touring the nation in a Ryder truck. Initially, the album stiffed; however, nearly a year after its initial release, the single “She Don’t Use Jelly” became a grassroots hit, and against all odds, the Flaming Lips found themselves on the Top 40 charts. Sensing their good fortune they took full advantage of their requisite 15 minutes of fame, appearing on MTV’s annual Spring Break broadcast, touring in support of Candlebox, and even appearing on an episode of Beverly Hills 90210. Following the 1994 release of a limited-edition sampler of odds and ends titled Providing Needles for Your Balloons, the Lips returned in 1995 with Clouds Taste Metallic, a strikingly mature and diverse collection highlighted by the singles “Bad Days” (which found its way into the film Batman Forever), “This Here Giraffe,” and “Brainville.” But despite critical praise and hipster status the album nonetheless failed to live up to the commercial success of its predecessor, and the band was again relegated to cult status. In 1996 The Flaming Lips must have felt cursed. First, Jones left to undertake a spiritual odyssey from which he did not return; Drozd’s hand was almost needlessly amputated after he was bitten by a spider and soon after, Ivins was the victim of a bizarre hit-and-run accident that left him seriously injured. Ironically, Coyne was having car problems of his own when rumors of his latest sonic foray – conducting an orchestra of 40 automobiles, all with their tape decks concurrently playing uniquely composed music – prompted fan discussion of his possible psychological collapse. “I would try to tell people what I was doing and found that I couldn’t explain it very well,” Coyne later remarked about the project, coined the Parking Lot Experiment. “Plus, I had a tooth abscess that made me talk kind of weird. I’m sure they thought I was losing it.” By the following year, the Flaming Lips (who continued as a trio, opting not to replace Jones) were back in the studio, recording an album that, according to Coyne, would be “so different and exciting it will either make us millionaires or laughing stocks.” 1997’s

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Cassara

Zaireeka did neither but it was a breathtaking and wildly experimental set of four discs designed to be played simultaneously. Meanwhile “Hot Day,” a previously unreleased track, also made its way onto the soundtrack to the movie Suburbia, while a retrospective collection of their early material was prepared. Never ones to sit idle, the band recorded what would be their finest album yet, the breathtaking new studio effort, The Soft Bulletin. It was not only a dazzling collection of new material, showcasing Coyne’s continued maturation as a songwriter and the bands’ own relentless pursuit of excellence, its sales actually reflected the praise that was heaped upon it. At long last The Flaming Lips were getting their due. After a three-year absence from the studio, time spent touring and reenergizing their creative juices, 2002 brought several new releases, including the concept album Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots and the previously mentioned retrospect, now expanded to a double disc set. Yoshimi won the group even more popular and critical acclaim than ever, which they maximized by spending half of 2002 appearing with Beck on his Sea Change tour as both his opening act and backing band. The Lips kept busy over the next two years by touring in support of the new record and working on a long promised concept documentary chronicling their livelihood. They returned to the studio in 2004 and spent much of 2005 recording; that year, the Flaming Lips documentary, The Fearless Freaks, and their VOID video collection were both released, whetting fans’ appetites for the band’s 2006 album, At War with the Mystics. In 2007, the Flaming Lips were nominated for a Grammy for Best Alternative Album for Mystics and won a Grammy for Best Engineered Album. One year later, the band’s long-awaited, seven-years-in-themaking film Christmas on Mars made its debut at the Sasquatch Festival in George, WA; that fall, the movie and its soundtrack were released as a CD/DVD set. During 2007 and 2008, the Lips began working on the follow-up to At War with the Mystics, taking a looser, more experimental approach than they had in years. The results were released in the fall of 2009 as Embryonic, quickly followed by the band’s quirky remake of the Pink Floyd classic Dark Side of the Moon. Recorded with such artists as Henry Rollins and the band ‘MoogFest’ continued on page 36

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 


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music TV on the Radio

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he deliciously named, Brooklynbased group, TV on the Radio, cleverly mixes post-punk, electronic, and other atmospheric sonic elements much as a painter orchestrates a multi media canvas. That should come as no surprise, given that their core duo-vocalist Tunde Adebimpe and multi-instrumentalist/producer David Andrew Sitek are both visual artists as well as musicians. As a graduate of NYU’s film school Adebimpe originally focused on stop-motion animation. His video interpretations for the pop band Yeah Yeah Yeahs helped solidify his interest in music while forg-

by James

Cassara

ing a friendship that continues to this day. He is also a painter (as is Sitek) and record producer, working closely with the Yeahs and other up and coming bands. The duo met when Sitek moved into the building where Adebimpe had a loft; each of them had been recording music on his own, but realized their sounds would work well together. Sitek’s brother Jason began playing drums and other instruments with the pair during their recording sessions, which resulted in OK Calculator, a self-released disc of four-track recordings. Due to other musical commitments Jason left the band for a short time but returned for the mak-

ing of their Touch & Go Records debut, the Young Liars. After the EP was completed, TV on the Radio added guitarist/vocalist Kyp Malone to their fold. Young Liars, which also features the Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Brian Chase and Nick Zinner, was released in summer 2003 to solid reviews, coinciding with a series of shows in support of the Fall. Their first full-length release, Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes, arrived in spring 2004. The band remained busy for the rest of the year, embarking on its own tours as well as dates with the Faint and the Pixies. Later that year they released the New Health Rock EP and again booked studio time. In 2005, the band kept busy with touring and began working on its second album. After signing with Interscope Records, they resurfaced with Return to Cookie Mountain, a more polished but wildly inconsistent collection of songs that featured David Bowie on backing vocals. The band veered in a sleeker direction on 2008’s Dear Science, finished a brief tour, and took a much needed break. Malone worked on his own project, Rain Machine, and appeared on Iran’s 2009

WNC Jazz Profiles: Frank Southecorvo

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with experienced musicians. During high school, Frank played in concert band, jazz big band and also studied with Boston tenor saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi. This led to a jazz quintet playing standards and writing his first songs. “I always wanted to play music, but my father thought that it would be a stupid job and advised me to study art with the idea that later, after college, I would be able to teach at a university.” In Boston, Frank met Robin Southall, whom he would later marry. They moved from Boston to Western New York, then later to California where he studied at UC Davis. They came to Asheville in 1987 where Frank taught sculpture, pottery and art history. Without trying to, he also fell into playing music. Frank’s first successful band was called Voice of the Turtle (which he co-led with Alan Childres) playing original music that focused on improvisation in a range of styles derived from the various backgrounds of the four musicians. As Frank became more involved with music, he realized that there was much to learn professionally, plus that both music and art took a lot of time! Eventually he decided to stop making and teaching art and focus instead on performing and composing. “After Jerry Bergonzi, most of what

10 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

If You TV on the Radio at MoogFest on Go Friday, October 28. The exact times

and location are to be determined, so be sure to regularly visit www. moogfest.com for more updates.

by

Born in 1961 in Wayland, Massachusetts, art and music played a big part in Frank Southecorvo’s life from an early age.

local potter, Margaret Hoenig, taught classes for children which Frank attended, off and on, from age 6 through his teens. She was an incredibly inspiring woman who encouraged Frank at eleven to build a potter’s wheel, a rudimentary kiln, plus set up a clay studio in his basement. The excitement from various classes, along with his endeavors at home, eventually led to formal art training. He received a BFA from the Program in Artisanry at Boston University (1983) and a MFA from UC Davis in California (1987). Frank started playing saxophone at age eight with group lessons once a week in school. In middle school, he was fortunate to meet another mentor — a young band director named Dave Faucher. Faucher was an accomplished musician on many instruments, but his main “axe” was the tenor saxophone. His enthusiasm for the saxophone in particular, and jazz in general, was infectious! Frank and a few other fellow students were soon transcribing jazz solos, learning the beginnings of improvisation, and later in high school coming in for early morning jam sessions. Faucher also encouraged the students to attend some of his gigs and sit-in

album Dissolver, while Sitek formed the collaborative pop project Maximum Balloon, which released its self-titled debut in 2010. As planned, their hiatus ended the following year, and TV on the Radio released their fifth album, Nine Types of Light, in early 2011. In March of that year, the band announced that bassist Gerard Smith, who had joined the TV on the Radio line-up in 2005, was suffering from lung cancer; the following month, Smith passed away at the age of 34, leaving the band in search of a permanent replacement. But despite such challenges the band is soldiering on: they’ve recently completed work on a soon to be released new album while headlining shows at NYC’s Radio Music Hall. Their brand of confectionary but literate pop makes them a perfect fit for MoogFest, another cherry on top of an already scrumptious dessert.

Frank Southecorvo

Photo courtesy of www.carrieturnerphotography.com

I’ve learned has been on my own and from what I’ve gotten from band mates. Some things I’ve just picked up, but I’ve also taken a few lessons here and there. As with most jazz musicians here in Asheville, pianist Bill Gerhardt has been a big influence. He’s explained certain music theory to me, but more importantly, has encouraged me in my own writing!” Frank added, “Asheville has so many talented musicians and many genres of music with a rich history. Bluegrass, southern rock, singer-songwriter and maybe even classical chamber music have pretty deep roots here — yet in 1987 when I arrived there were only a handful of jazz musicians, and even fewer venues for hearing jazz. That has really changed over the last 25 years! Audiences have become larger and more appreciative too. I currently play with a few different bands on a regular basis in a variety of styles

Eddie LeShure

and sizes. I enjoy writing music and playing original music by others, so you can hear me most Tuesday nights at Tressa’s for the Asheville Original Music series. The last few years I’ve not had the chance to write for two or three horns except for commercial bands and I hope to do some of that this coming year.” We all eagerly look forward to that! “Frank has all the qualities I like in a jazz musician. He has technical command over all the saxophones, his improvisations are expressive, and he doesn’t waste notes. On top of that, I also love his composing!”

~ David Wilken, Music Director of the Asheville Jazz Orchestra www.franksouthecorvo.com www.myspace.com/franksouthecorvo

Share Eddie LeShure’s passion for jazz with Jazz Unlimited on MAIN FM each Wednesday 7-10 p.m., at 103.5 or MAIN-FM.org.


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

Michelle Keenan is a long time student of film and a fundraiser for public radio. Chip Kaufmann is a film historian as well as a program host on WCQS-FM. Both are members of the Southeastern Film Critic's Association (SEFCA).

For the latest reviews, theater info and movie show times, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

Brent Brown is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

The story starts with a woman (Gwyneth Paltrow) returning from a business trip in Hong Kong (and a layover in Chicago for an adulterous quickie) who rapidly goes from being piqued to foaming at the mouth to dead. We see people in Hong Kong meeting the same fate. From there it spreads like wildfire. Next up we meet the scientists sent to study, quarantine and find the cure. As the pandemic grows, so does hysteria and desperation. Writer Z. Scott Burns and Marion Cotillard is a World Health Organization Soderbergh (who last teamed up worker held for hostage for a cure in Contagion. for The Informant) do something very interesting with the film given Contagion ∑∑∑∑ its plot. They do not give in to tragedy or Short Take: Scary, altogether too melodrama or even play very much on possible story of a lethal airborne virus our sympathies, whereas other filmmakers that kills within days and the fight to would have been preying on our emocontrol the epidemic and panic that tions and buying stock in Kleenex. This, ensues. combined with numbering the days of the Reel Take: Contagion is the kind of pandemic, creates a different atmosphere. movie that will bring out even the slightest It’s almost more scientific in its approach obsessive compulsive streak in a person. It’s to telling the story. It’s certainly a stark the story of a lethal airborne virus that kills contrast to the wannabe journalist turned within days. As the fast-moving epidemic sensationalist blogger played by Jude Law. grows, the world races to find a cure and It’s a solid cast and solid filmmaking control the panic that spreads faster than and they even manage to throw in a few fun the virus itself. It’s altogether too real, and I lines here and there. When the head of the have it on good authority that the filmmakCenter for Disease Control (Laurence Fishers were quite accurate with the explanation burne) is being questioned by government of the virus and how it spreads. Fortunately officials as to whether the terrorists could be for me however, the film lacked real staying weaponizing the bird flu, Fishburne replies, power, so after a few days I was able to stop “The birds are already doing that sir.” In counting how many times my husband, spite of its viral topic, Contagion really coworkers and even complete strangers doesn’t stick with you. At the end of the day touched their face. Contagion is just a movie, not the fate of the Packing his film with a plethora of world if you go to eat duck in Hong Kong. quality Hollywood stars in this fast-paced, Rated PG-13 for disturbing content and some viral thriller was probably a good strategy language. on director Steven Soderbergh’s part. I can’t Review by Michelle Keenan imagine this germaphobic inducing fare being at the top of the box office without some Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark of those names - Matt Damon, Laurence ∑∑∑∑ Fishburne, Gwyneth Paltrow, Marion Cotillard, Kate Winslet, Jude Law, Elliot Gould Short Take: This remake of the 1973 and Jennifer Ehle. They play biologists, TV Movie is not only better than the scientists, medical professionals, regular original, it’s a classic haunted house folks and one really loathsome blogger. thriller with spine chills instead of gut spills. Their scenes interconnect according to their relationship with the virus.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Reel Take: It seems as if everything is a

see what happens you just hear it and imagine the worst. If the movie had kept remake or a reboot these days (all my rethis approach all the way through, then it views this month fall into that category) and would have been well on its way to beyou’d be right to assume that a remake of a coming a bonafide 5 star cult classic. TV Movie that starred Kim Darby wouldn’t The one area where Don’t Be Afraid of be of any real interest but there you would the Dark stumbles is that the subtle chills be wrong. I know because that’s how I felt built up in the first two when I went to see thirds of the film give Don’t Be Afraid of the way to overindulgence Dark. The difference in obvious CGI effects is that the producer in the last third. It’s of the film is the great not enough to ruin the Mexican fantasy director movie but it would Guillermo del Toro have been truly great if (Pan’s Labyrinth). He they had only it toned loved the original for down a notch or two. its storyline and has Still I rank this film a crafted, along with his solid 4 stars and with a director Troy Nixey, a Katie Holmes comforts her boyfriend's budget of $25 million first class, old school, tormented daughter in Don't Be Afraid of the Dark. (including publicity), haunted house thriller. it shows that even A huge plus is the with CGI, it still possible to make a movie talented cast that has been assembled. Guy without an overinflated budget. That may Pearce and Katie Holmes make an ideal be Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark’s greatest accouple as they try to establish a relationship complishment. Like The Debt, this film sat from broken lives while renovating a classic on the shelf for over a year before Miramax old house. The central figure, however, is unceremoniously released it. Pearce’s 11 year old daughter Sally (Bailee Madison) who becomes the target of what’s Rated R (unnecessarily) for violence and terror. hidden in the house. Her performance Review by Chip Kaufmann is outstanding and helps to draw us in to what’s happening and to make us care about Drive ∑∑∑∑ her fate. Old Australian pro Jack Thompson Short Take: Existential art house flick (Breaker Morant) has a small but pivotal disguised as an action thriller has role as an old timer who knows the secret of compelling performances from Ryan the house. Gosling and Albert Brooks but sudden I don’t want to give too much away in outbursts of graphic violence will be this review (something I have a bad habit of unsettling for some. doing in real life conversation) but the presences in the house are unique to this film Reel Take: Here we have an example of a and are based on the writings of one of my movie that isn’t officially a remake although favorite fantasy writers, Welsh author Arthur it was clearly inspired by Walter Hill’s 1978 Machen (mispronounced in the movie as film The Driver even down to the anonyrhyming with BACON instead of BLACKmous driver who spouts existential diaEN but at least they do give him credit). logue that sounds like blank verse. It seems The photography, the music, the strange to me that every review I’ve read lighting and the overall design all blend so far fails to mention this. Instead they all together effortlessly to create an increasmention Quentin Tarrentino and/or Alexing atmosphere of dread. The opening of ander Jodorowsky (the film is dedicated to the film contains one of the most cringe him) as the inspirations for Danish director inducing sequences that I have encounNicholas Winding Refn. I guess journeytered in quite some time. It’s rendered ‘Movies’ continued on page 12 all the more effective because you don’t Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 11


