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The Asheville Symphony Orchestra Opens its 54th Season with Mozart & More PG 7 The Southern Highland Craft Guild hosts their 34th Annual Heritage Weekend PG 9

LEAF Festival PG 17 Chocolate art at The Chocolate Fetish

Open Studio Tour of Henderson County PG 11 Wonderful seasonal paintings by Joyce Schlapkohl PG 30

The 39th Fall

PG

Meet internationally-known authors each month at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café PG 28

37

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE Your passport to discovering excellent food in WNC

PGS

37-39

Calvary • Expendables 3 • Giver • Guardians of the Galaxy • Hundred Foot Journey • Magic in the Moonlight

PGS

12-15


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OPENING NIGHT

September 20, 2014 • 8PM Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

ORDER BY PHONE 828.254.7046 2 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

www.ashevillesymphony.org


PG. 32

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Oct. 16-19 JUrieD artiStS Craft DemonStrationS live regional mUSiC

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U.S. CellUlar Center Downtown aSheville, nC thU.-Sat.: 10am-6pm SUn.: 10am-5pm aDmiSSion: $8; ChilDren UnDer 12 free

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C O T T O N M I L L S T U D I O S F E AT U R E D A R T I S T

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Reflecting the stillness and simplicity of natural forms, BZDesign textiles are effortlessly stylish.

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performance Yesterday and Today: The Interactive Beatles Experience

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The 2014/2015 Mainstage Series season opens with Yesterday and Today: The Interactive Beatles Experience, a foot-stomping, singalong sensational night.

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Yesterday and Today combines the songs of a generation, songs that are woven into the tapestry of our lives, with a set list compiled according to the audience’s requests prior to the show. All songs are performed perfectly by the McGuigan Brothers: no wigs, no faked accents, no pretense, just the music exactly as it was recorded. Catch Yesterday and Today, Friday, September 19 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $30, Student $25, Children 12 and under $15; Student rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. One of Comedy Central’s 100 Greatest Stand-up Comedians, and panelist on NPR’s popular Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me show, Paula Poundstone entertains with wry wit and spontaneity. Laugh yourself silly with Poundstone on October 9. Tickets: $40; Student $35; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10.

The McGuigan Brothers sensational performance of Yesterday and Today: The Interactive Beatles Experience. IF YOU Tickets for all performances are GO available at www.dwtheatre.com as well

as from the box office by calling (828) 257-4530. Multi-show packages are available through the box only.


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number One

SEPTEMBER 2014 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Judy Ausley, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Ron Czecholinski, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Lindsey Mudge, April Nance, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Jeannie Shuckstes, Carlos Steward, Greg Vineyard, David Voorhees, Bill Walz, Truth Wingfield. Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com South and West Asheville Mary Lloyd (828) 712-0390 All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, September 2014, Vol. 18 No. 1

On the Cover:

Touch of Fall painting by Joyce Schlapkohl. PAGE 30

ONLY ONLINE

6 Performance Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Area Piano Forum . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7

8 Music Noam Pikelny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 A-1 Music Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . 8 LEAF Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Mutual Benefit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

9 Fine Art Craft Guild Heritage Weekend . . . . 9 Henderson County Studio Tour. . 11 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 21 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Joyce Schlapkohl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Flood Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

12 Movie Reviews 14 Columns Peter Loewer – Curmudgeon . . . . 16 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort 16 Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 24 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 25 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 25 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 26 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 W.H. Outland – Business of Art . . 31 Business I.A.M. Beautiful World . . 33

17 Local Favorites AAAC’s 2014 Color Ball. . . . . . . . . 17 Town Hardware & General Store 19

34 What to Do Guide

The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center in

SHORT STORIES Nothing Personal,

written by RF Wilson

Lollapalooza!,

written by Sandee Setliff

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

CONTACT US

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Clue, written by Terry Ward The Beasts at Pinebrook Farm, written by Richard Silver

downtown Asheville opens the exhibition Dan Rice at Black Mountain College: Painter Among the Poets on Friday, September 5. Soak up vistas from the highest peak in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Clingmans Dome, on the

Clingmans Dome

Classic Hike of the Smokies,

Tuesday, September 9.

WE’RE A LOCAL & RESPONSIBLE PUBLISHER Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

SPECIAL SECTIONS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 10-11 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . PGS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . PGS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 22-23 River Arts District. . . . . . . . . . . . PG 32

Susan Webb Tregay’s exhibition,

Contemporary Art for Adult Children, is currently on display at the Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park.

The Many Moods of McCartney, a

benefit concert featuring the 2009 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, Little Anthony Little Anthony, Roger Kellaway, Yongmei Hu, Peter Beets, Bobby Caldwell, the Asheville Symphony Orchestra, and many others honors Sir Paul McCartney’s musical compositions on Saturday, September 27 at the Thomas Wolfe Center.

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods 35

37 Dining Guide Chocolate Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 French Broad Brew Fest. . . . . . . . . 38 Organicfest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 5


Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social! v Area Restaurant Coupons v v Contests v

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captivating performances Old to New: Inspiration of Die Fledermaus

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Entering its 16th year, Asheville Lyric Opera will enchant audiences with their production of Die Fledermaus.

The Asheville Lyric Opera presented an exclusive performance by world-renowned Metropolitan Opera tenor, Lawrence Brownlee at the historic Grove Park Inn. This memorable event gave the creative directors of Asheville Lyric Opera the inspiration for an opera set in western Appalachia. When asked why and how he began to entertain the idea of opera set in the mountains, Executive Director David Starkey stated “This kind of project really came out of our exposure to so much history of the musicianss, famous families, iconic homes and estates in the region.” The flexibility to adapt Die Fledermaus to different cultures, communities, and countries makes it an ideal operetta for individualization.

An opera is set in western Appalachia.

Dr. Jon Truitt

Cornelia Laemmli Orth

Working with Starkey to rewrite the libretto into a charming mountain cocktail is Asheville Lyric Opera’s artistic advisor and longtime ALO director, Dr. Jon Truitt. Having performed Die Fledermaus three times and directed it twice with various adaptations, he is well prepared to direct this very unique performance. For this exciting masterpiece ALO will collaborate with Cornelia Laemmli Orth, conductor of Symphony of the Mountains, based out of Kingsport, TN. In her eighth season as music director of Symphony of the Mountains, internationally acclaimed conductor Cornelia Laemmli Orth will be contributing her considerable talent to the musical direction of this exciting performance.

As an advocate for Contemporary Music, Cornelia brings a variety of new music to the region. She has conducted several operas and will be providing excellent musical leadership to ALO’s singers and chorus members. Setting Die Fledermaus in a well known western North Carolina home, the “Giltmore” and tailoring the “Vanderburghs” to have certain Southern mountain charms will, without a doubt, create a humorous and original production, one that will create a deeper sense of appreciation for Western North Carolina’s culture. IF YOU Die Fledermaus, Friday, October 3 at GO 8 p.m., and Sunday, October 5 at 3 p.m.

at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets available by calling the box office (828) 2574530, or online at www.ashevillelyric.org. Students and other groups may purchse tickets to the Appalachian Party Preview Dress Rehearsal, held October 1 at 7 p.m., by calling the ALO at (828) 236-0670.

Asheville Area Piano Forum’s Fall Benefit Concert

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Always a highlight of the fall, the Asheville Area Piano Forum will present its 14th annual fall benefit concert on Sunday, September 28. The event will showcase the talents of 12 of its professional pianists including: Karen Boyd, Scott Camp, Elizabeth Child, Leslie Downs, Polly Feitzinger, David Francis, Anna Hayward, Ruth Nussbaum-Borden, Nathan Shirley, Michael Jefry Stevens, Teresa Sumpter and Brian Turner, in addition to guest artist, Mark Morales and AAPF student competition winner Ren Zhang. The program will include solo and two piano selections featuring both “the classics” and jazz. Its two annual benefit concerts, held in the fall and spring, are the main source of income for the AAPF educational outreach programs. These include: providing financial assistance to deserving students facing challenges paying for piano lessons, as well as support for the Keys for Kidz group piano classes which introduce music and the arts to underserved students in our community. The 501 © 3 non-profit organization provides lectures open to the public, master classes, student recitals, monthly performance groups, and the sponsorship of the Asheville Piano Competition for pre-college students. 2014 AAPF Student Competition Winner, fifteen-year-old Ren Zhang, will be a sophomore this fall at TC Roberson High School. He plays trumpet in the Marching Band, is a member of the Symphonic Band,

6 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

was a member of the math team which won the regional competition in the North Carolina State Math Contest, while at the same time continuing his studies as a classical pianist and winning piano competitions. Fifteen-year-old pianist, Ren Zhang Brian Turner (L) and Born in ShangScott Camp hai, his early years were spent in Totalent the AAPF seeks to mentor.” According ronto and then his family moved to Charlotte to AAPF President, Nathan Shirley, “Chilwhere he began piano studies at age nine. He dren derive countless benefits from early won several awards in competitions sponsored piano instruction and music education.” by the Charlotte Piano Teachers Association AAPF membership is open to profesbefore moving to Asheville in 2011. In 2013, sional and amateur pianists, teachers, and all he was the first place winner in the Difficult who support the outreach programs, which Division. enhance the music education of both children “This year he won the most Advanced and adults in our community. Division and has been invited to perform in the Forum’s Fall Benefit concert,” says Polly For more information about the AAPF and Feitzinger, Ren’s piano teacher and a founding the program for the September Benefit Concert, member of the AAPF. visit www.ashevillepiano.org. “When offered selections from which to chose his piece to perform at the Fall Benefit IF YOU Asheville Area Piano Forum annual fall – a difficult Rachmaninoff Prelude or an even GO benefit concert, Sunday, September 28 more difficult work, the famous Fantasieat 3 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre. Impromtu by Chopin, Ren selected the more General admission $28, Patron $50, free difficult work to learn this summer. for students 12 and under; students 13-21 $3. “His enthusiasm for music and making Tickets are available through the Diana Wortham music is very inspiring and gratifying,” says Box Office, (828) 257-4530, or purchase tickets Feitzinger. “He is a fine example of the young online at www.dwtheatre.com/boxoffice.


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captivating performances

ASHEVILLE SYMPHONY OPENS SEASON WITH

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played together and that made a huge impression on me. Music was fun and energizing, it was a wonderful way to communicate and be expressive, even then. Then things started to get “serious” when I began formal piano lessons at age 6 and violin lessons at age 8.

The season-opening program starts with Rossini’s overture to The Barber of Seville, followed by Dvorak’s Serenade, op. 44. After intermission, the orchestra will perform Holst’s St. Paul’s Suite and close the program with Mozart’s Symphony No. 39. Meyer’s intent for programming the concert was to select colorful, vibrant music to celebrate the opening of the season, which is the ASO’s 54th. “Rossini’s overture to The Barber of Seville is a perfect appetizer, full of flavor and interest, which leaves you wanting more,” Meyer said. “Then the strings take a back seat in a piece designed to feature the wonderful woodwind section in Dvorak’s Serenade.” The Mozart symphony — one of the composer’s final works — will serve as a sneak preview of the ASO’s Asheville Amadeus Festival set for March 17-22, 2015. Worldrenowned pianist Emanuel Ax will perform two Mozart piano concertos and other works during the festival. To help celebrate the Maestro’s 10th season, we sat down with Maestro Daniel Meyer for a few quick questions.

RRM: As the conductor of the Asheville Symphony for 10 years, you have participated in over 100 performances with the orchestra. Are there performances or moments that stand out in your memory for their significance? Could you tell us what made these performances particularly special for you?

Rapid River Magazine: It seems a good place to start would be the «how did you get into music» question — so, how did you get into music? Daniel Meyer: My mother introduced me to the magic of music. She is an excellent pianist, organist, and singer, and she would set me next to her at the piano when I was just about old enough to sit still. We sang and

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Franklin Keel performs JS Bach and original compositions inspired by the Baroque master on cello, Sunday, September 14 at 3 p.m. at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, 337 Charlotte Street, Asheville.

Barbara Weiss

The Angel and the Devil Early music artists, Gail Ann Schroeder on viola da gamba, and Barbara Weiss on harpsichord, join forces to play virtuosic highlights of the French Baroque period. These rivals

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The 2014-15 season of the Asheville Chamber Music Series opens Friday, September 12, at 8 p.m.

Music director Daniel Meyer celebrates his 10th anniversary with the ASO.

DM: I was particularly proud of the orchestra

when we performed Rite of Spring by Stravinsky — it was a watershed moment for us, because after that searing performance, there was no turning back. We can now play just about anything we want to. I also fondly look back on Falla’s El Amor Brujo, for which we created a brand new production and choreography with Attack Theatre, and our performance of Shostakovich’s 11th Symphony at the end of last season. That was such a powerful performance of a work which, frankly, not many of our musicians had performed before! I tend to remember best the concerts in which we took a particular risk and in some way exceeded our expectations — whether that expectation was for how we played the music or even more importantly, how did that music resonate with our audience?

RRM: In addition to your performing schedule, you also give frequent talks, master classes and seminars. What are some of the most important lessons you seek to pass on to your audiences? DM: You do not have to be an expert or a

trained musician to love the music we play. In fact, coming to the table with an open mind is most often an advantage and will free you to experience the raw power of great music played by a passionate group of musicians. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t invest a little research or advanced listening before you come to a concert. Just like anything else that is worth your passion and time, great music needs commitment on the part of its performers but also its listeners. Additionally, find your own way through the classical literature. You do not have to start at Medieval chant and work your way methodically through music you may or may not like. Find connections, take detours, enjoy the wonderful breadth of what we call “classical music.” IF YOU Asheville Symphony’s Opening Night GO concert takes place September 20 at 8

p.m. in the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium at the U.S. Cellular Center. Tickets start at $22 for adults and $11 for youth. For more information or to purchase tickets call (828) 2547046 or go to www.ashevillesymphony.org.

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Pan Harmonia Concerts

Inspired by Bach

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Pianist Bradley Martin and Violinist Justin Bruns

Mozart and More

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra will open its season on Saturday, September 20 with a concert featuring works by Mozart, Dvorak, Rossini and Holst, along with a celebration of Music Director Daniel Meyer’s 10th season with the ASO.

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from the court of Louis XIV were reported to have played like an angel, Marin Marais, and a devil, Antoine Forqueray. L’Ange et le Diable: Marin Marais and Antoine Forqueray, Saturday, Gail Ann September 27 at 7:30 p.m. Schroeder in the Chapel of First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, Asheville.

IF YOU GO: Tickets to both concerts available online at www.pan-harmonia.org and at the door.

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Local News, Views and Music on the Air at 103.7 FM

IF YOU Tickets are $38 each. To purchase GO tickets or for more information

please visit the ACMS website: www.ashevillechambermusic.org or call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427 or support@ashevillechambermusic.org.

Mountain Area Information Network

PG. 20

Bradley

The first of several Martin Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) concerts will feature pianist Bradley Martin and violinist Justin Bruns at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation at the corner of Edwin Place and Charlotte Street in Asheville. The program will include: Beethoven’s Violin Justin Sonata No. 7, Op.30 No.2; Bruns Ravel’s Sonata for Violin & Piano; and Beethoven’s Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 12 No.1. Pianist Bradley Martin has appeared with the Bolshoi Theatre in Russia and the Kusciuzko Foundation in New York. As first violinist of the Atlanta Chamber Players, Justin Bruns has performed with the Kocapelli String Quartet, Brave New Works, and Michigan Chamber Players. The ACMS has been recognized for its outstanding programs and for its unique education component through a collaboration with the strings program of the Asheville Buncombe Schools and our other cultural partners in the community.

main.nc.us • • • • •

Wireless Internet VOIP Web Hosting Mail Services Dial-up

34 Wall Street #407, Asheville :: (866) 962-6246 :: (828) 255-0182 Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 7


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sound experience The Get Right Band

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Asheville’s funk/rock/reggae trio, The Get Right Band, will be releasing their much anticipated album Bass Treble Angel Devil this month.

This is an album for dancers, for rockers, for connoisseurs, for radio junkies, for true music lovers. This is an album for anyone who rocks out to The Black Keys or The Red Hot Chili Peppers, for anyone who grew up blasting Sublime or Led Zeppelin on their car stereos, for anyone who dances in their living room to Michael Jackson or The Talking Heads. The hour-long juggernaut of highenergy tunes, bold and witty lyrics and adventurous production approach, melds funk, rock, and reggae into a dance party album that will have listeners singing along and shaking their booties from track one. The Get Right Band consists of Silas Durocher on guitar and vocals, Jesse Gentry on bass and vocals, and JianClaude Mears on drums and vocals. “This record was made to get you right,” says Durocher. “We wanted to do something big, something bold, something that makes a statement. We didn’t hold back or play anything safe. It’s a listening experience full of excitement.” Engineered and co-produced by Matt Williams at The Eagle Room in Hendersonville, the record manages to sound both raw and polished at the same time. Guest musicians include the talented Eleanor Underhill (Underhill Rose) and Stephanie Morgan (Stephanie’s Id) on vocals, Chuck Lichtenberger (Stephanie’s Id, The Archrivals) on keys, and Chris Pyle (former Get Right Band drummer) on percussion. The project was fully funded by The Get Right Band’s loyal fan base, a true testament to the strong connection the band has with their audience. GRB will be joined for the album release show by Asheville’s own Andrew Scotchie and The River Rat’s, and Nashville’s reggae favorites, Roots of a Rebellion. Bass Treble Angel Devil will also be available on September 12 at record stores, iTunes, Amazon, and CDBaby. For more information about the band, visit www.thegetrightband.com. IF YOU The Get Right Band CD release GO show, Friday, September 12 at

9:30 p.m. Tickets: $7. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com

A Match Made in Bluegrass Heaven

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At the age of 33 Noam Pikelny has already amassed the sort of credentials typical of someone twice his age.

The term prodigy is often cavalierly tossed around to the point that it begins to lose all meaning but Pikelny is among those for whom it’s appropriate. Winner of the 2010 first annual Steve Martin Prize for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass, Pikelny is a veteran of the progressive Bluegrass band Leftover Salmon (2002-2004), the John Cowan Band (20042006) before becoming a founding member of Punch Brothers. Over the last eight years with the band, his melodic and unique styling has helped redefine the role of the banjo, moving the instrument back to the forefront of modern music. In addition to his band work, Pikelny has released an acclaimed trio of solo recordings, the second of which was nominated for

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a Grammy Award. But it is his current project of which he’s the most excited. Teaming with sideman extraordinaire and four time Grammy winner Stuart Duncan, whose own credentials are a veritable who’s who of contemporary Bluegrass; Pikelny has embarked on his Noam Pikelny, winner of the 2010 Steve Martin Prize latest musical journey. for Excellence in Banjo and Bluegrass. The pairing of fiddle and banjo in duet is hardly unique but it has commonly James Cassara: As of this writing your curbeen used within the context of a larger band, rent tour hasn’t yet started but am I correct in surrounded by guitar and anchored by upright thinking you and Stuart have done this before? bass. It has rarely been placed center stage. Noam Pikelny: We played a few dates togethBoth Pikelny and Duncan are undeniably er in March and continued on into the sumamong the foremost players on their respective mer, mostly hitting the festival circuit and instruments, often blurring the lines of what things of that sort. It was a great experience, constitutes roots music in the 21st century. which is what inspired us both to continue Before them lies an unfolded carpet, an open working together. road that is theirs to travel as they wish. JC: How did the pairing of you two initially come about? Was this something that had percolated in the back of your minds and finally presented itself, or was it more of a spontaneous meeting of the minds?

