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SUMMER

FUN LEAF Marks 20th Year with

DOWNTOWN CELEBRATION

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88th Annual Mountain Dance

and Folk Festival PG 9

43rd Annual VILLAGE

Art and Craft Fair PG 11

Folkmoot –

North Carolina’s

INTERNATIONAL Folk Festival

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Jack Stern

– Creating a REAL

Sense of Place

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Local Dining ™ Guide Reel Takes Movie Reviews What to Do Guide

PGS PGS PGS

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July 16 - 26, 2015

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Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 3


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2015 SWANNANOA

Warren Wilson College in the Kittredge Theater July 3, 11, 18, 25 and August 1.

Beautiful North Carolina Venues World-Renowned Musicians

Join us for any of five different programs

WAYNESVILLE

Performing Arts Center July 5, 12, 19, 26 and August 2.

Enso String Quartet

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Jasper String Quartet

www.SwannanoaChamberMusic.com

(828) 771-3050

Four Decades of Art in Biltmore Village JOHN CRAM & THE VILLAGE ART AND CRAFT FAIR

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Thirty new artists will round out the nearly 120 total at the 43rd annual Village Art and Craft Fair, held August first and second at the grounds of the Cathedral of All Souls in Biltmore Village.

BY

pETRAS BARCAS

John Cram, founder of the Fair, has weathered the good and the bad in the Asheville arts scene over the last four decades. “When we first started it was very small, there were John Cram, founder of the Village Art and Crafts Fair. 30 people on the craft fair grounds. Every year, more and more people wanted to get into the craft “There’s a mixture of two- and threefair, and soon it got kind of crazy. We had as dimensional objects, more than 20 potters, many as 160 vendors at one time,” he said. 25 jewelers, and everything else filled in from Now, the Fair has reached a sweet spot of continued on page 10 space and variety.

New Textures

TH E

STEPS Ancient Techniques

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA Designer/Goldsmith

100 Cherry Street ~ Black Mountain pg. 24

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828.669.0065 | www.VisionsofCreation.com


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Eleven

JULY 2015

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Amber Combs Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sandi Anton, Petras Barcas, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, H. Tyrone Brandyburg, Cortina Caldwell, Lydia Carrington, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Josh Kravetz, Val Leeper, Tina Masciarelli, Kay S. Miller, Betina Morgan, Cindy Norris, Wendy H. Outland, Steve Plever, Dennis Ray, Shari Riendeau, Angeline Schwab, Pam Segal, Jeannie Shuckstes, Alice Stearns, Rachel Strivelli, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Dan Weiser, Jan Welch, Terri Wells, J. & R. Woods.

4 Fine Art

6 Performance

Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, July 2015, Vol. 18 No. 11

On the Cover:

Dill Falls, 72x60 inches, oil on canvas by Jack Stern. PAGE 18

David Teague! Ingredients,

written by David Teague

Winton Manor - Part 2,

written by Christopher Van Dyke

Small Measure - Lust for Life, written by Ashley English

Hiking the PCT - 23 Big Ones, written by John Swart

LEAF Downtown AVL . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Mountain Dance and Folk Festival 9 Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands 10 Village Art and Craft Fair . . . . . . . . 11 International ArtFest . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Folkmoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

12 Movie Reviews

Announcing a new short story writer -

written by Michael Landolfi

8 Fairs & Festivals

Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

New stories are added each month!

Flying Crocodiles,

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival 6 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Carl Sandburg Home . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Young Artist Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

8 Music

ADVERTISING SALES

SHORT STORIES

John Cram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Jack Stern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Seven Sisters Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Frances Greenberg . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

CONTACT US

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Buffalo Wabs & Price Hill Hustle . . 8 Larry Campbell & Teresa Williams 27 Concerts on the Quad at UNCA . 39

The Physical Body. Positive Thinking,

written by Ronya Banks

Life Part 2 - Dancing Shrimp, written by Jonathan Look

Short Story guidelines are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

SPECIAL SECTIONS

16 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-25 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 37

ONLY ONLINE Asheville’s Leather Queen Mary Lynn Schroeder, owner of In Blue Handmade, employs 11 artisans who craft an array of custom leather accessories, including guitar straps, journals, tote bags, purses, flask covers, wallets, luggage tags, and more.

The Curmudgeon,

by Peter Loewer. The general store was a scene of havoc, unleashed. The general mood reflected that famous line by Rita Hayworth in Fire Down Below, “…you don’t want me, armies have marched over me!” Linda Neff offers

Freedom from Pain, Discomfort and Suffering.

Have you ever been skeptical of something and then discover that it actually has become very beneficial?

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

30 Dining Guide Vineyard Wine Dinner . . . . . . . . . . 30 Cafe 64. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 The Beer Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Mother Earth Produce . . . . . . . . . . 32

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 5


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captivating performances The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival Festival Schedule Program 1 - Family Affair

Enso String Quartet; Inessa Zaretsky, piano

Program 2 – Hungarian Flavors

Enso String Quartet; Vadym Kholodenko, piano

Program 3 – Mostly Russians

George Pope, flute; Cynthia Watson, oboe; David Bell, clarinet; Lynn Hileman, bassoon; Inessa Zaretsky, piano; J. Frievogel, violin; Rachel Frievogel, cello

Program 4 – In Debussy’s Footsteps

Jasper String Quartet; George Pope, flute; Cynthia Watson, oboe; David Bell, clarinet; Lynn Hileman, bassoon; Inessa Zaretsky, piano Jasper String Quartet

Program 5 – The Great Masters

Jasper String Quartet; Philip Alejo, bass; Inessa Zaretsky, piano

AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

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The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, one of the longest running chamber music festivals in the United States, presents its 46th season to the listeners of the Carolinas. The five week festival will perform concerts in Swannanoa in Kittredge Theater on the Warren Wilson College campus on July 3, 11, 18, 25 and August 1. Concerts will take place in Waynesville at the Waynesville Performing Arts Center on July 5, 12, 19, 26 and August 2. Concerts in Greenville, SC will take place at the Fine Arts Center on July 6, 13, 20, 26, and August 3. All concerts begin at 7:30 pm. The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival is able to welcome widely beloved and internationally acclaimed musicians from all over the world to its annual fiveweek season. Among this year’s performers is Vadym Kholodenko, winner of the coveted gold medal at the Fourteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in 2013. The festival is also pleased to welcome back the Grammy nominated Enso String Vadym Kholodenko

tradition of musical interconnections and do an all-Bolling program featuring that first Suite for Flute as well as movements from his Picnic This exciting crossover concert Suite for Flute, Guitar, showcases the wonderful connections and Jazz Trio along with between classical music and jazz. some solo piano pieces. The featured musicians On the weekend of July 10-12, AmiciMusic Steve Newbrough, are pianist/Artistic will present four concerts called “Jazzical 2” guitar Director Daniel Weiser, featuring the works of Claude Bolling and flutist Lea Kibler, guithe talents of some of the top classical and tarist Steve Newbrough, bassist Will Beasley, jazz musicians in the region. AmiciMusic is and drummer Justin Watt. All have performed WNC’s premier chamber music organization around the world and for some of the top dedicated to high quality intimate concerts in musical organizations in the country. non-traditional venues. On Thursday, July 9 at 6 p.m., they play Claude Bolling, the great French at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall at jazz pianist, wrote his Suite for Flute 743 Haywood Rd in West Asheville. and Jazz Piano Trio in 1973 for the Concert is $15 and great food and best classical flutist of the time, Jeandrinks are also available. Reservations Pierre Rampal. For over 10 years, that are recommended. Visit www.isisaalbum remained on the Billboard Top sheville.com or call (828) 575-2737. 40 and helped build some important On Friday, July 10 at 7:30 p.m., bridges between the classical and they perform at the White Horse jazz worlds. Bolling followed that up in Black Mountain. Tickets are with several other crossover suites $20 at the door or $15 in advance. written for some of the top classical Daniel Weiser, To reserve, visit www.whitehorsemusicians such as violinist Pinchas AmiciMusic blackmountain.com or call (828) Zuckerman and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. founder and 669-0816. AmiciMusic will continue in this Artistic Director

“Jazzical 2”

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Enso String Quartet

Quartet and the Jasper String Quartet. We’re proud to be able to bring exceptional classical music to a wide audience. IF YOU Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, GO July 3 through August 3. Ticket prices

are $25 for individual tickets and $100 for a series ticket. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.scm-festival.com. In Swannanoa phone (828) 771-3050, or email chamber@warren-wilson.edu; in Waynesville (828) 452-0593; in Greenville (864) 355-2550.

BY

DAN WEISER

On Saturday, July 11 at 7:30 p.m., they will do a special House Concert at a beautiful mountain home in Hendersonville. This home features a 9 foot Lea Kibler, grand piano from 1892, flute panoramic views, and fabulous acoustics and food. Seating is limited. Cost is $35pp and includes food and drinks. Reservations are required by visiting www.amicimusic.org or by calling Dan at 802-369-0856. On Sunday, July 12 at 2 p.m., they will play at Beth Israel Synagogue in Asheville as part of a special fund raiser celebration that will also include a fabulous art show featuring the works of local artists Barbara Sammons, Raquel Egosi, and Eileen Ross, including a wonderful series by Ross called “The Colors of Jazz.” Light hors d’oeuvres and desserts are included. Reservations strongly recommended. General admission is $25pp; CBI members are $20, and children are free. Purchase your tickets at www.amicimusic.org, by calling CBI at (828) 252-8660, or via email to admin@ bethisraelnc.org.


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captivating performances

HART PRESENTS THE BROADWAY COMEDY SMASH

The 39 Steps

You don’t have to be a fan of Alfred Hitchcock to appreciate the wacky Broadway comedy hit The 39 Steps.

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Buy-one-get-one special for Saturday matinee performances. The story comes from a melodrama published in 1915 by John Buchan. It would have long been forgotten but it became a classic 1935 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Robert Donat. In 1999 the British Film Institute ranked Hitchcock’s version of The 39 Steps the 4th best British film of all time. Another version of the film, copied almost shot for shot, was made in 1959 by Ralph Thomas and starred Kenneth More. It has also been filmed for television and presented on radio, but none compare with the original, which is the subject of the stage production. This is theatre at its finest, with actors doing things that don’t seem possible, and that can only happen on a stage. The show will run weekends through July 5, then perform 2 p.m. Saturday matinees through August 1. HART is offering a special buy-one-get-one special for the Saturday matinee performances.

If you are a fan of Alfred Hitchcock, you will recognize nearly every film by the master of suspense in this send up, which opened at the HART Theatre on June 19. The first production of The 39 Steps opened on Broadway in 2008 to rave reviews and after a successful run, moved off-Broadway where it is still going. It won the Olivier Award for Best Play, was nominated for numerous Tony Awards, and has now been performed all over the world. It is a tour de force for four actors who have to be able to play multiple characters and even recreate a chase across the rooftop of a moving train. For HART’s production, Julie Kinter has assembled a stellar cast that includes guest actors Hunter Henrickson and Will Vickers, along with George Heard and Clara Burrus. It is a show designed to leave audiences rolling in the aisles and wondering how they did it.

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IF YOU The 39 Steps, July 3 & 4 at 7:30 p.m., GO Sunday July 5 at 3 p.m., and Saturdays,

The 39 Steps stars Hunter Henrickson, Will Vickers, George Heard, and Clara Burrus.

July 11, 18, 25 and August 1 at 2 p.m. Tickets are available at www.harttheatre.org or by calling the HART Box Office, (828) 4566322, Tues-Sat. from 1-5 p.m. Performances are at the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

Summer Plays and Programs at Sandburg Home

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Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site has launched into a fun summer season of theater, farm life demonstrations, and historic walks.

Apprentice actors from the Flat Rock Playhouse present Rootabaga! to visitors at the Sandburg Home. NPS Photo

Now until August 8 there is something new to see or do at Connemara. Wednesday through Saturday mornings at 10:15 a.m., the amphitheater adjacent to the Sandburg Home hosts live performances of Sandburg’s words and music. Wednesday and Friday morning features The People’s Poet, a journey through the American experience of love, children, nature and social activism. Based on Sandburg’s collection of poetry and prose, the presentation is both silly and serious and enjoyable for audiences of all ages. On Thursday and Saturday morning, Rootabaga!, fills the stage with taxi cab drivers, a gold buckskin whincher, the potato face blind man and more. This zany presentation is based on Sandburg’s collection of stories for children, The Rootabaga Stories. These 30-minute performances are held rain or shine.