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 11

man Walter Hill isn’t enough of a name director to be a source of inspiration. This time around the Ryan O’Neal character is played by Ryan Gosling who continues to grow and develop as an actor. He delivers his compelling but unrealistic dialogue with just the right amount of deadpan restraint so that when he varies from it, it comes as an effective surprise. The real surprise here is seeing Albert Brooks playing a lower down on the food chain crime figure. His outbursts of profanity coupled with his sudden displays of violence to others stands in stark contrast to his longtime comic persona. The standard storyline is simple and basic. Skilled driver Gosling is hired to assist in a robbery that turns out to be a setup and everything goes terribly wrong. He did it to help out the husband (Oscar Isaac) of a young woman (Carey Mulligan) in his apartment building that he has fallen for. The husband is intentionally killed and now Brooks and his associate Ron Perlman come looking for Gosling taking care of anyone who gets in the way. He fights back and there is extreme retribution. Within this standard revenge scenario we are treated to stylized noir lighting, low

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Ryan Gosling watches a robbery start to go wrong in the Art House action flick Drive.

key line delivery from most of the characters, a languid pace that is sometimes a detriment, and some unexpected bursts of the most graphic violence imaginable. This violence will certainly disturb some members of the audience especially those who read the reviews and come expecting something out of the French New Wave. Director Nicholas Winding Refn (Valhalla Rising) is constantly straddling the line between highbrow flick and outright exploitation and, as a result of that, is likely to wind up alienating most of his audience. The mainstreamers expecting another Fast and Furious will be put off by the lack of action, no sex, and no snappy dialogue while the art house crowd will be appalled by the language and the nastiness of the violence. It should be noted that on Rotten Tomatoes, the online review site, the critics liked this movie more than the audience did. For the most part I enjoyed Drive although I felt that it was running out of gas before it finally did. It seems destined for cult movie status so we’ll see how it’s regarded 10 years from now. Just to refresh my memory I rented The Driver from Netflix and, as far as I’m concerned, Walter Hill gets more mileage out of his 90 minutes than Refn gets out of his 100 although to be fair The Driver has a lower RT audience to critic rating as well. Rated R for brutal bloody violence, language, and some nudity.

Review by Chip Kaufmann

Point Blank ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: A tight French thriller from the director of Tell No One that isn’t quite as complicated or impressive as it thinks it is.

Reel Take: Fred Cavaye’s last film Tell

No One was an award-winning suspense drama with twists, turns, and thrills. It had something for everyone and was an exemplary piece of entertainment. Perhaps the cache of Tell No One is bringing Cavaye’s latest film Point Blank premature raves. Point Blank is a tight, non-stop thrill ride, which I didn’t find to be quite the piece of cinematic mastery as some earlier reviews made it out to be. It should also be noted that this film has nothing to do with John

12 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

Boorman’s 1967 thriller by the same name. Samuel (Gilles Lellouche) is a happily married nurse working in a Paris hospital. After saving the life of an anonymous patient, Samuel becomes the target of the people who want the patient dead. Samuel’s very pregnant wife (Anaya) is kidnapped before his eyes, he is told he has three hours to deliver the mysterious patient to them. The patient, Sartet (Roschdy Zem), is under police surveillance. Samuel is now under police surveillance as well as the watchful eye of the bad guys. The line between the good guys and bad guys blurs as we learn the lengths of corruption among the police and as Samuel and Sartet form an unlikely alliance. Point Blank keeps keeps the viewer on the edge of their seat as Samuel and Sartet race through Paris’ streets, subways, hospitals, warehouses, and police stations. As the body count rises and time is runs short, Samuel’s quest to save the life of his wife and unborn child is complicated even further when law enforcement and the media tout him as one of the cop-killing bad guys. Samuel’s predicament makes Dr. Richard Kimble’s plight look like a cakewalk.

naught. Point Blank is a solid pick for date night, but it won’t likely be around for long. See it while you can. Rated R for strong violence and some language.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Sarah’s Key ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: An American journalist in Paris stumbles onto a tragic story with a connection to her husband’s family while doing research for an article on the 1942 Vel’ d’Hiv roundup, a chapter in history the French would rather forget.

Reel Take: When I read Tatiana de

Rosnay’s best selling novel Sarah’s Key, I kept thinking it would make a great movie. Indeed it is a powerful story and it’s very well done, but the same things that kept it from being a truly great book also prevent it from being a great movie; more on that later. Kristin Scott Thomas (I’ve Loved You So Long, The English Patient) is Julia Jarmond, an American journalist married to a French architect in Paris. When she is assigned to do a story about the Vel d’Hiv round up of 1942, she uncovers the mystery of a young girl with a connection to her husband’s family. The Vel d’Hiv roundup was a chapter in French history during WWII that the French would rather forget. In the summer of 1942 the French government cooperated with the Nazis and had the police round up Jewish families who were then sent to concentration camps. When Julia discovers that the apartment she and her husband are renovating was acquired by her husband’s family when the previous occupants were removed in the round up, she Roschdy Zem and Gilles Lellouche are unlikely allies wants to know who they are and what in the action packed french thriller Point Blank. happened to them. What she discovers The dynamic that develops between the about the Starzynski family and the secrets naïve Samuel and the hardened criminal and in her husband’s family leave her forever professional safe cracker, Sartet is intriguchanged. She also becomes inextricably coning and certainly one of the movie’s greatest nected to Sarah Starzynski, the only member strengths. It struck me that Cavaye had a of her family to survive the Vel d’Hiv. very clear vision of what he wanted for this Sarah Starzynski (Mélusine Mayance) film and he exacted it deftly from his actors was a ten year old girl who, when the police and crew. To that end the wide lens cinemacome to her family’s apartment, hides her tography and sharp editing are perhaps the brother from them and lies as to his wherefilm’s best assets. abouts. The police were intimidating; her Samuel is a likeable protagonist a la little brother was scared. She thinks she’s Alfred Hitchcock - an innocent every man doing something helpful when she hides caught in unusual circumstances. Sartet is him in a secret cupboard and promises she’ll not an innocent, but he has a decency or come back to let him out soon. From there moral code of sorts, not found in many of the story unfolds well, intertwining Julia’s the men on his side of the law. To me, this investigation in modern day with Sarah’s is the story of intrigue and nuance. Unfortuvaliant effort to escape the camps and get nately Cavaye builds the whole show not on home to free Michel in WWII. narrative but on its kinetic pace, and for me, Mélusine Mayance gives a brave and that keeps it from being great. heart stopping performance as Sarah. Kristin That said, Point Blank is an art house Scott Thomas turns in yet another fine percinema action flick and is certainly worth formance. Interestingly she trades in some seeing. It may actually be more appealing to of her hallmark reserve for more warmth, American (adrenaline junkie) audiences than and it works. Adapting a book with such Tell No One, so my opinion may count for ‘Movies’ continued on page 13


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Kristin Scott Thomas uncovers a life changing story as a journalist writing about the the 1942 Vel d'Hiv in France in Sarah's Key.

vivid detail and thematic layers is always difficult, but Director Gilles Pacquet Brenner is a good steward of de Rosnay’s novel. He even sticks to de Rosnay’s storyline involving Julia’s unexpected pregnancy and subsequent marital troubles. For me this storyline waned in comparison to the bigger picture and kept the book in mediocre territory. I’d find myself flipping ahead to get back to Sarah’s story. It’s not that this segment of the story is poorly done in the film, it’s not – it’s fine. It’s just that it still felt rather insignificant in comparison, and it detracted from the film’s impact and the story, not just of the Starzynski family but from what happened to more than 8,000 French Jews. Sarah’s Key is certainly worth your time. It’s just that it misses greatness, and with a story like that, it really could have been great.

apparent oxymoron is what makes the original so memorable. Hoffman’s character, now played by James Marsden, has been transformed from a mild mannered mathematician into a Hollywood screenwriter, and the setting has been changed to the Deep South inhabited by a bunch of good ol’ boys ala Deliverance. Because of the setting and our stereotypes’ cinematic history we know there’s going to be trouble even if we haven’t seen the first film. Kate Bosworth, in Susan George’s role of the prodigal wife, acquits herself well. To avoid any hint of controversy in these politically correct times, the key scene in the movie involving her has no hint of enjoyment. Alexander Skarsgard, as the former boyfriend, looks great with his shirt off and he makes a good redneck as well. The overthe-top award goes to James Woods who is no stranger when it comes to this category. The story, for those of you unfamiliar with it, concerns a young couple who return to her hometown in rural Mississippi to take care of her late father’s estate which includes a large stone house on the edge of town. After hiring a group of locals to make repairs, they encounter increasing hostility which includes a home invasion. This leads to a final confrontation which becomes an increasingly violent showdown.

Rated PG-13 for thematic material including disturbing situations involving the Holocaust.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Straw Dogs ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Remake of Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 controversial film is better than I expected it to be but what’s the point?

Reel Take: Drum roll please. And the

award for the most pointless remake of 2011 (so far) goes to…Straw Dogs! If Sam Peckinpah hadn’t been cremated after his death in 1985, he’d be turning over in his grave. Spinning in his grave would be more likely as in addition to Straw Dogs there are at least two other remake/inspired by offerings in the works including one of his iconic and iconoclastic Western The Wild Bunch. But that’s another story for another time. Setting aside the 1971 version which most of today’s youth demographic hasn’t seen, this Straw Dogs is generally well acted, slickly edited and decently photographed. The key thing missing is the “fish out of water” feeling so pervasive in Peckinpah’s version. Not only was American Dustin Hoffman out of place in English Cornwall but the actions of the local villagers seemed totally inappropriate. The first Straw Dogs was essentially an English western and that

James Marsden and Kate Bosworth as the besieged couple in Rob Lurie's remake of Straw Dogs.

Being a film critic means (or should mean) that you are familiar with a lot more movies than a mainstream audience, movies they have either forgotten or never seen. Such was the case when I went to see Straw Dogs. An informal poll of the roughly two dozen people there revealed that only two people knew there was an earlier version and they hadn’t seen it. The fact that the youth demographic that Hollywood moviemakers cater to have little or no movie knowledge, is one of the major reasons that we are currently awash in a sea of remakes. Until the majority of these films start to tank, that’s what we’re going to continue to see for the immediate future. At least from Hollywood. Rated R for strong brutal violence, sexual content, and pervasive language.

Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Debt ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: The Debt is a complex espionage thriller, set in 1997, of three Israeli Mossad agents whose cover up of a 1966 incident begins to unravel.

Reel Take: This movie is a throwback to

the kind of complicated, thought provoking espionage saga that recalls such films as The Spy Who Came In From the Cold and The Kremlin Letter. Combine them with Steven Spielberg’s Munich and you’ll have some idea of what to expect from The Debt. The film is actually a remake of a recent Israeli film Ha Hov (2007) which features the same storyline with only a few minor twists. Once again it would appear that fear and/or dislike of subtitles has called for an English language makeover.

than Avatar after all. Although all of the performances are first rate, the one that you’ll remember after you leave the theater is Jesper Christensen’s as the target of the 1966 manhunt. His Nazi doctor is a cross between Laurence Olivier in Marathon Man and Jeremy Iron’s warped

Asheville Film Society October Screenings October 4 •

Brazil

(1985, Terry Gilliam) A bureaucrat in a retro-future world tries to correct an administrative errorcontinued and himself ‘Movies’ on page 14 becomes an enemy of the state. October 11 •

The Palm Beach Story

(1942, Preston Sturges) An inventor needs cash to develop his big idea. His wife, who loves him, decides to raise the cash for him by divorcing him and marrying a millionaire. October 18

I’ll Never Forget What’s‘isname Helen Mirren prepares to do what she has to do to keep a secret intact in The Debt.

The year is 1997. Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson, and Ciarin Hinds are 3 Israeli Mossad agents who are celebrated for bringing a wanted Nazi war criminal to justice back in 1966. Mirren’s daughter has even written a book about their exploits. Suddenly one of the them commits suicide and as a result a dirty little secret threatens to come out. The other two must deal with that secret head on and do something about it or there will be serious consequences. I don’t like spoilers so, unlike a number of other reviews, I won’t reveal what the secret is or what happens as a result of it. Half the fun of a mystery thriller is finding things out when the characters do as that helps you to connect with them and it keeps things more interesting. Unlike a movie like The Prestige which actually encourages repeated viewings, The Debt says all it has to say the first time around so it’s best to keep everything hidden until the appropriate time. One thing I can reveal about The Debt is that it switches back and forth in time from 1997 to 1966 on a frequent basis which can be a little confusing at first. The flashbacks actually take up more of the film as we meet the younger versions of the three principals (Jessica Chastain, Sam Worthington, Marton Czokas) and see what really unfolded all those years ago. The new kids hang in there quite well with the old pros especially Sam Worthington who shows us that there may be something more to him

(1967, Michael Winner) Advertising golden boy Andrew Quint is fed up with his fabulously successful life. He quits his job to write for a small literary magazine. He says good-bye to his wife and mistresses, but finds that it’s not so easy to escape the past. October 25 •

The Ghost Breakers

(1940, George Marshall) A radio broadcaster (Bob Hope), his quaking manservant (Willie Best) and an heiress (Paulette Goddard) investigate the mystery of a haunted castle in Cuba. This hilarious comedy about haunted houses and a menacing zombie is the perfect movie for Halloween. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.ashevillefilm.org

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 13


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twin gynecologists in David Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers. There is a gynecological scene that will make women feel the way men did during the Lorena Bobbitt trial. But Christensen is not just a cardboard Nazi villain and it is the film’s treatment of his character that will be controversial to some. The Debt, along with Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark (also reviewed in this issue), sat on a shelf for more than a year despite the presence of Helen Mirren and Sam Worthington. Miramax Films has changed hands yet again and the new regime didn’t want these films and dumped them unceremoniously into theaters. The fact that the film has done better than expected is a testament to how good it is. See it in a theater if you get the chance although it will come across well on DVD once it comes out. Rated R for some violence and language.

Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Guard ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Hilarity and a body count ensue when an unconventional Irish cop and a by-the-book FBI agent reluctantly team up to nab a drug ring infiltrating the rural west coast of Ireland.

