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Diana Wortham Theatre PG 4 Asheville Symphony PG 7

Open Studio Tour of Henderson County PG 11 Heritage Weekend at the Folk Art Center PG 18 Haywood Art Studio Tour Raise Your Hand Benefit Auction & Gala Local Dining Guide

PGS

PG

PG

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Painting All Over with John Mac Kah PG 9

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30-31 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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12-15 • What to Do Guide™

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BRUCH’S VIOLIN CONCERTO

September 19

OPENING NIGHT with

October 17

Angela Brown

THE PLANETS

Friday Dec. 11

November 21

“You would swear that Frank Sinatra has been resurrected.” – New York Daily News

soprano

VERDI’S REQUIEM April 16

BEETHOVEN’S VIOLIN CONCERTO

ROMEO AND JULIET

February 13

March 12

2015/2016 S E A S O N DANIEL MEYER MUSIC DIRECTOR

• THOMAS WOLFE AUDITORIUM •

ZUILL BAILEY RETURNS May 14

CALL FOR TICKETS: 828.254.7046 www.ashevillesymphony.org

2015/2016 SEASON

4000 MILES

Alison Brown Quartet • MOMIX Botanica • Romeo and Juliet The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • A Swannanoa Solstice Koresh Dance Company • Jesse Cook • Aaron Goldberg Trio Lucky Plush Productions • MUMMENSCHANZ The Cashore Marionettes and much more

Koresh Dance Company by Bicking Photography

OCT 7 - OCT 25

For tickets/info: www.dwtheatre.com or (828)257-4530 2 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

by Amy Herzog

NOV 4 - NOV 29

SOMEONE ELSE

DEC 9 - DEC 27

ALL IS CALM The Christmas Truce of 1914

JAN 27 - FEB 21

with nd Iver a nn-Mc ay ie Fly Charl readw T tt o Sc

JEEVES INTERVENES

by

Charlotte Cohn and Jason Odell Williams

by Peter Rothstein adapted by

Margaret Raether from the stories of

P. G. Wodehouse

APRIL 6 - MAY 1 WHO'S AFRAID OF by

VIRGINIA WOOLF?

MAY 11- JUNE 5

presented in partnership with

EDWARD albee

Bad Dates

by Theresa Rebeck

www.ncstage.org • 828.239.0263


5th Annual

Asheville Percussion Festival

June 13-19, 2016

Come enjoy a creative environment where percussionists and dancers of all traditions and skill levels gather to explore, create and innovate. pg. 21

20

www.AshevilleRhythm.org

pg. 36

ML

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 3


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performance Diana Wortham Theatre 2015-2016 Series

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The Diana Wortham Theatre is about to kick off its 2015/2016 Mainstage Series. From September until the end of May, over twenty colourful acts are scheduled to hit the theatre. The line-up contains a diverse collection of performance genres ranging from jazz to marionettes to tap-dancing. The series opens with the highly-anticipated Ms. Lisa Fischer & Grand Baton on September 18. This is sure to be a powerful demonstration of the soulful vocals of Fischer, who has worked with artists ranging from Tina Turner to Nine Inch Nails, as well as accompanying The Rolling Stones on every tour since 1989. She is featured in the film, 20 Feet From Stardom Lisa Fischer

pg. 24

BY JACOB

OLEY

which will be screened a day before her performance to officially kick off the opening of the season. The Hot Sardines Following up Fischer, Red Moon Road plays on September 25. This Canadian folk trio was apparently born from a sailboat wreck that occurred in 2009. Each member of the band has a unique background in music and come together with banjo, guitar, and mandolin to provide a heartwarming pop performance. If Celtic music is your thing, you are in luck – there are a good number of traditional Irish music acts that will be performing at the theatre in the coming months, each unique in their own way. Most notably, the Swanannoa Solstice will occur on December 20, continued on page 6

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Of Time and the River

Opening Reception 6-9PM

Thursday, October 15 Artists Interpret the French Broad River

Exclusive Sale & Benefit Featuring the work of 14 area artists, including John Mac Kah, Christine Dougherty, Julyan Davis, Mark Henry, Matthew Good, and Peter Loewer.

Three Days Only! October 15-18

at Sol’s Reprieve

11 Richland Street, Asheville

Of Wine & the River Preview Party

Art Benefit for RiverLink

October 15-18

Thursday, October 1 Smoky Park Supper Club 318 Riverside Drive in Asheville’s River Arts District

Tickets available at

www.riverlink.org oftimeandtheriver.weebly.com/blog

4 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number One

SEPTEMBER 2015 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Amber Combs Copy Editor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Hannah Barry, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Lisa Duff, Melissa Farina, Max Hammonds, MD, Beth Hanson, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Valerie Leeper, Steven Lloyd, Tina Masciarelli, Ashley Van Matre, Jacob Oley, Dennis Ray, Michelle Rogers, Jeannie Shuckstes, Pam Siekman, Greg Vineyard, David Voorhees, Bill Walz, J. & R. Woods, Andrea Zourzoukis.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, September 2015, Vol. 19 No. 1

4 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

Diana Wortham Theatre. . . . . . . . . . 4 Piano Forum Benefit Concert . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

New stories are added each month!

ONLY ONLINE

Adventures in Northern Iraq,

What’s the Buzz About Bees?

written by Tom Davis

Best Restaurant in Bali,

8 Music

written by Jonathan Look

The Blackberry Bushes Stringband 8 Callaghan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Flying Burrito Brothers . . . . . 27

9 Fine Art

Death at Sea, written by Terry Ward The Mysterious Disappearance of Phyllis Rivers, written by RF Wilson

John Mac Kah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Case Garden Designs . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Open Studio Tour of Henderson County . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 French Broad Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Grovewood Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Judy Rentner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 21 Haywood Art Studio Tour . . . . . . . 22 Mahogany House Art Gallery . . . . 22 Twigs & Leaves Gallery . . . . . . . . . 24 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Blackbird Frame & Art . . . . . . . . . . 37 Raise Your Hand Auction. . . . . . . . 38

12 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

16 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

Mind and Body - Flow, written by Ronya Banks

Viennas Ohio, written by Dave Rowe Answering the Master,

written by Michael Landolfi

Flash Fiction Contest! See page 28 for details. Short Story and Flash Fiction guidelines are available at rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copy editor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

SPECIAL SECTIONS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-25 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 32

Ceramic wall piece by Libba Tracy.

An art exhibit at the The Black Mountain Center for the Arts, and a series of “swarms” involving more than 200 children.

Made in WNC Works by twenty-four regional textile, ceramic, and furniture studios, and four regional artists are on display at the Center for Craft, Creativity & Design.

GSMA’s Compilation of Old-Time Smoky Mountain Music Carroll Best and the White Oak String Band have earned an award nomination in the International Bluegrass Music Association’s annual competition for the high quality of their liner notes.

Healthy Good Thoughts Kathleen Colburn has been thinking about delicious food. This month she shares some simple, yummy ideas.

Poetry Contest Winners! Read the winning entries in Rapid River Magazine’s annual contest. www.rapidrivermagazine.com

30 Dining Guide Great American Dog . . . . . . . . . . . 30 LEX 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Asheville Greek Festival . . . . . . . . . 39

34 What to Do Guide On the Cover: Riverside Rail, painting by John Mac Kah. PAGE 9

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 5


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captivating performances 15th Annual Fall Asheville Area Piano Forum Benefit Concert

F

Features Leading Area Pianists

BY

MARILYNNE HERBERT

The event will showcase the talents of no less than 17 professional pianists including: Will Baunach, Karen Boyd, Elizabeth Child, Philip Dettra, Leslie Downs, Anna Hayward, Mary Holmes, Virginia McKnight, Ruth Nussbaum-Borden, Susan Nussbaum Lisle and Sue Sena. Other performers include Nathan Shirley, Richard Shulman, Eunice Stackhouse, Michael Jefry Stevens, Teresa Sumpter and Brian Turner, in addition to AAPF student competition winner Nicholas Murphy. Teresa Sumpter (left) and Ruth Nussbaum-Borden. The program will include solo and two piano works by Chopin, Vermont College of Medicine found that Scott Joplin, Debussy, Thelonious Monk, early music training can increase a child’s Piazzolla, Scarlatti, Rachmaninov, and much receptiveness to learning other subjects. more. The program will feature a work played AAPF membership is open to profesby a total of 8 hands! sional and amateur pianists, teachers, The Asheville Area Piano Forum’s annual students, and enthusiasts. benefit concerts are the main source of income for the AAPF educational outreach programs. For more information about the AAPF These include: providing financial assistance to visit www.AshevillePiano.org. deserving students facing challenges paying for piano lessons, as well as support for the Keys IF YOU Asheville Area Piano Forum’s fall for Kidz group piano classes which introduce GO benefit concert, Sunday, September music and the arts to underserved students in 27 at 3 p.m. at the Diana Wortham our community. Theatre, 2 South Pack Square in Asheville. According to AAPF President, Nathan ShirAdmission $25; Patron $50; students ley, “Children, and even adults, derive count13-21 $3. Free for students 12 and under. less benefits from piano instruction and learnTickets are available by calling the Box ing music in general.” A recent study (2015) Office at (828) 257-4530, or online at www. dwtheatre.com/boxoffice. conducted by researchers at the University of

for their performance) on February 11. And if none of that 2015, which has been an Asheville strikes your fancy, there tradition for over ten years. Other are still plenty of other Celtic acts include Lunasa on acts – one of New York’s February 28, Altan on March 10, best jazz bands, The Hot and Dervish on March 25. Sardines, play on January Dance troops are no stranger to 30. Yamato, a Japanese the Diana Wortham Theatre and drum troop perform on this year looks especially interestFebruary 18 and 19, the ing. Catch MOMIX Botanica on Jesse Cook, Flamenco Aquila Theatre company November 17 and 18, a perfornuevo expert, performs in presents The Adventures mance akin to watching life in the April 2016. of Sherlock Holmes on jungle or underwater. In a more February 5, and so much traditional modern dance vein, more. For a season brochure, call the box The Koresh Dance Company will perform on office at (828) 257-4530 or visit www. January 22 and 23, and Lucky Plush Producdwtheatre.com. tions are scheduled for February 26 and 27. Flamenco nuevo expert Jesse Cook perIF forms April 15. Cook combines musical styles YOU Diana Wortham Theatre 2015/2016 from all over the world, using his own guitar GO Mainstage Series, September 2015 expertise and synthetic additions. Some of – May 2016. Featuring Lisa Fischer, the other more eclectic shows include a jugRed Moon Road, The Adventures of gling duo, The Passing Zone, performing on Sherlock Holmes, MOMIX, Alison Brown October 3, the Cashore Marionettes on March Quartet, Tom Paxton, The Passing Zone, Rhythmic Circus, the Hot Sardines, Lúnasa, 5, and Mummenschanz: The Musicians of Siand much more! lence (who don surreal masks and body shapes ‘Diana Wortham’ cont’d from pg. 4

6 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

Asheville Chamber Music Series

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The opening of the 2015-16 Asheville Chamber Music Series will feature the Ariel String Quartet. The program will feature: Haydn’s String Quartet in B-flat, Op. 76, No. 4; Bartok’s String Quartet No. 1, Op. 7; and Brahms’ String Quartet in A minor, Op. 51, No. 2. Recently award- The Ariel String Quartet ed the prestigious Cleveland Quartet Award, the Ariel String Quartet performs widely in North America, Europe and Israel. IF YOU The Ariel String Quartet, Friday, GO September 25 at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian

Universalist Congregation, corner of Edwin Place and Charlotte Street in Asheville. Tickets are $38. Season tickets are $150. To purchase tickets or for more information please call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427 or support@ashevillechambermusic.org, or visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org.

AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

LIVE at the USO

A

A celebration in song of the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII. The show will feature great war-related songs from the 1940’s including “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.” “GI Amanda Jive,” and Glenn Miller’s Horton “Moonlight Serenade.” The featured performers are soprano Amanda Horton, baritone Jonathan Ross, and pianist Daniel Weiser.

Friday, September 11 at 7 p.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall at 743 Haywood Rd in West Asheville. Tickets are $15, available at www.isisasheville.com, (828) 575-2737. Saturday, September 12 at 7:30 p.m. at White

Horse Black Mountain at 105 Montreat Rd in Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. Call (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sunday, September 13 at 3 p.m. at All Soul’s

Cathedral in Biltmore Village. Tickets are $20 for general public or $15 for Church members. Children are free. Tickets are available at the door. Advanced ticket purchase 10% discount available at www.amicimusic.org.


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captivating performances

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Asheville Symphony Season Features Big Voices and Big Masterworks

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A soprano straight from the Metropolitan Opera stage. Big orchestral works by Beethoven, Verdi and Dvorak. A top-selling cellist and recording artist. One of the world’s best interpreters of the great Frank Sinatra. The 2015-16 Asheville Symphony season is sure to be one of its biggest in recent years. “We are excited to present a season that includes top-notch solo musicians with international careers and Masterworks performances that require some of the biggest orchestras in the classical repertoire,” said ASO Executive Director David Whitehill. “It’s an opportunity to really show off the Asheville Symphony at its best.” All seven Masterworks concerts begin at 8 p.m. and are held at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in the U.S. Cellular Center. ASO Music Director and Conductor Daniel Meyer will lead the orchestra.

Season Program American Folk Songs Sacred and Secular

Steve Lippia

– Asheville Symphony Chorus, Saturday, November 7 at 7:30 p.m. Arden Presbyterian Church. Michael Lancaster, Director.

Simply Sinatra Christmas – Steve Lippia and the Asheville Symphony, Friday, December 11 at 8 p.m. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Masterworks 1 – Opening Night, September 19, 2015 at 8 p.m.

Masterworks 2 – Bruch’s Violin

Concerto, October 17, 2015 at 8 p.m.

Masterworks 3 – The Planets,

November 21, 2015 at 8 p.m.,

Masterworks 4 – Beethoven’s Violin

Concerto, February 13, 2016 at 8 p.m.

Masterworks 5 – Romeo and Juliet, March 12, 2016 at 8 p.m.

Masterworks 6 – Verdi’s Requiem, April 16, 2016 at 8 p.m.

Masterworks 7 – Zuill Bailey Returns, May 14, 2016 at 8 p.m.

All Masterworks concerts are held at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium with Daniel Meyer conducting.

The Masterworks season will open Saturday, September 19 when the Asheville Symphony introduces the brilliant American soprano Angela Brown as a special guest. Known for her sumptuous voice, Brown will perform Daniel Meyer conducting the Asheville Symphony. some of her signature roles, including beloved arias by Puccini and Verdi and favorites from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess and Bernstein’s West Side Story. “We know this program will be a highlight of the season and a concert that music fans will truly savor,” Whitehill said. “Angela received incredible praise and reviews for her Metropolitan Opera debut Stefan Jackiw David Kim Angela Brown as Aida, so it’s thrilling to think we’ll have an opportunity to perform some of those same arias day, April 16, when the Asheville Symphony here in Asheville.” Chorus and a quartet of rising operatic stars On Saturday, October 17, the ASO will join the ASO for Verdi’s Requiem. This welcomes David Kim, concertmaster of the powerhouse work features soaring, memorable Philadelphia Orchestra, for a performance of melodies, bone-crushing sonics, and an indelBruch’s virtuosic Violin Concerto No. 1. The ibly Romantic spirit. orchestra will open the concert with Osvaldo Cellist Zuill Bailey, one of the top-selling Golijov’s “Sidereus,” a hit overture written by classical artists in the U.S., will close out the one of classical music’s hottest composers, and Masterworks season on Saturday, May 14 with also perform Schumann’s Second Symphony. his performance of an ASO co-commission, The ASO’s Masterworks 3 concert on Daughtery’s Tales of Hemingway. A musical Saturday, November 21, features a season look at the fascinating life of the great Amerihighlight. The orchestra will perform Holst’s can author, this new cello concerto will most The Planets, an orchestral suite that explores certainly display Bailey’s superb technique and the cosmos and the astrology of our own his innate flair for the dramatic. The ASO will solar system and requires a massive orchestra. finish the season with Dvorak’s Symphony Haydn’s Sinfonia concertante, which is also No. 9 “From the New World,” a groundbreakon the program, highlights the members of ing work that taps into America’s rich Native the orchestra including concertmaster Jason American and African American culture by Posnock, principal oboe Alicia Chapman, actincorporating spiritual-tinged melodies, the ing principal cello Franklin Keel, and principal “Song of Hiawatha,” and an exuberant finale. bassoon Michael Burns for solos while the The ASO will also offer two concerts outmusicians of the ASO provide the charm and side of the Masterworks season. As a holiday zest that makes Haydn’s music so joyous. treat, singer Steve Lippia will star in “Simply The Masterworks season continues on Sinatra Christmas” featuring Christmas favorSaturday, Feb. 13, as rising star Stefan Jackiw ites and iconic Sinatra numbers. The concert is makes his Asheville debut with Beethoven’s scheduled for Friday, December 11 – the day bold and brilliant Violin Concerto. Two before the 100th anniversary of Sinatra’s birth. other works on the program are MendelsThe Asheville Symphony Chorus will sohn’s Hebrides Overture, which captures present “American Folk Songs: Sacred and the composer’s visit to and impressions of Secular,” on Saturday, November 7. Scotland, and Strauss’ Metamorphosen, an elegiac and deeply stirring work for twentythree solo musicians. IF YOU Single tickets for all concerts start at Selections from Berlioz’s scintillating GO $22 for adults and $11 for youth. Single Romeo and Juliet and Mozart’s beloved Piano tickets and season ticket packages can be Concerto No. 12 will highlight Masterworks purchased at www.ashevillesymphony.org, by 5 on Saturday, March 12. Another season calling (828) 254-7046, or in person at the U.S. highlight headlines Masterworks 6 on SaturCellular Center box office at 87 Haywood Street.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 7


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captivating performances The Blackberry Bushes Stringband

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With affection for traditional American music, paired with a pronounced slant towards innovation, The Blackberry Bushes Stringband is a modern acoustic group that continues to evolve, arriving at a space that recalls the best of their influences yet they can call their own. Merging musicianship with on stage ease the band combines what they call “playful twang” with tight harmonies and adventurous arrangements. The resultant sound is original songs that are certain to appeal to fans of bluegrass, Americana, folk and related genres. In the past half decade The Blackberry Bushes have played nearly every notable festival, including the Northwest String Summit, Yonder Mountain Stringband’s Harvest Festival, Wintergrass, and Telluride. In 2009 they placed 2nd in the Telluride Bluegrass Festival band competition, a distinction that helped jumpstart the band’s speedy rise. That ascent was furthered by a 2015 third place award in the highly competitive Rockygrass Band Competition, nonstop touring, and a growing reputation for giving their audience their monies worth and then some. The Blackberry Bushes Stringband is lead by Vermont born singer and flat-pick guitarist Jes Raymond. Raymond, who originally studied voice at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before moving to Olympia, Washington, went on to Evergreen College where she concentrated on Music & Mythology. That creative arts foundation served her well as she embarked on a songwriting career before forming The Blackberry Bushes.

