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The Inspiration of Fine Artist Grace C. Bomer PG 22

Driving Miss Daisy at Asheville Community Theatre

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Asheville Chamber Music Series 62nd Season PG 7 Diana Wortham Theatre’s 2014/2015 Mainstage Season HART presents The Buddy Holly Summer Dance Party PG 18

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The Laugh

Your Asheville Off Comedy Festival

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DINING GUIDE Your Passport to Discovering the Best Restaurants

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A Most Wanted Man • Begin Again • Dawn of the Planet of the Apes • Deliver Us From Evil • Snowpiercer

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2014-2015 Our 62nd Season

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C o t t o n M i l l S t u D i o S F e at u R e D a R t i S t

Christie Calaycay

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Friday, September 12, 2014 BRADLEY MARTIN, piano with JUSTIN BRUNS, violin

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Friday, October 17, 2014 FESTIVAL PABLO CASALS PRADES COLLECTIVE Sunday afternoon, November 16, 2014 ST. LAWRENCE QUARTET Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Opening the Asheville Amadeus Festival in collaboration with the ASO

BRENTANO QUARTET with HSIN-YUN HUANG, viola Friday, April 10, 2015 TRIO CAVATINA

828.575.7427 | AshevilleChamberMusic.org

Christie Calaycay creates handcrafted jewelry in mixed metals with an organic texture that remains solidly exquisite while being reminiscent of flora and the life of wood and leaves through delicate metal work.

Calaycay has cultivated her craft working with gold, silver, copper, bronze and gem stones. She gives these materials new life with subtle yet intricate details that are inspired mostly by the surroundings of the Western North Carolina mountains: patterns in textiles, the forest, all things old and natural. Calaycay combines traditional metalsmithing techniques such as piercing, hard soldering, forming, forging, riveting and patination. Fine details are pierced into hand cut metal using a jeweler’s saw, and hammering techniques create texture. Christie’s work can be found at Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Craft, the Asheville Art Museum, and Verve in New York City. Calaycay Design is located in the historic Cotton Mill Studios in the River Arts District.

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com

www.calaycaydesign.com

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

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“Reflections of Summer”

An Invitation to Intimacy by Hal Boyd

Visitors to Asheville’s longest-established downtown art gallery find a wealth of images, techniques and styles. And each original twodimensional picture—whether abstract, representational or a mix— is its own unique invitation to intimacy. The trick is to open one’s self deeply, fully, to the proffered image.

Works by Joyce Schlapkohl

Reception August 1, 2014

5:00 - 8:00 pm Show runs Aug. 1 - 31, 2014 Monday - Saturday 10:00 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 1:00 - 4:00 pm Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Asheville, NC 28801 4 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

Next time you visit AGA, find a picture that especially attracts or interests you. Surrender to the promptings of its imagery. Accept the artist’s invitation to an intimate exchange, one in which you are the sole expert. Let what you see, feel and think enrich your understanding and enjoyment of the piece and make the picture complete. AGA has been a welcoming destination for “lookers,” as well as for shoppers, for 26 years. Work of all 28 current AGA professionals may be viewed at http://www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Asheville Gallery of Art

16 College Street Asheville, NC 28801 828-251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com pg. 20

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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Twelve

AUGUST 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sandi Anton, Judy Ausley, Jenny Bunn, Jeremy Carter, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Ron Czecholinski, Kelly Denson, Susan Devitt, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, David Nicholson, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Ashley Van Matre, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com South and West Asheville Mary Lloyd (828) 712-0390 All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, August 2014, Vol. 17 No. 12

On the Cover:

One Who Came On The Waters of Time II, by Grace C. Bomer. PAGE 22

3 Fine Art Christie Calaycay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Steve Noggle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 SVFAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Joyce Schlapkohl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Grace Carol Bomer . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Art Mob Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Artetude Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Amy Perrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

6 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles – Only Online www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

REVIEWS & NEWS

Radical Acceptance

Rosco Bandana

Written by Lydia Scott

Foul! A Story

Written by RF Wilson

Sandee Setliff

What is the Truth About You

Written by Phil Okrend

Expresso Yourself

ACT – Driving Miss Daisy . . . . . . . 6 HART – The Odd Couple. . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Chamber Music Series . . . 7 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 David Troy Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Diana Wortham Theatre. . . . . . . . . 11 HART – Buddy Holly . . . . . . . . . . 18 Laugh Your Asheville Off . . . . . . . 20

8 Columns Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 14 Peter Loewer – Curmudgeon . . . . 16 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort 16 Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 17 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bill Walz – Mindfulness . . . . . . . . . 25 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 25

8 Music Transfigurations II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Toadies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

12 Movie Reviews

Written by Sandee Setliff

Creative Mentoring

Written by Greg Vineyard

WE’RE A LOCAL & RESPONSIBLE PUBLISHER Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

SPECIAL SECTIONS Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 River Arts District. . . . . . . . . . . . pg 22 Dining Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 30-32 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 38-39

at The New Mountain Theatre. Written by James Cassara.

Rosco Bandana

The first installment of

The Business of Art, written

by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland.

Wendy H. Outland

The Asheville Loft, a unique

contemporary fine art gallery located in downtown Asheville. Written by Kathleen Colburn.

The Asheville Loft

Business in a More Beautiful World

Spirituality and Collaborative Community, written by Ron

Czecholinski & Kathleen Colburn

WELCOME ABOARD! This month we welcome two new writers to Rapid River Magazine. Wendy Outland of WHO Knows Art looks at the Business of Art – on our website. Food writer Sue Devitt visits some of our favorite restaurants.

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

30 Dining Guide Oil & Vinegar Recipe . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Café 64. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 The Chocolate Fetish . . . . . . . . . . . 32

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 5


Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social! v Area Restaurant Coupons v v Contests v

Keep up with Local Arts, Events, Performances, and Festivals. www.facebook.com/ rapidrivermagazine

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captivating performances A Journey to a Friendship

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Driving Miss Daisy, the Pulitzer Prize winning drama by Alfred Uhry, opens this month at Asheville Community Theatre (ACT).

Driving Miss Daisy shares the story of the relationship between an elderly white Southern Jewish woman, Daisy Werthan, and her African-American chauffeur, Hoke Colburn over the span of 25 years. Driving Miss Daisy is set mostly in Atlanta, just prior to the civil rights movement. Having recently demolished another car, Daisy Werthan, a rich, sharp-tongued Jewish widow of 72, is informed by her son Boolie that he has hired a chauffeur for her: an AfricanAmerican man named Hoke. In a series of scenes that spans from 1948 to 1973, Daisy and Hoke grow ever closer and more dependent on each other – and they both come to realize they have more in common than they ever believed possible. Driving Miss Daisy was first produced Off-Broadway in 1987 with Dana Ivey as Daisy and Morgan Freeman as Hoke. The 1989 movie was adapted by the playwright and starred Jessica Tandy as Daisy, with Morgan

BY JENNY

BUNN

Freeman reprising his role as Hoke. The movie won four Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Actress. The play did not debut on Broadway until 2010. The Broadway production starred James Earl Jones as Hoke and Vanessa Redgrave as Daisy. Asheville Community Theatre’s production of Driving Miss Daisy Daisy (Pamela Gilmer) and her chauffeur Hoke (Ronnie combines the talents of three newcomPepper) in Driving Miss Daisy. Photo: Tommy Propest ers and one ACT veteran. Director Patricia Heuermann is making her ACT directorial debut. A former resident of Atlanta For more information about ACT’s Mainstage season, visit www.ashevilletheatre.org with a directing resume a mile long, Driving Miss Daisy is the perfect fit for her. This show also marks the ACT debuts for two of the three stars: Hendersonville IF resident Ronnie Pepper (Hoke) has been YOU Driving Miss Daisy runs from August GO 1 through August 17, with performances burning up I-26 traveling to rehearsals, while Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Pamela Gilmer (Daisy) splits her time between Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $22 for adults, Virginia and North Carolina. Rounding out $19 for seniors (65+) and students, and $12 for the cast is ACT veteran Michael Boulos as children 17 and under. Asheville Community Boolie. The scenic design is by Jack Lindsay, Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) with costumes by Deborah Austin and lighting 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. and sound by Adam Cohen.

HART CELEBRATE’S 30TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON WITH

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The Odd Couple

Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple opens August 22 at HART.

This blockbuster comedy by Broadway’s master, known affectionately as Doc, opened at the Plymouth Theater in March 1965 and, The Odd Couple, starring Walter Matthau and Art Carney, ran nearly a thousand performances. The 1968 film version starred Matthau and Jack Lemon. The film was such a hit that a TV series followed in 1970 with Jack Klugman and Tony Randall which ran five seasons. In the play, Felix, a fastidious man who has just separated from his wife, moves in with his friend Oscar, a sports writer who has also separated from his wife. Oscar is something of a slob, whose idea of a great evening is poker with his buddies. The comedy situations that evolve have become classics in the theater. There are two different accounts of what inspired Simon to write The Odd Couple. In one, Danny Simon, Neil’s brother and early writing partner, moved in with a theatrical agent, named Roy Gerber, in Hollywood. They invited friends over and Mr. Simon botched the pot roast. The next day Gerber told him: “Sweetheart, that was a lovely dinner last night. What are we going to have tonight?” Mr. Simon replied: “What do you mean, cook you dinner? You never take me out to dinner. You never bring me flowers.”

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Danny Simon wrote a partial first draft of the play, but then handed over the idea to Neil. However, in the Mel Brooks biography, It’s Good to Be the King, author James Robert Parish claims that the play came about after Simon observed Brooks, in a separation from his first wife, living with writer Speed Vogel for three months. Vogel later wrote that Brooks had insomnia, “a brushstroke of paranoia,” and “a blood-sugar problem that kept us a scintilla away from insanity.” Whichever story is true Simon wrote one of his best works as a result. HART’s production is being directed by Judy Dybwad and will feature David Spivey, Steve Turner, Holly Cope, Becky Seymour, Steve Jarrell, John Winfield, Alan Sheinfeld and Cord Scott. This summer HART has a design intern from the UNC School of the Arts, Tony Debernardo. One of Tony’s assignments has been designing the set for this production of The Odd Couple. So look for his model in the lobby during the production. IF YOU The Odd Couple, August 22, 23, 29, GO 30, and September 5 & 6 at 7:30 p.m.;

August 24, 31, and September 7 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $22 for adults; $18 for seniors; students $10. Special $6 discount tickets for students Sundays. Box Office Hours: Tue-Sat 1-5 p.m. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville. Call (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com.

Sisters

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BY JEREMY CARTER An intriguing chronicle of the relationship between two AfricanAmerican women who represent opposite ends of the “color spectrum.”

Different Strokes Performing Arts Collective presents Sisters by Marsha JacksonRandolph, on stage August 8-24 at The BeBe Theatre. Darker-skinned Olivia spends her Kirby Gibson (left) days in an executive and Cyd Smith office on the 20th star in Sisters. floor, while lighterskinned Cassie spends hers in a housekeeping uniform. When the two women find themselves snowbound alone in the middle of a power outage, they reluctantly accept an opportunity to filter through their mutual pre-conceptions and expectations of one another and themselves.

IF YOU GO: Sisters, August 8-24 at The

BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., downtown Asheville. Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets: $10 in advance at www.differentstrokesavl.com; at the door $15; $10 for students and seniors.


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captivating performances

Asheville Chamber Music Series 62nd Season

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The Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) will be presenting a distinguished roster of internationally acclaimed ensembles for its 2014-15 season.

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MARILYNNE HERBERT

Brahms: String Quartet, Op. 67

Festival Pablo Casals Prades Collective Friday, October 17, 2014 at 8 p.m. (Unitarian Universalist Congregation) Milhaud: La Creation du Monde

Mozart: Clarinet Quintet The renowned Brentano Quartet with violist, Prokofiev: Overture on Hsin-Yun Huang, will Hebrew Themes perform during the openFaure: Piano Quartet ing concert of the Asheville No. 1 Amadeus Festival in colBrentano Quartet laboration with the AsheSt. Lawrence Photo: Christian Steiner ville Symphony Orchestra String Quartet on March 17, 2015. Sunday afternoon, November 16, 2014 at 4 “This event will surely highlight the p.m. (Unitarian Universalist Congregation) important role the Asheville Chamber Music Series plays as one of Asheville’s leading music Haydn: String Quartet in C major, Op. 76, presenters,” says ACMS President, Polly No. 3 (Emperor) Feitzinger. “Haydn Discovery” hour

FEATURED PERFORMANCES

Beethoven: String Quartet in C sharp minor, Op.131

Pianist, Bradley Martin/Violinist, Justin Bruns

Brentano Quartet/Hsin-Yun Huang

Friday, September 12, 2014 at 8 p.m. (Unitarian Universalist Congregation)

Opening Concert of the Asheville Amadeus Festival

Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 7, Op.30 No.2

Collaboration with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra

Ravel: Sonata for Violin & Piano Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 12 No.1

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Mozart: String Quartet, K.458 (Hunt)

Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 8 p.m. (Diana Wortham Theatre)

Mozart: Viola Quintet K. 515 Subscribers will receive tickets to all performances, including the opening concert of the Amadeus Festival featuring the Brentano Quartet and Hsin-Yun Huang. No single tickets for this concert will be available through the ACMS website.

Trio Cavatina Friday, April 10, 2015 at 8 p.m. (Unitarian Universalist Congregation) Schumann: Etuden in kanonischer Form, Op. 56 (selections) Schumann: Piano trio in D minor, Op. 63 Schubert: Piano Trio in B-flat, D. 898 With the exception of the Sunday, November 16 afternoon concert at 4 p.m., all concerts begin at 8 p.m. on Friday evenings at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, at the corner of Charlotte Street and Edwin Place. The Brentano Quartet/Hsin-Yun Huang concert Tuesday, March 17 will be held at the Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 South Pack Square in Asheville at 8 p.m. IF YOU Season tickets are available for $150 GO each, individual tickets are $38. To

purchase tickets or for more information please visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org, call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427, or email support@ashevillechambermusic.org.

AmiciMusic’s 4th Summer Music Festival

AmiciMusic, Asheville’s award winning chamber music organization, presents a special August festival.

AmiciMusic, meaning “Music Among Friends,” was founded in 2011 by Artistic Director Daniel Weiser. The organization presents top quality chamber music in relaxed and informal atmospheres with fun educational talks before each piece.

Italian Inspirations

Jewish Jazz

Music of Milhaud, Schoenfield, Gershwin, Benny Goodman, and more with Patrick, Weiser, and clarinetist Matthew Boyle. This concert will show the connections between Jewish folk music/ Klezmer and American Jazz. Wednesday, August 6 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain Violinist Rachel Patrick

Saturday, August 9 at 11 a.m. at Isis (brunch/concert)

Music of Paganini, Verdi, Respighi, and Stravinsky’s Suite Italienne with violinist Rachel Patrick and pianist Daniel Weiser.

Saturday, August 9 at 6 p.m. for a House Concert in Arden

Friday, August 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain

A Toast To The Steins

Saturday and Sunday, August 2 & 3 at 11 a.m. at Isis (brunch/concert) Saturday, August 2 at 7:30 p.m. for a House Concert in Hendersonville

Sunday, August 10 at 1 p.m. at UU Asheville Features music from several different shows by Leonard Bernstein, Marc Blitzstein, and Jules Styne, including excerpts from West Side Story, Candide, Regina, and Gypsy, as staged by acclaimed director Pat Heuermann. Two

sopranos named Amanda Horton (yes, both live in Asheville), along with soprano Allyson MacCauley, tenor Andrew Hiler, and baritone David Fields perform. Friday, August 22 at 7:30 p.m. at All Soul’s Cathedral Saturday, August 23 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain Sunday, August 24 at 4 p.m. at Beth Israel Syagogue

Short History of the Piano

Pianist Daniel Weiser performs “The Romantic Heart,” featuring great music by – and interesting stories about – Chopin, Brahms, Grieg, and more. Thursday, August 21 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain. IF YOU For more information about each GO concert, visit www.amicimusic.org or

contact Dan Weiser at 802) 369-0856 or daniel@amicimusic.org.

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Interview with Concert Pianist David Troy Francis

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David Troy Francis is an exciting, authoritative performer, described by the Los Angeles Times as “consistently absorbing, whether in lyrical repose or compulsive fury.” Mr. Francis has recorded eight cds and has served as the recording pianist for Pursuit of Happyness, Fame, and Elegy. He is the executive producer and composer David Troy of the smash musical Francis BARK!, and the artistic director of the Asheville non-profit, The Modern American Music Project (www.tmamp.org). Mr. Francis is well known in the western North Carolina region for his piano performances and his willingness to work with other non profits for the benefit of our communities.

Rapid River Magazine: So let’s get right to it — what fantastic musical event do you have coming up?

David Troy Francis: I am playing a piano concert at Stuart Auditorium out at beautiful Lake Junaluska on Saturday, August 2 at 7:30 p.m. I am so excited to be back playing their nine foot concert Steinway Grand piano! I am going to smash into some Rachmaninoff & Gershwin, but will also play my unique arrangements of beloved American hymns. Additionally, Broadway veteran performer Mark Morales will sing songs from his new cd we recently finished recording. RR: You have been battling tonsil and lymphnode cancer. How is your health? DF: This concert will be my first big event since undergoing cancer treatment for the past year. While I may have lost 80 pounds I certainly gained some new and valuable perspectives about life and joy. I am now cancer free and feel so ready to play piano for a huge audience again. I want to share my life long love for music with all who want to hear and I promise the evening will be uplifting, exciting and intimate. So everybody come! IF YOU Concert pianist David Troy GO Francis, with special guest star,

Broadway performer Mark Morales in concert, Saturday, August 2 at 7:30 p.m. Stuart Auditorium, 91 N. Lakeshore Drive, Lake Junaluska, NC 28745. Tickets: $17.50, available in person at Lake Junaluska Bethea Welcome Center, open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., or online at www.lakejunaluska.com/concert-tickets

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sound experience Transfigurations II

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This month I am delighted to showcase Matt Schnable and Mark Capon, the two gents who own Harvest Records store in West Asheville. Since 2004 Harvest Records has set a standard for independently owned record stores and has been nationally recognized by Rolling Stone Magazine as one of the best 50 such stores in the USA. In addition to supplying many a music lover with vinyl and CDs (both common and collectible) the pair have promoted numerous musical performances-both at the shop and elsewhere-as well as art shows, poetry readings, and anything else that intrigues them. One of their most ambitious undertakings is the three day Transfigurations II music festival, taking place the weekend of August 28-30. The event is centered on three venues — Asheville’s Grey Eagle, the Mothlight Theater, and Blannahassett Island in Marshall — and features a wide assortment of bands and styles. The lineup is staggering and is reflective

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH JAMES CASSARA

of the bands that Matt and Mark, along with those who work at and frequent Harvest Records, love. My thanks to Mark C. for taking the time to chat!

James Cassara: First question… are you

guys crazy? If running a record store wasn’t enough, what possessed you to take on something this massive?

Mark Capon: I think we are a little crazy, no

doubt about it. But Matt and I always seem to thrive on opportunities like this, on challenges that seem daunting but exciting at the same time. It’s in our nature, and that nature is what has driven us this far already, so we might as well keep going with it while we’ve got the energy.

JC: Talk a bit about the history of Transfigura-

tions, how it came about and what’s involved in planning an event like this. Obviously your long standing connections in town come into play.