Reel Take: The Guard is without a doubt

my personal favorite movie of the year so far. Not because it’s the best movie of the year, but because it’s the most enjoyable and laugh out loud funny film to come down the pike in a while. Written and directed by John Michael McDonagh, brother of Martin McDonough, The Guard is drawing comparisons to Martin’s 2008 critically acclaimed and much overlooked film In Bruges (see my DVD pick on page 13). While John Michael displays a similar flair for dark wit and peculiar characters as only the Irish can do, The Guard offers far more levity, and is more digestible than In Bruges. Judging by the laughter and applause the night my viewing partner and I saw the film, The Guard is a crowd pleaser from the get go. The film stars Brendan Gleeson (who also starred in In Bruges, ergo drawing some of the comparisons) as Gerry Boyle, a rather unorthodox, non-conformist police sergeant in rural Connemara. The first ten minutes of the movie quickly illustrate what a colorful oddball he is. When a drug smuggling investigation inadvertently teams straight laced, by-thebook African American FBI agent Wendel Everett (Don Cheadle) with Segeant Boyle, hilarity and a head count ensue. Cheadle plays straight man to Gleeson’s politically incorrect antics. I suppose one could say Gerry is innocently racist (by cultural perception, not by personal belief or conviction), which somehow makes his remarks appallingly funny, rather than just plain appalling. As Agent Everett says, “I don’t know if you’re

mother f%#!ing in common than one smart or just mother would expect, when f%#!ing stupid.” they find themselves How Cheadle keeps each other’s only ally a straight face is in their efforts to nab anyone’s guess. the drug smugglers. His deadpan ‘youTheir night and day didn’t-just-say-what differences and their -I-think-you-said’ unexpected bond looks play well off make the buddy-flick Gleeson’s innocuaspects of the film an ous comments. All I absolute delight. know is the out takes Meanwhile a from the film must be fantastic supportDon Cheadle and Brendan Gleeson are an unlikely but outrageously funny dynamic hysterical. ing cast provides a duo in The Guard. Sergeant Boyle lively, if not unand Agent Everett are usual ensemble to two diametrically different men from totally flank our heroes. Fionnula Flanagan as Sgt. dissimilar backgrounds, but they share more Boyle’s dying mum is a hoot. Mark Strong,

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Frankenstein”

October DVD Picks

Frankenstein (1931) 2011 marks the 80th anniversary of the original Frankenstein starring Boris Karloff in his legendary portrayal of a creature made from parts of dead bodies and then brought to life through electrical overstimulation. The iconic monster makeup (see this month’s cover) is as much a part of American movie folklore as King Kong or Judy Garland’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. In truth, this is not the original Frankenstein movie. That distinction belongs to a 15 minute one reel adaptation done in 1910 by Thomas Edison with a completely different look for the monster. However that version is only for silent film buffs as is the 1920 German film The Golem on which a lot of James Whale’s 1931 film is based. What is there left to say about the story. Most everyone knows how high strung scientist Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive) creates a being out of dead tissue then brings it to life only to have it turn on him and his loved ones. The original book by Mary Shelley is quite different but it wouldn’t be Hollywood if they didn’t significantly change things. Why see it? Because, although it isn’t scary any more thanks to overexposure, parody, and far more explicit violence in films today, Frankenstein is still one of the classic American movies that can be seen now as it was back in 1931. The print was lovingly restored in 2006 for the film’s 75th anniversary and all the censored bits about the little girl and her fate and Dr. Frankenstein’s scandalous line about “knowing what it feels like to be God” have been put back in.

14 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

If you watch Frankenstein, not as a horror movie but as the story of a giant, frightened child lost in a world of adults that he cannot understand (which is why young children still relate to it) then it can still be a powerful and moving film experience.

In Bruges (2008) After reviewing The Guard and Point Blank this month, it was a toss up as whether to offer In Bruges or Tell No One as my DVD pick for the month. I reference both in the respective reviews and I highly recommend both. In Bruges, however, gets the nod. I’ve recommended The Guard to so many people and when I ask them if they saw In Bruges, they respond, “in what?” This is a must-see movie for people who love film, enjoy thought provoking dialogue, and who aren’t afraid to venture off the beaten path. In Bruges tells the story of two hit men, Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson, hiding out in the city of Bruges after a hit gone awry. Ken (Gleeson) is a veteran of business, he’s calm and thoughtful. Tough talking Ray (Farrell) is a novice; he’s jittery and jabbery. They have been instructed to go to

Liam Cunningham and David Wilmot make the funniest trio of philosophizing bad guys since Pulp Fiction, and Tarrantino can only wish he wrote such a clever script. The Guard is the best showcase to date for Gleeson’s multi-faceted talents. Getting to the crux of Gerry Boyle is half the fun. He is a mass (literally and figuratively) of contradictions which weave throughout the film. Not one bit of the script and storyline is wasted. The Guard is a must see. Unfortunately, by the time this issue comes out, it may not even still be in the cinema. If it is, get thee to a theatre post haste. If it’s not, look for it on DVD in the coming months. Rated R for pervasice language, some violence, drug material and sexual content.

Review by Michelle Keenan

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “In Bruges” Bruges and take a bit of a holiday while they await further instructions from their employer, a nasty London crime boss named Harry (Ralph Fiennes). Bruges is a well preserved medieval city in Belgium often described as having a charming, fairy tale-like quality to it. Ken takes Harry’s advice and takes in the sights. The younger and simpler Ray does not share Ken’s enthusiasm for playing tourist and is rattled by the innocent life taken in the hit. While they wait for news, each has time to ponder their views on life and death. The basic story, men who do bad things rethinking their lives, is nothing new, but how it is presented is. Written by renowned Irish playwright Martin McDonagh, brother of John Michael McDonagh (See review of the The Guard on this page), it’s a black comedy that burns with laughter and pain and balances light and dark in a way that you won’t soon forget. McDonagh’s flair for wit and almost screwball comedy-like dialogue amidst some macabre twists and turns is like no other. Some have compared McDonagh to Tarantino. Like Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction, our protagonists are not exactly good men, but that doesn’t mean they are unlikeable. McDonagh however takes it up a notch, making us not only like Ken and Ray, but truly care about them. In the end In Bruges is hilarious, tragic, and surprisingly moving. If you’ve seen In Bruges and liked it, you’ll love The Guard. If you liked The Guard, you’ll love In Bruges. Bottom line – make sure you see them both!


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fine art pg.

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Rick Hills’ Passages

orks by Waynesville artist Rick Hills will be featured during Waynesville’s Art After Dark. An opening reception will be held on October 7 at the Village Framer, 56 N. Main Street in Waynesville, from 6 to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be served. The artist will be in attendance to discuss his new body of work entitled “Passages.” Mr. Hills’ new work blends his photography and painting to create an exciting new impressionistic vision. For details phone (828) 452-0823.

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fall gathering A ceramic bowl, with handles formed of pine needles, to hold the harvest and share with friends.

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Pine Needle Bowl Nicaragua, $74

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10 College St. Asheville, NC

828-254-8374

A Fair Trade Retailer • asheville.tenthousandvillages.com

Bring in this ad to receive 25%

OFF one item.

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Offer valid at participating stores until 10/31/11. Not valid with other discounts, purchase of gift cards, or Oriental rugs.

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 15


27th Annual Blue Ridge Artists & Crafters

Fall Leaves Show October 8-9 • October 15-16 Saturday & Sunday 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. All INDOORS Handmade Art and Crafts Food • Free Admission • Free Parking

Haywood County Fairgrounds Lake Junaluska, North Carolina DIRECTIONS: From I-40 take Exit 24; go South on Hwy 209, 3.7 miles on left. From Hwy 19/23 take Exit 104; go North on Hwy 209, 1 mile on right.

For more information visit www.bracaorg.com

tw erd nu n k esday october 5pm-9pm TRADE K A R AT S FOR K A R AT S

show

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Recycle your unwanted gold and platinum towards new Alex Sepkus jewelry

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www.jewelsthatdance.com pg.

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fine art The Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

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ince 1948, the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands has set the standard for fine craft shows across the country. The tradition continues this year, October 20-23, in Asheville. Over 200 craftspeople fill two levels of the Civic Center selling their works of clay, glass, leather, metal, fiber, mixed media, natural materials, paper, wood and jewelry. All exhibitors are mountain artists who are masters of their craft and have been accepted into the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The Guild is a non-profit organization which has been supporting local and regional craftspeople since 1930. From its humble beginnings, the Guild has grown to represent more than 900 members living and working in the mountain counties of nine states from Maryland to Alabama. The Craft Fairs are a wonderful way to showcase the talent of this diverse group. Crafts rooted in Appalachian customs are featured along with the work of contem-

Michael Lightcap

by

Demonstrations October 20-23

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April Nance

porary artists. Tradition and innovation are trademarks of the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, setting it apart from other shows. Throughout the show, the Guild sponsors educational craft demonstrations. Some demonstrations for the 2011 Craft Fairs include natural dyeing and spinning, raku firing, and doll making. In addition to the demonstrations of members, the Guild also invites non-member artists to participate. In October, Asheville Bookworks will take the stage sharing a variety of techniques from book binding to letter press. Since the first Craft Fair in 1948, the Guild has been supporting and conserving Southern Appalachian dance and music forms which have developed hand in hand with regional craft traditions. The Guild celebrates this strong connection by sponsoring live entertainment beginning on Friday during the Fairs. Local musicians play live on the arena stage, sharing their love of old time and bluegrass. A gala mood invigorates each Fair through fine crafts, demonstrations, and live music. The Craft Fairs take place in beautiful

Nancy Kubale

downtown Asheville, NC nestled within the Blue Ridge Mountains. Long known as an arts and crafts destination, Asheville offers architectural charm, eclectic restaurants and a wide variety of lodging. People come to Asheville seeking relaxation and inspiration. The Craft Fairs of the Southern Highlands certainly enhance this experience each October.

If You The 64th Annual Craft Fair of the Go Southern Highlands takes place

at the Asheville Civic Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville, October 20-23. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. For additional information visit www. craftguild.org or call (828) 298-7928.

Appalachian Craft Center

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to move two doors down, same building, into 1000 feet of space, nearly doubling her retail area. Ms. Conway pursued her dream of stocking her store with pottery, and other handcrafted items, from the older potters of NC and local craftsmen. She prospered, and in 1989 she felt it was time to move on. Enter Jackie Craig, who purchased the business from Ms. Conway in 1989. Jackie was completely new to the business but learned quickly. She continued to focus on North Carolina’s major pottery names, such as G.F. Cole, ML Owens, Laura Teague Moore, and others. When Gallery 10, the adjoining gallery, closed its doors, Appalachian Crafts expanded into that space as well, doubling the retail space. A couple of years down the road, Jackie

For the full schedule of demonstrations and entertainment, please visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

would again expand, but remain at the same address. The shop now occupies more than 2,000 feet of space. Jackie has done a magnificent job, continuing to carry the work of North Carolina’s folk potters, as well as adding a significant number of local potters, and additional crafts, from the southern Appalachian region. In 2000, Jackie and Andrew began operating the gift shop at the Renaissance Asheville Hotel, just down the street from the main store. It is called Appalachian Crafts Too, and carries a product line similar to the original store, as well as items found in a hotel convenience store. We are pleased that many of our hotel guests are referred to the main store.

North Carolina and the Appalachians on Display in Downtown Asheville

ppalachian Crafts occupies 2,000 square feet on 10 North Spruce Street, its home since 1979. But that belies its heritage. Appalachian Crafts opened in 1979, under the careful tutelage of Ms. Arlene Conway. Ms. Conway retired from teaching in the inner city schools of Los Angeles, CA and settled in Asheville where she became interested in the folk pottery of North Carolina. Her interest led her to open Appalachian Crafts as a means of encouraging the folk potters of NC to continue their work through having a retail outlet in Asheville. The store opened in the left corner of the building, utilizing just 650 square feet of space. Soon the opportunity came for her

raft demonstrations are a highlight at the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands. Watching and interacting with highly skilled craftspeople as they create is entertaining and educational. Throughout the show, visitors will have the opportunity to observe works by over 200 members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and to learn about their inspiraCharlie Patricolo, tion and doll making. methods. There are also scheduled demonstrations to enhance the experience. Most demonstrators are Guild members while others are community artists who have been invited to the Fair.

and her husband, Andrew, took the opportunity to purchase 10 North Spruce Street, which meant that Appalachian Crafts

Appalachian Crafts is open MondaySaturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and for special events. Appalachian Crafts Too at the Renaissance Asheville Hotel is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., 365 days. Y’all come!

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 17


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fine art 2011 EAST Fall Studio Tour

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Patti Best Realism in Oil Commissions Accepted

Original Oil Paintings Giclee Prints and Note Cards

www.mountainbrushworks.com

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October 15 and 16 – 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

he signs of autumn are in the air — summer’s heat has given way to cooler weather, brilliant sunshine, radiant sparkling light, and abundant harvests in the mountains of Western North Carolina. It is time to celebrate Black Mountain Studios Pottery and sculpture by visiting the rich legacy of art and potter Austin Boleman. artist Vicki Pollack. prepare for the fabulous Many of the artists will provide demfall EAST Studio Tour. Mark your calenonstrations of their work for the public to dars and make room in your busy schedules see and enjoy. Visiting a gallery or show is for the fall open studio tour located in East wonderful, but when an artist welcomes Asheville, Black Mountain, Swannanoa, Old people into their personal studio, one gets Fort, and Fairview. to see whole new dimensions of the creative The EAST Studio Tour will be particispirit and process. Part of the gift is havpating in American Craft Week, a nationing an opportunity for a personal exchange wide movement dedicated to celebrating and meeting with the artists themselves. It American arts has been said often, that a home provides a and crafts, which window into the human soul, and visiting an is celebrated artist’s studio provides an unique opportuOctober 7-16. nity to not only meet and interact with local For the first time, artists, but to see and understand more fully the EAST Studio the nature of their own unique creativity. Tour extends all The Asheville area is proud to have a the way to Old strong grassroots tradition of supporting loFort and welcal businesses, and the EAST Studio Tour is comes many new a terrific opportunity for everyone to come artists from that out and enjoy the beauty of our region’s area. artistic legacy and support our local artists. The EAST Fibre artist Vicki Art is personal and what we bring into our Studio Tour Bennett from Fairview homes reflects deeply who we are and how showcases a we live, what we value and love. diverse array of artists including exquisite hand blown glass, ceramics, painting, fine woodworking, sculpture, and more. If What better way to celebrate the beauty of You The Fall EAST Tour takes place autumn’s radiant glory in these mountains Go October 15 and 16 from 10 a.m. than to spend two days exploring and visitto 6 p.m. For more information please visit www.eaststudiotour.com or ing artists. See their work first hand, and in phone (828) 686-1011. their own element.

Black Mountain Swannanoa East Asheville Asheville

Fairview

18 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

Old Fort


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fine art Interview with Photographer and Painter

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

Catherine Vibert

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atherine Vibert moved to Fairview, NC three years ago from California to pursue a creative lifestyle while taking care of her dad. She is the copyeditor, journalist and photographer for the Fairview Town Crier.

Rapid River Magazine: How do you define your photographic style and signature?

Catherine Vibert: It’s a good question and

one that causes me to pause. There are a few styles I utilize for different purposes, be it portrait, commercial, event or fine art photography. All require a different focus. Color, light and texture or the capture of a significant moment in time are my passions in my work.

RRM: Why do you choose to change the

colors in your photography and how does this connect with the viewer?

CV: Photoshop is like a box of crayons, I

just keep shifting and changing things until

Catherine Vibert, Self Portrait

the image pops out at me and says THIS! I don’t do this with all of my photography, it’s just one of the tricks in my box. Texture and color are all part of the fun of making a great image.

RRM: When did you first begin working in photography?