Callaghan

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When Callaghan moved from London to Atlanta during the summer of 2010, she was still a relatively unknown name in the States. A singer/songwriter whose music blurred the edges between pop, adult contemporary and Americana, she had been drawn to Atlanta by Shawn Mullins, who’d agreed to produce her first album. It was a classic story of taking risks, of willingly throwing your life into upheaval in order to chase your dreams. Callaghan’s debut album, Life In Full Colour, was the culmination of that journey. Its 12 songs introduced Callaghan’s eclectic and dynamic style – shades of folk, country, rock and pop combined into a seamless fusion of feeling and melody. The songs on her second album, A History of Now, reflect moments and experiences from her own life, as well as stories that people have shared with her. “Who Would I Be,” one of the album’s many highlights, pays tribute to her fans, thanking them for allowing her music to enter their lives and for enabling her to do what she loves. “Crazy Beautiful Life”

8 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

BY JAMES

CASSARA

In addition to Raymond, the band features Midwesterner Jakob Breitbach (fiddle), who has been in the band since it began touring in 2009. They are joined by Daniel Ullom (mandolin), Forrest Marowitz (upright bass), and Alex Genova (banjo). The various members share Raymond’s thirst for music and knowledge of it. Breitbach holds a degree in Jazz Violin (Cornish College of The Arts), while Ullom has learned from a lifelong immersion in bluegrass. Marowitz has a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Colorado College, and Genova, the newest member, joined this summer, fresh from banjo studies at Berklee College of Music. It would be difficult to name a better educated band! Since its infancy – and through a few changes along the way – the group’s goals have remained steadfast. “We want to move people in their hearts like Gillian Welch, and in their bodies like The Infamous Stringdusters,” explains Raymond, who has watched the group mature over time. “Like our thorny namesake, the blackberry bush, we have taken root, and we are growing, growing, growing.” Riding on a strong, second wind, The

BY

MELISSA FARINA

— the album’s lead single — celebrates the joys found in the sheer unpredictability and exuberance of life. “Best Year” — a re-recording of a bouncy, breezy song that also apCallaghan peared on Life in Photo: Scott Lowden Full Colour — is a seize-the-day anthem aimed at anyone who’s longed to “tear up the rulebook, leave it all behind... and find some bluer skies.” Her pioneering coast-to-coast house show tour in 2013 secured a multi-page feature in Billboard Magazine, where they credited her with “helping reshape the business of touring, if not music consumption entirely.” www.callaghansongs.com IF YOU Callaghan, Friday, September 11 at 8 GO p.m. $12 adv./$15 door. The Altamont

Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets and show times call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com.

The Blackberry Bushes Stringband

Blackberry Bushes Stringband has released a new album, Three Red Feathers, a collection of original songs that explore “a theme of impermanence and imperfection” (see review in this issue of Rapid River). The band’s intent may best be summed up by the mantra “After you aim, you gotta let it go.” That’s precisely what The Blackberry Bushes Stringband has done and to this point it’s a philosophy that has served them remarkably well.

IF YOU The Blackberry Bushes Stringband on GO Tuesday, September 29 at 5 p.m. Isis

Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. For more details, call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

Lauren Shera on Tour with Mikaela Davis Shera, who moved to Nashville the day after the final recording session for Gold and Rust, wrote the album as a musical farewell to her home state of California. “Making the record and finishing it, Lauren Shera knowing that Photo: Alysse Gafkjen I was about to be leaving, inspired some of the songs,” explains Shera. IF YOU GO: Lauren Shera, Mikaela Davis, Wednesday, September 30 at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets and showtimes call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com


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fine art John Mac Kah

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PAINTING ALL OVER, HERE AND THERE

Weekly, weather permitting, John Mac Kah and a group of dedicated students, meet to paint on location from the French Broad River to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Mac Kah has painted views of Cold Mountain in Haywood County over 30 times since 2000 when he moved into his studio on Riverside Drive, at Cotton Mill Studios. “Once you identify Cold Mountain’s peak, it’s hard to miss. It keeps cropping up, but sometimes it’s inaccessible and hard to find a place set up. I’ve driven all over looking for vantage points. Sometimes, it seems as if the mountain is playing hide and seek.” Plein-air painting, originally studies for larger work, came into its own with new pigments, tube paints and better brushes in the early 18th century and is often equated with Impressionism. In practice, it began earlier. The term simply means in “open air.” Train travel got artists out and away from smoky cities, and American painters were documenting the New World using techniques of observation and rendering in the Dutch tradition. A landscape might serve as a window full of light that would glow in lamplight. Hudson River painters were equally interested in the technical issues of atmospheric effects and the new colors but handled oils in a different way. Their goal was to create luminescence building layers and glazing. Sargent and Whistler, both Americans in Europe played an im-

Workshop & Harvest Dinner Chestnut harvest farm dinner at Addison Farms Vineyard, following pleinair workshop on Sunday, October 11. Come to paint, then stay for wine and an amazing dinner. Friday, Saturday & Sunday, October 9, 10 & 11 – Vineyard Plein-Air Workshop from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily demos, discussion, color mixing, and individual critiques. Great autumn views. Catered picnic lunch. Discounts on wine purchases. Deposit option available; due by September 15. Friday, October 9 – Wine tasting at 4 p.m. Free for workshop participants. Sunday, October 11 – Harvest Dinner at 5 p.m. Ticketed event. Register for the workshop and learn more at JohnMacKah.com For more details about Addison Farms Vineyard, located in Leceister, visit www.addisonfarms.net

portant part for both sides of the Atlantic in the later evolution of moody, smoky and expressionistic effects of Tonalism. With the Civil War and the Cold Mountain Clouds, painting by John Mac Kah recession that followed, southern paintings were relatively “He was accustomed to emerge... carrying a large easel... and rare. Winslow Homer then suddenly to plant himself down nowhere in particular, travelled to Florida behind a barn, opposite a wall, in the middle of a field. The and Cuba. Sargent was other painters were all astonished at Sargent’s never ‘selecting’ invited to the Biltmore a point of view, but he explained it in his half-articulate way. House and painted His object was to reproduce precisely whatever met his vision portraits of the famwithout the slightest previous ‘arrangement’ of detail; the painter’s business being, not to pick and choose, but to render ily and of Frederick the effect before him, whatever they may be.” Law Olmstead who designed the grounds ~ Sir Edmund Gosse, and gardens in 1898. on John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) It is a sympathetic portrait of an old man leaning on a cane, blending into the rhododendrons and mountain skyline. In John Mac Kah’s studio and pleinair classes, students are encouraged to learn ‘the painter’s craft’, the DIY of oil painting. They prepare oil-varnish mediums, their own panels and canvas and to fuse oil and acrylics for some special effects. The intent is to take advantage of oils longevity and luminosity. “Some people have asked me if oils are toxic. All paints can have components that can be harmful. I teach good practice in use of traditional materials all derived French Broad by John Mac Kah. from nature…sourced from wood, earth, plants and animals. Safe handling is common sense. We recycle and dispose of waste materials with respect for the environment. And when we paint on site, we don’t leave trash or trespass.” He maintains a busy weekly schedule of studio classes in all levels from drawing to still life, and weekend workshops. Saturday is plein-air day and open to all levels. We are excited to have Alisa teaching after-school classes for children over 10. To view Kah’s paintings, drop by The Grand Bohemian Gallery, 11 Boston Way in Biltmore Village, or visit www. grandbohemiangallery.com John Mac Kah, fine artist. For a complete class schedule and portfolio, visit www.JohnMacKah.com

IF YOU The Cotton Mill, where John’s GO studio is located, is having an open

house party for a new mural on Friday, September 18 from 6-9 p.m. There will be live music and food. All are welcome to attend.

John Mac Kah Cotton Mill Studios River Arts District Asheville 122 Riverside Dr., 28804 828 225-5000 www.johnmackah.com

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 9


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Case Garden Designs is anticipating the arrival of the annual NC Apple Festival, held over Labor Day weekend in downtown Hendersonville.

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We invite you to come see our selection of garden & patio decor, decorative accents, unique gifts, and more. In store Labor Day sales will be going on throughout the festival which runs September 4th through September 7th!

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514 N. Main Street • Hendersonville, NC HT 828-698-4888 • anita@spiritfeather.com Facebook/AllNationsTrading • www.SpiritFeather.com

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Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar NEW Exotic Menu Items

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Gift Certificate With Purchase of $30 or more. With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 9/1/15.

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3 Biltmore Ave.

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885

437 N. Main St.

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Case Garden Designs 530 N. Main Street, Hendersonville • (828) 697-1300


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HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock Open Studio Tour of Henderson County SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 & 20

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Self-guided free tour of studios throughout Henderson County NC The 2015 annual Open Studio Tour of Henderson County NC will be held the third weekend of September, the 19th & 20th, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. This free self-guided tour features fine art and fine craft studios throughout Henderson County. Artists’ studios will be open with their latest artwork to view and purchase with many studios featuring visiting artists.

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DAVID VOORHEES

A preview of work by artists on the Open Studio Tour of Henderson County can be seen from 5-8 p.m., Thursday, September 17, during Rhythm & Brews in downtown Hendersonville, a free event with live music held in the Azalea Lot adjacent to King street between 3rd and 4th Avenues. A sample of work by each of the artists on the tour will be displayed. There will also be an art raffle featuring works donated by tour artists.

Keith Berner

Original works in painting, sculpture, pottery, jewelry, fiber and metal arts, woodworking and glass will be offered by artists located in studios on four art corridors from Downtown Hendersonville: North off Hwy 25 N; South into Flat Rock and Zirconia; Southwest on Kanuga/Crab Creek; and West on 5th Avenue/Laurel Park as well as 64 West Horse Shoe. The Art League of Henderson County is a major tour sponsor. Open Studio Tour guide booklets will be available early August in the Henderson County Travel and Tourism Center and many locations throughout Henderson county. The Tour is also available on line at www. OpenStudioTourHC. com. For more Susan Webb-Tregay information email openstudiotourofHC@gmail. com.

Janet Leazenby

Barbara Wilcox IF YOU Open Studio Tour of GO Henderson County, Saturday and

Meghan Bernard

Sunday, September 20-21, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Visit www. openstudiotourhc.com. Preview, Thursday, September 17 from 5-9 p.m. in the Azalea Parking lot, along King Street between 3rd and 4th in downtown Hendersonville.

www.thewrinkledegg.com • 828-696-3998

It’s a Great Day When You Get a Treat from the Wrinkled Egg Southern American Folk Art Eclectic Gifts & Accessories Great Stuff for Kids Antique Furniture Fine Reproductions Summer Camp Care Packages

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Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Diary of a Teenage Girl  Short Take: The sexually frank story of a 15 year old girl in 1976 who has an affair with her mother’s 35 year old boyfriend.

REEL TAKE: Critics are singing the praises for Marielle Heller’s indie darling Diary of a Teenage Girl. The film, based on Phoebe Gloeckner’s semi-autobiographical graphic novel, takes place in 1976 San Francisco. It tells the story of Minnie, a fifteen year old girl who readily and eagerly has an affair with her mother’s 35 year old boyfriend. This is, of course, a terrible idea and has damaging consequences, but make no mistake, this young woman is no one’s victim. And that, more than anything else, is why this film succeeds. Be assured, this coming of age story is a

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Girl makes no apologies for its blunt tone. Instead, it thrives on it. The film is not for everyone. In fact, if you’ve already cringed a bit while reading this, you may want to skip it altogether. Minnie (Bel Powley) is an artistically inclined young woman with a seemingly healthy curiosity about sex (After her initiation however, it becomes more of an insatiable preoccupation). She lives with her mother (Kristen Wiig) and younger Kristen Wiig, Bel Powley, and Alexander Skarsgard in sister (Abby Wait). Since divorcing her Marielle Heller’s The Diary of a Teenage Girl. uptight father, her mother is letting loose; let’s just say she’s ‘embracing the journey of sexual awakenings unlike anything ‘70s. She loves her daughters but, somewhat you’ve ever seen. To say this film is sexually adrift in a smoke-filled and/or boozy haze, frank is an understatement. To say that it is she’s hardly a role model for Minnie. When squirm inducing is fair. Diary of a Teenage

THE MONTHLY REEL There’s No Escape from the Diary of a Teenage Girl… U.N.C.L.E., please!

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Greetings and salutations dear readers! This is Professor Kaufmann doing the honors for the Monthly Reel this month. We have a rather odd but interesting array of movies for your consideration. This month I reviewed the highly regarded but remarkably intense psychological character study The Gift. Writerproducer-director Joel Edgerton somehow found the time to act in this as well and does a masterful job in all four departments. Then there’s Guy Ritchie’s stylish reboot of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. Finally, my personal pick of the month is the not highly regarded but remarkably intense Owen Wilson actioner, No Escape. My DVD pick, Java Heat, was inspired by this film. Michelle tackles the very controversial and no-holds-barred Diary of a Teenage Girl, the German post World War II film, Phoenix, and the fascinating End of the Tour, about a Rolling Stone interview with American writer David Foster Wallace. Her DVD pick is Noah Baumbach’s

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appropriate, as autumn is just around the corner. Among the anticipated releases are A Walk in the Woods with Robert Is Johnny Depp Whitey Bulger or Redford and Nick Nolte midlife crisis comedyHunter S. Thompson? We’ll find (September 4), a return drama While We’re Young. out in Black Mass. to his roots for M. Night His new movie, Mistress Shyamalyn in The Visit America just opened. (September 11), Johnny The HFS lineup this Depp as Whitey Bulger month will feature the in Black Mass, and the George Burns comedyharrowing 3-D/IMAX drama Going in Style, adventure epic Everest Paul Newman and Joanne (September 18). Finally Woodward in The Long, there is Roland EmmHot Summer, The Devil erich’s take on the birth & Daniel Webster, and of the Gay Rights moveMerchant-Ivory’s The White ment with Stonewall Countess. AFS has just (September 25). shown Nickelodeon and has That’s it for this scheduled Bliss, the original month. Even in this age 1934 Imitation of Life, the Robert Redford and Nick Nolte of the stream and the original The Front Page take A Walk in the Woods. download, nothing beats from 1931, and The Bank seeing a film up on the Dick with W.C. Fields. The big screen, so get out there and experiBudget Big Screen feature at the end of the ence a movie the way it was meant to be month is The Third Man experienced. It looks like a good month ahead regarding new movies as the summer blockbuster fare Until next month, enjoy the show! gives way to more thoughtful fare, which is

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Charlotte’s boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard) is so easily seduced by young Minnie, this too shows little guidance and a distinct lack of moral compass. And yet all of this unfolds without judgment. We learn much of Minnie’s story through her diary, an audio diary. Armed with her portable cassette deck and a microphone, she records her thoughts and musings, her insecurities and her epiphanies. A budding cartoonist, Minnie takes inspiration from Aline Kominsky-Crumb. Often accompanying Minnie’s audio diary are animated, almost doodled embellishments, all of which bring warmth, levity and a likeability to polarizing subject matter. The graphic elements also serve Minnie’s journey of personal and artistic discovery. Working through her personal exploits, Minnie becomes remarkably clear in her sense of self and purpose. I’m thinking Gloeckner’s source material contained this interesting mix of sexual and emotional rawness which Heller and her cast could really dig their teeth into. The result is a refreshingly honest and eyeopening film. I confess I found myself prey to double standards; would I have found it half as jarring if this story had been about a 15 year old boy? Probably not. Bel Powley as Minnie is a pure and total revelation. Heller could not have made a better casting call there. Wiig also turns in a fine performance and Skarsgard elicits a surprisingly tender performance – something one would not necessarily expect given the circumstances. The Diary of a Teenage Girl is not for everyone, but it is a cinematic ground breaker. It’s wonderfully raw and real. Rated R for strong sexual content including dialogue, graphic nudity, drug use, language and drinking - all involving teens. Review by Michelle Keenan

The End of the Tour 1/2

Short Take: The five-day interview in 1996 between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed author David Foster Wallace.

