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Now in Our th year!

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ColorFest in Dillsboro PAGE

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Heritage Weekend at the Folk Art Center PAGE

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Made in Weaverville Blissful Village by Reiko Miyagi PAGES 29-31

Interviews with: Painter Cheryl Keefer

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Artist Dominique Harder

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Natalie Byrnes, of the Glass Onion Restaurant

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Steven Forbes-deSoule

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Rob and Beth Mangum, of Mangum Pottery

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Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s 53rd season begins with a performance by Noah Bendix-Balgley. PG 7

2 Guns • Blue Jasmine • Elysium • Paranoia • Lee Daniels’ The Butler • Unfinished Song

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Asheville Symphony Orchestra MASTERWORKS SERIES

Masterworks 1

Sept. 21, 2013 Opening Night: Fantasy and Firebird

All programs and artists subject to change

Wagner Tannhäuser Overture Bruch Scottish Fantasy

Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin

Wagner Tannhäuser Venusberg Music

2013-2014 SEASON

Daniel Meyer, Music Director

All Masterworks concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium on Saturdays at 8pm

Masterworks 3

Masterworks 4

Masterworks 5

Masterworks 6

Masterworks 7

Oct. 19, 2013

Nov. 16, 2013

Feb. 8, 2014

March 15, 2014

April 12, 2014

May 10, 2014

Northern Lights featuring Grieg’s Piano Concerto

Beethoven’s Seventh

Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake

Beethoven and The Romantic

Bartók Divertimento

Golijov Muertes des Angel

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 2

Trumpet Spectacular and Fireworks

Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2

Bach Suite in B Minor

Barber Violin Concerto

Handel Music to the Royal Fireworks

Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2

Masterworks 2

Rautavaara Cantus arcticus Grieg Piano Concerto Ran Dank, piano

Sibelius Symphony No. 5

Lissie Okopny, flute

Beethoven Symphony No. 7

Stravinsky Firebird Suite (1919)

Elena Urioste, violin

Ravel Pavane Tchaikovsky Suite from Swan Lake

Alon Goldstein, piano

Bruckner Symphony No. 4 “Romantic”

Hummel Trumpet Concerto Hayato Tanaka, trumpet

Haydn Lord Nelson Mass

Asheville Symphony Chorus WCU Concert Choir Michael Lancaster, director

Order by phone 828.254.7046 • www.ashevillesymphony.org

2 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

Mariangela Vacatello, piano

Shostakovich Symphony No. 11 “The Year 1905”

Call for season brochure or visit us online.


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performance The Diana Wortham Theatre 2013/2014 Mainstage Season

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The Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville will present a wide range of top touring artists in music, theater, dance, comedy, and other performing arts for their 2013/2014 Mainstage Series. The 2013/2014 Mainstage Series season opens September 20 with an opening

Grammy-nominated blues artist Ruthie Foster.

BY JOHN

ELLIS

night party sponsored by Pack’s Tavern at 7 p.m. and an 8 p.m. performance by Grammy-nominated blues artist Ruthie Foster, with an opening act, blues and roots artist Seth Walker. The 2011, 2012 and 2013 winner of the Koko Taylor Award for Traditional Blues Female Artist, Ruthie Foster smolders, sizzles and ignites with an intensity born from her vibrant voice and indelible presence. The 2013/2014 Mainstage Special Attractions Series showcases five performances that cross multiple genres. In her one-of-a-kind live performance “SandyLand” comedian Sandra Bernhard (October 12, 2013) sharply blends theatre, rock-n-roll and standup comedy with a little burlesque and continued on page 22

'OLDEN3APPHIRE $IAMOND 0ERIDOT

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com PG. 20

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4 Biltmore Avenue | Downtown Asheville | 828.277.1272

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 3


daringly different

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fine arts & crafts Colorfest: Art & Taste of Appalachia

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On Saturday, October 5, you’ll want to be in the Art of Nanci Leigh historic town of Dillsboro for ColorFest, an exciting celebration of American artisans.

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

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4 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

Take a whiff and then taste the steaming apple butter simmering in a cast iron pot or try a hot, buttered biscuit with some local honey. Visit with artists who have won national and international awards for their work as they demonstrate their techniques right before your eyes. Listen closely, the sounds of mountain music and clogging could draw you over to the middle of town! Why...even as you follow the sounds, a stray musician may follow you down the street playing just for you! Selected ColorFest artists will have their artwork on display in the windows of shops in Dillsboro beginning September 5. Their unique fine art will be available for sale throughout the month of September and on Saturday, October 5, during ColorFest. The culture of the Blue Ridge Mountains has always reflected a spirit of individuality and independence. These traits fit well in the advocation of handmade, one-of-a-kind artistry. The people here excel in music, the visual arts and most any handmade, priceless gem. Naturally masterful paintings, quilts, carvings, sculpture, metal works, wood works, glass art, hand caned chairs, folk & mountain music, all have a flavor that’s irresistible. David Ammons Spend demonstrates chair the day in the canning. historic town of Dillsboro, North Carolina, where the streets will be transformed into a Paris-like setting amid the glorious colors of autumn. For Colorfest, you’ll find the fine artisans creating their art pieces under colorful umbrellas and tents. Surrounded by the spectacular beauty of fall in the mountains, you can talk with local artisans, authors, growers and musicians as you wander through the picturesque town, unique shops and choice restaurants.

BY

AMY AMMONS GARZA

HISTORICAL MURAL UNVEILED To honor the heritage of the town, a 16' by 12' historical mural is being painted by noted muralist, Doreyl Ammons Cain. Entitled “On Hallowed Ground,� the mural brings alive, with glowing colors, the look and feel of Dillsboro in the 1880’s.

Art by Doreyl Ammons Cain

Depicted on the mural, against a backdrop of the Blue Ridge Mountains, will be some of the “Early People,� 1800’s Cherokee Chief, Nimrod Jarrett Smith, and town founders William Allen Dills and his wife, plus endangered plant and animal life. To kickoff the festival at 10 a.m., the mural will be unveiled by the current Principal Chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Michell Hicks.

Featuring Demonstrations by: • Pamela Haddock – Original Watercolors, Sylva, NC. • Jane McClure – Oil Painter, Sylva, NC. • Sheryl Bessette – Watercolors, Murphy, NC. • David Ammons – Chair Canning, Tuckasegee, NC. • Nanci Leigh – Jewelry, Franklin, NC. • Diane Halasz – Rock Painting, Murphy, NC. • Susan G. Phillips – Oil Painter, Hiawassee, GA. • Neal Hearn – Glass Boxes, Franklin, NC. View works at www.colofestartblog.com

IF YOU ColorFest, Art & Taste of GO Appalachia, October 5 from 10

a.m. to 4 p.m. Dillsboro is located in Jackson County at the intersection of US Hwys. 19/74 and 441. For more information call (828) 631-4587.


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we love this place WNCAP 2013 Raise Your Hand Auction and Gala

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number One

SEPTEMBER 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach, Erica Mueller Proofreading: Diane S. Levy Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, DeWayne Butcher, MD, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Amy Ammons Garza, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, Kay Miller, Andrew Montrie, April Nance, Peggy Newell, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Alice Sebrell, Greg Vineyard, David Voorhees, Kelly Walker, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, September 2013, Vol. 17 No. 1

3 Performance

Diana Wortham Theatre. . . . . . . . . . NC Stage – Stalking the Bogeyman HART – Ave. Q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . .

4 Fine Art

Colorfest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Henderson County Studio Tour . . . 8 Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 The Emerald Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Dominique Harder . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Asheville Quilt Show . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Satellite Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Art in the Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Steven Forbes-deSoule . . . . . . . . . . 30 Art in Autumn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Mangum Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

8 Columns

Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . 13 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 14 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 15 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 16 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 27 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . 28 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 28 DeWayne Butcher, MD – Health . 33

15 Music

David Hartley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Chelsea Lynn La Bate . . . . . . . . . . . 17

18 Local Favorites

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s 53rd season begins with a performance by Asheville native Noah Bendix-Balgley. PAGE 7

The Western North Carolina AIDS Project’s annual Raise Your Hand Auction will celebrate its silver anniversary this year at the Doubletree Hotel-Biltmore on Saturday, October 12.

Andrew Brunk of Brunk Auctions will take to the stage for the Live Auction portion of the evening, bringing with him this year’s Raise Your Hand Signature Piece; Daniel McClendon’s Gazelle (Gemsbok).

With 250 ballroom seats available and tickets on sale now, the agency hopes to raise the critical funds needed to support their mission of providing HIV/ AIDS prevention education to the community and client services to over 500 men, women and children living with HIV/AIDS in 18 western counties.

Auction planners are also excited to announce Laurey Masterton, of Laurey’s Catering, as this year’s Honorary Chair. Besides her “WNCAP is feeling the effects of state renowned culinary skills, funding cuts.” says Pam Siekman, Masterton has become a WNCAP Board President and Raise local hero for her support of Your Hand Chair. “Our services have non-profits throughout the expanded due to the increasing needs Daniel McClendon’s Asheville community. She of our clients for assistance with acGazelle (Gemsbok) continues to bravely inspire cessing and paying for their expensive others living with serious medications, finding affordable houshealth issues in her courageous journey as a ing and food and transportation support three-time cancer survivor. services, all of which help them lead healthier and more productive lives.” The auction is WNCAP’s second largest fundraiser. Guests will be invited to bid on elaborate dinner packages presented by Asheville’s most creative chefs, antique

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 10-11 Biltmore Village . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 18 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . PGS 20-22 Weaverville + Northside . PGS 29-31 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 32

IF YOU GO: Raise Your Hand Auction,

Saturday, October 12 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Doubletree Hotel-Biltmore. For more information go to www. wncap.org/ryh or call (828) 252-7489.

Cradle of Forestry’s Gallery in the Woods An exhibit of artwork by Rudy Wendelin, the renowned Smokey Bear artist, who for decades expressed the image and message of this much loved symbol of forest fire prevention and safety. Details at (828) 877-3130; www.cradleofforestry.org.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us on Facebook

Events in Black Mountain . . . . . . . 18 Glass Onion Restaurant . . . . . . . . . 29

We’re Hyper Local and Super Social!

23 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 23

34 What to Do Guide On the Cover:

3 6 6 7

collections, fine wines, getaway vacations, and an eclectic collection of local art.

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

35 35 35 35 35

37 Unique Shops

Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 5


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captivating performances

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The Bogeyman is Real

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM

North Carolina Stage Company (NC Stage) will kick off its 2013/2014 season with the world premiere of Stalking the Bogeyman, a probing new play adapted and directed by Markus Potter (Artistic Director, NewYorkRep). The play is based on the true story of David Holthouse, a journalist who stalked the man who abused him as a boy. At the center of a raw and insightful narrative is David Holthouse, a journalist who was molested as a child and is attempting to come to grips with the killer inside him. Based on the true stories of David Holthouse originally aired on NPR’s This American Life, this play provides an unfiltered view of the events of that night and Holthouse’s journey to get revenge. Holthouse says he spent years plotting the murder of the man who traumatized him and only changed his mind when his mother found the journal he wrote as an 11 year old boy. “If you want to keep a secret, never write it down.” This powerful story sheds light on the emotional struggle victims of sexual violence and their families face while it explores the nuanced responsibilities of the victim and the offender. What will happen when David comes face to face with the man who caused him so much pain? NC Stage has the unique opportunity

BY

KELLY WALKER

to produce Stalking the Bogeyman before it’s produced Off-Broadway early next spring at NewYorkRep. Playwright Markus Potter got in touch with Flynn-McIver after seeing him on the American Theatre Wing’s television program Working in the Theatre where Flynn-McIver was being interCharlie Flynn-McIver and Chris Alison in Stalking the viewed about NC Stage’s National Bogeyman. Photo by Scott Treadway Theatre Company Grant award. that includes Bill Munoz (Love Child and “When I heard Charlie talk about NC Mambo Mouth), David Novak (R. BuckStage and its relationship with Asheville’s minster Fuller The History and Mystery of audiences, I knew they were the perfect thethe Universe), and Callan White (Angels in atre company to help birth the first theatriAmerica, The Glass Menagerie). cal production of this amazing story,” says Potter. Of Bogeyman Flynn-McIver states, “When Markus told me he had a script of IF the David Holthouse story I immediately YOU Stalking the Bogeyman, remembered the This American Life I heard GO September 18-October 13. it on and how compelling and haunting the Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., story was. I knew we had to produce it!” Sunday at 2 p.m. Preview Week: $20 Flynn-McIver will be playing The Bogeytickets September 18-22. Pay What You man. Can Night: Wednesday, September 18. Joining Flynn-McIver, Asheville native Tickets: $16-$28. Students $10. Call (828) Chris Alison (Shakespeare’s R&J, One Flea 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in Spare, It’s A Wonderful Life) returns to the downtown Asheville. stage to lead an all-star professional cast

HART presents the Tony Award Winning Musical “Ave. Q”

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HART tends to be the first in the area to produce many of Broadway’s newest hits and this season is no different. Up next, the Tony Award Winning Best Musical “Ave. Q”. This was the little show that could. In 2004 it came along and toppled the odds on favorite beating out “Wicked” for top honors. Both shows are still running in New York and both have huge followings among young people, although the show is not for young children. “Ave. Q” was inspired by Sesame Street and the Muppets but with a decidedly mature twist. Teens should be fine but it is racy, politically incorrect, modern and topical. It is also funny and imaginative. The main characters are puppets and their human operators. The actors in the show must play the characters, sing and operate their puppet counterparts at the same time. No small feat. Think “The Lion King” with a twist. Any kid who grew up on Sesame Street began creating parodies of it by the time they were in their teens. The creators of “Ave. Q” waited until they hit their twenties

6 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

and then made something really special. Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, wrote the music and lyrics. The two met while attending a musical theater workshop when they were twenty-three. Within two years they had created “Ave. Q” along with friend Jeff Whitty who wrote the script for the show. They conceived of “Ave. Q” for television but the show was first staged at the prestigious Eugene O’Neil Theater Center in Connecticut in 2002. It was immediately picked up for an off-Broadway run and opened at the Vineyard Theater in March 2003. It got rave reviews and transferred to Broadway four months later. There are many odd things about “Ave. Q” and one is that it opened on Broadway in July. Nothing ever opens on Broadway in New York in the summer. Shows wait until the fall, or late spring to maximize their chance of building an audience and getting noticed for awards. By the time the 2004 Tony Awards came along, “Ave. Q” had been running for nearly a year, and “Wicked” had become a major smash. “Wicked” was a ten million dollar behemoth inspired by “The Wizard

“The Lion King” with a twist – adorable and original. of Oz.” But “Ave. Q” was adorable, and original. In the wake of 9/11 it seemed to capture the sassiness of the city in a playfully naughty way, and in the end was impossible not to leave with a smile on your face. HART’s production is being directed by Charles Mills, and all of the puppets have been rented from New York for the production. The cast is stellar, including: Kristen Hedberg, James Meador, Justin Slack, Strother Stingley, Jordana McMahon, Samantha Alicandri, Sean Bruce, and newcomers Daniel Hensley, Brad Mercier and Kirby Gibson. Music Director: Chuck Taft. IF YOU Ave. Q, September 20, 21, 27, GO 28 and October 4 & 5 at 7:30;

September 22, 29, and October 6 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $24 for Adults; $20 for Seniors; Students $10. $8 discount tickets for Students for Thursdays and Sundays. Box Office Hours Mon.-Sat. 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville.


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performance Prodigal Son Returns to Perform with Asheville Symphony

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The Asheville Many opera companies Symphony Orchesand orchestras around tra will open its 53rd the world are markseason on September ing the anniversary of 21 – a night that will the composer, who mark not only the reis a seminal figure in turn of the ASO to the music history. Thomas Wolfe Audito“For me, it’s rium stage, but also the important to include homecoming of a spethis music to remind cial soloist whose career ourselves that Wagner has taken off since his is the link between last engagement with Beethoven and the the orchestra. modern musical Asheville native world,” says Meyer. Noah Bendix-Balgley, “Wagner’s approach to a violinist who played music and drama was with the ASO in 2009, revolutionary in that will open this season it expanded the color with a performance palate for the orchesof Bruch’s Scottish tra and emboldened Fantasy. Bendix-Balgcomposers to reach ley returns to Asheville beyond traditional two years after he was forms to reveal an appointed concertmasemotional content in Violinist Noah Bendix-Balgley ter of the Pittsburgh music that entranced Symphony Orchestra – one of the most a staggering number of artists. The fact that prestigious posts of its kind in the world. we begin with Wagner this season and travel It takes a special kind of musician to through Bruckner and end with Shostakovassume a concertmaster position, according ich is no accident. Once Wagner opened the to ASO Music Director Daniel Meyer, and floodgates, an overwhelming amount of epic Bendix-Balgley has the talent to persevere music poured forth.” in the post. The ASO also joined orchestras around “Essentially, an orchestra like the Pittsthe world last year to mark the 100th anburgh Symphony is looking for a violinist niversary of the premiere of Stravinsky’s of international renown, with the technical Rite of Spring. For the ASO, it was the capabilities of a concert soloist, the musicenterpiece of last year’s season finale. This cianship of a first violin of a major string year, the season opener will include a perquartet, and the leadership qualities of a formance of Stravinsky’s Firebird as Meyer great team captain,” Meyer says. “For Noah continues his programming of Stravinsky’s to have reached such an important position great ballet works. and to have been respected and universally “They in many ways represent such an loved by the orchestra’s musicians is no important turn in Stravinsky’s creative life small achievement.” and, as it turns out, all of the concert music Meyer is anticipating Bendix-Balgley’s of the twentieth century,” Meyer says. “I return to create a special atmosphere in really think of these works as a springboard Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, especially befor me, the orchestra, and our audience for cause the young violinist is so well-suited to further discovery. So I am really pleased to perform the Bruch Scottish Fantasy, which complete this cycle, and I suppose it’s simply he will also perform with the Pittsburgh serendipitous that our Firebird comes on the Symphony in October. heels of our season- ending performance of “I love Noah’s depth and sweetness of Rite of Spring.” tone,” Meyer says. “I think those qualities, coupled with his staggering technical virtuosity and innate ability to communicate the IF essence of the music, makes him a perfect YOU Tickets to Asheville Symphony’s choice for the Bruch. It’s a piece that deGO Opening Night: Fantasy and mands a completely musical approach, from Firebird at 8 p.m. on Saturday, the folk-inspired melodies and rhythms to September 21 at Thomas Wolfe its sheer breadth of expression.” Auditorium can be purchased by calling the Other pieces on the opening-night symphony office at (828) 254-7046, online program include two Wagner compositions, at www.ashevillesymphony.org, or by the Tannhauser Overture and Venusberg visiting the U.S. Cellular Center box office Music from Tannhauser, in celebration of at 87 Haywood Street, Asheville. Tickets the 200th anniversary of Wagner’s birth. start at $20 for adults and $10 for youth. Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 7