INTERVIEW WITH CHRIS CHADWICK, OWNER OF THE

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A-1 Music Warehouse

Rapid River Magazine: Tell me a little about

A-1 Music Warehouse.

Chris Chadwick: A-1 Music Warehouse is a family run, throwback style record shop similar to the one we had growing up. We believe in the power of music as it invokes nostalgic memories; our first dance, our first date, our first kiss. Our passion is Heavy Metal and Classic Rock and Roll. We, however, pride ourselves on having something for every ear. We also carry a large array of memorabilia. We have t-shirts, posters, silk flags, authentic concert photos and locally made hemp jewelry.

RRM: Vinyl seems to be having a resurgence lately. Why is that? And do you see records making a comeback with mainstream listeners in the near future? CC: Retro as well as new vinyl is becoming a rapidly sought after trend. I think it is a sign of the times. Music is coming full circle. Today’s artists are realizing that vinyl stands the test of time. It sounds better and lasts longer. Therefore, I do see vinyl making a comeback. We have customers we call purists that come to A-1 Music Warehouse for vinyl only. They all say the same thing. “Nothing sounds like vinyl.” It is bridging generations. The kids are catching on too. It doesn’t get more mainstream than that. RR: What are the basic essentials you

need in order to have a good, not overly

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INTeRVIeweD By

NP: The pairing with Stuart was something

DeNNIS Ray

When it comes to listening to vinyl, quality is the key. expensive, home sound system? What do you recommend?

CC: All you need is a turntable, receiver and speakers. If you’re just starting out, remember, bigger does not always mean better. When it comes to listening to vinyl, quality is the key. It’s hard to make recommendations without meeting the person first. We tailor all aspects of the sound system to meet the person’s needs and expectations. We recommend starting small and experiencing the music. The choices are endless. Be it a new sound system, your favorite album, the missing piece to your CD collection or a unique accessory, “If we don’t have it, we’ll find it!”

A-1 Music Warehouse 1408-B Patton Ave. in West Asheville 828-575-9333 www.mymusicwarehouse.com

I’d been thinking about for a long time. I was obviously familiar with his work, especially the acoustic stuff he’d done with Bela Fleck, and readily admit to being in awe of his playing. When I was putting together a band for the Plays Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe project I kept thinking he’d be perfect for it. Luke Bulla, who plays fiddle in my band, was producing the album and he’s also a fan of Stuart’s. In fact Stuart had been a mentor of sorts to him, so that pretty much sealed it.

JC: You’re both known for your virtuosic skills on your instruments, yet looking at a few of the live music clips I was sent, there’s a lot of playful improvisation going on. How important is that to you? NP: It’s vital. The more we played together

the more comfortable we got, and we began to really challenge one another. I’m not putting myself in Stuart’s league (writer’s note: I would) but playing with him pushed me to work harder. There’s a lot of dynamic stuff going on, a lot of counter rhythms and such that the audience might not hear or be tuned into. But we know it’s there, and try to keep finding new ways to move it.

JC: I’ve seen performers who are so skilled on their instruments it almost comes across as an instructional video. But with you there’s a lot of interchange with the audience. Did that develop during the Leftover Salmon days? NP: That was one of the great things about

playing with the Salmon. We played a lot of continued on page 27


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A Celebration of Southern Appalachian Culture

The 34th Annual Heritage Weekend will be held September 20-21 at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center. This free festival sponsored by the Southern Highland Craft Guild features traditional music, dancing and heritage craft demonstrations. A highlight of the weekend is the 34th Annual World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle

HERITAGE WEEKEND ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE Saturday, September 20 11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass 12 noon – Split Rail 1 p.m. – Firefly 2 p.m. – 34th Annual Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition 3 p.m. – J Creek Cloggers and the Ross Brothers

Sunday, September 21 12 noon. – Level Ground Gospel 1 p.m. – Carol Rifkin and Friends 2 p.m. – Cole Mountain Cloggers with Carol Rifkin 2:30 p.m. – Gospel Grass Carol Rifkin

Photo: Diana Gates

3:30 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike

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Competition on Saturday, 2-3 p.m. Joe “Colonel Buncombe” Bly will emcee the competition. A whimmy diddle is an Appalachian mountain toy traditionally made from Cole Mountain Cloggers two sticks of Photo: Diana Gates rhododendron. Notches are carved into one stick and a propeller is attached to the end. The other stick is rubbed against the notches, causing the propeller to spin either gee (to the right) or haw (to the left). During the World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition contestants are judged on the number of rotations between gee and haw they can complete during a given time. They may also have to switch hands during the competition or whimmy diddle behind their backs. There are three divisions of competition: children, adult and professional. Sign up throughout the day to compete. Winners receive a trophy, Heritage Weekend poster designed by Hand-Cranked Letterpress, t-shirt, a Moon Pie, and bragging rights. During Heritage Weekend, learn from area experts about beekeeping, coopering, heritage toy making, natural dyeing, spinning, broom making and furniture making. Handson activities related to traditional crafts will be provided for all ages. Other highlights include sheep shearing demonstrations throughout the day on Saturday, and border collie demonstrations on Sunday.

Jim McGie Photo: Diana Gates

The Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center is the ideal place for Heritage Weekend with free parking, access to hiking trails and grassy areas for a picnic. Spend an early autumn weekend in WNC honoring and learning about crafts of yesteryear while enjoying the beauty of the region. Granny’s Country Kitchen food truck will be set up on the grounds of the Folk Art Center both days. For more information, including a list of participating craftspeople and musicians, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

IF YOU The 34th Annual Heritage Weekend, GO Saturday, September 20 from 10 a.m.

to 4 p.m., and Sunday, September 21 from 12 noon to 5 p.m. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Hwy. 70 entrance in east Asheville.

40th Annual Mountain Heritage Day

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Mountain Heritage Day is a combination old-fashioned mountain fair and showcase for Southern Appalachian music, arts, dance and song, with the atmosphere of a big family reunion.

Visitors to Mountain Heritage Day will find three stages of traditional old-time, gospel, and bluegrass music and dance, with plenty of clogging and fiddle and banjo music. Shape-note singers come from across the Southeast to take part in one of the mountains’ most sacred traditions.

The Mountain Heritage Day arts and crafts area offers juried, handmade items ranging from woodwork and pottery to paintings, jewelry, and quilts. Food booths feature fare such as ham biscuits, churned ice cream, lemonade, barbeque, Cherokee Frybread, fried green tomatoes, Kettle Corn, beans, cornbread, and the like. The festival also includes hayrides, Cherokee stickball games, and several just-for-fun competitions, including a Chainsaw Contest, Antique Car show, Costume Contests, Beard and Moustache Contest, and Baked Goods and Canning contest. A great addition this year is our Children’s Tent, with activities for kids

all day long. Demonstrations of folk arts and skills take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Chuck Anderson, Broom Making

IF YOU Mountain Heritage Day will be held GO Saturday, September 27 on the campus

of Western Carolina University in Cullowhee. For more details, call WCU’s Mountain Heritage Center at (828) 227-7129, or visit www.mountainheritageday.com.

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 9


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September 1 – Apple Festival. Street fair, arts & crafts,

entertainment, children’s activities, parade, food & more. Fri.-Sun. 10-8, Mon. 10-5. From 6th Ave to Caswell St., downtown Hendersonville. (828) 697-4557

Enjoy a guided tour of Carl Sandburg’s home.

September 1 – WNC Air Museum Open House. 10-5.

Free admission. Airplanes of the 1930’s-50’s, many models and pictures on display. (828) 290-8230

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College, 100 mile (century), 63 mile (metric), 45 mile, and 25 mile bike tours through Henderson County apple orchards, 8-5. Registration $55. (828) 674-8584

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September 1 - October 24 – Bearfootin’ public art display featuring fiberglass bear sculptures decorated in different themes. On the sidewalks of Hendersonville’s Main Street. (828) 233-3216

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“Coming of the Railroad” exhibit. A replica of the Saluda Mountain Grade, the History of Laurel Park, and a replica of a general store. Henderson County Heritage Museum, Wed.- Sat. 10-5, Sun. 1-5. Free. (828) 694-1619

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Activity Center, Mon. 10-5. Gemstones, jewelry, fossils, lapidary equipment; demonstrations; exhibits & programs. Admission: $4; Children 12 & under free when accompanied by an adult. 404-277-9000

September 1 – Tour d’Apple, Blue Ridge Community

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Special Exhibit. Mon. 10-2. Free admission. (828) 698-1977

September 1 – Gem & Mineral Spectacular. Whitmire

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September 1-14 – The Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown presents the comedy The Mystery of Irma Vep, Wed.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m. (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008 September 5-14 – NC Mountain State Fair. Agriculture, music, crafts, art, food, entertainment, display of livestock, competitions, and midway amusement rides. Fletcher, (828) 687-1414 September 6 – Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra pres-

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ents “Crossroads: The Corner of Classical and Bluegrass, Blue Ridge Community College Concert Hall. $35; $5 for 176 students. Flat Rock, (828) 697-5884

September 6 – Summer Music in Flat Rock featuring

Nikkie Talley & Jason Sharp, Little Rainbow Row’s back deck (corner of Greenville Hwy.& W. Blue Ridge Road) 6-8 p.m. Free, bring-your-lawn-chair. Weather permitting. (828) 693-1313 or (828) 694-3551

September 11-14 & 18-21 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents

the Music of James Bond. (828) 693-0731 or 866-732-8008

September 12-13 – Bullington Gardens Fall Plant Sale.

Featuring many late-blooming perennials & annuals from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (828) 698-6104

September 12, 13, 19, 20, 26 & 27 – Henderson County Library Book Sale. 1940 Spartanburg Hwy. 100,000 books, CD’s, DVD’s, tapes & records on sale. (828) 697-4725

September 17 – Citizenship Day and Naturalization Ceremony. 11 a.m. (time may change) at the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site. Official oath-taking ceremony, open to the public. Flat Rock, (828) 693-4178 September 18 – Rhythm & Brews Concert featuring Blue Dogs. Azalea Parking on King St. between 3rd & 4th. 6-9 p.m. Free outdoor concert. Bring a chair. (828) 233-3216 September 21 – The Henderson County Library turns FH

10 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

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The 2014 annual Open Studio Tour of Henderson County NC will be held September 20-21.

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This free self-guided tour features 30 fine art and fine craft studios throughout Henderson County. Artist’s studios will be open with their latest artwork to view and purchase with many studios featuring visiting artists. Original works in painting, sculpture, pottery, jewelry, fiber and metal arts, woodworking and glass will be offered by the 57 artists located in studios on four art corridors from downtown Hendersonville: North off Hwy. 25 N; South into Flat Rock and Zirconia; Southwest on Kanuga/Crab Creek; and West on 5th Avenue/Laurel Park as well as 64 West Horse Shoe. The Art League of Henderson County is a major tour sponsor. Open Studio Tour guide booklets are available in the Henderson County Travel and Tourism Center and many locations throughout Henderson county. Preview works by artists on the 2014 Open Studio Tour Preview works from 5-8 p.m. on Thursday, September 18 during of Henderson Rhythm & Brews. County from 5-8

cont’d. from pg. 10

WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher. (828) 329-1671

September 24-28 – GEAR Rally, WNC Agricultural Center, Fairgrounds, Fletcher, (570) 279-0756

The tour is also available online at www.OpenStudioTourHC.com.

A raffle of donated works will benefit Backpacks for Kids.

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for the

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September 26-28 – Asheville Quilt Show, WNC Agri-

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cultural Center Expo Center. (828) 687-1414 or (828) 281-3653

September 27 – Henderson County Curb Market Old Timey Day. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sausage & ham biscuits cooked on a wood stove, music, antique display, demonstrations & more. (828) 692-8012

Professional Custom Framing for Your Pictures and Memorabilia

October 2-5 – NC Championship Walking Horse Show,

WNC Agicultural Center. (828) 687-1414 or 919-681-4431

October 2-26 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Wed.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Thurs., Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m. Tickets $40. Mild adult content. Flat Rock, (828) 693-0731 or 866-732-8008 Henderson County Tourism Development Authority, 201 S. Main St. in Hendersonville. For more details call (828) 693-9708 or 1-800-828-4244, or visit www.historichendersonville.org

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IF YOU Open Studio Tour GO of Henderson

p.m., Thursday, September 18, during Rhythm & Brews in downtown Hendersonville, a free event with live music held in the Azalea Lot adjacent to King street between 3rd and 4th Avenues. A sample of work by each of the 57 artists on the tour will be displayed in four tents representing each of the four art corridors on the tour. There will also be a tent with art work donated by tour artists for a raffle benefitting Backpacks for Kids.

100! Children’s activities, tours, and refreshments from 1-4 p.m. Special ceremony at 2 p.m., followed by Realms of Gold, an original play portraying the history of the library, written by Tom Orr. Encore performance at 3 p.m. (828) 697-4725

September 21 – Carolina Mountain Home Showcase,

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234 Main Street ~ Hendersonville 828.697.0025

414-a Kanuga Road, Hendersonville HR

Mon-Fri 9-5

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(828) 693-7967

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www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Calvary  ½

small town in Sligo. He’s a good man, truly called to his vocation. Unlike most priests, he comes to the ministry after being married, having a child, battling the bottle and being widowed. REEL TAKE: John Michael At the start of the film McDonough’s Calvary is a Brendan Gleeson pays for the Father James is hearing powerful character-driven sins of others in Calvary. confessions. The voice drama strewn with dark on the other side of the confessional says, “I comedy throughout, but it is not a dark was seven the first time I tasted semen.” A comedy. Calvary is a shatteringly cruel film startling opening line to be sure and a lynch ensconced in a scathingly satirical script. Fans pin as well. He proceeds to tell Father James of McDonough’s previous film The Guard that he was preyed upon by a bad priest every (which also starred Gleeson) will be a likely day for five years and now, decades later he’s audience for this one, but they should not go going to retaliate. But with the perpetrator in expecting the more comedic bent of that long dead, the mysterious confessor says he’s film. Calvary is an emotionally brutally story, going to take a good priest’s life because, one not for the faint of heart. It is however an “that’s something people will pay attention to, utterly engrossing and worthwhile film. won’t they.” He gives Fr. James a week to put Brendan Gleeson gives the best perforhis affairs in order and says they are to meet mance of his career to date as Father James, on the beach Sunday next. the moral compass in a sea of depravity in a Short Take: A good priest in a small Irish town receives a mysterious confessional death threat as payback for the sins of the church.

THE MONTHLY REEL

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This past month dealt the entertainment world a staggering blow; the tragic passing of actor, comedian and all round good guy, Robin Williams.

Not a day later actress Lauren Bacall passed at the age of 89. We, at Reel Takes, like to think that Bogey and Bacall are together again, as they were always meant to be. While sad that another member of Hollywood’s golden era has left this world, Bacall’s passing was easier to bear, becoming eclipsed by the ongoing revelations regarding Williams’s death. We pay tribute to both this month. See “Robin Williams: Tears of a Clown” on page 15 and our DVD picks on page 14. This month’s reviews include a little something for everyone. If you’re up for super heroes and action heroes, there’s Guardians of the Galaxy and Expendables 3. The popular 1990’s sci-fi novel The Giver has been adapted for the screen and while die-hard fans of the book may have been disappointed, our Chip Kaufmann was not.

The week that ensues would be enough to send most of us over the edge, but the good father does his best to maintain his usual quiet devotion to collar and creed in service to the community. He seems to wrestle more with relevance of the church in today’s society than he does with his own mortality, but that would be thanks to the unrepentant lot of characters in his midst. In short he counsels a battered but adulterous wife, her butcher husband with an ax to grind, a contemptuous African immigrant (with whom the aforementioned wife is cheating), a lonely young man, a vastly wealthy gin-soaked prig of a businessman and last but not least a serial killer. He also endures the wrath and scorn of a local pubowner facing foreclosure, a local policeman, a cold hearted atheistic doctor, and a male prostitute. The only allies he seems to have are his aging dog, an elderly American novelist and a French woman whose husband has just died. He’s also working through his relationship with his suicidal daughter who thinks of

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Robin Williams

Lauren Bacall

If you’re in the mood for a delightful summer dalliance, then you must see Magic in the Moonlight. Hungry for another foodie movie? Move over John Favreau, Helen Mirren’s got a Michelin star and she’s not afraid to use it in The Hundred-Foot Journey. And last, but certainly not least, Brendan Gleeson stars in John McDonough’s Calvary, an emotionally shattering story that’s well worth the time, albeit not for the faint of heart. If Robin Williams hadn’t passed, Brendan Gleeson would have been the man of the month as far as Reel Takes goes. Once again some great little titles came and went quickly. One of particular note was The Grand Seduction. It’s not even remotely as sexy as it sounds, but it is a delightful little distraction. Gleeson plays an out of work fisherman in a

12 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

MICHeLLe KeeNaN

little harbor town in New Foundland. He leads the sparsely populated town in an elaborate lie in order to attract a town doctor and secure a profitable contract with a petrol chemical recycling plant. Folks who enjoy fun little films like Waking Ned Divine are sure to like The Grand Seduction. It will be on DVD in the not too distant future, so be sure to keep an eye out for it. We also hope you’ll peruse the listings for the Asheville Film Society and the Hendersonville Film Society. AFS Director, Ken Hanke has some rare gems lined up for the month. And HFS Director, Chip Kaufmann has some special treats in store as well. At press time we’re looking forward to The November Man, The Trip to Italy, What If, Land Ho, Love is Strange and Skeleton Twins. We’ll be sure to tell you what we think about them next time. Until then, enjoy.

his vocation as a form of abandonment. Yeah … so, it’s a lot. It’s heavy. There’s so much more going on than I’m able to delve into and keep to a word count. Suffice it to say it’s quite a juxtaposition; a mash up of bleakness, despair, faith and forgiveness. It’s difficult and desolate, but it’s also fascinating and it stays with you. Gleeson brings a transcendent grace and dignity to James that makes the viewer ache for this melancholy soul. McDonough’s gift for dialogue leaves you leaning forward, hinged on every word. The photography is brilliant. The end result of this collaboration is a smart, exemplary little film. For me Calvary is a must-see movie for 2014. Rated R for sexual reference, language, brief strong violence and some drug use. Review by Michelle Keenan

The Expendables 3

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Short Take: Third installment in the aging action hero series differs little from the previous two but it really benefits from a “killer” performance from Mel Gibson as a former member turned rogue.