CV: My first camera was a gift from my dad

sometime around the age of 10. That camera was left on the hood of his car and flew into the San Francisco Bay when we were driv-

ing across the Golden Gate Bridge. I was hooked though, so we quickly replaced it.

actually ask it to stay still while I run up and grab my camera. They tend to be very cooperative subjects. RRM: How do you apI also like to travel proach composition? and I had the fortune to travel in Asia for CV: My dad used six months in 2007. to lecture me about There is something composition. Also, I in the exotic that is had a grandmother that always pleasing to the used to take shots that Ladybug on Astragalus by eye, the colors and Catherine Vibert only included the tops circumstances of a far of people’s heads and a away place. But it’s also very painful to learn whole lot of sky. It was an example of what exactly how difficult life can be for people. not to do in photography. In Macro there is I found myself wanting to document what a shallow depth of field in most non-flash I saw when I was abroad, and my photograsituations, what’s out of focus (the bokeh) is phy took on a photojournalistic bent. important and can make or break the shot. It’s hard to pass by difficult circumIt’s a lot to think about if you’re chasing a stances and not start shouting to the world butterfly. If I get the eyes of a creature in how much we need to change things. I did focus there is hope the shot will work. some journalistic blogging during that trip, RRM: How do you decide on location or documenting the women tea workers and subject? the work of an “untouchable� girls school in India. You can read about that online at CV: I let the thing tell me. Whether it is a www.catvibe.blogspot.com/india. shaft of light, a creature, the arrangement of something, the leading lines. Many times I’ll run into a creature in the garden and I’ll ‘Catherine Vibert’ continued on page 20

">PQĄLCĄPEBSFIIBĄ0QRAFLĄ1LRO ,@QL?BOĄĄĄ Ą ĄfĄ Ą>JĄgĄĄMJ

#OBBÄ„0BIC $RFABAÄ„1LRO

MLQQBOVĄfĄTLLATLOHFKDĄfĄDI>PPĄfĄ'BTBIOVĄfĄ?>PHBQOVĄfĄM>FKQFKDĄĄ MELQLDO>MEVĄCF?BOĄ>OQPĄfĄJBQ>IĄ>OQPĄfĄ#LIHĄOQĄfĄ#BIQFKD

OQFPQPĄLCĄ">PQĄPEBSFIIB Ą I>@HĄ*LRKQ>FK Ą0T>KK>KL> Ą ,IAĄ#LOQĄĄ#>FOSFBTĄ FKSFQBĄVLRĄQLĄSFPFQĄQEBFOĄPQRAFLP "  0 1 Ą1E>KHPĄLROĄPMLKPLOP Asheville: Custom Cuts & Color Styling Salon • Filo Pastries • East Village Grill Black Mountain: ANTHM • Artisan Gourmet Market • Black Mountain Bakery • CW Moose • Dynamite Coffee Roasters • First Citizens Bank • Fresh Wood Fired Pizza Greybeard Realty • Las Cazuelas • Madison Inn • Matt Scroggs Homes • The Merry Wine Market • Michelle Salon • Monte Vista Hotel • My Father’s Pizza • Old Depot Seven Sisters • Thai Basil • Town Hardware Old Fort: Catawba Falls Campground • Inn on Mill Creek • The Rail Restaurant • McDowell Chamber of Commerce • Old Fort Mountain Heritage Association • Kim’s Nail Boutique Fairview: Victor Chiarizia Artisan Cheese • Busey & Laughlin Family Dentistry Ira Starr & Associates • Piazza Restaurant • Visual Eyes Optical

E.A.S.T. tour maps can be found on our website, our sponsor’s business locations and other businesses in the tour area. Look for the yellow signs during the tour!

TTT B>PQPQRAFLQLRO @LJĄfĄĄ   Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 19


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Local Artists Shine at the Weaverville Art Safari

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weaverville fine art

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by

Steven Forbes-deSoule

ditional door prize tickets available for $5 each. All event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari events. Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information are available at Asheville-area art galleries, restaurants and shops beginning in October. A downloadable brochure is also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

ome of the top artists the local art in Western North community. Carolina open their During mountain studios to the Art Safari, the public during the guests have Weaverville Art Safari, Octhe opporMichael Hatch tober 29-30, 2011. This extunity meet clusive weekend event is an the artists and opportunity to interact with learn about 40 regionally and nationally the creative recognized artists and see the process. Works Suzanna Biro process behind the developof art showment of their art. cased during The Art Safari provides a chance to the event include pottery, About the Weaverville wind through the backroads and main handmade glass, sculpture, Art Safari streets of jewelry, furniture, paintThe Weaverville Art Weaverville ings, drawings and fiber art. Safari is a collection of and BarnardsSelect studios offer public Western North Carolina ville on a selfdemonstrations and door artists whose goal is to guided driving prizes. Studios are open raise awareness of the tour during from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on vibrant art community the peak of fall Saturday and Sunday. residing on the outskirts color. Those A special preview of Asheville, NC. The looking for a party at Reems Creek Golf Weaverville Art Safari is a more exclusive Club on Friday, October biannual event held in the experience 28, kicks off the event and Mark Peyton spring and fall. can request a celebrates the Art Safari’s guided van tour tenth anniversary. The fun includes door If from Artistree. prizes, heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts and a You The Weaverville Art Safari takes Available at an cash bar. The highlight of the evening is a Go place October 29-30 from 10 a.m. additional cost, silent auction featuring art from participatto 6 p.m. For more information, the guided van ing artists. Guests have the opportunity to including a list of participating artists, tours are led bid on gallery-worthy works of art selected visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com, or by experts pasexclusively for the event and its patrons. contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) sionate about Event tickets are $10 at the door with adDiane Hall 645-9065 or forbes143@charter.net.

‘Catherine Vibert’ continued from page 19

RRM: Which one photograph you’ve created do you consider your favorite and why?

CV: I took a photograph of Mt. Kanchen-

juenga while in Sikkim, India. It’s a favorite because how often do you have a chance to put yourself in front of the third highest mountain in the world? I got up at the crack of dawn and walked up to a monastery above the town of Pelling to get this shot. I was also recording the sound environment at the time, so I can listen to the birds that were present at the time and it puts me back into the moment of being there.

RRM: What kind of equipment do you use? CV: There’s a saying with photographers

that the best camera to use is the one you have on you. I have my cell phone, a Canon S95 Point and Shoot and a Canon EOS 40D DSLR and a few lenses. I’m always wanting more but I try to subdue my desires.

RRM: How about your paintings? 20 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

CV: Over the last year I’ve developed a style

that I’m really enjoying which utilizes a texturing medium to create landscapes that are three dimensional. As in photography, color and light and how to make them play together are my goals. I use metalic paints in my work, which, in combination with the texturing, have a unique effect of attracting light and highlighting shadows. The look of the painting changes in the ambient light and so seems to be a living landscape.

Exhibitions & Displays You can see Vibert’s work online at www.catvibe.com, and at the following events and locations: • Hendersonville Art on Main, October 1 and 2, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. • In her home during The EAST of Asheville Studio Tour, October 16 and 17, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. • Regularly on display beginning October 3, 2011 through Christmas at The Dog and Pony Show and Emporium at the Eblen Short Stop Mall on Hwy. 74A, 1185

Blue Heart, Warm Fire by Catherine Vibert

Charlotte Hwy in Fairview. The emporium features booths of local artisans and crafters. Hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sundays. • Catherine will be one of 14 talented local photographers featured in The Click Project, on display at the Conn-Artist Gallery in Hendersonville. She will be showing images of Asia and macro photography applied to painted wood panels via image transfer. The show opens on Valentine’s Day and will close on May 4, 2012.


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weaverville fine art interview with

Karen Keil Brown

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interviewed by

Dennis Ray

apid River Magazine: When did

you first realize you were an artist?

Karen Keil Brown: My first aware-

ness of creating art was when I was about 7 years old, competing in a school art contest. I was so excited when my parents gave me a set of acrylic paints for Christmas at 12 years old and I was hooked! In high school I earned a few dollars for my artistic abilities too, but I knew I was on my way after receiving my BA in Fine Arts from UNC Asheville and awarded the Best in Show of the Senior Art Exhibition. So, somewhere between 7 years old and now, I realized I loved expressing myself through art!

RRM: Where do you go or what do you do to find inspiration for your work?

KKB: Life inspires me and I take lots of photographs to capture all the beauty out there! We are a family of photographers/artists! My husband and I love to ride bikes on the parkway or downtown for dinner and a sunset! When we travel, I take lots of photos of the sky/ground relationships in different atmospheric moods and incorporate them into my paintings. You don’t need to look too far to find inspiration in Asheville!

RRM: Could you tell us some more about your work?

Artist Karen Keil Brown creates fine art original paintings.

istic artists: Monet, Renoir, Manet, and Van Gogh. Some people say my work reminds them of J.M. William Turner, a late 1800’s landscape artist. That’s cool! After using acrylic paint for many years, I have recently changed to oil water soluble paint because I needed a smoother softer effect the oil lends to my landscapes. I don’t set out to conform to a specific style; rather I use my own experiences to create a way of seeing and a style of my own.

RRM: What inspires you to keep creating art and how do you keep motivated when things get tough ‘in the studio?

KKB: Four years ago, I

joined a co-op gallery, the Asheville Gallery of Art. I love to create art and starts in the evening in sell/share my work with my studio at home, music others which motivates me playing in the background Painting by Karen K. Brown to keep painting. I keep and maybe a glass of wine! inspired and encouraged by my family and I work in acrylic and oil paint on canvas. I friends who support me through my creative have a passion for color, form and moveprocess. Especially when I reach a point of ment. I would describe my style as ethereal, saturation and I am unable to come up with (light and airy), with warm colors that wash anything new! Yikes! over the rolling landscape. Sometimes it’s Just getting away from my work for a spontaneous composition with a spiritual even a couple of hours can do wonders for peace that transcends the viewer to a restful my creative juices. Just chill. Turn up the space or the blue ridge mountains set in a music and relax my mind and body and the morning light with a misty fog ascending rest will take care of itself. By the grace of with the day. God, I have been privileged to create and RRM: How do you see that thread in terms sell my work. I try to keep humble as I know of time from when you first started creating I have a long way to go. If people like my art art to today? Are there sudden shifts in your work, great. If they don’t, well, maybe they style or material? will next year! Life is a journey of discovery, so bring it on! KKB: After college, married and raising 3 lovely artistic daughters, I made it a challenge to paint in between nap times, but Karen K. Brown, KB Art Studio I continued to paint and teach art to our 10 Beaver Creek Lane, Asheville, NC children and in the school system. I am in(828) 231-0617, kcaabrown@gmail.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com fluenced by modern art and the impression-

KKB: My creative time

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 21


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biltmore ave shops Exciting Shopping ~ Fine Art ~ Theatre A B C

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The Rapid River Magazine has been one of my favorite publications for advertising over the last 6 years. Not only do you reach local and out-of-town people, you also benefit from the interesting articles the magazine writes about you and your business. I would encourage you to consider participating in a group advertising section. When enough businesses from a specific street or area advertise together, it makes for a worthwhile destination for people to visit. We all benefit when this happens. ~ Susan Marie, owner of Susan Marie Designs Fine Handmade Jewelry, (828) 277-1272 4 Biltmore Avenue, downtown Asheville

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B 22 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

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(828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com


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fine art Paintings from the Cave…

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John Mac Kah

ohn Mac Kah has been working out of his studio in the River Arts District of Asheville since 1999 in the Cotton Mill. His studio is a retreat, where he plans, prepares and returns to finish work after working on location. The studio houses his collection of props for still-life: an old mandolin, an antique turtle shell, bones, fossils, early commissioned opera posters, a collection of miniature horror film figures, and two shelves of dinosaur models.

experience this world…and we share with bears, bobcats, birds of prey, frogs, ants…even when we deny it, they A few of John’s occupy the huminiature figures. man built space. The turkeys stalking in my back yard, the possum in the basement…our only evidence is road-kill, sadly…as if they want to let us know, we are all in this together.” “We might do well to wonder at how they see this world. It’s hard not to be aware that we may well be the last generation to experience polar bears. Humans may have been trying to explain our relationship to the wild from early on, by painting on cave walls.” Included, for the first time in Asheville, will be some of Kah’s few wild-life paintings. Using traditional oils on panel or linen, his paintings are the result of acute observation and close study combined with respect for the materials. “Trying to salvage something John Mac Kah, Swannanoa Valley. Oil on panel, 9x12 in. of this, these moments of magic light …here, now then gone forHis library includes not only art books ever; different from and yet always falling by past masters, but books on natural history short is what a painting does, at least for and animalia. The music is more likely to be this painter…” film sound tracks or classical than contemporary. Several easels, with work in various states of finish, or for use by students fill the space. He conducts weekly classes in painting and drawing. Works in the upcoming exhibition at 16 Patton Gallery, here in Asheville, include plein-air and studio paintings, some done with my students in various locations in the southeast. “Every painting is a narrative of the artist’s experience and to that extent, they are biographical, he says. They are a recounting of my travels… sometimes revisJohn Mac Kah, Cold Mountain, Summer. iting views that I find inspiring or thoughtOil on panel, 9x12 in. ful, or a close look at some place new. One piece, a view of Florida, is where my grandIf mother was born. The barrier island, now You John Mac Kah: New Works, reverting to cedars, was stripped of trees Go on display at 16 Patton Fine Art for a pencil factory, long since in ruins. To Gallery, October 15 through that extent, capturing these places is about November 19, 2011. renewal and a reminder of impermanence.” Opening reception Saturday, October 15, When he left art school in 1984, he from 3-6 p.m., 16 Patton Ave. in Asheville. spent hours in the Everglades, owned 142 (828) 236-2889, www.16patton.com. snakes and once owned 42 turtles and an alligator. “I always have drawn and painted wild-life, the other animals with which we John Mac Kah share the planet.” Cotton Mill Building, 122 Riverside Drive “Landscape is the context in which we (828) 225-5000 • www.jmackah.com

October 20-23 Asheville Civic Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm Admission: $8 Children Under 12 Free

Marti Mocahbee (Photo: Scott F. SMith)

www. craftguild.org 828-298-7928

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 23


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fine art interview with

RRM: How long (on aver-

eresa Pennington is a self-taught colored pencil artist with a talent she says is God-given. Often spending as much as four months on one drawing, she meticulously renders the scenery, landmarks, flora and fauna of Western North Carolina with an emphasis on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

It takes anywhere from 3 weeks to 4 months to do one piece, depending on the size and detail. It takes a lot longer to draw the Biltmore Estate than it does to draw mountains and trees.

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RRM: How do you go

best about working in colored pencils and why did you choose them as the medium for your artistic expression?

about creating your colored pencil artworks, from start to finish?

Teresa Pennington: I actually didn’t choose

TP: I start with a blank piece

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sons seems to be a strong part in your landscapes. How has living in WNC inspired your work?

age) does it take you to complete a drawing?

Rapid River Magazine: What do you like

colored pencil. I started out doing watercolor but was dissatisfied with it because I wanted to do detail. A friend of mine gave me a set of colored pencils as a Christmas gift and I fell in love. It has been my only medium for 25 years.

RRM: The changing of sea-

Dennis Ray

Teresa Pennington

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interviewed by

TP: I love the changing of

People of the River by Teresa Pennington

of watercolor paper, do a rough sketch with graphite and beginning with the foreground start filling in the color and finishing it as I go. Working from light to dark I start with the front of the piece and work back. The pencils are transparent so you do not begin with a base layer.

RRM: When did you first start drawing and creating, and when did you first consider yourself an artist?

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TP: I stopped calling myself an artist

Mouthwatering Gifts Grandfather Mountain by Teresa Pennington

when I went to the Louvre in Paris. J I began my work when I was 23 and pregnant. My morning sickness lasted all day. I quit my job and was bored at home so I started painting. About 18 months later I found colored pencil and knew I had found my calling.

the seasons. I have lived in WNC all my life and can’t imagine being in a place where it is the same temperature all the time. I need variety. Autumn is my favorite. The variation in color in the fall is magic to me. There are 50 different shades of red, 20 shades of gold. I never tire of looking at the mountains.

RRM: How do you like to work - big blocks of time, late at night, early in the morning - what conditions are ideal for you? TP: My studio is a half circle room on the

back of my house. It is all glass and sits out over a creek. I have bird feeders right outside the window and I look out over the mountains. This is my ideal refuge. But colored pencil is easy to transport so sometimes I work outside, on airplanes, at shows and in my gallery. I am a night owl and enjoy working late at night.

RRM: Which artist has had the most influence on you in terms of how you create your art?