MC: We’ve done something close to this level just once before — Transfigurations I, which celebrated our 5 year anniversary back in 2009 with folks like Budos Band, War on Drugs, Bonnie “Prince” Billy, etc. — and it was a total blast. So we just wanted to build on the same principles as that festival, which were to highlight a limited number of acts compared to the average festival, focusing on a positive environment, and an emphasis on not having sets overlap so everyone can see each artist; making everything as intimate as we would want it to be ourselves as festival goers. It’s a daunting task, and every time we think we’ve nailed down a detail, there are three more details that hit us over the head in that same moment! But as I said, we really enjoy this type of challenge. And yes it’s a good time to use our connections to venues,

WNC Jazz Profiles: Youth At Jazz

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be provided. They expect youth to be good citizens, practice at home, and show up on time. Frequently, some of the results are improved parent/child relationships, better school performance, and many members are now in college and getting gigs to help cover expenses. The Youth At Jazz workshop in August consists of the Youth Jazz Camp and Masterclass Series. The events begin at 10am with Youth Jazz Camp Day classes taught by Kayvon Kazemini, Ryan Kijanka and Matthew Richmond until lunch at noon. The Masterclass Series starts at 1pm, when everyone is welcome to come and learn from featured clinicians Michael Jefry Stevens, Sharon LaMotte, River Guerguerian, Steve Alford and Mike Holstein. In the Masterclasses, students participate with their instruments while virtuoso faculty members and guest artists present their approach to learning jazz. The dialogue introduces concepts particular to the study and performance of jazz, and provides students with the personal insights of experienced jazz musicians. In the Special Presentations and Demonstrations, these lesson times will include a variety of classes that are geared towards learning the history of jazz and developing the facilities to read and play more proficiently.

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JC: The Grey Eagle and the Mothlight seem like pretty obvious choices, but Blannahassett Island much less so. How did that expansion come about? Are you counting on folks who might not typically come into Asheville being encouraged to do so? MC: We’re definitely counting a little more on out of towners than we normally would. We wanted to expand ever so slightly into the all-day, indoor/outdoor type vibe which we haven’t really explored before. In fact, other than a Drive By Truckers performance behind the shop on Record Store Day 2010, we’ve never really hosted an outdoor performance. There will be two stages outdoors and one indoors in Marshall, so this is a very exciting step for us. We did a Bonnie “Prince” Billy show on the Island (indoors) back in October 2011, and when we booked it I remember thinking “well, I hope at least some people want to take the continued on page 33

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Youth At Jazz, a music and mentorship program geared toward offering accessible music education to the Asheville area, is hosting its YAJ Summer Workshop from August 4-8. The Youth At Jazz Summer Workshop will be a blend of ensemble playing, music fundamentals, and Masterclasses, featuring an amazing and diverse group of clinicians, and will be open to the general public. Youth At Jazz came about eight years ago when created by Davidson Jones as a result of three factors occurring simultaneously: His decision to retire from his Organization Development Practice; a trip to New York City with his then eight-yearold son Josh; and while there a visit to the Louis Armstrong House at 44-56 107th St. in Queens. Josh had heard about Armstrong from his dad and seen artifacts in their house that his dad had accumulated. For Josh, the trip filled gaps in knowing about just who Armstrong was to such a degree that on the plane trip back, he asked his dad for a trumpet. Josh’s request gave Davidson an idea on how to engage in the Asheville community, and on June 6th, 2006, Youth At Jazz, Inc. officially came into being as a 501c3 organization. Since then, they have offered numerous performances within the Asheville area. Youth At Jazz welcomes all youth, regardless of their ability to read music, pay, or play – and instruments are provided, if needed. Transportation may also

our friends, our friends’ businesses, and local artists, our customers — bringing all of those folks into the fold to make the event as exciting and successful as possible.

Youth At Jazz Photo: Frank Zipperer

Examples include “Appreciating Jazz - Early Swing to Bebop”, “Hard Bop to Modern Jazz”, and “Original Jazz Composition”. In the Ensembles/Combos module, students will be grouped in a way that will encourage listening skills and communication, while also providing an avenue for applying the information gained through the Masterclasses and special presentations. In addition, parents as well as students are encouraged to attend the faculty performances, which will include a featured guest artist each day. The Youth At Jazz program is in an exciting transitory stage. They are establishing a board of directors comprised of many talented musicians and promoters, hoping that the new wave of ideas will help direct the program even further into Asheville’s music community. The program has graduated many students in the past few years, seeing them continue their education into college, but is

EDDIE LESHURE

now in need of more youth. The success of Youth At Jazz is based on its ability to enrich the lives of others. With the amazing space being utilized at E. Larchmont Road in Asheville, plus the incoming staff members, it’s hard to imagine that a lack of students will continue to be a prominent concern. Youth At Jazz is aiming to offer a standard of excellence that they are hoping will resonate within the Asheville community for years to come. www.youthatjazz.org

Alas, Rapid River Magazine must bid Eddie LeShure a fond farewell. Thank you Eddie for your multiple years of insightful columns. We wish you and Asheville Jazz Unlimited much success. Eddie LeShure produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 7-10 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/mainfm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain. Eddie LeShure also produces a comprehensive website on local jazz, www.ashevillejazzunlimited.com, which includes a weekly newsletter and ongoing WNC jazz calendar.


Shana Tucker Paula Poundstone Aquila Theatre Arlo Guthrie Pilobolus Solas Red June

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Kids Villages. Local Brews & Eats. Camping & Cabins Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 9


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adorn with sunny elegance

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Join us in building community while sharing our common humanity. Bring your family and friends, share a story, and allow us to transform your ordinary stories into

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Improvised theater based on personal stories from the audience.

63 Haywood St. • Asheville, NC • 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10:30-6

10 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

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Asheville Playback Theatre

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

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extraordinary events. Asheville Playback Theatre practices deep listening. No scripts. No elaborate sets or costumes. The stories that come to life on stage are provided, on the spot, by random audience members. Free!

IF YOU GO: Sunday, August 24, 10-11 a.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville. www.ashevilleplayback.org


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Diana Wortham Theatre’s 2014/2015 Mainstage Season

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The Diana Wortham Theatre Mainstage Series includes a wide range of top touring artists in music, theater, dance, comedy, and other performing arts. The 2014/2015 Mainstage Series season opens September 19, 2014 with Yesterday and Today: The Interactive Beatles Experience, a foot-stomping, sing-along sensational night presenting the songs of a generation. The set list is compiled according to the audience’s requests prior to the show and performed perfectly by the McGuigan brothers: no wigs, no faked accents, no pretense, just the music exactly as it was recorded. The 2014/2015 Mainstage Special Attractions Series showcases four performances that cross multiple genres. Paula Poundstone (October 9, 2014) entertains with wry wit and spontaneity. The pioneering physical theater company Cirk La Putyka presents Slapstick Sonata (November 7 & 8, 2014). The warm sounds and merrymaking of the season shine in A Swannanoa Solstice (December 21, 2014). And experience the awe-inspiring feats and gorgeous traditional music of The Peking Acrobats (March 14, 2015). The 2014/2015 Mainstage Music Series at Diana Wortham Theatre features power trio Red June (November 15, 2014) who seamlessly blend country, bluegrass, and American roots music with a dash of indie rock. The rich voice and distinctive cello of Shana Tucker (January 17, 2015) is a sultry fusion of soulful jazz-folk and acoustic pop. Arlo Guthrie (February 13 & 14, 2015) brings The Alice’s Restaurant Massacre, in its entirety, along with other Guthrie favorites. Natalie MacMaster and Donnell Leahy (March 4, 2015) two of the world’s most celebrated fiddlers, appear together as husband and wife in Visions of Cape Breton and Beyond. Vocal acuity and sumptuous harmony are the hallmarks of the Grammy Award winning quartet New York Voices (April 11, 2015). And the Annie Moses Band (May 2, 2015) blends fiddle, jazz, and classical influences with soaring, folk inspired vocals. The 2014/2015 Mainstage Dance Series opens with Paul Taylor Dance Company (October 17 & 18, 2014). Kyle Abraham’s company, Abraham. In.Motion (March 24 & 25, 2015), flows from opera to rap, creating movement that is fresh and unique. The wildly creative and gravity defying Pilobolus (April 7 & 8, 2015) is back to wow you with its athleticism, invention, and grace. The 2014/2015 Mainstage Theatre Series features three compelling

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performances. A Christmas Carol (November 28 & 29, 2014) is reenvisioned by Jeremy Webb into a family-friendly, one-man play with puppets for ghosts. Aquila Theatre Company stages Wuthering Heights (January 30, 2015), a tale of ill-fated lovers on the lonely moors of northern England. On the following night the company presents The Tempest (January 31, 2015), a production imbued with magic and the supernatural. The 2014/2015 Mainstage Celtic Series presents four unforgettable bands. The Irish-American band Solas (February 27, 2015) presents Shamrock City. Lúnasa (March 26, 2015) is internationally acknowledged as being the finest Irish instrumental band of recent times. Canada’s Celtic ambassadors, The Barra MacNeils (April 30, 2015) bring their virtuosic talents to Asheville for an unforgettable evening of august and spirited music. And the delicate power of her pristine voice make an evening with Karan Casey (May 15, 2015) a beautifully inspiring, soulful event. The Intersections Series presents Martin Dockery, whose performances are fast-paced, and hilarious in Wanderlust: From Here to Timbuktu (January 22-24, 2015). And, Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (February 27 & 28, 2015) is brilliantly dramatized by Cherita Armstrong. This year’s Mainstage Matinee Series for Students and Families includes: Paul Taylor Dance Company; The Lightning Thief ; Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream; The Tempest; Laura Ingalls Wilder; Fly Guy and Other Stories; Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Kyle Abraham; and Curious George.

Milepost 382 - BlueRidge Parkway, Asheville, NC 828.298.7928

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26 Lodge Street, Asheville, NC 828.277.6222

For a season brochure, call the box office at (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com

IF YOU Tickets go on sale at 10 GO a.m. on August 21 and are

available at the box office, (828) 257-4530, as well as online at www.dwtheatre.com. Multi-show discount packages range from 10% to 20% off regular prices (available only by calling (828) 257-4530.)

Steven Forbes-DeSoule

WWW.CRAFTGUILD.ORG The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

THE MONTHLY REEL

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Usually the summer movie season brings action-packed CGI fests, animated blockbusters and little else. This year that is not the case. Asheville continues to book the usual big budget box office fare, but also a host of smaller titles. Since 2008 the good Professor Kaufmann and I have tried to cover as much as we can, as best we can, despite the challenges of being a monthly publication. Often we’ll write about a film which we may have seen just before deadline, but which may be gone by the time the issue hits the streets. When we’ve known a smaller film will be long gone by the time the issue is out, we’ve often opted to include something more timely and mainstream. With the plethora of little films that play for but a week with little notice, Chip and I want you to know about these films, even if they are gone by the time you read our reviews. You don’t need a review of the next Transformers movie to know whether you are going to see it or not. But you may not have been aware of a film called Locke, which played at The Carolina back in June (see my DVD pick on page 14), or A Most Wanted Man, which recently opened at The Fine Arts Theatre (reviewed this month). We feel films like these are worth your time, even if time is not on their side. To that end, the good Professor Kaufmann contemplated our quandary and penned an observation about writing for a monthly publication in an age of cinematic ADD. He makes some interesting points about the film industry and offers some food for thought from a reviewer’s perspective. Happily, not all of the smaller films have left in a hurry. At press time Chef was still playing in the area after an almost twomonth run. It’s not an important film, but it’s a dandy little crowd pleaser, tailor made for the Asheville foodie scene. It’s also proof of Chip’s point that if you give a film some time to find its audience, it will. All that said, we’ll still cover the occasional blockbuster, including Dawn of The

Planet of the Apes which, Two thumbs up for Life at press time, Itself, in theatres now. was swinging from the rafters and conquering the box office. Another film some cinephiles may want to check out is Life Itself, Steve James’ documentary about the late, great film critic Roger Ebert. It’s not a reverential, posthumous biographical documentary, but rather a wonderfully alive and brutally honest and candid look at Ebert’s life and work. In conclusion it’s only fitting to acknowledge the recent passing of two Hollywood legends, Eli Wallach and James Garner. Wallach, who passed in late June at the ripe old age of 98, will forever be remembered as Tuco in The Good The Bad And The Ugly, as well as for his roles in The Misfits and The Magnificent Seven. He was a good man and he had a remarkable career. At press time we learned that the ever likable James Garner passed at age 86. GarWe bid a fond ner, who was known farewell to acting for iconic roles in legends Eli film and television, Wallach (top) and James Garner. was an actor who seemed to enjoy equal popularity among men and women. Maverick, The Great Escape, Marlowe, Support Your Local Sheriff, The Rockford Files, those great Polaroid commercials, Muphy’s Romance, and The Notebook – James Garner was just plain cool. Bravo, Mr. Wallach and Mr. Garner. RIP. Until next time, thanks for spending a few minutes of your time with Reel Takes.

12 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

A Most Wanted Man 

A Most Wanted Man marks Hoffman’s last fully completed film. It’s a fine performance (though perhaps not one of his most comfortable) imbued with wonderful complexities. John le Carre himself was delighted with it. McAdams, Dafoe and newcomer Dobrygin also deliver REEL TAKE: Based on John le solid performances. Carre’s 2008 best-selling novel by Unfortunately Hoffthe same name, A Most Wanted man, McAdams and Man, is a thinking man’s thriller. Dafoe all affect vague Directed by Anton Corbijn German(ish) accents (The American), this is not an which I found someespionage thriller with mass comwhat distracting and mercial appeal, but rather a subtle, unnecessary. The suspense drama. A Most Wanted merits of the film far Man is filled with the duplicioutweigh this grievtous cat and mouse games of the ance, but I thought it Philip Seymour Hoffman grills a politico/intelligence arena. It’s the distracting enough to human rights lawyer played by type of action that often plays out mention. Rachel McAdams in the screen better on the page than it does on A Most Wanted adaptation of A Most Wanted Man. screen. At the center of this parMan is a gritty, grey ticular game is Gunter Bachman, toned jigsaw puzzle. Its cerebral suspenseful played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. quality is refreshing. The film isn’t quite as As is often the case with le Carre novels, good as it thinks it is, or maybe as it wants Gunter is an old school, chain-smoking, to be. It doesn’t possess the charm, wit or hard drinking, cold war type spy. In the wake stylishness of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, but of September 11th, he runs a little known, folks who liked Tinker will likely enjoy this low-profile intelligence operation in Hamone. People who are unfamiliar with le Carre’s burg, where, hidden among its heavy Muslim flawed characters and untidy endings may be population, the terrorist attacks were plotted taken slightly aback, but this is not a bad thing. without notice. Gunter is being pressed by If for no other reason, see A Most German and US intelligence agencies to come Wanted Man for Philip Seymour Hoffman’s up with proof that a prominent [and apparperformance. ently moderate] Muslim doctor is not what he Rated R for language. purports to be. Review by Michelle Keenan When a half-Chechen, half-Russian man (Grigoriy Dobrygin), shows up with a claim Begin Again  to his late Russian militarist father’s ill-gotten fortune, German and American intelligence ofShort Take: From the maker of Once comes ficials are ready to pounce. Seeing young Issa as another story of two struggling musicians. a conduit to Dr. Abdullah, but knowing there’s It passes on the merits of its actors, but more to the big picture than they realize, let’s hope Carney realizes that Once was Gunter bargains for time. This in turn brings enough, so let’s not Begin Again. a notable banker (Willem Dafoe) and a human REEL TAKE: In 2006 Irish writer/director rights attorney (Rachel McAdams) and a slick Jim Carney took the world by storm with the CIA operative (Robin Wright) into the fold. indie darling Once. Like many, I fell under its As the story unfolds the difference becharming spell and couldn’t get enough of its tween how modern intelligence operates and soundtrack featuring the irresistibly captivating how Gunter operates is striking. At the end of music of Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova. the day Gunter is a man who wants to do the Not heeding the title of the first film, Carney right thing and exact true justice. Meanwhile decided to make another movie about strugthe other agencies are concerned with exacting gling musicians. Lightning didn’t strike twice. their own polished brand of justice to “make the world a safer place.” Movies continued on page 13 Short Take: When a half-Chechen, halfRussian man with terrorist ties turns up in Hamburg with a claim to his father’s illgotten gains, German and U.S. intelligence agencies take notice.


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Once told the story of an Irish busker falling for a piano playing Czech immigrant. There was something truly special about the story, the characters were immensely likable and then there was the music – oh that beautiful music! It was pure magic. In Begin Again we meet Greta and Dan. Greta (Keira Knightley) is a recently jilted songwriter and occasional singer. Dan (Mark Ruffalo) is a washed up record producer. When Dan hears Greta sing a song he hears it like no one else does. He sees Greta and her guitar joined by keyboards, cello, violin, and sets his sights on recording an album with her. Greta resists at first, but having just been unceremoniously dumped by her rising star boyfriend (played by Maroon 5’s Adam Levine), it’s go home to England or make the record. Greta is a refreshingly high minded individual and she’s likable. The fact that Dan is an unhappily divorced, drunken has-been and absentee father makes him somewhat of an annoying cliché, but he’s definitely got potential. Once he’s making music, you know he’s going to get his groove back. The film has some great attributes. The concept is good. Having the leads share an incredible, yet unromantic relationship was very smart. The way Carney illustrates Dan’s talent for arranging music is almost hokey, but somehow it really does work. The idea to record Greta’s album in impromptu sessions throughout New York City with the city’s living sounds as part of the recording is pure genius.

Music brings Mark Ruffalo and Kiera Knightly together in Begin Again.

Unfortunately there are a few too many moments that just don’t work and chip away at our characters and diminish the story. The music they record for the album is nice, but ironically the best song is one Greta and her BFF and fellow Brit (James Corden) write under the influence of whiskey and then record on the ex-boyfriend’s cell phone. Also ironic, Knightley and Corden have some of the best chemistry in the movie. Ultimately I was quite torn about whether or not I liked Begin Again. The more time that passes, the less I seem to like it. That doesn’t mean it’s not worthwhile. Just don’t expect lightning to strike twice. Rated R for language. Review by Michelle Keenan

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Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 1/2

Short Take: It’s man versus ape ten years after Rise of the The Planet of the Apes with what’s left of humankind struggling to rebuild civilization.

Can man and ape coexist peacefully? Jason Clarke and Andy Serkis try to find out.