REEL TAKE:

3rd installment, 3 stars. That seems fair doesn’t it? I certainly think so. The Expendables 3 is far from being a great movie but then it has no pretenses at Sylvester Stallone trying to be. It’s vows revenge in The Expendables 3. a throwback to the Saturday matinees of yore where action is meant to trump plot and character development but not the characters themselves. I’ve read a lot of criticism online that has been leveled at the film for toning down the graphic nature of its violence to achieve a PG-13 rating. I completely disagree. There’s killings a plenty going on here (I lost count at around 500 and that’s just the opening prologue) but there’s no need to show all that detailed blood and gore. That’s what video games are for. Movies continued on page 13


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After the frenetic opening I just mentioned, which was to break a former member (Wesley Snipes) out of a foreign prison, it turns out that another former member of the team believed dead (Mel Gibson) has gone rogue (just like Sean Bean in Goldeneye) and he needs to be brought to justice. In order to do this, Stallone must retire the old team and then recruit a newer, younger one. While movies of this type are always built around an aging action star (in this case several aging action stars), it’s the villain who makes or breaks the film in the long run. Where would James Bond be without Goldfinger or Doctor No? Mel Gibson as Stonebanks, the rogue member, isn’t in their league but he’s more than a worthy adversary for this film recalling Alan Rickman –vs- Bruce Willis in Die Hard or Richard Boone –vs- John Wayne in Big Jake. In fact he is, by far and away, the best thing in the movie. In brief, Gibson sabotages the opening rescue effort and cripples Caesar (Terry Crews) while shaking up the rest of the team. CIA operative Harrison Ford is none too pleased and this is why Stallone must get some new blood. He seeks out soldier-of-fortune Kelsey Grammar who recruits Kellan Lutz, Glenn Powell, Victor Ortiz, and the team’s first woman Ronda Rousey (hey, gotta keep up with the times). They track Gibson to his lair where he is more than ready for them. After getting captured, it’s up to the old team (with the addition of Harrison Ford doing his best Han Solo imitation) to save the new one leading to a final, top notch showdown between Gibson and Stallone. Guess who wins. I thoroughly enjoyed The Expendables 3 because it delivered exactly what it promised. This movie already has a built in audience and I doubt that anything I have to say will influence those people in any way whatsoever. For you others, if you’re looking for a movie to end the summer with, you can do a lot worse than The Expendables 3. Rated PG-13 for violence including sustained gun battles, explosions, and some language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

The Giver 

Short Take: Beautifully realized film version of the Newberry Award winning book about a future society where emotions have been eliminated and sameness in all things is celebrated.

REEL TAKE: Of the three movies that I had to review for this issue, along with others that I also saw, The Giver was the one that I enjoyed the most. Going into it, I knew nothing of the 1993 book by Lois Lowry other than the fact that it had been a Newberry Award winner and that it had a science-fiction setting. Having not read the book, I was not prepared for the film to open in black & white. Only later does color gradually enter into the

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movie; by the end everything is in full color all the time (much like the movie Pleasantville from a few years back). The setting is a future society Jeff Bridges in the where sameness imaginative and is celebrated and thoughtful sci-fi flick conformity rules. The Giver. There is no ethnicity other than white, no war or poverty, and no religion. In fact emotions such as love are banished and have been erased from the society’s collective memory as have all memories of things past. Everyone is calm and harmonious and everything is peaceful thanks to daily medication. People go about their daily assigned tasks without rancor and without question. One member of the society is known as “the Giver” and only he is permitted to possess memories so the community has them if they need them. The community is led by a group of elders headed up by Meryl Streep. As everyone in the new society is given a preordained task to do, one young person will be chosen to succeed the existing Giver and it is up to the old one to train the new one. Jonas (Brenton Thwaits) is chosen in the annual coming of age ceremony to be the next Giver. He must now train with the existing Giver (Jeff Bridges) who is getting old and must pass on his memories. At first Jonas is fascinated by all the new things he is discovering then he is appalled at all the knowledge that has been withheld. The Giver explains that this was done to protect and improve society for it is these memories that bring pain and cause strife among humans. Memories evoke emotions and emotions inspire strong feelings both good and bad. Should memories be banned for the good of society? That’s the question that Lois Lowry and the filmmakers want young adults (the target audience) to grapple with. But while young adults may be the target audience, The Giver has something to say to all of us. This makes it a throwback to the thoughtful sci-fi of the 1950s-1970s before the special effects departments took over. Even though the budget for the film wasn’t huge by today’s standards ($25 million as compared to Guardians’ $140 million) it manages to beautifully evoke its futuristic setting. Director Philip Noyce and his cameraman, Ross Emery, skillfully handle the transition from the black & white fake world to the rich colors of the real one. Of course once Jonas is exposed to memories of the past (shades of Soylent Green), there is no turning back and he does everything he can to restore them to his society although it means pain and death and the ultimate demise of that society. Even watered down there is more food for thought in The Giver than in most of your big sci-fi epics. For that reason The Giver is a movie that

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3D and IMAX tickets), the producers wanted to make sure you get your money’s worth and Rated PG-13 for mature themes and sci-fi acyou certainly do but they could have scaled tion violence. them back a little and the film’s overall runReview by Chip Kaufmann ning time, 121 minutes, could Guardians of the have been cut to around 105. Galaxy  Those Short Take: Although it has a last two points little too much razzle-dazzle and are just a 60+ goes on longer than it should, year old’s Guardians of the Galaxy doesn’t minor quibbles. take itself seriously and makes Guardians of the for an ideal summer moviegoing Galaxy makes experience. for ideal summer REEL TAKE: In the ongoing “war” family fare and between movies made by Marvel I’ll take it and Comics and DC Comics, I’ll go for other Marvel those made by Marvel every time. The Guardians of the Galaxy prepare movies in the The primary reason for this is that for their final showdown. same vein over the Marvel films don’t take themChristopher selves as seriously which is rather ironic as it Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy any day. was Heath Ledger’s Joker in DC’s The Dark Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi Knight who famously said “Why so serious?” violence and action, and for some language. Guardians of the Galaxy continues Review by Chip Kaufmann the tradition of Marvel’s The Avengers and subsequent sequels by providing top notch enMovies continued on page 14 tertainment with liberal doses of humor (and not of the pitch black variety). Like the other movies in this genre, it contains a little too much razzle-dazzle and goes on longer than it should but that can be forgiven considering how good it is. The plot is a complex one for the uninitiAsheville Pizza & Brewing Company ated involving multiple characters including Movieline (828) 254-1281 two villains to go along with our 5 “superhewww.ashevillepizza.com roes” as well as several different planets and Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) their respective civilizations. The streamlined Movieline (828) 298-1234 version is as follows. In order to save an Earth like planet (headed up by Glenn Close) from Biltmore Grande annihilation, 5 unlikely characters must come 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 together to defeat a super-villain who, so far, www.REGmovies.com has been indestructible. Carmike 10 (Asheville) These 5 characters are an Earthman Movieline (828) 298-4452 abducted as a child (Chris Pratt), the daughwww.carmike.com ter of the principal villain (Zoe Saldana), a genetically altered raccoon (voiced by Bradley Carolina Cinemas Cooper), a living tree named Groot (voiced (828) 274-9500 by Vin Diesel), and an escaped prisoner (Dave www.carolinacinemas.com Bautista) bent on revenge for the murder of his family. The principal villain, Ronan (Lee Cinebarre (Asheville) Pace), is made to look and sound as much like www.cinebarre.com James Earl Jones as possible. The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Guardians moves from one large set Movieline (828) 883-2200 piece to another starting with Peter Quill’s abduction from Earth. Years later he steals an Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) orb that everybody seems to want and despite Movieline (828) 232-1536 numerous attempts to steal it, he manages to www.fineartstheatre.com hang on to it. This brings him into contact with the other 4 members and they all wind Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 up in an intergalactic prison. After a protracted www.flatrockcinema.com escape, they face the film’s principal villain in a spectacular showdown and finally defeat him. Four Seasons (Hendersonville) They then decide to join forces as G.o.t.G. Movieline (828) 693-8989 As I mentioned earlier, the special effects and CGI are marvelous and are obviously Smoky Mountain Cinema geared for the 3D and IMAX audience but they (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091 do get a little wearisome after awhile. With The Strand (Waynesville) ticket prices being what they are (especially (828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Theatre Directory

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ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. September 2: Counselor At Law (1933) A successful attorney has his Jewish heritage and poverty-stricken background brought home to him when he learns his wife has been unfaithful. Stars John Barrymore, Bebe Daniels and Doris Kenyon. Directed by William Wyler. September 9: Every Day’s A Holiday (1965) British musical comedy about a group of teenagers who take jobs working in a seaside resort for the summer. It is also known as Seaside Swingers. Stars John Leyton, Mike Sarne and Pete Birrell. Directed by James Hill. September 16: Last Days Of Disco (1998) Two female Manhattan book editors, fresh out of college, find love and themselves while frequenting the local disco. Stars Chloe Sevigny, Kate Beckinsale and Chris Eigeman. Directed by Whit Stillman. September 23:

Love Me Tonight (1932) A Parisian tailor finds himself posing as a baron in order to collect a sizeable bill from an aristocrat, only to fall in love with an aloof young princess. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian. September 30: Help! (1965) Ringo finds himself the human sacrifice target of a cult and the band must try to protect him from it. Stars John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. Directed by Richard Lester. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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The Hundred Foot Journey

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Short Take: When an Indian family opens a restaurant in a small town in France, across the street from a Michelin starrated restaurant, the flour flies.

REEL TAKE: Lasse Halstrom’s The Hundred-

Foot Journey is one of two utterly delightful summer confections for the art house cinema scene this summer. The other is Magic in the Moonlight (see review on page 15). If Magic in the Moonlight is a champagne cocktail, The Hundred-Foot Journey is the petit fours of films this summer. Based on Richard C. Morais’ novel by the same name, it’s beautifully made, well acted and very charming. Halstrom, who directed the magical and playfully naughty Chocolat, is the perfect chef de cuisine for this simmering pot of goodness. The fact that it’s predictable and is not exactly a groundbreaking or important piece of filmmaking matters not.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The World According to Garp”

Helen Mirren and Manish Dayal get their sauce on in The Hundred-Foot Journey.

The Hundred-Foot Journey tells the story of the Kadam family who, after losing loved ones in political violence in Mumbai, immigrate to Europe, seeking the right place to settle down and rebuild their restaurant in their adopted home. Eventually they settle in a lovely little town in the south of France. When Papa Kadam (Om Puri) purchases a dilapidated building across the street from the stately Le Saule Pleureura he has no idea of the battle royale to ensue. Le Saule Pleureura is an haute cuisine establishment and is run by the imperialistic and meticulous Madame Mallory (Helen Mir-

September DVD Picks

The World According to Garp (1982)

I was one of the last people, among those I knew, to jump on the Robin Williams bandwagon. I never watched a single episode of Mork & Mindy (not even in reruns) and I didn’t care for Williams’s standup comedy routines with its schizophrenia on amphetamines “Reality, what a concept!” approach. That all changed with The World According to Garp. I had not read John Irving’s book but was well aware of its storyline so the plot of the movie held no surprises for me. What was surprising was how really good Robin Williams was at playing a real human being. I had previously enjoyed him in Popeye (1980) but then he doesn’t exactly qualify. As we deal with Williams’s tragic death there are several films that keep cropping up in the media remembrances such as Good Morning, Vietnam, Dead Poet’s Society, The Fisher King, and of course Aladdin and Mrs. Doubtfire but because of the impression it made on me and the fact that it seems to have been unjustly forgotten, Garp is the first Robin Williams movie that I want to remember him for. For those of you unfamiliar with Irving’s book, a simple plot analysis of the film cannot begin to convey the incredible variety of emotions and human complications that are involved. Even reading about it on Wikipedia won’t do the trick, you need to SEE the movie. Humor, tragedy, irony, social commentary, and even sex, it’s all there.

14 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

Director George Roy Hill (The Sting) was one of America’s most accomplished filmmakers in the 1970s and 80s but he is all but forgotten today which is puzzling considering how many good films he made. He was always an actor’s director and that may be the reason why. It’s the performers we remember. If you love Robin Williams and you’ve never seen Garp then you owe it to yourself and to him to see the movie that first showed what he was truly capable of. If you have seen it, then it’s time to revisit it to refresh your memory. Requiescat in pace, Robin.

To Have and Have Not (1944)

With the recent passing of Lauren Bacall and this month marking her 90th birthday it seemed only fitting to remember her. For me, I wanted to remember where it all began – her career and the romance with the love of her life, Humphrey Bogart. Directed by Howard Hawks, To Have and Have Not marked Lauren Bacall’s screen debut, and what a debut it was. At the ripe old age of 19 she took the world [and Bogey] by storm.

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ren). Madame doesn’t take kindly to little India moving in across the street and gastronomic and cultural clashes ensue. However, when Papa Kadam’s son Hassan (Manish Dayal) displays culinary genius and an interest in French cuisine and Madame’s lovely young sous chef (Charlotte Le Bon), get ready for Michelin star-rated romance and fun. Cultural acceptance is an important by-product of the story, but it is secondary to the sparring between Mirren and Puri, the chemistry between Dayal and Le Bon, and the sumptuous feast for the eyes. But then again, that’s the unifying power of food, the magic of spice and the connectivity of breaking bread. Puri is a delight. Mirren is a tour de force, as always, Le Bon is lovely and Daynal is a charming revelation. They play well as an ensemble. With the exception of one misstep regarding Hannan’s meteoric rise to super chefdom, the pacing is excellent. Those who liked Chocolat in 2000 and Chef earlier Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “To Have and Have Not” Hawks had originally been set to direct 1943’s Casablanca. To Have and Have Not became Hawks’ answer to Casablanca. He secured Casablanca’s leading man, but his wife gets the credit for “discovering” Bacall on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar. When they started filming, Hawks soon realized Bacall had something special, something different from the other leading ladies of the day. There was also something special between his leading man and leading lady, in spite of a 25 year age difference, and the evidence is on the screen. To Have and Have Not takes place in wartime Martinique. Humphrey Bogart plays Harry Morgan, a charter boat captain who “sticks his neck out for no one.” Walter Brennan plays the trusty side kick and lovable rumpot, Eddie, who loves to sum people up by asking them, “Was you ever stung by a dead bee?” Their status quo existence is turned upside down when French resistance activists try to hire Harry to smuggle an important underground leader to safety. Meanwhile a young pickpocket and chanteuse (Bacall) steals his wallet and his heart. The script, by Jules Furthman and William Faulkner, pops with great quips and witty banter. Hoagey Carmichael provides a terrific musical backdrop to the proceedings as Cricket, the ever watchful and affable resident piano player. As with the dialogue in Casablanca, you just wish that’s the way people actually talked. Bacall is smoking hot and elegant all at the same time. Bogey does what Bogey does best and Brennan is a sheer delight.


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Making the news even harder to digest was that he had been in a dark enough place to commit suicide. In the world of celebritydom, premature death, be it directly or indirectly by one’s own hand, is not uncommon. It was only a few months ago that we lost Philip Seymour Hoffman. It was a tragic death and a great loss for the acting world. Most of us probably thought that was the worst entertainment news we’d hear this year. However, as greatly as Hoffman was mourned and is missed, the news of Williams’s passing dealt a palpable blow to our collective heart. Indeed, the sadness his passing cast over the world was uncommon. Williams’s suicide promoted an outpouring of tributes. His own brand of quick-witted, manic improvisational comedy was one-of-a-kind. His talent didn’t just entertain us, it connected us. Part of his universal appeal was his ability to plum the depths of the human condition with a heart like no other. I think it was the heart he brought to everything that allowed us to connect with him on such an intimate level.

Movies continued from page 14

By

British magician and illusionist behind his alter ego Wei Ling Soo. A master of illusion, Crawford believes in little, certainly not magic, this summer will surely want to take The the occult or a divine entity. When friend and Hundred-Foot Journey. fellow illusionist Howard Burkan (Simon Rated PG for thematic elements, some vioMcBurney) solicits his help in debunking a lence, language and brief sensuality. young spiritualist that he thinks is fleecing a Review by Michelle Keenan wealthy American widow, Stanley is Magic in the Moonlight on the case. This is right up his alley  ½ and helps to fortify Short Take: A 1920’s British his rigid beliefs, or illusionist, pessimist and all lack of beliefs, and round curmudgeon sets out his general view of to debunk a lovely, young the world. American spiritualist and Welcomed as ends up believing in more a guest at the home than just himself. of the Catledge Emma Stone and Colin Firth in REEL TAKE: Woody Allen’s family, Stanley Magic in the Moonlight. Magic in the Moonlight is gleefully sets out to a delightful dalliance in the expose the lovely 1920’s Cote d’Azur countryside replete with Sophie Baker (Emma Stone) as a fraud. Mrs. witty repartee, fabulous costumes, amazing Catledge (Jacki Weaver) has committed to music and some very fun shenanigans. Watchfund an institute for the occult with Sophie ing it one could not help but think how much at the helm. Sophie’s always hovering stage fun they must have had filming it. mom-like mother (Marcia Gay Harden) sticks Colin Firth is Stanley Crawford, the stuffy close to the flighty matriarch to keep their goal

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If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310.

MICHeLLe KeeNaN

Williams possessed a special kind of magic rooted in the wonder of the human experience. He did more than make us laugh. He was incandecent. He made us believe in the best version of this world and of this life. He also reminded us that our imperfections were more than ok. They were beautiful. They were part of the experience. They were the good stuff. Robin Williams was honest and open about his battle with addiction and depression. I believe that some of the funniest people on this earth are often the most perceptive and the most sensitive among us. This level of sensitivity is a conduit to their craft, but perhaps it’s also what leads to addiction or sometimes just makes the world too much to bear. Lucky for us, the best drug Williams knew was performing and making us laugh. That seemed to keep him going for a long time. How many of us have waged battles within ourselves about which our nearest and dearest are completely unaware? That same beautiful human condition that allows us to feel the greatest of joys, can also leave us vulnerable, afraid and alone. It’s been said Williams’s worst battle with depression ensued after open heart surgery in 2009. In the days following his death we also learned that he was in the early stages of Parkinsons Disease. We’ll

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Robin Williams: Tears of a Clown

On the night of August 11th the world was stunned to learn of the death of beloved actor and comedian Robin Williams.

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Robin Williams in Patch Adams. You really were the best medicine in this world. Rest in peace, Robin.

never know exactly what brought him to such unspeakable despair. Though it was cut short before its time, Robin Willliams lived a great life. He gave of his craft and of himself without ever asking for anything in return. Perhaps we can repay that debt now. Be kind. Listen. Be generous of spirit. Carpe diem. “Please, don’t worry so much. Because in the end, none of us have very long on this Earth. Life is fleeting. And if you’re ever distressed, cast your eyes to the summer sky when the stars are strung across the velvety night. And when a shooting star streaks through the blackness, turning night into day... make a wish and think of me. Make your life spectacular. I know I did.” ~ Ending monologue to Williams’ 1996 “Jack”

in her sites. Meanwhile the ukulele-playing heir apparent (Hamish Linklater) of the Catledge family fortune has fallen head over heals for Sophie and serenades her at his every opportunity. Very predictably, though not disappointingly, Stanley’s plans go awry. Instead young Sophie turns the staunch pragmatist’s faithless world on its ear. Magic in the Moonlight is not nearly as magical as Allen’s Midnight in Paris, but it is a charming throwback to another era (for my money a most lovely time and way of life). Even the fast paced dialogue, and especially Firth’s slightly stagy delivery of it, harkens back to films from the 1930’s or 40’s. It struck me that this must be Allen’s perfect dream world. With that all said I am quite perplexed by the greatly divided [and mostly negative] reviews for Magic in the Moonlight. At press time it only had a 48% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Audiences gave it slightly higher rating at 58%, which was also surprising to me. (There is a bit of a twist to the story that may not sit well with some folks, but to speak of it would spoil the fun.) I’d like to think that the good Professor Kaufmann and I help steer people towards quality movies that they are going to enjoy or at least appreciate. This isn’t the first time we’ve

September 7:

I Am A Camera (1955) Before Cabaret there was John Van Druten’s non-musical stage version of Christopher Isherwood’s Berlin Stories. This version was made in Britain with Julie Harris reprising her stage role as Sally Bowles. The film also stars Laurence Harvey and Shelley Winters. Directed by Henry Cornelius (Genevieve). September 14: Hamlet (1969) This minimalist Hamlet captures Nicol Williamson’s intense and cerebral performance of the man who “could not make up his mind.” Joining Williamson are Anthony Hopkins, Judy Parfitt and Marianne Faithfull as Ophelia. Directed by Tony Richardson (Tom Jones). September 21:

The Lady Vanishes (1979) This is the rarely seen version shot on location in Bavaria. It may not be Hitchcock but it’s still a good story about an English governess who disappears on a train. Stars Angela Lansbury with Cybill Shepherd, Elliot Gould and Herbert Lom. Directed by Anthony Page (Absolution). September 28: Waterloo (1970) This European-Russian co-production faithfully recreates the celebrated battle and shows just how close Napoleon came to winning. A grand epic in the old style with an all-star cast including Rod Steiger as Napoleon and Christopher Plummer as Wellington. Directed by Sergei Bondarchuk (War & Peace).

differed with the over all critical consensus and it won’t likely be the last time. Perhaps it’s because the good professor and I are each a bit of a throwback to another era. For me Magic in the Moonlight was an effervescent trifle and a lovely escape for an hour and a half. I hope it will be for you too. Rated PG-13 for a brief suggested comment and smoking throughout. Review by Michelle Keenan

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There was a morning fog almost every day last week and the outside air seemed to be cloying with dampness, a situation confounded by the sudden breakdown of the air conditioner in the General Store.