‘Teresa Pennington’ continued on page 25

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Georgia, she began her professional career as a graphic designer. For Exhibit of New Works at BlackBird celebrates the past several years, Karen Weihs’ remarkable career she has painted primarily from her studio in o you favor art that is more abthe talent behind them, Cashiers, NC, while stract or representational? While but the extent to which teaching regularly at the some find pleasure in both, the Karen’s art continues Bascom Museum in division separates much of the to evolve. Even longHighlands. Along the art-viewing public, and strong time followers will see way, she wrote a popupreferences are the rule. in these paintings new lar book about creativity On rare occasions, we find an artist who directions in both color Karen Weihs, Landscape Vibrations II. and the artistic process Oil on linen, 36x28 in. bridges the two — abstract art that connects and form. titled Out of My Mind. viewers with nature in ways we all instincKaren says, “I love The exhibit at BlackBird allows one tively understand — representational art that to create images that depict endless visual to more fully appreciate the breadth and portrays nature more realistically, but with space. Forsaking all details, I conjure patstrength of Karen Weihs’ work, shifting a mastered simplicity that evokes emotions terns of light, air, weather and reflection that between abstract and more representational transcending the subject matter. It takes an feel ethereal and diffused. Layered pigments, images, frequently offering a taste of one in experienced painter to effectively negotiate contrasting colors and geometric shapes the other. Altogether, a satisfying experience, the commonalities of the two and produce breathe life into my images, and while my no matter your personal art preferences. work that art lovers of different walks can landscapes are minimal in representational

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enjoy together. Throughout October, BlackBird Frame & Art will join just such an artist, Karen Weihs, in celebrating the 20th anniversary of her career as a painter. Some of her newest works will be displayed, to show not only

24 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

content, I find viewers often see the familiar in the abstract.” As a teacher and practicing artist, Karen long ago earned the respect of collectors as well as other painters. A native of Charleston, SC, with a BFA from the University of

On display from September 30 - October 31 BlackBird Frame & Art is an independent art gallery and custom frame studio owned by Pat and John Horrocks and located at 365 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville.


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fine art ‘Teresa Pennington’ continued from page 24

TP: I don’t know another colored pencil artist. When I started working in this medium no one used it. I collect other artist’s work because I enjoy their detail and imagination but I really developed my style on my own. I haven’t had any training and have never met another artist who employs the same technique I use. James Christiansen is my favorite artist, but his work is whimsical for the most part and nothing like my work.

RRM: You’ve won an awful lot of awards – which one means the most to you?

TP: My greatest joy has been working with

the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation. To be chosen to create the commemorative series for the 75th anniversary was such an honor. In October I will be spending three days on the parkway drawing on location. I am doing a series called “Fences along the Parkway.” I am counting the days.

T. Pennington Art Gallery, Inc. 15 N. Main St., Waynesville (828) 452-9284 www.tpennington.com

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Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 25


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fine art Ray Byram Captures Nature’s Beauty Through Fine Art

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aymond M. Byram was born and raised in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He received his primary and secondary education in area schools. He earned his Bachelors of Fine Arts from Indiana University, graduating in 1976. Ray is the co-founder of the Indiana University

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Art Museum, which he accomplished while completing a museum internship. Byram has been painting in oil since 1969. Presently a free-lance artist working in oils, watercolor and printmaking, he has done extensive commission work for private and corporate collections.

Women in the Moon Creative and Distinctive Gifts

Almost Home by Ray Byram

163 South Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786 828-452-4558 Follow us on Twitter and Facebook Time to Reflect by Ray Byram

Located in a turn of the century medical office. Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 to 5:00

Although he has worked in a variety of genres, styles and mediums from abstract to surreal to neo-realism, from oils to watercolors, etchings, woodcuts and serigraphy, it has been landscapes in oil that have been his primary pursuit. His love of nature, the Appalachian forests in conjunction with his love of Impressionism have combined to synthesize his individual style, which he

Take Your Craft to Another Level Workshops and Core Programs for Adults and Youth

The Only Professional Acting Studio in WNC www.stellaadler-asheville.com (828) 254-1320 Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

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The Morning’s Glory by Ray Byram

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Wireless Internet Access!

26 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

calls a “tight impressionism.” Byram explains, “At quick glance my style obviously looks realistic, yet I employ the theories and approach of the Impressionists.” In the late 80’s, Byram discovered a medium that would revolutionize his work and his career; serigraphy — silk screen print making. Most serigraphy is basically a stencil process, working directly on the continued on page 30

Women in the Moon

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Creative and Distinctive Gifts

he beautiful sign for Women in the Moon invites you into this unique store and building. The store is located in the turn-of-thecentury (1898) medical office which is part of the famous Way House complex. It is named on the National Historic Register and is one of Waynesville’s treasures. Doctor Way was the physician and surgeon for the Waynesville area in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Women in the Moon, and this turn of the century building constructed in 1898, have come

Photos by Liza Becker

together to create a space filled with local artists’ work, North Carolina organic teas, soaps, lotions, scarves, hand crafted hand bags, and jewelry. The old operating room invites light in through a skylight that is original and from which hangs a multi-colored chandelier (along with many others which are for sale). Owners Lynn Hughes and daughter Jody Bender have embraced this historic building and filled it with treasures. “Our customers compliment us often on our unique style and continued on page 30


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joe’s brew notes Women of Beer: Asheville Beer (City) Divas

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t’s no surprise by Joe Zinich in a city with Asheville’s rich with a favorite beer culture and brew. After a time, passionate beerthey believed other community that a women might like beer-inspired social to do the same and club of, by, and for the Asheville Beer women would soon City Divas was form. A group of formed. Although women who gather the word City has to learn the ABC’s of been dropped from beer and chat in an official communiatmosphere which From left Divas Lexi Close, Mary Eliza L cations, it’s used in encourages them to McCrae, and Stacey Sparks. personal conversa“sit, sip, and relax” tions to reflect Asheville’s Beer City title. — the Asheville Beer (City) Divas. From the start the purpose of the A.B. The word diva (literally goddess) was Divas is for women to “meet up” for an introduced in the late 19th century in referenjoyable night out, discuss and learn about ence to distinguished female opera singers, beer (if interested), or just socialize. Many the prima donna (principal woman). Lanmembers are homebrewers and also brew guage evolves and the term ‘diva’ expanded together; their tasty Divalicious Pale Ale was to include respected, successful, female perentered in the recent Just Economics Brewformers in many arenas but is now also used Off competition. Some members just want disparagingly for someone who acts overly to learn more about beer to improve their entitled. Diva, no matter its interpretation, is knowledge or to be able to speak fluently a word that resonates with women. about beer with their friends and relatives. Asheville’s beer-community divas Others have little interest in beer but want Julie Atallah, Caroline Forsman, Anne Fitto hang out with other women. No matter, ten Glenn, and Mary Eliza L McCrae are everyone is welcomed. known and highly regarded beer enthusiI was issued a special Guest-Diva pass asts who met at various places on a regular for the September “meet up” at Barley’s basis to talk beer and life while they relaxed Asheville and had a great evening that included beer samples, pizza, and engaging conversation. I met and spoke with, among others, Mary Eliza McCrae, Lexi Close, October Events at Tanya Fletcher, and Stacey Sparks. Lexi is The Weinhaus a passionate home-brewer (member of the State of Franklin Homebrewers Club) and Wednesday, October 5 travels from Johnson City for almost every Wine dinner at Chef Mo’s Restaurant. meeting to talk beer. Tanya, a first-timer Chef Mauricio Abreu did a lovely job who works for a brewery- and pub-direccreating a menu for our Burgundy tory publishing company, wants to meet and tasting last spring. We are thrilled to “talk beer talk” with knowledgeable people. return to enjoy more of his cuisine. This time we will present a variety of wines to pair with Chef Mo’s five course feast. Join us in his private dining room for a fun filled evening in South Asheville. The time is 7 p.m. Price: $65 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

Friday, October 28 Monstrous Malbecs. Join us for a ghoulish evening. We will lurk through the cellars of the producers of one of the darkest of grape varietals. We will taste some classic French examples, as well as the popular Argentine expressions of the grape. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at the Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave. Asheville.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

Stacey drinks mostly wine and makes almost every meeting for the camaraderie and relaxed atmosphere. While there I recognized how many accomplished women, both in beer and in life, attended. They included brewers, writers, public speakers, marketers, managers, and business owners. All were friendly and willing to share their knowledge and history. The Divas are a great networking opportunity for any woman who may want to make a career change in, into, or outside the beer industry. If you are a woman who wants to sit, sip, and relax with a brew and talk about beer, life, and whatever else comes to mind, join the Asheville Beer Divas and enjoy the convivial atmosphere and camaraderie. The Asheville Beer Divas meet the first Tuesday of every month. Find them on Facebook or email avlbeerdivas@gmail. com for more information.

Asheville Beer Divas – The Founders Julie Atallah is co-owner of one of the top 5 beer stores in the world. She is also a graphic designer with over fifteen years experience in creative marketing, design, and print media. Caroline Forsman is the General Manager of the Thirsty Monk and the event planner and buyer for both the downtown and south locations. Anne Fitten Glenn writes about beer for the Mountain Xpress and her Brewgasm blog. Also look for her “Edgy Momma” articles for the Xpress and blog with the same name. Mary Eliza L McCrea is craft-beerbrand manager for Budweiser of Asheville.

Brew News Greenman Brewing has a Hopfest-Tap-Takeover on Saturday, October 1 from 2 p.m. until closing with 14 hoppy beers made by both the Greenman and local home brewers. Enjoy a White IPA, Red IPA, Black IPA, single hop pale ales, imperial pilsner and imperial ESB, hoppy black saison, and many more. Free admission and $2 LilGreenie half-pints all day long. Pisgah Brewing releases LEAF Amber October 13 at the Thirsty Monk Downtown’s Pint Night. A portion of the proceeds supports LEAF, a local non-profit organization, which builds community and enriches lives, locally and globally, through the Arts with a variety of programs. On October 27 Pisgah hosts a collaboration event with the Black Mountain Tailgate Market non-profit that facilitated the growth of the local food movement in the Swannanoa Valley for over 16 years. The tailgate market will benefit from the proceeds. Next day join Pisgah at the Thirsty Monk South for a flight night that features a firkin of Vortex II, a savory Russian Imperial stout. Find more information at pisgahbrewing.com.

The former sales marketing director for Highland Brewing now teaches local Budweiser salespeople about craft beer as well as ordering, buying, and advertising. For eight years, Joe Zinich has been taking a selfguided, high-intensity tour of the Asheville beer scene. Contact him at: jzinich@ bellsouth.net.

Great values & styles Free Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 27


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noteworthy Andie MacDowell in “Footloose”

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ndie MacDowell, Asheville resident and well-known actress, will star in “Footloose,” opening October 14 nationwide. She plays Vi Moore, the wife of Reverend Shaw Moore (Dennis Quaid), in this remake of the 1984 original film. Filmed mostly in Acworth, GA, near Atlanta, the story recounts the energy and increasing tension in Bomont, as young newcomer Ren McCormack (Kenny Wormald) challenges the Southern town’s ban on dancing and rock music. During a phone interview from Venice Beach, CA, on the filming location of her upcoming TV series “Jane by Design,” MacDowell talked about her work for “Footloose.”

Rapid River Magazine: What impressed you

most about being part of this movie remake?

Andie MacDowell: The movie is such a classic. Kids will enjoy it. It’s very upbeat and makes you want to dance! There’s lots of humor and heart.

Angels in America Part 2:

Perestroika

This fall, North Carolina Stage Company offers a rare opportunity to see both parts of Tony Kushner’s Angels in America. It’s 1985. Gay men are dying of a mysterious and terrifying new disease. Reagan and an energized right wing are trying to steer the country in a new direction. And in a lonely hospital bed, a very sick man hears an unearthly voice telling him to prepare, because the millennium is approaching. Angels in America is two plays, and one epic experience. NC Stage is offering the plays in a repertory schedule, meaning audiences can see the two parts several days apart. Or, for an indelible theatre experience patrons can see the plays just hours apart in a single day.

If You Go: Angels in America runs October 13 – November 13, 2011. Tickets: $17-$29; $10 student rush. For more information visit www. ncstage.org or call (828) 239-0263.

interviewed by

Cherry Hart

RRM: Did you find it hard to play the role

of the preacher’s wife, standing behind the husband who would not allow dancing in the town?

AM: No, I understood the classic actions of

her position. She and her husband were such pillars of the community, and everybody looked up to them. Ultimately, she stands up for the kids. You can see her struggle. There was a fine balance between what she was supposed to do in supporting her husband and how she wanted to support the kids. Craig Brewer directed and co-wrote some of the screenplay with Dean Pitchford, who wrote the original story. Brewer also directed “Hustle and Flow” (2005) and “Black Snake Moon” (2006). In a phone interview from Memphis during movie promotions, he said he wanted to include MacDowell in the cast, because “she is one of a handful of Southern actors who have a certain authenticity.” He added, “America fell in love with Andie and Dennis Quaid around the time of the original ‘Footloose.’ I wanted that connection with the audience. When they see Andie in the movie, she is like a friend already.” In the screenings of “Footloose,”

P

Nightwoods, a Novel by Charles Frazier

ublished in 1996, Cold Mountain was one of the most auspicious literary debuts of recent decades: it won the National Book Award, the American Booksellers Book of the Year Award, and it spent 61 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list in hardcover and 33 weeks on paperback list. Now, fifteen years after Charles Frazier’s debut, Random House is proud to publish his third book Nightwoods, a dazzling novel of suspense and love set in small town North Carolina in the early 1960s. Frazier delivers

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most dramatic scenes happened in the church when I was beaten up and bruised. I was blown away by her nurturing manner toward me in that scene.” “Andie came on set one day with no make-up; her skin is so flawless. She is beautiful, inside and out! She is a wonderful woman.” Kenny Wormald said it was an honor to work with MacDowell. “I am a big fan of her past films and was so excited to work with her on ‘Footloose.’ She is possibly the nicest woman on the planet. She genuinely made me and all the younger cast members feel appreciated. I taught her daughter at This glimpse into the movie Footloose includes a dance convention. It was lovely (l-r) Andie MacDowell, Kenny Wormald, and Dennis seeing her as a dance mom and then Quaid. Photo by K.C. Bailey, courtesy Paramount Pictures a beautiful professional Hollywood actress. I look up to her for balancing the two so well, and I’d love to work Brewer said, “It was a joy seeing the audiwith her again!” ence cheer for Andie (Vi), when she stands up for Ariel (Julianne Hough). She really Andie MacDowell’s nailed it. She had the audience in the palm of her hand! It was an absolute joy to work upcoming appearances: with Andie. I’m a big fan of hers.” Footloose, October 14, 2011. Julianne Hough said during a phone inJane by Design, January, 2012, terview from Los Angeles that she was very ABC Family TV. excited about working with MacDowell. “Groundhog Day is one of my favorite movMighty Fine, with her own daughter ies!” Hough was impressed by MacDowell’s Rainey Qualley, to be announced. acting skills and her beauty. “One of my

a brilliant portrait of Luce, a woman who becomes the guardian of her twin niece and nephew after the murder of her sister. Alone in an abandoned lodge in rural Appalachia, Luce grapples to understand the children’s needs. Meanwhile, two men arrive in town — one, the heir to the abandoned lodge, and the other, her sister’s murderer on a rage-fueled hunt for the children. All four newcomers change Luce’s solitary life in difficult, hopeful and dangerous ways. In Nightwoods, Frazier puts his remarkable writing gifts in the service of a

Bright’s Passage by Josh Ritter

osh Ritter is an acclaimed musician whose albums include The Animal Years and So Runs the World Away. On June 28, 2011, The Dial Press published the newest extension of Ritter’s talent with the publication of his debut novel, Bright’s Passage. Known for the storytelling and literary sophistication of his lyrics, Ritter has written the type of rich and expressive story that signals he is not only the bright songwriter

28 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

we know, but truly a born novelist. The novel follows a young, widowed veteran of the First World War, Henry Bright, as he and his infant son, along with an unlikely guardian angel flee from a forest fire and Bright’s cruel in-laws. Shifting between their strange journey through West Virginia’s hickory-canopied foothills, Bright’s harrowing memories of the trenches of France, and

lean, taut narrative while losing none of the transcendent prose, virtuosic storytelling, and insight into human nature that have made him one of the most beloved and celebrated authors in the world.