REEL TAKE: Rupert Wyatt’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes (in 2011) revived the franchise after Tim Burton almost single-handedly killed it in 2001’s Planet of the Apes. Now Matt Reeves (Cloverfield) continues the series reboot with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, and for my money, it’s the best blockbuster of the summer. Picking up ten years from where Rise left off, humankind is struggling to survive and rebuild civilization in the wake of the catastrophic simian flu virus, accidentally released by scientists. None of the humans from the previous film are featured in this one. Caesar (the focus of the 2011 film and now head ape; played by Andy Serkis) and his nation of genetically evolved, intelligent primates are thriving. But just when they think they’ve seen the last of the humans, a group of gun toting homo sapiens enter their forest. The humans, led by Malcolm (Jason Clarke) need access to a now defunct dam and hydro-electric plant in an effort to restore power to San Francisco. Malcom is accompanied by his second wife Ellie (Kerri Russell), his son Alex (Kodi Smit-McPhee) and some additional members of his team. After a rough start Caesar and Malcolm form an uneasy accord made ever more tenuous by a moronic hothead among Malcolm’s group and the human-hating Kuba (Toby Kebbel) from Caesar’s tribe. As you may have guessed, war of course breaks out. Predictability is one of the film’s weaknesses, but it’s a pretty forgivable flaw, given its strengths. Some of the movie’s greatest moments are the scenes between Caesar and Malcom. While most epic summertime fare would focus more on the action and sequences of war, the emphasis here is squarely on these two characters, even when the action surrounding them is over the top and more than a little disturbing. This imbues the story with an organic dignity. Andy Serkis, who has made an incredible living working in performance and motion pictures – starring as Gollum in the Lord of the Rings franchise, and as Captain Haddock in the Tin Tin movie – gives a tremendous performance as Caesar. However, props have

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to be given to Jason Clarke. He had to envision Serkis as a giant monkey in their scenes together. Clarke’s look of awe-struck wonder and respect while in Caesar’s presence comes off so realistically you’d have thought there was an actual talking ape in front of him. There are some surprisingly touching and sensitive moments throughout the film. While the visuals are a marvel [a true marvel], I believe it’s the heart at the center of this film that delivers such satisfaction. There’s an innate goodness in Caesar and Malcolm. It’s a decency that transcends warmongering and gives hope that man and ape can peacefully coexist (allegory anyone?) While it is helpful, one does not need to have seen Rise of the Planet of the Apes before seeing Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Dawn is a big score for 20th Century Fox in a summer where box office returns are grossly down and many of the so-called summer blockbusters. Dawn of the Planet of Apes is not just another sci-fi CGI action-fest, it’s movie magic and some seriously good monkey business. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action, and brief strong language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Deliver Us From Evil 

Short Take: Updated version of The Exorcist, while not bad on its own modest terms, is completely unnecessary and was, for all practical purposes, a complete waste of my time.

REEL TAKE: This is just what I needed, an

almost exact clone of one of my least favorite movies from the 1970s, The Exorcist. Although I knew it was going to be about an exorcism going into it, I had no idea just how similar it would be to William Friedkin’s 1973 opus. The film opens in 2010 in the Middle East (Iraq to be exact, just like Friedkin’s film) where a trio of soldiers (Scott Johnsen, Chris Coy, Sean Harris) unleash an evil spirit that “bedevils” their lives from then on. Four years later we are then introduced to NYC police sergeant Ralph Sarchie (Eric Bana) who has been neglecting his family in an obsessive attempt to clean up crime in the South Bronx. Sarchie (a real life person) who co-wrote the book Beware the Night on which this movie is based, discovers evidence that three

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recent crimes are related to the 3 soldiers we met earlier and that, somehow, his family is in danger. Being a lapsed Catholic (of course), he has a hard time believing that spiritual evil is behind it until he meets an unorthodox priest (are there any other kind in these movies?) played by Edgar Ramirez who convinces him otherwise. After a series of harrowing incidents (including the film’s best scene in the Bronx Zoo), and more than a few gory details, the movie arrives at its climactic set piece, the expected exorcism which takes place in Sarchie’s police station. By the time that occurred I was thinking of how much I enjoyed the 2012 restoration of Hammer’s Dracula. Director Scott Derrickson is best known for his 2005 “based on real events” saga The Exorcism of Emily Rose which I didn’t see and 2012’s Sinister which I did. So why did I go see Deliver Us From Evil you might be tempted to ask? Reason 1… hope springs eternal, 2) I’m a masochist, 3) I needed another movie to fill up this month’s Reel Takes. In order of importance it’s 1, 3, 2 (although every critic must have something of the masochist in them to sit through some of Movies continued on page 14

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema Sean Harris as a demonically possessed soldier about to do some damage in the highly derivative Deliver Us From Evil.

(Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

The Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. August 3:

All Quiet On The Western Front (1979) August 4th marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I. The most famous novel to come out of that war is Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front. This is the 1979 remake, not the 1930 original. It stars Richard Thomas & Ernest Borgnine. Directed by Delbert Mann (Marty). August 10: Judex (1963) French filmmaker Georges Franju’s tribute to a celebrated 1917 silent serial. It tells the story of a mysterious caped figure who protects the daughter of an unscrupulous banker from harm. It was the winner of numerous International awards. Directed by Georges Franju (Eyes Without A Face). August 17: Flesh & Fantasy (1943) This long unavailable multistory film features an all star cast and focuses on several individuals whose lives are touched by fate and the consequences that occur as a result. Charles Boyer, Edward G. Robinson, and Barbara Stanwyck co-star. Directed by Julian Duvivier (Tales of Manhattan). August 24:

The Hound Of The Baskervilles (1959) This remake of the 1939 film by England’s Hammer Films is bolstered by strong performances, a quality script, and is richly atmospheric. Peter Cushing is an excellent Sherlock Holmes and here, Dr. Watson is not clueless. Directed by Terence Fisher (Dracula). August 31: Rain Man (1988) Winner of four Academy Awards, Rain Man tells the story of a self centered individual (Tom Cruise) who discovers he has an autistic brother (Dustin Hoffman) who is a math genius. Together they crash Las Vegas with surprising results. Directed by Barry Levinson (Avalon).

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the movies that we do). I can truthfully say that I am not paid enough to sit through movies like this one. Ultimately Deliver Us From Evil is at least half an hour too long and offers up nothing new although to be fair minded, it isn’t trying to. Eric Bana tries his best to lend gravitas to the whole proceedings and there are great turns from Sean Harris as the chief possessed soldier and Joel McHale as Bana’s streetwise partner but director Derrickson and the script writers ultimately let them down. One good thing to come out of all this is that we do learn never to visit the Bronx Zoo at night.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Zardoz”

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Rated R for bloody violence, grisly images, terror throughout, and language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Snowpiercer 

Short Take: Thought provoking dystopian sci-fi about a supertrain that circles a frozen Earth with passengers rigidly divided by class. Snowpiercer is superbly acted with great production design but it sure could use some editing.

REEL TAKE: Locally there has been a lot of

buzz surrounding Snowpiercer, the latest dystopian future epic in a time honored tradition that stretches back to Fritz Lang’s Metropolois in 1927. The buzz has been very

August DVD Picks

Zardoz (1974)

Of all the dystopian sci-fi flicks out there from Metropolis to Snowpiercer (see review this issue), none is more unique or more bizarre than British director John Boorman’s 1974 opus Zardoz. Back in the day it was what was known as a “head trip”. The film is set in the 23rd century where 95% of the world has descended into chaos (no reason is given) while the remaining 5% consists of intellectuals who live in force field protected communities known as vortexes. These intellectuals are keepers of the world’s collective knowledge but do nothing with it. Sean Connery plays an outsider who infiltrates one of the communities and discovers a society of people who are immortal and where disobedience is punished by aging the lawbreakers into senility without the possibility of death. People who commit suicide are simply regenerated so there is no possibility of escape. And that’s just for starters. Boorman based his concept of a future society on a combination of the New Age communes and wealthy gated communities that he ran across in California in the late 1960s. You have to admit that the idea of such a possibility sounds pretty nightmarish and in this film it truly is. Connery (in a role originally intended for Burt Reynolds and wearing a costume that makes him look like Pancho Villa in a red diaper)) is joined by a solid cast of British and Irish actors including Charlotte Rampling, Sara Kestleman, and John Alderton. Zardoz is loaded with extremely imaginative visuals that still astonish (the film was shot in Ireland’s Wicklow Mountains) and it contains a bleak, absurdist Samuel Beckett sense of humor that plays better today than it did in 1974. Once

14 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

seen Zardoz cannot be forgotten and the title punch line remains one for the ages.

Locke (2014)

In keeping with our promise to cover unsung films that we think are worth your time, Locke is my DVD pick for the month. It played a well received, but short run in June here in Asheville, and it makes its way to the small screen August 12. As a feature film, the premise for Locke sounds more than a bit boring. People have responded with bewildered amazement when I tell them they simply must see this movie. It’s difficult to convey how interesting it actually is, but here goes. Ivan Locke (Tom Hardy) is a successful construction manager and a happily married family man. At the film’s start night has fallen and Locke is leaving his job site and getting into his car. We realize almost immediately that he’s making a decision – to go home or elsewhere. He chooses elsewhere, a choice that could irrevocably divest him of the life he has so carefully and lovingly built. The rest of the film takes place in that car, on his drive from Birmingham to London, the titular character explaining his decision to colleagues, family, and the person awaiting his arrival at his journey’s destination. The only person we ever see is Locke. We hear other voices, but the camera stays

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favorable, but while there is much to admire in Snowpiercer, I was not as enamored of it as my colleagues were. The basic plot is as old as Metropolis, the privileged few at the top and the rest of society at the bottom. In this case, instead of above ground and below ground, the physical metaphor is a supertrain with the few in the front, the poorest in the rear, and the workers in the middle. The movie is based on the 1982 French graphic novel Le Transperceneige where a failed attempt to control global warming sends the Earth into another ice age and kills off all life except for those who live inside this monuMovies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Locke” with Locke throughout. The minimalistic and unnecessary challenge to tell the story from this vantage point may seem like a stunt to some and/or a little too ‘artsy’ to others. Both of which could have been true in the wrong hands. In this instance it seems to have challenged the filmmakers and the actor to work that much harder to create an incredibly compelling piece of work. Locke loves his job. He knows concrete the way a painter knows his canvas. Locke is also an adoring husband and father. The son of a good-for-nothing, deadbeat dad, he is determined to be a better man than his father; he may make mistakes but will ultimately do the right thing, even at his own expense. Locke’s fateful drive takes place after he receives a call (a call that has already occurred at the start of the film). A woman he barely knows, and for whom he feels very little, is in premature labor with his child (the result of a night where he behaved ‘not at all like himself’). He navigates alternately through all three pressing situations. The result is an emotionally riveting film and a brilliant performance from Hardy. Hardy, who is best known to American audiences as the villain in The Dark Knight Rises, draws the viewer with his calm and painfully controlled demeanor and a Welch accent reminiscent of a young Richard Burton in tone and Anthony Hopkins in its rhythm. Seeing Hardy’s face for the entire 85 minutes of the movie is remarkably powerful; all the cracks in the not-so-subtle foundation metaphor play out in his every expression. Written and directed by Stephen Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) and produced by Joe Wright (Anna Karenina, Pride and Prejudice), Locke is an impressive, not-tobe-missed little movie.


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mental train which circles the earth on a continuous track which takes a year to complete. We see none of how it happened (which is good) and jump straight away into the squalid conditions of those who live in the rear cars. They are led by the old crippled Gilliam (a reference to director Terry and played by John Hurt) and his protégé Curtis (Chris Evans). They are planning a coup to get to the front of the train and take control. End of Act 1. So far, so good. Unfortunately, from my perspective, the film bogs down in Act 2 as the attempts to reach the front are filled with lots of bloody mayhem, which goes on far too long and could easily have been edited down. Fortunately Tilda Swinton shows up as an evil bureaucrat and with her red wig, thick glasses, false teeth, and an accent best described as posh on LSD, she owns every scene she’s in. As they proceed further up the train aided by a drug addicted designer (Song Kang-ho)

CHIp KAUFMANN

distribution has changed dramatically. Time was that a movie would come to your local multiplex and play for a minimum of two weeks and usually three or four, unless it became a monster hit, like Star Wars, and then it would play forever. That blockbuster aspect of certain films is still with us today. What has changed is that there is an increase in the number of films being released as well as an increase in the number of companies releasing them. As a result of this, there is now a DEcrease in the amount of time that they play in local theaters. There are also raised expectations of how a movie is expected to perform in order to stay in those theaters. If a major release doesn’t make at least $10 million in the first three days then it’s considered to have “tanked” and it will depart as quickly as it arrived. It is this last item that impacts reviewers like Michelle and me. It used to be that movies were given time to find an audience or vice versa, but not anymore. An interesting or perhaps even a great little movie comes to town, but by the time we have written our reviews, the movie has moved on.

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The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings.

If you’re a regular reader of Rapid River Magazine’s movie section, then you know that when I write an article it’s usually a profile of some movie person, such as silent movie comedienne Mabel Normand (March 2014). Or, it’s to provide a historical overview on something film related (like June’s Godzilla Turns 60). This time around it’s something a little different. BY

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ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY

Helping Films Find Their Audience in a Short Attention Span Theatre

I still plan to talk about a topic that’s movie related, just more personal. Writing reviews for a monthly publication as opposed to a weekly (like Mountain Xpress) can sometimes be an exercise in frustration. This is not the fault of the monthly publication. The problem is in the nature of contemporary movie distribution and how it has changed in the last several years. I first began reviewing movies for SC Educational Radio in Charleston SC back in 1979. I was volunteering for the Charleston affiliate WSCI when I found out that they were looking for a local movie reviewer. After years of watching old movies on TV with my mother (who was quite the movie buff), having read several books, and armed with the knowledge from my Film 101 class in college, I was hired. That job lasted about a year. Life intervened and I stopped reviewing films until 2001 when I began posting mini-reviews on amazon. 13 years and over 450 reviews later, I’m still at it. I began writing reviews with colleague Michelle Keenan for Rapid River Magazine back in 2008 and, after more than 250 reviews, I’m still at it here as well. Since I first started reviewing, the nature of movie

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Third Person opened in Asheville in late July with only two showings a day.

We are fortunate in having the Fine Arts Theater in downtown Asheville and The Carolina Cinema in South Asheville. Both of which strive to bring small, outof-the-way films to our area. However, with people having so many viewing options these days and the cost of tickets being what they are, it’s hard to draw an audience for every little film. Neither the Fine Arts nor The Carolina have the financial resources to hang onto films if they don’t sell well straight out of the gate. The silver lining is that, thanks to the availability of quick DVD releases and streaming services like Netflix, a title generally becomes available right after it leaves town, therefore rendering our reviews not completely obsolete. Michelle and I love movies, and we enjoy writing about them. Our goal is to enlighten our readers about films, especially the ones they may not have heard much about, so our readers can decide what they want to see. To borrow a well known phrase from a well known network, “We report, you decide.”

blance (plot wise) to John Boorand his teenage man’s 1974 dystopian saga Zardoz. daughter (Go AhEd Harris as Wilford, the train’s sung), surroundings creator, gives a wonderful perget better with each formance. But then he has some car until they reach really choice dialogue, as he holds a classroom where the key to the film’s meaning. an idyllic setting unChris Evans as Curtis the expectedly becomes rebellion leader provides a solid a deadly trap. With anchor, which is not that different only a handful of from his Captain America, but the followers left, he context is different. This is good as finally reaches the he’s in almost every frame of the all powerful engine Evil bureaucrat Tilda Swinton film. The strong supporting cast of and its creator putting the rabble in their place Octavia Spencer, Jaime Bell, and Wilford (Ed Harris). (for now) in the visually striking, especially Song Kang-ho give extra End of Act 2. sci-fi epic Snowpiercer. substance to an already solid effort Act 3, which from Korean director Bong June-ho. involves a series of revelations, is the best part In the final analysis, Snowpiercer struck of the whole movie. Therefore I will tell you me as an extended episode of the 1960s sci-fi very little about it as you’ll have to see it for TV series The Outer Limits, but obviously yourselves but with the exception of a few with a much bigger budget. Limits concentratminor surprises, I had figured everything out ed on ideas rather than effects like much of the in advance thanks to the film’s striking resem-

August 5: Unconquered (1947) Intrepid frontiersman Chris Holden foils the political and personal ambitions of renegade Martin Garth in the Ohio Valley following the French and Indian War. Stars Gary Cooper, Paulette Goddard, Howard Da Silva. Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. August 12: Liliom (1930) Two women love the same man. Liliom is a rascal who’s a carousel barker, loved by the experienced merry-goround owner and by a young, innocent maid. Stars Charles Farrell, Rose Hobart, and Estelle Taylor. Directed by Frank Borzage. August 19: Four Men And A Prayer (1938) The sons of a disgraced British officer try to clear his name. Stars Loretta Young, Richard Greene, and George Sanders. Directed by John Ford. August 26:

Trouble In Paradise (1932) A gentleman thief and a lady pickpocket join forces to con a beautiful perfume company owner. Romantic entanglements and jealousies confuse the scheme. Stars Miriam Hopkins, Kay Francis, and Herbert Marshall. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

sci-fi from another era when nuclear annihilation seemed a distinct possibility. This movie has the ideas and the effects (great model train work), but it could have paced itself a little bit better by removing some extraneous footage. Rated R for violence, language, and drug content. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 15


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Last week in the midst of one of the season’s worst downpours, the Curmudgeon opened the door of the General Store.

Holding his 20-year-old outdoorsman’s canvas hat, originally purchased from Eddie Bauer, rolled up and wet in his left hand, a paper drink container labeled “Exotic Coffee” in his right, and a small pushcart with its handle deftly tucked within the slight depression between the rise of his stomach (above) and the large brass buckle of his John-Deere belt (below), pushed the door open so that he could enter the welcoming comfort of the emporium’s warm and gentle atmosphere. “Will somebody help me with this cart?” he asked. “Allow me—“ answered City-Fella who was there to collect his morning mail and one of two copies of The New York Times that were saved every morning, the other copy going to an unidentified person known only to Mr. and Mrs. Store-Keep. “You seem to be a bit upset and, frankly, befuddled, Curmudge,” said Mr. Store-Keep. “Is there anything going on outside of the general state of things that has you looking as though you are flying, internally, from pillar to post?” “Yes,” said Curmudgeon,” and it all revolves around the continued stupidity of Jeff Bezos, the owner of Amazon and his continuing effort to move the publishing industry back to the days when the best way to get information around was similar to a time when the Marquis de Sade was imprisoned

some of the largest publishing companies in the business, like Random House or Penguin BY pETER LOEWER or Hachette in France, by slowing shipment of books in the Bastille and threw letters they’ve published from Amazon and pamphlets our of his cell warehouses while speeding up window to excite the citizens to the shipment of books from think about possibly revolting companies that agree with him! against the French aristocracy. So Amazon becomes another Illustration by Peter Loewer “How was that?” asked killing machine that can lead City-Fella. to an inevitable digital disruption in the book “Well,” said Curmudgeon, “On July 2, industry and bring said publishers into the 1789, de Sade was chiefly responsible for the true world of the 21st Century, where he will storming of the Bastille where he was held control all the e-books, regulate the prices, and as a prisoner at the behest of his mother-indecide who gets published and why.” law along with a number of other fouler folk “Isn’t that illegal?” asked City-Fella. including some counterfeiters, a number of “Sure, but that didn’t stop the banks from cardsharps, and a great many so-called simple being too big to fail, and their successful romp people who were over their heads in debt, and through the last depression.” using the same mentality found in the English Quietly, behind the main counter back debtor’s prisons, rather than putting debtors where the coffee urns and the donuts lived, to work on fixing broken sewers or pulling Mrs. StoreKeep took a larger than usual cecrabgrass from local parks, they were interred ramic mug and adding extra sugar and cream, just to keep them off the streets. mixed a fresh cup of steaming coffee and care“Using a folded paper megaphone and fully handed it to the Curmudgeon as she said: tossing manuscript pages out of the window, “Curmudgeon,” she said, “what hapde Sade incited the people below into aiding in pened to our plans to balloon our way to his liberation by shouting through his makeRaleigh for a Moral Monday and bring the shift megaphone: ‘They are killing prisoners state’s attention to its precipitous fall into the here!’ As a result they moved de Sade to the abyss of ignorance so in the next election— hospital for the criminally insane where he was which is creeping up as we speak—the citizens released in 1791 and became chair of one of stop talking and get to the polls and vote the the many tribunals for eventual beheading.” rapscallions out?” “Before,” said Citi-Fella, “we get too deep “We’ve been sidetracked,” he said, “but as let us simplify this all a bit, OK? Exactly, what soon as the rain stops, I’ll get to work on our did Mr. Bezos do?” organization and off we will go into the wild “In a very large nutshell,” sighed Curblue yonder.” mudgeon, “he has attempted to take over “Let’s hope,” said City-Fella.