REEL TAKE: The End of the Tour is surprisingly and wonderfully riveting. However, in Movies continued on page 13


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Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segel star as Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace in The End of the Tour.

the interest of full disclosure, there is a part of me that wonders if people with a penchant for the pen and literary aspirations find this more interesting territory than others. It would make sense. The film is nothing more than the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace. It’s nothing but an ongoing dialogue between two young men — two young writers in very different places. One of whom is in a very enviable position and one who’s doing the envying. Jesse Eisbenberg plays David Lipsky, the Rolling Stone reporter who scored a groundbreaking interview with novelist David Foster Smith (played atypically by Jason Segel) upon the publication of his much lauded novel Infinite Jest. The interviews take place during the last days of Foster’s book tour. I confess I fully expected The End of the Tour to be a little pretentious, especially with the twitchy and sometimes whiny Jesse Eisenberg; but instead of getting a film that takes itself altogether too seriously, the audience is treated to something so wonderfully done it seems utterly organic. The two men engage in a wily dance with one another — Wallace not wanting to be perceived as being too full of himself, and Lipsky wanting to get the story, but also wanting Wallace to like him and see him as a peer. The two share great moments of camaraderie, angst and vulnerability, but both remain guarded to a certain degree. Written by Donald Margulies (Dinner With Friends) and directed by James Ponsoldt (The Spectacular Now), the conversation is intelligent and insightful. It is as prodigiously observant as Foster’s writing. Segel plays way against type here and turns in a pitch perfect performance. His portrayal is tinged with an inescapable sadness due to Wallace’s suicide in 2008. Eisenberg takes his adeptness for playing contorted, conflicted characters to new heights with a simmering resentment and simultaneous admiration for his subject. The End of the Tour really is one this year’s must see movies. Rated R for language, including some sexual references. Review by Michelle Keenan

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No Escape 

Short Take: Surprisingly intense actionadventure flick about an American family’s attempt to stay alive after an unspecified Southeast Asian uprising suddenly forces them into hiding.

REEL TAKE: I fully expected that I would enjoy No Escape despite the lukewarm reviews it has received from some critics. I considered the source of the reviews along with the genre and the performers and figured that it would be money well spent. What I didn’t expect was how surprisingly good and remarkably intense No Escape was. The opening pre-credits sequence sets the tone right away. A landmark deal between an American company and an unspecified Asian prime minister ends with his sudden death and the brutal demise of an associate. Quick cut to the title No Escape and then to the introduction of Jack Dwyer (Owen Wilson), his wife Annie (Lake Bell), and their two young daughters during a long plane ride to this unspecified country.

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action-adventure flicks, Don Siegel. 2) The characters of Owen Wilson and his family. They are innocents who are suddenly dropped into a world of chaos. We like them and can relate to them and we cheer their resourcefulness even when it is sometimes surprising and brutal. Wilson’s performance is remarkable as he shows an intensity which is very uncharacteristic of him. Lake Bell matches him every step of the way as his wife and Brosnan is sublime. This brings us to the controversial aspect of No Escape which is its xenophobia. The film was originally called The Coup which is a more accurate title though not nearly as effective hence the change. The original title does help to explain the actions of the mob. People who overthrow governments aren’t nice people no matter what their nationality (check out ISIS) and so their actions should be regarded as such. The film isn’t about ethnicities, it’s about survival for the country as well as for the family. If you enjoy white knuckle, pulse pounding, edge of your seat excitement, then this movie is a must. If you don’t and/or are swayed by political correctness then give No Escape a wide berth. Is it illogical? Is it short on plot? Of course it is! Remember this movie was designed to be an audience thrill ride and on that score it succeeds brilliantly. Rated R for violence including a sexual assault and for language.

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probably the most interesting in terms of the aftermath of the war. Regardless of individual mindset and circumstances, all three characters are rather like the city itself; they are shells. They are shadows of their former selves. Also interesting to note, even though Nelly and Johnny were musicians before the war, there is very little music in the film. What music you do hear is scene specific, not a score. This tact is appropriate and effective. Writer/director Christian Petzold (Barbara) has crafted a far fetched but engrossing and even poignant story. The characters and Movies continued on page 14

Review by Chip Kaufmann

Phoenix 1/2 British operative Pierce Brosnan and frightened father Owen Wilson desperately try to find a way out for his family in No Escape.

Once there, they discover things in their hotel don’t work and that something is definitely wrong. While out to get a newspaper Jack witnesses a rebel mob grabbing foreigners and executing them on the spot. He races back to the hotel to get his family and they try escaping to the roof before an ever growing mob reaches them. Forced to jump to the building next door, they begin a mad scramble to keep “10 steps ahead” as Jack puts it. Aiding them is a seemingly down and out Englishman (an effortlessly charismatic Pierce Brosnan) who is actually a British operative who explains what the uprising is and why they are caught up in it. Each escape from the mob becomes more and more harrowing until we reach the final showdown that involves Jack, the mob leader, and his children. Two things raise No Escape above the average action-adventure fare we’ve become used to. 1) The movie is technically accomplished with crisp editing, a skillful and subdued soundtrack and lots of hand held camera footage that adds to the tension without becoming too much as in The Hurt Locker. The solid no-nonsense direction by John Erick Dowdle (who made the effective, low budget horror film Devil) recalls an earlier master of

Short Take: A Hitchcockian tale of mystery and intrigue unfolds when a concentration camp survivor returns home, unrecognized by her husband, in an effort to find out if he was the person who betrayed her to the Nazis.

REEL TAKE: Phoenix is easily one of the best

films of the year so far. So intriguing, spellbinding and wonderfully atmospheric, one completely forgets that they are reading subtitles. Nelly Lenz (Nina Hoss) is a GermanJewish chanteuse who returns to post-war Berlin for reconstructive surgery, after being shot in the face and left for dead at Auschwitz. Nelly’s devoted friend Lene (Nina Kunzendorf) sees her through surgery and recovery and makes plans for their future. But Nelly longs to return to her husband Johnny and to the life they knew. Lene believes that Johnny is the person who betrayed Nelly to the Nazis. Lene roams the bombed streets of the city looking for Johnny. She finds him bussing tables at a bar aptly called Phoenix as it sits glowing atop the rubble. Johnny doesn’t recognize her but thinks she looks enough like his [presumed] dead wife that he can bring Nelly back from the dead and collect on her estate. Nelly goes along with the ruse, but will she win the love of her husband or catch a traitor? Nina Hoss and Ronald Zehrfeld turn in remarkable performances. Nina Kunzendorf gives a quietly strong performance; hers is

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

The Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Our four HFS movies this month feature the first teaming of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, a romantic drama from MerchantIvory set in 1930s China, a classic fantasy film on an American legend, and a comedy-drama about three elderly men who hold up a bank. September 6:

Going In Style

(1979) George Burns gives his best performance in this poignant comedy-drama of 3 elderly men who hold up a NYC bank and then go to Las Vegas to have one last good time. Art Carney and Lee Strasberg co-star. Directed by Martin Brest. September 13: The Long, Hot Summer (1958) Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward made their first appearance in this steamy, Southern drama that owes more to Tennessee Williams than to William Faulkner. Orson Welles, Lee Remick, Tony Franciosa, and Angela Lansbury co-star. Directed by Martin Ritt. September 20:

The Devil & Daniel Webster

(1941) Made the same year as Citizen Kane and at the same studio, this award winning fantasy recounts the story of a New Hampshire farmer who sells his soul to the Devil and winds up being defended by Daniel Webster at an infernal trial. Walter Huston and Edward Arnold co-star. Directed by William Dieterle. September 27:

The White Countess

(2005) This penultimate film from Merchant-Ivory is set in 1936 Shanghai and focuses on a family of white Russian émigrés and the blind British diplomat who aids them by opening a nightclub. Natasha Richardson and Ralph Fiennes co-star along with Vanessa & Lynn Redgrave. Directed by James Ivory.

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the setting make for a unique blend of deception, guilt and suspense. Phoenix is a well paced slow burn, leading to a simple but powerful ending. At press time Phoenix was playing at the Fine Arts Theatre in downtown Asheville. The film is in German with English subtitles. See it while you can. Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements and brief suggested material. Review by Michelle Keenan

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Java Heat”

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The Gift 

Short Take: Australian actor Joel Edgerton produced, co-wrote, directed, and stars in this tense psychological drama that is being marketed as a thriller.

REEL TAKE: The Gift is another one of those movies to be added to the list of films that I admire on many levels but did not enjoy (as opposed to films like A Clockwork Orange which I neither admired nor enjoyed). This doesn’t make it an unworthy film just one that I won’t be revisiting if I can help it.

September DVD Picks

Java Heat (2013)

Having thoroughly enjoyed No Escape (see my review this issue), I was immediately reminded of this little action flick from Indonesia that did decent business back in 2013. The setting is Southeast Asia, it has action to spare, and has the added bonus of a big name star (Mickey Rourke) in the plum role of the film’s reptilian villain. Java Heat is old school filmmaking recalling the medium budget international thrillers of the late 1960s and the early 1970s but retooled for the 21st century. It’s a well made crime thriller/ buddy movie with a touch of the exotic and an inside look at Indonesia’s peoples and its customs. The film opens with a suicide bombing at a lavish party that kills a Javanese Sultan’s daughter. An American graduate student (Kellan Lutz) and an Indonesian policeman (Ario Bayu) join forces to discover who is beyond the bombing. Turns out that the student is an undercover marine and the daughter isn’t really dead but is being held for ransom by a vicious criminal with ties to terrorists. The storyline may be predictable but the surprising use of split screen (echoes of Brian De Palma – remember Carrie?), a refreshing lack of computer generated effects, a normal running time and the exotic Indonesian locale make Java Heat an effective way to spend a couple of hours. Kellan Lutz as the American lead is more than adequate for his role. Kind of like a young Arnold Schwarzenegger minus the accent. He even looks great in the buff. An amusing joke even pokes fun at his having been in the Twilight series. Of course the villain in a film like this is the plum role and Mickey Rourke doesn’t disappoint. He even delivers several lines in Javanese. Java Heat isn’t a great film and has no illusions about being one. It is sim-

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ply good, old fashioned entertainment that effectively achieves its thrills for 1/10 the budget of a superhero blockbuster. In fact it had surprising staying power after I left the theater which only confirms the lesson that Hollywood needs to learn and that is… less is more.

While We’re Young (2014)

At press time, I have not yet seen Noah Baumbach’s latest film, Mistress America. I don’t know where that film will stack up for me at year’s end, but earlier this year I was quite taken with his coming of middle-age story While We’re Young. If you missed it in theatres, you may want to check it out now on DVD. It will likely end up on a number of ten best lists this year, including mine. While We’re Young tells the story of a documentary filmmaker (Ben Stiller) in his mid-forties who’s at an impasse in his life. Josh is suffering a creative roadblock professionally and personally. He and his wife Cornelia (Naomi Watts) are adrift and slightly deadened as they enter midlife. Their friends have morphed into parental/ family units, while they remain childless. Josh and Cornelia are the kind of couple who talk about doing great things but never actually do them. So when they meet a young 20-something couple who embody the people they used to be and the people they aspire to be, their lives are reinvigorated. Jamie (Adam Driver) is an aspiring documentary filmmaker who admires Josh’s

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Australian actor Joel Edgerton, who is best known for the first two Star Wars movies along with the recent Baz Luhrman version of The Great Gatsby, pulls off the Orson Welles hat trick of writing, producing, directing as well as starring in this harrowing psychological drama which is being marketed as a home invasion thriller but is much, much more. Simon and Robyn Cullen (Jason Bateman, Rebecca Hill) relocate from Chicago to LA and everything seems to be ideal. Simon Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “While We’re Young” earlier work. His wife Darby (Amanda Seyfried) makes boutique ice cream. They are consummate hipsters. The contrasts between the Millennial couple and the Gen-X couple are stark, noteworthy, even comical and ironic. As can be expected, all is not what it seems. But, it’s through the whole journey with Darby and Jamie that Josh and Cornelia find their own truth. Baumbach could have let the story just be a personal coming-of- middle-age story. Because Josh and Cornelia inhabit the world of documentary filmmaking, that forum allows Baumbach to debate editorial and ethical integrity of documentary filmmaking in today’s on-demand, always streaming, and constantly connected world. The exploration of that truth and that dialogue seems like an entirely different concept better saved for another story altogether, but instead serves and enhances the primary story beautifully. I like Ben Stiller, always have. But for many his performance in While We’re Young will be a revelation. He and Baumbach previously collaborated on Greenburg, a good but cynical work (a little age is working to everyone’s advantage here). Naomi Watts and Amanda Seyfried both turn in terrific performances. Charles Grodin livens things up a bit as Cornelia’s father, and The Beastie Boys’ Adam Horowitz has a plum little role as one of Josh and Cornelia’s friends who has recently had children. For me the real revelation was Adam Driver, who worked with Baumbach on Frances Ha and has gained notoriety on the HBO show Girls. My only real issue with the film comes at the very end of the story, but fortunately the final shot throws even that plot point into question and in doing so quelled my aggravation at a possibly contrived ending and, instead, left a smile on my face.


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The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

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Short Take: Guy Ritchie’s reworking of the 1960s TV show has its plusses and minuses but overall it proved to be worth the price of the ticket.

A former classmate (Joel Edgerton) with malice on his mind spies on his old high school "friend" and his wife in The Gift.

then runs into Gordo (Edgerton), a former high school acquaintance that he can’t seem to recall. Gordo then starts presenting them with “welcoming” gifts that become more and more elaborate. After a dinner at Gordo’s home ends badly, things begin to get out of hand. The film starts to reveal more and more about the principal characters with each revelation becoming darker and darker. As with all good psychological studies, things turn out to be very different from what we were first led to believe. The ending is very unsettling. To say more would be giving too much away as The Gift is a movie designed to be experienced rather than explained. Edgerton has crafted a remarkable little film that starts off as something rather conventional and then morphs two or three times into something else while never losing sight of what it started out to be. As has been pointed out elsewhere, the film has a very European feel to it. It delves much deeper into the mindset of its characters than a conventional thriller would. It is these background excursions that raise the movie way above the norm. Think of a home invasion movie as directed by Ingmar Bergman. All the expected thriller tricks are here from quick edits and barely perceptible camera movements to sinister music and enigmatically menacing performances especially from Jason Bateman who reveals his true self as the movie progresses. Writerdirector Edgerton doesn’t overdo his part as the catalyst of the movie’s ever increasing tension. Rebecca Hall, who starts out as the most conventional character, also reveals more layers than we are expecting. The film is so well made that I’m sorry to report that, in the end, I didn’t like it. It has nothing to do with the mechanics of the movie which are practically flawless, it’s with the storyline. It’s dark and disturbing. The writer O.Henry said on his deathbed, “Leave the light on, I don’t want to go home in the dark.” While I am hopefully not on my deathbed, as I get older I find myself more and more in need of lighter rather than darker endings. Rated R for language (and that’s it). Review by Chip Kaufmann

REEL TAKE: I was in junior high school back in 1964 when the original Man from U.N.C.L.E. premiered on NBC. It was originally in black and white as were the majority of TV shows back then and was designed to capitalize on the recent success of the Sean Connery James Bond films. In fact the original concept was by none other than Ian Fleming himself who came up with the character of Napoleon Solo. The series ran for four seasons (through 1968).

Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) joins forces with Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) in the stylish reboot of The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Taking a page from England’s The Avengers series (before the comic book super heroes), U.N.C.L.E. featured a partnership rather than a single spy. Napoleon Solo was played by Robert Vaughan and his partner was a Russian agent named Ilya Kuryakin played by Scottish actor David McCallum (still working today at the age of 82 in NCIS). It was the height of the Cold War and the collaboration between the two men drove the show. For his reboot, Guy Ritchie wisely decided to set the movie in the era of the original series (the 1960s) which gives him numerous opportunities to evoke that period through fashions, popular music and the like. He does a good job of not overdoing it. The movie is actually a prequel telling us how the organization U.N.C.L.E. (United Network Command for Law & Enforcement) came into being. The year is 1963. Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) is a former professional thief now working for the CIA. He arranges the successful escape of Gaby Teller (Alicia Vikander) daughter of a Nazi collaborator from East Berlin despite the best efforts of KGB agent Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer). He is then ordered by his superior to join forces with Kuryakin who is ordered by his superior to work with Solo and Gaby in retrieving a stolen computer disc which contains information on how to build a nuclear bomb. The principal villains are an Italian

brother and sister (Elizabeth Debicki and Luca Calvani) and Gaby’s Uncle Rudi (Sylvester Groth) who have already built a bomb and intend to deliver it for deployment. The bulk of the movie consists of the good guys infiltrating the island fortress (of course there’s an island fortress) and keeping the villains from getting away with it. Since this is set in the early 1960s as well as an old school espionage yarn, we know they’ll succeed. That’s not important, what’s important is how they do it. Young Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki is a cool and stylish villainess with amusing support from character actor Sylvester Groth (his demise is especially memorable). Hugh Grant, in the old Leo G. Carroll role of Alexander Waverly, makes what is essentially a cameo appearance as does Jared Harris as Solo’s CIA boss although both make the most of their limited appearances. My big problem with U.N.C.L.E. is that the primary element behind the old TV show, the chemistry between Solo and Kuryakin, is missing. Armie Hammer makes for an engaging Kuryakin but Henry Cavill’s Napoleon Solo falls flat. He looks the part but his glibness is ineffective and his scenes with Hammer are easily won by Armie. Guy Ritchie directs with his usual flair, though not as much as he displayed in the two Sherlock Holmes movies, and keeps the film interesting while moving it along at a decent pace. I enjoyed it, but not as much as I was hoping to, and I don’t see myself paying it a return visit. Rated PG-13 for action violence, suggestive content, and partial nudity. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Independent Films Movies That Matter – A new series held on the second Thursday of each month will screen movies that look at complex and emotional issues faced by the modern world. On Thursday, September 10 catch Beyond Right & Wrong at 7 p.m. $6. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-0816, or visit www. whitehorseblackmountain.com. Twin Rivers Media Festival – The latest in independent features, documentaries, short and animated films. The free festival takes place Friday, September 11 at 8 p.m., and Saturday, September 12 from 12 noon until 6 p.m. at the Phil Mechanics Building, 109 Roberts St. in Asheville’s River Arts District. (828) 273-3332, www. twinriversmediafestival.com.