If You Go: Charles Frazier reading and

booksigning takes place on October 21. For more details on this ticketed event call Malaprop’s at (828) 254-6734.

recollections from his childhood, the novel is at times suspenseful and kinetic, quiet and eerie, and often humorous.

If You Go: Josh will read from and sign copies of Bright’s Passage on Thursday, October 6. The event begins at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., in Asheville. Phone (828) 254-6734 or visit www. malaprops.com for more details.


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poetry & poets / authors & books

“Hell’s Broke Loose in Georgia!”

Stephen Vincent Benet’s “The Mountain Whippoorwill”

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ast month’s poetry column explored the interrelationship between poetry and storytelling. This month’s column will celebrate a poem that perfectly illustrates how a memorable narrative can be rendered more powerful by being communicated through distinctive poetic form and language. The work in question, “The Mountain Whippoorwill, Or, How Hill-Billy Jim Won The Great Fiddler’s Prize (A Georgia Romance),” is one of a handful of nationally recognized longer narrative poems set in Appalachia. Composed in 1925 by eventual twotime Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stephen Vincent Benet (1898–1943), the poem is a vividly imagined, fictionalized interpretation of the once-popular regional tradition of fiddle contests. While such competitions have occurred in various southern Appalachian locations from the late nineteenth century through the present day, Benet’s poem is based on a specific fiddle contest held in 1924. At the Georgia Old-Time Fiddlers’ Convention in Atlanta that year, first prize went to a then-unknown fiddler from Cartersville, Georgia, named Lowe Stokes, who beat the long-established star of Georgia fiddle competitions, Fiddlin’ John Carson (the latter musician is renowned for having recorded, at a field session in Atlanta in June 1923, the first commercial “hillbilly music” recordings). While Stokes was in his mid-20s at the time of his victory over Carson, newspaper

Rapid River ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

15th Annual

Poetry Contest 5 Winners! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Tickets to the Opera; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

Any unpublished poem 35 lines or less is wanted! Deadline January 15, 2012. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2012 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems. For more information please call (828) 258-3752. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

by Ted

Olson

The Mountain Whippoorwill Or, How Hill-Billy Jim Won The Great Fiddler’s Prize (A Georgia Romance) by Stephen Vincent Benet Up in the mountains, it’s lonesome all the time, (Sof win’ slewin’ thu’ the sweet-potato vine).

October

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

Partial Listing More events posted online.

articles covering that 1924 fiddle contest in Atlanta stressed Stokes’ youthfulness. One article appearing in The Literary Digest in December 1924 reported that Stokes “came down from the Blue Ridge foothills primed with all the Southern tunes that he had learned from his grandad, and full of the spirit of victory.” That description caught the attention of Benet, who was living in New York City but who had grown fond of old-time music as a youth while spending several summers in the town of Highlands, in Macon County, North Carolina. Moved by what he remembered about the excitement of fiddle contests, Benet promptly composed “The Mountain Whippoorwill,” and the poem was published in the March 1925 issue of Century Magazine. After his emergence as a champion fiddler, Stokes joined the north Georgia-based string band The Skillet Lickers, which was one of the most popular 1920s-era “hillbilly” recording acts. The poem in which Stokes is immortalized — enlivened by Benet’s vivid literary rendering of Appalachia’s dialectical speech and by the poet’s evocations of the rhythms of southern mountain music — has charmed countless Americans over the years. Whether encountered in literary anthologies or on-line (or perhaps initially heard as part of the stage repertoires of such performers as the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Stephen Wade), Benet’s poem is among the most beloved American poems. Just ask Charlie Daniels, who in 1979, haunted by his early exposure to “The Mountain Whippoorwill,” recast the poem’s basic theme into song form, yielding the biggest hit of his long and influential recording career. Ted Olson is the author of such books as Breathing in Darkness: Poems (Wind Publications, 2006) and Blue Ridge Folklife (University Press of Mississippi, 1998) and he is the editor of numerous books, including CrossRoads: A Southern Culture Annual (Mercer University Press, 2009). His experiences as a poet and musician are discussed on www.windpub. com/books/breathingindarkness.htm.

Poets who would like for their poetry to be considered for a future column may send their books and manuscripts to Ted Olson, ETSU, Box 70400, Johnson City, TN 37614. Please include contact information and a SASE with submissions.

Up in the mountains, it’s lonesome for a child, (Whippoorwills a-callin’ when the sap runs wild).

readings & booksignings

Up in the mountains, mountains in the fog, Everything as lazy as an old houn’ dog.

Friday, October 7 from 5 to 6 p.m. – ROBERT BARTLETT, Real Alchemy and The Way of the Crucible.

Born in the mountains, never raised a pet, Don’t want nuthin’ an’ never got it yet.

Friday, October 7 at 7 p.m. – PAT MACENULTY, author of Wait Until Tomorrow: A Daughter’s Memoir.

Born in the mountains, lonesome-born, Raised runnin’ ragged thu’ the cockleburrs and corn.

Saturday, October 8 at 7 p.m. – MARLIN BARTON, author of The Cross Garden.

Never knew my pappy, mebbe never should. Think he was a fiddle made of mountain laurel-wood.

Tuesday, October 11 at 7 p.m. – JAMES VALENTINE, author of Southern Appalachian Celebration.

Never had a mammy to teach me pretty-please. Think she was a whippoorwill, a-skitin’ thu’ the trees.

Wednesday, October 12 at 7 p.m. – THOMAS RAIN CROWE, BARBARA DUNCAN & BRENT MARTIN, Every Breath Sings Mountains: The Great Smoky Mountains.

Never had a brother ner a whole pair of pants, But when I start to fiddle, why, yuh got to start to dance! Listen to my fiddle Kingdom Come—Kingdom Come! Hear the frogs a-chunkin’ “Jug o’ rum, Jug o’ rum!” Hear that mountain-whippoorwill be lonesome in the air. An’ I’ll tell yuh how I traveled to the Essex County Fair.

Thursday, October 13 at 7 p.m. – NORMA WATKINS, The Last Resort. Friday, October 14 at 7 p.m. – DONNA JOHNSON, author of Holy Ghost Girl.

Essex County has a mighty pretty fair, All the smarty fiddlers from the South come there.

Saturday, October 15 at 7 p.m. – ALLAN WOLF presents The Watch That Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic.

Elbows flyin’ as they rosin up the bow For the First Prize Contest in the Georgia Fiddlers’ Show.

Sunday, October 16 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. – Fundraiser with Kathryn Stripling Byer, Joseph Bathanti, and Pamela Duncan.

Old Dan Wheeling, with his whiskers in his ears, King-pin fiddler for nearly twenty years. Big Tom Sargent, with his blue wall-eye, An’ Little Jimmy Weezer that can make a fiddle cry. All sittin’ roun’, spittin’ high an’ struttin’ proud, (Listen, little whippoorwill, yuh better bug yore eyes!) Tun-a-tun-a-tunin’ while the jedges told the crowd Them that got the mostest claps’d win the bestest prize.

Monday, October 17 at 7 p.m. – Health & wellness with SAMANTHA POLLACK, CPT. Tuesday, October 18 at 7 p.m. – SARAH LARSON, memoir writing workshop. Wednesday, October 19 at 7 p.m. – ARIELLE GUTTMAN, Venus Star Rising. Thursday, October 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. – Lee Pantas, The Ultimate Guide to Asheville & the WNC Mountains.

Everybody waitin’ for the first tweedle-dee, When in comes a-stumblin’—hill-billy me!

Thursday, October 20 at 7 p.m. – CAREN GOLDMAN, author of Restoring Life’s Missing Pieces.

Bowed right pretty to the jedges an’ the rest, Took a silver dollar from a hole inside my vest,

October, 28 at 7 p.m. – Caleb Beissert, New Translations of Neruda and Lorca.

Plunked it on the table an’ said, “There’s my callin’ card! An’ anyone that licks me well, he’s got to fiddle hard!” Old Dan Wheeling, he was laughin’ fit to holler, Little Jimmy Weezer said, ‘’There’s one dead dollar!”

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

Big Tom Sargent had a yaller-toothy grin, But I tucked my little whippoorwill spang underneath my chin, An’ petted it an’ tuned it till the jedges said, “Begin!”

To read the entire poem, “The Mountain Whippoorwill,” please visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 29


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thoreau’s garden The Peacock and Prayer Plants

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he peacock plants of the genus Calathea and the prayer plants of the genus Maranta both belong to the Maranta Family. Although the flowers are pretty, they are small and usually overshadowed by the exceptionally beautiful leaves, which appear in such luxurious colors and color combinations that they surely must rival those found in Joseph’s coat of Biblical fame. Both are native to tropical America. Caletheas (at left in the drawing) are supposedly derived from the first botanical description when an unknown botanist saw the leaves of Calathea lutea used in basket weaving — the leaves also produce a wax similar to carnauba — hence the Greek word calathos, meaning basket. The common name of peacock plant is immediately evident upon viewing the leaves. My favorite is Calathea Makoyana, a species originally from Brazil and a plant that bears large oval leaves — often a foot long — that are patterned on both sides: the top with olive green lines and ovals over a field of pale yellow-green, while the underneath pattern is repeated in a rich purple-red. But running a close second is Calathea Warsceqiczii, a species from Costa Rica that bears very dark green leaves feathered with paler green markings on either side of the midrib and purple underneath. The plant is named in honor of a Polish botanist, Joseph Warsceqicz (1812-1866). At least twelve different species and cultivars are available, including a number

by

Peter Loewer

fertilize at least once a month when they are in active growth. The prayer plants belong to the genus Maranta (at the right in the drawing) and were named in honor of Bartolomea Maranti, a Venetian botanist who explored jungles in the mid-1500s. They are aptly named because the foliage patterns strongly suggest those found in Venetian glass and the word prayer refers to the plant’s habit of curling up its leaves at night and unfurling them in the morning light. Three varieties of Maranta leuconrura (the species name refers to light veining or the pattern of veins on the leaf) are found in cultivation. The cultivar known as Var. erythroneura (erythro is a fifty-dollar word for red) bears leaves up to five inches long that exhibit a herringbone design of carmine veining that overlays a background of a velvety olive green. In cultivation treat these plants like the peacock plants.

Illustration by Peter Loewer

of dwarf plants, especially valuable if your plant space is limited. Peacock plants like a humid atmosphere much as is found in their jungle habitat. Keep the soil evenly moist and use a planting mix of potting soil, composted manure, and some sand or vermiculite. Prepared African violet soil is perfect. Avoid full sun as it will burn the leaves and

Peter Loewer, shown here, examining the blossoms of early-blooming Lenten roses, is a wellknown writer and botanical artist who has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

‘Ray Byram’ continued from page 26

‘Women in the Moon’ from page 26

screen, whereas Byram works from the opposite premise by doing a painting first and then hand separation from it using a separate sheet of acetate for each color and red opaquing pen to duplicate every speck of the one color he is picking out. Unlike most serigraphy, this gives the finished work a much stronger, painterly effect. Thus far, Byram has done from 16 to 22 colors per serigraph. This very tedious separation process takes him up to 200 hours to complete. Each color is individually hand pulled, layering one over another until each color is complete. There is no room for error. Byram’s oils are almost exclusively done with small palette knives rather than brushes. Byram finds his inspiration throughout the eastern mountains and forests, particularly in the North Georgia and North Carolina. He also finds it in the local roads around his home in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina. Byram lives with his wife Dona, also an artist, who worked in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art.

reasonable prices. It has taken us three years to build a customer base but now we always hear, I’ll be back.”

30 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

Looking North by Ray Byram

Byram has a son, Sam, who is married and living in Atlanta. The artist explains, “There are so many beautiful roads, even the well traveled, where it’s difficult or impossible to just stop in your tracks and take it all in — the winding roads, the light filtering through the trees. That lighting effect is what I’ve been keying in on. That sense of ‘realness’ to me, it is a very special spiritual magical thing.”

Ray Byram 566 McGuire Rd., Pisgah Forest, NC 28768 (828) 877-6509 • www.raybyram.com

If You Go:

Women in the Moon will host a trunk show featuring upscale jewelry artist Amber Hatchett of Asheville on October 8 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

Women in the Moon 163 South Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786 (828) 452-4558


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artful living Meeting The True Self Excerpt from a talk at the Black Mountain Unitarian Universalist Church, July 31, 2011 Insight Meditation and Mindfulness practice introduces us to, as the Zen Master, Sekkei Harada once instructed us, the “one person we must meet: The True Self.”

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ho is this true self? In 1951, the scientist/mystic Albert Einstein wrote:

“A human being is part of a whole, called by us the ‘Universe,’ a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest – a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” This is the true transcendental vision – transcending the conventional egoic perspective of a world of competing, conflicting separate objects in which the purpose of life is to dominate – and in domination – destroy Beingness. This is the vision that can transcend and evolve humanity beyond the insufficient consciousness that has caused our problems as individuals and as the human collective. Through meditation we can meet this True Self. In doing so, the first task is to learn to quiet the superficial dimension of mind that drowns all else out with its incessant talking and self-absorption. This is called Shamatha, Samadhi – Single pointedness of mind – Peaceful abiding.

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You must learn to concentrate the mind on the peaceful, transcendent dimension of life happening through you – where the Universe happens as a living Being – through you. And the best vehicle for this is awareness of your breathing, the merging of the two fundamental dimensions of your existence – you as a living biological form and the true and elemental dimension of consciousness that is awareness. You must realize that you are awareness – in a living biological form. Life in form and consciousness is happening through this mystery of a phenomenon that is a Human Being. Meditation properly directed awakens the realization that who you are is awareness – and this insight is of the absolute utmost importance. No thought, no emotion, no sensation can be you – they all come and go - we have them – but are not – cannot – be them – we cannot be defined or captured by them – yet – we are conditioned by our society to invest them with our identity – MY thoughts, MY emotions, MY perceptions. MY people, MY interests, I think, I feel. I think and care about what I am conditioned to think and care about. Everything else is “other.” This is the prison Einstein spoke of. Buddhism teaches us to attend to that

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which does not come and go – What does not come and go? What in our experience has constancy? Awareness and Life – the same awareness that witnessed your first breath – when independent sustaining Life entered you – that same awareness sits here now – as Life. But we have become distracted from that which is essential. We are so caught up in our circumstances, our life situations – those thoughts and feelings that are our story about life – that we have lost connection with Life, its totality, the context of everything that comes and goes – with what is essential, with what is unshakable, with what is the never wavering context for all that occurs. With meditation, we can return to what is essential.

This is Samadhi meditation, and here are the instructions: Sit straight – as you would sit to maximize alertness – but close your eyes – we are going to be looking within - As I like to say, “Sit like a Buddha,” as most of you have seen pictures or statues of this perfectly alert, relaxed, slightly smiling, serene figure. In Buddhism, the statues and pictures are not meant as objects of worship, but rather inspiration, models of what a Human Being is capable of. Buddhism teaches that the Buddha – an awakened True Self lies asleep within us all. So Sit – so as to awaken this perfectly wise and compassionate self – your true self. Sit like a Buddha. Now - Focus awareness into your breathing. And with your breathing – relax into that alertness – be alert and relaxed.