SOUTHERN COMFORT Surviving

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When I wrote my last column, little did I know that a nightmare was hiding and about to challenge my life.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

I was taken back to times in my life I thought had been pushed far back, never to awaken ever again! I was afraid and with no place to go. After spending 10 happy years in my home in Asheville, I was displaced, like so many women I have known over the years. I had no place to live at 74 years of age. My very age only intensified my predicament. Pictures of being homeless flashed in and out of my mind. It is sad to remember that many of us in the 1960s were homeless and displaced all over this country. I wandered around that afternoon in an attempt to connect with gay women in Asheville, just to ask if I could park my car in their yard so I could rest that night. Over and over

16 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

BY JUDY AUSLEY

there was no answer at their residences. I thought, “This cannot be happening to me again.” It happened to me once before in California long, long ago, but I was 21. When we are young we have no fear. We take chances, and if we are meant to be here we live on. Back to my most recent experience. Somehow, with my vehicle loaded with most of my belongings, I ended up at a Motel 6 on Tunnel Rd. I made another bad decision to come to a farm in Hendersonville’s rural countryside. I did not know what was ahead. I ended up in a homeplace that is as far back into the past as some people would ever want to go. I was not in the least bit interested in taking a trip back to an old house that had been unlived in for several years. No telephone, no TV or cable, and no

internet. The nightmare for me was still happening. I was searching for another home, but not a place that only can be described as the 1950s. “Oh my God!,” was what I exclaimed after just one day there. “I am not conditioned to live like this,” I thought. I searched from that day on to find a place I could comfortably call home, living in the fashion I was accustomed to for the past 10 years. I finally found a place. I hope I can live here and enjoy it as much as I enjoyed my townhome in Asheville. I can say it seems that every 10 years another change occurs. Speaking about the future, I remembered that in my last column I wrote, “I wonder if this is the end of me.” It could have been if it had happened at any other time in my life. Thank God my doctors in Asheville are more progressive and do not make those remarks. But, there is no stopping aging. It happens to every human being. It gives me, as a woman, horrors to think that in another 10 years I will be 84. Do I have that much time to do all I want to accomplish before exiting? It is happening to me and hundreds of thousands continued on page 33


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SVFAL at the Red House Studios and Gallery

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The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League (SVFAL) features an exciting array of art in their 47th Annual Juried Exhibit.

The exhibit is known for high quality work in a variety of media. Including drawings; oil, acrylic and water media paintings; mixed media and clay pieces; wood, found object sculpture; and glass art, to name a few. This year’s juror is Chris Groves, B.F.A. The historic Red House Studios and Galin Environmental Design, University of leries is a beautiful backdrop for the exhibit. Colorado at Boulder. Groves spent ten years as Once an annex of the old Monte Vista Hotel, an art director before studying at the Florence the Red House was refurbished and is now a Academy of Art in Italy. perfect gallery for the Annual Juried Exhibit, Chris will have his work cut out for him. as well as the SVFAL shows that are changed throughout the year. “An exhibit tends to be more interesting when it is juried and includes two and three dimensional pieces in a range of objective and nonobjective styles. The Annual Members Exhibit is popular among tourists as well as locals, as it brings out the members’ best works,” says curator Cheryl Keefer. In addition to gallery shows, the Red House has seven studios where SVFAL artists make and show their work. Studio artists Deb Anderson, Pat Cotterill and Ursula Goebels-Ellis will be featured on Ursula Goebels-Ellis, Deb Anderson, Sculpture Saturday, August 9 during the Ceramics

Suspension of Disbelief STRADDLING VARIOUS WORLDS

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Many forms of entertainment require a suspension of disbelief.

Sitcoms and rom-coms, for example, often expect one to believe that anyone can have a fabulous New York flat, that all couches face the viewer, and that no mere set of wacky circumstances can hinder true love. Science fiction, however, is a MEGAsuspension. Gravity’s not a problem, teleportation is normal, and food – including the dishes upon which it is served – are replicated in a slot in a wall. Stars go zooming by when in reality it would take forever to reach even one of them, let alone pass them in such a continuous fashion. And yet when I watch Thor traveling between Earth and Asgard, or explorers navigating a wormhole, I rarely question it. Even knowing a bit about how shows are made doesn’t affect my nerdy, Y-chromosome ability to just sit back and enjoy wonderful visual storytelling. It serves to fuel my imagination, albeit in an amped-up Walter Mitty-ish sort of way. Sci-fi provides me an alternative to the life I already know: I regularly hit the snooze alarm before shuffling out to the kitchen to feed the cat, wondering what this or that newly-arrived pain might be. And just before I spend an inordinate amount of time making

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Painting by Cheryl Keefer, SVFAL curator

monthly second Saturday Studio Show and Sale. They will offer demonstrations and refreshments from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. IF YOU An opening reception for SVFAL’s GO 47th Annual Juried Exhibit will be held

Friday, August 1 from 5-7 p.m. The exhibit runs from August 1-31, 2014, at the Red House Studios and Galleries, 310 W. State St., Black Mountain, NC. For more information visit www.svfalarts.org.

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When one has a passion – geeky or otherwise – it can lead to original moments every day!

about how cool that would be, not having to pause the Star Trek myself presentable to the Deep Space Nine world at large, I take care of marathon to raid the mundane tasks like cleaning fridge for a snack! the cat box, taking out the You may be trash, and fussing over some several sentences past bills. wondering how on Golly, the excitement earth this relates to could cause a stampede! So art. (But, then again, it’s no surprise to me that you may be used to secret agents working in a me.) I believe having warehouse full of unusual some type of personal artifacts capable of doing passion – like being Earl Grey – Hot! madcap things is more likely a sci-fi geek - grants Illustration by Greg Vineyard to grab my focus. That new one a type of balance, noise under the hood of the where a deeper sense car can wait, there’s aliens and monsters on! of creative-fueling and idea generation unfolds However, compared to some of my in part of our brains. As an illustrator, suspendfriends, I’m merely an average escapist. Enthuing disbelief and temporarily enjoying stories siasts in the art world here have very serious that are otherworldly helps me refresh and discussions about whether Marvel or DC has zero-in on the right idea for any given concept. created the better, more cohesive universe. As a working professional, I also believe And they explain to me in scientific terms that having an individual enthusiasm or two (AGAIN, ‘cause I’m kinda slow) about how helps me to be a better worker. My career one day we really will be able to bark: “Earl has always had a creative component, and I Grey Tea – Hot!” at a hole in the wall, and believe ALL work involves inventive thinking. receive exactly that. In a china cup. And it will But even for jobs that might not be deemed actually BE Earl Grey tea, not a copy. I think BY

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“creative”, having additional interests allows folks to be more refreshed and innovative on the job. This idea-generating ability makes one a bigger contributor in the workplace, being of greater service to both the core team and the company overall. Taking a real break allows one to come back refreshed, energized and ready for the next task. Why not do this all the time? When one has a passion – geeky or otherwise – it can lead to original moments every day! So, I suspend disbelief regularly - not because I’m an escapist, but rather, because I’m a realist. Even though I still have to make my tea the old-fashioned way each morning, and most of my illustrations involve my earthbound cat, spending some time in other worlds helps me remain fully-engaged and in love with this one!

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery (www. zapow.com), carries his illustrations, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 17


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Buddy Holly – August 8, 9, 10

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Four years ago Mark Jones blew audiences away when he appeared on the HART stage as Buddy Holly in Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story.

This year, HART Executive Director, Steve Lloyd, and Jones have come up with a new twist, The Buddy Holly Summer Dance Party. The production will recreate the feel of the 1950’s, bringing back the music of Holly and the Crickets, along with the Big Bopper, Richie Valens and Patsy Cline in an all music evening complete with hamburgers and hot dogs. The event will benefit HART’s building fund. Doors

to the lobby will be kept open to encourage people to dance.

IF YOU GO: HART

Mark Jones as Buddy Holly presents The Buddy Holly Summer Dance Party, August 8 & 9 at 6:30 p.m., and August 10 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $25. For reservations call (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville.

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18 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

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WAYNESVILLE

Art After Dark

The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present the August edition of Art After Dark, happening Friday, August 1. Enjoy the bountiful fruits of Haywood County’s many artists by wandering through the galleries and working studios on Main Street, Depot Street, and Frog Level. Festive Art After Dark flags denote the participating galleries, which stay open late, offering a wonderful opportunity to spend the evening viewing art, in addition to witnessing its creation. Members include the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Burr Studios, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, Art on Depot, and the Village Framer.

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$6 Adults $4 Kids $3 Matinee

Movie Showtimes

Friday: 7:45pm Saturday: 2pm, 5pm, 7:45pm Sunday: 2pm

Enjoy the bountiful fruits of Haywood County’s many artists. pg. 18

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Events this month include

Burr Studio is offering a bookbinding demonstration, conducted by local artist Becki Kollat. Her altered journals are all one of a kind, and available for purchase in the gallery. Join Becki as she shares her wonderful techniques, and enjoy refreshments. Twigs and Leaves will feature Haywood County native, Melissa Burrell, who will be demonstrating her torn paper collage technique at Art After Dark, Friday evening, from 6-9p.m. Melissa’s unique collage technique combines hand painted papers with “found” papers. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Waynesville’s Dr. Bill Stecher and delight in the savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs and Leaves Gallery is located at 98 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786. They are open Monday through Big Red, torn paper collage by Melissa Burrell Saturday 10-5:30, and Sunday 1-4; (828) 456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com. The Mahogany House will feature the heavenly Betina Morgan on the harp for your entertainment. Visit our lively gallery, for refreshments, and watch as Dawn Behling demonstrates the process of screen printing. Gallery 86 will spotlight Mark Menendez, artist, teacher and mentor. Nationally recognized painter and illustrator, Mark offers instruction to locally aspiring, and experienced artists. Stop by the gallery for refreshments, and visit with Mark and his students, many of whom are featured in the exhibit.

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HOURS:

Tues-Wed 11-6pm Thurs-Sat 11-10pm Sun 1-5pm A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

828-283-0079 www.38Main.com

MOVIES 8/1, 8/2, 8/3 – It Happened One Night 8/8, 8/9, 8/10 – God’s Not Dead 8/15, 8/16, 8/17 – Disney’s Bears 8/22, 8/23, 8/24 – Bigfoot Wars 8/29, 8/30, 8/31 – X-Men: Days of Future Past

SPECIAL EVENTS Thursday 8/21 at 7pm – Open Mic Night (6pm signup) Saturday 8/23 at 6pm – Red Carpet Gala Movie Premiere: Bigfoot Wars

38 N. MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN WAYNESVILLE

IF YOU For more information contact Twigs and Leaves Gallery GO at (828) 456-1940 or visit the Waynesville Gallery

Association at www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com.

ART at Laurel Ridge

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An exclusive viewing & sale of local art, featuring ccommunity members and invited guest artists.

See original paintings, jewelry, woodworking, quilting, pottery, furniture and much more! Artwork will be available for purchase (no credit cards please). Dine in the clubhouse from 5:30-8:30 p.m. “Flying Pasta” dinner for $15.99 by reservation only. IF YOU ART at Laurel Ridge takes place Friday, August 22 from GO 4-7 p.m. in the Pavilion at the Laurel Ridge Country

Club. Laurel Ridge Country Club, 49 Cupp Lane, Waynesville. (828) 452-0545, www.laurelridgegolf.com

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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Laugh Your Asheville Off Comedy Festival

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The Laugh Your Asheville Off Comedy festival kicks off August 13 with Chris Porter, a top three contestant during Season 4 of NBC’s Last Comic Standing.

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From Lord of The Rings to the Beatles

Artwork inspired by the British Isles, in mediums ranging from ink paintings to digital. Free beer! Live music! Meet the artists!

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com

IF YOU GO: Opening reception, Saturday, August, 2 from 7-9 p.m. Zapow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. More details at www.zapow.com.

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DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE - 28801

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Best known for his third place finish on the Season 4 of Last Comic Standing, Chris can also be seen on his own “Comedy Central Presents” special and “Live at Gotham.” Chris Porter has been a touring comic since he was 23. Since the beginning, Chris’ raw energy and unique perspective has distinguished him as one of the elite comics in the industry. Born and raised in Kansas City, Chris brings a true stand-up experience to his live shows. There are no sound cues, no puppets, and no catch phrases. Just gut wrenching laughter drawn from his own experience and observations. Catch his hit special on NETFLIX. The multi-day, multi-venue Laugh Your Asheville Off festival spotlights more than 50 of the nation’s funniest up-andcoming and established comics. The comics have hopes of turning the heads of the major TV network casting agents, talent bookers, and comedy club owners that have traveled to the festival to discover stand-up comedy’s next crop of rising talent. “We’ve received seven years of support from Asheville and we’ve been embraced by the national comic community, and have grown into one of the largest comedy festivals in the country. In return, we hope to continually raise the bar of world class entertainment while keeping ticket prices reasonable,” said Charlie Gerencer, festival producer and production company executive.

Comedians from all over the country submitted clips, hoping to secure one of the 60 performer slots. Since submissions began this year, several hundred comedians from all over the country submitted stand-up clips hoping to secure one of the 60 performer slots. The festival kicks off Wednesday, August 13, with the “Brother Wolf Animal Rescue charity show at Highland Brewing Company. A portion of the proceeds from the show will be donated to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. The largest non-competitive comedy festival in the southeast, LYAO hosts comics, industry professionals, and talent

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KELLY DENSON

Chris Porter has been a touring comic since he was 23.

producers. Previous talent have gone on to appear on network sitcoms, half-hour Comedy Central specials, and late night flagship shows like The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan, and The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson as well as many others.

About Brother Wolf Animal Rescue

Brother Wolf Animal Rescue is a No Kill organization in Asheville. They are a 501(c)(3) tax deductible corporation. In addition to offering free spay/ neuter assistance and a pet food pantry, their Behavioral Counseling and Youth Education programs help promote a better understanding of, and respect for, companion animals. The 10,000 sq. ft. Joyce B. Cambron Adoption Center, located at 31 Glendale Avenue, is home to up to 100 dogs, puppies, cats, and kittens each day. In this clean, happy, and energetic environment, animals receive mental stimulation and exercise through a variety of enrichment programs. BWAR’s dedicated volunteers and friendly adoption counselors and animal care attendants work hard to find just the right match between a potential adopter and a furry new family member. IF YOU Laugh Your Asheville Off GO Festival launch party and Brother

Wolf Animal Rescue Benefit, Wednesday, August 13. Individual show pricing: $16/ticket. Cosmo festival passes: $66-$86 for access to all shows. At Highland Brewing, 12 Old Charlotte Hwy., Asheville. Tickets are on sale now at www.laughyourashevilleoff.com.


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Fabulous & Unique Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Joyce Schlapkohl at the Asheville Gallery of Art

Joyce Schlapkohl presents Reflections of Summer, on display August 1-31. “For many years, I studied, taught and painted in watercolor,” says Joyce, who is a past president of the Blue Ridge Watermedia Society and a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina. “After a while, I felt a strong desire to switch to oils and have been painting almost exclusively in oils for the past nine years.” Reflections of Summer will feature a range of subject matter, including landscapes, flowers, still lifes, and ani-

mals. “I try to transform ordinary images into reflections of color and light,” says Joyce. “A wonderful thing about painting is that you never stop learning, never stop developing your eye. I’ve come to enjoy and appreciate the process. “Often, clear value patterns of light and shade draw me to a particular subject. Then I strive for strong design and color harmony. The changing mountain landscape, animals grazing, and flowers blooming are generally my subjects, as well as my inspiration. Painting is a solitary, nonverbal form of expressiveness that enriches my life and brings me joy.”

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SANDI ANTON

IF YOU GO: A reception

is scheduled for Friday, August 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Path Worth Taking, Asheville, across from by Joyce Schlapkohl Pritchard Park. For more details, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Jce Schlapkohl Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown H pg. 20

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain “Summer Rain” by Rick Hills

Porchoir painting with handmade bark frame pg. 20

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1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

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Cedar Hill Studios, Waynesville WC

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www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

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Grace Carol Bomer

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Asheville has been a nurturing community for artist Grace (Carol) Bomer. An arts review in the Asheville Citizen Times once called her work “a silent form of poetry.” Thirty years later, Carol’s paintings are still a silent form of poetry suggesting metaphors that allude to the extravagant mystery of God’s grace. Poetry from Michael O’Brien’s novel, Island of the World, inspired the image featured on this month’s cover. The In the Path of the Wind, image, entitled One by Grace C. Bomer Who Came On the Waters of Time II, is about a grace story that is transcendent and eternal. The painting encapsulates her desire to fathom this grace that surrounds us and her desire to be washed in words and images that proclaim beauty and truth.

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Beneath The Waves

To you, the one who came on the waters of time, like a swimmer, you passed in front of my eyes at the very moment when hope was sinking low...

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

The work is part of the Vessel Series, which focuses on journey and pilgrimage. We are vessels, voyagers, and seamen. The journey of life is sacramental (i.e. sacred) in that we are vessels created in the image of God to proclaim His glory. We have an insatiable longing for worship and the spiritual because we are One Who Came On The Waters of Time II, by Grace C. Bomer. created to worship – to “give worth to” – God who created us. If we do not worship God, we will worship something or someone. The spiritual world is as real as the material world and we long to apprehend and see it. This is where the artist comes in. Federico Fellini, one of the most influential filmmakers of the 20th century, said, “What is an artist? A provincial who finds himself somewhere between a physical reality and a metaphysical one… It’s this inbetween that I’m calling a province, this frontier country between the tangible world and the intangible one which is really the realm of the artist.” continued on page 23


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fine art

‘Grace C. Bomer’ cont’d from page 22

An artist makes visible the invisible. Or another way to say it, the artist makes pictures of, or “gives flesh to,” ideas and words, and to realities both seen and unseen. Art is incarnational. It puts flesh on spiritual and unseen things. Grace Bomer’s art is incarnational. She longs to “speak” God’s story into the world in a way that takes seriously the grace of a Creator who chose not merely to create but to interact with that creation, to engage with humanity in nothing less than the beauty and mess of human-form himself. This is the truth of the Incarnation. The God-man, Jesus, entered time and space. “The Word became flesh and lived among us,” and we have seen his glory” (John 1). He came to give life to spiritual corpses. He makes visible the invisible, “and he holds all things together by the Word of his power.” He is Word and image. Our human condition is broken and separated from God – our words and images are manipulated for power. But grace is possible! Grace’s painting, Voyagers, has been selected for a soon-to-be-published North Light book on cold wax painting by Serena Barton.