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the Society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special Members Only events and screenings. September 1: Nickelodeon (1976) Leo Harrigan is a lawyer and Buck Greenway is a cowboy and gunman. Both are sent to California to shut down a renegade group of silent-movie makers but find themselves vying for the affections of the leading lady. Stars Ryan O’Neal, Burt Reynolds, Brian Keith, John Ritter and Tatum O’Neal. Directed by Peter Bogdanovich. September 8: Bliss (1985) Harry Joy, an advertising executive who is known for his ability to tell stories, dies and goes to hell, or rather a hellish version of the world he knew. Stars Barry Otto, Lynette Curran and Helen Jones. Directed by Ray Lawrence. September 15: Imitation of Life (1934) Two single mothers, one black, one white, strike it rich in the pancake business while raising their daughters. As the years pass their relationships with their daughters are strained. Stars Claudette Colbert, Louise Beaver and William Warren. Directed by John M. Stahl. September 22: The Front Page (1931) Hildy Johnson is on the verge of getting married and retiring from Walter Burns’ Chicago newspaper, when he agrees to cover the execution of convicted cop killer Earl Williams. Stars Adolphe Menjou, Pat O’Brien and Mary Brian. Directed by Lewis Milestone. September 29: The Bank Dick (1940) Egbert Sousè has comic adventures as a substitute film director and unlikely bank guard. Stars W.C. Fields, Cora Witherspoon and Una Merkel. Directed by W.C. Fields.

BUDGET BIG SCREEN FEATURE Tickets $6 for AFS members, $8 general. September 30:

The Third Man

(1949) Pulp novelist Holly Martins travels to shadowy, postwar Vienna, only to find himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, Harry Lime. Stars Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten and Alida Valli. Directed by Carol Reed. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 15


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The course guides the participant through the process of business planning and covers the essentials of a craft artisan’s business model. Participants emerge with a business plan tailored for the economic success of their creative product, and will receive one free hour of technical assistance from the Asheville Area Arts Council and participating partners . The course is enhanced by in-depth workshops on related subjects, as well as introductions to area supporting organizations and finance opportunities. Tonya Snider, of TenBiz Inc. teaches the course and utilizes the NC REAL’s unique facilitation technique known as Action Learning. Action learning, REAL style, means learning by doing. What sets the REAL approach apart from others is well over 100 “action learning” activities that students complete individually, or in groups. The activities are directly related to running a small business, such as how to determine

16 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

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Good Solutions are Great. Now Do One More. Even if one has a great visual solu-

Key Learnings, 2015, illustration by Greg Vineyard

Know the Client. Not what they had for dinner, necessarily, but rather, what their business, mission, and core values are about. Know the story, the assignment and the details. Do the Measured Things. By this I mean follow the rules first, then adjust flexible items as needed for balance. In art and design, this literally has to do with measuring, grids, spacing and more. The origin of this thought

Business Planning Course

The Asheville Area Arts Council is breaking ground with a unique 8-week business course for artists and creative entrepreneurs.

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is that one must wrangle proper techniques before breaking the rules.

Many things we encounter on the Internet simply aren’t true (say it isn’t so!), but I recently saw a photo joking about how artists need to pay attention to where they set their dirty brush water versus where they set their coffee cup. moments and days, to see if we’re staying in the flow of what we Do. Here are a few musings about some things I’m learning in my process. While I focus on the creative world, sometimes topics like these could cross over into other areas of work and life. Maintain a Creative Environment. I surround myself with stimuli that inspires me, like favorite music, and movies (I have to warn you: when re-watching the Jurassic Park series, pace yourself. Turns out a little dinosaur goes a really long way.). I also keep up my reference library of art and artist books, periodicals, tear sheets and design samples. Stay in Touch. Like-minded professionals can provide engaging feedback, be a source for activities and opportunities, and spark inspiring new thoughts. Even the most solitary of folks needs contact with the other humans. Take Stock. Not just of supplies, but also of existing inventory. Sometimes idea files and older sketches can yield as much potential in new light as the neatly organized stacks of finished works. In any business, when a request comes in it helps to know what one has on-hand.

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FROM KLUTZY TO KEENLY-AWARE

That one is true for many a studio maven. This, along with topics like: “Are my hands clean before I touch the pretty, pretty (read: expensive) paper?” are simpler examples of things we get schooled about along the way. I also recently learned not to lean too hard on the front edge of my main drawing table. As I was picking up the 1,000 or so pieces of pastel that were no longer neatly organized in little drawers by color – and in color wheel order, no less – I was immediately certain that I’d only have to do that once. Other lessons are less physically comic, but are deeply important, like learning how to critique one’s work and progress without being critical, and how to stay in the creative zone regardless of what is going on around you. No matter the professions, hobbies or passions, it can be useful to regularly evaluate how things are going, what we’re absorbing as we bumble along. Once we get past some of the professional requirements, like establishing routine disciplines, following instructions, and engaging in regular self-promotion, there is room to drill-down a bit into the individual

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your breakeven point, or set the right price for a product in order to make a profit. Beginners and experienced entrepreneurs alike will draw powerful tools to adapt to a variety of needs.

Course Dates September 30 – November 18 from 2-5 p.m. February 9, 2016 – March 29 from 4-7 p.m. April 21, 2016 – June 9 from 3-6 p.m. The fee for the course is $445, which includes supplies. Scholarships (some up to 75%!) will be available for qualifying participants. For more information or to learn more about this exciting opportunity, please e-mail Johanna, program manager at johanna@ashevillearts.com or visit ashevillearts.com. IF YOU Business course for artists, September GO 30 - November 18. Classes held at the

Goodwill Career Center, 1616 Patton Avenue, Asheville. For details, or to register, call (828) 298-9023. Asheville Area Arts Council, 1 Page Ave. Suite 143A, Asheville. Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. (828) 258-0710, www.ashevillearts.com

tion immediately, come up with an alternate thought or two before narrowing the focus. It’s smoother to know we explored multiple avenues than to anxiously wonder if we should have. These are just a few thoughts out of dozens, which means there may be a Part II to this someday (and we can blame sequel-laden Jurassic Park if I expand to a Part III). In the meanwhile, in your field of work, what would be on your list? What bubbles up to the top as key understandings you can share with your peers, the things you want to work on, and the achievements about which you feel most confident? We’re learning all the time. Growing. Advancing. Honing our skills. Even on a Klutz Day. One of the main things I’ve learned along the way is that this path can remain broad, with plenty of opportunities to dodge dinosaurs, look ahead, and enjoy the journey.

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

Colossal Cuts

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How do you make a print that is too big to fit on a press?

Use a steamroller, naturally! Look on in amazement as 18 local printmakers create giant block prints—36 x 36-inches and larger—using only their bare hands (and a steamroller). Hickey, entry 5 for The event will take PrintOcracy: Play! place in the parking lot adjacent to Asheville BookWorks in West Asheville. Prints will remain on view through November 25, 2015. IF YOU GO

Colossal Cuts takes place Saturday, September 19 between 1 and 5 p.m. You can also view PrintOcracy: Play! opening Friday, September 18 from 6-9 p.m. with live music. Asheville BookWorks, 428 ½ Haywood Rd., West Asheville.


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Virginia Pendergrass, Sandra Brugh Moore and Sahar Fakhoury will show new fall landscape paintings at their French Broad Artists studio in the River Arts District in September. All three artists paint plein air (outdoors in the open air) landscapes in beautiful Western North Carolina. Pendergrass and Fakhoury work in oil, and Moore primarily in water media. Their new works capture the beautiful warm colors of autumn very differently, and not just due to medium. Pendergrass comments, “Sandra and I paint with a plein air group called Mixed Nuts. Based on our paintings, I have often marveled that we were in the same location. I think a painting Autumn Pond, 8 x 10 in. oil painting is a reflection of by Virginia Pendergrass the artist’s eye, not the photographic reality of the scene. Artists’ feelings generated by memories and life experiences affect what is ‘seen’ by the artist and therefore emphasized, omitted or distorted in a painting.” All three agree that “painting plein air on a beautiful fall day is the best. The weather is cool, the colors are brilliant, and of course a picnic lunch is always fun.”  But plein air painting is not for the faint of heart.  At Slick Rock Lake, Moore says, “Originally I wanted to

ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

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paint more of the lake but the strong autumn winds encouraged me to find an area protected from the wind but in Autumn, 20 x 30 in. watercolor the warming sunby Sandra Brugh Moore shine. The values and colors worked, so the ‘feel’ of the day happened on the canvas.” The essence of plein air painting is capturing a “sense of place.” Pendergrass moved to North Carolina from Florida, where bright color and brilliant sunshine dominate. Gradually, she recognized the atmospheric beauty of Western North Carolina days with rain, low light in morning and evening, fog, and quiet clouds.   She explains, “Because I react strongly to color, my early fall paintings in North Carolina were shock waves of hot, saturated colors. I have gradually shifted toward muted colors with bright accents and less contrast in shadows and light, which to me are more reflective of the sense of place in Western North Carolina. ‘Autumn Pond’ has accents of color within an overall tonal quality, which expresses my experience on that quiet day at Beaver Lake.” Fakhoury has a different approach. She says, “I start paintings in plein air for shapes and color, and finish them in the studio, away from outdoor distractions, to develop my concept. The French Broad River and Blue Ridge Parkway are favorite painting spots. Long shadows and reflections in the water attract me.”

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More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

French Broad Artists

IF YOU New fall landscapes, on display September 1-30, GO Thursdays through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 4:30

p.m. The French Broad Artists Studio, 191 Lyman St. (Riverview Station) in the River Arts District. Directions at riverviewstation.com.

SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS

NEW STUDIO IN THE RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

Flamenco, 24 x 30 in. oil painting by Sahar Fakhoury www.sahar-art.com

For 3- hour Oil Painting Classes (all levels) with Sahar Fakhoury, call (828) 242- 4708

Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

Riverview Station #216 • South Entrance

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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191 Lyman St. • River Arts District • Asheville, NC

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Designer/Goldsmith

100 Cherry Street ~ Black Mountain 828.669.0065 | www.VisionsofCreation.com

Saturday, September 19

11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass 12 noon – Split Rail 1 p.m. – Firefly 2 p.m. – 35th Annual Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition 3 p.m. – J Creek Cloggers and the Ross Brothers

Sunday, September 20

12 noon – Level Ground Gospel 1 p.m. – Carol Rifkin and Friends 2 p.m. – Cole Mountain Cloggers with Carol Rifkin MB

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Will Hines demonstrates his coopering and craft.

Pamela Etheridge works with pine needles weaving small baskets.

tion: children, adults and professional. Sign up throughout the day to compete. Winners receive a trophy, Heritage Weekend poster, t-shirt, a Moon Pie, and bragging rights. During Heritage Weekend, learn from area experts about beekeeping, coopering, heritage toy making, natural dyeing, spinning, broom making and furniture making. Hands-on activities related to traditional crafts will be provided for all ages. Other highlights include sheep shearing demonstrations throughout the day on Saturday, and border collie demonstrations on Sunday. The Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center is the ideal place for Heritage Weekend with free parking, access to hiking trails and grassy areas for a picnic. Spend an early autumn weekend in WNC honoring and learning about crafts of yesteryear while enjoying the beauty of the region. Farmhouse BBQ’s food truck will be set up on the grounds of the Folk Art Center both days. IF YOU The 35th Annual Heritage Weekend GO at the Folk Art Center. Saturday,

Carol Rifkin and Friends

2:30 p.m. – Gospel Grass 3:30 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike

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A Celebration of Southern Appalachian Culture

Heritage Weekend Entertainment Schedule

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fine arts & crafts

This free festival sponsored by the Southern Highland Craft Guild features traditional music, dancing and heritage craft demonstrations. A highlight of the weekend is the 35th Annual World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition on Saturday, September 19 from 2-3 p.m. A whimmy diddle is an Appalachian mountain toy traditionally made from two Practicing for the sticks of rhododendron. World Gee Haw Notches are carved into Whimmy Diddle one stick and a propeller Competition. is attached to the end. The other stick is rubbed against the notches, causing the propeller to spin either gee (to the right) or haw (to the left). Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from the masters, and even participate in the competition. During the World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition contestants are judged on the number of rotations between gee and haw they can complete during a given time. They may also have to switch hands during the competition or whimmy diddle behind their backs. There are three divisions of competi-

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The 35th Annual Heritage Weekend will be held September 19-20 at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center.

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September 19 from 10-4 p.m., and Sunday, September 20 from 12-5 p.m. For more information, including a list of participating craftspeople and musicians, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC.


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In celebration of American Craft Week (October 2-11), Grovewood Gallery in Asheville presents Vessels of Merriment, an intoxicating exhibition of handcrafted drinking vessels by 25 artists from around the country.

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ASHLEY VAN MATRE

Moonshine Jug by Steve Hansen

This invitational art exhibit will feature more than 200 drinking vessels in a variety of mediums. Exhibiting artists will showcase works ranging from ceramic beer steins, tumblers, and tankards, to porcelain sake sets and decorative moonshine jugs. All vessels Beer Bear Stein on view will be available for sale. by Charlie Tefft “Whether you are looking for something special to sip from, or just appreciate One-of-aquality craftsmanship and unique or one-ofa-kind works, we encourage you to see this Sake Set kind works. show,” says Ashley Van Matre, marketing by Reiko Miyagi director at Grovewood Gallery. “Grovewood Gallery is also a participant of American Craft IF Week, and the kick-off for Vessels of MerriYOU Vessels of Merriment, opening ment will be one of many ACW festivities that GO reception, Saturday, October 3 from 3-6 p.m. at Grovewood Gallery. To will take place around the country in an effort learn more about Grovewood’s studio to enhance the knowledge and appreciation of artists, attractions, and upcoming events, visit handmade craft.” grovewood.com or call (828) 253-7651. The exhibition will be celebrated with an opening reception on Saturday, October 3 from 3-6 p.m. (free and open to the public). Several participating artists will be in attendance and special guests from Metro Wines Finding Senior Housing can be and Noble Cider (both sponsors of this event) will be on hand offering tastings of their complex, but it doesn’t have to be. products. Vessels of Merriment will remain on view through Sunday, December 31, 2015.

Exhibiting Artists

Kathryn Adams, Scot Cameron-Bell, Clancy Designs, Julie Covington, Kyle Carpenter, Megan Daloz, Marissa Domanski, John Geci, Lisa Gluckin, Erik Haagensen, Steve Hansen, Phil Haralam, In Blue Handmade, Mark Knott, Amber Marshall, Andrew Massey, Reiko Miyagi, Moxie & Oliver, Ronan Kyle Peterson, Helen Purdum, Justin Rothshank, Luba Sharapan, Dave Strock, Charlie Tefft, and Evelyn Ward.

(800) 520-9135

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About Grovewood Gallery

Grovewood Gallery is a family-owned, fine crafts destination that showcases traditional and contemporary crafts, all handmade by American artisans. The gallery is housed in the historic weaving and woodworking complex of Biltmore Industries, located adjacent to The Omni Grove Park Inn in North Asheville. In addition to the historic buildings, museums, and art offerings, visitors can enjoy outdoor sculpture gardens complete with picnic areas and panoramic views across the valley to the nearby Blue Ridge Mountains. A new restaurant is slated to open in the former Grovewood Café spot this fall. Free parking for Grovewood patrons is available on site.

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Judy Rentner, Landscape Artist

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One would think that after 40 years of painting a person would have the creative process nailed down, but such is not the case with Judy Rentner.

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Judy loves the fact that she is always learning, always finding new ways to express her ideas and her art. For many years she painted in watercolor, loving the fluidity of the medium, and in acrylics, enjoying the various experimental possibilities of the paint. She took workshops in both and taught workshops over the years in both media. Today Judy is focusing on using the palette knife and brush in oils. This has given her a new direction and a new

continued on page 38

Asheville Gallery of Art

CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

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www.janedesonier.com

janedesonier@aol.com 828-281-3577

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On display at the Asheville Gallery of Art Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

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www.joycepaints.com

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joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

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ELINOR BOWMAN

Works Available at: 7

Jce Schlapkohl

...oil painter

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16 College Street, Downtown Asheville 828.251.5796 • www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

JANE DESONIER

Works on display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Carlton Gallery, Banner Elk, NC

Painting by Judy Rentner

JUDY RENTNER

ASHEVILLE, NC

L A N D S C A P E O I L PA I N T E R

Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville, NC Northlight Studios, 357 Depot Street, Asheville, NC

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT:

Seve Sisters Gallery, Seven 117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC

Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District

Mahogany House Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville, NC Up Against the Wall Gallery 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

828-450-1104

828-255-7894 www.elinorbowman.com ebowman6@charter.net

www.Cher ylKeefer.com

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Works on display at Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 Patton, Asheville, and at Twigs & Leaves Gallery, Downtown Waynesville View online at ashevillegallery-of-art.com • Judyart@bellsouth.net


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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Renewal: Meditations on Nature

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Sandra Brugh Moore is Asheville Gallery of Art’s featured artist for September.

IF YOU Renewal runs September 1-30. GO An opening reception takes place

Moore’s watercolor and ink paintings focus on the patterns and lines of the natural world. “These works are products of a meditative process that transforms realist style into an organic, contemplative process,” says Magnolia, watercolor and ink Moore. Known by Sandra Brugh Moore. primarily as a watercolor artist, Moore is featuring new work that incorporates ink drawing.

September 4 from 5 to 8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, downtown Asheville. Mon. - Sat., 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 1-4 p.m. (828) 251-5796, ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

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Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

15 N. Lexington Ave.

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since 1992

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September Engagement Event: 10% off todd reed wedding band with purchase of todd reed engagement ring

N. Spruce St.

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Walnut St.