Cityfella walked in on a damp Friday waving a letter he had just received from his sister Tosca, who had a condo in a large development outside of Burnsville, known publicly as Hill-Top Heaven but privately as Grandiose Manor. When he stopped to sip his just provided coffee, Fella (whose proper name was Forest) began reading from his sister’s latest email that he had printed out so he was able to read it to the assembled throng. “Dear Forest (he began), it’s started again, you know that ubiquitous fog, the all-consuming early-morning mist that ruins golf shots, outdoor selfies, and not only local shopping but even regional forays down below. Just this

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THE CURMUDGEON Ubiquitously Grandiose Lives

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Fella continued to read the letter aloud. “Forest, we are, after all, fortunate to be at home morning our windows looked out here in our precious condo, not on that pearly mist covering our only because of our wonderful little piece of heaven, which is home but for the fly-casting part of the newly-restored salute pond and the Labyrinth, all to elegant mountain living called those meandering footpaths, the Hill-Top Heaven. (Fella’s aside: waterfalls, the woods, and our Illustration by Peter Loewer These were mini-estates carved beloved koi pond.” from the Asheville holdings of “That’s true,” Fella said as Grover Clampert, a man who made his money he set aside the letter and spooned more twicein the first Florida real-estate wars of 1892). filtered fresh cane sugar into the coffee, “but “You will remember (Fella continued having been up to her condo and visited their reading the letter) that my husband Phillip Labyrinth, I do wonder about that dressed-up promised we would all adjust to the climate monster that works daily in the center of the here. After all, we’re only in Asheville one maze and preaches that drivel about redempmonth a year, then it’s on to Greece, Madrid, tion and Mother Crete.” London, Peru, and our own beloved LA.” “Do your sister and husband work at all?” “Thank God for that,” interjected Fella, asked Mrs. Storekeep. as he stirred his freshly-brewed coffee. The Cityfella thought for a moment then said, paper cup helped to dry his damp hand as it “My sister stopped working when she found— held the General Store’s latest import of tasteand married—Phillip, and he hasn’t worked fully refined coffee, delivered from one of the since this last big property windfall when his great new Asheville grocery stores. This one art gallery in Atlanta was standing in the way was from Farmer Oscar’s Peruvian Import of downtown street expansion and he made a Shop, especially known for their expensive killing selling the air rights to the city. but artfully designed cups cast in the shape of “Surely, that wasn’t enough to support a deadly amanita mushroom, one of Oscar’s their present life style—or was it?” asked little jokes. Curmudgeon, who up to now had sat silently in the rear of the store’s postal area. “Phillip took that money,” said Cityfella, “then invested it into some kind of a phantom hotel expansion scheme in Asheville. Following up that profit with more money that BY JUDY AUSLEY came from buying stock in Duke Energy, and now they have enough, it seems, for all their worldly wants.” perament is the key to “We all should work,” said Mrs. Storefinding work you love, keep in her often quite voice. and work that matters. At that moment, Cityfella’s wife, Doreen, One genuine new walked into the store, looking great in her relationship is worth smashing outfit made from imported wool a fistful of business collected in the Ecuadorian Mountains and cards. loomed in that charming little shop in Biltmore Village. It is OK to cross the street to avoid making “Forest,” she said to her husband, “we small talk. just got a call from Tosca, in a panic because “Quiet leadership” is not an oxymoron. Phillip appears to have run off to Miami with a waitress who works at a trendy restaurant in Love is essential; gregariousness is optional. Madison County, and now she’s destitute. So “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.” come along, we are off to console her.” I especially like the last sentence. It just Suddenly, Forest was consumed with a happened to me recently when I casually desperate love for his wife Tosca, and setting wrote an email to a first cousin of mine. I told his cup down on the desk next to the store’s my cousin that I want to live out my life in post office, reached for her hand (almost cutAsheville. I added, mainly because Asheville is ting his finger on the 20-karet faux-emerald gay. After sending the email I thought, that was she wore, which was imported from a jeweler a good move, Judy, it only took you 60 years or on the north side of Greensboro). Taking her more to tell her. LOL (laughing out loud) hand in his, they rushed out the front door and That surely was in a gentle way, and I drove off in the direction of Burnsville. am sure I shook her southern woman biased Silence reined in the General Store until thinking, and touched her conservative heart. Mrs. Storekeep muttered in a low tone: “If I have no desire to shake the world at the only that ubiquitous fog would fade away.” moment, but I sure do get a sense of happiness when I shake up one of my cousins. Please do not misunderstand my comment about southern women. Most southern Peter Loewer has written and illustrated women — and I am a proud southern woman more than twenty-five books on natural

SOUTHERN COMFORT Who Has More Fun, Introverts or Extroverts?

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Most folks know me as being very social and outgoing.

I admit I was for years and all through my newspaper reporting days, but now I can say age does change us in many ways. I find myself thinking more like an introvert instead of an extrovert. I was looking through some story ideas today, when I found a manifesto for introverts I had clipped out of an article printed someplace in the magazine world. I think you readers of Southern Comfort might get a kick out of this list. Following are 10 sentences about introverts, apparently written by Mahatma Gandhi. (No date listed or year written) There is a word for “people who are in their heads too much:” thinkers. Solitude is a catalyst for innovation. The next generation of quiet kids can and must be raised to know their own strengths. Sometimes it helps to be a pretend-extrovert. There is always time to be quiet later. But, in the long run, staying true to your tem-

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history over the past thirty years.


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can Steampunk performance troupe MarchFourth Marching Band. The 39th LEAF features more diverse performers such as the Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn De La Soul Bhangra/Celtic ensemble from Canada, Delhi 2 not only be showcasing world class talent, but Dublin, and soulfully seductive sounds from will be sharing a powerful positive message The Nth Power. The lineup rounds out with through every artist, musician, and performer. genre-bending performances from the East LA and Afro-Caribbean infused beats of Las CafFor the full line-up, details, tickets and more, eteras, transcendental folk-rockers Mandolin call (828) 68-MUSIC [686-8742], Orange, and many more. or visit www.theLEAF.org. LEAF Festival musicians provide the soundtrack to a memoIF YOU Prices are discounted through rable experience filled with culGO September 3. Adult tickets start at $41 tural treasures and fun around every for the day, or $147 for the weekend. corner. The festival combines a Additional discounts for local commuting great diversity of names and faces residents and youth ages 10 through 17. with a myriad of community dances Children 9 and younger are always free. Limited including Salsa, Swing, Cajun, the car camping, lodge rooms and cabins are Waltz and traditional, contemporary available. Festive attitudes welcome! and techno forms of Contra. Enjoy Purchase tickets online at www.theLEAF.org or poetry and puppetry slams; healing by phone at (828) 686-8742. arts workshops; folk art and handcraft exhibitions, installations and interactive demonstrations; camping, watersports and outdoor adventure; and kid’s activities. This fall, LEAF will

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The AAAC’s 2014 Color Ball

In 1895 George Vanderbilt opened his Biltmore Estate; this year marked the crowning moment on years of construction.

The Estate fostered a community adorned with lovers of art, beauty, and culture. The 2014 Color Ball is dedicated to the same elegance and energy of a golden age. This was the time of Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Aubrey Beardsley, Erik Satie, Oscar Wilde, and Joseph Conrad. The Gilded Ball, like the era, will indulge in extravagance and elegance. The Gilded Age was an important time for Asheville and its reverberations can still be seen today. Join us as we celebrate this era and the Asheville Area Arts Council’s mission to advance Buncombe County by providing access to resources, developing innovative collaborations, and fostering creativity in the community through Asheville’s finest cocktails, costumes, decor, art, and entertainment. The Gilded Ball is sure to be this year’s richest social occasion. “The Color Ball is our chance to celebrate the unusually successful year that the AAAC has enjoyed, but it is also crucial to raise funds for even better

service next year. We have a new strategic plan, a new location that will enable us to better serve Buncombe County, and a renewed commitment to support our creative entrepreneurs. “More than ever, this year I feel the AAAC has reached a level of service that I can truly feel proud of. Our grants programs are growing, we have had inspiring exhibitions, and we are launching a powerful new business planning curriculum for craft artists. Additionally, our arts advocacy has begun to create new perspectives in earnest, which is a change that will manifest in ways we can only imagine. I believe we are on the verge of great things as a city, and that our creative sector will be a part of that success.”

DOT EDITIONS FINE ART PRINTING

PHOTOGRAPHY OF 2D AND 3D ARTWORK

~ Kitty Love, Executive Director IF YOU The Gilded Ball, Saturday, September GO 27. Tickets: $50; $100 VIP ticket

includes VIP pre-party and sneak peek of art auction, food and special entertainment, access to VIP lounge and bar, and 2 drink tickets. Additional details at www.ashevillearts.com. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit their website at www.isisasheville.com.

828.275.7028 PG. 36

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Archival Pigment Prints Custom Framing & Stretchers

828-575-5534

www.doteditions.com

Asheville’s Full Service Fine Art Studio

2004 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, UNIT W. ASHEVILLE, NC 28804 Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 17


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BLACK MOUNTAIN SWANNANOA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE PRESENTS

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THE CHAMBER TOURS November 2014 New York City Bus Tour & Pre-Thanksgiving Shopping May 2015 Great Britain & Ireland Tour

Black Mountain Events

September 2015 Romantic Rhine River Cruise May 2016 Alaska Cruise Tour

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Saturday, September 13 - 2nd Saturday Studio Show & Sale. Featured Artists, Art Demo, Refreshments. 10% sales. 11-5 p.m. at Red House Studios & Gallery, 310 West State St.

For more information, contact our travel agency:

Black Mountain Travel

Your dream design awaits

(Independent Affiliate of Avoya Travel)

(800) 393-7804 or (828) 357-8335 susan.donnelly@avoyatravel.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

Saturday, September 13 - Hard-2-Recycle

Collection Event. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Madden Ace Hardware Parking Lot, 2319 U.S. 70, Swannanoa. Visit web or call for information on what is and is not accepted. Details available at the Black Mountain Visitor Center. (828) 254-1776, www.ashevillegreenworks.org

Sunday, September 14 - Fifth Annual Fashion

Bring Back the Monarchs

Fundraiser Runway Show. 2 p.m. $30. Contact: Black Mountain Center of the Arts. (828) 669-0930, www.BlackMountainArts.org

Wednesday, September 17 - Bear Cub Classic. Black Mountain Home for Children, Youth and Families fundraising event in Fletcher. Registration required. (828) 686-3451 September 19 to October 3 - Bring Back the Monarchs. Awareness

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100 Cherry Street

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Black Mountain, NC 28711

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event includes a gallery show with lecture and multi-media display, poetry presentation, painting workshop, milkweed seed distribution, monarch tag and release event, and “migration” performance art event. Contact the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 669-0930, or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

Friday, September 26 - Show at Asheville Christian Academy at 6:30 p.m. $15 in advance, $18 at door. Bravehearted Boys - The Superhero Experience. Reinforces values and point boys toward Jesus. (828) 5812204, www.braveheartedboys.com Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce 201 E. State Street, Black Mountain • (828) 669-2300 Toll Free: (800) 669-2301 • www.blackmountain.org

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Creative Mountain Food Tours Black Mountain Food Tours are 2½ to 3 hour funfilled, guided walking tours, appealing to all foodies and history buffs. Tours offer food, beverage and dessert tastings at an eclectic representation of at least five of Black Mountain’s eateries. Stroll, sip and taste while going behind the scenes for insightful tidbits of Black Mountain’s culture, history and cuisine. Chat with knowledgeable and entertaining local chefs, owners and guides. Tours begin at 2 p.m.

September 5 & 19 - Pub and Grub Crawl. $40 per person, for adults 21+. Visit four or five pubs, restaurants and a local brewery. September 12 & 26 - Dessert Tour. $30 per person.

Samples treats from Kilwin’s Chocolates, Spice It Up, HeyHey Cupcake, Red Rocker Inn, and Dobra Tea

September 27 - Ultimate Foodie Tour, $40 per person.

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18 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

IF YOU For more details and to register, (828) 419-0590 GO or www.creativemountainfoodtours.com.


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LEAF FESTIVAL

INTERVIEW WITH PETER BALLHAUSSEN, OWNER OF BLACK MOUNTAIN’S

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

about Town Hardware & General Store.

Peter Ballhaussen: Not too many stores

like us exist anymore. We are a fullservice hardware store and have a great selection of all the items do-it-yourselfers need for that weekend project or repair. Town also has all the items you might expect to find in a general store, such as jams, jellies, candy, cookware, and gadgets. We sell gifts and souvenirs for the tourists, but also have all the items that local residents need. In our hardware section, we have recently upgraded our paint department and now are the only western NC dealer for Pratt & Lambert paint. P &L is an historic brand that is known throughout the industry for their high quality paints. We have also recently added two lines of grills. Wilmington Grills are a

INTeRVIeweD By

DeNNIS Ray

At Beautiful Lake Eden Close to Asheville & Black Mtn NC

They carry a great selection of grills.

great stainless steel gas grill product line, manufactured in Wilmington, NC. They have a long history in the eastern part of the state and we are introducing them in the mountains. We also are selling a wonderful kamodo style grill made by Vision grills. In the general store area, we have opened our new Book Nook. It has been a very popular addition. We have books for all ages and interests. From children’s books to gardening books, from history to cook books, from nationally known authors to local authors, we have something for everyone. Also, in response to customer requests, we have improved our craft and art supply section. We have begun carrying Faber-Castell products for both adults and children.

RRM: What are some of your most popular

as well as unique items?

PB: Oh, that is a hard one to answer,

because so much of what we sell isn’t typically found in other stores. Our most popular item over the summer months has to be our unique selection of craft soda. We stock over 50 varieties at any given time. We have also seen a lot of interest in our Boker knives this summer. Also, our selection of old-fashioned wooden and tin toys continue to be very popular.

RRM: How long has the Town Hardware & General Store been around, and what has led to its longevity? Town Hardware has something for everyone, including books.

OCTOBER 16th-19th

39th

Town Hardware & General Store

Experience the charm of an oldfashioned hardware and general store featuring hand-woodworking tools, toys, gardening supplies, gifts and practical house wares.

Music. Dance. Handcrafts. Poetry. Healing Arts. Lake Sports.

PB: There has been a hardware store at this same location for over 85 years! The store was originally known as Black Mountain Hardware, but during an ownership change back in the 1960’s, I believe, it became Town Hardware & General Store. The store has grown over the years and our footprint now includes what was formerly a 5&10¢ store on one side and a drug store on the other. I attribute our longevity to outstanding customer service and a great selection of hard-to-find products. continued on page 33

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k & ing Band c e l F a l e B er ch th Pow th Mar

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FESTIVAL SCHOOLS & STREETS INTERNATIONAL

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do n a ons Tr R m t r e l e F b Ro x | Dom rang e Wilco olin O d n a David M | feteras a C s a L

�#1 Music Festival •�#1 Festival for Kids • �#1 Festival for Camping

Kids Villages. Local Brews & Eats. Camping & Cabins Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 19


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Downtown Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

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Beyond Rosie: Women in World War II

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Rosie the Riveter is the iconic symbol of women’s involvement in World War II.

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She is one part of a larger story about the many ways women contributed to and were affected by war. World War II changed the everyday social, cultural, and economic realities of life in the United States, especially for women. Beyond Rosie: Women in World War II explores the lives of women in World War II. On loan from the Museum of History & Holocaust Education in Kennesaw.

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com

IF YOU Traveling exhibit on display September 12 GO December 15 at aSHEville Museum, 35 Wall St.,

downtown Asheville. www.aSHEvillemuseum.com

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“Fragments of Time and Space”

Exercise Your Imagination by Hal Boyd

A popular song says that imagination can turn a cloudy day sunny and produce other beneficial effects. So, while I at least think about exercising my body, what about my imagination?

Works by Sahar Fakhoury

Among other things, a healthy, healthful imagination—the ability to picture more than is readily available to the senses—is important to problem-solving in every department of life.

Reception September 5, 2014

5:00 - 8:00 pm Show runs Sept 1 - 30, 2014 Monday - Saturday 10:00 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 1:00 - 4:00 pm Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Asheville, NC 28801

That said, the Asheville Gallery of Art, Asheville’s longest-established downtown gallery, is a great place to exercise your imagination. Looking at fine art sparks the imagination as nothing else can. Art requires the viewer to interpret what is depicted. Looking at art stimulates thought and is enjoyable as well as edifying.

Please consider this message your personal invitation to bring your imagination in for exercise. You may very well turn a cloudy day sunny.

Asheville Gallery of Art

16 College Street Asheville, NC 28801 828-251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com 5

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

European-Style Road Cycling

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Take a Sunday drive on two wheels and see the Smoky Mountains from a whole new perspective during the Asheville Gran Fondo on Sunday, September 7. A gran fondo is a European-style cycling challenge that takes bicycle racing to the next level through a hybrid of competitive road racing and casual century rides, designed for cyclists of every skill level. The Gran Fondo National Championship Series® (GFNCS) 2014 circuit will stop in Asheville with courses covering 20, 60 and 100 mile journeys. The Gran Fondo Asheville will start and finish in conjunction with the annual Organicfest held in the heart of Asheville, at Pack Square Park. Organicfest celebrates everything organic, green, healthy & sustainable, and offers food, music, vendors, family fun, and more. “Cycling is a fun way to get out and see the beauty of this area while getting great exercise,” says Meridith Elliot Powell, cyclist and Friends of the Smokies board director. “We are thrilled to offer this

opportunity for visitors and locals alike to enjoy the back roads of the area.” The Gran Race through the mountains during the Fondo Asheville Asheville Gran Fondo on Sunday, September 7. features four timed sections, fully stocked aid stations along the route, food & beverage at the finish, and prizes for overall and age-group winners. continued on page 31

Fragments of Time and Space

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The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack.

Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

PG. 20

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MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

Jce Schlapkohl Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown 5

IF YOU GO:

A reception for “Fragments of Time and Space,” takes Painting by Sahar Fakhoury place Friday, September 5, from 5-8 p.m. The public is cordially invited. The exhibit runs September 1-30, 2014. The gallery is located at 16 College Street in downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. Regular hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Sunday, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 251-5796 or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

The Asheville Art Museum

“After the Storm”

Asheville Gallery of Art By SaNDI aNToN presents works by Sahar Fakhoury during the month of September. “Fragments of Time and Space” presents recent work reflecting Fakhoury’s impressions of figures and objects glimpsed at distinct coordinates of time and space. The artist’s intent is to suggest movement inherent in stillness. Fakhoury paints with oil on canvas, focusing mainly upon aspects of human form. Fakhoury, who currently resides in Asheville, is an alumna of the University of North Carolina at Asheville, where she earned a BFA degree. Her work resides in private and corporate collections internationally, as well as in the United States.

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PG. 20

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

PG. 36

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Cedar Hill Studios, Waynesville wC

PG. 22

PG. 20

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www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 21


~ FROG LEVEL ~

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FALL INTO VINTAGE OPEN HOUSE

Over 40 vintage trailers!

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ANGELA EASTERLING IN CONCERT

Angela Easterling is a country ballad singer/songwriter who brings to her music the sweet cultural heritage of her early years growing up on a Greer, SC farm – run by her family for seven generations. She is also the main artist of a duo/solo performance group known as “The Beguilers.”

Saturday, September 27 from 1-4 p.m. $5 adults, $3 children 6-12. All proceeds benefit local charities. Hosted by the Tin Can Tourists. Waynesville Boy Scout Troop 318 will host a pancake breakfast at 8 a.m.

IF YOU GO: Free concert featuring

IF YOU GO: Pride RV Park, 4394 Jonathan Creek Road, Waynesville. Details at (704) 507-9565.

Angela

Angela Easterling at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Easterling September 21 at the Canton Public Library, 11 Pennsylvania Avenue. (828) 648-2924.

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HISTORIC FROG LEVEL wS

Yoga & Pilates Classes Massage & Bodywork Therapy

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WELLNESS

WD WS WH

Self-Improvement Workshops Nutritional Support

WC

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245 Depot Street Waynesville, NC

Lynda Saffell

in the Historic Frog Level

813-629-1835

WT

LMBT #9861

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WB WM WP

FROG POND DOWNSIZING 18 Commerce St. Waynesville

828-734-3874 Insured & Bonded

• Clean Out Service • Company Transfer • Estate Sales • Downsizing • Divorce

HELPING IN HARD TIMES We are Known for Honesty & Integrity

WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

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Check out our Estate Sales

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Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

22 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

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Art After Dark

On Friday, September 5 continue the Labor Day festivities by taking a visit to downtown Waynesville.

By JeaNNIe

SHUCKSTeS

Our vibrant town, nestled in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, is home to a multitude of artists and galleries. Walk through the galleries and working studios on Main Street, Depot Street, and Frog Level. Festive Art After Dark flags denote the participating galleries, which stay open late to offer a creative way to spend the evening. Witness the creative process, and possibly find something to take home. Members include the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Burr Studios, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, Art on Depot, and the Village Framer. ARTSHARE opens on Friday, September 5 at Gallery 86 with a reception from 6-9 p.m. ARTSHARE is a project of the Planned Giving committee to benefit the Haywood County Arts Council. It is a special sale of art collectors’ donations and consigned pieces. Basket weaver, Suzanne Simoneau, will be demonwM strating her weaving technique at Twigs and Leaves Gallery Movies during Art After Dark on Friday, September 5, $6 Adults from 6-9 p.m. Suzanne $4 Kids enjoys weaving all styles $3 Matinee of baskets but has a special interest in reed, market baskets and pine needle baskets. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Basket by Suzanne Simoneau Waynesville’s Dr. Bill Stecher, and delight in the savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs and Leaves Gallery is located at 98 North Main Street in Waynesville. they are open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30, and Sunday 1-4. For more details call (828) 456-1940 or visit www. twigsandleaves.com Works by Nancy Howell Blevins, silk painter extraordinaire, are on display at Cedar Hill Studio, during Art After Dark. A most fascinating demonstration will be presented by Blevins. Lynn Heinrich will provide music on the key board. Come join us!

Demonstration by featured artist

Suzanne Simoneau during Art After Dark, September 5, 6-9PM

PG. 22

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC • (828) 456-1940 • www.twigsandleaves.com

PG. 22

IF YOU For more information contact Twigs & Leaves Gallery GO at (828) 456-1940 or visit the Waynesville Gallery

Association at www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com.

SHOP AT MAST GENERAL STORE TO SUPPORT FRIENDS OF THE SMOKIES Shop at Mast General Store from September 1-13 and Patagonia will donate proceeds from each product sold to Friends of the Smokies. Then on Friends Day, September 13, Mast General Store will donate 10% of your purchases to Friends!

IF YOU GO: Mast General Store, 63 North Main Street,

Waynesville. (828) 452-2101, www.mastgeneralstore.com

Custom Engineered Sound System for True Movie Sound – Better Than Your Home Theater System! Serving Local Craft Beer and Wine, Local Ice Cream from The Hop, Organic Popcorn, and Local Sodas.

HOURS:

Tues-Wed 11-6pm Thurs-Sat 11-10pm Sun 1-5pm

828-283-0079 www.38Main.com

Movie Showtimes

Friday: 7:45pm Saturday: 2pm, 5pm, 7:45pm Sunday: 2pm

MOVIES

September 5-7: The Big Sleep September 12-14: Ida September 19-21: X-Men September 28-28: The Fault in Our Stars

“Jewel Tones” A colored pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington. Available in Prints, Christmas Cards and the 2014 Ornament.

MUSIC

September 11 – Jamie Laval September 18: Open Mic Night (6pm signup) September 25: Linda McRae

38 N. MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN WAYNESVILLE

PG. 22

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The Eighty-Twenty Principle …AND OTHER UNUSUAL MATH RATIOS

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Math can be a funny thing. Including several non-traditional concepts I offer up here.

2014 Signature Art: “Radiance” by Mark Bettis

at the

2014 BENEFIT AUCTION & GALA

for the WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA AIDS PROJECT

Saturday, October 11, 2014 Doubletree by Hilton, Asheville - Biltmore Reception & Silent Auction 6:00 pm Live Auction & Dinner 8:00 pm Leah Karpen, Honorary Chair

Andrew Brunk, Auctioneer

Tickets $125 on sale now at wncapgala.org or 252-7489 ext. 310

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

Asheville’s Gay Bar

An Alternative Industrial Bar

24 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

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GReG VINeyaRD

shuffled to the front, while the remaining captains adjust their timing a bit but not life-affectingly, and everyone gets to where they Like “age-math.” Ask need to go with a minimum someone: “How old do I of fuss. look?” and you’ll see them Imagine a year in the quickly calculating “Eeklife where prioritizing, What-Do-I-Say Math” in tackling and planning one’s their heads. And there’s the work and life tasks yield a ol’ “I-Relied-On-My-ATMhigh percentage of manageReceipt-For-My-Balance ability, where yard work Math.” And let’s not forget and going to the dentist and “Weather-Forecaster Math.” dealing with vexing possesWhere I grew up, a Goals & Plans, 2014, sions blend just fine with thirty percent chance of mixed media by Greg Vineyard pleasantries like weekends rain usually meant half away and reading beach that. Here, it could mean novels. When everything’s gully-washers. (But only if I a rush, there’s no way to leave my umbrella in the car. Prioritizing and enjoy a balance. Keeping the Which I do when I know we twenty percent at or under really need the rain. You’re planning yield a twenty boils down mostly to welcome.) The one I monihigh percentage of disciplined scheduling. tor closely is more of a ratio. A suggested 80-20 “Cat Litter Used” vs. “Fresh manageability. exercise, using the old Litter In Bag.” A zero balance fashioned tools of pen and is highly undesirable. yellow pad: “Top Ten ColA more useful type of umns.” (Hey, this is Western North Carolina, arithmetic in both the business and personal we’re used to Top Tens!) Jot down ten houseworlds is the “Eighty-Twenty” principle. I hold tasks that must get done. I don’t mean was first introduced to this in the late 80’s (for “dusting” (Although that could be a part of the those of you not quite old enough to rememmuch bigger topic, “Spring Cleaning.” Which ber the late 80’s, it was a time of great music, SOME people should do every season. I don’t bad perms and acid-wash everything. If we mean ME. Necessarily. OK, I do mean me.), had only known the photos would show up on but rather, things like “Move,” or “Open a 401 “Throw Back Thursdays” on Facebook…). K” and “Create a Family Emergency Plan.” This concept is about maintaining a level In the second column, write ten goals of “rush” incidents below a certain percentage, related to personal passions. For me, that’s all thus allowing all projects to successfully get art and creative project related. In the third, ten through their processes and out on schedule. projects in one’s area of business. On paper, And the side benefits are multiple: more is one can begin to ascertain how to juggle these learned about what causes rushes, and how tasks and goals, put them on a calendar, and to continue driving their impact downward, move forward. It’s not rocket science. Um, unresulting in fewer frantic timetables. less “Rocket Science” is on one of your lists. Overtime goes down, productivity goes There’s an old famous quote conveyup, and a few more projects may actually fit ing how most folks are about as happy as they on the schedule. Time is gained for training, make up their minds to be. But it certainly can which helps company growth. There is now help to sprinkle some action on that attitude to time to handle actual emergencies. Crossing help achieve an eighty-twenty ratio. Except for that twenty percent threshold appears to be the the cat litter situation. Try not to go past fiftymagic line. fifty on that one. I liken it to a traffic jam of ten Starship Enterprises (Enterprisi?) waiting to dock at a Mars-based spaceport. You know, ‘cause of all the alternate realities in this episode. Which I Greg Vineyard is a marketing shall now name “Mars Times Ten.” professional, and an artist Two of these ships are in a hurry due to and writer living in Asheville, connections with otherworldly delegations, NC. ZaPOW Gallery (www. while the other eight are simply arriving at zapow.com), carries his their final destination, which is Disneyland illustrations, prints and Mars, because everyone is on a highly popular cards. Tim Burton/Disney themed spacecation. www.gregvineyardillustration.com Anyway, the two ships with urgent needs are


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you will notice that with the threatening thought there is a contraction of the energy of the body and mind into a state of tension. With the pleasant thought there is an opening of the energy, the body and mind relax. There is a feeling of soft expansive openness. We can feel the effect of thoughts. Then – with the bringing of your awareness into the experience of your breath and into listening to the subtle soft sounds of the world around you, notice how the feeling state becomes even more expansive, open, relaxed, clear. This is the experience of no-thought, or, at least, quieted thought. Your sense of your separate self at the center of experience is softening, maybe even disappearing. The experience of the moment is the center of consciousness. “Out there” feels like it contains you and there is no or very slight thought of yourself. You are experiencing awareness, the clear, bright light of consciousness that we are usually distracted from noticing by the noise of the mind. You are becoming aware of awareness. Thought, emotion, sensations happen in awareness, and awareness is the clear energy of consciousness that shines on everything without discrimination, just as light is the clear energy of the sun that shines on everything without discrimination.

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“I thought you were on a diet because Doc saw some cardiac irregularities?” Matt asked. “Oh, didn’t you hear the latest?” Carl responded. “We can eat as much saturated fat as we want now. It’s not bad for you. The story’s in all the news media.” “Is that where you get your EMT training – and your health information – from the public media?” Matt asked with a frown of concern. “Well, no… but…” “What did the news article really say?” Matt said, shaking his head. “It said saturated fat isn’t as much of a risk for heart disease as we once thought. It didn’t say there was no risk.” “But the real problem,” Carl argued, “is the sugar and refined carbohydrates we’re eat-

ing to replace the saturated fat. Sugar is causing the obesity and Type II diabetes epidemic in our country. That’s the real culprit. That’s what I’m avoiding.” “And putting back the saturated fat,” Matt finished the sentence. “Well… yeah… they said it was good for me.” Matt put down his fork. “Okay, tell me what you learned in EMT school. Does saturated fat still decrease the HDL (good) cholesterol and raise the LDL (bad) cholesterol?” “Yeah… but not as much as sugar does!” he said, taking a big bite of no-sugar-added salad dressing. Now Matt was pointing his finger. “Does saturated fat still decrease the body’s ability to use insulin – the cause of Type II diabetes?” “Yeah…” Now Carl sat his fork down on the table. “And does saturated fat still increase the incidence of several cancers?” “Yeah… but sugar is worse!” But Carl didn’t sound convinced anymore.

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This is the realm of consciousness beyond happy and unhappy. This is what Buddhism calls original mind, buddhamind, Satori. Thought has ceased to be the centerpiece of consciousness and you are realizing a deeper level of mind. Buddhists also call this “big mind” as differentiated from the thinking dominated “little mind.”

“Who we are is awareness, but we block this with our selfcentered thinking.”

~ Charlotte Joko Beck Every thought is a contraction of the energy of the mind from its original and clear state of awareness into some limited form. With the creation of thought, we experience the creation of a world of virtual reality, where the thoughts are mistaken for who we are and what the world is about. We experience the dimension of mind that is the ego, the dimension of mind that takes the streaming energy of Life and organizes it into bits of information that we can use to organize our experience. And from the ego comes the idea of our own separateness amidst a world of separate objects. This separateness feels absolute and solid, and with it, a sense of isolation and the problem of finding our own significance in this vast and challenging world that is experienced as “out there.” There is a loss of the experience of oneness with Life that is our natural consciousness. Although this condition isn’t generally experienced as dramatically and ominously as the description here sounds, at very subtle levels

Saturated Fat – Is it Now Safe to Eat?

Two paramedics stopped for lunch at noon. Matt watched Carl order a large steak sandwich and slather fatty dressing on his salad when it came.

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“As you are aware of your thoughts and emotions, you must ask yourself, who is it that is aware?” ~ Zen koan Thoughts and emotions arise. The human mind is a thought-producing machine. Emotions happen. The human body is a resonance chamber for the energy of thoughts and emotions. A thought or emotion arises in the dimension of mind, and in the body, a resonant feeling, a quality of energy, is experienced. A happy thought creates a happy feeling – expansive, light, energized. An unhappy thought creates an unhappy feeling – contracted, heavy, energy dissipating. Try it for yourself. Close your eyes. Think of something or someone that is very challenging, even threatening to you. Hold that thought for about ten seconds. Pay attention to the feeling state that accompanies the holding of the thought. Now, think of something or someone that is supportive, pleasing to you. Hold that thought for about ten seconds. Pay attention to the feeling state that comes with that thought. Now, bring all your attention to experiencing the gentle flow of your breathing. Do not accentuate or change the breath. Feel the rise and fall of your chest, the flow of air across your nostrils. Allow the exhalation to be relaxing, a releasing of tensions of body and mind, while with the inhalation, the oxygenation of the body and brain causes a brightening of alertness. Also listen carefully to the sounds of the world around you. (Do this away from loud sounds or TV – very soft music helps this exercise – or best of all, go outside and listen to the birds and the wind in the trees.) Do this for about 30 seconds. Now, open your eyes and feel what you feel. If you are paying very close attention,

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we experience this challenge of sufficiency and it drives our daily lives. It shows up in anger, anxiety, frustration, tension, worry, regret, and a dozen other variations of thought/emotion/body distress. In times of great threat or challenge, this experience of tense uncertainty accompanied by frenetic mental activity is amplified greatly, and although we don’t recognize the dramatic threat to our well-being, as the Buddha deduced, this is the source of all of humanity’s unnecessary suffering. Thoughts race, attempting to make sense of and assert control of our life, and many of the thoughts are subtly or not-so-subtly fear based, for we are filled with uncertainty that Life will be manageable without great effort of mind and action, and the more fear-based the thought, the more the mind and the resonant body-emotion contracts into its experience of separateness. While many of our thoughts are simply utilitarian, i.e., figuring out situations and problems, this challenge to a secure sense-of-self is so all-consuming that a great many of our thoughts are, in some way, self-centered thoughts, for we are struggling to make sense of and plan for the physical and psychological survival and flourishing of this “me” that is at the center of our continued on page 36

MaX HaMMoNDS, MD

Matt said, “Okay, let’s say that you’re riding that new street bike of yours in the sand dunes and you get sand in the gear box.” Carl grimaced. “And you use a detergent someone recommended to clean out the gear box. And then you discover that the detergent is worse than sand for the gears.” Carl was listening. “Would you stop using the detergent?” Carl nodded. “And put the sand back in the gear box?” Carl stopped and looked at his salad. “The investigator who discovered the bad results of saturated fat recommended that we replace it with fruits and vegetables,” Matt said. “But instead, the food manufacturers replaced it with high-fructose corn syrup – the detergent in the gear box. Do you think we should put the sand back in the gear box? Or is sand still bad, even though the detergent is worse?” Carl pushed his fat-covered salad to the middle of the table and raised his hand. “Could I change my order, please?”

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 25


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spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

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You Should Be So Lucky Blue Note

Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Tench is the ultimate utility player, the go to guy who helps steady Tom Petty and company but can step to the plate as needed. You Should Be So Lucky – his first official solo release – beautifully displays the attributes that define the essence of a support musician. His versatility, exceptional playing, and exquisite sense of timing propel the dozen songs into uncharted and unexpected terrain. Be it the mournful pop of “Today I Took Your Picture Down” or the New Orleans funk of “Wobbles” Tench consistently plays to his strengths; as a vocalist Tench is no better than serviceable but he stays within his range and smartly allows his band to hold sway. Recorded live in the studio by legendary produce

A-1 MUSIC WAREHOUSE 1408-B Patton Ave. ~ West Asheville, NC

PG. 36

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In an effort to cover as much worthy music as possible, I am going to limit my reviews to around 150 words. There’s just so much good stuff out there worth mentioning! As always buying your music from one of our many fine independent record stores is the way to go.