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Grace works at a studio in Asheville’s River District at 140 D Roberts Street. When she has time, she teaches oil and cold Voyagers, by Grace C. wax workBomer, has been selected shops. Carol for a book on cold wax has shown painting by Serena Barton. nationally and internationally—from the Asheville Art Museum to the Karas Gallery in Kiev, Ukraine. In 2003, she taught and spoke at Luxan Academy of Fine Art in Shenyang, China. Her work is currently traveling in Spain with Arte-FE. www.gracecarolbomer.com IF YOU Works by Grace Carol Bomer are on GO display through August 28 at Andrew

Charles Gallery at Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville. Call (828) 989-0111 for details.

at the

2014 BENEFIT AUCTION & GALA

for the WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA AIDS PROJECT

Saturday, October 11, 2014 Doubletree by Hilton, Asheville - Biltmore Reception & Silent Auction 6:00 pm Live Auction & Dinner 8:00 pm

Leah Karpen, Honorary Chair Andrew Brunk, Auctioneer Tickets $125 on sale now at wncapgala.org or 252-7489 ext. 310

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

Asheville’s Gay Bar

An Alternative Industrial Bar

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Create your own

JEwElRy www.visionsofcreation.com

This 8 hour class includes all your tools, silver and your choice of stone, no experience necessary. Classes are small (2 students). $350 per person.

It’s Fun. It’s Educational. It’s a beautiful memento of your visit to the mountains.

For further information or to schedule your hands-on class call

828-669-0065

Students will learn shop safety, metal cutting, basic forming and soldering. Each class will focus on simple to intermediate level projects that students can complete and develop confidence. Jewelry design will be discussed.

Master skills and techniques under the guidance of designer

Roberto Vengoechea 100 Cherry Street pg. 36

Black Mountain, NC

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Create your own one-of-a-kind masterpiece from start to finish in our fully equipped studio.

Go home with your hand-crafted jewelry that you created. No experience necessary. All supplies included. Jewelry classes for rings or pendants available.

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arts & crafts

Wood & Wine

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ASHLEY VAN MATRE

Grovewood Gallery opens an exhibition space dedicated solely to fine wood art.

Wood & Wine features contemporary sculptural and functional wood art by some of the most highly respected national and international artists in the field. Grovewood’s new exhibition space currently features more than 50 pieces The Dervish by ranging from unadorned functional forms to complex Alain Mailland sculptural work. This rotating collection will feature works by different artists throughout the year. All of the items will be available for purchase.

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FIRST FRIDAY ART WALKS

Friday, August 1 & Friday, September 5 from 5-8 p.m. Stroll galleries, meet the artists and enjoy refreshments. Through December in downtown Hendersonville and Flat Rock. Art Cover Show – “Indian Summer” by Myxolydian Master James Davis, has been selected by Hendersonville Magazine to be their 2014-2015 cover image. Stop by the studio to see his work on display. Art In The Park...ing Lot – Saturday, August 9 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. See local artists and jewelers in the parking lot of Art MoB. Applications accepted for artists, jewelers & craftsmen. Booth fee is $35. Second Saturdays through September.

IF YOU GO: Wood & Wine celebration takes place Thursday, August 7 from 12-6 p.m. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Rd, Asheville. Call (828) 253-7651, or visit www. grovewood.com/wood for details.

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CLASSES

SVFAL’s 47th Annual

Juried Art Show August 1-31, 2014

Celebrate the End of Summer with ABIPA! Spend Sunday Afternoon in the Country for our

Community Cook-Out at Hickory Nut Gap Farm Sunday, August 31 ~ 5-8PM ~ Fairview, NC Adults $15; Couples $25; Family $30 (2 adults + children)

Local Food, Music, Hiking, Pony Rides, Auction & More!

Groups of 10 or more, $10 each person

(828) 251-8364, www.abipa.org

Call toll-free: 1-800-381-7278

Are You Still Paying Too Much For Your Medications?

Cheryl Keefer

You can save up to 93% when you fill your prescriptions at our Canadian and International prescription service. Their

Price

~ at the Historic ~

Red House Gallery Black Mountain, NC 310 W. State Street 828-669-0351 Presented by the Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League pg. 36

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www.SVFALarts.org

24 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

Bottle A Manufactured By PfizerTM.

Our

CelebrexTM $679.41 Typical US brand price for 200mg x 100

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Get An Extra $10 Off & Free Shipping On Your 1st Order!

Call the number below and save an additional $10 plus get free shipping on your first prescription order with Canada Drug Center. Expires December 31, 2014. Offer is valid for prescription orders only and can not be used in conjunction with any other offers. Valid for new customers only. One time use per household.

Order Now! Call Toll-Free: 1-800-381-7278

Canvas & Corks – Share a bottle of wine and paint with friends. Many different fun classes. August 13 or 27 or September 24, 6-8 p.m., or Tuesday afternoons. $35, supplies included. Rug Hooking – Learn the basics. August 7, 14 & 21, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond. Bob Ross Painting – Instruction on painting landscapes. Different subject each class. August 6, 23 or 27, 12-4 p.m., $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry. Scratch Art – Learn scratch methods on boards. August 18, 12-3 p.m., $40, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display. Gourd Art – Different techniques taught in each class. August 17 or September 8, 1:304:30 p.m., $42, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display. Watercolor Gouache Resist Painting – Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. August 19, 1-4 p.m., $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display. Introduction to Drawing – Foundations, contour, tones and light, perspective and shading. Class is 3 weeks. Dates TBD. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $90 plus supplies. Instructor: Donna McMahon All Levels Drawing – Sketching, ellipses, shading, perspective, etc. August 7, 14 & 21, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $90. Pencils and charcoal supplied. Bring paper or sketch book. Instructor: Donna McMahon.

Use code 10FREE to receive this special offer.

Please note that we do not carry controlled substances and a valid prescription is required for all prescription medication orders. Prescription price comparison above is valid as of May 1, 2014. All trade-mark (TM) rights associated with the brand name products in this ad belong to their respective owners.

Call Toll-free: 1-800-381-7278

Art MoB Studios & Marketplace

124 4th Avenue East in Hendersonville (828) 693-4545, www.artmobstudios.com


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What’s Ok?

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~ Charlotte Joko Beck (from Everyday Zen)

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misery is not out there, it is in here, in our own minds. This is very similar to Eckhart Tolle addressing the suffering issue by expressing it in terms of being in resistance to what is. Are you in emotional resistance to something? – then, it must be causing you unhappiness and some degree of suffering. Again, very useful, yet, still a bit abstract. Just what does “resistance” mean? There’s nothing abstract about whether you are OK with something or not. When you are not OK with something, you know it. What Zen is teaching us is that if you can know it, you can work with it, and in working with it, you can transform your attitude toward it. You can grow from a state of not-OK to OK. In other words, you can grow from suffering to not suffering, from resistance to acceptance. Eckhart Tolle teaches us that “pain is not suffering; pain plus story is suffering.” Do you see? Pay attention to the next time

Don’t Be Afraid of Your Food

“I’m afraid my food was grown in poor soil and doesn’t have the right nutrition.”

“What if my food has been contaminated by pesticides?” “Will I get cancer from my food?” “Did someone irradiate my food?” “Do I need to avoid certain types of food?” These are questions heard by nutritionists every day from concerned people – who are misinformed. The misinformation comes from multiple sources: those who have a “safer” product to sell, a “back to nature” agenda, or those who have done their research on fear-mongering web-sites. And some – also as fearful – are “helping” to spread “the truth” about the “dangerous” condition of food. The truth is – in general – food in the United States is safe. We eat food for the nutritional elements it contains – the vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, carbohydrates, amino acids, fats, and fiber. If the plant is deficient in some nutritional element, it will look off-color,

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“One way to evaluate our practice is to see whether life is more and more OK with us… More and more we know that whatever happens, however much we hate it, however much we have to struggle with it – in some way, it’s OK… We grow in understanding and appreciation of the perfection of each moment… we grow in being able to say, ‘Yes, it’s OK.” The central purpose of Buddhist teaching and practice is to understand and overcome the causes of human emotional suffering, yet, “suffering” is a rather vague and abstract term. Mostly we associate the word with extreme physical and emotional pain, and while Buddhism’s use of the word certainly contains these extreme and obvious examples, it really is also meant to address mental states of far greater subtlety. We know it must mean being unhappy, even miserable, but it doesn’t give us a good practical handle on understanding where this unhappiness, this misery, is coming from and what we can do. We too easily associate suffering with its infliction by sources and conditions outside ourselves, rather than as a state of mind within us, when in fact, that’s precisely what it is. That’s why I so greatly appreciated Charlotte Joko Beck’s bringing the issue of suffering and enlightenment down to a most practical level. She asks: Are you OK? And tells us, that if there’s something in your life with which you are not OK, that’s the growth edge of your practice. It’s you who is not OK with something, not that the something is not OK in itself. Our suffering, unhappiness and

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deformed, stunted. These elements are just as essential for the plant as they are for us. If the plant looks healthy, it has the nutritional elements it needs – and that you need. Some thin-skinned foods – like berries and apples – can become contaminated with pesticides, especially if they are over-utilized. But foods that have thick skins or foods in which we normally peel off the outer layer – like oranges and some vegetables – only need to be washed. This includes most leafy vegetables – washed not so much for the pesticides as for the hands that picked and processed them. Pesticides are responsible for 2% of cancers. High fat foods cooked at extreme temperatures increase cancer risk by 36%. Which one is more risky? Radiation of foods kills germs; it does not alter the nutritional elements of food. Radiation can alter the DNA of living cells to become cancerous; it does not alter dead foods. Radiation is not “stored” or trapped in foods. You can’t “eat” radiation. The latest fear fads include eating “gluten

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your dog or cat is sick or injured. They don’t suffer. They are just slowed down, incapacitated by the sickness or injury in some way. Remember the last time you were significantly sick or injured. If you are like most of us, you suffered not only with whatever actual incapacitation you experienced, you suffered mentally. You were not OK with being sick or injured. You had a story in your mind about how not OK it was , even scary, to be sick or injured. Your dog or cat is OK with being sick or injured; they have not created a story of affliction by the sickness or injury. We human beings tend to do just that. We tell ourselves a story of how it is not OK to be sick or injured, or financially broke, or in relationship crisis, or to have a difficult boss or co-workers, or that world and national or local politics are not going the way we want, and so we suffer. Taking this further, Joko Beck asks us, would it be OK with you if you were told you have one more day to live? Or if your arms and legs had to be amputated? Or if you were never again to receive a kind or friendly or encouraging word from anyone? Or if you had to be in pain and bedridden for the rest of your life? And her list goes on through some gruesome, awful scenarios. She then says, “to answer ‘OK’ is the enlightened state,” while acknowledging that she herself (this acknowledged Zen Master) cannot say OK to these things. She goes on

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to say: “for something to be OK, it doesn’t mean that I didn’t scream, or cry, or protest, or hate it. Singing and dancing are the voice of the dharma, and screaming and moaning are the voice of the dharma. For these things to be OK for me doesn’t mean that I’m happy about them. If they’re OK, what does that mean? What is the enlightened state? When there is no longer any separation between myself and the circumstances of my life, whatever they may be.” This is what Tolle means by no resistance. It’s not about being passive or numb. It’s about being wise. For the truth is that in all these scenarios, we become OK with these circumstances through the passage of time, as the separation between our self-image and the reality of our situation disappears, as we get use to being an amputee, a political prisoner or a chronic pain patient – or blind, or deaf, or battle with cancer, or adjust to going broke. Being OK means we no longer are victims of our circumstance, we no longer experience being victims. We just live with what we’ve got to live with and don’t fill our minds with stories of how horrible it is. When we become OK with whatever Life continued on page 36

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

free” and adding nutritional supplements to the diet. Some people have food intolerances; they cannot process some foods like other people. They should follow the old adage: “if it makes you sick, don’t eat it.” The rest of us DO NOT have to worry about gluten or any other substance which we tolerate well. Likewise – be careful with supplements. Any nutritional element, taken in larger than normal amounts, is a medicine with side effects and unintended reactions, some of which are dangerous. Know what the normal levels of a supplement should be; don’t oversupplement. Most food-caused illnesses are due to contamination in unhygienic food processing. Food should be inspected, packaged properly, cleaned, served from a clean kitchen on clean dishes, and put away in a fridge after serving. All these strategies are good public health recommendations that have been in place for decades – though not always followed. Don’t be afraid of your food. Be food smart.

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spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

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It’s hot time, Summer in the City but that doesn’t slow down the music. This month delivers a bit of genre hopping, as I cover music ranging from country to symphonic rock and all points in between. As always, Rapid River Magazine readers are encouraged to support their local music stores; they’re a big part of what keeps Asheville cool!

Joe Henry Invisible Hour Ear Music

These are songs about “marriage as a verb, not a noun” writes the perpetually undervalued Joe Henry in the liner notes for his thirteenth studio album. In doing so he sets the tone for this purposefully connected stream of powerhouse songs; life is tough and growing older can be a struggle, but if you’re going to sign on the bottom line of matrimony you’d better be prepared for the hard work ahead. Invisible Hour deals with the heavy lifting of relationships, and while it’s a record steeped in love-the real kind that authentic grownups engage in-there’s nary a trace of Pollyanna romance or contrived cynicism. Henry spells things out in terms that are brutally honest, direct, and deeply reflective, all the while giving us a dose of his unparalleled skills as a wordsmith. There’s the fragile nature of relationships (“Sparrow”), the unrequited side of longing (the epic nine minute “Sign”) and the regret that comes with words spoken in anger or unspoken in shame (“The Water Between Us”). Backed by his longtime band of drummer Jay Bellerose, bassist Jennifer Condos, and multi-instrumentalist Greg Leisz, Henry himself assumes the production chores for Invisible Hour, striping things down to basics (with the tasteful exception of occasional horns and backing vocals courtesy of the Milk Carton Kids) which allows the beauty of the lyrics and Henry’s soulful and dynamic voice to resonate through. The album’s sound is neither overly fussy nor needlessly sparse; after three decades of making records Henry, himself an in demand producer, clearly knows his stuff. It would be misleading to suggest Invisible Hour sets some new standard for Joe Henry. His register of albums is so consistently brilliant that simply maintaining such a level is impressive enough. But in its own way it does move his music in a new direction, guided by his aging into his 50s as well as his keen mastering of the craft of songwriting and recording. Either way, it’s a haunting and powerful collection of songs by an artist whose creative well seems to never run dry. *****

Amen Dunes Love (an LP recorded in 2013) Sacred Bones Records

Amen Dunes is the nomenclature under which Philadelphia native Damon McMahon creates his mesmerizing blend of atmospheric folk and psychedelia. His earliest

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albums, recorded under his own name, reveled in sprawling layers of overly dense packed rhythms, sonic idolatry, and layered vocals that while garnering a certain degree of hipster press, where somewhat impenetrable affairs. As such, Love is a startling shift in gears, a sea of change that takes him further away from that point of departure in much the same way Beck’s Mutations was the yin to Mellow Gold’s yang. The result is an album that more clearly defines who McMahon is-an artist-there’s far less gimmick and much more gift. The album kicks off with “White Child” one of his most appealing songs to date and one which hints at what’s to follow. “Lonely Richard” is as close to pop engagement as McMahon is ever likely to get-its lively hook and sing along bounce might be off putting to long-time fans but this is clearly a new and brighter day. But long-time fans should rest assured that not all is bright and sunny. “Splits Are Parted” and “Lilac In Hand” lean back towards the “weird for weird’s sake” but do so in ways that are far more digestible and likely to stay in your consciousness. The dainty throwaway “Sixteen” is a brilliantly understated gem as McMahon, accompanied only by his playful piano work, sings a lovely lament to romance gone by. What really sets Love apart is the meticulous ways in which McMahon constructs a series of story arcs that build logically upon themselves. I cannot imagine the songs being sequenced any differently than they are while still retaining the immediacy and depth this album espouses. It’s far and away his most accessible work but that accessibility in no way sacrifices the richness and grace of the songs; and while I generally avoid such simple comparisons, it’s hard not to think that fans of Beck Hansen ought to be embracing this creative and endlessly enjoyable nugget. ****

Craig Bickhardt The More I Wonder Stone Barn Records

Subtitled 12 Scenes from Life, Love and Family, the fifth album from folkie Craig Bickhardt is a densely packed collection of ruminative songs, observations of the mundane details of everyday life that are extraordinary in their precision and empathy. Bickhardt’s voice has a warm and timeless quality to it-equal parts world weary resignation and relentless optimism-that compliments the songs without distracting from them. It also drives home the authority of his lyrics; “…It was always the madness of the drink you were driven to / I guess in the end those were the bars you were singing through…”

“Crazy Nightingale” is a pretty fair example of the ways in which Bickhardt can sum up the struggles of the ordinary in a sentence or two. And while Bickhardt has a knack for the universal, one construct of the album is a deeply personal one; the struggles of his handicapped son. In the liner notes, accompanied by a 20 page booklet of photos and essays, Bickhardt writes about “becoming the father of this very brave kid who has overcome a lot of the challenges he’s faced with cerebral palsy.” It’s a sentiment any parent can relate to and one which speaks volumes about the generosity of spirit and the solid songwriting and performing that gives The More I Wonder its punch. ***1/2

Renaissance Symphony of Light

MRI/Symphonic Rock Recordings

First a bit of history: Renaissance’s original incarnation was founded in The album’s 1969 by ex-Yardbirds gorgeous cover members Keith Relf painting was and Jim McCarty, as a created by neo-progressive folkAnnie Haslam. rock ensemble. The band released a pair of modestly successful albums before the two departed, essentially turning Renaissance over to then aspiring vocalist Annie Haslam. For the next four decades players would come and go, but Haslam, classically trained and gifted with a three-octave range, has been the mainstay. Besides Haslam, the lineup featured on Symphony of Light includes Michael Dunford on guitar, the twin keyboards of Rave Tesar and Jason Hart, drummer Frank Pagano, and bassist David Hayes, with all members contributing various levels of support vocals. Sadly, Dunford, to whom the album is rightfully dedicated, died just prior to its completion. Symphony of Light falls somewhere between folk rock and New Age (a label that carries more negative connotation than it should), with an abundance of lengthy songs, semi-mystical lyrics, orchestral arrangements, and guest appearances by Ian Anderson (of Jethro Tull), and Yes bassist John Wetton, both longtime collaborators and friends. It kicks off to an audacious start – a ten minute plus title track – and consistently returns to its core topics of reawakening, natural beauty, the search for true love and inspiration, and the creative muse within us all. The sound is deeply layered and meticulous (sometimes overly so) and, buoyed by Haslam’s striking voice (best evidenced on “Cry to The World” and “Renaissance Man”), ‘CD’s’ continued on page 25


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Jack Bruce Silver Rails

Esoteric Antenna

It’s been a full decade since Jack Bruce released a studio album, years during which he lent his creative brilliance to a variety of projects, most notably his high profile and too brief reunion with Cream. His last solo effort, 2003’s More Jack Than God, paired Bruce with producer Rob Cass and found the ever restless Scotsman collaborating with a dazzling array of younger musicians who share his fondness for unwavering experimentation. For his latest offering Bruce brings back John Medeski and Cindy Blackman Santana, who worked with him on his Tony Williams Lifetime tribute band Spectrum Road, and adds his son Malcolm, guitar legends Phil Manzanera, Robin Trower, and other notables to the mix. Again pairing with longtime lyricists Pete Brown and Kip Hanrahan, Bruce has written some of the most diverse and complicated songs of his storied career. From powerful rockers (the surprisingly political “Drone”) to the R & B inflected “Reach for the Night” Bruce is in brilliant form, exploring and mastering every musical form he touches. And while his vocals aren’t as forceful as they once were – after all the man is well into his seventies – Bruce’s bass lines remain as endlessly inventive and supple as ever. In

Silver Rails is rife with musical surprises.