Hide The World, by Dodd Ferrelle

odd Ferrelle just released his most commercial album in 10 years with “Hide the World.” It is also by far the best album I have listened to in ten years. Like all good musicians, Ferrelle cannot be compared to anyone. Before Hide The World I had never heard of Dodd Ferrelle. If you want to listen to something good, something that will make you feel good about the quality of music being recorded then do yourself a huge favor and listen to Hide The World. Ferrelle started his musical adventure

about 20 years ago with Me’an Mills down in Savannah, GA. Me’an Mills split and Ferrelle had to find another outlet for his songwriting. He teamed up with his former band mate Jon Mills and future Drive By Trucker John Neff and started Rags. They went in the studio with John Keane and came out with a fine roots rock CD that laid the groundwork for Ferrelle’s next CD, A Carriage On The Hill. Carriage was Ferrelle’s first recording produced by David Barbe, and he has been at the controls for every Ferrelle CD since.

Bill Walz

reviewed by

With your exhalation, relax more deeply – shed unnecessary tension of body and mind. With your inhalation, sharpen the clarity of alert awareness trained on the experience of breathing – just normal natural breathing. When your mind wanders, return it to your breathing. When your mind wanders it’s OK to note – oh, “thinking”– but rather than following the thought, getting caught in it, just return awareness to breathing. Try this now for ten minutes. There – notice how you feel. Notice the peace of it. Notice the calm of it. Notice the deep sense of presence – really, peacefully, calmly, experience this presence. Feel the sanity of it. This is meeting your true self. This is Samadhi training – single pointed focus – peaceful abiding. It is the first stage of Buddhist meditation. With its development, we can begin to open into the flowering of the development of the whole mind, into Vipassana – Insight meditation and mindful living – where we truly begin to meet our full true self – where we begin to meet where we and the universe are one. Where we begin “to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

Bill Walz teaches meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Info on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail healing@billwalz.com Visit www.billwalz.com

Beth Gossett

Hide The World features new songs by Ferrelle, who has been writing at home in Winterville since the release of his last CD, Lonely Parades. Hide the World continues the sonic exploration beyond the roots rock territory he is commonly associated with. With Barbe’s guidance the new CD features horns from Knox Summerour, Kyle Spence on drums, and Neff on pedal steel. “Sucker Punch Town” neatly sums up the past decade or more for Dodd. Not at all indicative of the town he has lived and worked in but more a reconciliation of what he has seen from the stage and the bar.

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 31


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fine art Gallery 262 in Waynesville

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allery 262 has quickly made a name for itself as one of the premiere art galleries in Western Carolina. Since opening its doors in Waynesville’s Frog Level District earlier this year, the gallery has received a tremendous amount of praise, from both the local arts community and area visitors alike, for its modern, clean feel and eclectically diverse collection of art. Owner Aaron Stone initially set out with one goal in mind – to showcase the vast array of highly talented artists and craftspeople in the Southern Appalachian region, in a space that had the feel of a contemporary urban gallery. “Artists here in the mountains have been pigeonholed into a box that they clearly don’t fit,” Stone says. “This region is ripe with artisans and craftspeople, rivaling most large, urban markets. Its not just painted sawblades and gourds like many have thought in the past.” To achieve this, Stone sought out more than two dozen of the area’s finest artists. From lush mountain landscapes in oil, to vibrant still lifes in watercolor, to intriguingly powerful abstracts and mixed media pieces, the gallery offers the client a comfortable, exciting setting in

which to experience the work. But framed art is only a small part of what the gallery has to offer. “True artisans of the handmade object, fine craft, is something this region has always been renowned for and I felt strongly about showcasing these objects,” Stone says. Meticulously crafted wood furniture accentuates the space, along with delicately turned wood bowls & accessories, contemporary & traditional pottery, fiber art, stained glass, metalwork & blacksmithing, and handcrafted jewelry. Having enjoyed its success in Frog Level, Gallery 262 has announced that it will be moving locations this October to 142 N Main Street in Waynesville, formerly Textures Gallery. “I really love Frog Level, and believe it could be a great draw for both locals and tourists alike, but we simply don’t get the exposure here that we’ll get on Main Street,” Stone says. “You’ve got an area with a truly deep & rich history, and such a unique feel, that could easily become a thriving part of town, like Asheville has done with the River Arts District.” “There’s such an eclectic array of businesses in Frog Level, from art studios like Art On Depot, to Pana-

Natural Fiber Tableau

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by Andrea Knott Brewer

tudio B by Patti Bell Custom Framing & knows well. Fine Art will The exhibit be hosting opens October 7, in an exhibit, Fellow conjunction with Travelers, by AnAmerican Craft drea Knott Brewer. Week, and will be Brewer makes an on display from uncommon deparOctober 7 through ture from traditionNovember 12, al two-dimensional 2011. painters with her If You Go: Studio three-dimenB, a gallery/framing Foggy Morning sional natural fiber by Andrea Knott Brewer studio, is located tableau. Created at 171 Weaverville strand by strand Hwy., one-tenth of a mile north of using organically hand-dyed wool, silk Exit 23 (Merrimon Ave./Woodfin) off and bamboo fiber, she makes scenes I-26. Hours: Tues-Fri 10 a.m. to 5:30 of uncomplicated beauty. In tranquil p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. depictions of a baby rabbit in the For more information please contact tall grass, a black bear pausing at the Patti Bell at (828) 225-5200, email water’s edge, and a curled and sleeping patti.studiob@gmail.com, or visit red fox, Brewer offers the collector www.galleryatstudiob.com. a unique view of the mountains she

32 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

Gallery 262 features furniture by John Gernandt.

cea Coffee Roasters & Frog Level Brewing Company, to Lee Brooks’ Art Infusion Tattoo, one of the finest tattoo artists in the area. It’s a shame these businesses have to struggle so much just to get the small amount of customer traffic they get. It’s a real travesty that the town of Waynesville has done so little to promote Frog Level and its businesses.” With its new location, Stone plans to expand the number of artists and mediums it showcases, including the works of former Textures owners’ John & Suzanne Gernandt. So stop by this fall and experience a truly unique art experience in the heart of Western North Carolina.

Gallery Two Six Two 262 Depot Street Waynesville, NC 28786 (828) 452-6100 www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Autumn... And Then Some! Constance Williams Working Artist Gallery presents new work reflecting our region’s beautiful fall colors for their “Second Saturday” gallery-within-a-gallery opening. As with many artists, the approach of a new season brings inspiration about new works. The whole gang is looking forward to welcoming friends and visitors alike all day at the opening reception on Saturday, October 8, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The show runs through November 9, 2011. Show and main gallery are open seven days a week, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

If You Go: Constance Williams

Gallery, 9 Riverside Drive in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more details visit www. constancewilliamsgallery.com or call (828) 225-1762.


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noteworthy HART presents the Broadway Musical Comedy Hit

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee

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he Haywood Arts Regional Theater prides itself in being a leader in the area in selecting the newest hits coming from Broadway. HART’s next production is no exception, the group was one of the first in the country to be granted production rights to “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” for a three week run. The original production opened at the Circle in the Square on Broadway in April 2005 to rave reviews and ran for over three years racking up a basketful of awards along the way: Six Tony nominations including Best Musical, winner of Best Book, Three Drama Desk awards, and a stack of others. It was the little show that could, charming audiences and now spreading across the country. The plot is simple, the show is set at a fictional middle school spelling bee and features six quirky finalists. These are kids role’s played by adults, and this is a PG-13 show. It is not “children’s theater.” The songs

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Theater in leading roles in “Smoky Joes Café,” “West Side Story,” “Miss Siagon,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” “A are fun, and sometimes Chorus Line,” a bit bawdy. The spell“Hamlet,” “South ing bee itself is hysterical Pacific, “The Probut along the way you ducers,” and many come to really care about more. the contestants and who Ms. Fernanwill win. This irresistible dez will be joining combination makes it a a cast that features show people tend to want Regina Fernandez plays the role area actors who to see more than once, as of Marci. have played starit is also filled with a dash ring roles in some of improv which makes of HART’s biggest hits. Under the each performance unique. direction of Charles Mills, and Music HART is moving towards being Director Chuck Taft, the cast includes one of the region’s semi-professional Mark Jones (Buddy Holly), Strother theater companies, compensating exStingley (Max Biallystock), Emily Warperienced actors in leading roles. This ren (Jane Eyre), Rod Leigh (Floyd Colproduction will also feature a special lins), and Tabitha Judy (Electra). They guest artist, Regina Fernandez playing will be joined by newcomers Jeremy the role of Marci. Ms. Fernandez, Bridges, Justin Slack, and Leslie Putan Equity actress, will be a guest in nam. This is an ensemble cast which the community for a month. She has requires that every actor be onstage performed with Walt Disney World, throughout most of the show and each Creede Repertory Theater, Orlando role is considered a lead. Broadway, the Show Palace Theater, Seaside Music Theater, the Orlando Repertory and the Merry Go Round

Getting Your Red Dress On

n October, 2006 then First Lady Laura Bush attended the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts as they presented their annual honors program for individuals who have made significant contributions to the arts in the United States. Mrs. Bush was a wearing an Oscar de la Renta red dress. Imagine her surprise when she met another attendee with exactly the same red dress. They made a few half-hearted humorous remarks and moved on – until two more ladies appeared in the same dress. At this point Laura Bush got all the women together for a group photo, a photo op that refused to die. Mrs. Bush was asked repeatedly about her experience – until she realized that this was the perfect opportunity to connect her unsought publicity to a topic that she wanted to get before the public – heart disease in women. Mrs. Bush had learned that women are often misdiagnosed when they appeared in a hospital ER with symptoms of a heart attack because their presenting symptoms are sometimes different than those of men: pain radi-

ating into the neck or chin, shortness of breath, and/or dizziness. Few doctors were attributing these symptoms in a woman to a heart attack. She also learned that one of every three deaths in women was from heart disease, especially heart attacks. Further, most of the research done in modern heart attack treatment had been done in men so that the stents to open up blocked arteries were too big to fit in the arteries of women. Laura Bush made the connection between the “red dress” and the “red heart” of the American Heart Association and began to make the “Red Dress” a springboard for raising awareness of heart attacks and heart disease in women. Within the last five years, much has been done to correct this inequity. Hospitals have become more aware and attuned to potential heart attacks in women. Heart stents have been made smaller. The goredforwomen. org and americanheart.org websites have multiple resources available focused specifically on women’s heart health.

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The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, October 2, 9, and 16 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $22 for Adults; $20 for Seniors; Students, $8. Special $5 discount tickets for students for Thursday and Sunday performances. Box Office Hours: Monday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets are available on line at www.harttheatre.com. HART is located at the Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC 28786. If You Go

Max Hammonds, MD

As Mrs. Bush presented in her recent book, Spoken from the Heart, and as she has presented in her many personal presentations, heart disease prevention in its simplest form consists of five easy guidelines: 1. Manage high blood pressure. 2. Manage high cholesterol. 3. Maintain a healthy weight. 4. Stop smoking. 5. Exercise regularly. As a result of the “Red Dress” initiative and the recent changes in the approach of the medical community and the attention of women to this potent killer, Laura Bush was pleased to note that heart attacks account for only one in four deaths in women. Like the former First Lady, do your part. Wear your Red Dress pin and take advantage of the five easy steps to improved heart health (which works for men as well as women). Your heart will thank you.

Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 33


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what to do guide through October 30

Eliada’s Annual Corn Maze Open each Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Hours: 4-10 on Friday, 10-10 on Saturday, and 12-6 on Sunday. Tickets are $9 for adults, and $6 for children ages 4-11. Visit www.fieldsoffun.org or call (828) 254-5356 x 303.

through October 31

Seeing Reality A showcase of original drawings by William Asman T.Y. at Atelier Gallery, 24 N. Lexington Avenue, Asheville. Visit www.theateliergalleries. com, or call (828) 505-3663.

Saturday, October 1

the ARC, 39D S. Market Street. Free and open to the public.

Sunday, October 2

Homage Squared

Saturday, October 1, 8 and 15

Asheville Art in the Park 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Pack Square. Pack Square will be filled with local artists. After Market Mixer from 5-10 p.m. at

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

October 2 – String Quartet playing

Opening Reception at the Asheville Art Museum for sculptural work by local artist Kenn Kotara. On display through March 4, 2012. (828) 253-3227.

Haydn, Mozart, and Schubert.

October 9 – Rich Willey’s Jazz Band performs.

October 15 – The Duo Montag-

Friday, October 7

nard (sax and guitar) at 7:30 p.m.

COOP Art Opening

October 16 – Craig Carol will

6:30 pm. Opening for Jeunesse (Youth), and solo show for French painter Asya Colie. Runs through November 1, 2011. Coop, 25 Carolina Lane, downtown Asheville. (828) 5050791. Visit www.coopasheville.com for more details.

Opening Reception from 6 - 8 p.m. at the Asheville Art Musuem. Free for BMCM+AC members + students w/ID, $3 non-members. On display through January 14, 2012. www.blackmountaincollege.org.

Friday, October 7

Jackass Flats CD Release Party High energy, foot stompin’, red-faced singin’, bluegrass-infused Americana band that will make you bones move. 10 p.m., 18+, $5. MoDaddy’s, 77 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. Details at (828) 258-1550, www.jackass-flats.com.

Friday, October 7

Pierced! Exhibition of photos by Leigh Svenson documenting the phenomenon of physical adornment. Opening reception from 4-6 p.m., Blowers Gallery in UNC Asheville’s Ramsey Library. Exhibit open daily through October 30, 2011. Call (828) 251-6436.

October 7 & 8

International Dance & Music Shows The biggest, best, most beautiful performances in tribal! 8 p.m. at Camp Tekoa, 211 Thomas Road, Hendersonville, NC 28739. $15 tickets available online and at the door. Visit www.triboriginal.org or call Onça O’Leary at (828) 232-2980.

Saturday, October 8

Grovewood Open Studio Tour Take a free, self-guided tour of the artists’ studios from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Interact with professional artists, see artwork at the source. For more details call (828) 253-7651 or visit www.grovewood.com. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Road, Asheville.

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Sunday, October 9

Mountain Spirit Concert Series A Musical Journey Through the Scottish Highlands featuring Jamie Laval with special guests EJ Jones, bagpipes, and David Brown, guitar. 7 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place. $15 adults/$10 students www.uuasheville. org Info: Louise Baker (828) 299-4171.

Sunday, October 9

October 23 – The Pyramid Brass

The Grassroots Revival is an informal potluck celebration of individuals and organizations working for social justice and sustainability in Asheville and the Southern Appalachians. At the Pearson Drive Community Garden in Montford from 4-7 p.m. To learn more go to www.bountifulcitiesproject.org.

Saturday, October 8

The Art of Making Music Instruments made in WNC past and present. Reception 3-6 p.m. Strings, woodwinds, keyboards, drums and more by several talented WNC artists. Showing through December 31, 2011. More info: (828) 253-7651. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Rd. Asheville.

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Concerts are held on Sundays at 3 p.m unless otherwise noted. A free-will offering will be taken for the restoration fund and for the musicians. The historic church is located just off South Charlotte Street at Max Street, on the hill across from the Public Works Building (1 Dundee St.).

John Cage: A Circle of Influences

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present a solo guitar concert. Quintet performs.

Friday, October 7

Changing Hands An evening of acoustic guitar with Billy McLaughlin. Proceeds will support the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation. Tickets are $35. Concert from 8-10 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville, NC. Call (312) 447-5098, or email events@dystoniafoundation.org.

Concerts at St. Matthias Church

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Sunday, October 9

The Grascals Grammy-nominated bluegrass musicians perform at 3 p.m. at Western Carolina University’s John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. The show is a musical tribute to 1960s sitcom “The Andy Griffith Show.” Tickets are $20. (828) 227-2479, bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

and the true meaning of “home.” Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place at 10 a.m. and 12 noon. Tickets $6-$7. Recommended for Grades 1-5. Tickets or information, (828) 210-9837, www. dwtheatre.com.