Benmont Tench

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We Carry NEW and Used Vinyl Mention this Ad and Receive 15% Off Rock & Roll Jewelry and Accessories Records • CD’s • Tapes • Posters T-Shirts • Stickers • Sweatshirts & more

828-575-9333 www.mymusicwarehouse.com • If we don’t have it, we can find it! 26 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

Dual Drive

Glyn Johns, Lucky has an intentionally shaky feel, the sort of rag tag disc that makes its mark and moves on. The result is an understated surprise that makes me wish he’d step more often into the spotlight. ****

Blue Mother Tupelo

Only Sunshine Juke Tonk Records

The Nashville based duo of Ricky and Micol Davis have spent two decades under the radar, making their harmonious brand of Southern rock with skillful care. From the opening “Country Fun” through the Cajun call of “Mississippi Mud” Only Sunshine remains addictively engaging, the sort of breezy delight that seems equally well suited for an afternoon of porch sitting or a long mountainside drive. With energy to spare it’ll work its way into your subconscious and have you humming along in no time. Engineered and recorded by Ricky Davis the sound is clear and precise, showcasing the pair’s simpatico vocal styling and expressive voices. Unlike their previous efforts – which balanced between cover songs and original material – Only Sunshine is entirely written by the two, adding a certain gravitas and sensibility to an already fine recording. ***1/2

Peter Frampton

Hummingbird in a Box: Songs for a Ballet

Say what you will about Frampton, but for all his wealth and fame he’s never been one to avoid a challenge. Written as an accompaniment for the Cincinnati Ballet, with whom he’s collaborated on several occasions, HIAB consists of seven elaborate compositions that are as far removed from Frampton Comes Alive as one could imagine. It’s also among the most adventurous music he’s ever made, a rare example of an artist thinking outside their own box and making it work. Largely instrumental, the emphasis is on Frampton’s supple and highly inventive guitar skills and melodic knack. “The Promenade’s Retreat” is as lovely a tune as he’s ever written while “Shadow of My Mind” – easily the most Frampton like song herein – hearkens back to his celebrated tenure with The Herd while the jazz focused “Norman Wisdom” sounds like an extended Humble Pie workout. It’s not a disc for everyone and will likely leave longtime followers scratching their heads. But I find it a refreshing change of scenery from an artist determined to not rest on past glories. ****

The Memphis Project Icehouse Records

The brainchild of guitarist Garry Goin and saxophonist/flutist Pat Register (aka Dual Drive) this disc is a healthy dose of blues and funk with a decidedly good-natured swing. Both are deeply rooted in the Memphis scene, meaning you can expect lots of Booker T. and the MGs style groove. Ten cover tunes, most leaning towards the familiar and largely instrumental, are all played with respect and reverence. At times a bit too much, as Goin and Register tend to mirror the original arrangements, but when they do step out, particularly on Charlie Rich’s “Who Will the Next Fool Be?” (with a smoking vocal performance by Wendy Moten) the results are stupendous. Highlights include faithful renditions of “Green Onions” (pretty hard to mess that one up!) and a surprisingly taut “Never Can Say Goodbye.” For those of us who love the particular bit of soul that emanated from Memphis, this disc is a deferential remembrance of an era largely past. ***1/2

Mark “Mule Man” Massey One Step Ahead of the Blues Icehouse Records

Mark “Mule Man “Massey is a Mississippi hill country bluesman with enough life experiences for ten. A stretch at Parchman prison not only set him straight, but introduced him to the restorative nature of music. After an apprenticeship with David Kimbrough – son of blues legend Junior – he set out to make his mark. With a band comprised of extraordinary music vets (averaging 40 years on the road) Massey is the youngest white blues musician on the circuit. One Step Ahead reflects this “hard times build determination” mantra. It’s as pure of essence blues romp as I’ve heard all year, abounding in swagger, swing, and scorch. Featured guest Willie Clayton infuses “In the Hole” with grit and desperation while the exuberant “Double Trouble” (not the Otis Rush song) shows off the band’s transcendent yet fiery expertise. This is Blues done right, with passion and authenticity, and one heck of a fine listen. **** ‘CD’s’ continued on page 27


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‘CD’s’ continued from page 26

Shaman Juan Soothsayer

Mysterious Force Records

As the first Caucasian signed to Motown records, Shaman Juan holds a unique niche in cultural history. It speaks to both the diversity of his music and his flair for writing songs well beyond his empirical norm. Juan – who has worked in film and radio, collaborated with Guns N’ Roses, and spent time as a member of the SNL band – has seen and done it all. This wealth of experience is reflected in Soothsayer, a funk laden observation of life, love, and the universal longing for understanding. Anchored by longtime James Brown drummer Clyde Stubblefield, it’s an infectious dance along that, much like the best work of Marvin Gaye and Curtis Mayfield, looks unflinchingly at the social injustices of our day. There’s a lot more below the surface of Soothsayer than you might think; both worthy of our deliberation and a call to action. ***1/2

‘Bluegrass’ continued from page 8

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Wendy Jones Quartet Perfect Dream ARC Music

A collaboration with Asheville based pianist Michael Jefry Stevens, and ably accompanied by bassist Zack Page and drummer Rick Dilling, this is 50s period lounge jazz at its finest, smoothly laden undertones that go down like fine scotch. And while this delight would have been a perfect coupling to season one of Mad Men it’s no simple exercise in nostalgia, but rather a terrific extension of a style that deserves preservation. The bulk of the material is written by Stevens – playful and romantic ruminations that perfectly suit the band – and aptly demonstrate his skills as an arranger. Album highlights include the sensual “Highway Blues” and the delightfully coy “Losing Streak,” but as one who adores this era every track here hits the mark. Perfect Dream is an example of just how much the jazz scene in Asheville has grown, and how blessed we are with local talent. *****

so then things get scaled back. It might just be the two of us, rather than a full band.

JC: Your session work, which has included Wilco, Fiona Apple, Norah Jones, as well as a fair amount of soundtracks, has taken you well outside what some might think of as your province. What do you look for in deciding on which projects to take on?

JC: Talk a bit about playing with John Cowan.

balance touring with staying in town for a few days. I now live in Los Angeles which makes it easier for me to do some session stuff. I look for projects that sound interesting or people I just admire and want to play with. It’s not a big part of my work and I suspect it never will be, but when the right opportunity comes my way and it fits my schedule I grab it.

NP: We did, and since then I’ve made it my

mission to come back. Being part of the John Cowan band was never less than great. I was surrounded by first class musicians and played venues big and small. I also met so many musicians I had long looked up to. I wouldn’t have traded that for anything.

JC: The Altamont is a fantastic acoustic

venue, intimate in size and just aesthetically gorgeous. I suspect you don’t choose the venues in which you perform but it must be a delight to show up and discover a location tailored for your music.

NP: Actually when it’s just Stuart and me we

have the luxury of choosing the venues we want. I had heard of the Altamont and while we usually play the Grey Eagle, if I remember right they were booked. So the Altamont seems a great fit. When I pull into an unfamiliar venue, one that looks and sounds great, it just inspires me. I take it as a challenge to do that venue proud. Of course there is also the economics. If a venue only seats a hundred or

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sound experience

festivals and such but, while the band really grew in popularity, we never lost touch with the audiences. And Salmon was never so big that it played the huge halls that make it easy to become disconnected with the fans. We played a lot of shows and still took audience requests and chatted back and forth. I’m pretty sure the band played Asheville during the time you were with them.

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NP: Often it’s a matter of scheduling, trying to

JC: Any plans to record again with Stuart? NP: We’d love to but again it’s a matter of

scheduling. We’re both incredibly busy, and he’s one of the most in demand musicians around. We’re tentatively looking at late fall, but the first thing is to wrap up this tour. Anytime I can work with a musician as great as Stuart I am going to do so. This has been the best year of my career and I can only see it getting better. IF YOU Stuart Duncan and Noam Pikelny in GO concert, Sunday, October 5 at 7 p.m..

Tickets are priced at $30 adv. / $35 day of show for this all ages seated event att The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For more information call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com.

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Mutual Benefit at the Mothlight

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Blending elements of folk, avant garde pop, and psychedelia, Mutual Benefit – the brainchild of singer/multi-instrumentalist Jordan Lee – has steadily garnered a following among those who gravitate toward the wide umbrella known as “Freak Folk.”

By JaMeS

CaSSaRa

Lee, who grew up in Columbus, Ohio, first began writing songs “inspired by guys like Sufijan Stevens and Elliott Smith” while still in high school. Upon graduation he relocated to Texas where he Jordan Lee, singer/multi-instrumentalist. began taking his music into a more Photo: Danny Dorsa experimental direction, intrigued by field recordings and found sounds (both of which he integrated into his own been properly released – into what would recordings) and began writing and recordbecome Mutual Benefit’s debut album, ing as Mutual Benefit. Love’s Crushing Diamond (reviewed in After moving to Boston in hopes of the February 2014 issue of Rapid River). making music with an old friend who had Lee is currently working on a new masattended the Berklee School of Music, Lee tered and expanded physical version of expanded his interests and took his music The Cowboy’s Prayer while embarking into new and more audacious directions. As on a massive fall tour in North America. Mutual Benefit, Lee’s debut release, Figure Part of that tour brings him to Asheville in in Black (2009), was originally issued only what promises to be one of the fall’s most on cassette. 2010 saw the release of a pair intriguing shows. Don’t let this one slip of Mutual Benefit EPs: Drifting and Spider under your radar screen! Heaven on Lee’s own self-financed label. Lee had a busy 2011, collaborating IF with Holy Spirits on the Mutual Spirits YOU Mutual Benefit, with Dent May and GO Soft Cat at the Mothlight on Friday, split single and delivering two more EPs, September 5. Doors open at 8:30 I Saw the Sea and The Cowboy’s Prayer, p.m.; show begins at 9:30 p.m. Tickets: $10 available only as downloads. Later that year, adv / $12 at the door. For more information he began assembling material from the past go to www.themothlight.com year – loose odds and ends that had not

David Mayfield Mayfield says that a series of life changes inspired the songs on the new album, Strangers. “The underlying tone of struggle and trying to gain ground gave a sincerity to the music that makes me feel like I have finally found my voice,” says Mayfield. David Mayfield came up on the bluegrass circuit, winning contests on mandolin and guitar, playing bass with his families bluegrass band, and even doing a stint living in Bill Monroe’s old bus, Bluegrass Breakdown.

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MIKe FaRLey

Mayfield will be showcasing tracks from the album while on tour this summer with Jason Edwards (drums), Jenn Star-Symch (fiddle, synth), and John Warren Watson (bass, vocals), all members of his band, The David Mayfield Parade. www.thedavidmayfieldparade.com

IF YOU GO: Friday, September 12 at 9

p.m. All ages. $10/$12. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 2325800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com.

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 27


COPYEDITING &

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PROOFREADING SERVICES A sharp eye for the big picture and the small details. Books • Websites Short Stories • Cookbooks Assistance with Self Publishing

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www.aptitudeforwords.com

828-581-9031

JAMES PATTERSON Signing & Celebration Saturday, September 6 from 6-8 p.m.

The beloved author of the Alex Cross books, the Maximum Ride series, the Homeroom Diaries series, Treasure Hunters, and many more will join us for a champagne and lemonade toast and book signing! We’ll be celebrating the generous grant Mr. Patterson gave to us as part of his Million Dollar campaign to help indie bookstores. While the reception is open to the public, the signing line requires a ticket. Signing line tickets will be given out on Saturday, September 6 with the purchase of a James Patterson book from Malaprop’s. The store opens at 9 a.m.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. For more details please call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

SKY WRITING

It’s all because of clouds.

Kathleen Colburn

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Poets can’t help themselves. The names of clouds are poetry: Cirro-cumulus, Cumulo-nimbus, Nimbo-stratus, for example. Cirro means wisps of hair, the highest clouds. Cumulo means puffy, or heaped clouds, thunder-heads. (The kind I conjure teddy bears from.) Thin wisps of Cirrus,the highest clouds, are ice crystals, the lowest, fog which comes in on little cat feet. We all know that. I’ve been in the North Woods of Minnesota, can you tell? The sky is wide, the cornfields wide, and so are the barns. I miss that sky. I miss lake sunsets, and loons hailing one another at dusk. When I’m in Asheville, I miss the Minnesota sky. When I’m in Minnesota, I miss the mountain sky. I’m always missing. When clouds fill the sky, words appear on my page. I call this sky writing. When I lived in Minnesota (14 years) and didn’t write about the sky, friends wondered if I was all right. I’m not the only sky writer. Here’s poem #895 by Emily Dickinson.

A Cloud withdrew from the Sky Superior Glory be But that Cloud and its Auxiliaries Are forever lost to me Had I but further scanned Had I secured the Glow In an Hermetic Memory It had availed me now. Never to pass an Angel With a glance and a Bow Till I am firm in Heaven Is my intention now.

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CaRoL PeaRCe BJoRLIe – THe PoeT BeHIND THe CeLLo

Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote The Cloud, a seven verse wonder. Here is the first verse. Perhaps you will read the rest online.

This poem was written while I listened to an orchestra perform Hovhanness’s Mysterious Mountain.

Mysterious Mountain

The Cloud I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers, From the seas and the streams; I bear light shade for the leaves when laid In their noonday dreams. From my wings are shaken the dews that waken The sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother’s breast, As she dances about the sun. I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I pass in thunder. From The Poetry of Zen, translated and edited by Sam Hamill and J. P. Seaton, we find this 8th century poem by Han Shan. The gorge is long, rocks, and rocks and rocks jut up. The torrent’s wide, reeds almost hide the other side. The moss is slippery even without rain. The pines sing; the wind is real enough. Who’s ready to leaf free of the world’s traces: come sit with me among white clouds? From a later Zen poet, Chinese writer Ching An (1851-1912)

Returning Clouds Misty trees hide in crinkled hills’ blue green. The man of the Way’s stayed long at this cottage in the bamboo grove. White clouds too know the flavor of this mountain life; they haven’t waited for the vesper bell to come on home again.

I live in clouds, snakes of them at my feet, a cool scarf of them around my face. This mountain could be the heaven I’ve waited for. Below the summit, clouds obscure the top. From above, I see only the mountain shining. Today my mountain is cloud covered. (Sounds like a poem!) Autumn is on its way. I look forward to the sky. I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

POETRIO Sunday, September 7 at 3 p.m. Readings and signings by three poets at 3 p.m. This month features Anne Harding Woodworth (Unattached Male), Quitman Marshall (You Were Born One Time), and Pasckie Pascua (Red is the Color of My Night).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Malaprop’s as a Destination

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Where to meet nationally-and internationally-known authors many times each month, and participate in book clubs, discussion groups, community events, and book signings every week of the year?

Come to Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street, established 32 years ago in downtown Asheville. While at Malaprop’s, enjoy some of the best coffee in town and locally-baked pastry. Tourists and locals alike appreciate the wide selection of guidebooks and maps for exploring parks, cultural sites, outdoor resources in WNC, and for travel to destinations worldwide. You’ll find contemporary bestsellers and classics, signed first editions, an

28 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

By

VIRGINIa MCKINLey

expansive children’s section with books and book-themed gifts, and a rich selection of fiction, non-fiction and poetry by distinguished local and regional authors. Consult the Malaprop’s “Staff Favorites” shelves to see what the booksellers are reading. Strike up a conversation with a bookseller whose favorites interest you, and who will surely find the perfect book for you. It’s a gift? Add a card by a local artist, and enjoy complimentary gift-wrap! Prefer to shop on-line? You can do that at www.malaprops.com. Find titles in hard copy, paperback and e-books too; all are available at this local, independent bookstore!

Photo: Erica Mueller, www.ericamueller.com

Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café 55 Haywood St., Asheville, NC 28801 828-254-6734, www.malaprops.com


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Orison Books, a New Non-Profit Literary Press

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Luke Hankins, senior editor of the Asheville Poetry Review, recently launched Orison Books, a new nonprofit literary press.

Orison Books is a 501(c)(3) non-profit literary press focused on the life of the spirit from a broad range of perspectives. The new press will serve as a home for writers and readers of all backgrounds, religious and non-religious. In addition to publishing spirituallyengaged poetry, fiction, and non-fiction books of exceptional literary merit, each year Orison Books will publish The Orison Anthology—a collection of the best spiritual writing in all genres published in periodicals the preceding year. Orison’s titles will be released in beautifully-designed hardcover and paperback formats, and many will also be released as e-books. Additionally, Orison Books aims to contribute to the cultural conversations around spirituality and literature by hosting classes, readings, symposia, and other public events. Orison Books is currently conducting a fundraiser through Indiegogo, an online crowdfunding platform: www.indiegogo.com/ projects/orison-books. Through behind-thescenes efforts, Orison Books initially raised $6,500, which allowed them to incorporate, apply for tax exemption with the IRS, and create a logo and website. Their goal is to raise an additional $40,000 to enable them to begin publishing books in early 2015. “Today, a significant gap exists between literary publishers and strictly religious publishers. Literary publishers

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Publishers of spiritually-engaged poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. occasionally publish books of spiritual depth, but few, if any, set out to do so as a mission and raison d’être. “Religious publishers, on the other hand, tend to publish work that offers little appeal to readers outside a particular ideological group. Orison Books, a new non-profit literary press, aims to address this gap through its focus on the life of the spirit from a non-ideological standpoint.”

~ Luke Hankins, Editor

“Orison” [awr-uh-zuhn] is an archaic word that means “prayer.” The founders at Orison Books believe that the best spiritual art and literature call us to meditate and contemplate, rather than asking us to adopt any ideology or set of propositions. As Simone Weil wrote, “The mysteries of faith are degraded if they are made into an object of affirmation and negation, when in reality they should be an object of contemplation” (Gravity and Grace). This type of art evokes the human experience of transcendence and explores the mysteries of being, and in so doing opens our minds and hearts to the divine and the possibility of becoming the fullest humans we can be. In their view, spiritual writing has little to do with subject matter. Rather, the kind of work they seek to publish has a transcendent aesthetic effect on the reader, and reading it can itself be a spiritual experience. Such work is not merely

Not For Children Only CHILDREN’S CLASSICS FOR ADULTS

If you’d like to learn more about great children’s literature, Pack Library is offering a free “Let’s Talk About It” book discussion program.

Not for Children Only: Children’s Classics for Adults is a six-part series which will run from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. every other Thursday beginning September 11. Participants will have the opportunity to read and discuss eight children’s books, from traditional fairy tales to modern children’s novels. The history of children’s literature will be shared by guest humanities scholar Joy Neaves, who will also guide the discussions. Neaves has more than 15 years of experience as an editor of children’s picture books, poetry, middle grade fiction, and young adult fiction. She also teaches in UNC-Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program and has conducted workshops about writing for children through the Highlights Foundation and namelos.com.

By

ReGINa ILLIG

SEPTEMBER

about spiritual contemplation, but itself leads the reader into profound contemplation. It is not merely about the sublime, but itself has a sublime effect on the reader. It is not merely about the mystery of being, but itself heightens the reader’s sense of the mystery underlying the fabric of our daily lives. Orison Books will release its first title, I Scrape the Window of Nothingness: New & Selected Poems by Stella Vinitchi Radulescu, on March 15, 2015. Radulescu has for decades been writing poetry in three languages (Romanian, French, and English), and while she has garnered much attention in France, winning numerous awards for her books, her work has received relatively little attention in the States. Orison feels her work is a perfect fit for their mission, and they hope to help remedy the neglect her work has suffered in this country. I Scrape the Window of Nothingness is a compilation of the best selections from several decades of her English-language books, along with a substantial section of new, unpublished work. Visit www.orisonbooks.com

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Thursday, September 4 at 7 p.m. TONY EARLEY, Mr. Tall: A Novella and Stories. Tuesday, September 9 at 7 p.m. KAREN ABBOTT, Sin in the Second City, interviewed by Denise Kiernan, The Girls of Atomic City. Wednesday, September 10 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Mindfulness Practices for ADHD with Coach Rudy Rodriguez, LCSW Wednesdays, September 10 & 24 at 7 p.m. Women Who Run with the Wolves, salon with Andrea Olson, MA, Min. Sunday, September 14 at 3 p.m. REZA ASLAN, No god but God: the Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam. Monday, September 15 from 6-9 p.m. MASTIN KIPP, Growing Into Grace. Lecture and Q & A followed by a book signing. Get tickets at www.TheDailyLove.com. Wednesday, September 17 at 7 p.m. LAIRD HUNT, Neverhome, a woman in The Civil War. Thursday, September 18 at 7 p.m. KATY SIMPSON SMITH, The Story of Land and Sea, love, place, and circumstance. Friday, September 19 at 7 p.m. Local witches *Diuvei (Steve Rasmussen) and Lady Passion (Dixie Deerman) discuss The Goodly Spellbook. Magic, chant, dance and song. Saturday, September 20 at 7 p.m. DAVID MADDEN, The Last Bizarre Tale, short fiction.

PACK LIBRARY BOOK DISCUSSION SCHEDULE Thursday, September 11 – Classic Fairy Tales

by Iona & Peter Opie

Thursday, September 25 – Little Women This program is designed for adults, but interested teens and tweens are also welcome to participate. Adult readers will be able to revisit old favorites or discover them for the first time. Register to receive your free book loans at Pack Library’s adult services desk; call 2504717 or email library@buncombecounty.org. “Let’s Talk About It” is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, in partnership with the North Carolina Center for the Book, a program of the State Library of North Carolina.