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Toadies Hop into The Orange Peel

‘CD’s’ continued from page 24

it’s the sort of album that would appeal to musicians (the sheer musical craft is stunning), and those with a greater spiritual curiosity than I. More than once I found myself largely ignoring the repetitive nature of the lyrics, and focusing on the gorgeous harmonies and intricate arrangements that have long been the trademark of this band. Few groups have had such distinct histories as have Renaissance, and still fewer groups have consistently reinvented themselves in response to shifting personnel. That alone is worthy of respect. Symphony of Light is not necessarily an album that appeals to my tastes but it’s certainly one I can recommend for those who enjoy New Age music that stirs their consciousness. I’ll also give props to the album’s gorgeous cover painting – Haslam is an accomplished and committed painter – and to the loving nature that obviously went into its making. With Dunford’s passing there is no telling what future if any is in store for this renowned band but I for one hope they soldier on, following their own journey and doing what they love. ****

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While perhaps best known for their 1995 grunge breakthrough “Possum Kingdom” the Toadies have a long and sturdy history, one which roughly correlates with the musical trends of the past quarter century.

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The band emerged out of Fort Worth, Texas, in 1989; the earliest incarnations were noted for the ever shifting nature of their personnel. From the start, musicians cycled in and out of the band’s lineup but by 1991 guitarist/vocalist Todd Lewis had emerged as their implicit front man. Lewis, heavily influenced by a wide range of artists and particularly fond of the Pixies, wrote and produced the Toadies’ early recordings. Following the release of a series of homemade tapes, the band’s line up began to stabilize and jell. Drummer Mark Reznicek was bought into the fold and the band began work on a proper effort. The EP Pleather was released in 1993. It attracted the attention of the suits at Interscope Records who signed the Toadies soon afterwards. Buoyed by a larger budget and major label support, the Toadies quickly returned to the studio with producers Tom Rothrock and Rob Schnapf, who had recently scored a major hit with Beck’s platinum-selling album Mellow Gold. 1994’s Rubberneck continued their success, largely on the strength of the oddly metered but endlessly engaging “Possum Kingdom.” With replacement guitarist Clark Vogeler joining the band, The Toadies settled into a routine of near constant touring, playing high-profile shows with the likes of Bush, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and the Butthole Surfers. Yet not all was right in the Toadies’ universe. Producing a worthy follow-up to Rubberneck proved a challenge.

that regard he simply has no match. “Fields of Forever” is a keyboard driven delight (Bruce is a woefully underrated pianist) while “Rusty Lady” takes more than a few lyrical jabs at Margaret Thatcher. “Hidden Cities” is classic Jack Bruce, walking a tightrope between blues, rock, and jazz with distinction and vitality. But the best is saved for last, ending the album with a flourish; “No Surrender” is a full bore, rock and roll masterpiece, reminding us that while Bruce is an intellectual jazzman, he’s a rocker at heart. Silver Rails is rife with musical surprises, a risk taking and thunderous album that, while not quite the highlight of his long and illustrious career, stands as clear evidence that Jack Bruce is one of the most consistently brilliant and adventurous voices of the past five decades. ****1/2

The band returned to the studio in 1997, working up a slate of new material with plans to release a new album, tentatively titled Feeler. However, Interscope balked at the new songs and permanently shelved the project. Disenchanted with this turn of events the band The Toadies: Mark Reznicek, Clark Vogeler, Doni Blair and opted to take a break and esTodd Lewis (far right). Photo: Matt Cooper sentially lay dormant for the remainder of the decade. scene-and hit the road, albeit on a slightly The Toadies eventually resumed their more limited scale. pace in 2001, salvaging some songs from the 2010 finally saw the release of the Feeler sessions and recording new materiallong delayed Feeler, again on the Kirtland their long-awaited Hell Below/Stars Abovelabel, but since Interscope still owned the again produced by the team of Rothrock and rights to the original master tapes the band Schnapf. Buoyed by strong reviews and solid opted to rerecord the songs. Since 2012’s sales The Toadies embarked on a national release of Play/Rock/Music they’ve been tour. But in mid tour longtime bassist Lisa touring steadily, reconnecting with their Umbarger announced her decision to quit fan base and hopefully introducing new the band; rather than soldier on the rest of the audiences to the Toadies Universe. That group followed suit, offering up a live album expansion includes a mid-August show to fulfill their contractual obligations. that is certain to be one of Asheville’s most The remaining members splintered into highly anticipated late summer concerts. various bands — Reznicek pursued his love of country music with his band Eleven Hundred Springs while Todd Lewis fronted The Burden Brothers. Still, the Toadies continued IF YOU The Toadies (with opening band to play the occasional one off gig and talk of an GO Black Fire Pistol) on Sunday, August eventual reunion was often in the air. In 2008, 10. Doors open at 7 p.m. for this 8 Lewis, Reznicek, and Vogeler banded together p.m. show. Tickets are $20 in advance and to record No Deliverance (Kirtland Records) $23 for day of show. Limited seating. Must and finalized plans for a tour. They were be 18 years or older. The Orange Peel, 101 joined by longtime friend Doni Blair — himBiltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837, self a veteran of the Dallas/Fort Worth music www.theorangepeel.net.

Wink Keziah Cowbilly Great South Records

No one will ever accuse Charlotte, NC, born and raised Wink Keziah of being the most polished or articulate singer around but there’s no denying the rough honesty and “take me as I am” earthiness he brings to the table. And that working man approach plays to his advantage, setting him apart from the mainstream middle of the road country singers who seem to dominate the current music scene. In the manner of say Ernest Tubb (or to a much lesser extent Johnny Cash) Keziah

delivers a realism and gut level directness that ideally matches his music and message. He sings about the everyday nuances of real life with an acute and discerning eye, and if his songs aren’t models of articulation that’s probably okay by him. This is music that’s far more about connection than coolness. It kicks off with the jaunty “When I Get Paid,” the sort of song you’ve heard before but somehow never gets old, and moves right into the ‘on the road again and missing my family’ solitude of “Cincinnati.” “Dead Man Walking” gives the album some nice emotional oomph while the somber “Time to Move On” cuts right to the core, the level of pain only a broken heart can bring. Cowbilly might not be an album that’s going to change your life but for a rainy Saturday listen it hits the mark just fine. ***

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 27


COPYEDITING &

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PROOFREADING SERVICES A sharp eye for the big picture and the small details. Books • Websites Short Stories • Cookbooks Assistance with Self Publishing

Kathleen Colburn www.aptitudeforwords.com

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THE WRITERS’ WORKSHOP One-day intensive classes, for any level writer, meet Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 387 Beaucatcher Rd. Registration is in advance only, by mail or register online at www.twwoa.org.

Saturday, August 2 Creating and Publishing the Poetry Chapbook with Richard Krawiec This workshop will explore poetic revision strategies, and ways to identify themes and organize poems into a collection for submission. Information about submitting to literary publishers will also be discussed. Bring up to ten poems to the class for review. 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members.

Saturday, August 16 Writing for Magazines, Journals & Newspapers with Jodi Helmer Learn how to develop ideas for articles, and how to turn life experiences into essays for national magazines, newspapers and literary journals. Discussion will cover the elements of a successful article, what editors are looking for, how to submit your work and where to find the best markets for publishing stories and essays. 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members.

FOR MORE DETAILS call (828) 254-8111, email writersw@gmail.com, or visit www. twwoa.org. The Writers’ Workshop, 387

Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville.

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

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I am grateful for Mary Oliver’s ‘wild and precious’ world. Yes, it exists in Texas. Our days were wind-dizzy; road side cactus prevalent. Flat land with hill country lay in the distance. I expected cowboys to whoop down the highway. (I did see some whooping cowboys, but not on the interstate.) Yes, we drove. Yes, we got off the interstate and took the Natchez Trace in Mississippi. It was slow going. Slow is the operative word. Mary Oliver would never see foxes, fawns, or otters from the interstate. I admit, I complained at our snail pace. My husband’s middle name should be Patience. (It is Oscar, instead.) Before I began this column, I flipped through John Fox’s book, Finding What You Didn’t Lose: Expressing Your Truth and Creativity Through Poem-Making. One chapter is titled, ‘Eternity In An Hour’. I began to wonder, is gratitude secular or sacred? The first poem in the chapter is e. e. cummings’s poem which begins, “i thank You God for most this amazing/day”. Then there is a selection from Kahlil Gibran, which begins, “I say yes and ever yes.” That’s gratitude for you! William Blake wrote, “Everything that lives is holy;” Rilke, “To praise is the whole

Summer Reads

MALAPROP’S STAFF PICKS FOR SUMMER READING

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Kendra: The Quick written by Lauren Owen The vampire trend may have grown cold, but Lauren Owen’s novel brings the Victorian monster back to vigorous life. The Quick is deliciously moody and atmospheric, written in the tradition of Stoker’s Dracula and seeming – miraculously – almost as fresh. A superb mix of horror, drama, and intrigue, this book makes for perfect summer entertainment. If you can manage it to read it in a creaky old house, on a quiet night, with no one else around – well, so much the better.

Lauren N.: Pretty Deadly Vol. 1 written by Kelly Sue DeConnick “...Sound the bell’s knell that calls her from hell, Ginny rides for you on the wind my child, death rides on the wind!” Let yourself get swept up in the epic tales of Death’s half mortal daughter, Ginny the Reaper of Vengeance, in this gritty, mythological western adventure series.

28 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

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CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

GRATITUDE IS MY WORD FOR THE MONTH

My husband and I just returned from a visit to West Texas.

828-581-9031

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thing!” I could go on. You could add to a growing list of thanksgivings by writers. Is gratitude sacred or secular? Yes. Get out your poetry toolbox. Take a walk and look for the right rock, leaf, feather, or twig. Carry it home. Hold it in awe. Listen for the voice of your object. Yesterday, walking on the lycopodium trail in Bent Creek, I found half of a white eggshell. It fit my thumb like skull cap. I listened. It wouldn’t talk to me. What would an empty eggshell say? I’ll take it with me to Minnesota. There will be time to listen. I will sit by a North Woods lake, listen for the loon’s cry, hope I’m not late for Lady Slipper blooms, and that the dock hasn’t floated away. I will bring my heavy wool sweater. The Polar Vortex is acting up. I will sit still in a canoe. I will walk the forest path. I will visit Itasca State Park where the Mississippi emerges. Our job as writers is to practice, every day, how to pay attention. I’ve said it before; I’ll repeat myself. Stop. Look. Listen. In his first poem in A Timbered Choir, Wendell Berry writes: I go among trees and sit still. All my stirring becomes quiet around me like circles on water.

Alsace: Fourth of July Creek written by Smith Henderson Smith Henderson’s tale of a young man and (possibly) former alcoholic social worker in early ‘80s Montana is a dark tale. But the plot and characters are so fantastic, and the prose so gorgeous that I couldn’t set it down.

Justin: Joe, written by Larry Brown Originally published about two decades ago, Brown’s most successful novel has recently been reprinted thanks to a film adaptation that came out earlier this year. The result is an opportunity to discover one of the South’s most overlooked writers with Joe, easily the author’s most successful novel. This book, about hard living in rural Mississippi, is surprisingly touching, humane and genuine, pushed forward by Brown’s wonderful prose.

Tickets for Tom Robbins on Sale Now! Author Tom Robbins (Even Cowgirls Get the Blues) reading and booksigning at 3 p.m. on Saturday, September 13. Tickets are $29.95 and come with a copy of Tibetan Peach Pie. Purchase at Malaprop’s or call (828) 254-6734. Tickets are not available online. Limited to 200 people. Malaprops Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville.

I’ll let Ludwig van Beethoven have a word.

Think of Me Kindly by Ludwig van Beethoven Surrounded by nature’s beauty, often I sit for hours while my senses feast upon the spectacles of nature. Here the majestic sun is not concealed . . . . here the blue sky is my sublime roof. When in the evening I contemplate the sky in wonder and the host of luminous bodies continually revolving within their orbits, suns or earths by name, then my spirit rises beyond these constellations so many millions of miles away. From Think of Me Kindly: Thoughts on friendship, nature, love and creativity from the letters of Ludwig van Beethoven, edited by Susan Polis Schutz.

On Friday, August 1, at 7 p.m. at Calvary Episcopal Church, I will play cello, read poems, and be part of a confluence of nature photography by Ruthie Rosauer. We call our collaboration, Poemscapes. Admission to this event is one jar of peanut butter for Calvary’s Food Pantry. Ruthie’s cards with photos from around the world (including Monet’s house) will be for sale, as well as framed collages of my poetry and her nature photography. Y’all come. It’s my birthday! IF YOU Poemscapes, reading and photographic GO collaboration with music, Friday, August

1, at 7 p.m. at Calvary Episcopal, 2840 Hendersonville Road. Check out our website: Poemscapes.wordpress.com I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

POETRIO Sunday, August 3 at 3 p.m. Readings and signings by three poets at 3 p.m. Featured poets are Janice Fuller (On the Bevel), Laurence Avery (Mountain Gravity), and Ron Moran (The Jane Poems).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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Messages to the Heart, Reflections of Beauty and Truth

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WRITTEN BY ELISE AND PHIL OKREND

“People are pulled to places. Sometimes they don’t know why. They just listen to the call.”

Elise and Phil Okrend have found home in Asheville. Elise’s art is at home here and things have fallen into place in many ways. They also saw the area as the perfect place to introduce their book. These Messages To The Heart are gracefully spoken and beautifully painted. They are messages that my heart welcomes. Every image urges me to pause. Every passage speaks to me, carrying ideas and wisdom that remind me how essential this path of self-discovery is. Phil says, “I truly believe that this book can help people make authentic changes in their lives. And I think that it can get them to a place of empowerment, wisdom and peace. It’s not by telling them what to do, but stripping away the illusions that limit their growth and potential.” The passages are ordered so that you move from letting go, removing obstacles to your authentic self, feeling alive with trust and positivity, to an empowered place of wisdom and higher consciousness. This is the kind

pREVIEW BY

KATHLEEN COLBURN

New book by local Asheville couple! of book that you want to spend contemplative time with. We’re drawn to a passage, its image, and given an opportunity to reflect on a visceral connection; an emotional or intuitive understanding of what the image is saying. I asked Elise about the connection between the images and the passages. “With some of the images the connection is immediate and clear. Others leave you to spend time with them and allow your own connection to form.” This is not a book to just read and put away. It is a book that will continue to beckon you to open its pages for the wisdom that it holds. Wherever you open to, you’re given insight to move you along on your path. Phil says, “In a world of distraction, this book calls you home.” For Elise and Phil, their book is as much a celebration of creativity as it is a guide to help

Realizing Emerald City

FIND YOUR TRUE POWER ON THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD

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Alcoholics Anonymous is a well documented program that has restored hope for millions by changing their lives.

The Rainbow Gates are focused on: True Power True Purpose True Peace True Partnership True Prosperity The release date for Realizing Emerald City is August 1, 2014. Look for it on www.Amazon.com. Visit www.RealizingEmeraldCity.Pubslush.com

True rags to riches stories abound in the original 12-steps’ programs. Why should the “Anonymous people” have the corner on life-changing miracles? Most recovering people wished the rest of the world could get hold of this wonLydia Scott, is a derful program for spiritual awakening. Now everyone can access these miracles. counselor, spiritual advisor and Realizing Emerald City is an addiction specialist. introduction to the 12-Rainbow Gates. ABOUT LYDIA SCOTT It is about 200 pages which includes the As a counselor, spiritual advisor and adallegory of the “Wizard of Oz.” This makes diction specialist Lydia guides outwardly sucfor an entertaining and enlightening reading cessful people toward inner success by showexperience. ing them how to harness their true power. It’s The Rainbow Gates are a derivative of a transformative power that changes people these miracle-producing steps. The 12-Rainand the world around them. bow Gates utilize the perspective of laws of Lydia’s personal story inspires audiences attraction, “A Course in Miracles” concepts to reach for their best. It’s a heroic story. She and universal truths. Some of the modificaovercame multiple addictions, and later, distion of the 12-steps came from a renowned abling depression after losing a 13 year court spiritualist, Abraham Hick’s critique of the battle to have contact with her minor children. 12-step programs. Other changes include Despite these obstacles she returned to college redefining powerlessness and removal of outat age 40, earned an MSW with high honors dated phrases like “character defects,” “moral all while co-founding a non-profit that feeds, inventory,” “Him” and “Higher Power.”

us get out of our own way. We are shown that, “We all have a purpose and if we can allow our wounds to dissipate and not own us, we see our purpose more.” Messages to the Heart, available in Asheville at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, The Kress Emporium, Grateful Steps Bookstore, whiteSpace Gallery in the RAD’s Wedge Building, the Asheville Visitor Center Gift Shop and on line at Amazon.com and www.messagestotheheart.com IF YOU Elise and Phil Okrend reading GO and booksigning takes place Friday,

September 19 from 5:30-7 p.m. at Grateful Steps Bookstore, 159 South Lexington Ave., Asheville. For more details please call (828) 277-0998.

AUGUST

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, August 4 at 7 p.m. DESHA PEACOCK, Create the Style You Crave on a Budget You Can Afford. Tuesday, August 5 at 7 p.m. Young Adult Panel featuring Ann Aguirre, Beth Revis, Alexandra Duncan & Megan Spooner. Sunday, August 10 at 3 p.m. TOM FRANKLIN and BETH ANN FENNELLY, The Tilted World. Monday, August 11 at 7 p.m. Small Press & Self Published Authors. Wednesday, August 13 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Alternative treatments for ADHD: Feeding the Brain with Coach Rudy, LCSW Wednesday, August 13 at 7 p.m. WOMEN WHO RUN WITH THE WOLVES, salon with Andrea Olson, MA, Min. Thursday, August 14 at 7 p.m. STEPHANIE PERKINS, Isla and the Happily Ever After. Friday, August 15 at 7 p.m. SARAH CREECH, Season of the Dragonflies, romance. Saturday, August 16 from 10-11 a.m. Slam Asheville, ages 12-21 open mic poetry slam.

An entertaining and enlightening reading experience. houses and supports people with disabilities. In regard to partnership, Lydia’s 16 year marriage to the love of her life and a self-proclaimed “recovering sociopath” gave Lydia the perspective needed to realize the function and meaning of true partnership while studying “A Course in Miracles.” Her unique perspective on relationships re-frames their purpose so the individuals within it flourish. She views true partnership as a path to quantum awakening. Her business adventure of starting a non-profit and buying commercial property with no money down demonstrates she understands mindful and miraculous business practices. This was accomplished with pending bankruptcy, foreclosure and eviction all while living in a hotel and dealing with a city hostile toward the housing rights of her clients. Lydia Scott navigated the storm of social discrimination and ended up securing their housing rights. Additionally, Lydia is one of the first to crack the insurance code in her industry, aiding clients to be reimbursed for the clinical aspects of their housing.

Monday, August 18 at 7 p.m. The Great Escape Mystery Panel. Saturday, August 23 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Booktopia celebration of authors. Sunday, August 26 at 7 p.m. MARTHA WOODROOF, Small Blessings, debut novel. Thursday, August 28 at 7 p.m. CATHERINE FAHERTY, Asperger’s, What Does It Mean To Me?, second edition. Saturday, August 30 at 3 p.m. JEANIENE FROST, The Beautiful Ashes, new series. Sunday, August 31 at 3 p.m. ANN B. ROSS, Etta Mae’s Worst Bad-Luck Day.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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If you would like to know more about Lydia Scott or the Rainbow Gates visit www.LydiaScott.com, call (828) 242-8177, or email 12RainbowGates@gmail.com.