BY

H. TYRONE BRANDYBURg

Wednesday through Sunday afternoons at 2:15 p.m., visitors can learn how Mrs. Sandburg turned sweet fresh goat’s milk into cheese, butter, yogurt and more. These farmlife demonstrations focus on cheese-making with recipes and samples for the audience. Monday and Tuesday mornings, beginning July 6 at 10:15 a.m., rangers will stroll the grounds uncovering the history of Connemara from the first residents in 1838 to the Sandburg family. This is a great opportunity to see inside buildings normally closed to the public and discover how life at Connemara changed over time. Thanks to generous support from Eastern National (the park’s bookstore) and the Flat Rock Playhouse, Rootabaga! and The People’s Poet are offered to the public free of charge. IF YOU Carl Sandburg Home National Historic GO Site is a unit of the National Park

Service. The park is located three miles south of Hendersonville off U.S. 225 on Little River Road, and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. For more information, please phone (828) 693-4178, or visit www.nps.gov/carl

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 7


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1st Annual LEAF Downtown AVL

Since 1995, LEAF has been championing its mission to connect cultures and create community - both locally and globally. Following the creation of Lake Eden Arts Festival, LEAF expanded its programming to include a focus on arts education with LEAF Schools & Streets and LEAF International. Now in its 20th Year Anniversary with over 41,000 youth served, LEAF is proud to step into the heart of Asheville with the 1st Annual LEAF Downtown AVL. LEAF Downtown AVL aims to celebrate communities, creativity, diversity and families and work toward a long-term vision of building quality of place by intentionally infusing the power of the arts, culture and creativity.

The inaugural event will take place in Pack Square Park on Saturday and Sunday, August 1 and 2. LEAF Downtown kicks off with a Funky Cocktail Crawl July 17 through July 31, followed by Bootsy Funk Dynasty Day at New Mountain AVL on Friday, July 31. The LEAF Art Dash 5K and Family Relay takes place on Saturday, August 1 at 9 a.m.

BY

CORTINA CALDWELL

Bootsy Funk Dynasty Day is a first-time opportunity for music lovers to immerse into a full day funk experience that will include workshops, group intensive skill sessions, and a special 1.5 hour workshop and lecture with the funk master himself, Bootsy Collins! Bootsy Collins will also join LEAF Downtown on the Main Stage on August 1 for an encore of the May 2014 dynamo performance held at the LEAF Festival. The LEAF Art Dash is an opportunity to “Run Your Ash Off” in support of arts education in Western North Carolina. The run will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday with a chip-timed 5k for individual runners. The course will travel through the city’s downtown and surrounding area. At 10 a.m. a Friend & Families Relay will commence from the start line. Teams of four people will compete in a relay. At each exchange point, team members will work with volunteers from Roots + Wings School of Art and Design to create small works of art that will contribute to a larger communal project which will then be donated to the city of Asheville. Register for Bootsy Funk Dynasty Day and the LEAF Art Dash online at theLEAF.org. LEAF Downtown AVL is open to all families from all communities and is a FREE, nonticketed event! Come celebrate the milestone of 20 years with LEAF artists, performers, youth, parents, staff and volunteers!

LEAF Downtown AVL Performer Lineup • Bootsy Collins’ Rubber Band • Red Baraat • Dangermuffin • LEAF Love Band • Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds • The Main Squeeze • Old Landmarks Gospel Blow Out • The London Souls • Empire Strikes Brass • Arouna Diarra • Santos • Marcel Anton • Indigo de Sauza • To All My Dear Friends • Unifire Theatre • Faerie Kin • Asheville Yoga • Old Timers in the Round • Fritz Beer & The Crooked Beat And Many More…

IF YOU LEAF Downtown AVL, Pack Square GO Park, Saturday and Sunday, August 1

and 2. Bootsy Funk Dynasty Day at New Mountain AVL on July 31. The LEAF Art Dash 5K and Family Relay, Saturday, August 1 at 9 a.m. More details at www.theLEAF.org

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

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Appearing Live at Jack of The Wood “Everybody’s getting a raise!” has become the unofficial tag line of Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle, a line screamed out at an early show that somehow stuck. Since the band last set foot in Asheville they’ve played everywhere from “Hannibal, Missouri, to Youngstown, to Milwaukee to Cleveland and from Bloomington to Knoxville and back around again.” They’ve also recorded and released Revival, a live recording that captures the essence of their stage show, and were nominated for a Best Folk/Americana Cincinnati Entertainment Award. The Ohio based four piece Americana/folk band, whose sound blends “the tradition of heroes like Woody Guthrie and Mississippi John Hurt into a contemporary flavor” is made up of guitarist/ vocalist/spokesperson Matt Wabnitz (aka Buffalo Wabs), along with Casey Campbell, Ian Mathieu, and Scott Risner. The group is deeply rooted in the tradition of Old Time pioneers with an energy that

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Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

“could burn down the rowdiest honky-tonk in town.” The four met through the Cincinnati music community at open mics and “began seeing each other at other shows around town. We all had different musical projects of our own but after playing together onstage we realized the chemistry was undeniable.” Soon after they’d become the musical pride of Cincinnati, with no less a name than former Cincinnati mayor and famed daytime talk

BY JAMES

CASSARA

show host Jerry Springer joining them on stage. After hitting the road they’ve scarcely had time to look back, playing about 150 shows a year while steadily increasing their geographic fan base. Cincinnati music writer Dylan Bentley, an early champion of the band, sums it up thusly: “They play Folk-Americana music, and they do it in the kind of hell-blazing, barn-burning, foot-stomping way that rejuvenates, enriches and enlivens the intent and aspirations of that style of song.” Now that’s the sort of praise only a true fan could heap upon any band! IF YOU Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle GO on Friday, July 10 at Jack of the Wood,

95 Patton Ave. For more information go to www.jackofthewood.com/music-events Local and regional musicians! If you want coverage in Rapid River Magazine please email jjcassara@aol.com.


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fun summer festivals Asheville’s 88th Annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival

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The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival is the country’s longest running folk festival. Now in its 88th year of highlighting mountain culture, the festival returns this summer for three full evenings, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, August 6, 7 and 8, at the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville. With introductions beginning at 6:50 p.m. and the show beginning at 7 p.m. nightly, the festival Stoney Creek Cloggers Photo: Wendy Olsen formally showcases an amazing repertoire of mountain performers – old-timers as well as the newest Cream-of-the-crop musicians, generation of bluegrass and mounballad singers and dancers. tain string bands, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers – who share music and dance festival features both well-known musicians that echo centuries of Scottish, English, Irish, and new talent alike, representative of the Cherokee and African heritage. Southern Appalachian Mountains and its The festival begins Thursday, August 6 continuing traditions. with Hometown Appreciation Night. In The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival is keeping with the grassroots flavor of the presented by Asheville’s Folk Heritage Comfestival, local families and individuals are mittee which also produces its sister event, encouraged to attend to help kick off the first the 49th Annual Shindig on the Green, a free night of the festival. gathering held each year at Pack Square Park on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford stage, with a stage show and informal jam sessions on Saturday evenings throughout the summer. Ticket sales for the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival are a key element in supporting the free Shindig on the Green events each summer. IF YOU The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, GO Diana Wortham Theatre August 6, 7

and 8. Tickets: Adults $22 or $54 for 3-night package; Children 12 and under $12 or $24 for 3-night package; Groups of 10 or more $17 per person. Tickets available through Diana Wortham Theatre at (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com/mountain-dance-and-folkfestival-2015.

Shindig on the Green Cole Mountain Cloggers Photo: Wendy Olsen

Audiences at each of the three performances will see an extensive line-up of the cream-ofthe-crop musicians, ballad singers and dancers from the region; each evening features at least four dance teams from the very young to the young at heart. The popular and long-standing house band, the Stoney Creek Boys, returns to perform each evening. And each night of the

July 11, 18, 25, August 15, 22, 29 and September 5. Saturdays... Along About Sundown (7-10 p.m.) Roger McGuire Green at Pack Square Park in downtown Asheville. FREE. Bring your instruments, families, friends, lawn chairs and blankets. www.folkheritage.org

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 9


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fairs and festivals Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

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The 68th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands takes place at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, July 16-19. Nearly 200 juried artists of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be selling works of clay, metal, wood, jewelry, fiber, paper, natural materials, leather and mixed media. With styles ranging from traditional to contemporary, the Fairs showcase the rich talent, diversity and craft mastery of Guild members. Beginning on Friday July 16 mountain musicians perform live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of the Craft Fair experience. From old time to bluegrass, this tradition is kept alive today. In addition to providing a retail market for juried members, the Guild hosts craft demonstrations during the Fairs. A strong part of the Guild’s mission is to educate the public about the history of crafts in this region, various craft techniques, and an appreciation

Fine Work On the cover of our June issue we featured a painted clay owl created by Mary Dashiell, a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. The photo was taken by Robert Batey.

‘John Cram’ cont’d from page 4

A to Z. Some people don’t quite fit into a category, but it’s quite a variety,” said Cram. “People should come to the Fair because they love it, they love the consistency, and the quality of the art is great.” As for Asheville, the Fair draws exhibitors mainly from the southeast, and 30 from western North Carolina, but artists will be traveling from 16 different states to what is becoming an art mecca. “The River Arts District is exploding and going really, really well, and Biltmore Village is picking up. It’s got some artification going on, because we’ve had a lot of commercial stuff move into the Village. The Folk Art Center also has a branch in the Village, which I think is great,” said Cram. Cram says the low point of the fair was when it rained all day on Saturday years ago, but the only thing that can be done about that is hope for clear weather.

10 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

BY

HANNAH BARRY

for fine crafts. The July show features wet felting, sunprinting, natural dyeing, bamboo fly rods and blacksmithing. Jan Davidson, Director of the John C. Campbell Folk School, stated, “Creating a world in which craft and other native talents can flourish – this is the Guild’s legacy. The craftspeople of Southern Appalachia are always aware of tradition and forever renewing themselves from the old sources of nature, family, spiritual life and the desire to share one’s gifts with others.” The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 with headquarters at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville. The Guild region covers the mountain counties of nine southeastern states from Maryland to Alabama, representing more than 900 craftspeople. The Craft Fairs are one of the ways in which the Guild fulfills its mission, which is to bring together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing, and conservation. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of scheduled craft demonstrations an performances. IF YOU GO The 68th Annual Craft Fair of the

Southern Highlands, July 16-19 at the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, Children under 12 free. More information at www.craftguild.org or phone (828) 298-7928 .

“We had one year where there was a 90 percent threat of rain. It rained in west Asheville and downtown, the south, the east, and Biltmore Forest, but it didn’t rain in the Village. We lucked out. We had some protection there going on,” said Cram, who later found out a local priest had offered up prayers to stave off the rain. “That was pretty incredible.” One of the differences between the Fair and the now defunct Belle Chere Festival, says Cram, is that the Village Art and Craft Fair brings outside business into Biltmore Village, rather than roadblocking it from the outside. It’s a trait that he says ensures longevity for the Fair. “The rest of the Village has one of their best days in business. The wallets don’t stay at the fair, they wander around the Village. It’s an event that completely enhances business,” he said. New Morning Gallery 40 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, (828) 254-0701 www.newmorninggallerync.com


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fun summer fairs and festivals 43rd Annual Village Art and Craft Fair

1st ANNUAL

In its 43rd year, the VACF continues a long tradition of bringing high-quality crafts to Historic Biltmore Village. The fair hosts 114 artists from 17 states, representing the full spectrum of craft media – jewelry, ceramic, wood, fiber, metals, two-dimensional art and more. The craft fair is a great opportunity to encounter new artists (25 are first-time exhibitors) and to talk with crafters one-on-one. 36 artists are from Western North Carolina. Thousands of shoppers from all over the southeast arrive to stroll through the fair, discovering unique gifts for friends, family and themselves! A cat has been in almost every poster design. John Cram, the fair’s coordinator, says, “The public is always anticipating what the design will be just as they anticipate the fair itself.” This year’s poster is by NC artist C. Shana Greger and offers a unique variation to the usual cat theme. Intrigued by Shana’s colorful landscape imagery and waterfall series paintings which are carried at New

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SHARI RIENDEAU

114 artists from 17 states displaying jewelry, ceramics, wood, fiber, metals, two-dimensional art and more!

Morning Gallery, John approached Shana about creating the craft fair poster for 2015. “While we expected to see Shana’s strong style represented in the poster, the bobcat was a surprise.” Though it has been awhile, the posters have featured non-traditional cats in the past and with the show’s 50th anniversary approaching it seemed a fitting opportunity to flash back to earlier years. “This year’s poster and t-shirts are going to be highly collectible,” says Cram. “This design is a winner!”

This year’s poster is by NC artist C. Shana Greger.

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Stroll through the fair and discover unique gifts.

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Fair hours are Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., rain or shine. There is no admission fee. Homemade refreshments are available at church sponsored concession booths with proceeds benefiting the Cathedral’s outreach program. IF YOU Village Art and Craft Fair, August 1 & 2 GO in Biltmore Village. Saturday 10 a.m. to

7 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

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On August 1 & 2 New Morning Gallery and Bellagio Art-to-Wear sponsor the Village Art and Craft Fair on the grounds of the Cathedral of all Souls in Biltmore Village.

PACK SQUARE PARK

ASHEVILLE, NC

theLEAF.org

Join Bootsy Collins’ Rubber Band, Red Baraat, Dangermuffin & More! Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Dope  ½

Short Take: A precocious trio of misfits from ‘the Bottoms’ inadvertently end up with a backpack full of drugs, a gun and a wild ride.