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fine art I Think, Therefore, I Art

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AND SOMETIMES TEA HELPS

My time in AsheBY GREG VINEYARD ville, including fourplus years of monthly And fear simply needs to columns for Rapid River be squishy-squashed. Magazine, has marked a Squash it with new creative era in my something simple. I’m little book of life. talking field trip! My I remember when solution: go out for editor Dennis Ray ina cup of tea. I don’t vited me to contribute, fully understand how I I thought: “Can I come can become massively up with a topic every focused and productive month?” It was shortly when surrounded by thereafter that I realized strangers, but it works. I have so many ideas Not to mention how running through my head mysterious and interestabout so many things ing we all look. People that sometimes I have a are so intense! I wonder hard time harnessing my what they’re thinking. thinking. I take paper, a Over-thinking in my Tea Time, pastel by Greg Vineyard couple pens and a head visual arts process presthat needs emptyents a similar obscuring ing to Dobra Tea downtown, order a pot of the essence of a kernel of an idea. It’s of Japanese Yamacha and a little bowl of kind of like being caught in a current going completely indulgent crystallized ginger the wrong way – which I have experienced chunks, back myself into a cozy corner, and – where one must not panic, and swim parlet doodles flow through me. It may seem allel to shore to eventually get out. I wasn’t counter-intuitive, but when I am overnearly as freaked out about being lost to wrought, this type of break can be uberthe open Pacific as I was about being eaten helpful. I can fill an entire sketchbook with by sharks. a myriad of ideas by cup three. I’m supposedly on a break, yet I’m Working. Change Do you have a hard time of scenery, change of pace, and it all starts moving again. It’s awesome. harnessing your thoughts? Here’s a little list of hints to re-direct the over-thinking or creatively-blocked brain: Now, some of you might be thinking: 1) Field trip. A date with yourself. Take “Oh, Greg, you dramatic little guppy!” (Or your sketchbook. Consider not taking elecperhaps you weren’t thinking that, but now tronics; you are.) But, really, have you ever been 24 2) Nap. With or without a big recue cat. hours past a deadline, with a mess o’ text Who owes you one because of the whole that has stopped looking anything remotely 3:30 am waking you up thing; like English, and is double the allotted word count? Or stuck on an illustration, where 3) Critique. Join a community that’s interevery attempt to capture something you’ve ested and open to sharing; drawn many times before has come out 4) Action. Just start. Even for an hour; looking sort of Frankensteinish? And it’s 5) Schedule. I keep a Day-Timer. No eyenot Halloween? Edge of madness, I tell you. rolls! You can still find twenty types of them Minus the great whites. out there because they work; Say I want to draw my cat. And then I become obsessed with capturing a carica6) Trust. You’re good at what you do. The ture. Because somewhere along the line I occasional struggle is part of life’s lessons. decided I should make him into a cartoon Trust that you’ll get it, and see no. 4. super-hero, rather than an ordinary ador7) Did I mention how awesome no. 4 is? able cat. So now he’s got to be an adorable SO, all this thinking just enough but feline who can speak several languages and not too much helps me hone my craft, so rescue field mice from owls, and open his that even when I stray off course a bit, I can own cans of food when he’s hungry at 3:30 get back on the fairway quickly. In writing a.m. (Because a super-hero cat can tell time. and drawing, I separate-out all those mixed And is courteous.). And sometimes the overtopics, thus creating the bones of several thinking dilemma is tied to procrastination. ideas and visual lines at once. Bonus! Sometimes procrastination is tied to fear. 8 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

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Open Studio Tour of Henderson County

The Open Studio Tour of Henderson County will be held September 21 & 22, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. This free self-guided tour features fine art and craft studios throughout Henderson County. Artist’s studios will be open, displaying their latest artwork to view and purchase; many studios and galleries will feature guest artists. Original works in painting, sculpture, pottery, jewelry, fiber arts, metal arts, woodworking and glass will be offered by more than 50 participating artists in all towns of Flat Rock, Tuxedo, Hendersonville, Horse Shoe, Mills River, and Laurel Park. The highly anticipated Preview Party will be held on Friday, September 20 from 5-8 p.m. at Southern Appalachian Brewery, 822 Locust Street in Hendersonville. Tour artists will be present; view examples of artwork to be found on the tour. The evening will also include an art raffle benefitting Backpacks for Kids and live music starting at 8 p.m. Open Studio Tour guide booklets are available at Henderson County Travel and Tourism and many locations throughout Henderson County.

BY

DAVID VOORHEES

The Art League of Henderson County is the major Tour sponsor. IF YOU The Open Studio Tour of GO Henderson County, Saturday

and Sunday, September 21-22, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Preview Party takes place Friday, September 20, from 5-8 p.m.

Additional details and printable maps are available at www.openstudiotourhc.com and on Facebook: www.facebook.com/#!/OpenStudioTourofHendersonCounty For more details email openstudiotourofhc@gmail.com

We must delve frequently into the arena of cognition. But it also helps to know – whether by intuition or through learning - when to simply stop and pick up the keyboard, pen or brush. Much can be accomplished in any creative endeavor when one unblocks that fearless, channeled flow. I hope you get a chance today to carve out both some thinking time and some action time in support of your creative goals! See you at the tea house … where I assume you are drawing cats. Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville carries his illustrations, giclees prints and cards,www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com.

First Friday Art Hop Friday, September 6 from 4-8 p.m. – Hendersonville and Flat Rock With the opening of two new galleries this year, the Art House and Sweet Magnolia, and a strong base of established galleries and working studios, Hendersonville is a great place to dine and shop. View the work of more than 500 artists at 11 galleries and studios. Explore Hendersonville’s historic area and visit lower Main Street and Flat Rock. Celebrate the one year anniversary of the Art Mob Studios and Marketplace.

IF YOU GO: For more information visit www.henderosonvilleartsdistrict.com


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fine arts & crafts A Celebration of Southern Appalachian Culture...

31st Annual Asheville Quilt Show

Quilting in the Carolinas

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The 33rd Annual BY APRIL NANCE Heritage Weekend will be held September 21-22 at Diddle Competition the Blue Ridge Parkway’s contestants are judged Folk Art Center. This free on the number of rotafestival sponsored by the tions between gee and Southern Highland Craft haw they can complete Guild features traditional during a given time. They music, dancing and heritage may also have to switch craft demonstrations. hands during the competiA highlight of the tion or whimmy diddle weekend is the 33rd Annual behind their backs. There World Gee Haw Whimmy are three divisions of Diddle Competition on competition: childrens, Saturday, 2-3 p.m. Joe adults and professional. “Colonel Buncombe” Bly Sign up throughout the will emcee the competition. day to compete. Winners A whimmy diddle is an receive a trophy, Heritage Appalachian mountain toy Lyle Wheeler competes in the Weekend poster designed traditionally made from two World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle by Hand-Cranked Lettersticks of rhododendron. Competition. Photo: Diana Gates press, t-shirt, a Moon Pie, Notches are carved into and bragging rights. one stick and a propeller is attached to the During Heritage Weekend, learn end. The other stick is rubbed against the from area experts about beekeeping, rifle notches, causing the propeller to spin either making, coopering, heritage toy making, gee (to the right) or haw (to the left). natural dyeing, spinning, broom making During the World Gee Haw Whimmy and furniture making. Hands-on activities related to traditional crafts will be provided for children. Other highlights include sheep HERITAGE shearing demonstrations throughout the day ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE on Saturday, and border collie demonstrations on Sunday.

More Than 250 Quilts From All Over the U.S. h Demonstrations h Silent Auction h Gift Shop, Quilts for Sale h Opportunity Quilt

September 27, 28, 29 Fri. & Sat. 9-5 • Sun. 10-4:30 Admission $6

WNC Agriculture Center Expo Building Just off I-26 across from Asheville Regional Airport. Handicap Accessible.

www.ashevillequiltguild.org Follow us on Facebook @ Asheville Quilt Show

Lunch Available • Multi-Day Pass Group Discounts • Free Parking For more information: Charlotte McRanie, Show Chair, mcranie.show@charter.net Hosted by The Asheville Quilt Guild and Moda Fabrics www.modafabrics.com

Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center

Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | Asheville, NC Open Daily 9am-5pm | 828-298-7928

Guild Crafts

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70 | Asheville, NC Open Mon.-Sat.: 10am-6pm | 828-298-7903 Buncombe Turnpike performs Sunday, September 22. Photo: Diana Gates

Saturday, September 21 11:00 – Southern Crescent Bluegrass 12:00 – Split Rail 1:00 – Firefly 1:30 – Apple Chill Cloggers with Firefly 2:00 – 33rd Annual World Gee Haw Whimmy Diddle Competition 3:00 – J Creek Cloggers and the Ross Brothers

Sunday, September 22 12:00 – Level Ground Gospel 1:00 – Carol Rifkin and Paul’s Creek 2:00 – Cole Mountain Cloggers with Paul’s Creek 2:30 – Gospel Grass 3:30 – Buncombe Turnpike

Blacksmithing demonstration during Heritage Weekend 2012. Photo: Diana Gates

The Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center is the ideal place for Heritage Weekend with free parking, access to hiking trails and grassy areas for a picnic. Spend an early autumn weekend in WNC honoring and learning about crafts of yesteryear while enjoying the beauty of the region. IF YOU 33rd Annual Heritage Weekend, GO September 21-22. Saturday, 10

a.m. until 4 p.m.; Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Folk Art Center, Milepost 382, Blue Ridge Parkway, Asheville NC. For more information, including a list of participating craftspeople and musicians, call (828) 2987928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

Supporting mountain artists and setting the standard for fine crafts since 1930.

Shop online: www.craftguild.org The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

work shown: Jim McPhail

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 9


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The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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The Emerald Ball

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Mark your calendars for Saturday, October 5 when one of Asheville’s most anticipated events of the year takes place – the Asheville Area Arts Council’s Emerald Ball and Art Auction! One of this year’s highlights will be a live and silent Art Auction, curated by nationally recognized artist, Randy Shull. Works featured in the auction will be from local collections as well as the work of celebrated artists. Tickets on sale soon. VIP Tickets, only $100, include the pre cocktail party and a “meet the artist” auction preview! General Tickets are $50. For more details visit www.ashevillearts.com The Asheville Area Arts Council Gallery 346 Depot Street, Asheville, NC Phone (828) 258-0710

RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

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10 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

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* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios


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INTERVIEW WITH AWARD WINNING PLEIN AIR PAINTER

Cheryl Keefer

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Cheryl Keefer’s recent works feature vivid colors of reflected light in wet pavement, contrasted by rainy-day grays.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

turnes, Keefer places cars, figures and umbrellas in her compositions, giving the viewer a sense of place. The collection of oil paintings include rural landscapes, many done on location en plein air. Keefer holds a Masters Degree with a degree in art education and art history. Inspired by the genre of her southern heritage, and from the works of Rembrandt, Monet, and Sargent, with whom she became acquainted with at an early age, Cheryl Keefer paints on location and from life. As a child, she spent countless hours looking over art history books, drawing family members and painting outdoor scenes. At age 13 she began her journey with paint and canvas. This journey continues today.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little Cheryl Keefer, plein air artist

Keefer’s loose painting style lends itself to capturing soft, atmospheric moods of rainy street scenes and even nocturnes. Inspired by French Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte’s paintings of Paris, and James McNeil Whistler’s noc-

about your art.

Cheryl Keefer: My work is represen-

tative of nature. I hope my paintings reflect my close observations of slices of my world. Working with oil, watercolor, or charcoal, I try to give the viewer a sense of being in a place in time, whether on a misty mountain in morning, or on a city street at night. I love classical art, and have always

Painting by Cheryl Keefer

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been drawn to painting in the traditional style, from life.

RRM: I really love your rainy

weather paintings. Has all our rain this year inspired you to do more or to focus on sunny blue sky days?

CK: LOL! No. I actually began

this series on a trip to San Francisco four years ago - I think WNC was experiencing drought then! While in San Francisco, I was enthralled by the sliver of sky between buildings, figures with umbrellas, and reflected city lights. Upon returning to Asheville I thought about traveling to Paris, or New York to get references for more paintings. However, travel wasn’t an option then, and I discovered the beauty continued on page 38

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INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

Dominique Harder

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about your artwork and the direction you see yourself progressing toward.

Dominique Harder: My artwork

over the past few years is what I developed in college. I chose something that helped me develop my drawing skills, and that also has a message. The series I produced was several large-scale charcoal pieces. The theme was cosmetic surgery and, more specifically, the pressure that is put on young girls by society and its standard of beauty. The series was successful, but

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

now I’m trying to move away from the work I did in college and work for myself. It’s not an easy task, but every person is and always will be a work in progress. Dominique Harder, fine artist Being in the same place photography, and ceramics. creatively for a long time doesn’t help me learn new things, so I’m RRM: How did you first get doing my best to branch out and not into the arts and did you always become a slave to routine. I’m going know you wanted to be an artist to continue to do charcoal drawings but also shift over to digital work, continued on page 38

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Rapid River Magazine has been for 17 years and continues to be an effort to rev up small business, and the arts, and give to them a voice!

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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The theme of the 31st Annual Asheville Quilt Show is “Quilting in the Carolinas,” celebrating all that the Carolinas have to offer. This judged exhibition, which runs Friday September 27 through Sunday September 29 features more than 275 quilts from all over the country competing for more than $8,000 in prizes.

2013 Opportunity Quilt, Our Delectable Mountains, by Out of the Box Bee. Photo: Sharon Smaldone

Ongoing throughout the Show are demonstrations of quilting techniques by well known quilters in the region. Special guest this year is Mark Dunn, owner of United Notions and Moda Fabrics. He will present a trunk show of his private quilt collection on both Friday (3pm) and Saturday (11:30am). Mr. Dunn, whose company is the Show’s Platinum sponsor, has a special

12 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

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A SHOWCASE OF 275+ QUILTS

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31st Annual Asheville Quilt Show

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fine arts & crafts

Celebrating 17 Years! We are the Champions of Small Business and of the Local Arts.

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place in his heart for Asheville: it’s where he started his career. Also in the demo area, on Sunday at 1:30, Connie Brown, AQS Certified Appraiser of Quilted textiles, presents “Let’s Talk Quilts.” Attendees are encouraged to bring antique quilts and Ms. Brown will answer questions. (This will not be a full appraisal, and Ms. Brown will address as many quilts as time allows.) In addition to a wide array of quilts ranging from professional level to first timers, king-sized to miniatures, there will be more than 20 vendors selling quilting related products and gift items. The Guild sponsors a Gift Shop and Silent Auction as well as a used quilt and craft book sale. There is a special area of quilts for sale. Tickets are available to win the Opportunity quilt made by Asheville Quilt Guild members to support the mission of the Guild: To promote and preserve the art and history of quilts through education of its members, and to inspire community involvement. This year’s fundraiser quilt is called “Our Delectable Mountains.” The Show is sponsored by the Asheville Quilt Guild and Moda Fabrics, Asheville Cotton and Quilting Treasures, among others.

IF YOU The show, at the WNC Ag Center GO Expo Building, runs from Friday,

September 27 through Sunday, September 29; 9-5 Friday and Saturday, and 10-4:30 on Sunday. Admission is $6 per person. Lunch is available from Melt Your Heart. For additional details please go to www.ashevillequiltguild.org/show.html.


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authors ~ books ~ readings John Badham on Directing Notes from the Set of Saturday Night Fever, War Games and More

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Although he’s directed 39 featurelength productions and won numerous awards, John Badham is not among the household names of Hollywood movie directors. Badham’s latest book, however, may change that. John Badham on Directing: Notes from the Set of Saturday Night Fever, War Games and More is a book with a lot of built-in buzz — both a tell-all from the trenches of his days as a director, and an extremely practical, how-to guide for budding filmmakers. Born in England, Badham was raised in the U.S. and trained at Yale. He apprenticed in television before his breakthrough hit Saturday Night Fever (1977), which made John Travolta a star. In 1983 War Games, starring Matthew Broderick, captured the essence of Cold War paranoia through the eyes of teenagers. Blue Thunder, in the same year, starring Roy SchThunder neider, set the bar for white knuckle action in the skies. Other films included comedies and dramas. In essence Badham worked in so many styles of film that he didn’t carve out

LAUREY MASTERTON PRESENTS HONEY Laurey Masterton, local catering guru, pays tribute to her beloved bees and their magnificent gift of honey. Her newest book, The Fresh Honey Cookbook: 84 Recipes from a Beekeeper’s Kitchen (Storey Publishing, 2013), continues the author’s tradition of great storytelling and companion recipes. Come early for a good seat and an opportunity to meet other honey lovers.

IF YOU GO: Laurey Masterton

reading and book signing, Thursday, September 19 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

REVIEWED BY

SEPTEMBER

MARCIANNE MILLER

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS

“Actors want to be directed…but by people who help them do their best work.” John Badham, director.

a distinct niche, he just worked steadily and made a lot of good films. Known as an “actor’s director,” Badham was an expert in bringing out memorable performances from his actors, especially from those actors known by other directors to be difficult. Unlike many directors, especially film school graduates who have no theatre or acting background, Badham actually likes actors. Perhaps his fondness for actors was in his blood — he was the son of an English actress and his little sister, 13 years younger, is Mary Badham, chosen from thousands of girls to play the part of Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962).