PARTIAL LISTING

by Louisa May Alcott

Thursday, October 9 – The Secret Garden

by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Thursday, October 23 – Charlotte’s Web

by E.B. White, and The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Tuesday, September 23 at 7 p.m. CAROL BRADLEY, Last Chain on Billie, elephants. Friday, September 26 at 7 p.m. ALAN GRATZ, The League of Seven, alternate history. Saturday, September 27 at 3 p.m. FRANCINE BRYSON, Blue Ribbon Baking from a Redneck Kitchen.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

PG. 20

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Thursday, November 6 – Dragonwings by

Laurence Yep, and The Giver by Lois Lowry

Thursday, November 20 – Wonder by R.J. Palacio

IF YOU Not for Children Only: Children’s GO Classics for Adults takes place from 5:30

to 7:30 p.m. every other Thursday at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood Street, Asheville. For more details call (828) 250-4718, or visit www.buncombecounty.org

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 29


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Joyce Schlapkohl

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Joyce Schlapkohl was the “Featured Artist of the Month” for August at the Asheville Gallery of Art. Her twenty paintings, including her African animals, were a great success. She has a variety of paintings at the gallery: landscapes, still lifes, florals, and animals. “Any subject that catches the light and stimulates the senses is a subject worth painting.” Longtime watercolor painter and teacher and Signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina, Joyce started oil painting ten years ago and has loved the medium. The French Impressionists were always her favorite painters and oils seem to lend them-

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Touch of Fall by Joyce Schlapkohl

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Blue Ridge Majesty by Joyce Schlapkohl

selves to capturing the feeling she wants. Her paintings are filled with light and vivid colors. “There is a painting everywhere you look and especially in Western North Carolina. The big decision is choosing what to paint next from the Dupont Falls by wonderful seasonal Joyce Schlapkohl and light changes, to the variety of animals and florals, and so on. It’s always a learning and exciting experience to start a new painting and see it develop. I usually stay with that one painting, developing the shapes and values until it’s completed.” Joyce studied art at Florida Atlantic University and has taught workshops in watercolor and oil painting. She currently teaches from her studio in Waynesville. Joyce Schlapkohl is represented by the Asheville Gallery of Art, (828) 251-5796 or www.Ashevillegallery-of-art.com, and the Seven Sister’s Gallery in Black Mountain. She may be reached by email to joyce@ joycepaints.com and www.joycepaints.com.

Growing Radiant Flowers with Pastels

Free demonstration by award-winning pastelist, Susan Sinyai.

PG. 20

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been a working artist, exhibiting and winning awards in numerous local and national shows. Susan was commissioned by UNC Asheville to paint the portrait of former Chancellor Samuel Shuman. The quality of light is what Susan seeks to explore and capture in her work – the ways it can evoke mood and memory.

During the meeting of the Appalachian Pastel Society on Saturday, September 13, Susan will describe how she develops a pastel floral painting. She will explain and illustrate techniques and materials used in creating the underpainting, and then journey towards creating a sense of luminosity and delicacy. There will be a slide presentation, as well as a work in progress for the brief demonstration. Susan Meyer Sinyai received her BFA from UNC Asheville Resplendent in 1994. Since that time she has by Susan Sinyai

IF YOU GO: The group will

meet Saturday, September 13 from 10 a.m. until noon at Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road in Mills River. Non-members welcome. For more information call Suzy Hart at (845) 986-3653 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.


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fine art

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Establishing a Pricing Structure

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Western North Carolina’s NEW ART DESTINATION Offering Modern Fine Art

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

Plus Ethnographic Art & New World Antiquities

Artists often postpone By weNDy H. oUTLaND getting their work into the marketplace because they are uncertain about pricing. And that’s not surprising, because there is no quick and easy formula for determining a proper pricing structure. It takes time – but it pays off. Those that shrug off the legwork are likely to learn the hard way that any artwork that appears to be priced too high – or too low – is unlikely to sell. Be assured, you are investing your time wisely if you do the research to get a clear sense of the art market in your community. Of course, once an artist has spent a couple of decades selling their work, winning numerous awards and grants, serving residencies at respected institutions and having multiple solo exhibitions, they are able to name their price – provided they have kept their collectors informed every step of the way. However, for those just getting started, there are a few simple steps to make the task less daunting. Begin by evaluating the significance and quality of your work in relation to art produced by others in your area. Assess your Evaluate the accomplishments to date and how significance and they stack up in quality of your work. relation to other artists doing work in the same medium and scale. The buying public will often ask how long an artist has been working. It’s wise to have a brief printed bio on hand at all times! Visit artist studios in the River Arts District and galleries such as Van Dyke Jewelry and Fine Craft, Mountain Made, Castell Photography, all located in downtown Asheville. Also Seven Sisters and Mountain Nest in Black Mountain, as well as Miya in Weaverville. When reviewing other artists’ pricing structures, consider how long they’ve been active, where they show, and how collectible their work is. Until your career achievements measure up to theirs, don’t expect to get the same prices. Many established artists are extremely gracious and willing to share information. Of course, it is always a good idea to ask in advance if a working artist would be willing to talk with you for 10-15 minutes regarding their views on establishing a viable pricing structure. At the most basic level, be sure that the prices you set for your work will cover all of the expenses incurred to create and market it. That includes not just your materials and time, but also income taxes, overhead expenses and profit margin. The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz

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At Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville Exit 23 off I-26, cross Merrimon & up hill to 1st building on right

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC 1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway

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1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6

‘Cycling’ continued from pg. 21

There is a 500-person field limit to ensure safe riding conditions for all participants. Registration details are at www.gfncs.com. This event benefits Friends of Great Smoky Mountains National Park and focuses on advocating for recreational experiences for youth. For information about guided outings in the Smokies, events benefitting the park, priority park projects, and how to make a donation, visit www.friendsofthesmokies.org. IF YOU The Asheville Gran Fondo takes place Sunday, GO September 7 in downtown Asheville at Pack Square

Park. Start time is 8 a.m. For more details or to register, visit www.gfncs.com.

PG. 36

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Unique Restaurants & Breweries

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Mail Art Show

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Anything Goes – Everything Shows is an uncensored free style mail art show.

Carlos Steward

Mail art is art that uses the postal system as a medium. Mail artists typically exchange ephemera in the form of illustrated letters; zines; rubberstamped, decorated, or illustrated envelopes; artist trading cards; postcards; artistamps; faux postage; mail-interviews; naked mail; friendship books, decos and three-dimensional objects. Fundamentally, mail art Stamp mail art by in the context of a Mail Art Restren, Medellin, Network is a form of concepColumbia tual art. It is a “movement” with no membership and no leaders. This network involves thousands of participants in more than 50 countries. The Courtyard Gallery receives hundreds of submissions for this show from 80 countries and from throughout the US every year.

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IF YOU Anything Goes – Everything Shows opens GO Saturday, September 6 from 6-9 p.m. at the

Courtyard Gallery and the Flood Fine Arts Center, 109 Roberts St. in the Phil Mechanics Building located in Asheville’s River Arts District.

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The Village Potters at the Junction


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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

32 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

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The Village Potters will exhibit “On The Wall” at The Junction Restaurant in Asheville’s River Arts District from September 18 – October 14. For a special group exhibit at The Junction restaurant, The Village Potters are all creating work specifically for wall display, ranging from high-fire stoneware to Raku. The exhibit will feature work from Sarah Wells Rolland, Bernie Segal, Judi Harwood, Lori Theriault, Cat Jarosz, Karen Dubois, Melanie Robertson, and Dearing Davis. The Junction is a neighborhood eatery serving simple food with a fine-dining twist. Owners Charles and Tanya Triber have shared a passion for quality food and drink, but also a commitment to excellent service, environmental conservation, and bolstering community through many efforts, including monthly features of local artists. IF YOU An opening reception will be held on Thursday, GO September 18, at 6 p.m. The works will be on

display through October14, 2014 at the Junction, 348 Depot Street, in Asheville’s River Arts district. Call (828) 253-2424, or visit www.thevillagepotters.com.


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SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

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NEW! Web Exclusive Rapid River Magazine has expanded its online edition with a short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of “shorts,” including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 genres. All works will be reviewed for appropriateness and once chosen will be subject to a collaborative editing process. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is managing the section. Please contact her by email to shortstories@rapidrivermagazine.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. Visit her at www.aptitudeforwords.com.

‘Town Hardware’ cont’d from pg. 19

We have a fantastic staff that takes pride in helping customers to find the solution for their household problems. We are known for having products you can’t find anywhere else. Our new slogan is “This is your town” and we try to make every customer feel like this is truly their store. They don’t need to go anywhere else!

Town Hardware & General Store 103 W. State St. Black Mountain, NC 28711 (828) 669-7723 www.townhardware.com

‘Introvert or Extrovert’ cont’d from pg. 16

— are not biased. We are special regardless of our introvertism or extrovertism. We can drink most men under the table, literally; bet on horse races; mix a better drink than most in the summer time; and, be tender and understanding when necessary. Note: More about real southern women in another column. Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

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BUSINESS IN A MORE BEAUTIFUL WORLD

PARTY TOO HEARTY?

Cultivating Our Individual Center

Call a taxi! Don’t let friends drink and drive. In Asheville, call:

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Here in this beautiful place – the mountains of western North Carolina – and in many places around the world, communities of people are gathering together. We share interests, values, gardens and lawnmowers. We need and want to be together. Together we can shift our story from just me to we. In order to do this, we first need to embrace our individual center; the place in our heart where we know we are valued, loved and complete; the place where our passion is ignited and our gifts emerge. There we need to cultivate self-awareness and clear intention. We need to accept our ego with understanding and compassion, allowing our limiting beliefs, damaged emotions, and trapped energy to dissolve. We then need to embrace a collective center to fully function individually and together. To navigate the shift in our collective story, we deeply need to see our part in the whole. We need to embrace the community we are called to function within and our community needs to embrace its individuals. In that collective center we learn the art of collaboration. We learn to see ourselves from a broader perspective. We experience

By

RoN CZeCHoLINSKI & KaTHLeeN CoLBURN

the harmony and synergy that comes out of surrender. Like in our personal journey to a heart centered life, we learn to let go of our attachments in order to embrace a deeper sense of who we are. We move deeper into the center by letting go of control and embracing the chaos. With this deeper sense of community and collaboration we can fully awaken and emerge individually. From this place we are going to shift our collective story to pursue harmony and equilibrium. Next time Elise and Phil Okrend expand on a passage from their book, Messages to the Heart. We will explore specific concepts of the emerging global consciousness shift. This essential shift is the foundation of our new story.

• Beaver Lake Cab, (828) 252-1913 • Checker Cab, (828) 254-1155 • Metro Cab, (828) 254-1155 • New Blue Bird, (828) 258-8331 • Red Cab, (828) 232-1112 • Yellow Cab, (828) 253-3311

(800) 829-4872 | www.1800taxiusa.com

Find out more about the people behind the column and the live events that we host at: www. meetup.com/Business-in-a-More-Beautiful-World

Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. Please arrive early for the September 23 session.

CREATIVE BUSINESS AT ITS BEST

A-B Technical Community College, Ferguson Bldg., Asheville

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HandMade in America is offering a new fall workshop series, tailor-made for creative entrepreneurs.

Creative Business at its Best features three successive, in-depth workshops on business related topics – strategic marketing, the art of being an entrepreneur, and the craft of running a small business. The Strategy of Marketing will be held at Echo View Fiber Mill in Weaverville on Friday, September 12 from 1-5 p.m. Learn about target marketing, strategic communications, and the power of collective marketing. The Art of Entrepreneurship will be held on Friday, October 24 from 1-5 p.m. in downtown Asheville. Find out what artists need to know about public contracting. The Craft of Small Business will be held at the A-B Tech Small Business Center in Candler on Thursday, November 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Small business financing, cash management and budgeting will be discussed. Registration and information can be found at www.handmadeinamerica.org. Save 10% by registering for all three workshops!

$

30.00

Registration Fee Includes materials

Going Beyond Racism Through Understanding & Respect

Next 9-Week Session:

September 23 - February 18 Join us for compelling dialogue, community building, and a call to action.

Special Discount for Public School Teachers! Continuing Education Units available for health professionals, clergy, educators, and others.

Register online at www.buildingbridges-ashevillenc.org For more information call (828) 777-4585 Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 33


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September 2-28

p.m. along Front Street by the railroad tracks in Dillsboro, NC. Call Brenda Anders for details (828) 506-8331, www.spiritofappalachia.org

Saturday, September 6

Abstractions

The Odd Couple

HART presents one of Neil Simon’s biggest comedy hits, September 5 & 6 at 7:30 p.m.; September 7 at 3 p.m. $22; $18 seniors; $10 students. $6 tickets for students on Sunday. Box Office: Tue-Sat 1-5 p.m. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville. (828) 4566322, www.harttheatre.com.

through September 20

Camped Out on Greasy Grass

A series of portraits curated by Jeremy Russell and Jameid Ferrin, and featuring displaced artists from the RAD’s Lyman Avenue Studios. At the Asheville Area Arts Council Gallery, 1 Page Ave., in downtown Asheville. More details at www.ashevillearts.com

September 1-30

Whimsical Art by Marcy Jackson Narrative illustrations of fantastical

First Friday Art Walk, September 5 from 5-8 p.m. Opening recepRobert Winkler tion, Friday, September 19 from 6-8 p.m. Artwork by Barbara Fisher, Robert Winker and Pat Zalisko. Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave. (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com.

Friday, September 5

Painter Among the Poets

Dan Rice at Black Mountain College. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Gallery talk by curator Brian E. Butler at 7 p.m. Free. On display September 5 - January 10, 2015. The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, 56 Broadway, downtown Asheville. (828) 350-8484, www.blackmountaincollege.org

Friday, September 5

Shapes and Shadows

Various 2D and 3D works presented by the Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League at the historic Red House Gallery, 310 W. State St., in Black Mountain next to the Monte Vista Hotel. On display through September 29, 2014. Mon.-Sat. 10-5; Sun. 12-4. Call (828) 669-0351 or go to www.svfalarts.org.

September 5 - October 26

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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creatures, places and designs. On display at Flat Rock Village Bakery, 2710 Greenville Highway, Flat Rock.

through September 7

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Eliada’s 2014 Corn Maze

Over 4 miles of maze trails, and a field full of attractions. Sure to please children and parents. 9-4 p.m. Thursdays, 10-8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. $9 adults; $6 ages 4-11. Children 3 and under free! Call (828) 254-5356, or visit www. fieldsoffun.org, www.eliada.org.

Saturday, September 6

Harvest Conference

Organic Growers School’s 1st annual event for backyard and urban growers and homesteaders. Keynote: A Field Guide to Hope with Janisse Ray, 8 p.m. at Ferguson Auditorium, A-B Tech Campus, Asheville. $40, register at www.organicgrowersschool.org

Saturday, September 6

Dillsboro Celebrates 125 years

Entertainment, vendors, exhibits, children’s games, and demonstrations of old-time arts and crafts. 10 a.m. - 4

Corey Harris & The Rasta Blues Experience

Original and classic material that celebrates the timeless sound of traditional blues with fresh, insightful lyrics. 8 p.m. doors open; 9 p.m. show. 18+; $12/$15. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Avenue. Details at (828) 255-7777, www.AshevilleMusicHall.com

September 6 through October 3

Crimson Laurel Gallery

Sculptural and Joe Singewald functional ceramics by Rob Pullyen and Joe Singewald. Alternative Firing exhibit features Maureen McGregor, Edge Barnes, and Conrad Weiser. 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville. (828) 688-3599

Sunday, September 7

Zoom In

Exhibition of Asheville street photography. Opening reception 4-6 p.m. at The Green Sage Cafe in the Westgate Mall. On display through October 15, 2014. Free. Visit www.greensagecafe. com or call (828) 505-0144.

September 12-14

Playback Theatre Immersion Class A full weekend of improvisation with Deb Scott, former Artistic Director of Asheville Playback Theatre. All levels welcome! $60 to $120, sliding scale. Asheville Movement Center, 4 Richmond St., Asheville. (828) 329-5169, deborah.scott@tcqr.org

Saturday, September 13

5th Annual Hobo Ball

6 p.m. at Camp TonAWandah in Flat Rock. Fundraiser benefits Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site. $85 includes a social hour followed by a hearty buffet dinner, live auction with Jerry Stone, dancing and storytelling. More details at (828) 696-3455 or visit www.friendsofcarlsandburg.org

Saturday, September 13

Asheville Ghost Signs

Preservation Society downtown walking tour. Stroll and view hidden relics of history. 10 a.m. Pritchard Park. Dutch lunch at Laurey’s Biltmore Avenue. Details at www.psabc.org.

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Saturday, September 13

Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery

Dmonstrations, refreshments, music, and a showcase of ceramic arts by Joan Pennington, Christine Sams, and twenty five gallery members. Tues-Sun 11-5 p.m. 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Details at (828) 285-0210, or visit www.odysseyceramicarts.com

Saturday, September 13

Here’s Hope 2014

Luncheon and fashion show featuring cancer survivors. Live entertainment, silent auction, and raffle to benefit the Hope Chest for Women. At the Omni Grove Park Inn. 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. $50. Details by calling (828) 708-3017 or visit www.hopechestforwomen.org.

Sunday, September 14

Riders in the Sky

Heart. 5:30-7 p.m. at Grateful Steps Bookstore, 159 South Lexington Ave., Asheville. Details at (828) 277-0998.

Friday & Saturday, September 19 & 20

12th Annual Quilt Fair

Quilts and handcrafted items for sale. Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jefferson Station, West Jefferson, in Ashe county. More details at www.ashequilters.org.

Saturday, September 20

Journal Making Workshop

With Kent Stewart at 3 p.m. Intended for beginners, ages 11 through adult. $3 materials cost per person. Limited to 10 participants. Call Blue Ridge Books, (828) 456-6000, to sign up. Located at 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. More details at www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Featured in Toy Story, this band is known for award-winning harmonies, wacky cowboy wit and high-yodeling adventures. $21; $7 for students and children. 3 p.m. at Western Carolina University in the Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. (828) 227-2479 or bardoartscenter.wcu.edu

Sunday, September 21

Wednesday, September 17

Thursday, September 25

Hispanic Heritage Exhibition

Artwork by Luis Martinez Cruz, Victor H. Verde and Gustavo Villota, and “Mi Historia,” stories from Latinos living in WNC. Opening reception 6-7:30 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith Art and Intercultural Gallery. On display September 15 - October 15. Open Mon.-Sat. 9-6, Sun. 12-6. More details at studentactivities.unca.edu or call (828) 251-6990.

September 16 October 28

Beginner Bluegrass Music Classes

Tuesday evenings. Learn bluegrass banjo, fiddle or mandolin. Taught by Wayne Erbsen, author of dozens of self-help music instruction books. At the Log Cabin Cooking & Music Center, 111 Bell Road in Haw Creek. For more information: (828) 299-7031, www.nativeground.com.

Friday, September 19

Variety Musical Program

Free. First Baptist, 63 N. Main Street, Weaverville. 7 p.m. Featuring: Violin, flute, piano, vocal, guitar, marimba. Info at (828) 645-5798.

Friday, September 19

Reflections of Beauty & Truth

Elise and Phil Okrend reading and booksigning for Messages to the

Classicial Harp Concert & Harmonics

Concert harpist, Linda Barton Paul, with preservationist and architect Robert Griffin. 4 p.m. at All Souls in Biltmore Village, 9 Swan St, Asheville. $20, www.psabc.org.