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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(828) 281-4044 Hilliard Ave.

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www.vandykejewelry.com

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com 63 Haywood Street • Downtown Asheville 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon - Sat 10:30 - 6 15

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Representing 145+ Artists, Primarily from Our Region

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Haywood Art Studio Tour 2015

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A self-guided driving tour of artist studios and creative centers in Haywood County.

Mike McKinney

Pixies, Angels, Gnomes… oh, my! Featuring Dolls by Charlie Patricolo Demonstration & Reception, 6-9PM during

Art After Dark, Friday, September 4 pg. 24

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

The 2015 Haywood Art Studio Tour includes 38 artists at 22 locations in central and north-central Haywood County. A wide range of artistic endeavors in all media and many expressions within each media category will be available for the public to experience. The tour will include nine clay artists, two fiber artists, nine wood artists, three jewelry artists, two glass artists, and seven two-dimensional artists working in watercolor, acrylic, oil, encaustic, and gold and silver leaf. Four mixed-media artists use a wide range of materials including wood, steel, leather, gourds, natural materials, paper, encaustic and clay. Two sculpture artists complete the roster making large scale steel sculptures and surrealistic construction incorporating found objects. Brochures of the tour, including maps, may be picked up at Haywood County Arts Council Gallery & Gifts on Main Street, Waynesville, and Art on Depot and Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden on Depot Street in Waynesville.

Kaaren Stoner

Becky Burnette

IF YOU Haywood Art Studio Tour, GO Friday, October 23, 10 to 5 p.m.,

and Saturday, October 24, 10 to 5 p.m. Studio Tour Show on display October 1-29 at Haywood County Arts Council Gallery & Gifts, 86 North Main Street, Waynesville. Opening reception Friday, October 2, 5 to 9 p.m. during Art After Dark. Gallery hours: Monday to Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Bench by Gernandt

Maps for the tour are available at www.haywoodarts.org. Phone the Haywood County Arts Council for more information, (828) 452-0593.

Mahogany House Art Gallery

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Mahogany House Art Gallery is proud to present new paintings by Waynesville artist Rick Hills.

painting. Often the stencils are plants, twigs, ferns, branches and found materials. Once these items are secured the colorful overspray is applied in many layers. Finally brushwork and images are painted to complete the concept. Hills will be demonstrating his latest painting style during Art After Dark on Friday, September 4. Please come by for refreshments, live music, and a good time.

Hills is known for his wide variety of techniques and painting styles. Currently he is exploring the many apPorchoir painting by plications of stenciling Rick Hills. within his paintings. His painting process is called Porchoir, meaning stenciling, from the French Post Impressionists. First the artist lays down an underIF YOU Rick Hills demonstration, Friday, painting with acrylic paints, sometimes GO September 4 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. applying texture and imagery into Mahogany House Gallery, 240 the base layer. Next, Hills selects his Depot Street, Frog Level, Waynesville. stenciling material and secures it to the Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228.

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WAYNESVILLE

The Tony Award Winning Musical, Company

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Now through September 6 at HART. HART wraps up the summer with one of Stephen Sondheim’s most celebrated musicals. Company opened August 14, and features one of the most stellar casts the theatre group has ever assembled. Steven Lloyd directs a cast that includes Daniel Hensley, Leslie Lang, Lyn Donley, Tabitha Judy, Kristen Hedberg, Mike Yow, Karen Covington, Charles Mills, Dwight Chiles, Strother Stingley, Stephen Gonya, Chelsea Gaddy, Madison Garris and Kirby Gibson. Kelli Brown Mullinix is the shows music director, with choreography by Shelia Sumpter. Company became a landmark and one of Sondheim’s most successful shows. Sondheim’s godfather was Oscar Hammerstein, and he learned from the master, using song to advance the story. The show concerns a single man and his married friends. Bobby can’t commit to a serious relationship but finds that he is everyone’s best friend. He is celebrating a birthday, and confronting the need to change. The show is funny and touching, classy and sophisticated, and filled with great music.

BY

STEVEN LLOYD

Mix, and Tomato Jam; or a vegetarian option with White Bean and Avocado in place of the turkey. The picnic also comes with Kettle Chips, a salted caramel brownie, and sparkling or flavored San Pellegrino water.

IF YOU HART presents Company, GO September 4 & 5 at 7:30 p.m.,

September 6 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $26 for Adults, $22 for Seniors, Students $13 (prices include sales tax). Special $8 discount tickets for Students on Sundays. Box Office Hours Tuesday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville. Call (828) 456-6322 or visit www. harttheatre.org.

Meet Featured Artist PAUL MALCOLM During Art After Dark Friday, August 7 from 6-9 • On display thru August & September

Burr Studio

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GALLERY OF AMERICAN ART & CRAFT

136 N. Main Street • Waynesville • 828-456-7400

the

mahogany house art gallery and studios

New Paintings by Rick Hills Demonstration during Art After Dark, 6-9pm Friday, September 4

240 Depot Street

pg. 24

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Waynesville

Historic Frog Level 828.246.0818

themahoganyhouse.com

HART’s production of Company features a stellar cast.

Company opened in 1970 on Broadway and was nominated for a record breaking fourteen Tony Awards, winning six. It was one of the first musicals to deal with adult themes. The original production was directed by Hal Prince and choreographed by Michael Bennett and starred Dean Jones. Jones recorded the cast album but left the show shortly after its premier. He was replaced by Larry Kert who was best known for his role as Tony in West Side Story. The show went on to a run of over 700 performances. Patrons can upgrade their Company experience by adding the Central Park Picnic to their ticket for an extra $15. Served one hour before the show, the “picnic” includes a French Baguette Sandwich with Turkey, Smoked Gouda, Lettuce

MOOSE CROSSING’S  

BURL WOOD GALLERY CUSTOM ~ LIVE EDGE ~ FURNISHINGS

AWARD WINNING Designs in AMERICAN Burl Wood

184 N. Main St.

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Downtown Waynesville

828-452-2550 www.burlgallery.com Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 23


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Veterinary Hospital • • • • • • •

Wellness Care Laser Therapy Digital Dental X-Ray Surgery Pain Management Boarding for Cats and Dogs Day Camp with Supervised Group Play for Dogs • Grooming

Carryout + Catering

Fresh Southern Homemade Meals & Desserts 828-550-2265

Dr. Brian H. Birthright, DVM

1092 N. Main Street • Waynesville, NC Mon-Sat 6am-2:30pm

Sun 7am - 2:30pm

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Twigs & Leaves Gallery presents works by renowned doll maker Charlie Patricolo. She will be demonstrating her creative technique during Art After Dark, Friday, September 4 from 6-9 p.m. Watch as she transforms fabric and trinkets into whimsical dolls full of creativity and delight using her amazing imagination. Stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music and indulge in the savory hors d’eurves. Calling all kids! Stop by the gallery prior to the Block Party on September 19 for Kids on Main. We have a special art project planned. IF YOU Twigs and Leaves GO Gallery, 98 North Main

Street, Waynesville. Hours: Mon-Sat. 10-5:30; Sun. 1-4. (828) 456-1940, www. twigsandleaves.com.

Whimsical dolls by Charlie Patricolo.

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www.mapletreevet.com

1855 Russ Ave., Waynesville

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Open Monday - Saturday • 828-452-5211

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FROG LEVEL WP WU

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70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721 WH

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Advertise with Rapid River Magazine pg. 36

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Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

24 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071


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Art After Dark

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The September edition of Art After Dark takes place Friday, September 4. Art After Dark transforms downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center, making it a perfect night to explore downtown’s galleries, restaurants and gift-shops. Festive Art After Dark flags designate participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery. Cedar Hill Studios, across from the old Courthouse, presents a demo by noted artist Ernestine Bucking and her “Romantic Realism” paintings. Come enjoy the demonstration. There will be wonderful music and dancing with the Steve Whiddon one man band outside; Lynn Hendrick plays keyboard inside. They’re serving great refreshments and representing the works and fabulous talent of 90 amazing artists.

writes: “Through my photography and pastels I try to capture a different perspective The Haywood and moment in time. County Arts There is beauty in all Council’s Gallery & things around us, we Gifts opens a new just have to be willing exhibit, Raising Fun, to really see.” on September 3. The Village Framer Participating artists presents the paintings from the Master Dancing Flowers, of meditative painter Gardeners will be photo by Christina Moore. Haidee Wilson. Haiddisplaying works of ee writes: “Each brush art that include the stroke acts as a mirror monarch butterfly. to my internal state. This show will help The quality of the raise awareness about brush stroke is therethe plight of the fore seen as reflecting monarch, includmy innermost vitality. ing their struggles to I use various media survive and the causes with this same focus of their possible exand intent, such as tinction. The opening sketches in charcoal, reception of Raising Painting by Haidee Wilson. pencil and watercolor, Fun takes place mixed media with Friday, September 4 acrylics, pastels, and now the richness of from 6-9 p.m. Come enjoy fine food oils on canvas – all self-taught.” and live music by the Junior Appalachian Musicians. Raising Fun will run from September 3-26. For more details, IF visit www.HaywoodArts.org YOU Art After Dark, Friday, September The Jeweler’s Workbench feaGO 4, downtown Waynesville. For tures the photography and pastels more details call Twigs and Leaves of Christina Moore, an artist truly at (828)456-1940 or find us online at connected with nature. Christina www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com.

Pawsitive Pup Beginnings

Buy Haywood for Innovative Farm-to-Table Menus Year Round!

The intoxicating smells and colors of fall make this the perfect time to visit Waynesville for Art After Dark.

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Six-week socialization course for puppies 6-20 weeks old. Socialization is critical in healthy puppies during this age. The Dog Door’s program focuses on building a relationship of trust, positive experiences and education to create a well-rounded adult dog. Your team of teachers includes Maple Tree Veterinary Hospital and Dog Camp staff, and members of the award-winning team at the Dog Door Behavior Center. We are working together to bring you a specialized program designed to create a solid foundation for your puppy. IF YOU Classes begin when 5-6 puppies GO have registered; maximum class

size of 8 puppies. Cost: $120. Classes held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Maple Tree Dog Camp.Call (828) 2469770 email campleader@mapletreevet.com to register. Visit mapletreevet.com.

BY JEANNIE

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SHUCKSTES

Southern food is less about any particular ingredient and more about a state of mind.

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

BY

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09 One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

pg. 24

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pg. 36

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TINA MASCIARELLI

menu in an unexpected way. The sweet floral notes add so much depth to classic Dijon vinaigrette and Appalachian cuiserves to create a nice sine is deeply rooted crust on grilled meats in our heritage—born Breathe new life into your when used as glaze. through centuries mealtime routine – experiment At this time of year, of “making do,” with local apples. experiment with local never wasting and apples. From baking seeing delicious opto eating varieties, local farms have a portunities everywhere. Incorporate flavor for every palate. Visit our Farm more seasonal ingredients into your Fresh blog at BuyHaywood.com for mealtime routine and enjoy an added recipes and seasonal updates, fresh from punch of color and flavor. the farms of Haywood County. There are so many ways to incorporate local ingredients into your menus year-round—from local honey to farm-fresh eggs, meats, poultry, Buy Haywood Market Development trout products, and preserved items. Project, c/o Haywood Advancement One way to breathe new life into Foundation, 28 Walnut St., Suite 4, your mealtime routine is to play with Waynesville, NC 28786. sweet and savory flavors. Following (828) 456-3737 are a few ideas. www.BuyHaywood.com Introduce local honey into your

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CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Didn’t it Rain MUSIC

Even though it’s taken Amy Helm a while to get around to making an album of her own, astute music fans have long been aware of her name and voice. As the daughter of the late great drummer/vocalist Levon Helm (her mom is singer/songwriter Libby Titus) Helm has been around music her entire life. She helped her late dad in assembling the legendary Midnight Ramble shows and has, for several years toured and recorded with her own band, the highly respected Ollabelle, a band that reveled in diverse genre crossing and world beat explorations. Helm carries that sense of daring in Didn’t It Rain, with results that show an artist whose inherent gifts—and there are plenty—have been honed by commitment and a keen listening ear. Found herein are elements of old time gospel, New Orleans funk, swamp, folk, country, soul, and pop, all garnished with a generous bit of R&B. In the hands of a lesser artist such expansive reach might have been a disaster but Helm and producer Larry Campbell (who worked extensively with her dad) keep things focused and tastefully deliberate. It doesn’t hurt that her associations in the music industry allow her to engage some of the best talent around, including Little Feat pianist Bill Payne, John Medeski, guitarist Jim Weider and, in one particularly moving gesture, the final work of her father, but what really sets Didn’t It Rain apart is Helm’s powerful but controlled voice and her exquisite taste in material. Drawing from such brilliant songwriters as Beth Nielsen Chapman, Mary Gauthier, and even reaching back in the catalog of Sam Cooke, Helm approaches each song as a separate piece, choosing her own voice that best fits each one, and arranging them with thoughtful care. There’s a lovely Muscle Shoals vibe within that makes me hope Didn’t It Rain will be released on vinyl. It’s the kind of music that will withstand the test of time, which makes that format an especially appealing possibility. Listening to Amy Helm’s long awaited debut I get the sense that she too will never go out of style. ****1/2

Kasey Chambers Bittersweet

SUGAR HILL/ESSENCE RECORDS

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

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Summer is quickly fading, the kids are back in school, and I’m still spinning discs and sharing my thoughts. Thanks for allowing me to do so and remember, everything covered here is worth buying. Life’s too short to write about music I don’t enjoy; so let’s kick things off with a pair of releases by female artists and go from there.

Amy Helm EONE

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26 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

made—and she’s made them at an impressive rate—you might get the idea that Kasey Chambers needs a guiding hand to help her make great music. Bittersweet shatters that impression with formidable force; it’s not only the most personal and individual record she’s yet released, it just might be her best. While she’s employed many of the familiar hands she’s used before, including multi-instrumentalists Dan Kelly and Ashleigh Dallas, Chambers seems to have taken a more assertive role, relying on producer Nick DiDia to clean up and tinker around the edges rather than guide the recording from day one. It’s the most arty record she’s yet recorded, gliding lyrically from stripped down acoustic (“Oh, Grace”) to more muscular laments (“House on a Hill”) and venturing boldly into full bore rock and roll (the delightful garage country/rock “Hell of a Way to Go”). The range of songs indicates a willingness on her part to tackle larger issues—“Is God Real?”, “Heaven or Hell”, and “Christmas Day” form a sonic triptych that explores some pretty powerful spiritual concerns in ways that are both deeply private and broadly universal—but she’s also able to take on more down to earth concerns as reckless fear (“Stalker”) and resolute determination (“I’m Alive”). Bittersweet is an album that is intelligent, mature, but never the least bit pretentious or stuffy. It’s the work of an artist on top of their game, willing to take chances and let things fall where they may. In this case the result is one of 2015’s best albums, and a high water mark for an artist who continues to get better and better. *****

The Waifs

Beautiful You

COMPASS RECORDS

It’s been four long years since the core members of The Waifs have worked together but I am here to say it’s been worth the wait. In an odd concurrence of events sisters Donna Simpson and Vikki Thorn, along with co-founder Josh Cunningham, all found themselves away from their native Australia and living in the US. Internal issue had torn the band asunder—Cunningham having converted to conservative Christianity while Simpson battled alcohol and drug addictions— and while their last studio effort (2011’s appropriately titled Temptation) was a bit of a train wreck, there were hints that better things were to come. With Beautiful You the pieces have come together: Thorn and Simpson have never sounded better and Cunningham has contributed some of his best guitar work and an impressive set of arrangements. Much of the

credit goes to producer Nick DiDia (ironically an American now based down under) who guides the band with a gentle but firm hand. From the subdued urgency of “Black Dirt”—a travelogue of Thorn’s early years in rural Australia—through the wistful “Come Away” (another gem from her) Beautiful You crackles with energy. Simpson’s low down bluesy “Somebody’s Gonna Get Hurt” is among the best songs she’s ever written. At the center of things The Waifs still retain that nice roots rock groove— this is, after all, a group that started as a Bob Dylan cover band—but they’ve continued to refine and expand their sound. Beautiful You is more about rhythm than revelation, but it sustains itself nicely and plays to the band’s strengths. It might not match the authority of their best efforts (it’s certainly no Sun Dirt Water) but for a band that seemed on the verge of extinction it’s a surprisingly cohesive and welcome return. ***1/2

Pavement

The Secret History Volume 1 MATADOR RECORDS

Although hardly a “Secret History”—all the material herein has been previously found on various B-sides, EPs, and other odd releases—this vinyl only collection is a tidy means of having them all in one place. Even at that it’s by no means a complete summary of the band’s most fertile period, leaving off such pivotal moments as the stunning Live At Brixton Academy set, some bits of the deluxe reissue of Slanted and Enchanted and The Peel Sessions. So while it’s still a wildly incomplete snapshot of Pavement at their creative peak there’s no complaints in having this material finally out on vinyl, and it’s a sheer joy to revisit such gems as “Drunk With Guns” and “So Stark (You’re a Skyscraper).” Here’s hoping this secret history is but one of many. ****

Gregg Allman Live-Back to Macon Rounder DVD

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ENHANCED

CD

After more than forty years fronting the band named after him no one would fault Gregg Allman for, once the Allman Brothers called it a day, taking some time off. But despite the serious health problems that have dogged him—a liver transplant, hepatitis C, and his well-documented substance addictions—the now 70 years old continued on page 27