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 29


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Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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DINING & RESTAURANT GUIDE

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

Hors-d’œuvre Platter

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Preparation Time: 45 minutes. Serves 4-6 people.

Camembert from the Oven • 1 wheel of camembert cheese (or brie) • 2 tbsp olive oil Provencal herbs • 2 tbsp walnut honey • sprig of rosemary • 1 tbsp capperi salati (capers in salt), rinsed • croquets de Provence • cauliflower • ½ apple into small wedges (sprinkle with lemon juice) Additional: cloche à camembert

Preheat the oven to 350 ºF. Cut the top of the camembert and make several notches. Place the camembert in the cloche à camembert. Divide capers, olive oil, honey and rosemary sprig over the cheese. Put the top back on. Bake for 15-20 minutes in the oven. Serve with the apple, cauliflower and croquets with the cheese.

French Herbed Potato Sticks • 1 large potato, cut into long, thin strips • 2 tbsp mix for roasted potatoes french style • 1 tbsp olive oil Provencal herbs Heat the olive oil in a pan and fry the strips of potato about fifteen minutes until almost done. Add the spices and cook for another 5 minutes.

Roquefort-Ham Rolls • ½ cucumber • ham • chives • Roquefort cream (Delice au fromage bleu) Cut the cucumber lengthwise with a vegetable peeler or slicer. Cut slices of ham as wide as the cucumber slices. Spread with Delice and sprinkle with chives. Carefully roll up. Present all the hors d’oeuvres together on a large board and serve with Provencal Olives.

Oil & Vinegar Asheville 8 Town Square Blvd., Asheville, NC 28803 asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com, (828) 676-1678 pg. 18

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30 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12


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DINING & RESTAURANT GUIDE

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

Café 64 – That Special Place for Breakfast and Lunch

BY

SUSAN DEVITT

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a Culinary Gi Shop

If you enjoy traveling you might agree that the food is critical to your overall experience.

Asheville is definitely a town that showcases food as a huge part of the destination. If you live here, maybe you’ve noticed that traveling Café 64 on Haywood Street in downtown Asheville. to other towns can be Photo: Kelsey Jensen a letdown in the joy of eating. Leaving town? Time to go a nice view of Haywood St. awash in on a diet! umbrellas. So when I was invited to We sat down to the unveiling of the dine at Café 64 on Haywood menu, and it did not disappoint. In fact, Street in downtown Asheville, there were so many beyond-the-ordinary it was a chance for me to put on descriptions it was difficult to choose. a Visitor Hat and pretend I was Really. It was distinctly continental — a traveling to a new city without café, not a coffee shop/restaurant. actually leaving home. I’d never The menu offers a good choice in heard of Café 64 so to prepare vegetarian and vegan options, gluten for this…I did nothing. I didn’t free, organic and locally sourced foods. look at their website or menu. Of course they have coffee but also serve I wanted the full experience of espresso drinks plus teas and botanicals. I surprise. A food adventure in my have to add — a breakfast restaurant that own hometown. doesn’t have mind-blowing coffee is just Gary Taylor, the owner, plain mean and I won’t go back. I don’t came here two years ago, a west care how great the food is. No worries, coast Mad Men kind of man, Café 64 has excellent coffee. (Bean Werks leaving a long career as owner from West Asheville). So we started with of an established Los Angeles coffee while savoring the menu. ad agency to follow his life-long On the breakfast side of the menu, dream of opening a mountaina simple skillet breakfast popped out first. town café. That’s where Asheville A combination of familiar home-style comes in, and Café 64. breakfast favorites, guaranteed to satisfy: Café 64 is a breakfast and “Two farm fresh eggs over country lunch spot with a great location potatoes mixed with caramelized onions, in the middle of downtown, just bacon and roasted red peppers, topped across the street and a few doors with white cheddar cheese, diced tomaup from Malaprops. My lunchtoes and scallions.” mate Tom and I came in on a Or for something you probably rainy summer afternoon, after wouldn’t make at home, Smoked Salmon what had been a busy breakfast Scramble: “Farm fresh eggs scrambled and lunch crowd. There was a with smoked salmon, red onions, cream café board on the sidewalk with cheese and chives, served with country a preview of a few items to chew potatoes or grits and your choice of on before sitting down. A strawtoast.” And they use our local Annie’s berry shortcake desert had a great Bakery — delicious, fresh-baked breads. ring to it, along with a breakfast How about Carolina Shrimp and burrito. High anticipation for our Grits? Or homemade Granola? I admit Visit To A New Place! I have a sweet tooth, so I was pretty The Café isn’t too large, but tempted by the Banana Oatmeal Brulee: has ample seating for the walk-in “Oatmeal prepared with cinnamon crowd, about 20 seats, plus a and brown sugar then topped with caracounter and a couple of sidewalk melized bananas” Warm, sweet, comfort tables. It’s bright and pleasant and food…yum. has an unassuming atmosphere. But since it was going on 2 p.m., We were seated at a table with as much as the breakfast menu called to us, lunch won us both over (although

8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678 Try one of Café 64’s delicious and unique garden-fresh salads.

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

pg. 36

BC

At Café 64, dishes are prepared with very fresh ingredients.

breakfast is available all day). And, you guessed it, it was very hard to choose. The lunch menu features sandwiches, panini’s and salads. Right out of the gate, a New American sandwich twist out of a centuries old New York salad — Waldorf Chicken Salad Sandwich: “Grilled chicken, toasted walnuts, chopped granny smith apples, red grapes and chopped celery, topped with mixed greens on a lightly toasted croissant.” Croissant? Yes, please! The roast beef sandwich tempted Tom. Here’s why: “Angus beef, caramelized onions, arugula, parmesan, and horseradish mayonnaise, served on a country baguette” A simple roast beef sandwich, taken to another flavor level with arugula, Parmesan and caramelized onion. (Tom’s a sucker for arugula, you could put it on, say, pancakes, and you’d roll your eyes and he’d say “What? You don’t like pancakes?”) More sandwiches tempted, but I decided on the Tempeh Avocado: “Seared balsamic and soy-marinated tempeh, sliced avocado, melted provolone, sliced roma tomatoes and mixed greens, on toasted whole wheat bread with roasted garlic aioli.” continued on page 33

145 Wall Street

Downtown Waynesville

828.550.3610

pg. 18

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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients Gourmet Sandwiches & Wraps • Desserts

Homemade Soups • Salads Seafood • Steak • Chicken Pork Tenderloin • Pasta Vegetarian Co Espresso • Coffee • Teas Beer • Wine Daily Food Specials Kids Menu Outdoor Dinning

pg. 38

Hg

828.692.6335 Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Wed-Sat 5:30-9 pm

Live Dinner Music Fri & Sat Nights

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 31


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RESTAURANT GUIDE Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food

The Chocolate Fetish Wins National Awards

Monday-Friday only. One coupon per check. Pizza of least value is free. Not valid with other coupons or discounts. Asheville location only. Expires 8/31/2014.

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A Rapid River Magazine exclusive feature. The art you want to see. The food you want to eat. The beverages you want to drink. We’ll help you get there.

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Local business, The Chocolate Fetish earned 15 medals at the International Chocolate Salon’s 2014 Awards Competition.

before she began working in the family business. Among the many products that received awards at The International Chocolate Salon was their Four Piece Favor Box featuring Velvet Sin Ecstasy Truffles and Hand Decorated Dark Chocolate Hearts. The awards won The Four Piece Favor include one Gold Medal, Box features a long time eight Silver Medals, seven Elizabeth Foley, customer favorite, Velvet Sin Bronze Medals, and two general manager of Truffles. Velvet Sin Truffles The Chocolate Fetish. Honorable Mentions. The are a decadent blend of four medals recognize excellence European Dark Chocolates; the ultimate in a variety of categories including Most dark chocolate experience. One judge Artistic Designs, Most Luxurious Chocomentioned that The Chocolate Fetish was late Experience, and Best Taste. Awards among their favorite in the competition are decided by a panel of esteemed judges while another commented on the Velvet including culinary experts, respected Sin Truffles saying, “The dark chocolate magazine and newspaper editors, and food ones were amazing!” and lifestyle gurus. The Chocolate Fetish has received “It’s always an honor to be awarded local and national recognition for their in such a prestigious event,” says Aaron handmade artisan chocolates since openMorgan, Chocolatier and Production ing in 1986. Over the past three years Manager. “Our whole team is dedicated to they have won over 30 awards from The making outstanding artisan chocolates and International Chocolate Salon as well as it’s gratifying to be recognized for all our receiving the four star distinction as one hard work.” of the Country’s Best Chocolatiers and Elizabeth Foley, general manager of Confectioners from the International The Chocolate Fetish says she is particuChocolate Salon and Taste TV. larly proud of their accomplishments in You can enjoy The Chocolate the Bridal Chocolate Salon where they Fetish’s award winning chocolates at their won a variety of Silver medals including store in downtown Asheville or by orderBest in Salon, Best Bridal Gift Set, and ing online at www.chocolatefetish.com. Best Dark Chocolate among others. “I’m really excited about being recognized for our artistic chocolate deThe Chocolate Fetish signs. I am passionate about art and about chocolate and I am always trying to bring 36 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville those passions together in our chocolates,” (828) 258-2353 said Foley who was an accomplished artist www.chocolatefetish.com

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32 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12

pg. 20

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‘Cafe 64’ continued from pg. 31

I’ve had many a tempeh sandwich around town and I would put this one up against the best. The thickly sliced and seared tempeh was delicious. The tomatoes and greens were deep in color and taste — very fresh. The avocado was a perfect pitch, creamy, but not too ripe and blended well with the garlic aioli. The Annie’s bread was yummy (to make a great sandwich, you must have great bread). The sandwiches come with a choice of sides and I chose potato salad. It was nice; the potatoes were almost al dente, if you can call a potato that. I mean it in a good way… it wasn’t mushy. Looking around, the portions are nice — I could only eat half of my sandwich, so wrapped half to go. Tom went with a salad, and the menu has half a dozen to choose from, so it’s a tough choice. Like this one, The Portofino: “Pesto-tossed artichoke hearts, roma tomatoes, cucumbers, onions and fresh mozzarella on a bed of mixed greens tossed with balsamic vinaigrette, served with olive oil crostinis.” Pesto artichoke hearts! There was a garden-fresh Grilled Chicken Cobb salad with the usual suspects, plus

‘Surviving’ cont’d. from pg. 16

of women in my generation. Not that I am in the same crowd of women who are beginning that aging “thing” that is attached to all of us. Oprah, and many other aging actresses we love to watch in movie theatres, and politicians, including the Democrats favorite candidate of the day, Hillary Rodham Clinton, are also faced with the consequences of aging. Isn’t it crazy? This question of “will she run again or not run,” what will it be? I wish that was my only worry these days. I am just going to do exactly the same things I have done all these years and never look back, making every single day better than the one before. There is more left of my life and I am not going to give in to my nightmares, no matter what! Just saying, I am a survivor. And survivors never stop. Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

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avocado and thickly-sliced hickory smoked bacon, and an herb vinaigrette. There were several more, but he settled on the Walnut-Crusted Goat Cheese salad: “Sliced strawberries, candied almonds, and a pan-fried walnut-crusted goat cheese medallion over a bed of mixed greens tossed with balsamic vinaigrette.” As with my sandwich, the presentation was beautiful. Bright, bold vegetables with intense fresh flavors. The goat cheese medallion was a rich, warm, creamy cheese covered with walnuts; really delicious. The candied almonds added a sweet crunch, and the bright red strawberries paired well with the balsamic. The salad, a generous size, came with garlic toast, of course made by Annie’s, light and flavorful. The sidewalk sign had seared the strawberry desert in my brain, so we weren’t leaving without it. It was a ‘strawberry shortcake’ of sorts, with a wonderful homemade biscuit for the shortcake. The biscuit was perfect – a bit of a sweet crunch on the outside and light and fluffy inside. Neatly sliced open-faced with in-season strawberries, a scoop of vanilla ice cream, a sweet cream drizzle, and homemade whipped cream on top. If you’ve been yearning for strawberry shortcake, this one is yours. It’s as

‘Transfigurations II’ cont’d. from pg. 16

trip out there”... and it ended up selling out. As it turned out, folks were jumping at the idea to go see a show in a space that they’re not very familiar with, something that seemed like a unique experience. So that’s exactly the vibe we are hoping for with Transfigurations II.

JC: Talk a bit about the bands. Many of these artists have previously played Asheville, and there’s a great mix between local/ regional and national acts. How do you decide who to offer up to? MC: Exactly how you just explained

it, actually — that’s what we were hoping to do, to bring in a mix of acts from near and far that we already had befriended or promoted over the years, as well as taking some chances on some rare possibilities like The Clean (from New Zealand) or soul singer Lee Fields & the Expressions or Mudhoney, acts that to our knowledge haven’t played in Asheville in at least this past decade, if ever. More than a year ago we started a running list of dozens of artists we’d like to try and book for this, and so when the time came to officially make offers, we jumped on it, and waited to see who was down with the idea and who wasn’t.

RR: Okay, so imagine I’m new to this and to festivals of this nature. What words of advice do you offer? Three days of music can be pretty overwhelming.

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grand as it sounds, and there was plenty for two to share. Café 64 seems to have everything going for it: delicious, unique dishes prepared with very fresh ingredients, “wow” presentation, surprisingly low prices and the quality we’ve come to expect in Asheville. Kudos to chef Michael Silver and Gary Taylor for making my midday journey live up to a special place.

PARTY TOO HEARTY?

Café 64

(800) 829-4872 | www.1800taxiusa.com

Call a taxi! Don’t let friends drink and drive. In Asheville, call: • Beaver Lake Cab, (828) 252-1913 • Checker Cab, (828) 254-1155 • Metro Cab, (828) 254-1155 • New Blue Bird, (828) 258-8331 • Red Cab, (828) 232-1112 • Yellow Cab, (828) 253-3311

64 Haywood St. Downtown Asheville, 28801 (828) 252-8333 Monday – Sunday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Susan Devitt is co-owner of Asheville food company BelloLea Artisan Kitchen, which makes delicious, fun Pizza Kits. She and husband Tom are confessed foodies and therefore won’t be leaving Asheville, unless they’re dragged out, kicking and screaming. Contact her at SusanBelloLea@gmail.com

MC: Well we’re pretty confident that it won’t be overwhelming, since it’s only about 30 acts over the course of the three days. And I’m biased but I think everyone should try to see every act playing! But if I had to say there was one day you shouldn’t miss, it’s Saturday, August 30 on the Island in Marshall. About 18 acts on three stages on an island in the French Broad River in the middle of a beautiful and quaint mountain town... can’t beat that scene!

Asheville Wine & Food Festival

F

Featuring Hundreds of Local & International Wines, dozens of farm-to-table restaurants, local brews, spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages, a smorgasbord of artisan foods, culinary demos, and regional authors. ELIXIR – Thursday, August 21

Meet the distilleries producing regionally and national brands. Locally recognized bartenders are stepping out from behind the bar and into the spotlight for a mixology competition. Competitors will prepare creative cocktails made with liquors from North Carolina distilleries. A host of area bars and regional distillers will be on hand to serve samples of their latest and greatest concoctions, while you enjoy live entertainment and hors d’oeuvres.

SWEET – Friday, August 22

Chocolates, cakes, tarts, pastries and more! Wash it all down with glasses of sparkling wine, beer, and spirits while swaying to the jazz of “One Leg Up.” From 8-10 p.m. at the Grove Arcade in downtown Asheville.

IF YOU GO: Asheville Wine & Food Festival,

August 21-23 at the US Cellular Center in downtown Asheville. To purchase tickets visit www.ashevillewineandfood.com

JC: So in all the years I’ve

been a customer I’ve never thought to ask… does the store name come from the above quoted Neil Young song?

MC: Here’s the truth: the name was inspired by, but not necessarily named directly after, the Neil Young record. I know that’s kind of a wishy-washy answer, but we were just spouting off names for weeks, and finally “Harvest” just stuck, and yes, the word came up because of that record. Truth be told, we worship at the altar of Neil! IF YOU Transfigurations II at various sites GO in and around Asheville. For more

information, artist bios, and ticket prices go to www.harvest-records.com

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED!

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For www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

Rapid River Magazine has expanded its online edition with a short story section. We’re looking for a variety of “shorts,” including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 categories. All work will be reviewed for appropriateness and once chosen will be subject to a collaborative editing process. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, will be managing the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to shortstories@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 33


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what to do guide

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Friday, August 1

Monday, August 4

Sunday, August 10

Sunday, August 17

Hello Dolly!

Quilts as Inspiration

Midsummer Night’s Feast

Enchanted Nature Walkabout

Sven Hoosen Concert

Wednesday, August 6

Sunday, August 10

Creative Industry Management

WNC Battle of the Burger

August 1

SVFAL Members Juried Exhibit

The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League’s 47th Annual Members Juried Exhibit at the Red House Studios and Gallery, Black Mountain. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. On display through August 31, 2014. www.SVFALarts.org

Friday, August 1

Twenty Years of Progress

Large scale drawings by Tom Pazderka. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. On display August 1-31. Pink Dog Creative, 342-348 Depot Street in the River Arts District. www.pinkdog-creative.com

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Pattern. Texture. Emotion. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. On display Crazy Quilt through August by Darrell Loy Scott 21, 2014. American Folk Art & Framing, 64 Biltmore Avenue, downtown Asheville. www. amerifolk.com

Saturday, August 2

David Troy Francis in Concert

The talented pianist performs. With special guest, Broadway performer, Mark Morales. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $17.50, www.lakejunaluska.com/concert-tickets. Stuart Auditorium, 91 N. Lakeshore Drive, Lake Junaluska.

Farm to table dinner benefits local organic farmers. Mocktails & H’ors D’oeuvres at 5:30; 6:30 film, GMO OMG; 8 p.m. three-course seated dinner and panel discussion. $40. At the Hub, 278 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. www.organicgrowersschool.org

Technical assistance, workshops, and one-on-one mentoring at the Asheville Area Arts Council’s new Grove Arcade location, and at HandMade in America. 8-week course for $500 ($63 per week). To register, call (828) 258-0710 or visit www.ashevillearts.com

Friday, August 8

Matthew Zedler Exhibition

August 1-17

Driving Miss Daisy

By Alfred Uhry, directed by Patricia Heuermann. Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $22; $19 students and seniors; $12 children 17 and under. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320.

Saturday & Sunday, August 2 & 3

Village Art and Craft Fair

High quality craft fair sponsored by New Morning Gallery and Bellagio Art-to-Wear. On the grounds of the Cathedral of All Souls in Historic Biltmore Village. Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday noon to 5 p.m., rain or shine. Free. Concessions available. For more details call (828) 274-2831.

Saturday, August 2

Alternative Firings

Three acclaimed ceramicists, Maureen McGregor, Edge Barnes, and Conrad Weiser. Reception at 6 p.m. On display August 2 to October 3, 2014. Crimson Laurel Gallery, 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville. Details: www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com, (828) 688-3599.