“People tend to reject the influence of someone they don’t like.” Badham’s first book, I’ll Be in My Trailer: The Creative Wars between Directors and Actors (2006), is a popular textbook in film schools and acting classes. In his latest book, John Badham on Directing Directing, with the help of 33 contributors, he makes the case that trust is the most significant leadership quality for a director — or the leader of any creative team. An actor’s lot is not an easy one. You’re a sensitive creature to begin with, but any day of your career you can be caught in a creative crossfire — insulted, demeaned, laughed at or downright dismissed. And that’s just on Day One of the shoot! It’s amazing actually that so many good performances occur in films these

days, considering the resentment that runs between actors and directors. Actors don’t want to be a problem, Badham insists. “Actors want to be directed... but by people who help them do their best work.” To prove his point, Badham and his contributors relate tales from their own films, such as the time Badham had to talk Goldie Hawn into taking a roller coast ride that terrified her. Actors have different styles — Val Kilmer is an actor who reacts, compared to Matthew McConaughy who is outright gung-go. Each type of actor requires a different response from the director. It might be obvious, but many leaders in business, politics and education often forget a basic ground rule that Badham emphasizes. “People tend to reject the influence of someone they don’t like.” John Badham on Directing: Notes from the Set of Saturday Night Fever, War Games and More is a fun read, full of meaty advice and fascinating insights. Whether you are planning to make a film, or just want leadership tips to apply at work, this book is an excellent choice.

September 6 at 7 p.m. NANCY PEACOCK, The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson September 7 at 7 p.m. SARAH J. MAAS, SUSAN DENNARD, and ERIN BOWMAN. September 8 at 3 p.m. PAT SCHNEIDER, How the Light Gets in: Writing as a Spiritual Practice. September 9 at 7 p.m. Writing workshop with Annie Fahy, LCSW. September 13 at 7 p.m. WILTON BARNHARDT, Lookaway, Lookaway. September 14 at 7 p.m. BOB SHACOCHIS, The Woman Who Lost Her Soul. September 15 at 3 p.m. Writers at Home, Tina Barr, and author Bonnie MacDougal. September 18 at 7 p.m. COLIN MCADAM, A Beautiful Truth. September 20 at 7 p.m. DAN PIERCE, Corn from a Jar: Moonshining in the Great Smoky Mountains. September 21 at 7 p.m. RICHARD RUSSELL, Robert Henry: A Western Carolina Patriot. September 23 at 7 p.m. The Artist’s Way For Busy Adults with ASHER LEIGH. September 24 at 7 p.m. HENRIETTE LAZARIDIS POWER, The Clover House. September 25 at 7 p.m. GREGG BLANTON, Mind Over Marriage. September 26 at 7 p.m. V.E. SCHWAB, Vicious, a tale of desire and superpowers. September 27 at 7 p.m. ROBERT INMAN, The Governor’s Lady. September 28 at 7 p.m. Novelists ANN HITE, The Storycatcher; KAREN SPEARS ZACHARIAS, Mother of Rain. September 29 at 3 p.m. SHARYN MCCRUMB, King’s Mountain: A Ballad Novel.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

John Badham on Directing: Notes from the Set of Saturday Night Fever, War Games and More, written by John Badham. Michael Weise Productions, 2013, 240 pp. Former television producer Marcianne Miller is a local film and book critic. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com

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books ~ poetry ~ readings CORN FROM A JAR Moonshining in the Great Smoky Mountains “My hope is to humanize the moonshiner,” says author and UNCA history professor Dan Pierce of his latest work, “Corn From a Jar: Moonshining in the Great Smoky Mountains.” Whether it’s the iconic image of the moonshiner holding his XXX-labeled stoneware jug, the late 19th century view of the moonshiner as “public enemy number one,” or even the more recent romanticized vision airing on television screens today, the truth of the mountain ’shine producer has gotten muddled along the way. “It’s important to understand this regional phenomenon as the product not only of individual choices, but also of deep-seated cultural, economic and social conditions,” Pierce said. Today moonshine has gone from illegal to elite; state laws governing the production and sale of moonshine have shifted, allowing what Pierce calls “inspired entrepreneurs” to begin producing legal moonshine. “Corn from a Jar” is published by Great Smoky Mountains Association, a non-profit that supports Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Copies are available at local bookstores, and at www.SmokiesInformation.org.

IF YOU GO: Dan Pierce reading and booksigning, September 20 at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

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The Poet’s Voice

See If You Can Stop A poet thrust his poems into Robert Frost’s hands. “Mr. Frost, should I go on writing?” Frost replied, “Well, see if you can stop.” During August I came upon/was gifted/surprised by the work of some poets you have never read. Thanks to Rapid River Magazine, I have the opportunity to share words of real people, from a twelve-year-old girl to a couple of retired curmudgeons, and a woman who sent poems to me. Each of these writers reminded me why I write: I want someone to read my words. I want someone to know I was here. “If a poem is anything, it is an overture of friendship to whoever reads it and receives the poet’s meaning. We’re listening for words that could be uttered among friends who listen for an answer.” (Ester Cameron, editor of The Deronda Review Review) I say, “Yes! Yes! to it all.” Poet, Susan Marshall writes of “days of displacement/and journey.” Her poem, I Exist, is a testament to choice.

I EXIST I am. I breathe, breathe again and remember my choice of this human existence. I choose not to wrestle with the demons of undelight, only to remember and remember, and if I can’t remember, imagine that light. The demons still prance, but with less of a dance. I have the power and I nod to them remembering nostalgically, you may influence me, I see you. I once loved you and believed in your darkness. Yet now I know, it is not you who holds the key, it is me. I choose light. I choose to exist this night.

~ Susan Marshall

17th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

I want someone to know I was here. The following poem is by twelve-yearold Eliza Howard. Here she is in a “Mary Oliver moment,” intimate with nature.

MORNING BY THE RIVER Upon the river bank I stood, To smell the air so sweet and good. I stroked the water with my hand, To touch the bottom if I could. The day was misty and cloudy, but bright For it was dawn and not the night. The water flowed around my feet. The sun appeared and glowed with light! I waded in up to my knees. The water was cold as it could be. It was colored green and blue. The mist was gone so I could see. The water reflected the glittering light And everything seems just quite right. And it was oh, so very bright! And it was oh, so very bright!

Texas poet, Mario Sakran was searching for a home for his poetry children, and found Rapid River on-line. He lets us know he is here.

UNKNOWN A voyage starts from what is clearly known, a place of recognizable stillness. The passageway at first the wise condone, it leads to what they claim they do witness. The time does move as things do blur away, the path quickly goes to a novel land, the wisdom of the claims does blur away, the recognized recall now quickly banned.

But time does move and mists may disappear, if will read signs the land may be now clear. Robert Frost (1874-1963) explored profound issues of life and death with gravity and wit.

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THE PROMISE God sends Sol’s light westward, while His sunset signals, “I’ll send Sol back tomorrow morning, at first light. I’m very good at this. I’ve done it a long time. Trust me until tomorrow. Until morning comes, go admire my moon and stars.”

~ Tom Graham These disparate poets write because they can’t stop, because they want to share their awe, journey, and their selves. They want to be heard.

Should you go on writing? See if you can stop. I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

~ Eliza Howard

A place of new with signs that can’t be read, with those that move and those which seem so still, unusual gray mists follow with dread, and seem to block the force of hoped-for will.

Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline January 31, 2014. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2014 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

When I read the first line for the first time, I thought Mario had written, “A poem starts from what is clearly known.” Interesting. The poem could work that way also. Tom Graham sent me his book, The Dust Of My Bosom, published by the curmudgeon himself. This book is a patchwork of poetry, storytelling, essay/memoir of a life lived in full. Tom quotes Virginia Woolf, “No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anyone but oneself.”

~ Mario Sakran

THE WOMAN WHO LOST HER SOUL Renowned for his gritty and revelatory visions of the Caribbean, Bob Shacochis returns to occupied Haiti in The Woman Who Lost Her Soul. Sweeping across time and continents he unravels tangled knots of romance, espionage, and vengeance. In riveting prose, Shacochis builds a complex and disturbing story about the coming of age of America. Set over 50 years, four countries and various wars, Shacochis uses the allure of history to weave a portrait of the catastrophic events that led us to the war on terror and the America we are today.

IF YOU GO: Bob Shacochis reading and

booksigning, September 14 at 7 p.m., Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For details, (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.


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sound experience David Hartley, His War on Drugs, and Nightlands

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The dreamy pop ensemble Nightlands, a side project of multi-instrumentalist Dave Hartley, combines ethereal rock with Hartley’s obsessive love of experimentation, creating what might best be described as a sonic landscape, alternately frightening and exhilarating in the manner of the paintings of Giorgio de Chirico. Nothing is as it appears to be, but efforts at interpretation are often futile. Hartley may know what it all means (then again, he may not) but he’s determined to reveal as little as is possible, giving the listener a role as active interpreter. That’s not to say his music is diffuse or impenetrable; quite the opposite. Hartley’s inherent gift for melody and an almost giddy knack for hook laden pop make his music immediately

BY JAMES

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lands emerged during the recording of War on Drugs 2011 album Slave Ambient. The mixing and engineering of that effort took much longer than expected, giving Hartley ample time to pursue other musical inclinations. The resultant Forget the Mantra, released on Hartley’s own Secret Canadian label, ended up predating Slave Ambient by nearly a year, garnering its own positive reviews and press. Though his duties with the War on Drugs — spending nearly all of 2011 on the road — kept him busy for much of Multi-instrumentalist Dave Hartley performs at the that year, he also issued the All the Way Emerald Lounge on Saturday, September 7. and Covers EPs, the latter of which inengaging and endlessly fascinating. cluded a gorgeously hazy version of Lindsey Thanks in part to his genetic engineer Buckingham’s “Trouble.” father, Hartley, who is also the bassist for Earlier this year Hartley released Nightthe Philadelphia based band War on Drugs, lands’ second album, Oak Island (favorably brings a sense of wild exploration not unlike reviewed in the March issue of Rapid River a scientist’s quest for understanding. NightMagazine), which relied heavily on layered

WNC Jazz Profiles: Peggy Ratusz

A well established presence in the Asheville music scene since 2002, jazz and blues singer Peggy Ratusz performs an infectious, sultry, multi-layered brand of original, traditional and modern music. While influences such as Ray Charles, Anita O’Day and Bonnie Raitt are evident, it cannot be denied that her style is unique. Audiences are inspired by the rhythm, melodies and content of the stories she tells. Every drop of emotion is authentic. For nearly 37 years, opportunities have placed her on television shows, radio, festival line ups, theaters, bars, restaurants, benefits, private events and showcases. “Growing up in Worthington, OH, I took piano lessons from eight-years-old and my teacher encouraged me to sing. I listened to everything – Beatles, Elvis, Aretha, Sinatra, Ella, Janis, plus blues singers KoKo Taylor, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey and Memphis Minnie. I heard the soundtrack of “Jesus Christ Superstar” so much I knew most of the words by heart. One day I was singing Yvonne Elliman’s “I Don’t Know How to Love

~ Vocalist Aileen Pearlman Him”, when four of my brothers and my mom opened the door and applauded. This act of significant validation was from the people I needed it most! I haven’t stopped singing since!” After seven years touring the West in a folk rock trio based in Tucson, AZ, Peggy moved to Austin, TX in 1985 and fronted a 4-piece Chicago Blues style band called The Bootleggers, performing at numerous popular clubs. Throughout the 1990’s she was also a featured entertainer in show bands covering Motown and Soul music. After 17 years in Austin, Peggy moved to WNC and now makes her home in Fletcher. Peggy and her bands have placed or won Best in Blues/R&B for five straight years in the WNC Best-of Readers pole, and in both 2008 and 2010, she and her band were semi-finalists in the prestigious International Blues Challenge in Memphis, TN. “I don’t know where this woman came from, but Asheville’s Peggy Ratusz can flat out sing some blues, jazz and rock.”

~ David Brewer, High Country Press

harmonics and a decidedly nostalgic tone and is a strong candidate for my yearly top ten. In support of that effort Hartley is playing a series of smaller venues, accompanied by a band that works best in such intimate settings. Expect plenty of material from the Nightlands catalog, a smattering of War on Drugs tunes, and a few cover tunes. Expect to also be entranced and bewildered by the music of Dave Hartley.

IF YOU Dave Hartley’s Nightlands GO (along with Rose Windows and

the Friendly Beast) at the Emerald Lounge on Saturday, September 7. For ticket prices and more information go to www.emeraldlounge.com. Emerald Lounge, 112 N. Lexington Ave., downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 232-4372.

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“When Peggy performs she makes sure to maintain the quality and integrity that each song deserves. I love watching her do this. When you listen, you know every note in every phrase will be executed masterfully with heart and soul, and you cannot wait to hear it. True ear candy!”

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Layered harmonics and a decidedly nostalgic tone...

Peggy Ratusz Photo: Frank Zipperer

Ratusz has shared the stage with or opened for Taj Mahal, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Bernard Allison, Denise LaSalle, Candye Kane, Bob Margolin, Geff Achison, Kellin Watson, River Guerguerian, Jonathan Scales, Duane Simpson, Jonathan Pearlman, Shannon Whitworth and Gypsy Jazz’s One Leg Up. She’s performed at numerous blues festivals, as well as Bele Chere, The Orange Peel, Altamont Theater, Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, Grey Eagle Music Hall, Jack of the Wood, 5 Walnut Wine Bar and Tressa’s. Peggy and One Leg Up are featured in the Cabaret Jazz Series at White Horse Black Mountain on September 27. An advocate for other area musicians, Peggy has been booking, hosting and running sound for the incredibly popular twice monthly Singer Songwriter in the Round series at both Jack of the Wood and Jack of

EDDIE LESHURE

Hearts, giving area and touring songwriters a place to play and get paid. For two years, she hosted a bi-monthly Female Artist Spotlight Night at Tressa’s Jazz & Blues, which were paid showcases for women artists of all genres, from novice to professional. She is also a teen band music mentor for several area youth bands who perform soul, rock, jazz and blues and is a vocal coach to young and not-so-young area singers. Her regular column “Women Making Music” is featured in the monthly WNC Woman magazine, and she has recorded two CDs: “Infused with the Blues” and “It Takes a Lot of Faith”. “Listening is the most important aspect about creating music people need to hear. It enables us to lift each other up as musicians on stage together, which in turn gives us opportunities to fearlessly stretch ourselves beyond what we thought we were capable of doing.” The talented musicians who share the stage with her would agree! www.reverbnation.com/peggyratusz

Eddie produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

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I’m back again with a varied mix of bands and artists I’d not been previously exposed to, finding myself, once again, amazed by the quality of music that is out there. Download if you wish but I still prefer good old fashioned physical product, readily available at any of our area’s excellent independent record stores.

Vincent Cross a Town Called Normal Solidly written, impeccably played and gifted with the sort of nuance one doesn’t often hear in do it yourself recordings, Vincent Cross’s a Town Called Normal is one of the most pleasant surprises to have recently come across my desk. Born in Ireland and based in NYC, Cross has an intentionally modest vocal delivery that still carries a gut bucket of emotion. The sparse instrumentation (leaning towards, but not quite bluegrass and folk) works well alongside Cross’s own inherent knack for melody and structure. While the production is clean and bright it’s the songs that carry the day, be it the buoyant “Cuckoo” (in which the singers Celtic roots come shining forth), or the stunningly beautiful “Trouble Being There.” The depth of Cross’s songwriting continues to amaze me, even after listening multiple times. He capably shifts tempo and mood in ways that are both surprising and wholly logical. Overall, a Town Called Normal achieves an ideal balance between loss and redemption, and does so in ways that will make you wonder how and why Vincent Cross has managed to keep such a low profile. The town may be normal but this fine gem, well worth a much broader audience, is anything but. ****

The Deep Dark Woods Jubilee Sugar Hill Records While their press releases tout the Deep Dark Woods love of, and influence by, the music of Neil Young, it’s a very specific era of his work by which they seem the most enamored, mainly the Buffalo Springfield years. As a huge Springfield fan this is more than okay by me, giving Jubilee an immediate advantage in grabbing my attention. But it’s the songs that have kept me coming back to the record, revealing not only the strength of the material but other more broad influences — as well as their own unique imprint — that embellish the album. There’s a ragged melancholy, mixed in with a wicked sense of humor, that reminds me of the Band’s earliest albums (as well as The Basement Tapes), best found in the darkly comical “Bourbon Street” and the controlled abandon of “Picture on My Wall.” It’s a wonderful mix of elements and 16 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

influences — skillfully distilled through the band’s own sensibilities — resulting in an album, that with listening multiple times, sounds better and better. It’s my first journey through these Deep Dark Woods but it certainly won’t be my last. ****

Brian Wright Rattle Their Chains Sugar Hill Records From the start, Brian Wright has faced the challenge of disproportionately high expectations, a bar set so high as to demand a home run every time he stepped to the plate. Even before he began recording, he’d garnered a reputation as one of Texas’s new up and comers (he has since moved on to Nashville) and the sort of songwriter who demanded comparisons to Townes Van Zant, Joe Ely, and Robert Earl Keen. When No Depression magazine declared his 2011 debut House on Fire to be “darn near perfect” they were not doing him any favors. So along comes Rattle Their Chains (his second release on the Sugar Hill label) and those expectations continue to grow. Begun last summer in a Los Angeles studio, surrounded by an ace group of session musicians, Wright quickly recorded 18 meticulously arranged songs. But he still wasn’t happy with the results: “I didn’t like the songs once I heard them, so I scrapped all but three or four,” Wright explains in the accompanying promo pack. “It had hooks and melodies but it was empty. It didn’t feel or sound right at all.” So for his second go at making a new album, Wright retreated to the Oregon coast, where he held up in a friend’s hotel and started from scratch, following the same ritual for a week: “breakfast fueled by coffee and eggs sunny-side up; long beach walks and listening to Bob Dylan’s Basement Tapes”. Hunkered down with his Gibson J-45 the lyrics and melodies and a clear vision of the finished product began to surface: “I was picturing a band playing these songs – my friends – and I could hear what was going to happen: a band in a room, guys who really love each other and are really tight” he further explains. The resultant effort is a deliberately lose delight, songs that worm their way into your subconscious and won’t let go. Even the more subdued numbers, such as the strangely affecting “Weird Winter” are staggering in their richly evocative imagery. Outside of Peter Case I don’t know anyone writing songs — personal and universal, disparate and familiar — this multi-leveled.