REEL TAKE: Dope is a little movie that may or may not still be in local theaters by the time you read this. But, if it is and you have any interest in it after reading this review, see it quickly because it won’t be here long. Brown Sugar director Rick Famuyiwa turns in one of the year’s most pleasant surprises so far. The film is produced and narrated by Forrest Whitaker and opens with the three definitions of dope: drugs, a stupid person, and slang for excellent (a la “cool”). Dope tells the story of three misfits from ‘the Bottoms’ neighborhood of Inglewood, California who inadvertently end up with a

Tony Revolori, Kiersey Clemons, and Shameik Moore are some pretty dope geeks.

backpack full of drugs and a gun. At the center of our trio is Malcolm (Shameik Moore), a precocious geek with his sights set on Harvard and a penchant for 90s era hip hop. Flanking Malcolm are Jib (Tony Revolori) and

THE MONTHLY REEL

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Diggy (Kiersey Clemons). Jib is a more self deprecating geek and Diggy is an androgynous lesbian whose family takes her to church to “pray the gay away.” The greatest attribute of our trio is how comfortable each is in their own skin and with each other. What they are not quite as comfortable with are the every day threats in their neighborhood. It is while running away from some bullies that Malcolm ends up cornered by a local drug dealer (A$ap Rocky) and relaying messages for him to his on-the-rocks girlfriend (Zoe Kravitz). Both the dealer and the girlfriend take a liking to Malcolm and invite him and his friends to a party, but after a raid at a night club, Malcolm inadvertently ends up with a backpack full of ‘Molly’ (an ecstasy-like party drug), a gun, and a great big problem. The rest of the movie’s running time is pretty much spent dealing with said problem and, in doing

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of Chip Kaufmann when Can the Governator Terminate Mike’s Magic? he was just 10 years old. The good Professor pays A reboot of The Terminator (a first up with a backpack full of – tribute to Lee with “My installment in a new trilogy to be precise), a yep you guessed it – dope. Debt to Christopher Lee” super sized sequel to Magic Mike (because Also nearing the end of its on page 13. Hollywood can’t leave well enough alone), run at press time (at both The Sir Christopher Lee passed The Hendersonville a potty-mouthed talking teddy bear (again, Fine Arts Theatre and The away in June at the age of 93. Film Society will also pay because Hollywood can’t leave well enough Carolina) is Love and Mercy tribute to Lee this month alone), and little yellow Minions all – a biopic about Beach Boy, with a screening of Dracula on July 19. invade the big screen this month – yep, it’s Brian Wilson. We haven’t reviewed it here, but Another HFS highlight is a screening of summertime at the movies. if it happens to still be playing anywhere, it’s the original Stella Maris from 1918 starring At press time, genetically modified worth seeing. Mary Pickford. The Asheville Film Society dinosaurs were still trouncing box office Out this month that also qualify in the ‘see also has a great line up, including a rare records, but by the time this issue comes it while you can’ realm are A Little Chaos, screening of Sunrise: A Song of Two out we’ll see if the re:terminator can send Escobar: Paradise Lost, Me and Earl and the Humans from 1927. See pages 14 & 15. our Jurassic friends back to the age of Dying Girl, The Overnight, and Gemma Last but not least we need to mention the extinction and mute Mike’s magic. Rest Bovery. Unfortunately the highest rated film ‘Best of’ screening and awards ceremony for assured, if none of these offerings are up this month, and one of the front runners for this year’s 48 Hour Film your alley, there’s still plenty else to see – the year so far, When Marnie Was There, will Project happening July 9 provided you can get yourself to the theatre not be there, or rather here, by the time you at 8 p.m. at The Millroom in time to catch some little gems. read this. The good Professor Kaufmann gives in Asheville. The winning There are a couple of worthy indie the new anime from Studio Ghibli a glowing filmmakers will go on to titles that may still be in theatres by the five-star review and urges film lovers to look compete in the national time you read this. I’ll See You In My for When Marnie Was There on streaming 48 Hour Film Project. For Dreams is a great coming-of-old-age outlets and DVD soon. more information go to 48hourfilm.com/ comedy-drama starring Blythe Danner. This past month, the man whose name is Asheville-nc. And Dope, produced and narrated by synonymous with Dracula died at the age of Forest Whitaker, is a terrific urban drama 93. Christopher Lee left his mark on starlet’s Until next month, enjoy! about three geeks who inadvertently end necks and on the impressionable young mind

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so, ties in brilliantly with the various substories. I knew Zoe Kravitz was the daughter of actress Lisa Bonet and singer Lenny Kravitz, but the only actor I readily knew in the film was Tony Revolori, who played Zero in last year’s Grand Budapest Hotel. All three turn in fine performances, but I was particularly taken with Moore and look forward to seeing what he does next. Dope is an urban coming-of-age comedydrama. Its style and texture is smart, hip, surprisingly relevant and completely refreshing. There is a profound, but socially appropriate, use of the ‘N’ word. The major plot point involves drugs. And there is a smattering of teenage sexuality. If any of this is an issue for you, this isn’t the movie for you. There was a reason Dope was an audience favorite at this year’s Sundance Festival. It’s certainly one of the tops on my list this year too. Rated R for language, drug content, sexuality/ nudity, and some violence - all involving teens. Review by Michelle Keenan

I’ll See You In My Dreams

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Short Take: With the death of a beloved dog and the arrival of two new men in her life, a 70 year old widow takes stock of what’s important. A wonderful coming-ofold-age story.

REEL TAKE: One of the few people that I’ve talked to who has actually seen I’ll See You In My Dreams remarked, “It’s such a good movie, but that mambi pambi title is misleading.” And while the title does actually reference a plot point, my friend made a good point. One might expect I’ll See You In My Dreams to be a mainstream, formulaic romantic comedy or a romantic melodrama a la Nicholas Sparks. And while it has tried and true earmarks of the rom-com genre, it is anything but. Instead, director and co-writer Brett Haley has created a remarkably gentle yet refreshingly adult film. I’ll See You In My Dreams tells the story of Carol (Blythe Danner), a 70-something widow with a very tidy life. She has a beloved old dog, a nice house, a small circle of friends and a seemingly endless supply of Chardonnay. Within the first moments of Movies continued on page 13


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the film she realizes it’s time to put the dog to sleep. We watch her as she calmly watches her constant companion fade from this world. It’s incredibly moving, especially for anyone who has ever shared that experience, and it all happens before we even know her name. The loss is a catalyst that shakes her from the aimless routine that’s been passing for life since her husband’s death. Carol finds herself truly alone, perhaps for the very first time, and begins to question if maybe there should be more to life. Cue the rat (uncredited), a pool boy (Martin Starr), and a handsome silver fox (Sam Elliott). What ensues is a sweet and wonderfully awkward friendship with the pool boy and a touching romance with the fox. Along the way her bridge-playing girlfriends continue their plight to get her to move to the retirement community and her only daughter (Malin Ackerman), a person she doesn’t see very often, comes to visit. Oh, and periodically the rat makes a startling appearance. The story has elements of comedy, occasional snarkiness, vulnerability and heartbreak. Danner is positively luminous and is perfectly suited to the role. She shines brilliantly throughout, but no moment more so than when she sings Cry Me a River at a karaoke night. The supporting cast is also rather sublime, meeting Danner at her elevated bar. Sam Elliot delivers the single best ever pick-up line from behind that glorious mustachioed face of bravado, and he and Danner have an easy chemistry. But it is Starr that is a bit of a revelation here as the socially awkward, dejected and somewhat aimless pool boy. You want Carol to spend more time with both of these fellows. The scenes with her daughter are also excellent. The scenes with Carol’s friends, played by Rhea Perlman, June Squib, and Mary Kay Place, are entertaining and add levity, but they are the slightly more contrived trappings of the film. Although this is a coming-of-old-age film that will resonate with a certain age bracket, one does not need to be in their golden years to enjoy or appreciate the film. It may in fact interest some to know that the writers of this film are in their early 30’s. The film plays out with quietly moving moments infused with incredibly jarring reality. But then that really

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I first encountered Christopher Lee in 1962 when I was 10 years old.

Sam Elliott charms Blythe Danner out of a safe rut and into his boat in I’ll See You In My Dreams.

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bigger part in Scott of the Antarctic with John I didn’t know who he was, having not Mills. He labored for 10 years in a variety of yet seen any of the classic Hammer horror movies before hitting it big with Dracula in pictures. I had gone to see Boris Karloff in a 1958. He would essay the part nine more times. movie called Corridors of Blood which was Ian Fleming was a cousin and Lee was set in 19th century England. Karloff’s NBC Fleming’s choice to play Dr No in the first mystery/horror series Thriller was in full James Bond film but he didn’t get the role. It’s swing and had captured my young imaginajust as well as several years later he played the tion and I was hoping to see more of him. title character in The Man With the Golden Lee had a small but very effective part Gun. Among his many assorted skills, he was as a grave robber named “Resurrection an accomplished fencer and played the part of Joe”. Karloff throws a beaker of acid in his Cardinal Richelieu’s right hand man Rochefort face at the end. That was considered quite in The Three (and Four) Muskeshocking in 1962. The movie teers where he excelled alongside theater I saw it in, the old the other members of the all-star Paris Theatre in Greenville cast. Many years later would come S.C., had seen better days. The Lord of the Rings and Star In fact, just like Asheville’s Wars: Parts 1 & 2. own Fine Arts Theatre, adult Those are a few of his high movies were just around the profile films but it was the little corner. Sadly there was no films, the drive-in films I’ll call John Cram in Greenville to them, like Theatre of Death, save it and it was demolished Lee as Lord Summerisle in the 1970s. in The Wicker Man (1973). Horror Hotel, The Crimson Cult, and most notably The For no particular reason, Wicker Man (see my DVD pick) I had managed to miss the for which I most remember him. Hammer films on TV and By going to see anything that he the next time I saw Lee it was in, I exposed myself to many was 1968 and the movie was other movies that I normally Dracula Has Risen From would not have gone to see. The Grave. I had gone to see Like many British thespians, it with my best friend from Lee would appear in just about high school. Although Lee anything, including such bizarre had little dialogue (usually the Lee as The Man With the offerings as The Rainbow Thief case with the Dracula films), Golden Gun (1974). and Hercules in the Haunted his unmistakable voice was World. To paraphrase Michael World his greatest asset for it was Caine “Work is work. It pays the instantly recognizable. bills, you get to travel to exotic There has been and will places, and you might pick up continue to be many tributes something that you can use in to the man throughout the something better.” year, for he was truly remarkHis longevity is also remarkable. Born in 1922, he first able. To still be able to act (in entered movies in 1948 after any capacity) while in your 90s having served in World War II. He can be glimpsed in As Saruman in Lord of the is simply incredible. Only Lillian Gish did it longer (she made her Olivier’s Hamlet and had a Rings (2001).

is life, isn’t it and it’s part of this film’s beauty. The film is not a ground breaker of any kind, but that isn’t a criticism and it’s not meant to diminish it in any way. As I reflected on the film over the course of a few days, it dawned on me that this wonderful little film may just bring more to the table than its simplicity would imply, and that is just plain elegant. Rated PG-13 for sexual material, drug use and brief strong language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Inside Out  ½

Short Take: Pixar studios has its biggest hit yet—not including sequels—exploring the emotions of an 11-year-old girl.

REEL TAKE: Pixar’s Inside Out focuses on

an 11-year-old girl named Riley (voiced by Kaitlyn Dias). Like all of us, Riley is ruled by her emotions — Joy (voiced by Amy Poehler), Sadness (voiced by Phyllis Smith), Fear (voiced by Bill Hader), Anger (voiced by Lewis Black) and Disgust voiced by (Mindy Kaling) live in Headquarters – a control room in

Christopher Lee at the start of his career in 1948.

last appearance in The Whales of August in 1987 when she was 94). Lee’s last appearance will be in Angels in Notting Hill which is set for release later this year. By 2015 Christopher Lee had appeared in over 250 movies (you can check out the complete list on imdb.com) and lent his distinctive voice to many more. He can also be heard on everything from a complete version of Igor Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale where he plays all three principal parts to a heavy metal album entitled Charlemagne: By the Sword & the Cross. It seemed as if he would go on forever but, of course, that could not be. He was the last of the great classic horror stars to survive. Now he can be reunited with his good friends Boris Karloff, Peter Cushing, and Vincent Price with whom he shared a birthday (May 27). I shall miss him, for it is truly the end of an era. Sadly Christopher Lee’s brand of horror film died long before he did, but then he was so much more than just a horror star. In addition to his acting and fencing skills, he could speak seven languages as well as sing opera. Few performers in any field were that versatile. His passing also reminds me of my own advancing years. To think that I first saw him up on a movie screen 53 years ago is almost impossible to believe yet I can still recall it as if it were yesterday. For that cinematic memory alone, not to mention so many more, I will always be in his debt. Thank you Sir Christopher. Rest in Peace.