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clean and sober Allman shows few signs of slowing down. He continues to tour solo and with his own band, seems to show up at a multitude of benefit/tribute shows and stills finds time of record an album every two years or so. Take THAT, Mr. Millennial Generation. Of course none of that would be so impressive if the quality of music had faltered but as the 90 minute double CD/DVD set demonstrates, Allman has, like many a blues legend, gotten only better with age. Recorded in a single night in January 2014, in the city where it all began, Allman combines reinterpreted versions of some ABB classics with a smattering of R&B numbers, both common and rare. His eight piece backing band, including a trio of soulful horn players and two keyboard-

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While the Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo is largely considered the first country-rock album — although I will argue just as loudly for The International Submarine Band’s debut as holder of that title — The Flying Burrito Brothers, from the seminal Gilded Palace of Sin through Close Up The Honky Tonk, may not have originated the genre but to many music fans they darn sure perfected it. The history of the band intertwines with numerous groups, including various incarnations of The Byrds (whose own history is as convoluted as any) through Poco, SoutherHillman-Furay, Manassas, Burrito Deluxe, Firefall, and who knows how many others as members shifted back and forth, an ever changing ensemble that somehow, over the course of more than four decades, retained its original purpose and sound. The Burritos were at the crossroads of a movement that forever changed American music and whose influence continues to this day, and it is only fitting that their legacy be preserved. Those crossroads are home turf for The Burrito Brothers, a band that celebrates that legacy while serving up its own fresh contributions. Their 2011 release Sound as Ever gave evidence that while the Burrito Brothers may no longer be flying high, The Burritos are determined to keep it alive. The band’s current line up consists of players who logged stage and/or studio time with other, earlier iterations of the group or with iconic figures who helped build the Flying Burrito legacy. Vocalist/keyboard player Chris James is a longtime Nashville resident and perennial recording and performing sideman for artists like Bobby Bare, Carlene Carter, The Rascals, The International Submarine Band and Blues/R&B legend Johnny Jones. He and Rick Lonow started Mr. Hyde, a group dedicated to the legacy of The Byrds, and have been associated with diverse Gram Parsons

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tributes and the BurriThe Flying Burrito Brothers tos since the mid-1980s. A dedicated student of every and anything related to pop music Clark and Billy Joe Shaver. He’s played with James prides himself in knowing even the Dr. Hook, The Amazing Rhythm Aces, The minutest details of American and British pop Memphis Horns and many other touring and history; it’s a depth of knowledge he brings recording groups. He’s produced dozens of to every show in the form of between song Blues, Soul and R&B recordings, and played banter and obscure cover tunes. on and produced The International Submarine Drummer/vocalist Rick Lonow has long Band’s Back At Home. been considered the number one Americana Fred and Chris have been associated with Music drummer in Nashville, an elite session The Burrito brand since 1986. Bassist Rusty musician who has played with the likes of Russell is both a musician and a journalist, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, John Prine, bringing a keen observational eye to the band. and for too many to mention. For over a He’s toured with legends Little Anthony & decade he toured the world with The Bellamy The Imperials and has worked extensively Brothers and is an accomplished songwriter. with Grammy winner Mike Farris. His songs Among his many hits was Poco’s “Call It have been recorded by Johnny Rodriguez, Love” which in 1989 topped the country Sherman Robertson, Charles “Wigg” Walker charts. and Michael Burks. Lonow received a Grammy Award for his Steel player Tony Paoletta rounds out the work with June Carter Cash as well as playing band. His credits include six years touring on the recent posthumous Cash album prowith Patty Loveless, extensive session work, duced by John Carter Cash. He has performed and long associations with the Grand Ole and recorded with the various versions of the Opry. Paoletta studied under Flying BurBurritos since the early 1980s. rito’s founder the late Pete Kleinow, learning Guitarist/vocalist Fred James (brother of from the very best. As “Sneaky Pete’s” health Chris) is a five-time Grammy-nominated declined, Tony became the go-to guy. His songwriter who arrived in Nashville in the joining as a fully fledged Burrito is only fitting. early 1970s and fell in with the new wave of So those are the impressive credentials and songwriters like Townes Van Zandt, Guy a bit of the Burrito’s long and storied history. What cannot be heard in print are the pride, talent, and sheer love of the music the Burrito Brothers bring to the stage, as they run ists, is as tight as any around and while the through virtually every phase of the band’s absence of twin guitars—a trademark of the history as well as songs associated with the ABB sound—makes the evening lean less toFlying Burrito Brothers legacy. Look for “Hot wards rock and more to Memphis styled soul, Burrito Number Two” or “Hickory Wind” what the heck. That’s how Gregg Allman first but don’t be surprised to hear more than a few learned the ropes and how with surprisingly lesser known gems. fresh reworking of such venerable classics The set list is as flexible and varied as a 1968 as “Whipping Post,” “Statesboro Blues” and Flying Burritos show, and that’s exactly what “Midnight Rider”—songs he has no doubt they strive for, a capturing of a moment in played a thousand times over—Allman stakes time. So for those who couldn’t make a Flying his claim as being as relevant today as he was Burrito Brothers or Byrds show at The Whisback then. key A Go Go, circa 1969, this might be the Toss in a few sterling covers (Ray Charles’ closest thing to doing so you’ll ever experience. “Brightest Smile In Town” sounds particularly strong) and a powerful new tune in “Love Like Kerosene” and you’ve got a winning mix. The IF DVD includes a few band profiles, some nice YOU The Burrito Brothers, Saturday, GO September 5. Tickets are $15 in advance interview bits, and some especially welcome and $18 day of for this 7 p.m., all ages, sound checks; not to be missed by any fan of seated show. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman the ABB. ****1/2 Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit

Karl and his band, The Tiny Universe, have embarked on a nationwide run that will give new and old fans the chance to experience what is highly regarded as one of the best live bands on the planet. The line up includes Richmond guitarist DJ Williams, Soulive drummer Alan Evans, Greyboy Allstars bassist Chris Karl Denson Stillwell, Crush Effects David Veith on the keys, and Seattle’s Chris Littlefield on the trumpet, along with a rotating cast of special guests, including Chuck Leavell from The Rolling Stones and The Allman Brothers, guitar wiz Robert Randolph, Beto Martinez of Brownout, and Sacred Steel phenom Roosevelt Collier. Denson himself is an acclaimed saxophonist and songwriter who first came to national attention as a member of Lenny Kravitz’s Let Love Ruleera group. He is currently a member of The Rolling Stones touring band.

Earphunk

New Orleans quintet Earphunk is an ensemble of 20-somethings quickly making a name for themselves on the festival circuit and live music scene with jam-inspired hard-hitting funk tunes. Their high-energy prog-funk album, Sweet Nasty, was released in August IF YOU GO: Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe with special guests Earphunk. Saturday, September 19. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets $20-$25. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 785-1701, www.newmountainavl.com.

www.thegreyeagle.com

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Announcing the first ever Rapid River Magazine Flash Fiction contest! Writers! Paint a picture, tell a story, with 500 words or less. This is a family friendly contest and modest prizes will be awarded. Finalists, semi-finalists and honorable mentions will be announced in the December print edition, and will appear on RapidRiverMagazine.com.

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2015. Hardcopy submissions should include your email address and phone number. Submissions not in strict compliance with the guidelines will not be read or considered. Detailed guidelines on RapidRiverMagazine.com.

Send hardcopy only, by mail, with a $5 reading fee to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, Attention: Flash Fiction Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716. Contest is curated by Rapid River Magazine copy editor and Short Story editor, Kathleen Colburn.

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Vermeer’s silence was radiant, seeping yellow from pores of the candle and filling his figures with light. They still glow

A poet’s job is to be brave and tell the truth. I’ve said this before in my column. When is bravery Schubert’s E-flat shrieked through his silence, and truth-telling most difficult? gull cry intensifying the sea, or meteor For me, it is in times of despair, lighting the dark, noise shaking physical or emotional. Last other tones to music month I wrote about thresholds. Despair is one. My silence flashes with monitors, your heart When I lived in Minnesota beneath my hand. So much beats there I took an introductory class in daughter - my mother dead, all Poetry Therapy. the other partings I was open to possibility. For my MFA internship I played My fingers are steady, they feel your heart race cello on the Oncology Unit at and lurch, runner too tired to hold pace. Abbott North Western Hospital, Silence is numbers counting a transformative experience. My your time. I will not chapbook, Window, Poems of move my hand Healing, came from that intern~ From Intensive Care by Lucia Getsi ship. I can’t not respond, even when it involves bone marrow transplants, and patients in After my mother died, I was speechchemo. I embarked on a brave creative challess. I didn’t write. I was full, but unable lenge. I had no idea I would be changed. to empty myself. After six months, I beI stood on the bridge of attentiveness gan to write in response to art. As you can between the islands of poetry and healing. Loss imagine, my mother was in every scene. resonates in each of us. We are vulnerable. I continue this Ekphrastic practice. To sit This is a hard truth. We can take our time on with a work of art, to long-look, is meditation. the bridge of mindfulness, look back, move It is like being with nature where we find a ahead, and write. Poetry validates our experisacred space externally and internally. ence. The following poem is an example of A poem can take us where we need to be, how to stop. even though we may not leave our physical place at all. (From The Healing Fountain) Snowbound There is a time to stop traveling . . . to get off other people’s subways to halt airplanes from landing in your life. A time to refuel yourself. A time to be snowbound within your own private space where the only number you dial is your own. ~ Natasha Lynne Vogdes

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Short Stories, a Web Exclusive Contribute to Rapid River Magazine’s online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works in more than 20 genres. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. For submission guidelines and special editing rates visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Please contact Kathleen Colburn with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

28 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

The Temple Bell Fades The temple bell fades . . . but the tolling continues out of the flowers ~ Basho

scar we will learn to live together. i will call you ribbon hunger and desire empty pocket flap edge of before and after. and you what will you call me? woman i ride who cannot throw me and i will not fall off. ~ From lucille clifton’s book, the terrible stories

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Listening For Your Heart

“Poetry is a spell against death.” ~ Richard Eberhart 828-581-9031

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

THE LAST WORD

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I will end with THE poem (in my estimation) on loss, Elizabeth Bishop’s “One Art.”

One Art The art of losing isn’t hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. Lose something every day. Accept the fluster of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. Then practice losing farther, losing faster: places, and names, and where it was you meant to travel. None of these will bring disaster. I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or next-to-last, of three loved houses went. The art of losing isn’t hard to master. I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent. I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster. —Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident the art of losing’s not too hard to master though it may look like (Write it!) disaster.

My final word comes from Miss Bishop, “Write it.”

Resources Intensive Care, Lucia Getsi, New Rivers Press, St. Paul, MN, 1992. the terrible stories, lucille clifton, BOA editions, Brockport, NY, 1996. The Healing Fountain, Poetry Therapy for Life’s Journeys, edited by Geri Chavis and Lila Weisberger, North Star Press of St. Cloud, 2003.

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

POETRIO Sunday, September 6 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: Mary Kratt (Watch Where You Walk), Dawn Coppock (As Sweet as It’s Going to Get), and Richard Krawiec (Women Who Loved Me Despite).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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A Judgment of Whispers

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In Sallie Bissell’s latest, A Judgment of Whispers, due out September 8, attorney Mary Crow is in the midst of running her political campaign for DA and solving a decades-old murder. Twenty-five years ago, ten-year-old Teresa Ewing went out to deliver a casserole to a neighbor and never came back—at least not alive. Suspects at the time included a group of four boys, the Salola Street gang—Adam, Devin, Butch and Zach. Now, Adam is a travel photographer; Devin runs a used car dealership in town; Butch is a security guard at the college; and Zach, who’s on the autism

Fritz Fombie Have No Fear

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Fritz Fombie Have No Fear, written and illustrated by T. E. Antonino, is a whimsical and funny account of children overcoming fear. The middle-grade novel, perfect for ages 8-13, received The Portland Book Review’s highest five-star rating. Local author and illustrator T.E. Antonino is a teacher’s assistant at a daycare, where he’s read kids more books than he can count. He loves reading aloud at schools and libraries, using different accents and voices to engage listening children. Antonino has worked with children in the Asheville area for three years teaching the children not only to learn to read, but also to foster a love for reading. Fear is very prevalent in the world we live in. Fritz Fombie Have No Fear helps children to see they’re bigger than their fears. Antonino believes when a child is smiling and laughing they feel no fear and have no sense of something lacking in their life; thus, the goal of this book. IF YOU On Saturday, September 26 T.E. GO Antonino will read from Fritz Fombie

Have No Fear at the Waynesville library at 11 p.m. He will also give a manga art lesson for kids, and read from various picture books for younger children. On Sunday, September 27 at 2 p.m. T.E. Antonino will sign copies of his book at Papoose Children’s Clothing & More, 21 Battery Park Ave. in downtown Asheville. (828) 505-7879.

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spectrum, still depends on his mother, Grace. The community blamed Zach for the murder—and still do. “Different,” they call him, and every day, they deliver their judgment of whispers. The discovery of new evidence thrusts the four men back into the spotlight as the police demand new DNA samples. Harassment breaks out anew against Zach and Grace, who have now called on Mary Crow for aid. Now it’s up to Mary, who hopes her fresh eyes can sift through the lies and threats to discover the long-buried truth. Sallie Bissell is the author of the awardwinning Mary Crow series. A native of Nashville, Tennessee, she graduated from Peabody College (now part of Vanderbilt University) and resides in Asheville.

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7TH INSTALLMENT IN THE MARY CROW SERIES

A long-unsolved murder puts Mary’s political campaign in peril.

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~ Library Journal Bissell is a member of Mystery Writers of America and Sisters in Crime. Visit www.SallieBissell.com IF YOU Sallie Bissell celebrates the launch of GO her latest Mary Crow novel, A Judgment

of Whispers, Monday, September 14 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, malaprops.com.

See, There He Is

NEW MEMOIR BY GINGER GRAZIANO

Devastating loss and the journey back. See, There He Is is a memoir that lays bare the collapse and rebuilding of hope that local visual and graphic artist, designer and writer, Ginger Graziano experienced when her son died. Devastated, she returns with her daughter to the places where they had lived, and, like Proust’s madeleine cake in Remembrance of Things Past, the memories flow out. Each chapter in See is named for a street or place in the story and serves to create a framework for the reader to share the author’s experiences as she walks through her past. “Could I save my son? If not, could I go on? I wasn’t going to find the answers in a book. I had to look deep into my heart. My life as a single mother had taught me to confront challenges and to fight, but they had not prepared me for what I faced in those years and the years since.” Graziano’s visual art is stunning and imaginative and many of her sculptures showcase the mind, heart, and singular stories of women. As a mother, See is the culmination of her journey through grief. “As I grieved, I realized that I was actually going to come back to life which surprised me. I wasn’t going to stay in the grayness forever. Bit by bit, I found that I had a strong will to live both for my daughter and for myself. Part of my healing was to integrate who I had become.” Graziano’s works have been published in The Conium Review, Embodied Effigies, The Great Smokies Review, Stone Voices,

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and most recently, Writing in Circles. While her contributions have included poetry and short stories, See is the most lengthy piece she has composed and certainly the most personal. Ginger’s writing process is based in the visceral and organic, and it began with her journals. During the mid 1970’s, she began journaling to help with the decision to leave her marriage. “I wrote myself out of bed each morning.” When Jeremy was diagnosed with cancer, journaling became a way for her to cope with the shock and the emotions. The title of See comes from the following passage, “See, there he is with his freckled face, his tall thin body, his lopsided grin and goofy humor. There he is, big-hearted and gentle, standing in the doorway with his hands in his pockets, calling the dog Butthead.” See is not only a book about death and loss, it’s a book about one woman’s unique journey that resonates with others on a universal level. Ultimately, this book is about how to move through life’s adventures and challenges while remaining joyful and positive.

SEPTEMBER

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Saturday, September 5 at 7 p.m. DAVID MADDEN, The Tangled Web of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Tuesday, September 8 at 7 p.m. RON RASH, Above the Waterfall. Thursday, September 10 at 7 p.m. RITA ZOEY CHIN, Let the Tornado Come. Saturday, September 12 at 7 p.m. MATTHEW NEILL NULL, Honey from the Lion. Sunday, September 13 at 3 p.m. ROD KIGHT, Cannabis Business Law. Tuesday, September 15 at 7 p.m. SONJA YOERG, House Broken, debut novel. Thursday, September 17 at 7 p.m. MATTHEW VOLLMER, Gateway to Paradise. Friday, September 18 at 7 p.m. JOHN LANE, Fate Moreland’s Widow; JAMES McTEER, Minnow, coming-of-age story. Saturday, September 19 at 7 p.m. WILL HARLAN, Goshen: Places of Refuge. Sunday, September 20 at 5 p.m. ROBERT SHETTERLY, Americans Who Tell the Truth. Monday, September 21 at 7 p.m. SUSAN PIVER, The Path and Practice of Meditation. Tuesday, September 22 at 7 p.m. LISA WINGATE, The Sea Keeper’s Daughters. Thursday, September 24 at 7 p.m. ALEXANDRA DUNCAN, Sound, feminist sci-fi. Friday, September 25 at 7 p.m. MARGARET LAZARUS DEAN, Leaving Orbit. Tuesday, September 29 at 7 p.m. KIM BOYKIN, A Peach of a Pair. Wednesday, September 30 at 7 p.m. CONSTANCE LOMBARDO, Mr. Puffball: Stunt Cat to the Stars.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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Learn more about Ginger Graziano at www.gingergraziano.com

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 29


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Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Great American Dog

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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HENDERSONVILLE’S “BEST KEPT SECRET”

Just outside of downtown Hendersonville is a small, independently owned hot dog shop called Great American Dog.