Besides Dylan and the Band there are traces of Texas style songwriting, 1960s classic rock, and even in the monstrously good “Hear What I Want” a bit of neopsychedelic. Rattle Their Chains is a very different album from its predecessor House on Fire,, but it is no less satisfying. It’s the sort of record that makes you want to dim the lights, crank up the speakers, and ignore the rest of the world. It might have been created during a period of upheaval, and only came about after a couple of false starts, but it shows how much persistence and determination can pay off. Thanks for hanging in there Mr. Wright. And thanks for making this record. ****1/2

Moderat II Monkey Town Records Combine two German electronica bands (Modeselektor and Apparat) and what you get is Moderat. But what you also get is a curiously unified effort that eschews the harshness often prevalent in electronica — especially the European variety — and actually incorporates bits of R&B (“The Mark”), melancholic pop (“Damage Done”) and stretched out neo-prog (“Bad Kingdom”). The band’s mix of dance club music and heavy pulse may not be for everyone but I found it surprisingly palatable. The instrumental numbers often meander into galactic jam band noise but overall Moderat’s sophomore effort goes down surprisingly well. ***

Kevin Presbrey Dust unto Dust There’s something refreshing about a five song EP that states its case for the artist, collects a few of their stronger songs, and gets out of the way. Such is with Dust unto Dust, a more than respectable introduction to the music of Kevin Presbrey. Within its five songs are solidly told tales of promises not kept, dreams not realized, and love left unfulfilled. Presbrey, the former front man for Painkiller Hotel, has an easy going style (he admits an intense fondness for the music of Jim Croce and early Eagles) that might be a bit too mainstream for some but that shouldn’t diminish the quality of the songs. Best of the batch is “Good Man”, dedicated to his father, but both “Tell Me What ‘CD’s’ continued on page 17


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You Want” and “Something in the Water” would sound right at home on most 1970s FM stations. Producer Ryan Hadlock, best known for his work with The Lumineers, is certainly simpatico to Presbey’s ideas, making Dust unto Dust a more than adequate sampler of a rising artist. ***

Who is Harry Nilsson and Why is Everybody Talking About Him? (DVD) While he never reached the level of international stardom his unparallel talents warranted, Harry Nilsson remains a deservedly beloved figure in American pop music. Arriving at a time when the British Invasion ruled the radio airwaves — and achieving widespread acclaim when John, George, and Paul, but not Ringo, all famously named him the songwriter they were most listening to — his music defied easy categorization and marketing. It hearkened back to an earlier era, utilized melodic structures far advanced of what the record companies wanted, and worked on multiple levels that most listeners were, frankly, unable to fully understand. That, and his refusal to perform live, along with his infamously stubborn personality, must have made him a handful. But he was also a favorite of many in the industry, becoming fast friends with Keith Moon, Ringo (despite that lack of endorsement!) and attracting unwanted notoriety via his famous “lost weekend” with John Lennon. Nilsson was arguably the most respected singer, songwriter, and record maker of the ‘70s, winning a pair of Grammys for his covers of “Everybody’s Talkin’,” and “Without You.” This documentary features archival footage of the fiercely independent artist, and numerous new interviews with such contemporaries as Randy Newman, Jimmy Webb, Van Dyke Parks, and others. The film does a brilliant job of reckoning his outrageous behavior with his formidable talent, and goes a long way towards explaining how Nilsson’s impoverished and single parent upbringing affected his adult life. Poignant observations by Nilsson’s widow Oona O’Keefe give us an even deeper look at how the murder of his friend Lennon charted the later years of his own, too short, life. I’ve been a fan of Nilsson’s for many years and thought I knew nearly every important facet of his career. Who Is Harry Nilsson and Why is Everybody Talking About Him?, originally released in 2006 and recently expanded, has proven me wrong. *****

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A Visit with Chelsea Lynn La Bate

In the three short years since Chelsea Lynn La Bate rolled into Asheville – her ’95 Honda overflowing with her belongings – she has quietly observed and participated in our town’s vibrant and accepting music community. Hitting the road with the most Spartan of belongings, including her nylon stringed guitar, battery powered amp, clothes, and a “small collection of poetry books,” La Bate had spent three solid years supporting herself through her music, breaking even at best but doing what she chose to do. Having not even picked up the guitar until after completing an undergraduate degree in visual arts, La Bate tenaciously bucked the odds and continued pursuing her dream. After finding Asheville (or perhaps more correctly after Asheville found her) she began making more deliberate plans as to what would come next. That “next” has culminated in the Ten Cent Orchestra, a series of shows arranged (in more ways than one) by La Bate that engage a semi-rotating cast of local musicians to perform her compositions. With several successful performances under their belt, including a half dozen or so this year alone, La Bate is expanding her vision and moving Ten Cent to the next level.

James Cassara: Give us a brief bit of

background, where you were previously and what attracted you to Asheville.

Chelsea Lynn La Bate: Before I came

to Asheville, I was living out of my car, touring the South full time. Before that, I was in NYC playing music every night at songwriter showcases, open mics and headlining shows mostly in Brooklyn and the Lower East Side. My first tour was in Europe. I toured six countries and did thirty performances. After that I was sold on music. I came back to the states in search for a home base - one with a music scene, a healthy, happy, conscious community and access to wild and beautiful natural places.

JC: I guess Asheville fit that bill! Did

you arrive here with a clear goal in mind? How did you go about making contacts in an already crowded local music scene?

CLB: Yes. My goal was to make my

first album, Picking Through the Pawn Shop. I only had live recordings up until that point and wanted material

BY JAMES

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that radio would play. I couldn’t do it living out of my car. I needed to be in one place. I won a lot of songwriting contests in a two month span and did a pre-order campaign, earning support from fans throughout the whole East Coast. I then had enough money to start recording and hire an engineer and producer. Over ten musicians from the Asheville scene were guests on the record, most of them contacts from Jenny Greer’s Brown Bag Competition.

Chelsea La Bate and the Ten Cent Orchestra perform Friday, September 27 at the Isis Music Hall.

JC: You mentioned a bit that Asheville was initially not a good fit for you. You don’t play bluegrass or jam music, and you don’t quite fit into the singer/songwriter mold. What did it take to overcome that?

CLB: I don’t know that I have! Ha! I mean,

I haven’t been the first artist they call up for a street festival, but I’m not concerned with that. My goal has never been to be big in Asheville. I’m interested in my music reaching far beyond this town. I’m coming from a very big city of songwriters, several of whom toured the world with just their guitar or piano and now rule the airwaves. Around here it’s “we don’t do the songwriter thing.” A lot of venues want funk bands that can sell beer. I’ll never be that so I’m just doing my own thing and staying away from places like that. I have found my place here as a performer by learning to knock on the right doors and work with the right venues. I also rent out private spaces for the Ten Cent Orchestra so that I have full artistic control and we don’t have to fork over all of our patrons donations to slimy club owners. The result has been the blessing of a very engaged, intelligent, conscious, fan base here in Asheville and the South East. They are not the kind of people that flock out to a free jam night to drink cheap beer and talk over us while we play. Our fans come to the show because they know the music is made to be medicine. I work hard to create events that are intimate and articulate, where we can all relax into the experience, where the art comes first.

JC: So from that you’ve moved towards the Ten Cent Orchestra. Talk a bit about what that project is, and what sets it apart from what might be described as the “typical Asheville show.”

CLB: The Ten Cent Orchestra is my biggest

dream. It’s the result of ten years of song writing, song wishing, song working, and song sacrificing. It takes dozens of Ten Cent

Poetry songs and invites classical instrumentation into the mix with masterful arrangements by Silas Durocher. Each song has been tediously composed and arranged with the skill and attention of classical music. The lyrics, however, bring the fresh voice of contemporary songwriting — songwriting that speaks on our times now and on our issues now, as well as merging ancient human experience. What sets it apart from a typical show here in Asheville? Well, when is the last time you went to see a songwriter perform, only to discover they were playing with a full string orchestra?

JC: Not often, to be sure. You’re working a

lot with Alex Krug. Can you expand a bit on that collaboration?

CLB: Alex Krug is one of my dearest, closest

friends. We hike together, celebrate each other’s small victories and meet almost daily for pep talks and check ins. Artists need strong support from other artists. Only other artists can understand what it takes to walk this path. I mean, I wake up and write for five hours and when I clock out, there is no check waiting for me. She is in this full force too and gets so excited about my artistic growth. She comes to my shows and does sound when I need it. She helps to sell merchandise and take care of my musicians. I do the same for her. I give her feedback on press releases and have made flyers in Photoshop for her CD releases. I lend her my car when it’s raining. We’ve had silkscreen sessions where we help each other print t-shirts and posters; we post flyers downtown together. We swim upstream side by side. We are shoulder to shoulder in this from the emotional to artistic to the technical. This has been going on for years, a huge investment in each other’s artist and spiritual path. We have shared many big stages together, co-billing or singing with each other. continued on page 37

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Events in Black Mountain

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Specialty Shops • Fine Art Galleries • Fine dining • Antique Shops •

September 1-30 - Still Life: Shape & Form Art Show at

Red House Studios and Gallery, 310 W. State St., beside Monte Vista Hotel. (828) 669-0351, www.svfalarts.org

September 14 - Rockin’ Around the Square Concert.

Swayback Sisters performing on Town Square. FREE! Swayback 2-4 p.m. Bring a seat.

September 14-15 - AnTHM Gallery Fall Reception.

Enjoy refreshments, meet artists, and see what’s new. From fine, contemporary to outsider artworks. AnTHM Gallery, (828) 419-0049, www.anthmgallery.com

September 21 - Mill Around the Village Festival. Music, BJ BA

vendors, food, games. www.millaroundthevillage.com

September 28 - Third Annual Car & Bike Show, 9 a.m.5 p.m. at Harley Davidson of Asheville, 20 Patton Cove Rd., Swannanoa. Raffles, food, vendors, door prizes, and dash plaques. www.carshow.svfd.net

October 1-30 - Mountain Moods Gallery Show at Red

House Studios and Gallery, 310 W. State St., beside Monte Vista Hotel. Mon-Sat 11-5 p.m.; Sundays noon to 4 p.m. (828) 669-0351, www.svfalarts.org

October 5 - Old Toll Road Caravan Reservations

required. Contact: Swannanoa Valley Museum (828) 669-9566, swannanoavalleymuseum.com

October 5 - Fall by the Tracks Festival and 5K Fun Run

Downtown Black Mountain. Contact the Old Depot Association, (828) 669-6583, www.olddepot.org

October 17 to October 20 - L.E.A.F Music Festival,

Lake Eden Arts Festival at Camp Rockmont. Tickets in advance online. (828) 686-8742, www.theleaf.org

October 19 - Painted Rocking Chair Auction & Music.

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Rocking chairs painted by local artists and on display around town will be auctioned with proceeds donated to Town Square. FREE! 12 p.m. on Town Square. Preview chairs at www.thelittletownthatrocks.org. Contact: Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce, bmchamber@juno.com

October 26 - Howl-O-Ween Pet Parade & Festivities.

FREE! 12 noon, downtown Black Mountain. Costume contest and more. Email june@visionsofcreation.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

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The 5th Annual exhibition includes ceramics, textiles, furniture, printed material, sculpture and ephemera created at the iconic and legendary Black Mountain College by students and faculty. The show will be accompanied by a 32-page catalogue.

IF YOU GO: BMC Museum + Arts

Center, 56 Broadway, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 350-8484, or visit www.blackmountaincollege.org.

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Hoard Reflex NEW WORK BY JULIE ARMBRUSTER

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Julie Armbruster, known for her unusual creature portraits and dreamy landscapes, exhibits new work at The Satellite Gallery this month. This is Armbruster’s first solo gallery show. Hoard Reflex expands some of Armbruster’s classic narratives through 9 large format panels, a collection of smaller works including some sculptures and artifacts, and a companion guide. The guide will be printed with the help of letterpress expert Jessica White of Heroes and Criminals Press. Beloved characters like Potato Boy, the WoodChucks, Elmore, the Golden Unicorn, and Professor Wunderbar are placed in fantastically detailed environments as they live out their unique potentials. The works were conceived during an imagination exercise Armbruster undertook earlier this year, as well as a reflection on some of her favorite fairy tales. Often full of unexpected elements, all the works contain the hoard reflex

Little Did He Know by Julie Armbruster. Acrylic and ink on wood panel.

symbol, a circular design with a small creature in a drawer. Hoard reflex refers to a habit of involuntary collecting. The show will also include some collaborative elements including a custom soundscape arranged by Dulci Ellenberger and Dave Reinhardt of False Tropics. In addition, Newsworthy Drawing Club member and frequent collaborator, R. Brooke Priddy has sculpted plush versions of the characters, designed a custom fabric, and assisted with the window installation. Julie Armbruster’s work has evolved to include much more intricate compo-

sitions and details. Her work is often realized through automatic drawing and then refined through layered rendering and delicate outlining. The shine and saturation of color give the work an inviting pull. The viewer is further entranced by the complexity of emotions conveyed by the characters that are often faced with some sort of weighty decision or dramatic occurrence. The narratives are realized through anthropomorphic characters that seem bewildered and internal. Her stories are both funny and dark and typically lack a straightforward resolution.

IF YOU Hoard Reflex opens with GO an artist reception Friday,

September 6, from 7-10 p.m. and will remain on view through Monday October 21. The Satellite Gallery, 55 Broadway St., downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 505-2225 or visit www.thesatellitegallery.com

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Upcoming Issues October 2013: Art and Artists Fine Art / Fine Craft Issue November 2013: River Arts District Issue December 2013: Annual Holiday Shopping and Dining Guide

Reserve Your Ad Now! Call for Special Rates, (828) 646-0071.

Art Only Market in 5th Year

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Asheville Art in the Park is a shopping destination. With more than 60 local and regional professional artists showcasing their best work, Pack Square is transformed into a wondrous garden of handmade textures and forms each June and October. Every medium imaginable is represented in booths that line the streets with artists ready to discuss their work. Started in 2009 by local ceramic artist Andrew Montrie, Asheville Art in the Park has grown into a membership based organization of over 200 artists.

Art in the Park. Photo: Andrew Montrie

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ANDREW MONTRIE

The market is held on three consecutive Saturdays in June and October under the Vance Monument and on the raised lawn in Pack Square. In 2009, extensive renovations were completed, including the installation of the new Hoss Haley fountain. Asheville Art in the Park was the first event held on the newly paved N. Pack Square. Artists in the market have always donated 10% of profits to a local nonprofit organization. In 2012, the Asheville Area Arts Council created the Asheville Art in the Park Arts and Community Grant to give this money directly back to local artists. To find out more about the grant visit the Asheville Area Arts Council’s website at www.AshevilleArts.com For more information about Asheville Art in the Park, becoming a member artist, joining the email list, friending the facebook page, or becoming a supporter, visit www.AshevilleArtinthePark.com

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More of What Makes Asheville Special ‘Diana Wortham’ cont’d from page 3

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Chic Gamine is a hot new Canadian band giving a fresh spin to the classic 1960’s girl group sound. Friday, October 18 at 8 p.m. Photo by Rebecca Sandulak

cabaret, backed by her band, The Flawless Zircons. The 2013/2014 Mainstage Music Series at Diana Wortham Theatre features some of the nation’s top touring acts. Hot new Canadian band Chic Gamine (October 18, 2013) comes to Diana Wortham Theatre as part of its inaugural North Carolina tour. The 2013/2014 Mainstage Dance Series, recognized for offering some of the nation’s foremost dance companies right here in Asheville, opens with Diavolo Dance Theater (October 8 & 9, 2013) under Artistic Director Jacques Heim—back by popular demand. Diavolo’s dancers, gymnasts, athletes and actors brilliantly explore the space where reality ends and imagination begins. The 2013/2014 Mainstage Theatre Series features four compelling performances. Asheville audiences can experience the performance that brought down the house on its last visit to Diana Wortham Theatre: Shakespeare on Trial (November 23, 2013). Jeremy Webb presents writer Bill Shakespeare as he encounters four of his most famous characters up-close, personal and ticked-off ticked-off. 2013/2014 Intersections Series Performances: The Intersections Series features two dedicated performances in the 2013/2014 season. The ultimate troubadour Jim Malcolm (November 20, 2013) performs “Just Flown In From Scotland.” Malcolm warms the soul with masterful guitar and harmonica peppered with funny stories and engaging wit. The theatre offers flexible multi-show discount packages starting with as few as three performances. Savings range from 10% to 20% off Regular prices depending on the number of performances; multi-show packages are available through the Diana Wortham Theatre box only at (828) 257-4530.

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Ruthie Foster, Diavolo, Sandra Bernhard, Chic Gamine, Shakespeare on Trial, Norm Lewis, The Chase Brock Experience, The Teetotallers, Sierra Hull, and much more! For a season brochure call (828) 257-4530.

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details or to purchase tickets, call the box office at (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

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Whether renting a DVD or looking for new titles at the theatre, there’s plenty from which to choose this month. At the theatre you’ll notice the race to the Oscar’s has already begun. Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine has a distinct l’eau d’Oscar, and Lee Daniels’ The Butler will definitely be an audience favorite.

The World’s End

The good Professor Kaufmann and I didn’t get to everything we wanted to review, but if you are a fan of the nerdy, British comedy duo, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (and even if you’re not), we implore you to see The World’s End. It’s not Oscar bait, but it’s far more enjoyable than most titles that are. The Kings of Summer, currently playing at The Carolina Cinema, is another overlooked title that is worth your time. You’ll see plenty more releases on the road to Oscar in the coming weeks. Titles to look for include: • 12 Years a Slave • Aint Them Bodies Saints • All is Lost • Captain Phillips • The Counselor • Gravity • Inside Llewyn Davis • The Monuments Men • The Wolf of Wall Street Until next month, enjoy what you watch and watch what you enjoy.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

2 Guns ∑∑∑1/2

end. Edward James Olmos’s Mexican drug lord seems like a character out of a Robert Rodriguez movie and he plays it accordingly. While 2 Guns offers nothing new, it does offer a pretty good time at the local cinema. Simple, well crafted movies which have nothing more on their mind than entertaining an audience for a couple of hours deserve their place in the movie pantheon alongside the big budget extravaganzas and the art house/indie flicks. In fact the older I get, the better these movies look.

Short Take: Old school buddy movie benefits from above average plotting, crisp action scenes, and winning performances from Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg.