Friday, October 14

Fine Art & Gourmet Chips Art exhibit by Cleaster Cotton. Opening Reception at 8 p.m. Exhibit runs through November 14, 2011. The Gourmet Chip Company, 43 1/2 Broadway, downtown, Asheville. Proceeds to help fund art lessons for Asheville children. For information, call (828) 254-3335.

Friday, October 14

Appalachian Pastel Society Exhibit Opening reception from 6-8 p.m. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts, Suzanne Karnatz 225 West State Street in Black Mountain, NC. For more information, call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.blackmountainarts.org. On display from October 14 through November 23, 2011.

Saturday, October 15

October 13 – November 5

‘Night Mother

Doc Watson and David Holt

Works by Affrilachian artist Valeria Watson-Doost. Opening reception and Butoh performance “Ghosts of the South” at 6 p.m. Pink Dog, Creative, 348 Depot St., Asheville. On display from October 8 to November 20, 2011. Open daily from 10-4 p.m.

This eloquent, enthralling and ultimately shattering play examines the final hour in the life of a young woman who has made the decision that life is no longer worth living. Written by Marsha Norman. Performances Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $15. At Asheville Community Theatre, 35below. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Two priceless performances by Grammy winners of American folk. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.. Regular $45; Student $40; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10 (with valid I.D.) Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, October 8

Saturday, October 15

Sunday, October 16

Saturday, October 8

NiceNasty Exhibit

Sassafrass Studio Grand Opening Demonstrations of encaustic painting, refreshments, and sassafras champagne from 4-7 p.m. Visit www.sassafrassstudio.net or call (312) 437-4325 for more information. 191 Lyman St., Suite 168, Riverview Station, Asheville.

October 8 through November 5

Skyscape Exhibiton of environmental expressionist work by painter Elizabeth Lasley at 310 ART, Riverview Station North, 191 Lyman Street, Studio #310, Asheville. For details call (828) 776-2716.

Lucinda Williams Benefit Concert A benefit for Wild South, an Asheville based non-profit that aims to protect wild lands, wildlife and the wild character of the South. Tickets: $18 in advance/ $23 day of show / $35 Hopster VIP / $60 VIP Brewmasters Package. Concert will be held at the Pisgah Brewing Company Outdoor Stage, 150 Eastside Drive, Black Mountain, NC.

October 13 & 14

The Yellow Brick Road In this new musical loosely based on The Wizard Photo: Jeremy Daniel of Oz, Dora is caught between her Latino family’s traditions and her life as a contemporary American teenager. Click your heels together tres veces, delight in all-new songs written in contemporary Latin musical styles, and discover the power of embracing multiple cultures

HardLox Jewish Food and Heritage Festival Held in Pack Square Park from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit www.HardLox.com.

Four-Hand OktoberFest Daniel Weiser, the pianist and Artistic Director of Classicopia, will present several concerts for both four-hand piano and two pianos. At the Altamont on Thursday, October 27 at 7:30 p.m., and at the White Horse Black Mountain on Friday, October 28 at 7 p.m. A two-piano show will take place at a private home in Biltmore Forest on Saturday, October 29 at 4 p.m., by reservation only. For more information contact Dr. Weiser at (828) 505-2903 or at danielemmasophie@gmail.com.

October Events ~ Announcements ~ openings ~ sales 34 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2


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what to do guide

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October - November

Rock Saber

Best in Show

Brief Encounters features new works by local playwrights. Performances at 7:30 p.m. on October 27-29, and November 3-5, 10-12, and 17-19. Brief Encounters runs in repertory with Rock Saber, which follows a wannabe metal band called The Old Grey Goose Is Dead. Rock Saber runs October 21-22 with shows at 10 p.m. Tickets $12. Double feature tickets to see both shows are available for $20. Call (828) 668-2154, visit www.themagneticfield.com, or stop by the Magnetic Field at 372 Depot St. in Asheville’s River Arts District.

by Phil Juliano

Wednesday, October 26

Comedian Bo Burnham Performance at 7 p.m. at the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center at Western Carolina University. Tickets are $15 or $20 on the day of the show. Call (828) 227-2479 or visit bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Purchase the final bounties of the season from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Located in the parking lot behind the Cherry Cottage at 2760 Greenville Hwy./225 S. just south of the Flat Rock Playhouse. Call (828) 697-7719 for more information.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

The Asheville Community Band presents it’s Fall Concert at 3 p.m. in the Auditorium of Asheville High School. Admission is $8, students free. Featured on the program are Jupiter by Holst, and Mannin Veen by Hayden Wood. Call (828) 254-2234.

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Artists Sought for Small Works Show Show to be held November 16-December 31, 2011. All pieces must be 12" or smaller in every dimension, including base, matting, and frame. Each artist is required to submit original work to include a minimum of three pieces and Lauren Patton Johnson a maximum of five pieces. there is a $20 fee for handling and publicity. All work must be for sale, priced at $300 or below, and must have been created in the last two years. All mediums are welcome. For more information email Brittany Martin at info@haywoodarts.org, download an application at www.haywoodarts.org or call the Haywood County Arts Council at (828) 452-0593.

The vibrant colors of fall and the rich, natural diversity of western North Carolina is beautifully captured in more than 40 images in this juried Joye Arden Durham group exhibit. The 7th Annual Autumn Juried Group Exhibit of the Carolinas’ Nature Photographers Association (CNPA) will be hosted by Pack Place Gallery, 2 South Pack Square in Asheville. An opening reception will be held on Friday, October 7 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. For more details visit www.cnpaasheville.org.

Sunday, October 9 at 4 p.m.

Central United Methodist Church, Church St., Asheville. Tickets: $15; students $5. Available at the door. For more information contact Michael Jones (828) 650-0948 or visit blueridgeorchestra.org.

Annual Beth Israel Rummage Sale

Asheville Community Band

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“Green Themes,” selections using musical themes “recycled” from previous compositions. Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 4 “Mozartiana” (themes from Ave Verum Corpus), Stravinsiky’s Pulcinella Suite using themes from the 18th Century ballet composer Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. Solosit Judi Lambert will perform Vivaldi’s Concert for Piccolo.

Sunday & Monday, October 30-31

Sunday October 30

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Blue Ridge Orchestra Fall Concert

Friday, October 28

Electronics, household items, clothing, books, toys, tools, furniture and great holiday gifts. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Congregation Beth Israel, 229 Murdock Avenue, (right turn at light after Luella’s BBQ on Merrimon Avenue), in north Asheville (across from Weaver Park). For more information call Lina Newman (704) 773-3901.

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October 3 - October 24

Flat Rock Tailgate Market

A ceramic show highlighting our six Odyssey resident artists. Opening Reception is from 5-7 p.m. On display through January 2, 2012. Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts, 238 Clingman Avenue.

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Autumn in the Southern Appalachians

Thursday, October 27

Collect(ive) Components

Brief Encounters at the Magnetic Field

Black Mountain Fall Sculpture Stroll The Black Mountain Sculpture Stroll will be on display throughout the fall and Julia Burr winter. The pieces are installed at walkable locations close to downtown Black Mountain. For more information contact the Black Mountain Center for the Arts at (828) 669-0930.

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Dragin

by Michael Cole

Creatures Café Alcohol free music venue and café featuring live entertainment, amazing desserts, and an inspiring art gallery. Awesome desserts, delicious snacks, 23 bottled sodas, mocktails, an a full espresso bar. Tuesdays: singer songwriter showcase. Wednesdays: get your dance on at salsa night. Thursdays: holy hip hop. Fridays & Saturdays: live bands and entertainment. 81 Patton Ave, Downtown Asheville. Tues-Thurs, 5:30 p.m. to 12 a.m. (828) 254-3636, www.creaturescafe.com.

Classes ~ auditions ~ Arts & Crafts ~ Readings Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 35


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from here to there readying the best stuff for release.” Of course that summer tour includes an Asheville stop at MoogFest. It’s the highlight of the weekend for this music lover, a chance to again see in concert one of the few current bands whose referencing back to the heady days of psychedelic pop rings true. Since their beginnings more than two decades ago The Flaming Lips have rarely failed to ignite the imagination and

‘MoogFest’ continued from page 9

Peaches it, along with the limited edition (and distinctively packaged) six song EP Gummy Song Fetus, remains the most recent Lips release. But Coyne promises that will change. “We’ve been recording nearly non-stop, and the amount of material we have in the can is astounding. As soon as our summer tour is complete I’ll be

29. The exact times and location are to be determined, so be sure to regularly visit www.moogfest. com for updates.

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If You The Flaming Lips at Go MoogFest, Saturday, October

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expand the limits of the music they make. We should all be grateful to hear it from Coyne that the journey is far from over.

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WEAVERVILLE, NC - 28804

downtown Waynesville - 28786

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to Russ Ave.

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Waynesville / Russ Ave. WC

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Get On The Map, Call

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(828) 646-0071

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Waynesville / Great Smoky Mtn. Expy.

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3.22 miles past Exit 98 on right, next to Innovative Interiors.

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R A P I D   R I V E R

A R T S

shops

Elegant Interiors Bringing Your Home Together in an Elegant Manner

Interview with

pg.

Full Bar and Award-Winning Wine List

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Kim Shuford

Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

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apid River Magazine: Please give

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

us a description of yourself and what you do?

Kim Shuford: As an Interior Designer, I go to the client’s house and look at the shell of the rooms they want to decorate and consider all of its potential. I have to think about balancing function with aesthetics. I then help the client chose the right colors and fabrics to create a certain mood, decide what to put on the walls and floors, and the size and style of furniture they need. I try to make their home an extension of their personality.

Elegant Interiors Fine Furnishings and Interior Decorating

RRM: Give us a little history of Massie Furniture and its owners.

‘Massie Furniture’ continued on page 39

Enjoy Wine, Food, and Friends

• Breads Made from Scratch Everyday

Dinner Monday – Saturday 5 PM – 9 PM

828-452-6210

• Fresh Seafood

KS: My great-grandfather, Thomas Newton Massie, started

Massie Furniture in 1902. In the early 1930’s my grandfather, Francis Massie, began working at the furniture store. In the early 1960’s my father, Tom Massie, joined my grandfather. In 1987 I graduated from college and joined my father

• House Made Pastas

pg.

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39 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 828-452-3509 • Monday-Saturday 9-5

• USDA Choice or Higher Grade Black Angus Beef

Reservations Honored

30 Church Street Just off Main Street, across from the Town Hall parking lot, in Waynesville, NC

www.TheChefsTableOfWaynesville.com

The Green Light Cafe Hearty, Wholesome, and Delicious Homemade Vegetarian and Vegan Meals Festival & Event Catering

pg.

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18 N. Lexington Ave.

www.greenlightcafe.com

Indoor Wine Bar Cheese, Tapas, TV

Outdoor Seating Under the Trellis

Live Music Friday Nights Wineseller Bandstand

20 Church Street

Downtown Asheville • (828) 250-3800 Dinner Monday – Saturday Tues.-Thurs. 11:30-8pm • Fri.-Sat. 11:30-9pm Sunday Brunch 11-4pm • Closed Monday

Retail Wine, Beer, Champagne, Port

Waynesville, NC 28786 pg.

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828-452-6000 ClassicWineSeller.com info@classicwineseller.com

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Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 37


n i ’ s Bay a t p a C

LUNCH SPECIAL

Mon-Sat. from 11 to 3 PM

Lightly seasoned broiled grouper with a fresh baked potato and homemade hush puppies.

Only

pg.

Daily Dinner Specials Mon-Sat. 3 PM to Close Open Everyday 11 to 9 PM

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$ 95

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562 Russ Ave., Waynesville, NC (828) 456-6761

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LIVE Mariachi Band Estrellas Del Sur

Pizza & Hoagies

ICE COLD BUCKET of BEER

Seafood Restaurant Since 1996

CORONA 5PACK

We Bring the Sea to the Mountains

6-9 PM Every Friday Tax included

Extensive Seafood Menu Broiled, Steamed, or Fried

Family Owned & Operated

10

$

family sPecial 2 Pan Pizzas for

HALF OFF

Every Sunday & Tuesday

2ND DINNER

of Equal or Lesser Value

Offer good only with this coupon. Take-Out or Eat-In Only. Coupon Expires 10/15/2011

With Purchase of Regular Priced Dinner. Dine-in Only.

Designated drivers drink for FRee on Sundays for football games.

Coupon Expires 11/1/2011 pg.

Dinner Hours: Monday - Closed • Tues-Thurs 4-9 PM Fri-Sat 3-10 PM • Sunday Noon-9 PM pg.

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1047 Haywood Road

1445 Patton Avenue Asheville, North Carolina 28806

Phone (828) 285-0940

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$ 99

pg.

Serving Mouth Watering Lunch & Dinner Mon-Sun 11am - 10pm

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West Asheville ~ 828 255-5148

38 October 2011 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 15, No. 2

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84 Mineral Springs Road Behind Applebees by the Innsbrook Mall

We Deliver! (828) 255-8310

Authentic New York Style Hand Tossed Pizza, Stromboli, and Calzones!

Pennsylvania Style Hoagies, Cheese Steaks, and Chicken Cheese Steaks.

Find us on Facebook • woodys.woodring@gmail.com


R A P I D   R I V E R

guided fly fishing Trips

A R T S

shops ‘Massie Furniture’ continued from page 37

and opened the decorating business which I gave the name Elegant Interiors.

RRM: What kind of furniture does Elegant Interiors carry? KS: We carry middle to high end furniture lines. I wanted

to stock very good quality furniture with a reasonable price. Some of the well known upholstery lines we carry are Bassett, Broyhill, Bradington Young, Fairfield, Jetton, La-z-boy, Sam Moore, and Temple. Some of the well known case good lines are American Drew, Bassett, Broyhill, Kincaid, and Lane.

Beginners WelCome! All you need to do is show up. All gear is provided. Our guides are excellent at casting instructions, relaying fishing techniques, and teaching basics or stream biology. If you have ever wanted to try fly fishing and are intimidated, this is where to start.

Waynesville Fly Shop 168 S. Main Street • 28786 www.waynesvilleflyshop.com

RRM: Is there

such a thing as a wrong or right when decorating your house?

gmann@waynesvilleflyshop.com

828•246•0306

KS: There is no

pg.

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Call for Trip priCing

right or wrong style. Some styles are more popular than others, but popKim Shuford, Interior Designer for ularity changes Elegant Interiors. Photo by Liza Becker over time. There are basics of good design that remain constant. Be sure the proportions are pleasing, the colors are harmonious, and the scale is appropriate.

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RRM: When one thinks of redecorating a room, what factors do you look at to determine what they want?

KS: Analyze the space you are working with. Look at the size, shape, and the intended use of the room. • Add color and texture

• Select the right lighting to show off colors, forms ,and textures • Select a flooring material • Select wall and window treatments • Select furniture styles

RRM: What makes Elegant Interiors Special? KS: My passion for my work results in elegant and comfort-

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able interiors that reflect my client’s unique personality. Making my client’s home sophisticated and welcoming, I focus on the preferences of my clients rather than making my own statement in design. My most important goal is to make my client happy. I want them to love what I have done for them. I enjoy making lasting relationships with my clients. I believe in going the extra step to insure the highest level of customer satisfaction. Massie Furniture Company, fine furnishings and interior decorating. Visit us at 39 North Main Street, in Waynesville. Monday through Saturday, 9 to 5 p.m. (828) 452-3509.

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a^oVWZX`Zge]did\gVe]n @ \bV^a#Xdb Vol. 15, No. 2 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — October 2011 39


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