Riley’s head. It’s very much like the Captain’s bridge in Star Trek. From this control room, they monitor Riley’s daily interactions and experiences, carefully storing her core memories. It’s an interesting premise and an ingenious way to explore emotions with children, but in some ways it wasn’t really a children’s movie. All is well in Riley’s happy life until a job transfer uproots her family from the hockey loving frozen lakes of Minnesota to the big city of San Francisco. Movies continued on page 14

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. July 5: 1776

(1972) Just one day after Independence Day comes the film version of the Tony Award winning musical about the creation and signing of the Declaration of Independence. The film stars William Daniels, Howard Da Siva, and Blythe Danner. Directed by Peter H. Hunt. July 12:

Stella Maris

(1918) Mary Pickford has been in the local news of late with a recent Chatauqua program devoted to her and with library showings of her movies. This film, in which she plays two very different roles, is considered to be her finest achievement. Directed by Marshall Neilan. July 19:

Dracula

(1958) This adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel from England’s Hammer Films made Christopher Lee an overnight star (after 10 years) and helped to launch a wave of Gothic horror films during the 1960s. Peter Cushing stars as Dracula’s nemesis Van Helsing. Directed by Terence Fisher. July 26: Matchstick Men

(2003) Nicolas Cage stars as a con man with a severe obsessivecompulsive disorder who discovers that he has a teenage daughter. She comes to stay with him and wants to take part in his latest scam. Allison Lohman is the daughter while Sam Rockwell is his younger partner-in-crime. Directed by Ridley Scott.

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Suddenly, Headquarters is on red alert and Joy goes into over drive, trying to steady their girl. Sadness threatens to unwittingly dismantle everything, setting a catastrophic chain of events off inside Riley’s poor head which creates quite the existential 11-year-old crisis in Riley’s life. Joy and Sadness spend the rest of the movie in a race to save Riley and spare her any further emotional turmoil. Doing it will be easier said than done. Inside Out has been getting rave reviews. I don’t share in the rave. Oh, it’s beautifully animated, the voicing talent is terrific and the overall concept is great. It has some wonderfully brilliant moments too – bringing Riley’s forgotten imaginary friend

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Wicker Man”

Disney Pixar gets inside the head of a little girl in Inside Out.

Bing Bong (voiced by Richard Kind) out of the depths of her memory was a stroke of genius – but unfortunately there were not enough of

July DVD Picks

The Wicker Man (1973)

It is “singularly unfortunate” (to quote my son) that for most people the title of The Wicker Man conjures up the 2006 abomination featuring Nicholas Cage. This original version from 1973 is in a different league altogether. In fact there are several critics who label it “the Citizen Kane of horror films”. I wouldn’t go that far, as I don’t particularly like Citizen Kane and I don’t consider it a horror film. It is much more. On the surface the film is a mystery. A deeply religious police officer goes to an island off the west coast of Scotland to investigate the case of a missing child. Once there he discovers a society of modern day pagans which is in direct opposition to his strong Christian beliefs. Although treated kindly, he receives no help from the locals and has to solve the mystery by himself, which he does. It is then that things are not nearly what they seem. If you saw the remake then you know how the movie ends so that element of surprise will be missing. Yet this version offers so much more. Writer Anthony Shaffer (who wrote Sleuth) touches on issues of faith, society, and what it means to conform and to stick to one’s beliefs. The film is similar to Christopher Nolan’s The Prestige in that you need to see it again to see what was hiding in plain sight. The movie has a tortured history. Intended for release at 102 minutes it was subsequently cut to 88 minutes and then unceremoniously dumped into theaters where it quickly disappeared. A few years later the 102 minute version showed up in America and was released on VHS but the DVD version of that print is of dubious quality. A director’s cut of 94 minutes has just been issued on DVD/Blu-Ray which will allow you to more or less see the film the

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way it was intended. As the head of the pagans, Christopher Lee gives one of his best performances. Edward Woodward (The Equalizer) as the “Christian copper” is equally compelling. If you want to learn about Celtic mythology and enjoy Celtic music along with beautiful Scottish scenery, plus get a thrill out of things not being what they seem, then the original The Wicker Man is a must see especially in this new incarnation. Just make sure that Nicholas Cage is NOT in it.

’71 (2015)

In keeping with our efforts to promote worthwhile films that don’t last long in the theater, my DVD pick this month is ’71. At a time when our country needs to respond to violence and racism with unity, love and peace, this is the kind of film that is a reminder of the pointlessness of hate. ‘71 is a historical, fact-based action film that takes place over the course of a single night, when a young British solider (Unbroken’s Jack O’Connell) is accidentally separated from his unit following a riot on the streets of Belfast during ‘the troubles’ in 1971. The film marks a powerful feature debut for director Yann Demange. Unable to tell friend from foe or which side is which, Hook tries to get back to his barracks

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these moments to sustain it. I think the weak link is in the writing. Interestingly, co-director Peter Docter was the writer behind Up, Monster’s Inc. and Toy Story, to name a few and he directed Up and Monster’s Inc. His fellow co-director Ronnie del Carmen shared screenwriting duties on Up. I think Inside Out suffers from the lack of either of them being on the screenwriting team. But no matter, all in all it’s likeable, and it’s already Pixar’s biggest film to date, so it’ll be in theaters for a while and there will no doubt be some kind of sequel. Rated PG for mild thematic elements and some action. Review by Michelle Keenan Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “’71” but is thwarted at every turn. Whether it’s the Protestants, the Catholics, or members of his own squadron, everyone thinks they are doing what’s right, even when it’s playing both sides of the fence. The result is distrust, utter confusion and wasted life. We feel Hook’s confusion right along with him, thanks to Demange’s boots-on-the-ground, realistic approach. For those with a delicate stomach it should be noted that there are moments when the camera work makes Katherine Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker look like it was filmed with a steady cam. The film is dark and gritty. This also enhances the confusion, tension and suspense to great effect. We don’t get to know the characters, but you get an intuitive sense of each characters moral fiber. Jack O’Connell delivers a strong performance. (Although after this and Unbroken, I do hope he chooses something lighter for his next project.) Supporting cast members, including Richard Dormer, David Wilmot, Sean Harris and Velene Kane, all turn in strong performances. You can’t be in project like this and turn in anything less. The script by Scottish playwright Gregory Burke is stark but strikingly effective and bursting with humanity. Demange and Burke have managed to take a highly polarizing and political subject and strip it of all politics, ergo creating an incredibly powerful story and statement. There are no sides. It’s one of the most thought provoking darkly raw films I’ve seen in a while. ’71 is incredibly worthwhile but certainly not for everyone. It is confusing. It’s brutal and it’s profoundly sad on a number of levels. The film played to small audiences during its one week in Asheville at the Fine Arts Theatre, but I hope maybe a few of you will give it a view.


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Jurassic World  ½

Short Take: The long-awaited installment in the Jurassic Park series, timed perfectly to capitalize on the now grown children who loved it 22 years ago. Way to spell ‘b l o c k b u s t e r,’ Mr. Spielberg.

REEL TAKE: At press time, this brontosaurussize hit was rampaging its way to breaking all kinds of box office records. So really, my piddly review isn’t going to make a difference to anyone, nor impact whether you will or won’t see it. Still though, as it’s now one of the biggest movies ever, we might as well weigh in on it. The Good Professor Kaufmann has actually never seen any of the Jurassic predecessors, so it was up to me. I confess to thoroughly enjoying the first Jurassic Park in 1993. Who wouldn’t? But, like most people, I was disappointed with the second and completely forgot there was a third film in 2001. Jurassic World, however, showed promise and by and large it delivers on that promise. In the original Jurassic Park, Richard Attenborough showed us what could happen when you pay attention in science class and find a little dino-DNA. Fast forward 22 years and the dinosaur theme park, Jurassic World, is a huge success (Disney World would wane in comparison). But with success comes greed – corporate greed to be precise. So what’s the park to do? Why genetically modify dinosaurs, of course! Of course all of this is unknown to all but the inner-most circle of Jurassic World, including the park’s uptight, nervous Nelly operations manager, Claire (Bryce Dallas Howard), the Dr. Frankenstein of prehistoric DNA, Dr. Wu (B.D. Wong reprising his role from 22 years ago) and the park’s owner, Mr. Masrani (Irfan Kahn). Dr. Wu has created something spectacular for the investors – the Indominus Rex – a dinosaur hybrid that is part T-Rex and part something else (yet to be disclosed). So of course it’s when Claire’s nephews (Ty Simpkins and Nick Robinson) come to visit that said genetically modified, halfmystery beastie breaks out of her pen and goes on a tourist eating rampage. It seems the only one who can save the day is Owen (Chris Pratt), one of the park’s animal trainers and a dinosaur whisperer of sorts. But alas, Indominus herself cannot alone thwart Owen’s efforts. Of course, there has to be a villain to make matters even worse, played here with great aplomb by Vincent D’Onofrio as the head of security for the park. He is a right-wing Haliburton type contractor who also wants to use Owen’s velociraptors to fight ISIS. So yes, it’s all sounding pretty absurd and we haven’t even gotten to Claire’s outfit and high heels, her near constant flirtatious bickering with Owen or Mr. Masrani’s helicopter flying skills. No matter, we don’t want to give away all the fun. What I can say is what Jurassic

It’s a Jurassic World now that it’s one of the biggest films in box office history.

World has going for it – a good cast, a rather good script and terrific effects. Of the sequels in the franchise it’s definitely the best. At its core it’s a good old fashioned popcorn matinee. Director Colin Trevorrow (Safety Not Guaranteed) seems to know how to make the most out of that element. It’s exactly what it’s supposed to be — big budget, lively entertainment that doesn’t take itself too seriously. To me it was ridiculously good fun. Unfortunately, for all its effects not once did the filmmakers succeed in pulling off one genuinely thrilling, jump-out-of-yourskin moment. I’d have happily traded some of its anti-GMO, corporate greed messaging for a little more thrill. After all isn’t that what Jurassic World is all about? Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sciencefiction violence and peril) Review by Michelle Keenan

that transcends location. A socially awkward, asthmatic girl named Anna is sent from the city to the coast to stay with relatives to improve her health. Her guardian hopes that the change in scenery will also help her to come out of the shell that she has recently withdrawn into. As the film unfolds we discover why this has happened and we watch as she gradually emerges. The transformation comes about as a result of Anna’s friendship with a young girl, Marnie, who is the same age and lives in a big house across the bay which can only be reached by boat or at low tide. Anna is a budding artist who loves to draw and she first becomes fascinated with Marnie after sketching her. It becomes obvious to the audience early on that Marnie is an otherworldly spirit but, who she really is and why she is attracted to Anna, is what the film is really about. It’s also about Anna’s return to the real world which she has rejected because of an unpleasant discovery. As she finds out more about Marnie’s background she discovers more about herself. What makes Marnie so special is the style of animation employed. Unlike the typical Studio Ghibli offering which is usually done in a vividly drawn anime style, this movie is done in soft pastels and is like a delicate watercolor come to life which is in keeping with the art motif of the story. Another plus that kept me engaged rather than distancing me (as frequently happens with other Studio Ghibli offerings) is the

When Marnie Was There

The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. July 7: French Dressing

(1964) Ken Russell’s first feature film is a comedy about a stodgy British resort. Gormleigh-by-the-Sea is a holiday community besotted with dullness. But things liven up when a young deckchair attendant, convinces the local entertainment director and mayor into starting a film festival. Stars Peter Brett, Ronald Cass and Peter Myers. Directed by Ken Russell. July 14: The Life and Death of Col. Blimp

(1943) From the Boer War through World War II, a soldier rises through the ranks in the British military. The much-lauded, but controversial epic, satirizes British traditionalism. Stars Roger Livesey, Deborah Kerr and Anton Walbrook. Directed by Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger. July 21: Show Boat



Short Take: Exquisitely animated, this final offering from Studio Ghibli about a lonely young girl’s transformation with the help of a special friend is a must see but you’ll have to wait for the DVD.

REEL TAKE: By the time you read this, When Marnie Was There will have left the only theater in town that it was playing in. This comes as no surprise; how can a beautifully animated, deeply felt film about loneliness and redemption compete with that dinosaur movie that is playing in several theaters all over town and is on its way to becoming the number one box office attraction of all time. This is not meant as a criticism of Jurassic World but rather with 1) Carolina Cinemas for not giving Marnie a chance to be seen by dumping it after only one week and 2) the distributor (Disney) for opening the movie against Jurassic World which seems to me a convenient way of just writing it off. I had the type of emotional experience at this movie that I rarely have in the movies anymore and especially with an animated film. Part of the reason for that has to do with the subject material which is an English ghost story transplanted from Cornwall to the Japanese coast. The basic plot has a universality

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY

The somewhat other worldly Marnie in the moonlight in When Marnie Was There.