REEL TAKE: August seems to be the month

of retreads as opposed to remakes as far as my movie going is concerned. All three of the films I review in this month’s issue are reworkings of basic ideas and/or movies that have been made before. Of course “borrowing” ideas has been a staple of filmmaking since the earliest days of movies. How creative the borrowing is determines how good or bad the movie turns out to be. Case in point…the new Denzel Washington-Mark Wahlberg opus 2 Guns. There’s nothing in this movie that hasn’t been done before especially in Walter Hill’s Beverly Hills Cop movies with Eddie Murphy. However the complex plot full of double & triple crosses along with ingratiating performances from Mark & Denzel (they

Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg are an oddly matched pair of undercover investigators in 2 Guns.

have great chemistry together) help to raise 2 Guns to the level of a little something extra. Even if it doesn’t stick with you once the movie is over, you won’t feel cheated by it. Icelandic director Baltasar Komakur, who had previously collaborated with Mark Wahlberg on last year’s Contraband, once again weaves a complicated story of a heist that goes wrong with serious consequences. This time he borrows a critical plot detail from Don Siegel’s Charley Varrick (1973) in which undercover agents Wahlberg & Washington rob a bank which has far more cash in it then it’s supposed to have. Turns out that the money is a slush fund for the CIA and a ruthless agent (Bill Paxton) will break every law to get it back. Then there’s drug lord Papi (Edward James Olmos) who also wants a piece of the action since there’s a huge payoff involved. Throw in Washington’s girlfriend (Paula Patton) whose drug enforcement boss may be on the take and things start to get real complicated, real fast. There’s a brutal death on the horns of a bull awaiting our heroes if they don’t return the money and that’s just what the drug lord has in mind. Unlike Contraband which was done with a completely straight face, there’s a lot of humor here thanks to the two leads’ playing off each other. There is also some serious violence when things go awry that comes as something of a shock after the amusing opening set in a diner which is known for its killer doughnuts. Bill Paxton’s CIA agent Earl is a thoroughly nasty piece of work although you know he’s going to get it in the

Rated R for violence throughout, language, and brief nudity.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Blue Jasmine ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: A former socialite teeters on the brink of insanity in the wake of her husband’s Bernie Madoff-like fall from grace.

Cate Blanchette is arrogant, pitiful and just plain bat shit crazy in Woody Allen’s very nearly perfect Blue Jasmine.

REEL TAKE: Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine

gives off the distinct odor of Oscar bait. While it doesn’t have the warmth and general appeal of Midnight in Paris, Paris Allen scores big in this story of former socialite on the brink of insanity. Based ever so abstractly on Tennessee Williams’ Streetcar Named Desire,, Woody Allen breaks new ground even for him [with a track record of 40 some-odd films to his credit]. Jasmine, played by Oscar winner Cate Blanchett, is our Blanche Dubois. Ginger (Sally Hawkins), Jasmine’s sister, serves as the Stella character and her blue collar boy‘Movies’ continued on page 24

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friend Chili (James Carnavalle) is a Stanley of sorts. As the film opens Jasmine is flying to San Francisco to stay with her estranged sister Ginger. Jasmine is a [now] former socialite fleeing NYC in the wake of a BernieMadoff-like scandal that brought down her fabulously wealthy financier husband Hal (Alec Baldwin) and the posh life she knew. As she balances ever so precariously on the edge of reason, often sticking more than just her right foot on the bus to crazy town, she reveals the gradual undoing of her previous life. Allen brilliantly choreographs the scenes, masterfully dancing back and forth between the past and present. In the past Hal swindled the lottery winnings belonging to Ginger and her then husband, Augie (Andrew Dice Clay). It crushed their hopes and dreams and eventually ruined their marriage, while Jasmine and Hal moved on like a hit and run; hence the estrangement between the two sisters. In the present, Ginger, a wonderfully goodhearted gal, takes pity on her sister and offers to put her up until she can get back on her feet. Jasmine is contemptuous of Ginger’s low brow digs and aspirations and

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

even more so of her boyfriend, Chili, an apparent clone of Augie. Possessing no skill set for the 21st century job market, she draws from what little skills her former lifestyle afforded her and decides to become an interior designer. She wants to go to school for it online, after she learns how to use a computer. Yep – she’s in denial, she’s stalling and she’s pickled in vodka and psychotropic pharmaceuticals most of the time. Jasmine is incredibly self absorbed, arrogant and unlikable. Yet Blanchett pulls off the amazing feat of making us care, actually making us empathize with this God awful woman. The picture belongs entirely to Blanchett, but that’s not to say she’s in shabby company, everyone in the ensemble turns out terrific performances. Sally Hawkins is marvelous, Baldwin is a smooth and smarmy,

and Carnavalle is big old lug with a heart of gold. But perhaps the biggest revelation in the cast is Andrew Dice Clay. It’s not a large part, but his performance as Augie is pitch perfect and is a far cry from The Adventures of Ford Fairlane. From behind the camera Allen delivers a five star performance too. His talent for dialogue and jazzy soundtracks are a given. But what he achieves here is something on a whole new level. Blue Jasmine is not a comedy or even a dramedy, but only Allen could infuse such a story with marvelous comedic moments and deliver the punch. Allen’s touch and Blanchett’s performance turn an otherwise unpalatable story into a strangely compelling, gem of a film.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Charley Varrick”

September DVD Picks

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material, language and sexual content.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Charley Varrick (1973) Since I have referenced director Don Siegel in two of my reviews this month (22 Guns, Paranoia), Paranoia it seems only fitting that my DVD pick be one of his films. After some deliberation, I chose his 1973 crime caper film Charley Varrick. Siegel is best known for the 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers and the Clint Eastwood pictures Dirty Harry and The Beguiled but he made a number of other high quality movies and Charley Varrick is one of his best. The plot is very similar to 2 Guns though not nearly as complex. Walter Matthau stars as a stunt pilot down on his luck. Needing money, he and three others knock over a bank in a small New Mexico town which results in the deaths of two of the robbers. Instead of the several thousand they were expecting, they wind up with several HUNDRED thousand. Charley then realizes that they have inadvertently stolen Mafia money. Before they can give it back, the mob sends a brutal enforcer ironically named Molly (Joe Don Baker) who proceeds to muscle in by killing one of the gang members. In order to save himself, Charley devises a plan involving his stunt plane but will it work? As the title character Matthau is his usual, dependable self but he’s aided by top flight performances from Baker, Andy Robinson, and John Vernon. Don Siegel’s usual taut direction doesn’t hurt either. If you admire the movies of Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez then you’ll enjoy Charley Varrick. Its influence can be seen in a number of their movies

24 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

(Resevoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Once Upon a Time in Mexico) and, in an odd aside, Ray Davies of The Kinks says in his autobiography that it’s his favorite movie.

To the Wonder (2013) Writer / Director Terrence Malick is a profound if not prolific filmmaker. While he doesn’t make many movies, when he does you generally hear about them. I was caught off guard when I came across a title the other day, To the Wonder written and directed by Terrence Malick. My first thought was, “So soon after Tree of Life? That seems odd [for Malick].” My second thought was, “How did I not know about this?” While I don’t always like Malick’s films I am usually fascinated by them. His eye for photography trumps his sometimes esoteric pretentiousness. Inevitably they are beautiful, poetic spectacles to behold. To the Wonder is Malick’s sixth film and it’s no different in this regard. It does however seem to challenge some of Malick’s own conventions in filmmaking. The result is a heart wrenching essay on emotions and relationships. It doesn’t work perfectly, but for a

Elysium ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: With Earth an over-crowded wasteland and Elysium a sparkling space station in the sky that knows no sickness, a man suffering from radiation poisoning endeavours to get to Elysium to cure himself and maybe save the planet.

REEL TAKE: Neil Blomkamp’s Elysium is

good film that could have been – and should have been a great film. In the time that has passed since seeing the film, the detracting elements that kept it from greatness annoy me even more. That said, it is good and the concept is fairly fascinating. Like great science fiction books, it makes a statement on the issue facing the world, but speculating on what the world ‘Movies’ continued on page 25

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “To the Wonder” film geek, it is certainly worth watching. Neil (Ben Affleck) is an American in France who has an affair with divorced single mother, Marina (Olga Kurylenko). Their affair is beautiful, the kind that moves your soul. After Marina and her daughter move from France to Oklahoma to be with Neil, cracks begin to form in their relationship. They love each other, but they don’t communicate well. Marina seems a bit manic and Neil a bit closed down. Marina’s daughter is not happy and that doesn’t help matters. The footage of the relationship in France, complete with a trek through Mont Saint Michel, is gorgeous and everything a romantic affair should be. In stark contrast, once in America, more specifically, Oklahoma, the footage is desolate, cold and unsettling; vulnerability and insecurity set in. As their relationship begins to crumble we are introduced to a priest (Javier Bardem). A committed and dedicated shepherd to his flock, but a desperately sad lonely, he is a man suffering a spiritual crisis. As distance between Neil and Marina grows, Neil reconnects with an old friend from childhood, Jane (Rachel McAdams). While Jane seems happier than the other three, all four are lonely; something is missing in the lives of all four. Dialogue is minimal to say the least. It’s a stark work in so many ways, but it’s emotional impact is massive. Apparently To the Wonder was minimally received and distributed too, but I found it fascinating, as usual.


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 24

Set in the 22nd century, Matt Damon saves the second class citizen of Earth in Elysium.

may be like in the future because of its current actions. In this case, suffering from pollution and pillaging, Earth is a shadow of its former self. The haves [versus the have nots] have built Elysium, a space station of sorts where everything is perfect, the manicured people, manicured lawns and opulent homes. Best of all, there is no illness; disease, wounds and any health issues can be fixed in these special beds. However, rather than share this technology with the rest of Earth’s citizens it is saved only for the 1%, er, I mean the citizen’s of Elysium. Blomkamp claims the film is not an allegory for the issues of today, but there’s no denying he’s certainly touching upon some hot buttons – immigration, economy, depletion of Earth’s resources, and so on. However, much is subject of interpretation as he offers no back story, no explanation of what exactly happened. We also only see the decimated and over-crowded L.A. of 2154 and Elysium. The only back story we are given is a brief glimpse to into our hero’s past. Max is an orphan who dreams of doing something important some day and of going to Elysium. His best friend is a little girl named Frey; Max loves Frey. Fast forward thirty-some years – Max is a factory worker and Frey is a doctor and single mother of a dying child. When Max receives a fatal dose radiation at work (Earth apparently provides the labor force for Elysium’s economy), his only chance of survival is to get to Elysium, which of course will be easier said than done. With nothing left to lose, a band of revolutionaries, upfit Damon with an exoskeleton of a droid and an implanted data chip that allows him to find out what’s happening on Elysium. Their hope is that not only will he be cured, he will be able to secure the benefits of Elysium (i.e. healthcare) for the 2nd class citizens of Earth. What’s happening on Elysium is an intended coup by Elysium’s head of security (Jodie Foster). She enlists the service of a unscrupulous agent/mercenary (Sharlto Copley) and eventually both storylines collide. Ridiculously long fight sequences ensue

and at three quarters of the way through the film, Copley’s character becomes the main villain, not Foster’s. It’s not that this plot shift can’t work, it’s just that its implementation seems slightly awry. Damon delivers spot on as usual. Copley delivers a despicably good performance. Foster’s performance seem to drown in her Praetorian-esque accent. Blomkamp’s District 9 was a tremendous movie. Like Distrct 99, Elysium is smart and brutal, but compassionate. Unlike District 99, Elysium gets caught between Blomkamp’s style and Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster.

Blonde (2001). In addition to captivating but not overly confusing visuals, Luketic edits the film in a manner that exhilarates rather than exhausts. The screenplay by Jason Dean Hall and Barry Levy is Espionage Thriller 101 but it moves the story along and keeps us engaged. The contemporary music score by Junkie XL uses a number of recent hits to engage a younger audience. The performances were the most enjoyable part of Paranoia for me. Hemsworth is a likeable and engaging protagonist while Amber Heard manages to register as the co-worker and later love interest despite her limited screen time. However Rated R for strong, bloody violence and language the film belongs to Gary Oldman (in a role throughout. intended for Kevin Spacey) and especially REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN Harrison Ford who, at 70, shows that he Paranoia ∑∑∑1/2 still has a magnetic Short Take: A paint-byscreen presence. He numbers urban thriller has also become an about financial chicanery actor of stature in his and corporate espionage later years. Check that manages to be very out his final screen entertaining thanks a top appearance here and flight cast and solid noyou’ll see what I nonsense direction. mean. REEL TAKE: I have had it So don’t let up to here (place either hand an online review Harrison Ford is the unscrupulous as far above your head as you decide whether or head of a global software corporation can) with important critics not you see a movie. in the unfairly maligned Paranoia. who trip over themselves to The best gauge come up with snarky phrases still remains word for telling us what’s wrong with a movie of mouth from people you know whose without bothering to tell us what might be judgment you trust. I went to see Paranoia right with it. Paranoia is a case in point. The because of the corporate espionage theme day after it opened it received a 2% approval and to see the performers. I was very pleased rating on Rotten Tomatoes. 2%!?! Even the with the results and so was the audience biggest box office disaster of all time, last with me. Unfortunately it opened poorly year’s The Oogieloves rates better than that. and may not be around for long. At last check it was up to 5%. Rated PG-13 for some sexuality, violence, and Yes, Paranoia offers nothing new and language. yes, it’s predictable and disposable entertainREVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN ment but, like The Tourist Tourist, there’s nothing wrong with that when it’s well done. While Lee Daniels’ The Butler ∑∑∑∑ watching this I was reminded of the efShort Take: A compelling and ficiency of Don Siegel (Invasion of the Body emotionally rewarding story of hate Snatchers, Dirty Harry Harry), one of my favorite and humanity and the Civil Rights second tier directors whose nuts and bolts movement as told through the eyes of approach came as a relief from the excesses the black butler who served eight U.S. of 1970s filmmaking. No doubt it’s my age Presidents. showing but that approach would be a welcome sight today in mainstream filmmaking REEL TAKE: In 2008, The Washington not just in art house or indie movies. Post ran an article, “A Butler Well Served by The story is basic. Young hotshot comThis Election.” The feature told the story puter whiz (Liam Hemsworth) goes to work of Eugene Allen, a butler who served eight for software magnate (Gary Oldman) who presidents at the white house. Danny Strong enlists him to steal company secrets from his (who received accolades earlier this year for rival and one time mentor (Harrison Ford). writing and producing Game Change, the Naturally more is involved than first meets HBO movie about Sarah Palin and the 2008 the eye. Complicating matters are a young election) adapted the story for big screen, Oldman employee (Amber Heard) that fictionalizing the name of the main character Hemsworth must use without her knowland playing loosely with Allen’s personal edge to get at Ford. story for cinematic and emotional impact. Australian Robert Luketic directs the Directing the emotionally manipulative but film with a stylish flair more reminiscent ‘Movies’ continued on page 26 of 21(2008) than his breakout hit Legally

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. HFS features a classic film with a young Maggie Smith, a French Costume epic, the 1933 Oscar winner for Best Picture, an adaptation of a Philip Roth novel, and the 1950’s biography of Harry Houdini. September 1:

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969) Maggie Smith won an Oscar for her portrayal of an outspoken teacher in a girl’s school in 1932 Edinburgh. Stars: Maggie Smith, Robert Stephens, Pamela Franklin and Gordon Jackson. Directed by Ronald Neame. September 8:

The Horseman on the Roof (1995) Set in 1832, this French film relates the story of a young Italian nobleman in France raising money for the Italian revolution against Austria. In French with English subtitles. Stars Olivier Martinez and Juliette Binoche. Directed by: Jean-Paul Rappeneau. September 15:

Calvacade

(1933) Noel Coward’s epic play about the lives of an upper class British family and their head servants over a 30 year period bears more than a passing resemblance to Upstairs, Downstairs. It won Oscars for Best Picture and Best Director. Stars Diana Wynyard, Clive Brook and Una O’Connor. Directed by Frank Lloyd. September 22 –

The Human Stain

(2003) A solid adaptation of the Philip Roth novel about a college professor and the shameful secret he has kept hidden for half a century. Stars Anthony Hopkins, Nicole Kidman and Ed Harris. Directed by Robert Benton. September 29:

Houdini

(1953) Fanciful biography of the famed magician was made to showcase the talents of then husband and wife Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh. Entertaining hokum in the old Hollywood tradition. Stars Tony Curtis, Janet Leigh and Torin Thatcher. Directed by George Marshall.

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film reviews ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special membersonly events and screenings. September 3:

Be Kind Rewind

(2008) Two bumbling store clerks inadvertently erase the footage from all of the tapes in their video rental store. In order to keep the business running, they re-shoot every film in the store with their own camera, with a budget of zero dollars. Stars Jack Black, Mos Def, Danny Glover. Directed by Michel Gondry. September 10:

Gangs of New York

(2002) In 1863, Amsterdam Vallon returns to the Five Points area of New York City seeking revenge against Bill the Butcher, his father’s killer. Stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Cameron Diaz, Daniel Day-Lewis. Directed by Martin Scorsese. September 17:

The Loved One

(1965) Satire on the funeral business, in which a young British poet goes to work at a Hollywood cemetery. Stars Robert Morse, Jonathan Winters, Anjanette Comer. Directed by Tony Richardson. September 24:

Darjeeling Limited (2007) A year after their father’s funeral, three brothers travel across India by train in an attempt to bond with each other. Stars Owen Wilson, Adrian Brody and Jason Schwartzman. Directed by Wes Anderson.