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Boston. I just got back from a wedding where the groom is from Maine and his family flew down to North Carolina with whole lobsters to make lobster rolls for the wedding. These were amazing and very similar to Great American Dog’s lobster meat. But I’m getting ahead of myself. We walked in at 2 p.m. on a Tuesday and there were still people in line at the register and customers sprinkled around the small shop. This many people here this late in the day, told me this is a popular lunch spot. One trip advisor review described it as “the best kept secret in town.” After reading the extensive hand-written board menu, we decided to try the Mixed Seafood Basket to get a sample of everything seafood, and of course, I wanted to try the hot dogs. I went with the Carolina Dog – slaw, chili, mustard, and grilled onions; and the Great American Dog Great American Hotdogs are – grilled onions,

But don’t let the name fool you. While they do indeed serve a wide selection of specialty hot dogs, the menu runs the gamut from char-grilled burgers, sandwiches, salads, chicken tenders and seafood baskets to clam chowder. Seafood baskets at a hotdog joint, you may ask? Yes, and lobster rolls! And these are like the ones in Maine or

grilled, not boiled, adding additional flavor.

pg. 24

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128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

MICHELLE ROgERS

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

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Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Thomas Wolfe Mystery Dinner

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An immersive and historical dinner experience with Thomas Wolfe and Dr. Watson Jr. On Sunday, September 20, Lex 18 introduces Asheville’s first historical mystery dinner theater focused on Thomas Wolfe. Lex 18 takes you back to 1929 as Thomas Wolfe performs a reading from his newest book, Look Homeward, Angel. After the reading, a lovely dining experience, accompanied by live music, unfolds. Suddenly, in the midst of all this enjoyment, the evening takes a dark turn. A deceptive plot, prickled with mysterious motives and unwanted suspicions, is revealed in the chaos. This uniquely designed dinner experience blends historical facts, setting and personages with fictionalized events that are both fun and fascinating. Guests’ interactions and involvement can range from fully engaged mystery sleuths to removed observers with instructions to just play their authentic selves. The only guest requirement is to dress for dinner in the style of the 1920s and 1930s. Upon ticket purchase, guests will receive an invitation providing directions and information detailing the event.

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Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

IF YOU Thomas Wolfe Mystery Dinner, GO Sunday, September 20. $55 per

person. Lex 18, 18 North Lexington Ave., Asheville. For reservations, call (828) 620-5404, or visit www.lex18avl.com

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885 pg. 21

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

$44.99 per person

Includes 4-Course Dinner with Live Jazz. All shows at 7 p.m.

Everyone is Talking About Our

SEAFOOD!

Paid in part by Haywood County Tourism www.visitncsmokies.com

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Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

Indian ~ Nepali ~ Tibetan Himalayan Cuisine

15% Off Your Order

Maine Lobster Stew, Maine Lobster Roll & Whole Maine Fried Clams

Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

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Wireless Internet Access!

808 Greenville Highway Hendersonville, NC 28792

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Our Hotdogs are made from Premium Cuts of Meat • Natural Casing • Grilled

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Fresh, Hand Breaded & Deep Fried Handcut Fries & Homemade Slaw

828-697-2266

Like Us On Facebook pg. 21

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M-Sat 10-8 • Sun 11-3 T.Cote@morrisbb.net

www.greatamericandog.net Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 31


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3rd Annual

Public Art Rocker Crawl

Gear Up, It’s Grilling Time!

Downtown Black Mountain

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Stop by the Visitor Center and pick up a “Rocker Crawl” brochure with riddles and Fan Favorite Voter’s Ballot.

Ramp up your outdoor celebrations this season. There are plenty of new and interesting grills and accessories that’ll help transform all of your edible events. Find great cookware, accessories, and more at Town Hardware & General Store in Black Mountain. They carry all the products and services you would expect from a top-of-the-line

Vote for your favorite Rocker and be entered to WIN a Black Mountain Gift Basket (valued at $200).

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com (800) 669-2301

hardware chain. Plus, they carry a number of hard-to-find items — not just in hardware and tools, but also in housewares, toys, and outdoor living.

Town Hardware & General Store 103 W. State St., Black Mountain (828) 669-7723 www.townhardware.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

Great Selection of Gas & Charcoal Grills MA

Made in North Carolina Lifetime Burner Warranty

MV MS MG MC MR

103 West State Street in Black Mountain MB

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Corner of Hwy 9 & US 70 • 828-669-7723 MA

WWW.TOWNHARDWARE.COM

FAISON O’NEIL

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

Painting by David King

128 Cherry Street Black Mountain, NC

info@faisononeilgallery.com Mon-Sat. 10:30-5; Sun. 12-4

Jewelry by Dan Reiser

828.357.5350

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www.faisononeil.com

Breakfast

craft gallery

in the Mountains

117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5

SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107

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601 W. State Street

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Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm


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When the term “obstacles” is used conventionally, we tend to think of problems and circumstances that have interrupted or blocked our progress to the accomplishment of some goal or desire. But to understand the puzzling meaning of this Zen teaching we have to reframe completely our idea of what obstacles and goals are. In Buddhism, there is only one worthy goal, and to quote the Zen Master Yasutani, it is “to meet the True Self,” a term used to describe an insight into the non-dualistic truth of existence and thus, who we really are and what our capacities for clarity and insight truly are. From a conventional perspective, our goals are viewed as ways of establishing our lives as significant, and their accomplishment is highly desired, and the “obstacles” towards their fulfillment are our frustrations. Zen, in its usual paradoxical manner, instructs us that, in truth, it may well be that our greatest obstacles are our goals and desires themselves, and it may be that what we experience as obstacles to reaching our “goals” are our great opportunities towards the development of the true purpose of our lives – to grow in wisdom, compassion, insight and skill. So, as we live our ordinary lives, we have an idea of ourselves moving toward goals. As we experience success in meeting these goals, we feel pleased; as we are thwarted and frustrated in meeting these goals, we feel unhappy. Anxiety about the future of our ambitions and despondency and anger at past failure is typical. We experience being not-OK with our

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Is it exercise? Is it eating a plant-based diet? Is it lowering cholesterol or stopping smoking? Is it maintaining ideal weight? Is it getting enough sleep? As important as these activities are, none of these are the most powerful predictor of health and longevity. In 2001, Drs. Syme and Berkman reported on a study of people from Alameda County, CA. They followed more than 7,000 people for 40 years, noting who lived the longest and who had the best health. They noted: People classified as lonely and isolated had 3 times higher mortality from all causes. People with many social contacts had the lowest mortality. The amount of social support was the best predictor of good health. The authors said in their summary: “Social

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lives. Buddhism, as a psychology or philosophy of life, above all, points us toward being OK with life beyond success and failure in our endeavors and experiences. What we are exploring here is how the traditional idea of goals, such as dedicated focus on what we consider success, can get in the way of our being OK. This is obviously true if our goals are frustrated, but it is also true if they are fulfilled; for we begin to believe with ever greater certainty in these goals as the purpose of life, and, as Buddhism and life teach, everything that comes also goes. Peace and well-being cannot be accomplished through material success. Success only breeds desire for more success. Eventually this strategy will fail, but as long as we believe in it, we are diverted from opening beyond this belief that says happiness comes from success. In this way, success is an obstacle to realizing deeper and truer skills and perspectives. Likewise, frustration, even seeming catastrophe, may open us to look for deeper and broader perspectives, and in hindsight be realized as the source of our most important growth. Buddhism is a set of precepts and insights

How Long Will You Live?

What is the strongest predictor of who will live a long and healthy life?

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connection helps prevent premature death. It is a more powerful predictor of health and longevity than age, gender, race, social economic status, self-reported physical status and health practices such as; smoking, alcoholic beverage consumption, overeating, physical activity and utilization of health services as well as a cumulative index of health practices.” To be sure, the other health practices were important. A study of the three “blue zones” in the world (where people routinely lived to be more than 100) identified these common characteristics: physically active, socially connected, non-smokers, healthy diet, adequate rest, and have a purpose in life. But the most powerful predictor is social connectedness. In his book “Love and Survival: The Scientific Basis for the Healing Power of Intimacy”, Dr. Dean Ornish says: “I’m not aware of any other factor in medicine – not diet, not smoking, not exercise, not stress, not genetics, not

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into life accompanied by the development of mental skills that have proven effectiveness in leading to increased peace and well-being or OK-ness, independent of success or frustration in conventional terms. The great Vietnamese Zen master, Thich Nhat Hanh helps us better understand the key to Buddhist perspective and practice when he points out that there are two dimensions to our existence – the “historical” and the “ultimate.” The historical dimension is the idea of our life experienced in the timeline of past, present, and future, and the important word here is “idea.” We all live inside an idea of who we are made up of experiences, desires, fears, hopes, and capacities about which we are confident and capacities about which we are insecure. This idea of our self is very unstable, highly personalized and quite insecure. To this historical identity, obstacles are events, circumstances or people who obstruct the fulfillment of the idea of me getting to the goals that I imagine will give me peace, well-being and happiness. We believe that they are the reason we are not-OK. To explore the meaning of “the ultimate dimension” we have to return to Master Yasutani’s invitation to meet our “true self.”

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Obstacles are opportunities. This is no idea of who we are. This is who we are deeper than experiences, thoughts, desires, fears, hopes, and capacities about which we are confident or insecure. To the true self in the ultimate dimension, the “obstacles” encountered in the historical dimension are merely opportunities for practicing transcending the reactivity of the historic-self, understanding that it is our own ideas about events, ourselves, people and our life-circumstance that are the source of our feeling not-OK. We have all experienced obstacles to the historic-self. We’ve had problems and losses in relationship, occupation, the fulfillment of our desires, perhaps even severe illness or disabling injury. Even driving across town can be a frustrating encounter with the obstacle of traffic, throwing us into varying states of notOK-ness, for some, even rage. As these events occur in the historical dimension, we are affected quite adversely. We experience very difficult, perhaps overwhelming, negative emotions. We are reactive and judgmental about what is happening. It is this reactivity and judgment that our practice works with through realizing that as we are aware of these states of not-OK-ness, the awareness that witnesses it all is completely OK. We begin to recognize awareness as the pure witnessing consciousness before any thought or emotion colors the experience into good or bad. We are taking the first steps in discovering that awareness is the mind of the ultimate dimension and our true self and that ultimately we are that awareness. We begin to realize that we are awareness that has a body and a mind that engages circumstances in the historical realm, and that while body and mind may be threatened, awareness is not, cannot be, threatened for it exists in the ultimate dimension acting as witness to the historical dimension. continued on page 36

drugs, not surgery – that has a greater impact on our quality of life, incidence of illness, and premature death from all causes” than interpersonal relationships. According to Syme and Berkman’s studies, the effect of interpersonal relationships on health was frequently experienced from weekly church attendance, actively seeking a meaningful relationship with God and with people. Both men and women showed improvement in becoming physically active, quitting smoking, being less depressed, increasing the number of personal relationships, and initiating and sustaining stable marriages. Seek out the most potent activity for a long, healthy life. Establish meaningful relationships with others – not on electronic media, but in real face-to-face interactions. See you in church next week.

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 33


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Art After Dark Friday, September 4 Charlie Patricolo will be demonstrating doll making from 6-9 p.m. Patricolo’s show, Pixies, Angels, Gnomes... oh, my!, is on display throughout September. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 N. Main Street, Waynesville. Call (828) 456-1940, or visit www.twigsandleaves.com. Seasons, new paintings by Waynesville artist, Rick Hills. Hills will be demonstrating his unique Porchoir process from 6-9 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Mahogany House Gallery, 240 Depot Street, Frog Level, Waynesville. Call (828) 246-0818, or visit www.themahoganyhouse.com

thru September

Ceramic Art Exhibit

Ceramic art of Barbara Quartrone and Dyann Myers. Functional and nonfunctional pottery and works of figurative and abstract sculpture. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue in the River Arts District. Visit Odysseyceramicarts.com. (828) 285-9700.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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what to do guide

Friday, September 4

Sunday, September 6

Made in WNC

13th Annual LAAFF Festival

Works by 24 regional textile, ceramic, and furniture studios, and four regional artists. Opening reception from 6-9 p.m. On display through January 9, 2016 at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, 67 Broadway Street, Asheville. (828) 785-1357, www. craftcreativitydesign.org

Friday & Saturday, September 4 & 5

Quirky interactive events, quality food, family activities, local hand-crafted art, live performances and music. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Free. Lexington Avenue in downtown Asheville. www.laaff.com

Tuesday, September 8

LYLAS 10th Anniversary Show

We’re Funny. Period. An original sketch comedy performance written and performed by LYLAS, Asheville’s only all-female sketch comedy group. Starring Jenny Bunn, Tina Ford-Cox, Tab Hall, Delina Hensley, Hollis McKeown, Betsy Puckett and Robin Raines, with special guests Sarah Carpenter and Karri Brantley. Music from the Lady Parts. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, September 5

Open Studios Art Tour

On historic Grovewood grounds, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Go behind-the-scenes and take a free, self-guided tour of the artist studios on the historic Grovewood grounds (adjacent to The Omni Grove Park Inn). Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Road, Asheville. (828) 253-7651, grovewood.com

Saturday, September 5

A Night at the Opera

Rare two-piano benefit concert featuring John Cobb and Christopher Tavernier. 7 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre, down- Christopher Tavernier town Asheville. $9.50. (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com

Saturday & Sunday, September 5 & 6

Dig In Gardens and Pottery Sale

Three potters, Linda McFarling, Shane Mickey, and Karen Newgard, host a benefit sale with garden tours, great pottery, and delicious food and beverages. 39 Pisgah Mine Rd. in Burnsville. (828) 606-0058, www.diginyancey.org

September 5 & 6

14th Annual Railfest

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Old-time bluegrass, gospel, country music, and storytelling. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Bryson City, NC. Contact Catch the Spirit of Appalachia at (828) 6314587, www.spiritofappalachia.org

Dough

A film about the unlikely friendship between a Jewish baker and his young Muslim apprentice. 7 p.m. Tickets are $12 or $10 online. At Grace Centre, 495 Cardinal Rd. in Mills River. WNC Film Society, (828) 885-5354, www. wncfilmsociety.com.

Thursday, September 10

Alsarah and the Nubatones

Performance by East African retro pop group. 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Auditorium. $20. Info: cesap. unca.edu or (828) 251-6674.

Friday, September 11

Aurora; A Healing Light

Group art show featuring the work of nine artists from Aurora Studio & Gallery. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. at the Asheville Area Arts Council gallery in Asheville’s Grove Arcade. Rita Zoey Chin, author of Let the Tornado Come, will discuss creativity and the healing process at 6:30 p.m. On display September 10-20. Chin will also read from her book Thursday, September 10 at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore.

Keeping the Fires Burning Heroes of Mountain Culture features musicians, authors, and heritage preservation leaders who are working to keep mountain culture alive. Thursday, September 10 – Songcatcher screening at 2 p.m. at the Henderson County Main Library, 301 N. Washington St. in Hendersonville. Thursday, September 17 – Renowned mountain music performer and storyteller Betty Smith performs. 1 p.m. in the Patton Building, Room 150 on the campus of Blue Ridge Community College. Center for Cultural Preservation (828) 692-8062 www.saveculture.org

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John Mac Kah Studio Classes, Workshops, and Private Fine Art Instruction. Still Life Skill Building – Oils/ Acrylics. Mon., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. After School Artists with Alisa – Tuesday & Wednesday, 4-6 p.m. Children 10 and up. Studio Demos – Thurs. 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Sept. 3, Underpainting; Sept. 10, Atmosphere; Sept. 17, Fall Color; Sept. 24, Composition. Studio Painting – Thurs. 6-9 p.m. Plein Air – Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., weather permitting. On location. 122 Riverside Dr., Studio H, Asheville. (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

September 11-12 & October 23-24

Art on the Lawn

Saturday, September 12

TEDxTryon

A community conversation exporing the people, places, and events that shape our lives. This all-day event takes place at the Tryon Fine Arts Center. Visit TedxTryon.com.

Saturday, September 12

Appalachian Pastel Society

Free meeting and demonstration featuring Fleta Monaghan. 10 a.m. to noon at Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River. Susan Sinyai workshop from 1-4 p.m. Registration required. To register, visit www. appalachianpastelsociety.org.

Saturday, September 19

Americans Who Tell the Truth

Exhibit of paintings by Robert Shetterly. Rev. William Barber of Moral Monday fame will speak as his portrait is unveiled. 6 p.m. at the YMI Cultural Center, 39 S. Market St. in Asheville. www.ymiculturalcenter.org.

Fine art show and sale. Come discover awesome paintings, hand crafted jewelry, sculpture and stunning photography. Come see these extremely talented artist’s newest creations. In front of the beautiful Monte Vista Hotel and the Red House Studio, 310 W. State Street, Black Mountain.

Monday, September 21

September 11 & 12

Torah Paintings + Abstraction. Exhibition by designer, illustrator and fine artist Daniel Devins. S. Tucker Cooke Gallery, UNC Asheville’s Owen Hall. Opening reception from 6-8 p.m. Artist lecture October 22 at 6 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Humanities Lecture Hall. Free. On display September 21-October 30. Visit art.unca.edu or call (828) 251-6559.

The Watkins Family Hour Two nights of folk tunes, bluegrass jams and good old-fashioned musical revelry. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman

Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com

Saturday, September 12

Second Saturday celebration

Visit Odyssey Co-op Gallery located in the River Arts District at 238 Clingman Avenue for food, music, and artists’ demonstrations. Open 11 a.m. - 5.p.m. www.odysseyceramicarts.com

Saturday, September 12

Harvest Conference

For home growers, urban farmers, backyard enthusiasts, and homesteaders. Held at A-B Tech in Asheville. $50. www.organicgrowersschool.org

Saturday, September 12

Journeying Toward Reconciliation

Written by members of the First United Methodist Church in Waynesville, these stories explore the writers’ experience as gay and lesbian Christians and as parents and friends of gays and lesbians. 3 p.m. Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. (828) 4566000, www.blueridgebooksnc.com.