English dubbing. A talented vocal cast headed up by Hailee Steinfeld delivers the dialogue in a natural and unobtrusive way. This is probably because the movie is not really aimed at children even though children are the principal characters. I long for the days of one movie in one theater, not the same movie in several theaters, which is what we have today. I have nothing against big budget popcorn flicks but I hate to see important little ones like When Marnie Was There get lost in the proliferation. So keep a sharp eye out for streaming possibilities or the DVD, for that is [sadly] the only way you’re going to see it. Rated PG for thematic elements and smoking. Review by Chip Kaufmann

(1936) The second film adaptation (of three) of the Broadway musical, the daughter of a riverboat captain falls in love with a charming gambler, but their fairytale romance is threatened when his luck turns sour. Stars Irene Dunne, Allan Jones and Charles Winninger. Directed by James Whale. July 28: Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans

(1927) When a simple country lad becomes involved with a seductive city girl, she tries to convince him that murdering his wife will solve all of their problems. Stars George O’Brien, Janet Gaynor and Margaret Livingston. Directed by F.W. Murnau. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 15


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A VIEW INTO HCC’S CREATIVE ARTS PROGRAM

The value of education and life experiences in any field cannot be overstated. Like millions in our country, I am someone who has considered regional community colleges an integral part of any area in which I’ve lived. Friends received degrees. A teaching parent put food on our dinner table. I returned to one as a “non-traditional age” student (I prefer “NTA”: it sounds like a spaceship hyper drive device) to pursue additional schooling in the arts. And I always cross paths with folks who are affiliated with Haywood Community College (HCC) in Waynesville, NC. HCC’s Mission, to “provide accessible, affordable, and high-quality education, workforce training, and lifelong learning,” is supported by the campus’ physical environment. Tucked just off US 19, one is transported onto a calm, winding, tree-filled greenspace. The green-built wonder that is the Creative Arts Building is the epitome of support for what lies within. There are folks in the WNC arts collective who do some really cool things, and inspire us. Not just the makers, but also the leaders. Kari Rinn, Director of Creative Arts, carved some valuable time into her schedule to answer my questions, which ranged from her own history

to more about craft and the arts in our region. Like many who tend the fires of creativity for others, Kari’s thoughts provide evidence that hands-on creative experience is intrinsically intertwined with the goals of the community. Greg Vineyard (GV): What brought you to the craft/non-profit world, and what are some things you have done along the way to heading up Creative Arts at HCC? Kari Rinn (KR): It has been a fabulous journey to this point. I attended community college and took nearly every art class they offered. I spent nearly ten years traveling, working, seeing a lot of art and culture, and saving for school. After living in Montana, Michigan, Germany & Colorado, visiting more than half the states in the US, and 14 countries later, I finally made it back to art school. I attended Virginia Commonwealth University, majoring in Crafts and Material Studies. Education changed my entire perspective. I saw things differently, I learned to question and how to really see. It changed me as a maker and also as a person. After school I received a fellowship to OxBow School of Art in affiliation with the Art Institute of Chicago. This eventually led me to Chicago where I managed a contemporary handmade jewelry and fine craft gallery. It was an absolutely wonderful experience, which allowed me to work with the artists I loved and help the public to understand the importance of handmade.

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I held a brief position with HandMade in America, which is what brought me to this area. What a beautiful place that has a rich history in crafts, world renowned makers, community support and amazing educational opportunities. I am glad to have found a place at HCC. And what a dynamic, inspiring and exciting place to call home! GV: What are your personal creative endeavors in the arts? KR: My personal goals relate to simply using my voice. I hope to be an advocate for craft, working to educate the public on the importance of handmade. Through my position at the college, I am

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able to work with so many talented, passionate and extremely qualified instructors, faculty and staff to create a dynamic offering of classes. I find the continuing education program a great fit for me because it is ever changing. I never know what course someone might propose, from printing photos on fabric and altering them, to Japanese silk rag weaving – there is always something new. Even the classes we offer on a regular basis are continually new, (with) new students learning for the first time, being introduced to a new material. It is great being a part of the creative culture in this region; we are part of an important history. Several community members worked very hard to bring crafts into the educational system here at HCC. It was offered first through continuing education, and was so well received it was developed into a curriculum offering. That was 40 years ago next year! For more pictures of the Creative Arts programs at HCC, go to www.creativearts. haywood.edu, and for more information about HCC, go to www.haywood.edu. Stay tuned for Part II of this article in the August issue of Rapid River Magazine. Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Growing Your Audience

Some artists are extroverts, some are introverts; but all must apply effort to enhance their list of contacts. In order to thrive, you must consistently increase your audience. The upside is that it doesn’t take a huge bundle of money. Below are a few steps that, if implemented routinely, will contribute to growth that can be sustained. First and foremost, get out and about! Sounds pretty easy so far, right? Well, to make it pay off, you must be mingling on a regular basis. If you are normally a recluse, aim for once a month to start and gradually work up to once a week. Stay up to date on art happenings in your area. Visit the places where you feel most comfortable, such as artist studios, galleries, arts organizations, or museums. And be sure to have a small pad and pen to record notes. Ask an extroverted friend to go to an event with you. Your friend will likely see people they know and can introduce to you. Once you are out, be sure to make eye contact. When you get close to someone that

16 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

looks friendly and relaxed, smile and say hello. Speak clearly when you tell them your name. Then hand them your business card, which should include an image of your work and your contact info. Find out if they are local, part-time residents, or just visiting the area. Then inquire about their interest in regard to the arts. Tell them about the type of work you create and where/when they can see it. If during the event you see an acquaintance, greet them warmly and politely let them know that you are on a mission to make new contacts. That way they will not monopolize your time. They may even offer to introduce you to some people they know who are present. Finally, be sure to record the names and

BY

WENDY H. OUTLAND

Get out and about! Visit the places where you feel most comfortable. important details you have gathered within 24 hours, while facts are still fresh in your mind. And best to contact folks by mail or email within two weeks of your initial meeting. Invite your new friends to your studio or to your next event. Remember, growing your business requires building relationships, not just a big mailing list.

The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz


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RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

An Honest Look at the Naked Truth

ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

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After doing something BY JAN WELCH for more than fifty years, most people might be tempted to loftily lay back and be content with what they know. Discovery demands mental, emotional and physical energy. And a willingness to let go. With The Naked Truth, artist Jonas Gerard has indeed let go and ventured into new places, personally and thematically. His abstract “flow” paintings have given birth to provocative new figurative works that reflect his own process during their creation. Long Look Back, 40x40 inches, acrylic on canvas by Jonas Gerard

cont’d on page 18

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

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Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District

CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

French Broad Artists

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS

NEW STUDIO IN THE RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

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Lemon and Grapes, 12 x 16 in oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass

Grand Opening Celebration Saturday, July 11 Please join us for wine, food, and art at a reception open to the public from 2-5 p.m. in our new studio.

Riverview Station #216 • Asheville, NC Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. RL

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191 Lyman St., South Entrance • River Arts District

GRAND OPENING Riverview Station Studio #214

SATURDAY JULY 11 2-6PM

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

191 Lyman Street Asheville

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828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 17


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Jack Stern – Creating a Real Sense of Place

Jack Stern captures the natural beauty of landscapes on canvas.

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA Designer/Goldsmith

100 Cherry Street Black Mountain pg. 19

828.669.0065 www.VisionsofCreation.com MV

He is known for his amazing ability to capture perfectly lit skies, water reflections and mountain views. Encouraged by his grandmother, Jack began oil painting when he was just fourteen years old and within a few months started formal art instruction in San Diego, California. He sold his first piece at sixteen launching a lifelong career in art. Jack returned to his home state of Colorado in 1976 and opened an Dill Falls, 72x60 inches, oil on Tuckasegee at East Laporte, oil painting by Jack Stern art gallery in Silverton. He bartered canvas by Jack Stern a painting for a donkey and a mule and then headed into the high IF Rockies for extended plein air painting treks. Rock’s Art in the Park and the Best in the YOU Jack Stern will be at Twigs and Leaves Over the years, Jack has received numerLeagues and the Best in Oils from The BasGO Gallery for Art After Dark, Friday, July ous awards in California, Colorado and North com in Highlands. 3, from 6-9 p.m.. Enjoy piano music Carolina - most recently Artist of the Year and delight in the savory hors d’eurves. Twigs Jack still enjoys paint trips out west but curand Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, from the Art League of Henderson County, rently lives with his wife in a remote cabin in Waynesville. Open Monday through Saturday several Awards of Excellence in Blowing western North Carolina near the Black Balsam 10-5:30; Sundays, 1-4. (828) 456-1940 www. Mountains and the Blue Ridge Parkway. twigsandleaves.com

‘Naked Truth’ cont’d from page 17

original woodblock prints on handmade paper

April 1 (detail) • 10” x 6.5” • $80

Trees No. 28 (detail) • 10” x 13.5” • $95

Trees No. 5 (detail) • 4” x 8.5” • $80

Tulip Magnolia (detail) • 4” x 11” • $120 Inset: Homage No. 1 • 2.5” x 10” • $60 (framing additional)

pg. 36

MB 365 Merrimon Ave • Asheville 828.225.3117 • blackbirdframe.com

18 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

“The works are about going beyond not knowing. It’s scary and exciting because you need courage to erase the preconceived notions. Let the purity come through unadulterated,” Jonas says. “This exhibition is going to bring up a lot

In “Long Look Back” the contrast between the abstract and a human form suggests the vacillation between remaining in the familiar and moving toward the unknown. In haunting shades of cobalt and gold, a woman emerges, glancing over her shoulder. The mood is pensive, slightly mysterious. Gerard reveals hesitation in the musculature of her back, but the strength and movement inherent in the work hint at which choice she eventually will make. From The Depths, 56x56 inches, “From The Depths” captures the acrylic on canvas by Jonas Gerard struggle between leaving what was once enjoyable and breaking away to a of feelings.” freer place—toward the light. The color palette After spending considerable time mesmerof fiery orange hues and intense purples reized with the new works, a fellow artist cominforces the sense of push and pull. The fluid mented that you have to be honest with the vertical lines of the figure tethered to the past painting before it can be honest with you—an seem to challenge the theme, but ironically insight that Jonas Gerard has revealed on many support the premise of an unsettling and fearlevels in The Naked Truth. ful undertaking. The Naked Truth runs from June 28 to There are stories here. And collectively they July 27 at The Asheville Loft, a gallery space represent a story of transformation for the on the third floor at 52 Broadway St. in downartist himself. Jonas had not painted the hutown Asheville. man figure in over 30 years. With his desire to return to nudes, particularly within the context IF YOU The Naked Truth, New Figurative of his abstract “flow” works, he initially beGO Works by Jonas Gerard at The Asheville lieved the yearning was rooted simply in wantLoft, 52 Broadway St., Suite 3B. Meet ing to create something new, something fresh. the artist at the Opening Reception, Friday, But the creative process stirred him deeply, July 3 from 5 to 8 p.m. Gallery exhibit open 7 exposing areas of growth that were necessary days a week, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. On display until for him to paint with vulnerability. July 27, 2015.


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Seven Sisters Gallery

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Black Mountain, NC is a quaint little town with a bustling downtown.

Like a glass of wine while you shop? The first Friday of every month features a “stroll and sip” throughout Black Mountain when many of the shops stay open late and offer free wine samples! It’s a great way to casually check out the many independently owned small businesses and meet other like minded locals! Even if you are “just looking,” Seven Sisters provides a warm and welcoming respite in a fun, unpretentious gallery.

Here you will find many restaurants and fine specialty shops. One of these shops is Seven Sisters Gallery. Named after a local mountain range, Seven Sisters has been representing many of the areas top local artists for the past 34 years. Here you will find one of the largest selections of handmade pottery, both contemporary and traditional, in the area. There are also over 50 jewelers, several wood workers, furniture makers, glass blowers, sculptors, garden art, journals, and other gift July’s featured artist is items. photographer John Smith There is always a “featured artist”, and this month it is photographer John Smith, from Hendersonville, NC. John Smith prints large scale images of local scenery that are so crisp, one might feel as if one could walk right into the picture! Featured artists change every 3-4 months.

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July 4 - 4 p.m. on Sutton Ave. Fireworks at dark. Black Mountain Recreation and Parks, (828) 6698610, www.blackmountainrec.com

601 W. State Street

117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 28711 (828) 669-5107, sevensistersgallery.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

July 30 - Motownblue, Motown Soul & Blues. Food Vendors: Black Mountain Bistro and Hey Hey Cupcake.

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

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craft gallery 117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5

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Downtown Black Mountain

The 38th Annual

Sourwood Festival

FAISON O’NEIL Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

August 8 & 9 Saturday 9-8 Sunday 9-5

FREE ADMISSION

July 2 - The 96.5 House Band, classic top hits. Food Vendors: Black Eyed Susan Catering and Hey Hey Cupcake.

July 23 - The Broadcast, soulful rock. Food Vendors: Appalachian Smoke BBQ and Carolina Pops.