Saturday, August 2

Storytelling Dinner Theatre

With Wayne & Jane Sims, humorists, historians, tandem tellers. Reservations required. Italian Dinner & Storytelling $20; Storytelling $15. Dinner at 6 p.m., storytelling at 7 p.m. For more details or to make reservations: (828) 298-3553, or stjohnsasheville@gmail. com; Sara Davis (828) 298-1330 (voice mail). St. Johns Episcopal Church, 290 Old Haw Creek Rd., Asheville.

Original works by the modern linear-geometric painter. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Madison County Arts Council, 90 S. Main St. in Marshall. (828) 6491301, www.madisoncountyarts.com

Friday, August 8

Bring Us Your Best XI

All media visual art exhibition. Awards reception Home Port from 5-7 p.m. by Mike Alonzo Blue Ridge Community College, 180 West Campus Drive, Flat Rock, in the Technology Education & Development Center. Entries received on Monday and Tuesday, August 4 & 5, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. No late entries allowed. On display August 11-29, 2014. Details at (828) 693-8504 or www.acofhc.org.

Saturday, August 9

A 160-acre haven for Faerie, Orb and Nature Spirits. Led by John Springer, 2:30-5 p.m. Cost: $20; Couples $30; Seniors $10; Children $5. Must pre-register. The Light Center, 2190 NC Hwy 9, Black Mountain. www. URLight.org, (828) 669-6845.

Area chefs compete for a spot in the nationally televised World Food Championships. 4 p.m. at the Renaissance Hotel in downtown Asheville. Tickets are $5; Children 12 and under free. $30 for unlimited burgers, complimentary beer, early entrance and a ballot to vote for WNC’s Best Burger. To benefit Eblen Charities. www. WNCBurgerBattle.com

Tuesday, August 12

Hike to Charlies Bunion

8 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,800 feet. Moderately difficult with stunning views. Led by hiking guide and author, Danny Bernstein. $35 ; $10 for Friends of the Smokies members. To register visit www.friendsofthesmokies.org or call (828) 452-0720.

Wednesday, August 13

Laugh Your Asheville Off Festival

Launch party and Brother Wolf Animal Rescue Benefit. Individual show pricing: $16/ticket. Cosmo festival passes: $66-$86 for access to all shows. At Highland Brewing, 12 Old Charlotte Hwy., Asheville. For more details visit www.laughyourashevilleoff.com.

Call for Artists

RiverLink’s wildest, wackiest event of the summer. Judges will select a winner in each of four categories: Most Creative, Green Machine, Funniest, and Judges Choice. Part of the free RiverFest 2014 held at the French Broad River Park in Asheville from 1-7 p.m. Winners of the parade announced at 5 p.m. Visit www.riverlink.org.

Deadline: August 15, 2014 The Arts Council of Henderson County is looking for artists to demonstrate and sell their work at the 55th annual Art on Main Festival in downtown Hendersonville, October 4 & 5. Artists will be juried. $50 booth fee. Requirements and application at www.acofhc. org, or email acofhc@bellsouth.net. 401 N. Main St., Ste. 302, Hendersonville, NC 28792.

August 9 & 10

Sunday, August 17

Anything That Floats Parade

37th Annual Sourwood Festival

Free, non-alcoholic, family-oriented festival. 200 vendor booths, free entertainment, children’s area, and more. Sourwood Idol Contest held Friday, August 8 from 7-10 p.m. at the Big Tent next to Depot. Festival hours: Saturday 9-8 p.m., Sunday 9-5 p.m. In Black Mountain. More information at www.sourwoodfestival.com.

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Now through August 3 HART presents a musical production full of elaborate sets, costumes and orchestra along with a cast and crew of nearly forty. August 1 & 2 at 7:30 p.m.; August 3 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $24 for Adults; $20 for Seniors; Students $12. $8 tickets for Students on Sundays. Call (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com for reservations. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville.

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Folktales and Foolishness

Asheville Storytelling Circle presents a tell-off from 6-8 p.m. Free and open to the public. Bring chairs or blankets for seating. Buncombe County Recreation Park, Round Pavilion #3, 72 Gashes Creek Road adjacent to the WNC Nature Center. Information: (828) 667-4227 or email StoryBuff@aol.com

Mountain dulcimer performance at the Waynesville Public Library at 3 p.m. in the meeting room. Sven’s melodious songs will sway your soul to the dance of life in all its beauty with songs, melodies, and ballads. 678 South Haywood Street, Waynesville. (828) 452-5169.

Sunday, August 17

Larry G. Davis Concert

Hailing from Ridges Mountain in Randoff County NC, Davis is a former studio musician of Nashville, and a solo guitarist performing in classical, jazz, and other genres. Larry will be performing at the Canton Public Library at 3 p.m. in the meeting room. Canton Public Library, 11 Pennsylvania Avenue, Canton. (828) 648-2924.

The Lion in Winter

Written by James Goldman, directed by Jim Reid, produced by The Autumn Players. Tickets: $5, available at the door. August 22 & 23 at 35below at Asheville Community Theatre at 2:30 p.m. August 24 at the Reuter Center at UNCA at 2:30 p.m. Asheville Community Theatre Box Office, 35 E. Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320

Wednesday, August 27

Elegance & Spirit

The costume designers of Downton Abbey. Presentation by Cornelia Powell followed by book signing. 10-12 noonat the Center for Life Enrichment at the Peggy Crosby Center, 348 S. Fifth St., Highlands, NC 28741. Call (828) 5268811 or visit www.clehighlands.com.

Friday, August 29

Stories and Music of Faith, Hope, Charity

A program of inspiration, 7-9 p.m. at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 768 Asbury Rd., Candler, NC. Info: (828) 670-0051 or stjoanofarc3640@ bellsouth.net. Benefits church ministry and programs.

Monday, September 1

Whimsical Art for the Young at Heart!

Marcy Jackson of Red Cat Studio will be exhibiting her artwork for children of all ages. Narrative illustrations of fantastical creatures, places and designs.

AUGUST EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12


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Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery

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Best in Show

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Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

The Little Town that Rocks

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Movies at Pack Library Pack Memorial Library will host a free evening of fun for the whole family on Thursday, August 14 from 6-7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Local film historian Chip Kaufmann will introduce three short films which feature some of the best-known comedians of the silent movie era. Please join us as we enjoy their films, and learn more about five comedy greats: Charlie Chaplin, Mabel Normand, Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, and Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle. These actors sometimes appeared in each other’s films and were famous not just as comedians, but also as writers, directors, and producers of classic comedy films.

August 6: Mary Poppins (1964)

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

August 13: Singing in the Rain (1952) August 20: Meet Me In St. Louis (1944) August 27: Gypsy (1962)

Live Music at the Art House Saturday concert series, 8 p.m. to midnight August 9 - Carver & Carmody

Dragin

by Michael Cole

August 16 - Wendy Hayes & Michael Jefry Stevens August 23 - The Bluesy Duo with Garry Segal & Michael Filappone

Two AKC male and female English Bulldog puppies for adoption. Trying to find a good home for them. Interested contact Collinwalsh001@ yahoo.com

August 30 - Ellen Trnka Trio with Craig Woody & Howie Johnson The Art House Gallery and Studio 5 Highland Park Road East Flat Rock, NC 28726 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS?

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800867-6028.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for more details.

The Tax Doctor

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

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Pack Memorial Library is hosting a free summer film series in August called The Great American Musical. All films will be screened in the Lord Auditorium on the following Wednesdays at 3 p.m.

Puppies for Adoption

Medical Guardian

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The Great American Musical

(828) 669-2300 www.thelittletownthatrocks.org Art by Marcy Jackson on display September 1-30 at Flat Rock Village Bakery, 2710 Greenville Highway, Flat Rock. Visit Marcy’s artwork year round at Art Mob Studios in Hendersonville.

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Comedy Greats of the Silent Screen

August 9 – The River Art District’s Second Saturday event. Demonstrations, refreshments, live music, and a showcase of ceramic arts.

The town of Black Mountain is seeking sponsors for the 2014 Rocking Chair Campaign. For a $100 sponsorship a rocker with your name or business name will be placed either in downtown Black Mountain or at a regional attraction or tourism destination. The rockers feature photography and art, showcasing the valley, landscapes, lifestyle, nature, and landmarks of Black Mountain. The goal of 50 rockers is within reach. Sponsors are needed for 28 more chairs. For details email bmchamber@juno.com, or visit the Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce, 201 E. State Street, Black Mountain.

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August 5 – Celebrating the ceramic art of Anne Jerman, Melanie Dyel, and Mary Jane Findley, as well as new work by twenty-two other gallery members.

Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Tues-Sun 11-5 • (828) 285-0210 www.odysseyceramicarts.com

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www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 35


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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps 12 Bones (828) 253-4499

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Andrew Charles Gallery (828) 989-0111

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Appalachian Survival Gear & Knife Company www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Ariel Gallery www.arielcraftgallery.com The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com Art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com

Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814 Lime Leaf Thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Art on Depot (828) 246-0218 Asheville Chamber Music www.AshevilleChamberMusic.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com B & C Winery (828) 550-3610 BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Mehri & Company (828) 693-0887 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com

Black Forest www.blackforestasheville.com Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967 Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Brixx Pizza www.brixxpizza.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

The Strand www.38main.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com David Troy Francis www.tmamp.org

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League SVFALarts.org

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

hands us, we become whole again where there had been a hole, a separation between ourselves and our circumstance. This is not new to us. We’ve all done it with various difficulties in our life. We are not OK when the unwanted, even dreaded circumstance becomes a possibility, even more not OK when it becomes a reality and then, with time, we become OK. We’re not victims. It’s just who we are. The wisdom here, the skill here is developing the ability to see when we go into not-OK-ness and realize the outside affliction has now become an affliction of the mind, and rather than being passive and depending on time to restore us to OK, we make the mental adjustment ourselves as we also take what appropriate actions we can to address the circumstance. As the intriguing vernacular of Zen says: “This is this” or, “what-isjust-is.” There is no wisdom in being separated, in resistance, in suffering over what is. The practice of Zen is in increasing insight and skill at be-

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Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

VaVaVoom www.vavavooom.com

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com WNCAP - Raise Your Hand www.wncapgala.org

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WNC OVERVIEW

(828) 646-0071

PATTON AVE.

TUNNEL ROAD

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com The Writers’ Workshop www.twwoa.org

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

REYNOLDS VILLAGE

MERRIMON AVE.

TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

‘What’s Ok?’ cont’d from page 25

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

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artful living

Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

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Sourwood Festival www.sourwoodfestival.com

Grace C. Bomer Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

Frog Pond Downsizing (828) 734-3874

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

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coming conscious of what causes us suffering and instead of being dragged kicking and screaming to eventually becoming OK, we just make the mental adjustment to our circumstance, let go of our resistance, and become OK with it. We get in front of and initiate, rather than being dragged to, the process of being OK. This also has the effect of increasing our skill in the actions we take about the circumstance, as the action is not now arising out of a desperate mind clouded by fear or anger. How do we do this? All the ego By having a larger frame to really wants is view and experience Life than the very small frame of to be happy. ego that simply wants what it wants, and in effect, throws tantrums when it doesn’t get what it wants. The irony is that all the ego really wants is to be happy, but like a greedy child, it has no idea of how to accomplish happiness. Happiness is the result of a life lived resenting nothing, experiencing great gratitude and conducting oneself in a fundamentally ethical and responsible way so that situations and relationships are not constantly blowing up in our face. Happiness is the result of wisdom, and wisdom is the result of perspective, and perspective is to see Life in as big a frame as we are capable of. Happiness is in OK-ness. OK with the little things in Life, OK with the big, even catastrophic things in Life, and everything between. Since we have identified ego as the source of our being not OK, the most important lesson of Buddhism is “you are not your ego, “so don’t let it own you. If you want to be happy, you must take ownership of your own OK-ness. You must take ownership and responsibility for your ego. You have an ego for the very important job of managing the stuff of your life as a separate person. When we mistake ego for who we are, we are caught in the grip of its greed and self-centeredness. The roller-coaster of highs and lows, of inevitable suffering, is sure to happen. Let ego be the workman of the circumstances of your life. With the tools of ego, you do what needs to be done. You can go for whatever you want, while you cultivate wisdom as what guides your life – and helps you embrace what comes. Appreciate how much is good and beautiful in the world and train your awareness to see the subtleties of beauty and goodness - the flowers, the birds, kindnesses, children’s smiles and laughter, your own smiles and laughter, meaningful presence with fellow beings. As for the really bad stuff - the cancers, the divorces, the family tragedies, the job firings, the sicknesses and deaths, the injustice and stupidity and cruelty in the world, it’s OK to scream and cry. Then dry your tears and find the gold in the manure. It’s there. I promise you. Life is everything. As Joko Beck told us: “Singing and dancing are the voice of the dharma, and screaming and moaning are the voice of the dharma.” – It’s all OK when seen in the big picture. “What is the enlightened state? When there is no longer any separation between myself and the circumstances of my life, whatever they may be.” Open into the fullest perspective possible and let there be no separation, no holes, between you and what is – become whole with what is – let ego and awareness work together to manage what-is to the best of your ability; do what you can and let the rest go. And that’s what it means to be unassailably OK. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


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fine art

A R T S

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

Western North Carolina’s NEW ART DESTINATION Offering Modern Fine Art

Life in Motion

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Plus Ethnographic Art & New World Antiquities

Artetude Gallery presents works by two artists who are linked by their ability to capture movement.

Alyson Markell masters the formal language of monotype printing, using ink as the medium. Kenn Kotara’s paintings using curvilinear lines and shapes that mimic the flow of nature.

Kenn Kotara

IF YOU GO: Meet the artists Friday, August 1, from 5 to 8 p.m. On display through August 31, 2014 at Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Avenue, downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 252-1466, or visit www.artetudegallery.com.

Your Jersey and Shadowbox Custom Framing Experts GALLERY

EASTERN BREEZES Art with Asian Inspiration July 19 - August 28

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price pg. 36

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140 Airport Road • Arden, NC pg. 36

1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway

Hours: 10 - 5 pm Tue - Sat or by appointment: 828/ 989-0111

1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6

At Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville Exit 23 off I-26, cross Merrimon & up hill to 1st building on right

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August 9-10 Saturday 9-8 ~ Sunday 9-5 Sourwood Idol Contest • Friday, August 8 • 7-10 200 Vendors! More than 30,000 people from all over America!

Arts & Crafts Children’s Arena Specialty Items Great Food Wonderful Music Dancing

Downtown Black Mountain

FREE ADMISSION

www.sourwoodfestival.com

Honey and Bee Demonstrations Gourmet Sourwood Honey

No Alcohol • Call 1-800-669-2301 for more information

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INTERVIEWED BY

Rapid River Magazine:

DENNIS RAY

Tell us a little about your painting process.

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Amy Perrier: My painting process begins by staining the canvas with several layers of color. I then begin to finger paint more color on, rather rapidly. I usually have an idea in mind when I begin to apply paint, but I’m prepared to let go of that idea and go in the direction my applications are guiding me. As I see things happening on the canvas, I work to emphasize whatever idea it is I’m trying to convey. I will take a palette knife at several points during the process and scrape areas of paint off, which brings out the underlying color.

RRM: How did you first decide to work without using brushes?

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Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities.

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Paintings by Amy Perrier

“I love using my AP: I want to convey my work as an exfingers to paint...” 176 pression of color and energy. It isn’t about the details. When I had a brush in my hand, the instinct was to paint every detail. Last year after taking an abstract workshop, I felt empowered to lay down the brushes and work just with my fingers and a knife. The results have been very rewarding. RRM: Tell us a little about your

work.

AP: My work is a culmination of places I’ve been, places I’d like to go, and what I wish were true. I love to paint with vivid colors and Amy Perrier Finger Paint Artist my ideas usually come from the natural world. Something as simple as a reflection in a puddle, or a copse of trees can inspire me to paint. The passion comes from the enjoyment of transferring what I’m seeing or feeling to the viewer of my work.

Art MoB Studios & Marketplace 124 4th East Avenue, Hendersonville, NC 28739 (828) 693-4545 • www.artmobstudios.com FH

38 August 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 12


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MEHRI & COMPANY OF NEW YORK

HENDERSONVILLE

Estate & Designer Jewelry

The Core of Our Labor Day Weekend

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80+ Local Artists

BY DAVID NICHOLSON The 68th NC Apple Festival will be held in Hendersonville from Friday, August 29 through September 1.

AMY PERRIER

Finger Paint Artist • Stop by Her Studio • Watch Her in Action

Art In The Park...ing Lot ~ 2nd Saturdays

The Festival’s Street Fair will feature quality arts and crafts and wonderful traditional festival foods. You can buy many varieties of locally harvested apples direct from the growers. Enjoy your fill of fried apple pies, apple freezes and apple ice cream just for starters! The fair will be open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., with a mini-fair on Monday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. You can also enjoy free entertainment and dancing under the stars at the Historic Henderson County Courthouse on Main Street. A mixture of music, from bluegrass to rock and roll, will be performed Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Many more special events, including the Gem and Mineral Spectacular, Downtown Sidewalk Sale and the King Apple Parade, are listed at www.ncapplefestival.org.

124 4th Avenue East • Hendersonville 828-693-4545 www.artmobstudios.com

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for the

AMERICAN SURVIVOR

Art in the Park…ing Lot

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Art MoB Studios and Marketplace will host a local art and jewelry show on August 9.

Unsurpassed craftsmanship brought to you from all corners of the world.

Local artists will display and sell their work in the categories of painting, jewelry, photography, and pottery. This event is held the second Saturday of each month through September. “This is a wonderful opportunity to not only purchase uniquely crafted items, but to also meet the designers behind the work,” said Michele Sparks, owner of Art MoB. IF YOU Saturday, August 9 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the GO parking lot of Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124

4th Avenue East, Hendersonville. More details at (828) 693-4545, or visit www.artmobstudios.com.

Home Accessories • Silk Flower Arrangements Gifts • 26 years in the same location

501 North Main Street Hendersonville ❖ (828) 693-0887 Mon.-Fri. 10-5; Sun. 1-5; Closed Saturday Honoring the word of God, not the word of man.

Check our our Brand New Archery Equipment

Blue Ribbon Framing

Over 90 Name Brands

Henderson County Events

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Quality. Service. Selection. Since 1986

Made in America by Local Craftsmen

Owners: Bruce and Melissa Maurer

Now until October 24 – Bearfootin’, a public art display of

fiberglass outdoor bear sculptures decorated in different themes. On the sidewalks of Main Street. (828) 233-3216.

August 3 & 7-9 – Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown presents

Professional Custom Framing for Your Pictures and Memorabilia

Music on the Rock: The Songs of the 60s. 8 p.m. Call (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008.

August 21 & September 18 – Rhythm & Brews Concert featuring The Fritz, Azalea, 6-9 p.m. Parking on King Street between 3rd & 4th Avenues. Free, bring a chair. Call (828) 233-3216 for more details. August 24 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents the epic pop opera Miss Saigon. Wed-Sat 8 p.m.; Thurs., Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m. Flat Rock. (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008. For more details visit www.historichendersonville.org

234 Main Street ~ Hendersonville 828.697.0025 Hp

www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

414-a Kanuga Road, Hendersonville HR

Mon-Fri 9-5

Sat 9-3

(828) 693-7967

Vol. 17, No. 12 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — August 2014 39


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®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com 36 Haywood Street

pg. 36

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Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

pg. 22

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August 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
August 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Fine art by Grace C. Bomer..p22; Inside: Asheville Community Theatre..p6; Asheville Chamber Music Series..p7; Diana Wortham Th...

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