BIG SCREEN BUDGET FILM $5 for members, $7 general. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 18:

Wings

(1927) Two young men, one rich, one middle class, who are in love with the same woman, become fighter pilots in World War I. Stars Clara Bow, Charles ‘Buddy’ Rodgers, Richard Arlen. Directed by William. A. Wellman

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

What doesn’t play out quite so well is the all-star and somewhat bizarre casting of the occupants of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, in particular Robin Williams as Dwight D. Eisenhower and John Cusack as Tricky Dick. However, Whitaker’s graceful and utterly believable performance pretty much trumps any missteps. Oprah Winfrey is slightly distracting at first, only because she’s ‘Oprah,’ but as she settles into the role, she shines. Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Lenny Kravitz as fellow butlers and witnesses to history are both excellent. British born David Oyelowo Forest Whitaker gives a graceful and nuanced turns in a very strong performance performance in Lee Daniels’ The Butler. as Cecil’s son, and I fully expect that both he and Whitaker will be nomieffective proceedings is Lee Daniels. nated come award season. Before we go any further I should Lee Daniels’ The Butler succeeds on clarify that the film is titled Lee Daniels’ many levels. It’s far more mainstream and The Butler for legal reasons, not egocentric approachable than Daniels’ Oscar-nomigratification. Daniels takes us on a Forest nated Precious and, in this case, I think its Gump-like, encyclopedic look at the civil universal appeal makes it the more powerful rights movement through the journey of film. Daniels is unsparing in his depiction one man. For creative license, Allen has of the inequality for African Americans in been re-dubbed Cecil Gaines, and the film the 20th century. To balance atrocities born recounts his story from pivotal moment in of hate with grace and the unifying bonds his childhood in 1926 through the election of humanity (and to make it entertaining to of President Obama. The narrative voice is boot), is quite an accomplishment. Cecil (Forest Whitaker), now an elderly man At a time when we’ve made great strides looking back on his life. but have such a long way to go in the fight To the filmmaker’s credit, there’s a lot for equality, Lee Daniels’ The Butler is a of ground to cover, but the story never feels must for everyone. hurried or ill-paced. The film unfolds like Rated PG-13 for some violence and disturbing chapters in a good book without ever seemimages, language, sexual material, thematic ing episodic. elements and smoking. Cecil is the son of a share cropper. REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN Though it’s technically 1926, one would think Lincoln never issued the EmanciUnfinished Song ∑∑∑∑1/2 pation Proclamation. Trained as a house Short Take: This story of a misanthropic servant after the death of his father, Cecil elderly man dealing with the death learns to anticipate the white man’s every of his wife by joining her unorthodox need, but to act like he doesn’t exist. This choir is elevated by the remarkable training serves him well. As a young man he performances of Terence Stamp and comes up through the ranks in fine hotels Vanessa Redgrave. until he is ‘discovered’ at The Excelsior Hotel in Washington D.C. and recruited as REEL TAKE: Unfinished Song (Song for a White House Butler. It’s 1957. Eisenhower Marion in the U.K. and Europe) is another is President. (The real life butler, Mr. Alexample of a film that covers no new ground len, started under Truman, but the movie but is taken to a higher level thanks to a doesn’t suffer for the liberty.) number of fine performances spearheaded Cecil’s job at the White House serves by Terence Stamp and Vanessa Redgrave. as the framework for the movie and it is Writer-Director Paul Andrew Williams, interesting, but it’s not where the film’s whose previous efforts include two shorts, strength lies. Strong and Daniels raise the some TV shows, and a couple of horror bar, making an otherwise straightforward films, is aiming for a wider audience with narrative truly dynamic by interweaving this film and he has succeeded. The subject Cecil’s experience throughout the Civil material is tailor made for the over 40 set Rights movement and that of his son Louis who, until recently, have generally been (David Oyelowo). When Louis goes off to ignored by mainstream moviemakers. college, he becomes deeply immersed in Arthur Harris (Terence Stamp) is a the movement, becoming a Freedom Rider grumpy retiree with a critically ill but upbeat and activist. The deeper his involvement, wife (Vanessa Redgrave) who sings with a lothe more fractious the relationship becomes cal elderly choir. This choir is led by a much between father and son. The arc of this younger teacher (Gemma Arterton) whose plotline plays out brilliantly. personal life is a shambles. Her choice of ma‘Movies’ continued from page 25

26 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

terial for the choir is decidedly unorthodox as she has them singing pop standards with a little rap music thrown in for good measure. Arthur wants nothing to do with them or anyone else for that matter including his hardworking son (Christopher Eccleston). We know from the very beginning that Marion is not long for this world but the 76 year old Vanessa Redgrave makes her tried & true (some critics have suggested “trite & true”) material seem fresh and powerful thanks to her dynamic presence. The movie, however, belongs to Terence Stamp who at 75 has been transformed from a beautiful young man into a beautiful old man. He takes his standard material and infuses it with a depth and believability that makes the actor disappear and the character come alive.

Choir director Gemma Arterton hugs retiree Terence Stamp after his moving rendition of a Billy Joel song in Unfinished Song.

Youngsters Gemma Arterton and Christopher Eccleston hold their own with the old pros which gives this movie an appeal to those under 40 as well. Arterton’s choir director remains relentlessly upbeat in spite of her personal problems and is the key to getting the oldsters to try new things and to believe in themselves. Her scene of self revelation with Stamp is one of many emotional highlights that give the film a lasting resonance. Christopher Eccleston as the neglected and rejected son also gets the chance to shine in two key scenes leading up to the heartwarming and uplifting finale. While all of this is familiar territory and shamelessly manipulative, director Williams takes a simple, straight forward approach that draws us in and allows writer Williams’ material to seem better than it is. The movie builds to a predictable push button emotional finale but thanks to Stamp it transcends its limitations and becomes something truly special. His rendition of Billy Joel’s “Goodbye My Angel” will stay with you always. If you enjoyed Quartet or Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, then you’ll love Unfinished Song. Don’t be ashamed if you have a strong emotional response during this movie. That, after all, is what Unfinished Song is all about. Rated PG-13 for some sexual references and rude gestures.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN


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artful living Surrender “The way to practice true Zen is… just open yourself and give up everything… This is what it means to surrender... Without losing yourself by sticking to a particular rule or understanding, keep finding yourself, moment after moment… to have complete experience or full feeling in each moment.

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~ Shunryu Suzuki

If you notice, in the above quote, the ditioned self into the full great Zen Master, Shunryu Suzuki is saying thickness and totality of that in giving up everything - in surrender Life-as-it-is that is ev- we find ourselves. This may seem like erything and our true a nonsensical contradiction, but it is just self, what Zen calls another instance of intuitive truth revealing “Buddha nature.” itself in typical Zen fashion through paradox, This means letand as Zen emphasizes, Life is paradox ting go of the ideas because it is everything, so the ultimate we carry of what contradiction is contradiction itself. Noththe ego would ing can be separate from and in opposition call good, to anything because it’s all Life, that which is bad, pleasant, inherently inclusive, connected and whole. unpleasant, acYet, somehow, human beings find ceptable, unacthemselves experiencing just this contraceptable, beautiful, diction, dividing the whole of Life into ugly, right and wrong, to realize the everythis thing and that thing, drawing lines of thing that makes up the necessary seeming separation that just don’t exist, an experience polarities within the unity that is Life. that Buddhism calls egoic delusion. That To have a whole life, we must surrenthis delusion is so powerful and so much the der into the whole world, into the whole common view is why it takes a considerable universe. This is Zen, and this is mysticism amount of willingness, and even courage, as is expressed by every culture. If you look to open, to surrender yourself into the great deep, you will find it at the heart of Jesus’ everything that is Life. To experience “full teachings, in mystical Judaism and Islam, feeling in each and it is the very moment,” howcore of Native ever, requires it. American spiriTo have a whole life, we must “Open yourtuality. surrender into the whole world, self and give up It is also prointo the whole universe. everything.” The found psychol“everything” here ogy, but since is everything-asour conventional you-think-it. It is not everything-as-it-is. So culture and our conventional psychology you must be willing to give up the everyhas little room or understanding for the thing-that-you-think to realize “complete mystical, we find such concepts alien, and experience.” What we think comes from so our culture and our lives are dualistic, culture and society and family and all the materialistic and filled with strife. Our sources of psychological conditioning that psychology has to settle for being a psycholhave created the everything-you-think, and ogy of mental illness without the slightest it is not everything; it is very limited. understanding of the possibilities for true The everything-you-think is full of mental health. To “experience full feeling in what you like and don’t like. It is full of each moment” is true mental health. And it your prejudices and opinions. It is full of is true spirituality. what you are afraid of and what makes you Gerald G. May (1940-2005) was a angry and uncomfortable. It is full of your unique Western psychologist who realculture’s prejudices and opinions, fears and ized this deficit, and in his book Will and dictates. It is full of denial, rationalization, Spirit (1982) he explored the possibility for and projection, and everything Western a Western contemplative psychology that psychology calls ego defense mechanisms, could embrace mysticism, and he created protecting the ego from the discomfort of a very useful vocabulary for deepening our the full what-is of Life that doesn’t fit into understanding of the human experience. He its idea of itself. You must “open yourself” explained how psychological health requires to the true infinite everything that is Life to a vibrant experience of mystical spirituality, “have complete experience… full feeling in and he explored the dimensions of human each moment.” experience he referred to as “will” (that We cannot have “full feeling” without which can be equated to the term ego as surrendering our dualistic sense of conused by Eckhart Tolle), and “spirit,” which

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BILL WALZ

can be equated to Being in Tolle’s vocabulary, and how they interrelate. May examined how Life is always a blend of these dimensions, with immense qualitative difference occurring by which dimension dominates our sense of self. When will (ego) dominates our experience, May described this as “willfulness.” From this perspective, true spirituality is quite impossible, even though we are capable of deluding ourselves into believing we are living a spiritual life by mistaking emotional or intellectual experiences labeled as spiritual or religious as the real thing, though they are not. On the other hand, when spirit leads will, May describes this as “willingness,” leading to true spirituality and a truly meaningful existence. To live in willingness, there must be a surrender, a release from searching for happiness and meaning in ego and the material world. Rather, ego must be the servant of Being, of spirit, and then ego is in its proper function as the tool for realizing, coping, managing, and creating in our limited existence that which originates in That-whichis-without-limit. Our true meaningful self is, and has to be, a continuation and expression of That, the everything that is Life. This is the mystical perspective, and, as Suzuki told us, true Zen.

“Yes!” to That-which-is. We need mystery, and when we surrender into mystery something quite paradoxical occurs: in “complete experience or full feeling in each moment,” the answers needed for that moment present themselves through the medium of intuition. You cannot think your way there. Out of the silence of contemplative mind arises “knowing,” the realization of oneness within the moment, and what the moment needs. Do not however, be lulled into believing you now have the answer, for the next moment is always completely new. May encourages the evolution of a new paradigm that merges spirituality and psychology he calls “Contemplative Psychology.” He tells us that we cannot think our way to the experience of mystery, to truth, to oneness with all that is. Thinking fractures the world. Contemplation is the holding of the moment in mental silence that allows the infinite wholeness and connectedness of Life to be realized in intuition. Intuition, “willingness,” the intelligent silence beneath and before thought, is where continued on page 33

Willingness implies a surrendering of one’s self-separateness, an enteringinto, an immersion in the deepest processes of life itself. It’s a realization that one already is a part of some ultimate cosmic process. In contrast, willfulness is the setting of oneself apart from the fundamental essence of life in an attempt to master, direct, control or otherwise manipulate existence. More simply, willingness is saying yes to the mystery of being alive in each moment. Willfulness is saying no, or perhaps more commonly, “yes, but…”

~ Gerald May We must stop pretending and bluffing that we have the answers to Life. They are not to be found in our religions, in our philosophies, in our politics, in our economics, or in our psychologies; not as they exist today. Life is mystery. Say “Yes!” Not “no” or “yes, but.” Unequivocally, we must say Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 27


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Collective Memories

Weather usually experienced in New Guinea during the Second World War – and it was the mention of that war that got the Curmudgeon started in a rant that involved all the folks there standing and new customers as they arrived in the General Store. Before Curmudgeon’s outburst Storekeep and Mrs. Storekeep were discussing some bills with the Egg Man while Cityfella and Mrs. Cityfella were looking at the new coffee cups – especially the new logo – devoted to a hopeful upturn in sales for the store when a shout was heard:

Just how many of you people remember the Second World War? “Damn! Just how many of you people remember the Second World War? I don’t mean that your memories would be pegged to actually being there in person, but I assume that within the brains here represented, that most, if not all of you remember that there was a war that began in America with a Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor that happened on December the Seventh of 1941?” There was a general murmur of agreement including the local head of the American Legion who was there buying some donuts for visitors from Detoit. “So, unless I’m wrong most of your remember some other things that happened in the Twentieth Century even though you were not there in person?” Again, they agreed. “Well, my wife’s cousin from their family over in Statesville, is visiting for the coming holiday and while here is reading a book for a class in American Fiction entitled ‘The Wayward Bus,’ by John Steinbeck. This morning at breakfast I picked it up and the pages happened to open at the Notes section at the back of the book. And to prove a point I brought it along. “There for Chapter 1 I found the following bits of info: That Hollywood was the center of the American Film Industry, that Clark Gable was a popular actor who was voted the King of Hollywood in 1938 – this I did not know – and that the Sinatras, the Van Johnsons, and Sonny Tufts were handsome matinee idols from that time. Before I go on, how many of you were ignorant of those facts?” Silence after the Egg Man ventured to say that he would take a chance that most of

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Southern Comfort

the curmudgeon It was one of those late August days of this year beginning with mist in the morning, rain at noon, then at 4 p.m. a heat-and-humidity-storm.

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COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

PETER LOEWER Illustration by Peter Loewer

us knew – except perhaps for Gable being the King of Hollywood. “So,” said Curmudgeon, “I’ll continue with pointing out some items from Chapter Two that include the knowledge Henry Ford was an American automaker and Kit Carson was a Western scout and frontiersman. “So where are the collective memories of today? When Betty comes down to breakfast in the morning, she is accompanied by her cell-phone and her I-Pad that is fueled by her I-Pod – or is it the other way around – ” “Neither,” said Cityfella, but before he could say any more, Curmudgeon was hollering out some of the items found in Notes for Chapter Five. “ – and we swiftly heard more from Betty; they actually tell you who Harry S. Truman was and what happened during the Spanish Civil War, and a great piece of trivia that told me that a Baby Ruth candy bar – introduced in 1920 – was supposedly named for Baby Ruth Cleveland, the infant daughter of President Grover Cleveland and that later baseball star Babe Ruth – remember him? – was prevented from using his own name on a candy bar on the grounds of Copyright infringement.” “So my wife asked her if she did know most of these items and she said: ‘ – of course not, I wasn’t here at the time.’ So I ask is everybody losing their collective memories of life in these United States?” Again, there was a general silence except for Storekeep ripping open a small envelope of artificial sugar for the coffee he had just poured. “Perhaps,” ventured Cityfella, “I note by the logo on the spine, because the publisher is Penguin Books they imagine that many readers might not have the necessary knowledge that we have?” Curmudgeon cooled a bit, then thought a bit, and finally said: “This book is for sale in college bookstores across America and even at our local Barnes & Noble, so I doubt if it’s a reflection on English brains but more of an assessment of our own collective conscience and intelligence.” “Is it a book worth reading?” asked Mrs. Storekeep. “I don’t know,” said Curmudgeon, “I never read it.”

Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

28 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

Elmore Leonard’s Books Influenced a Generation

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A writer friend of mine in Boone turned me on to the books of Elmore Leonard in the ‘90s. At that time I was in search of his incredible books every time I went a bookstore. I would venture to say when he did a crime novel; no one could peg it like he did. He just had that inborn talent from long ago when he was a boy in New Orleans and Detroit. He died August 20 at his home in Michigan, from complications from a stroke. He was 87. His parents moved a lot back in those days and when he was 11, they left New Orleans and moved to Detroit. His father worked for years with General Motors. Leonard was exposed to big city schools in Detroit, where he once said that he became interested in literature when he was in the fifth grade. He was influenced by writing legends Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and crime writer Raymond Carver.

Some of you may know that he was the writer of the popular series, “Justified” starring actor Timothy Oliphant on FX. The show was based on one of Leonard’s short stories, “Fire in The Hole.” Westerns and short stories flowed from Leonard during those years. One short story he wrote, “310 to Yuma,” was turned into a movie, and another, “Get Shorty” starring actor John Travolta, was done on the Big Screen. Two of my favorites from Leonard were, “Up in Honey’s Room,” written in 2007 and “Road Dogs” in 2009. More than a couple of his books are in my bookcase at home. Some readers do not like gritty crime stories like I do. I still have a secret desire as a reporter to cover a criminal trial in

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

N.C. and write a book about it as several of my reporter friends did in the ‘80s down in Durham and Raleigh. One of them left his newspaper job to become a crime writer full time. Every single thing he American novelist and wrote about screenwriter, Elmore Leonard, October 11, crime was 1925 – August 20, 2013 genius. It has to be a really juicy and local A true legend, crime story to unpretentious enhance readand unbelievably ers’ curiosity. talented. There are too many movies and TV series to list all of them — indeed, so many he is a household name. Many of us have been depressed since his death, although most writers know very well about writing, that there is always some other special writer coming down the pike. However, I will say when it comes to writing crime stories another Leonard anytime soon is unlikely. Leonard’s one claim was his style but the man was a true legend who was unpretentious and unbelievably talented. One writer said of his life, “he was really a cool dude.” And for many of us like me from the “cool 60’s”, it is damn hard being “cool” in this world as we know it today.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


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Wonderful WEAVERVILLE + Northside Neighbors INTERVIEW WITH NATALIE BYRNES, OWNER OF THE

NORTHSIDE - 28804

Glass Onion Restaurant

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18 N. Main Street in Weaverville

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

about your restaurant and what you have about to offer.

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INTERVIEWED BY

WEAVERVILLE - 28787

DENNIS RAY

VP

Natalie Byrnes:

Our menu is primarily based on northern Italian cuisine very simply created dishes using the freshest ingredients available; we used global Italian to describe the cuisine allowing us to use other ingredients you may not see every day in Italian cuisine. We have blackboard specials every day allowing us flexibility for what the farmers may bring us, as we don’t always know. The wine list is very simply created w/a choice for everyone.

All of our desserts are made in-house. ways stands out is the Pistachio Nougat. It is a very light dessert of whipped eggs and cream folded w/pistachio praline. Simple. Delicious.

RRM: Tell us a little about who you are and what drew you to Weaverville?

NB: You can get a

good idea about who we are from our bio on line. What drew us to Weaverville was Change. We wanted a place we Owners of the Glass Onion, Natalie Byrnes and Eddie Hannibal. could join together, open a restaurant RRM: The name comes from a Beatles’ and be part of a community. We did not song. What was special about that song consider Asheville center, but looked in and are you a huge Beatles’ fan? I am not the surrounding towns. a huge Beatles fan, but my father is; he is We found Weaverville, an available an excellent guitarist and when deciding restaurant and it really fit the bill. Weaveron a name for the restaurant, this was his ville is a growing town w/a lot of potential first choice. and its location to Asheville made sense. RRM: What are a few of your favorite dishes?

NB: The Whole Black Sea is one of my

favorite dishes. It is usually a black board special as it is not always available. On the menu, the wild boar Bolognese is my favorite pasta - a real Italian classic.