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Park Rhythms

July 16 - Dashboard Blue, timeless dance grooves.

in Black Mountain

Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

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July 9 - Atlas Road Crew, southern fried rock. Food Vendor: Norman’s Ice Cream.

in the Mountains

Seven Sisters Gallery

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Downtown Street Dance & Fireworks

Breakfast

About 200 vendors • No Alcohol

Sourwood Idol Contest Friday, August 7 ★ 7-10PM Sourwood5K.com Saturday, August 8 ★ 8AM

800-669-2301 www.sourwoodfestival.com Presented by the Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

✿ Arts & Crafts ✿ Children’s Area ✿ Specialty Items ✿ Great Food ✿ Carnival Rides ✿ Wonderful Music ✿ Dancing ✿ Honey Bee Demonstrations

Night in the Mountains by Linda Johnson

128 Cherry Street Black Mountain, NC info@faisononeilgallery.com Winter Hours: Wed-Sat. 11-4; Closed Sun-Tues 828.357.5350 Queen’s Guard by Dan Reiser

www.faisononeil.com

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Pack Square Park, Downtown Asheville

The Asheville Art Museum The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack.

The sculptural railing on Reuter Terrace was designed and built by Black Mountain artist Julia Burr.

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street • Downtown Asheville 828.251.5796

www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Featuring a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums, and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

Jce Schlapkohl

AL JUNEK Fine Art

707 Victory Lane • Hendersonville Bon Appetit pg. 21

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828 890-5777     Cell:  828 606-4127 junekal60@yahoo.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Art on Spruce Street

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BY ALICE STEARNS Spruce Street Market will be taking over North Spruce Street to bring you an array of local and regional artists from textiles to digital art.

The market will take place every Saturday during the months of July, August and September, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Since the venue will be open regularly throughout the summer, artists are allowed to pick and choose the days they wish to sell their work. This means no two Saturdays will be alike, which makes Spruce Street Market a wonderful place to keep coming back to. Want to make a day of it? Spruce Street is located in the heart of downtown Asheville, right next to Pack Square Park and Splashville. Pack’s Tavern is just across the park, but Corey McNabb if you’re looking for something closer, Twisted Laurel shares our street. It is Mediterranean inspired with an American Twist and they have utilized their outdoor space to the fullest capacity. Have a sweet tooth? The French Broad Chocolate Lounge opened their new location down the street. Spruce Street Market is actively seeking creative vendors! Spruce Street has recently received new sidewalks, continued on page 38

Companions

ELINOR BOWMAN ASHEVILLE, NC

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New Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Works on Display at Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Asheville Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League pg. 19 MR Red House Gallery, Black Mountain Vortex Doughnuts, Asheville pg. 21

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Downtown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Recent Works by Frances Greenberg

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SANDI ANTON

“I’ve been working toward increasing the boldness of my colors so that my paintings will pop.” continued on page 38

Her show, titled “Recent Works,” presents Greenberg’s focus on the use of bold, exciting Late Afternoon Glow color. Her subjects by Frances Greenberg vary from landscapes, both plein air and imagined, to interiors and figurative subjects. She works in pastels and oils. Greenberg says of this new work,

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Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

15 N. Lexington Ave.

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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www.vandykejewelry.com

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Perfect for Shopping, Dining, and Live Entertainment

B&C Winery Locally Crafted Wines 828.550.3610

145 Wall Street Downtown Waynesville

Tucked away in an underground cellar at 20 Church Street, just off Main Street in historic downtown Waynesville, is an unassuming retail wine and beer establishment known as the Classic Wineseller. For 18 years, founder and owner Richard Miller has been strategic in adding to the shop’s inventory which now boasts over 12,000 bottles of wine and more than 100 craft beers. Wine prices start at $5.99 (less for beer) and can reach more than $3,000 for highly collectible or rare wines. Miller’s shop also has some of the best vertical collections around, as well as large format bottles, a great selection of half bottles, and a room dedicated solely to Port, a wine fortified with brandy. In the last few years, the Classic Wineseller has gained additional notoriety as a small plate restaurant and intimate live music venue. Imagine a Harlem speakeasy

pg. 24

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www.BCWINERYNC.com

Featured Artist for July

Jack Stern Demonstrations during

Art After Dark Friday, July 3 from 6-9PM

Saturday, July 4 from 11-3PM

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

The Art of Wood & Metal EXHIBITION OF LOCAL FINE ARTISTS On display through July 31, 2015

RICK HILLS of Rapid River Magazine

STEVEN METZGER of Burl Wood Gallery MICHAEL DODSON of Life Span

Haywood County Arts Council’s

GALLERY + GIFTS

86 N. Main Street • Waynesville Presented by the Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org 828.452.0593

22 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

BY

KAY MILLER

in the 1920s – a secret venue where you can escape to a cozy atmosphere, and where the performers are within arm’s reach. The Classic Wineseller is evocative of Hollywood movies about that era, including the European styling and Old-World charm. The restaurant, open Wednesday through Saturday evenings, accommodates approximately 50 patrons. Everyone is seated around tables, with front row tables for two, where you could (not advised) reach out and touch the performers. The menu has an impressive list of charcuterie and accompaniments including all-natural cured meats, all-natural local and imported cheeses, and olives imported from Spain and Italy. You’ll also find appetizers, salads, soups, flatbreads, small plates, and desserts prepared in-house Wednesday through Saturday night. Drop by from 6-8 p.m. for Wine on Wednesday (W.O.W.) tastings each week, and live music every Friday and Saturday night. Discrete waitstaff provide table service throughout the musical performances, fetching wine and craft beer orders, tasty small plate fare, tantalizing desserts, and a selection of all-natural sodas, tea, and coffee (including the Irish varietal).

“Jazz Divas” begins Saturday, July 11 at 7 p.m. with jazz and pop singer, Paula Hanke and partner Tony Godwin (guitar, vocals). Tickets are $44.99 per person and include a four-course dinner. Reservations are required, call (828) 452-6000.

The Classic Wineseller is well worth a venture out — and down (it really is underground). Meet-up with friends to escape the cares of the world. No matter where you sit, you can dine, drink, and relax to an evening of music from American Roots to Delta and Piedmont Blues guitar, to Pop, Rock, or Jazz standards played on the new Steinway piano.

The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street Waynesville, NC 28786 828-452-6000

International ArtFest

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Where the World Meets on Main Street. International ArtFest 2015 takes place Saturday, July 18, 10-5 p.m., rain or shine, in downtown Waynesville This event is the ultimate cultural exchange—juried international and regional artwork, international cuisine, international dance and music from Folkmoot USA, and regional music and dance. The Passport to the Arts children’s area is where kids “visit” foreign countries, create indigenous crafts, and get their passports stamped.

Performance Schedule

10-10:15 a.m. – Bangledesh 10:45-11 a.m. – J Creek Cloggers 11:30-11:45 a.m. – Istonia

12:15-12:30 p.m. – Philipeans 1-1:15 p.m. – Equadore 1:45-2 p.m. – Puerto Rico 2:30-2:45 p.m. – Chili 3:15-3:30 p.m. – Indonesia 4-4:15 p.m. – French Canadian 4:45-5 p.m. – Jess Cook & Friends IF YOU International ArtFest 2015, GO Saturday, July 18, 10-5 p.m. For

more information contact the Haywood County Arts Council, 86 North Main Street, Waynesville. (828) 452-0593, info@haywoodarts.org, www. haywoodarts.org.


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WAYNESVILLE Folkmoot – July 16-26

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NORTH CAROLINA’S INTERNATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL

Folkmoot is a ten-day event featuring more than 200 international performers from ten countries with performances in 12 Western North Carolina communities. Folkmoot performers are primarily college students who are acting as cultural ambassadors for their home countries. In 2015, Folkmoot is expecting musicians and dancers from Indonesia, Bangladesh, Estonia, Puerto Rico, Philippines, Canada, Ecuador, Chile, and the Eastern Band of Cherokee, plus several regional bluegrass and clogging groups representing Appalachian culture.

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ANgELINE SCHWAB

Dress in your best cultural regalia for Folkmoot performances! The public is encouraged to join the fun by sharing their own cultural heritage at all Folkmoot events in 2015. At each event, the “best dressed” will be chosen and this audience member will win a Folkmoot t-shirt.

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July 10 & 24 6:30-9pm • Main Street

Mountain

Live Mountain Music Clogging Teams

Street Dances

Instructions & Demonstrations

in front of the courthouse

Limited Bleachers, Bring a Chair or Blanket.

IF YOU Tickets for all performances can GO be purchased at folkmootusa.org,

in person at the Folkmoot Center, or by calling 1-877-365-5872. A complete schedule can be viewed at folkmootusa.org.

Young Artist Series Friday, August 14

Details at DowntownWaynesville.com  • 828.456.3517 Funded in part by Haywood County TDA   800.334.9036   visitNCsmokies.com   

HAYWOOD

COUNTY

International

ARTS

ArtFest

Where the World Meets on Main Street!

7:30 p.m. Tickets $22

COUNCIL’S

2015

Doors Open at 6:30 p.m.

First United Methodist Church 566 S. Haywood St., Waynesville

Saturday, July 18 10AM- 5PM • Downtown Waynesville

Andrew Tyson, Pianist

✦ Regional and International Art ✦ Children’s “Passport to the Arts” Tent ✦ Food Carts and Beer Tent ✦ International Street Dancers

Award-Winning Virtuoso A Distinctive and Important New Musical Voice Andrew Tyson will bring his international concerto experiences to the mountains of Haywood County.

For more information call 828.452.0593 or visit www.haywoodarts.org Presented by the Haywood County Arts Council

Presented by the Haywood County Arts Council

www.haywoodarts.org Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 23


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It’s the night before America’s favorite holiday, and Waynesville is going to give those colors in the sky steep competition. Art After Dark transforms Downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center, making it a perfect night to explore downtowns cool galleries, restaurants and gift-shops. July’s edition is a great way to kick off the 4th of July with lots of music and beautiful art exhibits. Festive Art After

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70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

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Massie Furniture Company 45 North Main Street, Waynesville 828-456-3311 • Hours: M-Sat 8:30am - 5:30pm Massie Furniture is proud to support the Waynesville Art Association’s presentation of the most recent acrylic paintings by local artist

Take Advantage of Our

SUMMER SPECIALS 25% OFF

Rick Hills

Suggested Sugges Retail Price

WM

Delivery in WNC is Always FREE!

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The Waynesville Gallery BY JEANNIE SHUCKSTES Association presents the July edition of Art After Dark on Friday, July 3.

Fresh Southern Homemade Meals & Desserts

Sun 7am - 2:30pm

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Carryout + Catering

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On display June 1 - July 30 at Gallery + Gifts on Main Street. We Offer Expert Decorating Services Serving WNC Since 1920

24 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

Additional paintings by Rick Hills are available across Main Street. Please stop by.

121 North Main Street, Waynesville WS

(828) 452-3611 • www.shopatstyle.com


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“The Art BY BETINA MORgAN of Wood and Metal” exhibit, currently on display at the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery & Gifts, takes the casual visitor by pleasant surprise. The viewer is greeted with an aesthetically refreshing, visually charged atmosphere, including a plethora of modern contemporary paintings of nature scenes, executed by Rick Hills, combined with the exhilarating abstract expressionism of Michael Dodson’s sculptures.

Fine artist Rick Hills

Offsetting these masterworks of fine art, are the bold and fabulous creative designs of the Burl Wood Gallery furniture, whose pieces exude originality of craftsmanship. Steven, Janet and Daniel Metzger work as a family team to provide some of the most solid furniture to be found in Haywood County. Along with the beautiful fine art in the current exhibit, the viewer will be pleased to discover a newly hung Shady Ladies Quilter Club quilt project, displaying scenes of Wall Street. It gives viewers a fun perspective of Waynesville. “The Art of Wood and Metal” exhibit at the Haywood County Arts Council effectively showcases some of the finest examples of our wonderful community here in the Waynesville area. The Haywood County Arts Council is open Monday through Saturday - 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The next opening reception will be Friday, July 3. All are welcome to come and enjoy! IF YOU Haywood County Arts GO Council’s Gallery & Gifts,

86 North Main Street in Waynesville. Call (828) 452-0593, or visit www.haywoodarts.org.

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Young Artist Series

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Hailed by BBC Radio 3 as “a real poet of the piano,” American pianist Andrew Tyson is emerging as a distinctive and important new musical voice. Tyson is consistently recognized for his commanding and expressive performances, replete with imaginative interpretations and exceptional artistry. Recipient of a highly coveted Avery Fisher Career Grant, Tyson won 5th Prize and was awarded the Terence Judd – Hallé Orchestra prize at the 2012 Leeds International Piano Competition. From this honor arose an extensive partnership not only with the Hallé Orchestra, with which he has performed numerous times to critical acclaim, but also with the Hallé Soloists, with whom he appears in chamber music concerts throughout the UK. A Laureate of the Queen Elisabeth Competition, Tyson has performed throughout the US and Europe, appearing to rave reviews He has performed under preeminent

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Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09

conductors, including Marin Alsop and Sir Mark Elder, and in recital at prestigious venues, including the Library of Congress Pianist Andrew Tyson in Washington, DC, the Caramoor Festival, and Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. After winning the Young Concert Artists International Auditions in 2011, he was awarded the John Browning Memorial Prize and was presented on their series at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and at Alice Tully Hall.