International Day of Peace

At 12 noon WNC 4 Peace hosts a March for Peace downtown to the Peace Pole behind Pack’s Tavern.

Thursday, September 24

With a Mighty Hand

September 24-26

The Asheville Yes Fest!

Featuring improv troupes, Reasonably No Regrets Priced Babies, No Regets, Blacklist Improv, and The OxyMorons. Performances at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $15 in advance/$18 at the door. At the Magnetic Theatre, 375 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Call (828) 239-9250, or visit www.themagnetictheatre.org.

Saturday, September 26

The Fountain of Youth

Exhibit for artists 60 years and up. Show us, through your art, what inspires and enlivens you, and what keeps you feeling youthful! All media accepted. Held at Arrowhead’s AnneX

SEPTEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1


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Gallery in Old Fort. Works may be delivered in Asheville or at Arrowhead Gallery on September 24. Opening reception held on Saturday, September 26 from 4 to 6. Go to www.arrowheadart.org for details and prospectus.

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what to do guide

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

All Over But the Shoutin’

Reading by author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Rick Bragg. 3 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Mission Health System Mountain View Room. Free. Info: (828) 251-6411, unca.edu.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

BARNAROO Music Festival

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

October 3 & 4

310 Art Classes

Dragin

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Spruce Street Market

Weekly artist market takes place every Saturday in September from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the intersection of College and Spruce Streets in downtown Asheville. Details at www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

World-class chamber music directed by flutist Kate Steinbeck. Friday, September 11 at 3 p.m. With guitarist Amy Brucksch. Free. Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNCA. www. olliasheville.com.

Sunday, September 27 at 4 p.m. With Amy Brucksch, guitar, Barbara Weiss, harpsichord. Free; $10 suggested donation. Freeburg Pianos, 2314 Asheville Hwy., Hendersonville. (828) 697-0110, www. freeburgpianos.com.

Sunday, September 27 – The Grahams, modern country, 7 p.m.

MOVIES Far From the Madding Crowd, PG 13 September 2, 3, 8, 9 & 10 at 7 p.m. Saturday, September 5 at 4 & 7 p.m. Sunday, September 6 at 2 & 4 p.m. Home, A Dreamworks Animated Film, PG Saturday afternoons in September. Free! The Strand Theater, 38 North Main Street Waynesville • www.38main.com

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and children’s classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort, NC.

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Friday, September 4 – Live music with Jacob Johnson, 8 p.m. $10 adv./$15 door.

Call for Artists

Hickory’s Oktoberfest 2015 is accepting applications for Arts and Crafts vendors. Celebrating its 30th year, this annual festival will be held October 9, 10, & 11 in downtown Hickory. For more information, visit www.hickoryoktoberfest.com or email info@downtownhickory.com.

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John C. Campbell Folk School 42nd Fall Festival

Celebrate the rich heritage of the Appalachians. Featuring the craft of 200 craftspeople, continuous live music and dance on two stages, craft demonstrations, food, kid’s activities and much more. It’ll be a fun time for the whole family. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Admission: Adults $5; ages 1217, $3; under 12, free. John C. Campbell Folk School, One Folk School Rd., Brasstown, NC. 1-800-FOLK-SCH, (828) 837-2775 ext. 127. Visit www.folkschool.org

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Monday, September 14. Amy Brucksch Kate Steinbeck, flute, Amy Brucksch, guitar. Wine and cheese at 6:30 p.m., music at 7:15 p.m. $20 adv./$22 door. $8 students. Haen Gallery, 52 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville. Buy tickets online at www.panharmonia.org

Saturday & Sunday, September 26-27 6th annual local grassroots, family-friendly, outdoor music festival. Crafters, food, and local brews. Saturday 10 a.m. until Sunday at noon. Franny’s Farm, 22 Franny’s Farm Rd., Leicester. Day Pass $20; w/camping $35; Children under 12 free. Day of $25; w/camping $40. Tickets and info at www.ashevillebarnaroo.com

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Pan Harmonia Concerts

Saturday, September 26 Craft brew, great music and beautiful scenery just north of Asheville in Hot Springs. $75 includes souvenir sampling glass, unlimited beer samplings from noon to 10 p.m., camping in Hot Springs campground, and great live music. $60 for music and camping only. FrenchBroadFallFest.com

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French Broad Brew Fest

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Classic Wineseller

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 35


Find It Here

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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps All Nations Trading www.SpiritFeather.com

Ichiban (828) 252-7885

Alzheimer’s Association alz.org/northcarolina

Jane Desonier www.janedesonier.com

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Asheville Percussion Festival www.AshevilleRhythm.org

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Judy Rentner Judyart@bellsouth.net

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burl Wood Gallery www.burlgallery.com Burr Studio facebook.com/burrstudionc Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Faces of War, Anthony Guidone www.soldierslament.com Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com HART Theater www.harttheatre.com Haywood Art Studio Tour www.haywoodarts.org Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Henderson County Studio Tour www.openstudiotourhc.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814 Kornerstone Kafe (828) 550-2265 Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com The Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Maple Tree Vet Clinic www.mapletreevet.com Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

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artful living

‘Obstacles’ cont’d from pg. 33

If we are to become conscious in our lives, that is, living from awareness of things as they are in large, even vast perspectives, rather than as we concoct them in our very small idea of our self and the world, we must practice living in awareness, the pure witnessing consciousness of the present moment unfolding. As obstructive events occur, our historical self, the mind of ego, reactivity and judgment, experiences these obstacles as injurious and frustrating. Awareness, the mind of the true self, witnesses and discerns the unfolding of events and is only there to learn and become more skillful. The obstacles as defined by the ego gradually become experienced as the path to personal growth into realization of the true self. When upsetting events occur in our historical dimension, our personal sense of self experiences being threatened and diminished by the event and we experience debilitating negative emotion as a result. An encouraging truth, however, is that often, with time, the event becomes just another incident in our lives – neutral, or it may even become valued because it brought with it perspective on the relevant circumstance that, with distance, we learn much about ourselves and the circumstances that we were incapable of seeing at the time. Our growth as a wiser, more skillful person gives credit to the then painful experience as now a valued lesson. This is awareness working through the passage of time as the event becomes more distant from our personal experience unfolding. As the event becomes less personally threatening, we are able to see the deeper truths it reveals. We can trust that this process happens for we have experienced it many times and this trust can be a great ally in bringing this lesson into the immediacy of a challenging situation. Our practice, then, is to bring this capacity for perspective

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to the events of our lives as they We must practice happen. Zen Master Shunryu living in awareness. Suzuki once said, “The essence of Zen is ‘Not always so,’” meaning that events are not always as they seem from the limited perspective of our personal conditioning. As we walk our path in life in the historical dimension our practice is to simultaneously maintain our perspective in the ultimate dimension where we can always be remembering, “Not always so” – always available to allowing that seeming obstacles can be valued elements of our path. Rather than having to go through weeks, months, or years of suffering as the lesson of a particular obstacle is processed, we can grow in the ability to look deeply into what is happening in the now. When we shift into present moment awareness in the midst of difficulties we can see what is happening with greater perspective and use the event as an opportunity for expanded capacities in wisdom, skill, compassion and insight. We can see the obstacle as the path and proceed mindfully towards its awaiting lessons free of resistance.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

PATTON AVE.

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Spruce Street Market www.sprucestreetmarket.com

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Smoky Mountain Foot Clinic, PA www.smokymountainfootclinic.com Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

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HENDERSONVILLE RD.

BD WA

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Stephanie Grimes www.artist-f.com

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Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

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Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Red House Studios and Gallery www.SVFALarts.org

TUNNEL ROAD

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

WAYNESVILLE

GROVE PARK INN

RUSS AVENUE

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Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com

The Wrinkled Egg www.thewrinkledegg.com Zapow www.zapow.com

WAYNESVILLE - NORTH

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

WNCAP www.wncapgala.org

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Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

WNC OVERVIEW

MERRIMON AVE.

Seven Sisters Gallery sevensistersgallery.com

CLYDE

NORTH ASHEVILLE NF

36 September 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 1

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GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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The Art of the Print

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The Face of War ~ A SOLDIERS LAMENT ~ NEW Book by Anthony Guidone

Two modern Italian artists, and a tradition preserved, at Stamperia d’Arte Busato. At the hands of three generations of skillful printers, the presses at Stamperia d’Arte Busato have brought to life the work of scores of artists, producing etchings, engravings and lithographs for the ages. Today, in the northern Italian city of Vicenza, Giancarlo Busato carries on, using much of the same equipment as his father and grandfather, determined to preserve an art that is being Untitled original lithograph Bosco, etching by displaced by modern technology. by Vico Calabrò. Gabriella Da Gioz. In September and October, BlackBird Frame & Art will host an exhibition honoring the great printing tradition represent a medium not as commonly used as exemplified by Busato and his predecessors. other printmaking methods, demanding parAlong with photographs of the print studio, ticular skill on the part of both the artist and the show will feature contemporary works printer. Busato is one of the rare lithographers by two of the talented artists who rely upon still using limestone plates from the Solnhofen the Stamperia d’Arte Busato to produce their quarries of southern Germany. prints in this time-honored manner. GraGraziella Da Gioz, also an accomplished ziella Da Gioz and Vico Calabrò present very artist, works in pastels, oils and etchings. Her different styles, subjects and media, but both landscapes and marine subjects project a calm illustrate the magnificence of the print as art to but complex place, much of the form derived be collected and enjoyed. from shadows and undulations in otherwise smooth surfaces, taking the viewer to a direct and intimate interaction with the Earth. This exhibit comprises etchings produced at Stamperia d’Arte Busato employing aquatint, drypoint and softground techniques. Graziella Da Gioz is a masterful printmaker whose work stirs an emotional response to the land not unfamiliar to residents of our own mountain region. This show is as much about the printer/artisan as it is about the artists themselves, and will include photographs of Giancarlo’s printmaking studio, where artists have found a dedicated partner Giancarlo Busato at Stamperia d.Arte Busato, since 1946. Its history is self-evident in Vicenza, Italy. the venerable presses, timeworn tools of Frequently referred to as “original prints,” the trade, and even the walls, bejeweled with these are not reproductions but individual framed art from decades of labor. In his own works printed from a plate or stone upon words, “This is a real print house where we which the artist has created an image. But the live on just this piece of paper. I live on every making of a fine art print continues with the piece of paper that I lift every day from my printer’s mastery of his craft, knowledge of his printing press.” equipment and materials, and collaboration Framed and unframed prints will be with the artist to achieve the desired colors, displayed and for sale throughout September shading and effects. and October. Refreshments - with an Italian The two featured artists put a modern face flavor – will be served at a casual opening on on a traditional medium. Vico Calabrò, born Saturday, September 5. in 1938, is renowned as a fresco artist, but he has worked with Stamperia d’Arte Busato IF since 1969, achieving an impressive refineYOU Debut & refreshments Saturday, GO September 5, 10-3 p.m. On display ment of his prints. His stone lithographs often September 1 – October 15, 2015. depict joyful dreamlike figures with an engagBlackBird Frame & Art is a custom framing ing but mysterious narrative, playfully drawn studio that features fine art prints. The shop is from an Italian Renaissance heritage. located at 365 Merrimon Ave, ¾ mile north of Calabrò’s work is equally at home in tradidowntown Asheville. Hours are 10-6 weekdays tional and contemporary settings, and can be and 10-3 Saturdays. Phone (828) 225-3117 or framed in either style. His stone lithographs visit blackbirdframe.com.

A view of life as it passes from one generation to another in a changing world.

Anthony Guidone’s photography and poetry honor and acknowledge the physical and mental hardships imposed on those who have engaged in armed conflict.

Available online at

www.soldierslament.com Contact soldierslament@gmail.com

Vol. 19, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2015 37


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Raise Your Hand Benefit Auction & Gala

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WNCAP is gearing up for the annual Raise Your Hand Auction & Gala with an impressive line-up of auction treasures, celebrities, fine cuisine, and much, much more! The well attended and celebrated event will be held on Saturday, September 26 at the Asheville Event Centre on Sweeten Creek Road. Andrew Brunk of Brunk Auctions will once again take the stage and entice the expected crowd of nearly 300 people to bid top dollar to help WNCAP raise much-needed funds to continue their work of HIV services throughout Western North Carolina. Andrew Brunk is President of Brunk Auctions and has supported WNCAP’s Raise Your Hand Auction for three years, raising more than $195,000 for the agency. The 2015 Signature Piece winner is Cindy Walton from the River Arts District. Walton’s winning art work, “In Flight,” is a 36 x 36 inch oil and cold wax abstract filled with energy and vivid colors. The Signature Piece of art is sure to be the highlight of the live auction. The first runner up for the juried competition was

Mark Henry for his framed oil on panel, “Cregg Farms, SC,” and 2nd runner up was Linda McCane Gritta for her acrylic and mixed media on canvas, “State of Wonder III.” These paintings along with an extensive collection of Cindy Walton, auction items includcreator of this year's ing local art, antiques, signature piece. vacation packages, and fine wines, are available for viewing at www. wncapgala.org. Guests attending the event will be wowed by Chef Anthony Cerrato’s exquisite menu filled with fine foods, including Strada’s famous Tuscan Stuffed Figs as appetizers, and outstanding dinner entrée choices.

Andrew Brunk, auctioneer.

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Dr. Lem Kirby bidding during the 2014 auction.

IF YOU Raise Your Hand Benefit Auction, GO Saturday, September 26 at the Asheville

Event Centre on Sweeten Creek Road. Tickets are $125 per person and are available at wncapgala.org or by calling (828) 252-7489.

‘Judy Rentner’ cont’d from page 20

Painting by Judy Rentner Judy Rentner, fine artist.

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freedom of expression. “I am able to have a more spontaneous approach to the subject, capturing purer color and deeper texture than I can with a brush alone. It enables me to push the elements of a painting, putting intense color where there is none and placing into the composition the effect of shimmering light.” As with many artists who live in this part of the country, Judy is constantly inspired by the beauty of its landscapes. Everywhere one looks, in all seasons, nature presents itself in splendor. That is why Judy is primarily a landscape painter, traveling the roads and following the rivers to find the scenes that move her, scenes that cause an emotional response. The play of dark and light is always a major theme in all of her work. “As in life, the light will always shine more brightly as it emerges from the darkness. I desire to awaken in the viewer a sense of hope, of optimism, of faith that in the end, all things will be made right. After all, that is the promise of ‘the Light of the World’.” Judy works from her studio in Clyde and shows her work at Twigs & Leaves in Waynesville, and at the Asheville Gallery of Art where

she will be the featured artist for October. Her work can also be viewed at the gallery website: ashevillegallery-of-art.com. IF YOU Fall Light opening reception, Friday, GO October 2, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The

Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, downtown Asheville. Mon. - Sat., 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 1-4 p.m. (828) 251-5796, ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

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AGA Now Accepting New Members The Asheville Gallery of Art invites area artists to apply for membership. Works must be submitted on Tuesday, September 22, between noon and 5:30 p.m., for review. Prospects must deliver five finished original pieces ready for hanging, six copies of a current art resume, and six copies of the completed membership application. To obtain more information and an application, visit the gallery, call (828) 251-5796, e-mail ashevillegalleryofart@gmail.com, or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.


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Orthodox Church of Asheville. These are the traditions of our Greek life, as are the “panigiri” (festival). Enjoy fellowship, food, dancing and all around good time.

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a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m to 4 p.m. 227 Cumberland Avenue in Asheville’s historic Montford district. For more details, call the church office at (828) 253-3754 or visit www. holytrinityasheville.com/greek-festival.

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‘Hot Dog’ cont’d from pg. 31

spicy red relish, mustard, and ketchup. We sat down inside, though there were tables with umbrellas outside, and soaked in the scenery – lots of locals it looked like, many regulars, country music on the radio, and a patriotic decor. Our food arrived promptly and we were taken aback by the spread. After trying everything, Tom came out of the kitchen where he was working and sat down with us to tell us about how fresh everything is at his establishment. He orders New England scallops kept dry, not soaked, which keeps the quality high. And he gets “real deal” lobster and whole clams shipped from Maine. The fried scallops were indeed my favorite – tender, flaky, and buttery. You really don’t need sauce with these. The fried oysters tasted like the ocean, clean and fresh. The shrimp, clams, and clam strips were a nice treat. These were served with hand cut and hand breaded fries and homemade slaw, which had a nice flavor. I often find myself looking for slaw with the perfect ratio of vinegar to mayo, and I would order the slaw here again. One thing I noticed is their prices can fit any budget, ranging from $1.99 for their Great American Dog to $15.95 for a lobster roll (served seasonally). The Great American Dog was my favorite of the two hot dogs I selected. The spicy red relish is what sold it for me, adding a little bit of heat and spice to a delicious dog. Both hot dogs had a nice snap when bitten into. They’re made with natural casings from Massachusetts and then grilled, not boiled, adding additional flavor. It is apparent that Tom Cote knows what he’s doing when it comes to owning a food business. From making sure the food is as fresh as possible to taking care of customers. He and his partner, Lisa Copeland,

Fresh and delicious seafood basket. Photo: Amber Combs

are both such warm and lighthearted people. And, this is not Tom’s first foray into food. He owned and operated a seafood restaurant in Maine for more than 30 years before moving down to Hendersonville. When asked what he likes most about owning a food business, he replies, “The people. It’s all about the people. Forming relationships is the most important part of my day.” His answer doesn’t surprise me. My lasting impression of Great American Dog is Tom and Lisa care about their customers and the quality of the food they serve. I will be going here again and telling my friends to experience the quality and down-home service Great American Dog has to offer.

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September 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
September 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by John Mac Kah..p9. Inside: Diana Wortham Theatre Series..p4; Asheville Symphony 2015-2016 Season..p7; Open Studio...

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