RRM: Tell us a little about your desserts

and why they are so worth saving a little room for after a good meal.

NB: All of our desserts are made in

house; we serve all of them with fresh whipped cream. One dessert that al-

The Glass Onion 18 N. Main St. Weaverville, NC 28787 (828) 645-8866 glassonionchefs@hotmail.com www.glassonionasheville.com Open 7 Days a Week Lunch: 11:30-3 p.m. Dinner: 5-9 p.m. Sunday Brunch 11:30-3 p.m.

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 29


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Wonderful WEAVERVILLE + Northside Neighbors PG. 29

INTERVIEW WITH WEAVERVILLE’S

VP

Steven Forbes-deSoule

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Raku Ceramic Artist

American raku pottery is a unique and magical form where the glowing hot vessel or sculpture is pulled from the kiln and placed with combustibles in a metal container. The can is then covered, smothering the flames. The results are always serendipitous and the pieces are truly one of a kind.

Art in Autumn

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The Weaverville community comes together on the 3rd Saturday of each September for Art in Autumn, extending a hearty welcome to both artists and visitors. Art in Autumn caters to the juried artists who vie for 114 selected spaces. This years’ judge, Mr. Lee Davis, brings a wealth of artistic knowledge from his years of teaching pottery and sculpture. The event is a rewarding treat, with a roster of artists exhibiting spectacular work. The 6,000+ visitors who grace Main Street during Weaverville’s Art in Autumn festival continue to exceed expectations. Come enjoy a day of dazzling art, friendly folks, trendy shops and restaurants and blue grass music.

Beth Gaudreau

Mangum Pottery

Photo: Erica Mueller

IF YOU Art in Autumn will be held Saturday, GO September 21 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on

Main Street in downtown Weaverville. For more information visit www.artinautumn.com.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

SF-d: Well, that’s where it all

starts! A beautiful form is essential to a beautiful finished product. As a potter/artist, it’s then my challenge to make sure the glaze fits the form, completing its expression as an Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a object in space. little about your artwork and how it My method of working is has changed or grown over the past, Steven Forbes-deSoule, ceramic artist. to create a series of forms that Photo: Erica Mueller say, ten years? relate to each other and then after the bisque firing, glaze Steven Forbes-deSoule: For those RRM: You are a very prolific artist. each one as it speaks to me. Of course, of you unfamiliar with my work, What drives you to work so hard? the raku firing is where the real serI’m a ceramic artist who uses raku endipity comes in. Personally, I think SF-d: Actually, I work easy, not as the firing method of choice. the firing reflects my state of mind hard. When one loves what they I’ve done raku exclusively for the that day and consequently some days do, it’s really hard to call it work. last 32 years, so I’ve had a lot of are better than others in terms of the I rather think of it as play. That’s practice. One thing I love is to be results achieved. where the creativity comes from. constantly looking for new forms The appearance of being proand glazes to create. RRM: How do you first create lific comes from waking up every your work? Do you sketch it out day and really looking forward to or have an idea you keep in your going to the studio. Fortunately, mind for a while or do you create my studio is the first floor of my as you go? home, so there’s no stressful commute and I can start playing right SF-d: For the most part, I “create away. And, there are virtually no as I go” in that I have ideas in my meetings to attend and no one head when I sit down to work. bosses me around (except for my Many of my vessels are made on cat). What a life! the potters’ wheel. The wheel is a tool for the potter, just like RRM: How do you currently marthe violin is a tool to the musiRaku pottery by Steven Forbes-deSoule. ket your ceramic art? cian. Throwing on the wheel is Photo: Erica Mueller a learned skill. In fact, that was SF-d: Presently, I’m doing 5 or In the past ten years, I’ve what first attracted me to ceramics. 6 retail shows annually and as become more interested in altering I could see when I was first learnclose to my studio as possible. I’ve forms as I create them on the wheel ing that one could always be a better learned, over the years, the closer and I’m also doing more hand thrower. As I sat there making my 4” I sell my work to my home/studio, building than I was back then. I cylinders I knew if I kept practicing, the easier and more profitable it is. know that I physically won’t always I would someday get better. It was a I’m very lucky that Asheville and be able to throw on the wheel, but challenge that I needed at that point in Weaverville have become major hopefully, I will be able to create my life. attractions for craft and art lovers forms using slabs, etc. even in my I’ve come to the conclusion that from both near and far. 70s, 80s and maybe 90s. learning a skill is the key to always On September 14, I’m hostI also love developing new having a way to make a living. Back to ing my exclusive 50th Firing Kiln glaze recipes. This is something I answering the question, I also someOpening at my studio, where I’ll started doing about 15 years ago and times sketch ideas, especially if it’s a being firing the 50th piece created I see it as a way of keeping my work new form that I haven’t made before. for this event during the afternoon looking new and fresh. In the end, I find that one thing leads and then giving it away in a drawto another and even when I sketch ing from attendees names. RRM: Tell us a little about what something out, it changes as I work This year I’m also exhibiting shape and form mean to you as an with the clay. continued on page 33 artist?

30 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1


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INTERVIEW WITH ROB AND BETH MANGUM, OWNERS OF

Mangum Pottery

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Rob and Beth met as sophomore and freshmen at North Carolina State University School of Design (now the College of Art and Design) where Rob studied graphics and illustration, and Beth focused on fibers and surface design. Rob began making pottery in his parents’ studio in the 70’s. In 1989, he and Beth formed their pottery studio after they graduated

Photo: Erica Mueller

‘SF-d’ continued from page 30

at the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands in downtown Asheville, October 17th through the 20th, and will have my studio open for the Weaverville Art Safari coming up November 2nd and 3rd. One big change for me a couple of years ago was becoming a member of Ariel Contemporary Craft Gallery on Biltmore Ave. in downtown Asheville. We’re a co-op and I’m honored to be showing my work with such talented artists/ craftspeople.

Steven Forbes-deSoule 143 David Biddle Trail Weaverville, NC 28787 (828) 645.9065 www.stevenforbesdesoule.com

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

from Design School. Rob went on to receive a MFA Rob and Beth Mangum. Photo: Erica Mueller from Indiana University. They have been creating work out of their Weaverville studio one in particular. I enjoy my wax since 1998. resist designs and developing new shapes and patterns with them. Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Mangum Pottery RRM: How do you go about creatand your location in ing the design look of your pottery? Weaverville. Do you first sketch it out or do you have a pretty good idea of it in your Mangum Pottery: We mind? have been in Weaverville for 15 years. We first MP: We are both trained as designused our shop primarers so a lot of thought and planning ily as our studio and goes into the forms we create in we would go to Art and clay. However, decorating is much Craft Fairs to sell our more loose and I’m often very sponwork. Through the years taneous in my approach. we have steadily built RRM: How does living in WNC our retail business and inspire your use of colors and the now we stay here and sell design of your works? most of our work out of our studio. MP: Living is WNC is inspiring Weaverville has really grown in on so many levels, and we get such the past 10 years and has become a great energy and feedback from our vibrant place to have a business like interactions with folks in our studio. ours. There are so many great ways to live around here: our downtime spent RRM: Tell us some of the benefits of hiking, paddling, birdwatching, using pottery tableware for daily use? playing music, and even our yoga MP: Using handmade tableware adds practice is very inspiring in how we meaning to the act of eating at home. work. We are surrounded by beauty It is satisfying to have a connection and depth. with your dishes and know where Rob has recently started makthey were made and that they were ing heron sculptures, and we always made locally by craftsmen. see herons when we are paddling on the river. He also makes banjos…we RRM: What glazes are you most fond are old time musicians. of using and why?

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MP: We use a range of high fire glazes. Some of them have been in our family since the 1970s and have evolved and combined with more recent glazes. It would be hard to choose a favorite because they are all part of the palette and we continue to discover new ways of applying and decorating with them, so I really can’t pinpoint

Mangum Pottery 16 N. Main St. Weaverville, NC 28787 (828) 645-4929 1-888-288-2112 www.mangumpottery.com

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 31


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The Classic Wineseller hosts an evening of Italian and Mediterranean folk music with Musica Nostra on Saturday, September 28 at 7 p.m. Musica Nostra, “Our Music” in ‘Italiano,’ is a unique ensemble that performs old Italian and Mediterranean mandolin music. The group is comprised of Dick Hull, first mandolin; Bob Kogut, second mandolin; and, Joseph Hasty, guitar. The evening also includes a specially prepared four course Italian dinner for $39.99 per person plus tax and gratuity. Call (828) 452-6000 to reserve your table or email info@classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited. Musica Nostra

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On Friday, September 6 downtown Waynesville will be transformed into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center. Festive flags denote participating Art After Dark galleries, such as Main Street Artist’s Co-op, Earthworks Gallery, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Jeweler’s Workbench, TPennington Art Gallery, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, and the Village Framer. Longtime Waynesville resident, acrylic painter Melissa Enloe Walter will give a demonstration at Twigs and Leaves Gallery on Friday, September 6, from 6-9 p.m. Melissa has developed a unique painting technique using transparent layers of acrylic paint over gold and silver leaf. Melissa’s exhibit “Forest Spirit Illuminated,” will be featured during September at Twigs & Leaves Gallery. As you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music and delight in the savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville. Monday through Saturday 10-5:30; Sunday 1-4. Phone (828) 456-1940, www. twigsandleaves.com The Haywood County Detail from Guardian Angel of the Forest, Arts Council’s Gallery 86 by Melissa Walter. presents Contemporary Traditions, an exciting mix of artists and mediums. The show features works by Norma Bradley, Robert Gardner, Bob Martin, Fleta Monaghan, Roger Parramore, Akira Satake, Corina Pia Torii & Tadashi Torii. Opening reception, Friday, September 6, from 6-9 p.m. at Gallery 86 in Waynesville.

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healthy lifestyles Caffeine - Friend or Foe?

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Nine out of 10 North Americans take a psychotropic (mind-altering) drug daily. The culprit? Everyday, ordinary, over-the-counter caffeine.

Psychological withdrawal can be even harder. People become accustomed to reaching for the pick-me-up throughout the day. The urge can be compared to the desire for a cigarette - it may be difficult ro resist.

How can that be?

Does caffeine damage the body?

Do you know many people who don’t drink at least one cup of coffee a day? Or tea? Or guzzle down a soda? Although caffeine free sodas are available, they are not nearly as good a seller as “the real thing”. People often think of “caffeine free” as being for children or those with medical problems.

But I need a lift now and then! And caffeine isn’t addictive, is it? An addictive substance produces observable and measurable physical and mental effects when it is withdrawn. In this sense, even small doses of caffeine, taken regularly over time, will usually produce some degree of addiction. A good way to check yourself is to stop all caffeine intake for a few days. The most common physical withdrawal symptom is headache, varying from mild to severe. Other physical manifestations include feelings of exhaustion, lack of appetite, nausea and vomiting. The good thing is symptoms only last from one to five days.

A BENEFIT FOR PEACE The Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Western North Carolina (RPCVs of WNC) continue their spirit of service with a fundraising event Sunday, September, 22 from 5-8:30 p.m. at the Grey Eagle. Featuring music by The Business, Asheville’s popular dance band, and a silent auction of great items and services. Meet Peace Corps Volunteers who The Business have served in countries around the world from the 60’s to the present. Tickets: $18 for adults; free for children 12 and under. Available at: The Grey Eagle, Outdoor Bird Company, and at www.thegreyeagle.com

• Most obvious is an overstimulated nervous system with tremors, nervousness, anxiety and sleep problems.

Caffeine increases energy by raising blood sugar levels. In time these symptoms give way to chronic fatigue, lack of energy, and persistent insomnia. • Caffeinated beverages can cause stomach irritation. While additives are primarily responsible for this effect, caffeine itself has a constricting effect on blood vessels. It can thus interfere with digestion. • Caffeinated drinks stimulate the stomach to excrete excessive acid. This may cause or aggravate ulcers. • Caffeine increases energy by raising blood sugar levels. These, in turn, draw out and insulin response which not only cancels the surge, but pro-

‘Surrender’ continued from page 27

the voice of the Infinite can be heard. Suzuki, Gerald May, Jesus are all saying, just show up in the vast infinite moment that is the truth of Life, and as you are within and an expression of Life, you will know what is needed. This is surrender, and it is what Zen refers to as “emptiness.” In being empty of all preconceptions, sense of control, even sense of a solid self, we know not only what to do, we know who we are. When empty of egoic self, we are now available to be filled by Life, and we know we are It. Gerald May tells us: “Mystery can indeed be known without being solved. Mystery can be experienced, sensed, felt, appreciated, even loved, without being understood. This may not be easy; it requires a surrender of all willfulness, a risking of self-image, and a nurturing of intuition. Mystery, says the contemplatives, can be ‘known’ without being known.”

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DEWAYNE BUTCHER, MD

duces the yo-yo syndrome – reaching for another caffeinated drink, and then another and yet another. • Caffeine also irritates the kidneys and acts as a diuretic (increased urine output). • Caffeine often stimulates the heart to beat faster and makes a person more susceptible to an irregular heart beat.

Are there some healthful alternatives to the caffeine high? Some find that ending the morning shower with a blast of cold water is quite stimulating. During the day, stand up, stretch, and take a few deep breaths every hour or so. Take a brisk walk at break time or during lunch hour. Drink a cup of cold (or hot) water several times a day. Walk to a window and relax your eyes on the distant landscape. Tidy up your work area. All these good things will make you feel better. Look for other creative ways to get a lift without the letdown.

In a crisis, would just a little caffeine really matter? Occasional small doses of caffeine will hardly make a difference. The trouble is, most of us have a hard time knowing when to stop.

And Shunryu Suzuki enlightened us: “Buddha nature is when you say ‘Yes!’ ... When you forget all about yourself and say ‘Yes!’ That is Buddha nature.” And it is what is meant by surrender.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 33


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September 6, 7 & 14

Saturday, September 7

September 13

Business After Hours

Haywood’s Got Talent III

A“Cello”Rondo

Song O’ Sky Chorus

Quality networking, complimentary food and beverages, live music, and a very special iPad Bundle Raffle to raise funds for a new playground in West Asheville’s Pisgah View Apartments.

Take home the gold! HART is offering a $1,000 top prize. No age limit or category restrictions. All contestants must audition. Semifinal round September 6 & 7 at 7:30 p.m. Finals held September 14 at 7:30 p.m. Runner’s up receive $300 and $200 prizes. At the Performing Arts Center, 250 Pigeon St. in downtown Waynesville.

AmiciMusic presents Franklin Keel, cello, and Dan Weiser, piano. 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black MounFranklin Keel tain. $15 for adults; $5 for children/students. (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sweet Adelines International performs old and new favorites sung barbershop style. White Horse Black Mountain, 8 p.m. Visit www.songosky.org, or go to www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Thursday, September 5

Femcare Fundraiser: Labor by Choice Speakers: Patsy Keever, Howard Hanger, Dr. Lori Horvitz, and Dr. Alice Weldon. Silent auction, speakers, short film screenings regarding abortion issues, music, cash bar, and a good time for a good cause. 6 p.m. at the Millroom, 66 Asheland Ave. in Asheville.

Friday, September 6

Verity of Genre Exhibition of works by Olga Michelson features oil paintings on canvas. Opening reception 5 to 8 p.m. On display through September 30, 2013. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street. For more details, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Sunday, September 8

September 6 – October 27

Eliada’s Annual Corn Maze Twelve acres of maze trails. Attractions include a giant sandbox filled with corn kernels, haybale maze, hay ride, pumpkin patch, barrel train, giant tube slides, and more. Open 4-8 on Friday, 10-8 on Saturday, and 11-7 on Sunday. $9 for adults; $6 for children ages 4-11. For more details call (828) 254-5356 or visit www.fieldsoffun. org or.

Saturday, September 7

Appalachian Pastel Society Meetig from by Deborah Broad 10:30 a.m. to noon with a free presentation by artist Deborah Broad. Workshop ($45 members/$55 non-members) from 1-4 p.m. At the Enka AB Tech Campus, 1459 Sand Hill Road, Candler, NC, 28715. Call Karen Chambers, (828) 691-7181 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety. org.

Saturday, September 7

Zansa CD Release Party With Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba. Doors open 5 p.m.; show at 9 p.m. $8 in advance / $10 at door. An African influenced dinner will be available. Reservations recommended. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com

Saturday, September 7

Asheville Lyric Opera Chorus Auditions YMI Cultural Center Auditorium, downtown Asheville, 2-5 p.m. Each applicant is required to sing one art song or aria, preferably in Italian. Send a cover letter requesting an audition, along with a resume, and $10 to Asheville Lyric Opera, 39 S. Market St., Asheville, NC 28801. Electronic copies accepted at adam@ ashevillelyric.org.

Pianist Maria Parrini The sixteen-year old pianist opens Pan Harmonia’s 14th season. Advance tickets are $15; $5 for students. Available at www.pan-harmonia.org/shop. $20/$5 at the door. 5 p.m. at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

September 10 through November 5

Building Bridges of Asheville Speakers and films on topics related to race relations. Tuesdays from 7 to 9 p.m. at First Congregational Church UCC, 20 Oak Street in downtown Asheville. $30. (828) 777-4585 or visit www.buildingbridges-ashevillenc.org.

Wednesday, September 11

Tadashi Torii Exhibition The glass artist will exhibit works at the offices of Beverly-Hanks in Biltmore Park Town Square, 1 Town Square Blvd, Asheville. A reception will be held from 5:30-8 p.m. On display through October 25, 2013.

Thursday, September 12

Adam Zwig in Concert Insightful Folk-pop songs. 8 p.m. at the Altamont Theatre. 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville. $10.

September 12-15

Saturday, September 14

Afternoon Tea with Llamas 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Meet fascinating pack animals. Take turns leading a llama on a 2 mile trail along the paved Forest Discovery Trail. Llamas will carry your lunch & snacks. Ice tea will be provided. $5 adults; under 16 free. (828) 877-3130; www.cradleofforestry.org.

Saturday, September 14

Western NC Run/Walk for Autism Participate in the challenging 5K race, the 5K non-competitive run, or the recreational 1K run/walk. At UNCAsheville from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. This family-friendly festival also features a fun zone, refreshments, and vendors. Call (828) 236-1547 or visit www. wncrunwalkforautism.org to register, sponsor, donate, or volunteer.