One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

pg. 24

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IF YOU Young Artist Series featuring GO Andrew Tyson, Friday, August

14 at 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $22. First United Methodist Church 566 S. Haywood St., Waynesville. Visit haywoodarts.org.

Find Your Adventure

IN HAYWOOD’S 2015 AGRITOURISM GUIDE

Imagine a place where farmers grow hundreds of acres of fresh produce, graze cattle, raise shrubs, trees, herbs, and bees?

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

BY

pg. 36

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TINA MASCIARELLI

where heritage meets modern convenience. It includes listings for: Farmer & Tailgate Markets, A place where farmaward-winning “Farm ers create dozens of value to Table” Restauadded products like Peach rants, uniquely local Shine Jam & Rainbow Trout Jams, Jellies, Savory Caviar, while embodying the Spreads and Artisan character of a rural commuPickles, Specialty nity. Welcome to Haywood County, North Carolina! U-Pick Berries at the Ten Acre Retail Shops, Rustic Hospitality Venues, Garden in Bethel. Haywood is home to over Heritage Festivals, 700 farms encompassing U-Pick Farms, Historic Preservation more than 56,000 acres, from sprawling Sites, Educational Opportunities for all picturesque farms to family-owned and ages, and a 2015 Calendar of farm-related operated farmsteads, making it an ideal events and activities. destination for agritourism. Pick up a free copy of Buy Haywood’s Agritourism is commonly defined as 2015 Agritourism Guide at the Haywood agriculture related outdoor recreation, County Chamber of Commerce or the educational experiences, entertainment, Waynesville Visitor Center, both in unique hospitality services as well as the downtown Waynesville. opportunity to visit farms. In addition to being hailed as a “primary force” in our modern economy, agritourism has hisBuy Haywood Market Development toric roots throughout our region dating Project c/o Haywood County Economic back to the early 19th century. Development Commission, 144 Buy Haywood’s annual agritourism Industrial Park Drive, Waynesville. guide is an invitation to explore our vibrant community of agripreneurs – (828) 456-3737, www.buyhaywood.com

pg. 36

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No shortage of new music this month, with an amazing variety of stuff out there. Enjoy the comments, savor some good music, and be sure to support our local independent record stores. More of my reviews can be found at rapidrivermagazine.com

by James Cassara

Antique Persuasion

Don’t Forget Me Little Darling VOXHALL RECORDS

Antique Persuasion is a bluegrass super group of sorts, forged by Nashville publisher and producer Jimmy Metts, with the sole intent of creating a new tribute album (there have been many) devoted to the music of the Carter Family. Enlisting the formidable talents of Brandon Rickman on guitar, Jenee Fleenor on fiddle, guitar and mandolin, and Brennen Leigh on guitar and mandolin—with all three sharing vocals—Metts clearly wants to present traditional country music in the way in which it was intended. As such there are no overdubs, the tracks were recorded live in the studio (typically in one or two takes) and post recording corrections were kept to an absolute minimum. Of course given the vast catalog of Carter family recordings, Don’t Forget Me can at best skim the surface. It’s a nice touch to include the first song the Carters ever recorded (“Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow”) as well as the last (“You’re Gonna Be Sorry Cause You Let Me Down”) but the heft of this project comes from the middle ground, lesser known tracks that were staples of the Carter family’s road show. While none of the performances are revelatory they do maintain the spirit of the Carter’s—tight yet fluid playing balanced by near perfect harmonies—and the spontaneity of the sessions work to its advantage. As such it manages to serve as both a reminder of the Carter family’s distinctive place in our musical heritage, as well as an introductory point for those to whom the Carter’s have only been a name in a history book.***1/2

Maura Kennedy

Villanelle: The Songs of Maura Kennedy and B.D. Love

VARESE/SARABANDE RECORDS

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

It’s always gratifying to see a musician push the edges of their creative boundaries, taking a risk rather than stand pat on their strengths. Villanelle: The Songs of Maura Kennedy and B.D. Love certainly fits that criteria; having struck a friendship and mutual admiration the two agreed upon the parameters of this project. Love would create a series of freeform poems and sonnets and hand them off to Kennedy. She in turn would set them to music, intentionally leaving them as he wrote them (no dropping of a syllable to fit the melodic

26 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

structure) and, along with husband Pete Kennedy, write the arrangements and record the songs. It’s a daunting and somewhat daring task, and one that deserves credit for the mere attempt. Unfortunately it’s a not always successful pairing, as the somewhat traditional arrangements seem counterintuitive to the project’s aim. What could have inspired both Love and Kennedy towards greater heights, instead finds them at odds. Certainly there are moments when their intentions click; the gorgeously ruminative “Bicycles with Broken Spokes” and the lovely title track both hold to Kennedy’s stated goal of “not writing standard song forms” to Love’s circular and elastic wordplay while the woeful lament of “Soldier’s Wife” is Kennedy at her best. Yet all too often the album falls back upon a rather generic blend of folk/blues/pop that neither distinguishes nor elevates, giving Villanelle a sense that the whole is less than the combined parts. Maura’s voice—equal parts robust and delicate—are in fine form while Pete’s guitar work sizzles as always. But in the final count Villanelle seems a bit of a misstep, an example of the best of intentions going astray. ***

Neil Finn

Dizzy Heights

LESTER RECORDS

While not as visible as he was during the heyday of Crowded House, Neil Finn has over the past decade or so been no less active. He’s recorded an album with his brother Tim, reunited Crowded House for a pair of studio albums and an extensive tour (documented in a three disc Record Store Day exclusive), toured with his 7 Worlds Collide collective, formed the band Pajama Club (with wife Sharon and friend Sean Donnelly, both of whom assist here), and released a live record in tandem with Paul Kelly (see the next review). Yet despite this buzz of energy he’s been remiss in releasing an album of his songs under his own name. Dizzy Heights is his first proper solo effort since 2001, yet it’s a radical departure for an artist best recognized for his impeccable harmonious structure and uncanny pop sensibilities. Collaborating with Dave Fridmann, a producer better known for his neo-psychedelic work with Mercury Rev and the Flaming Lips, Finn kicks off the shackles of his past—however successful it was—and plows head first into relatively uncharted waters. While the underpinnings of his sound— great hooks, gorgeous melodies, and deceptively simple lyrics—remain, they are masked within a soundscape of cascading effects, supple adornments, and production that is as defined as his song craft. The risk is that Finn’s strengths will be overwhelmed by his deliberate attempt to make Dizzy Heights

more about surface and less about song. He need not worry. While bursting with orchestral strings and bubbly sound textures “Dive Bomber”, which opens the album, is pure Finn, a dazzling combination of effervescent pop with ominous undertones. “White Lies and Alibis” sounds like an outtake from 1993’s Together Alone—Crowded House’s least commercial but most intriguing album-while a string of well-built pop gems ranging from “Flying in the Face of Love” to “Pony Ride,” and “Recluse” remind us yet again how effortlessly Finn can create songs that are both cerebral and unremittingly catchy. Which is the real strength of Dizzy Heights; it’s an ideal blend of Finn’s respected ability to conjure up the perfect pop song and his determination to not be anchored by same. As such it’s audacious, tuneful, unexpected, and as wonderful as anything he’s yet done. ****1/2

Neil Finn and Paul Kelly

Goin’ Your Way EMI RECORDS

The product of their highly successful 2013 tour, this two disc live album was originally limited to a down under release, a move necessitated by economics but frustrating to collectors. While both the New Zealand born Finn and native Australian Kelly have achieved huge success in their region of the world only Finn, via his work with Crowded House, has mirrored that acclaim (and sales) in the US. Given their mutual respect and friendship it was only a matter of time before the pair collaborated on a larger scale, and those of us who love their music can only rejoice that Goin’ Your Way has finally been distributed in this country. Backed by a stellar band—including Neil’s son Elroy on drums, Kelly’s guitarist/ singer nephew Dan (along with former Buttercups bassist/vocalist Zoe Hautmann) —the two reinvent and reinvigorate songs from their respective vast catalogs. More to the point they each inhabit the music of the other; there’s no lazily trading a few licks while sticking to a familiar formula. Thus we have Finn taking chorus lead on Kelly’s “Leaps and Bounds” (among others) while Kelly provides throughout the vocal harmonies that Tim Finn once so beautifully laid down. All the better known songs are here, along with more than a few surprise choices, which makes this extensive set a hard core fans dream. The interplay between the two is seamless, the band is both controlled and adventurous, and for the most part, the songs draw out the best of what each artist has to offer. Finn’s seductive “Into Temptation” is given new power while Kelly’s “Deeper Water”—a cyclical life continued on page 27


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and death rumination that ranks among his greatest songs—is more affecting than ever. Toward the end, Goin’ Your Way tails off a bit—Kelly’s “Love Is The Law” has always come across as his straining too hard for a hit—while back to back covers of both Buddy Holly’s “Words of Love” and Henry Mancini’s “Moon River” seems a lazy way to end the evening. But for the most part this is a mesmerizing experience, showcasing the prolific talents of two musicians (and their band) who rarely disappoint and have given us an astounding number of great songs, tunes which inhabit much of the soundtrack of our adult lives. It’s hard to ask for more than that, other than a studio album (hey, a music lover can always dream, right?) ****

Eilen Jewel

Sundown Over Ghost Town

SIGNATURE SOUNDS

Following the release of her acclaimed 2011 effort Queen of the Minor Key, Eilen Jewell embarked upon an extensive US and European tour—nicely documented in a double live album—took time off to birth and begin raising a daughter, and made the risky decision to retreat from the energetic musical environs of Boston and return to the pastoral surroundings of her native Boise, Idaho. That partially explains the four year gap between studio efforts but in truth, Sundown Over Ghost Town sounds like an album that needed to be thought through, carefully calculated, and made exact before its release. The country/blues/folk/western swing feel that Jewel has developed is still intact, but there’s something much deeper going on here, an elevating of the bar in both composition and performance. Unlike her early works which, for all their charm were often uneven affairs, Sundown Over Ghost Town is Jewell in full stride, precisely extracting from each idea every nuance and essence. Yet it is still a lively affair, as Jewell jaunts her way through such delights as “Worried Mind” and “Songbird”, both of which reflect upon motherhood, and “Hallelujah Band” in which Jewell sings of “standing next to the tracks just to feel something pushing back” as if she knows her moments of familial joy may one day be tempered by challenge. Backed by her touring band, husband and drummer Jason Beek, bassist Johnny Sciascia, and guitarist/mandolin player Jerry Miller, Sundown is reflective of musicians who instinctively know what the other needs and wants. The inclusion of a pair of outlying numbers, the mariachi fueled rocker “Rio Grande” and the surf guitar driven “Pages” are welcome evidence that Jewell is willing to expand beyond her musical horizons, take a few chances and have fun in the process. As an artist Eilen Jewell has only gotten better, and if this fine release is any indication, her best moments are still to come. ****

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Sometimes a musician’s reputation is built around the names he or she has worked with. As such Larry Campbell is one of the most respected and envied artists of his day. The multi-instrumentalist-vocalist has worked with a veritable who’s who of the music world. Both on stage and in the studio Campbell has plied his trade with such icons as Bob Dylan—with whom he toured for eight years—Paul Simon, Little Feat, Emmylou Harris, Hot Tuna, Sheryl Crow, Mavis Staples, and many others. He remains most proud of his tenure with the late Levon Helm, for whom Campbell acted as both musical director and career resurrection champion. His wife and musical partner Teresa Williams is not as well known but has, via her work with Campbell and her own support and solo efforts, carved a formidable niche in Americana music. The pair is now stepping out into new territory, releasing their self titled debut album (on Red House Records) and assembling a band that best expresses their musical ideas. Produced by Campbell, the eleven new trackseight originals and a trio of covers—distill their influences into an effective and infectious blend of Americana style and timeless soul, offered with a relaxed generosity that can only come from decades of playing together. The couple’s story begins at New York’s famed Bottom Line club in the mid 80s; Williams was singing country songs while Campbell was playing pedal steel. “It was love at first chord,” jokes Campbell. “She was the real deal, none of that Urban Cowboy nonsense. And she was clock-stopping gorgeous