Rubblebucket

Full of explosive synthesizers and melodies made to climb the charts. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. Details at (828) 398-1837, or www.theorangepeel.net.

Friday, September 26

Garland to Joplin Get Happy!

Cabaret Jazz Series featuring Annie Sellick and Michael Jefry Stevens, plus James Simmons, Byron Hedgepath and Billy Cardine. 8 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com or (828) 669-0816. Annie Sellick

Saturday, September 27

Many Moods of McCartney

Benefit concert featuring the Asheville Symphony Orchestra. Honoring Sir Paul McCartney’s classical compositions and well-known hits. 7:30 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Center, 87 Haywood Street in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $100 VIP, $69, $59 & $29. Box office (828) 259-5736, or thomaswolfe. eventticketscenter.com.

Every Saturday

North Asheville Tailgate Market

8 a.m. till noon at UNC Asheville Campus (Lot C). Local, sustainably produced vegetables, fruits, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, herbs, plants, flowers, prepared foods and crafts.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1


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Asheville Playback Theatre

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what to do guide

Best in Show

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Live Music at The Green Room Café Artisan crafted scrumptious food made fresh from local ingredients. Gourmet entrees, sandwiches, soups and salads, breakfast and baked treats, premium beer & wine, Fair Trade locally roasted espresso & coffees, loose leaf teas. Live dinner music Friday’s & Saturday’s from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Every Monday

Saturday, September 6 – Kevin Lorenz, guitar; Jazz, Pop, Ragtime, Bossa Nova & Classical. Friday, September 12 – Lake & Moore, acoustic guitar duo; Folk & Americana. Saturday, September 13 Jazz with Elise Pratt on vocals, Mike Holstein on guitar.

Open Mic

8 p.m. at the Courtyard Gallery. Musicians, poets, comics, singer/songwriters, filmmakers, writers. Flood Gallery Fine Art Center, 109 Roberts Street, Asheville. www.floodgallery.org

Saturday, September 20 The Woody & Johnson Duo; Pop & Blues.

October 4 & 5, 2014

Friday, September 26 – Jazz & Pop, soft sounds on sax by Olivier.

41st Fall Festival

John C. Campbell Folk School, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Crafts from over 200 vendors. Demonstrations, music and dance, great food. Fun for the whole family. $5; $3 ages 12-17; under 12, free. John C. Campbell Folk School, One Folk School Rd., Brasstown, NC 28902. 1-800-FOLK-SCH, www.Folkschool.org

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Improvised theater based on personal stories from the audience. No scripts. No elaborate sets or costumes. The stories that come to life on stage are provided, on the spot, by random audience members. Thursday, September 11 at the Henderson County Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 301 N. Washington St., Hendersonville. Free. Friday & Saturday, September 26 & 27 at 8 p.m. at the BeBe Theater, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. $10; $5 youth. www.ashevilleplayback.org

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Corgi Tales

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Saturday, September 27 – Evalina & Marty, vocal and guitar duo; Blues, Folk & Troubadour music. The Green Room Café 536 North Main, Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

October 16-19

Handcrafted Ukulele

Tryon luthier Jay Lichty has donated a handcrafted instrument for the annual fundraising raffle by LEAF Community Arts Programs. Retail value is $4,135. Raffle tickets are $10 each and may be purchased by calling (828) 686-8742, online at www. TheLEAF.org, or at the LEAF fall festival in Black Mountain October 16-19. Only 500 tickets will be sold. The winning ticket will be drawn October 19. The winner does not have to be present.

Live Music at the Art House

Dragin

by Michael Cole

September 13 – Chris Smith, acoustic folk/ roots, guitar, singer-songwriter. September 20 – Alec & Jacqui Fehl, eclectic mix of acoustic blues and decades rock. The Art House Gallery and Studio 5 Highland Park Road East Flat Rock, NC 28726 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS?

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800867-6028.

Medical Guardian

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for more details.

The Tax Doctor

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

Saturday concert series, 8 p.m. to midnight Local and regional artists perform in the 3,000 foot gallery/performance space. The space includes artists studios, a deck, and a cozy couch lounge.

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 35


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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps 12 Bones (828) 253-4499

The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

A-1 Music Warehouse www.mymusicwarehouse.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

Andrew Charles Gallery (828) 989-0111

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Appalachian Survival Gear & Knife Company www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Ariel Gallery www.arielcraftgallery.com The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com Art on Depot (828) 246-0218

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814 Lime Leaf Thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Asheville Area Arts Council www.ashevillearts.com Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org B & C Winery (828) 550-3610

Mehri & Company (828) 693-0887 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com

Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com Black Forest www.blackforestasheville.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden www.theOG.us Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Brixx Pizza www.brixxpizza.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Building Bridges www.buildingbridges-ashevillenc.org

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Grace C. Bomer Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

The Strand www.38main.com Studio Tour of Henderson County www.OpenStudioTourHC.com

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

Frog Pond Downsizing (828) 734-3874

VaVaVoom www.vavavooom.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

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thought-matrix world. We lose awareness of awareness. We lose awareness of our original and clear consciousness that is irreducible and is the very stability we chase after as we are tossed about by the ever-changing and unstable mind of thought and emotion. We are accustomed to experiencing that we are the thoughts and emotions and the behaviors that result from those thoughts and emotions. We say, “I am happy” or “I am sad” or “I am angry” and act out these thought/emotion experiences as if they are our only choice, as if they are who we are. But is this true? Zen teaches us that, no, we are not these thoughts and emotions or consequent behaviors, They are the product of but one dimension of mind, and a problematic one at that, called the ego. We have these thoughts and emotions. They are properties of being human, just as we have hands and we have feet. Who we are, in our essence, is the awareness, the pure field of consciousness that experiences these phenomena of the mind and body and out of which they are generated. Little mind exists within big mind, and it is the big picture that we are missing. So, we are answering our question: Who is it that is all this cacophony of thought and emotion, and who is it that is the awareness within which all this mental activity occurs? Our culture has kept from us the answer to this very important question and our schools of learning and our psychologies fail even to bring the question up for our examination. Without a clue, we experience the chaotic realm of ego-identity as who we are while we live in awareness as a fish lives in water. We live unaware of awareness, unaware of who we are at our

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Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

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irreducible level, unaware that who we are must be that which is irreducible and unchanging in our experience. As I instructed you to create a happy thought, then an unhappy thought, we must ask, how could these thoughts and emotions be me if I can voluntarily create them? Who is the “me” that can create them? Must there not be a more fundamental entity that receives these instructions and intuitively knows how to manifest them? So then, as we go about our everyday lives, how can these thoughts and emotions be who we are when they spontaneously arise in response and reaction to our daily events and challenges? Where do they come from? Is there two of “me”? Is there one who reacts with ever-changing thought and emotion to ever-changing circumstances, while there is one behind this activity that is unaffected and unchanged by this activity? In a narrow sense, the answer is yes. These two are (1) the ego with its cacophony of thoughts and emotions, and, (2) behind and greater than ego is awareness and its accompanying intelligence we call intuition functioning silently and constantly. To bring this into broader accuracy, however, we must realize, there is only one, awareness, the undifferentiated energy of consciousness out of which arises the differentiated consciousness of ego. Non-duality contains duality as a vivid experience, while what is important to realize is that duality cannot contain nonduality other than as an idea. To live in the duality of egoic mind as our culture conditions us blocks the living experience of the peaceful unity of life-experience we seek. Do you see the empowerment and liberation in this? This is the true purpose of Zen meditation and teaching, to awaken us to awareness and intuition as the irreducible source and experience of our existence. In meditation, as you quiet the talking and emotionally reactive “little” mind, you begin to open into the field of consciousness that is awareness, the water we fish usually swim in unnoticed. And as you continue to meditate, you begin to be aware of awareness and the dawning realization that you are the “big” mind of awareness. This is the very ground of your Being, your source, who you truly are. Oh, how everything then begins to change. Thoughts and emotions come and go. We begin to realize that they are conditioned patterns of our cultural, societal, family and personal experience. They are programmed reactions to situations. They are certainly not who we are. We can begin to let them come and go without investing our sense of self in them. Defensiveness, reactivity, the need to identify with them begins to dissolve. Once we know we don’t have to be controlled by these thoughts and emotions, we can begin to reshape and refine them. We can experience our thoughts as tools, like our hands, which we can train to be increasingly skillful, graceful, compassionate and wise in dealing with the circumstances of life. The egoic mind is really a very remarkable computer that can serve us brilliantly once we stop confusing it for who we are. This is why Buddhism’s teachings and meditation are “liberation” leading to an “awakening” out of living in the little mind of ego into the wisdom and effectiveness of a much bigger, more adaptable and compassionate mind, the mind of awareness itself. The answer to our koan is: YOU are who is aware. It is YOU, the deepest, truest, sanest you.

We are not these thoughts and emotions…

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

Decorated with colored cocoa butter these “Asheville Rounds” make a tasty and unique gift. Also available in fall themed colors.

Destination: Chocolate

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Rapid River Magazine: What makes The Chocolate Fetish an Asheville destination? Elizabeth Foley: The Chocolate Fetish

Our fall display is based on a Thanksgiving table centerpiece featuring hand sculpted fall flowers, hand decorated chocolate pumpkins, turkeys, and fall leaves. It’s fun watching people interact with our seasonal displays; you have to tell them over and over that everything in the display is edible.

has been handcrafting our gourmet chocolates in our store in downtown Asheville since 1986. People come to taste our award-winning chocolates, watch our chocolates being made on site, and explore our RRM: Do a lot of out of town fun and amazing visitors buy your chocolates chocolate art displays. for gifts? Do any of them Over the years worry about it melting we have built quite a before getting home? following of dedicated EF: Yes, a lot of people, both customers that tell locals and tourists, purchase their friends and famour chocolate for gifts. We ily about our shop. I’ll offer a lot of great things for never forget the time gifts including assortment we had a couple all boxes. We recently started the way from Korea offering “Asheville Rounds” come to our shop. which are gifts as unique When I asked, “How as Asheville itself. Each did you hear about Asheville Round is a 6-inch us?” they responded Chocolatier Jessica Lied diameter disc of chocoin broken English applies the finishing touches late and is decorated with that their neighbor to fall chocolates. airbrushed colored cocoa in Korea told them butter to create a Blue Ridge they had to visit The mountain scene. They are finished Chocolate Fetish if they with a hand piped “Asheville, NC” visited Asheville. script and available in milk or dark chocolate. RRM: Can you tell me more about your A fall themed chocolate chocolate art displays?

EF: Visitors to our

store are always amazed to discover that chocolate can be colored into any color of the rainbow as well as sculpted into anything you can imagine. We have a display area dedicated to displaying chocolate sculptures which currently holds three sculptures, one of which is nearly three feet tall. We also have a wide array of chocolate art available in our store including hand decorated high heel shoes, our new hiking boots and for fall, pumpkins, turkeys, black bears, and leaves. The great thing about our chocolate art is that each piece is unique, affordable, and edible! We also have rotating seasonal displays in our store that feature amazing chocolate art. During the summer we feature a “chocolate aquarium” filled with chocolate shells and fish. The hand applied colors make the shells look so real that we challenge customers to find the one real shell hidden in the display.

“Smash Cake” is adorned with edible chocolate leaves. To enjoy this non-traditional cake smash the cake with a small hammer to reveal more chocolates inside.

During the summer people do worry about the chocolate melting but we have lots of ways to make sure that doesn’t happen. We ship nationwide and we often have visitors select things in our store and then ship them back home. When planned right we can actually have the chocolate arrive the same day you get home so you don’t have to worry about it at all. We also offer convenient reusable cooler bags and ice packs. These bags will keep the chocolate cool for up to 48 hours and have a convenient easy to carry handle.

a “through the glass” look into our kitchen and of course samples. The great thing about our shop is that our production kitchen is glassed in so you can always see where the magic happens. From inside our shop you can see our dipping room where we hand dip over 20 flavors of truffles and you can go around through the Haywood Park Hotel Atrium and see our main production kitchen. The best times to see it in full production are Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. We do offer tours for small groups (please call ahead to arrange) and we are planning to offer additional tours in the future. The best way to hear about new tours and everything else at The Chocolate Fetish is through our Facebook page or at www.blog.chocolatefetish.com.

RRM: Anything else people should be sure to see when they come to visit The Chocolate Fetish? EF: Definitely check out our mural that

was painted by prolific local artist Joshua Spiceland. It is a visual narrative of the story of how chocolates are made starting with cacao growing on the tree.

The Chocolate Fetish 36 Haywood St., downtown Asheville (828) 258-2353 www.chocolatefetish.com

PG. 10

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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients Gourmet Sandwiches & Wraps • Desserts

Homemade Soups • Salads Seafood • Steak • Chicken Pork Tenderloin • Pasta Vegetarian Co Espresso • Coffee • Teas Beer • Wine Daily Food Specials Kids Menu Outdoor Dinning

828.692.6335 Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Wed-Sat 5:30-9 pm

Live Dinner Music Fri & Sat Nights

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

ASHEVILLE IN TOP 10 Top-10 Cities for Best Restaurants and Healthy Eating Establishments 1. New Haven, Conn. 2. Scottsdale, Ariz. 3. Boston, Mass. 4. ASHEVILLE, NC. 5. Traverse City, Mich. 6. Berkeley, Calif. 7. Boulder, Colo. 8. Burlington, Vt. 9. Omaha, Neb. 10. Washington, DC. from www.Livability.com

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RRM: Do you ever offer tours? EF: The best way to get a tour of our shop

is to join an Asheville Food Tour (ashevillefoodtours.com) on Wednesday or Friday. We’ve been a part of this downtown walking tour since it began in 2009. We give guests a thorough tour of our shop including history, how to identify high quality chocolate, and

Monday-Friday only. One coupon per check. Pizza of least value is free. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. Asheville location only. Expires 8/31/2014.

Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 37


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French Broad Brew Fest

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Celebrate fall by the river with breweries, and live music.

With Purchase of Entrée

After 17 years hosting the French Broad River Festival in the spring, the organizers are now perfecting the French Broad Brew Fest, now in it’s 4th year, which features a few of the area’s best resources: craft brew, great music and beautiful scenery. Brew: 15+ breweries will be onsite and festival-goers will receive a commemorative souvenir glass for sampling from noon to 10 p.m. on Saturday, September 27. Entertainment: Lineup includes Yarn, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra, Tony Trischka & Territory, Hymn for Her, Wick-it the Instigator, Empire Strikes Bass, and the Mountain Top Polka Band in the Brew Tent… and more! Relax: No worries about driving, because camping is included with private campsites, rv sites and cabins available on the festival grounds. Lodging is also available within walking distance at one of the hotels or B&B’s in town.

2nd frEE appEtizEr! Visit

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With Purchase of Entrée

1/2 Off EntrEE! Equal or Lesser Value, with Purchase of Entrée

One coupon per table. Coupon must remain intact. Expires 12/31/14

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In addition to the festivities, festivalgoers can also enjoy the 100 acre resort and modern Jacuzzi style hot tubs, positioned outside along the river and supplied with a continuous flow of natural hot mineral water. If you’d like to reserve a soak in the hot tubs or a stay in the campground in advance of the festival, go to www. nchotsprings.com or call (828) 622-7676. Full details at www.FrenchBroadFallFest.com IF YOU French Broad Brew Fest, Saturday, GO September 27. $75 ticket includes a

souvenir sampling glass, unlimited beer samplings from noon to 10 p.m., camping in Hot Springs campground, and great live music. $60 ticket for music and camping only (no beer sampling). Get tickets at www.FrenchBroadFallFest.com, at Southern Raft Supply, 2000 Riverside Drive, next to Watershed and below Cheney Graphics, (828) 252-7111. Or, in downtown Asheville at ERA Sunburst Realty, 111 Central Ave., (828) 230-4054.

28th Annual Greek Festival

Thank You Rapid River Magazine Magazine. I was pleasantly surprised by the wonderful response my cafe attracted when I advertised in your magazine monthly magazine.

The Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of Asheville will hold their annual Greek Festival September 26, 27 & 28.

Come and share in the festivities! Sample traditional foods like Lamb Shank, Pastichio, Spanakopita, Gyro & souvlaki, and pastries like Baklava, Kourambiethes, Galatoboureko and Loukoumathes. Enjoy the sounds of Greek music. Browse through the marketplace. Watch

a live performance of talented dancers. Take a tour of the historic church. Enjoy fellowship, food, and dancing. In the Historic Montford District, 227 Cumberland Avenue in Asheville. IF YOU Greek Festival, September 26, 27 GO & 28, Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to

9 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information call the church office at (828) 253-3754 or go online to www.holytrinityasheville.com/greek-festival.

~ Gary Taylor, owner of Cafe 64

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order

Café 64, 64 Haywood St., downtown Asheville

Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

Open daily, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., for breakfast and lunch.

828-252-8333 • www.cafe-64.com

(828) 236-9800 Open 7 Days a Week

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com 38 September 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 1

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Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Chee se, and other Vege tarian Options!

Delicious Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones Wireless Internet Access!


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~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

Organicfest

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Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

Celebrating everything organic, sustainable, healthy, and FUN! Asheville’s annual Organicfest, held in celebration of National Organic Month, was created to spotlight, connect and share and grow our rich organic community of farmers, artists and businesses. On Sunday, September 7 enjoy a day filled with tasty organic and local eats, foot stomping music by talented local musicians such as Chris Rosser, Sheri Lynn, Greenway, and many more. The Organicfest Marketplace features an array of local organic and green products, businesses and services with offerings from food and gardening to flowers and fashion as well as beautiful and unique natural arts and crafts. Participants can also take home plenty of awesome information about growing organic gardens and living more organic, sustainable, eco-friendly lifestyles. Each year, donations from local and national businesses are gathered for the popular Organicfest drawings with lucky winners taking home fabulous organic gifts, goodies and gift certificates throughout the day. This family event includes lots of fun and eco-friendly activities for children, including special entertainment on the Imagine OrganicKidz stage. And you won’t want to miss the Organicfest Pollinator Parade where kids (and their parents) are invited to come dressed as their favorite good bug (honeybees, ladybugs, butterflys or garden fairies!). Organicfest is presented by a local, all-volunteer non-profit group in partnership with Asheville Greenworks to present a low impact, green event. The greening of Organicfest will include recycling and composting.

145 Wall Street

Downtown Waynesville

828.550.3610

PG. 22

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IF YOU Organicfest, Sunday, September 7 from 10 a.m. GO to 6 p.m. Pack Square Park, downtown Asheville.

www.organicfest.org

PG. 22

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Thai Fusion Bistro Experience the Excitement of Flavor

a Culinary Gi Shop

342 N. Main St. Hendersonville, NC

Open 7 Days A Week Mon-Sat 12-9:30 Sunday 12-9 . 10 PG

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8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

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Vol. 18, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2014 39


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Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com 36 Haywood Street

PG. 36

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Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

Seen

Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine

Free Web Links Free Ad Design Easy Monthly Billing

Call today (828) 646-0071

The Asheville Area Arts Council presents

Gilded Ball & Art Auction

Join us for cocktails, fine food, live music , Fine art, VIP pre-party, dancing & celebration

September 27, 2014

Isis Music Hall Information & Tickets www.ashevillearts.com

PG. 36

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September 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
September 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by Joyce Schlapkohl..p30. Inside: Asheville Symphony Orchestra..p7; Southern Highland Craft Guild..p9; Henderson Coun...

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