September 14-15

AnTHM Gallery Artist Reception Noon-4 p.m. Artists Bill Boyd, Phil Arrington, and jewelry designer Susan Sorrentino who will present a Trunkshow of her handmade organic jewelry. Refreshments will be served. AnTHM Gallery, 100.5 W State St., downtown Black Mountain. Call (828) 419-0049 or visit www.anthmgallery.com

The Annual WNC Foto Fest, held at the Montreat Conference Center, features presentations by nationally known photographers, a photo contest, and vendors showcasing the latest gear. Registration is $165; $95 for students. To learn more or to register visit www.wncfotofest.com.

Friday, September 13

Geoff Achison and the Souldiggers Geoff is from Melbourne, Australia. 9 p.m., $10/$14. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. For details call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

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Thursday, September 19

Farm Tour Kickoff Party The Spade to Spoon Social runs from 6-9 p.m. and features beer, wine, and local food. $20. Hosted by ASAP at Sunny Point Café, 626 Haywood Road in West Asheville.

Thursday, September 19

Ahleuchatistas The progressive rock duo performs along with Bad Fog & Cumulus, 9 p.m. $5. At the Odditorium, 1045 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 575-9299, www. ashevilleodditorium.com.

Friday, September 20

Ruthie Foster in Concert

Sunday, September 15

Award-winning blues artist – dropdead gorgeous voice, indelible presence and hand-picked blues band. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Opening night party at 7 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30, Student $25, Children 12 and under $15; Student rush day-of-show $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Writers at Home Fall Series

Saturday, September 21

Poet Tina Barr and novelist Bonnie MacDougal will read beginning at 3 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 250-2353 or visit http://agc.unca.edu.

From the Mountains to the Sea by Claire Waller

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Thursday, September 5

5:30-7 p.m. at Charlotte Street Computers, 252 Charlotte Street in Asheville. For more information visit www.charlottestreetcomputers.com or call (828) 225-6600.

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Monday, September 16

Empty Bowls Choose a bowl handmade by local artisans. Enjoy a hot bowl of soup, bread, dessert, and live entertainment. Lunch from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Double Tree Biltmore Hotel. Dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Biltmore Park Hilton Hotel. Tickets are $30. Call (828) 299-3663 or visit www.MANNAFoodBank.org.

Tuesday, September 17

Asheville Symphony Musicians at Western Carolina University String musicians from the Asheville Symphony Orchestra team up with students and faculty from the Western Carolina University School of Music.

Nora Jane Struthers & The Party Line The high energy, Nashvillebased quintet perform Struthers’ original story-songs with tight, three-part harmonies, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, acoustic guitar, bass, and drums. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. For details call (828) 575-2737, or visit www.isisasheville.com. Photo: Scott Simontacchi

September 21 and 22

ASAP’s 2013 Farm Tour Learn how food grows, taste farm-fresh products, and meet farm animals. 1-6 p.m. One pass admits an entire carload both days. Passes are $25, available at www. asapconnections.org. Passes can also be purchased the day of the tour for $30; individual farms can be toured for $10. For more details call (828) 236-1282.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1


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Best in Show

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Friday, September 6

Free Shows at Zia Taqueria Thursday, September 5 – New Orleans

From 5 to 8 p.m. every month through December. More than 25 galleries and museums will host receptions and exhibitions. Complimentary trolley service during the event. Park at the Asheville Visitors Center and hop on!

band The Long Time Gonners; opening band Goodness Graceful, 7 p.m.

Thursday, September 12 – Old Time String Band, 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, September 26 – Hearts Gone South, 7:30 p.m.

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

Zia Taqueria

Sunday, September 22

Asheville Area Piano Forum Fall Benefit Concert

521 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. (828) 377-9393, www.ziatacom.com

Dragin

by Michael Cole Saturday, September 14

Michael J Stevens Solo Jazz Piano

Solo and two-piano performances by 16 of the areas leading pianists. 3 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre. For tickets and more information visit www.ashevillepiano.org

Celebrating the Genius of Bill Evans and Thelonious Monk. Tickets: Adults $20. Concert begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theatre, www.dwtheatre.com.

Sunday, September 22

Art Workshops at Riverside Studios

Bring Back the Monarchs 2 p.m. A lively multimedia program on monarch butterflies: their biology, migration, and conservation. $5 adults; under age 16 free. (828) 877-3130; www.cradleofforestry.org.

Sunday, September 29

Holding Down the Homefront

Saturday, September 28

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Shortages, Submarines, Saboteurs & War Bonds. Featuring Humorists, Historians, & Tandem Tellers Wayne & Jane Sims, and Storyteller Nancy Avera. 3-5 p.m. at Fletcher Feed & Seed, 3715 Hendersonville Road. FREE and open to the public; donations welcomed.

Saturday, October 26 Drawing the Face with Nancy Blum, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A workshop for all levels using charcoal pencils and pastels, drawing from live model. $95 + $15 model fee.

Through September

Dreams, Trains & Carousels Mixed media works by Sarah Britt & Caleb Arney. by Sarah Britt On display through Friday, October 4 at MESH Gallery, 114-B West Union Street, Morganton, NC. Details at

Glass Mosaic, with Nancy Rohan, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. An introduction to mosaic for beginners, and for those who have some experience, but have never used stained glass as a medium. $95 includes all materials to make one mosaic.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

For more information and to register, go to: www.riversidestudios-asheville.com or contact Brit J Oie at (828) 551-5045.

Riverside Studios/Fine Art by the River 174 W. Haywood Street in Asheville’s River Arts District

(828) 437-1957, www.meshgallery.com.

Friday, October 4

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

Help Somebody Womansong Benefit for Homeward Bound of WNC. 7:30 pm at the Central United Methodist Church, Church St., downtown Asheville. Tickets are $18; $10 for children under 15. Available at www.womansong.org, from Womansong members, and Homeward Bound staff.

at the Classic Wineseller Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www. classicwineseller.com.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more - only $29.95 per month. 800-892-4631

October 4 & 5

I Pagliacci & Suor Angelica Asheville Lyric Opera presents an operatic double bill combining comedy, tragedy, and redemption all in one night. 8 p.m. at the Diana Wortham Theater. Performed in Italian with English supertitles. Tickets available by calling the box office: (828) 257-4530. For more details visit www.ashevillelyric.org

Medical Guardian

SAVE on Cable TV

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

Internet-Digital Phone-Satellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-871-6180

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 35


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find it here Asheville Quilt Guild

www.ashevillequiltguild.org

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Glass Onion

Cheryl Keefer

Newbridge Cafe

The Spice & Tea Exchange

Asheville Salt Cave

Chifferobe

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art

Karen Keil Brown

North Carolina Stage Company

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro

Biscuit Head Restaurant

The Chocolate Fetish

HART Theater

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe

O’Charley’s

Susan Marie Designs

BlackBird Frame & Art

Colorfest

www.spiritofappalachia.org

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Miya Gallery

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Town Hardware & General Store

Black Mtn. Center for the Arts

Cottonmill Studios

Henderson County Studio Tour

Points of Light

On Demand Printing

TPennington Art Gallery

Black Mtn. Iron Works

Double Exposure Giclee

Hey Hey Cupcake

Mangum Pottery

Octopus Garden

Tree & Vine

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney

Earth Guild

www.earthguild.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Mine & Yours Consignments

Potter’s Mark

Twigs and Leaves Gallery

Bogart’s Restaurant

Explore Black Mountain

Isis Restaurant & Music Hall www.isisasheville.com

Morning Sky Pottery (828) 273-5317

Riverside Studios

Updraft Fine Art Gallery

Cafe 64

Faison O’Neil Gallery

Jewels That Dance

Mountain Top Appliance

Satellite Gallery

WNCAP

The Cantina

Frugal Framer

Julia Fosson Fine Art www.juliafosson.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Soapy Dog

Zia Taqueria

Cathy Searle Fine Art

GD Whalen Photography

Just Ducky

Nancy Silver Art

Southern Highland Craft Guild

www.ashevillesaltcave.com

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

www.biscuitheads.com

www.chocolatefetish.com

www.blackbirdframe.com www.blackmountainarts.org

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

www.BlackMountainIron.com

www.doubleexposureart.com

www.blackmountainstove.com www.bogartswaynesville.com

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com

www.cafe-64.com

www.faisononeil.com

www.cantinabiltmore.com

www.frugalframer.com

www.artbycathysearle.com

www.gdwhalen.com

www.glassonionasheville.com www.gracecarolbomer.com

www.jewelsthatdance.com

TUNNEL ROAD

BLACK MOUNTAIN

www.ziataco.com

CHARLOTTE ST.

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www.updraftgallery.com

www.craftguild.org

www.nancysilverart.com

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HENDERSONVILLE RD.

www.thesatellitegallery.com www.thesoapydog.com

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www.twigsandleaves.com

www.riversidestudios-asheville.com

www.mountainviewappliance.com

www.justduckyoriginals.com

www.thetreeandvine.com

www.pottersmark.com

www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

www.townhardware.com www.tpennington.com

www.theOG.us

www.mangumpottery.com

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www.ondemandink.com

www.pointsoflight.net

www.stormrhumbar.com

www.susanmariedesigns.com

www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

www.miyagallery.com

www.heyheycupcake.com

NORTHSIDE NEIGHBORS

www.ocharleys.com

www.malaprops.com

www.openstudiotourhc.com

www.spiceandtea.com

www.ncstage.org

www.karenkbrown.com

www.harttheatre.com

WEAVERVILLE +

HAYWOOD ROAD

www.thenewbridgecafe.com

www.cherylkeefer.com

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We were eager to advertise our new ownership of Bogart’s Restaurant in Waynesville with Rapid River Magazine Magazine. While we kept all the original menu items, we were excited about trying out new, homemade original dishes as well.

Points of Light

Points of Light crystal and mineral gallery, located in North Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, is a wonderful source for fine crystals, gems, minerals and living art. The gallery, which boasts an amazing collection of huge Quartz crystals, as well as a seven-foot tall Agate geode, is much more than just another rock shop. Points Of Light's collection includes many unique Quartz clusters and Amethyst Geodes in addition to healing stones, mineral specimens and a wide variety of books on stones. They specialize in breathtaking interior design pieces and one-of-a-kind pieces for decorators, collectors and healers.

This magazine has been a great value for getting our message out to their readers. After running a coupon, we were pleasantly surprised at how well it was received. A big THANK YOU to all our awesome Bogart’s customers and to Rapid River Magazine!

~ Shelly Sneed, Co-Owner of Bogart’s Restaurant 303 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313, www.bogartswaynesville.com

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Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing

(828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com

‘CLB’ continued from page 17

Our show at the Isis Theater will be the most beautiful one yet: Me with the Orchestra, Alex with her combo and a handful of albums under her belt.

JC: What’s next for the Ten Cent Orchestra? I assume there are plans to take it to other cities. Points of Light carries a variety of Quartz clusters and Amethyst Geodes.

A “must see” destination! Every single item on display has been carefully and lovingly handpicked for quality, beauty and energy. The Rare Bolivian Amethyst Clusters. gallery works with a renowned group of internationally acclaimed crystal and mineral artisans, and as a result carries some of the finest cut and polished pieces available anywhere in the United States. Points Of Light is also home to one of the largest selections of crystal singing bowls on the east coast, as well as a comprehensive and truly beautiful group of crystal healing wands, including cuts by world-famous lapidary artist, Lawrence Stoller. From museum pieces weighing more than a ton, down to the smallest of their tumbled stones, the quality and scope of their inventory is unsurpassed. Points Of Light is a “must see” destination in Asheville!

Points of Light Crystal and Mineral Gallery 391 Merrimon Avenue, downtown Asheville (828) 257-2626 Shop online! Visit www.pointsoflight.net

CLB: Ten Cent Orchestra is not your typical music

experience. It is looking for listening rooms, theaters, old cathedrals, private spaces, festival stages. I want to bring it to schools, community orchestras, churches, universities. I can travel solo and collaborate with musicians anywhere in the world. I have the sheet music! They don’t even have to speak English. That is the vision. To blaze through as a visiting artist, maybe do a workshop on songwriting, have dinner with the players and then have a sponsored or low cost performance that is accessible to their community. If orchestra is going to survive and continue to be appreciated, it needs to be accessible both financially and socially. I want to see their craft survive. It is a beauty that we can’t afford to lose.

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JC: Anything else you’d like to add? CLB: I am an enthusiastic cheerleader for songwriters. I

teach courses and workshops on songwriting. I do one on one lyric tutoring. I find it crucial to bring songwriters together so that they can find the support they need, support that they may not get from their parents, spouses, teachers or local music scene. I also offer Artist Way Courses and am working towards artists retreats too! I do visiting artist talks and love to perform and speak to students, especially empowering teenage girls. All of that information can be found by visiting my website, www.TenCentPoetry.com IF YOU Ten Cent Orchestra with special guests the GO Alex Krug combo at the Isis Theater on Friday,

September 27. Tickets are priced at $10 for the 8:30 p.m. performance. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., in west Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

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of local backdrops for these paintings. I must admit, the rain this year has been good for gathering reference material, but I wouldn’t mind painting a sunny day now and then!

RRM: Being a full-time artists is undoubtedly hard work. What inspires you to paint each day?

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ly inspired by life in everyday scenes. For example, I see a tree on the side of the road and think about how I would paint it. Seeing light reflecting white off a red apple always amazes me. Inspiration comes from within. God created me for various reasons, and one of them was to paint.

RRM: Your work ranges from still life to plein air. Which method do you prefer and why?

CK: Please, don’t make me choose!

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Painting is gratifying, no matter the subject or medium. Plein air simply means “in the open air,” and usually refers to painting a landscape outdoors. Observing nature first hand

‘D. Harder’ continued from page 11

of some kind?

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helps me capture atmosphere and create distance in a landscape painting. In the studio I practice much the same, through careful observation. Discovering beautiful compositions through nuances and patterns in light and shadow is always fascinating. I will say that painting outdoors, en plein air, is very exciting and you must work quickly to respond to the land and the light before it changes. However, painting inside my studio is usually more comfortable. I consider both methods important to each other and am delighted I am able to experience both methods.

RRM: Your work is quite powerful

with mood and story using light and shadow. How much planning goes into a piece before you ever put brush to canvas?

CK: Planning a painting is the most

important part of the process. After planning thousands of paintings, planning gets faster. Still, I always have a plan, if just in my head. Every painting is different and I use a variety of approaches when planning paintings. When painting outdoors, en plein air, I choose a composition rather quickly.

Online I see work by amazing visual artists from all over that make me both inspired and jealous. Not just visual arts but film and music also are huge inspirations. It’s hard to pick just a few because inspiration can come from a million different places every day. In general, I’d say what inspires me most are distinct and interesting characters.

characters a lot as a kid and I knew early on that I wanted to be an artist, if that meant I could draw all the time. My parents made it possible for me to attend an art class taught by Lorelle Bacon, and I did that for several years. My favorite thing RRM: Do you feel it is was always writing important for an artist stories and drawing the to have something to characters. I still enjoy Dia de los muertos say with her art? doing that to this day, by Dominique Harder especially because it’s DH: Not really. Someso much more rewarding to draw a times artists have a lot to say through person if you know their personality, their art, and that’s great. I’m one of story, and motivation. That has always those artists sometimes. Making a been my passion, so my dream job statement, even just through some would probably be drawing concepcreative outlet, makes you feel like you tual designs for television, movies, or have a voice. Though sometimes, art video games. has no meaning. Pieces can be made to tell the RRM: What artists have most inspired viewer something, to let the viewer you? figure out the meaning on their own, DH: When it comes to the old masters or sometimes just to be art for the I would have to say Bernini. But I’m sake of being art. Each are respectable inspired all the time by new and curin their own way and each have their rent artists that I learn about every day. respective viewers who enjoy them.

38 September 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 1

Outdoors the light and conditions are always in motion, requiring haste to choose and get it done. I use a small canvas and apply the paint directly, sometimes using less than 100 strokes and finish the painting in less than 30 minutes. On the other hand, studio work lends itself to creating larger pieces. While mulling over a large composition, I may make numerous value studies before executing the final painting. Or, I may skip pencil and paper, working with a thin tone on the canvas to work out the composition. The thinly applied values work as an under painting for the final, more colorful layers.

Cheryl Keefer Fine Art Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College St., downtown Asheville The Wedge Studio, 2nd Floor, the Whitespace, 129 Roberts St., Asheville’s River Arts District Seven Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry St., Black Mountain, NC www.cherylkeefer.com By appt: (828) 450-1104

RRM: What is your favorite medium to work with and why?

DH: My favorite medium changes

every so often. In the past it’s been colored pencils, painting, clay, and digital. Charcoal has been my more recent favorite; I feel partial to it because it’s very easy to manipulate and is able to produce very dark blacks. I am just as fond of working in black and white as I am in color, since both are fun to experiment with.

RRM: As an artist what do you find beautiful?

DH: In general, I find nature to be very

beautiful. Art is a different kind of beautiful to me; it’s more like people. A lot of times when you grow to like someone you find them more beautiful than you did when you first met them, and it’s usually their personality that makes you like them. I think the more personality a piece of art has, the more beautiful it is. I try to infuse personality into my work as much as possible, so that things that appear unsettling can still be enjoyed. So I guess I find personality beautiful.

Dominique Harder 375 Depot Street, Studio 107 in Asheville’s River Arts District


for the WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA AIDS PROJECT

2013 SIGNATURE ART: Gazelle (Gemsbok)

by DANIEL McCLENDON Photographed by Michelle Miller

SEPTEMBER EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS Monday, September 16

Friday, September 27

Weinhaus Wine Dinner at Chelsea’s Brickyard Restaurant at The Etowah Country Club. Asheville culinary pioneer Lance Carter of Southside Café fame directs Chelsea’s Brickyard Restaurant at the Etowah Country Club. Event begins at 7 p.m. Price is $60, all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

Friday Night Flights presents Marvelous Merlots. Please join us for a wonderful evening in our new Cork&Keg bar area. The price is $10 for four tasting pours. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $6. From 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave., in Asheville.

The Weinhaus • 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC • (828) 254-6453

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Vol. 17, No. 1 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — September 2013 39


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September 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
September 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: The Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s 53rd season begins with a performance by Asheville native Noah Bendix-Balgley..p7; Inside:...

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