Cassandra Wilson

Coming Forth by Day LEGACY/SONY MUSIC

Cassandra Wilson has long evoked the spirit of Billie Holiday—a honeyed blend of sassy and sultry—but has never fully embraced her music to such a scope as this. Released to mark the centennial of Holiday’s birth, Coming Forth by Day honors Lady Day as both a singer and composer. But Wilson wisely avoids the conventional by hiring Nick Launay—best known for his work with Nice Cave— as producer. The pairing might appear at first incongruous but both Cave and Holiday share a pervasive brand of ethereal darkness, a sense of tension and destiny that seems just right for this project. Wilson both interprets and inhabits Holiday’s songs; frequently luxuriating in atmosphere and mood which allows the material to take her where it may. Her own penchant for torch revelry is well served, particularly on a playful version of “Good Morning Heartache”

and I was smitten.” The feeling was evidently mutual, adds Williams. “I’d thought the idea of a country music player in New York was an oxymoron. But he saved my life on that stage. I thanked him for bringing the heavy steel down to play just a few songs, and when we looked into each other’s eyes I saw everything he is, the depth of his soul.” They married soon after, setting off on their own individual highways, but always circling back to each other. Among other adventures, Williams originated the role of country music pioneer Sara Carter in the stage musical Keep On the Sunny Side, while Campbell achieved renown as the go-to roots music guy who could master a dizzying array of stringed instruments and styles. The seeds for a duet project were unwittingly planted in those early days; the two would sing and play with the local musicians under her great-great grandmother’s Tennessee cedar tree, the same one under which they married. (These gatherings continue to this day.) Later, when the duo was song-swapping all night with the band in the back of Bob Dylan’s tour bus, Dylan’s longtime manager Jeff Kramer told them they were “crazy not to make hay with what they had as a duo.” Unfortunately their schedules kept the idea on the back burner until 2005, when Levon Helm called. He’d beaten cancer, was recharged as never before, and was putting

while “Last Song for Lester” evokes newfound respect for both the subject (Lester Young) and the singer. Coming Forth by Day would be the high water mark for many jazz singers but this is after all Cassandra Wilson. As such it maintains the impossibly lofty standard she’s set for herself, another feather in the cap of a career that has few equals and—some four decades in— shows not the slightest trace of decline. ****

Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank American Shuffle CHAPERONE MUSIC

“I don’t know I was told, my thoughts become benign… Sometimes I think that all I’ve done was just a waste of time” bellows Ian Alexy in the marvelously off kilter “Down the Line”, the second track from American Shuffle. Along with brother Teague, Ian is one half of the Duluth, Minnesota band Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank. The two, whose music sounds more than a bit like Basement Tapes era Band meets

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Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams

together a band for the soon-to-be legendary Midnight Ramble at his barn-studio in Woodstock, NY. He wanted some CampbellWilliams magic to help make the most of his surprise fourth act. This humble beginning— playing in a barn on a dirt road—inaugurated the greatest musical experience of their lives. Campbell became the levelheaded leader of the shape-shifting Midnight Ramble Band, earning a trio of Grammys for producing continued on page 39

Captain Beefheart, have released one of this year’s most unexpected and refreshing records. Songs of the weary life of the transient (There’s Your Train, Here’s Your Ticket”) mingle with soulful love (“When The Night Comes”) and illicit encounters (“Low Flying Bird”) that are set against arrangements deeply rooted in the Midwest; banjo, pedal steel, and harmonica sit alongside guitars, bass, percussion, and even bits of trombone and viola. The sound is impeccable—kudos to producer Ryan David Young, whose work with Trampled by Turtles is equally adept— and while the songs occasionally feel incomplete there is plenty here to like. A pair of sports songs, one devoted to Packer great Brett Favre (“Old Number Four”) and the other to Yankee Billy Martin (“The Day Billy Martin Quits”) work equally well, but to my mind and ears baseball has always seemed better suited to storytelling and myth. At less than forty minutes American Shuffle feels a bit like a throwback—one can almost hear the crackle of a needle dragging across well worn vinyl—but it’s a most welcome reprieve from the pretense that dominates far too much music these days. It’s direct, earthy, engaging and one heck of a lot of fun. ***1/2

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Find Waldo!

July 1 through July 31

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

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Rapid River Magazine Web Exclusive

Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

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WRITING HOME

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All month long find Waldo at local businesses and enter to win prizes! Passports and details are available at Malaprops’s Bookstore. Take your passport to the businesses listed and look for Waldo. When you find him, ask a store employee to stamp your passport. Get 10 stamps or more and you will receive a button and a coupon toward the purchase of Waldo books. Get 20 or more and you will be entered to win prizes at the Find Waldo Party on Friday, July 31!

Women’s Writing Circles Celebration Sunday, July 26 from 2-5 p.m Writing in Circles is an anthology inspired by Peggy Tabor Millin, and a companion piece to Millin’s widely-read Women, Writing, and Soul-Making. Works by local writers in the Asheville area, include: Ellen Beegal, Suzanne Bleivernicht, Jennifer Browning, Kimberly Childs, Betsy Fletcher, Robin Gaiser, Ginger Graziano, Peggy Millin, Nancy Newlin, Jeanette Reid, and Tracey Schmidt. Malaprop’s Bookstore and Cafe will host Peggy Millin and the local writers who contributed to Writing in Circles. The event will include a writing exercise led by Millin, readings, book signings, Q&A time, and chatting with the authors. IF YOU Held at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, GO 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-

6734, malaprops.com.

28 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

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husband and I are scraping and painting his family’s cabin. It is a sixty year old mess. We practice resurrection here. I stood on an extension ladder for six hours a day, four days in a row. We got the work done. I love to paint! I forgot my camera. I write to “see” and feel this experience. I could share a photograph. You could see what I see. A poem allows you to be here with me. From my recent book, Impossible Brightening, I include two lake poems.

Solitude At last, stilled alone. No guests, chaos, news. Only pines, lake, pencil.

Cabin Sanctuary The rain that woke us rustled the birch leaves. There are mice, quieter than rain, though not as quick. The voice of the lake? Today I understand every lapping syllable. In her poem, “The Supple Deer” from Come, Thief, Jane Hirshfield gives us an example of being with the poet.

The Supple Deer The quiet opening between fence strands perhaps eighteen inches. Antlers to hind hooves, four feet off the ground, the deer poured through. No tuft of the coarse white belly hair left behind. I don’t know how a stag turns into a stream, an arc of water. I have never felt such accurate envy. Not of the deer: To be that porous, to have such largeness pass through me.

Near the end of New and Selected Poems she includes, “A Letter From Home.”

A Letter From Home She sends me news of bluejays, frost, Of stars and now the harvest moon That rides above the stricken hills. Lightly, she speaks of cold, of pain, And lists what is already lost. Here where my life seems hard and slow, I read of glowing melons piled Beside the door, and baskets filled With fennel, rosemary and dill, While all she could not gather in Or hide in leaves, grows black and falls. Here where my life seems hard and strange, I read her wild excitement when Stars climb, frost comes, and bluejays sing. The broken year will make no change Upon her wise and whirling heart; She knows how people always plan To live their lives, and never do. She will not tell me if she cries. I touch the crosses by her name; I fold the pages as I rise, And tip the envelope, from which Drift scraps of borage, woodbine, rue. Mary Oliver

Dear reader, write a letter. Include a poem. Perhaps you will get a reply. With gratitude, Carol Pearce Bjorlie I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

Jane Hirshfield

Mary Oliver invites us into her poem, “The Sunflowers.” I’d go with Mary anywhere. This is the first verse.

The Sunflowers Come with me into the field of sunflowers Their faces are burnished disks, their dry spines

POETRIO Sunday, July 5 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: William Wright, Tree Heresies; Ray McManus, Punch; and Ed Madden, Nest.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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Asheville Creative Arts co-founders, Abby Felder and Robbie Jaeger, present an opportunity to meet the playwright/composer and select cast members of Miss Nelson Is Missing! Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe will host a free special event on Thursday, July 16 from 5:30-6 p.m. that will include selections from songs from the production of Miss Nelson Is Missing! Join the cast for light refreshments and a Q&A session led by Joan Cushing, who according to TYA Magazine, “is the most produced playwright in children’s theatre.” According to artistic director Robbie Jaeger, “We are really excited to build this partnership with Malaprops, and to be part of a forum that celebrates writers creating work for multigenerational audiences. Joan is a leader in the field, and it’s an honor to bring her to Asheville.” Producing director Abby Felder states that, “In coming seasons, ACA will focus on nurturing new works through an Incubator Series that helps develop plays, and we will seek out world premiere productions. This event, which will allow Joan to discuss aspects of her

artistic process, is the perfect springboard for these new initiatives.” Miss Nelson Is Missing! follows a long suffering teacher, Miss Nelson, who is played by ACA resident artist Gina Jones. When she turns up missing the students of Room 207, played by Kelli Cayman Cozlin, Jordan Ellis, Emma Gwynneth Gutt, and Maximilian Koger, are in for a surprise when she is replaced by Viola Swamp, a scary substitute. In desperation, the students set out to find their beloved Miss Nelson with the help (and hindrance) of an assortment of colorful characters, played with zest by local favorite Strother Stingley... but will they ever get her back? Miss Nelson’s creative team includes costumes by Caroline Bower, props by Chifferobe Home and Garden, sets by Gian Marco Lo Forte, sound by Jonesalee, and lights by Eric Winkenwerder and Barbara Berry. Production Manager is Anthony Napoletano. Tickets, which are $23 (adults) and $12 (students), are available at Miss Nelson Is Missing! is “a musical the NC Stage Box Office: www.ncstage.org. Groups that will charm anyone who has and camps may contact ever sat in front of a schoolteacher’s ashevillecreativearts@ gmail.com for a schedule desk – or, for that matter, behind it.” and to purchase discount~ The New York Times ed $7 tickets. Special weekday performances

New Disney Book Set at Biltmore Estate

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Serafina and the Black Cloak set for nationwide release on July 14. Asheville author Robert Beatty debuts his novel, Serafina and the Black Cloak, a spooky mystery-thriller from Disney Hyperion that takes place at the iconic Biltmore Estate. The book tells the story of an intriguing and brave 12-year-old girl who lives secretly in the basement of the grand Biltmore mansion. It’s an idea that grew out of the author’s love of writing stories for his daughters. Although it was written for middle grade students, Serafina’s mix of historical fiction, fantasy and mystery makes it appealing to adult readers as well. Biltmore House and its opulent furnishings, as well as the gardens and grounds of the estate, play a big role in the book. The story takes place in 1899, during the time of George Vanderbilt, and Beatty exhaustively researched the history of the house and visited the estate more than 50 times to ensure he was depicting accurately the 250-room

chateau and its period in history. “Never go into the forest, for there are many dangers there, and they will ensnare your soul.” Serafina has never had a reason to disobey her pa and venture beyond the grounds of Biltmore Estate. There’s plenty to explore in the shadowed corridors of her vast home, but she must take care to never be seen. None of the rich and fancy folk upstairs know that Serafina exists; she and her pa, the estate’s maintenance man, have secretly lived in the basement for as long as Serafina can remember. But when children at the estate start disappearing, only Serafina knows who the culprit is: a terrifying man in a black cloak who stalks Biltmore’s corridors at night. Following her own harrowing escape, Serafina risks everything by joining forces with Braeden Vanderbilt, the young nephew of Biltmore’s owners. Braeden and Serafina must uncover the man in the black cloak’s true identity before all of the children vanish one by one.

JULY

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Wednesday, July 1 at 7 p.m. JENNY MARTIN, Tracked, debut sci-fi novel; and COURTNEY STEVENS, Faking Normal, drama. Thursday, July 9 at 7 p.m. FIONA RITCHIE & DOUG ORR, Wayfaring Strangers: The Musical Voyage from Scotland and Ulster to Appalachia. Live music by Little Windows. Cast of Miss Nelson Is Missing!

for students include an Activity/Fun Guide developed by Lucy Hazlehurst. For more details please call (914) 830-3000 or (828) 239-0263. Whet your appetite for their fabulous new production, Miss Nelson is Missing!, meet some of the cast and crew, and hear music from the show performed by Joan Cushing, who wrote the book, music, and lyrics for the stage adaptation. The musical is based on the book by Harry Allard. Miss Nelson Is Missing! will run from July 16-26 at NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville. Visit www.ncstage.org. IF YOU Selections from songs from Miss GO Nelson Is Missing! Thursday, July 16 at

5:30 p.m. at Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Saturday, July 11 at 7 p.m. RAVI BATRA, End Unemployment Now, practical solutions. Sunday, July 12 at 3 p.m. DR. BUD HARRIS, Cracking Open: A Memoir of Struggling, Passages, and Transformations. Monday, July 13 at 7 p.m. MARLIN BARTON, Pasture Art, collection of short stories. Wednesday, July 15 at 7 p.m. BRIAN PANOWICH, Bull Mountain, debut novel. Friday, July 17 at 7 p.m. PHIL JAMISON, Hoedowns, Reels, and Frolics: Roots and Branches of Southern Appalachian Dance. Wednesday, July 22 at 7 p.m. MARLA MILLING, Only in Asheville: An Eclectic History, weird and wonderful. Thursday, July 23 at 7 p.m. CHARLES THOMPSON, Border Odyssey: Travels along the U.S./Mexico Divide. Sunday, July 26 at 2 p.m. Writing Workshop with PEGGY TABOR MILLIN followed by a Writing In Circles reading at 3 p.m. Monday, July 27 at 7 p.m. RAY BARFIELD, The Book of Colors, novel.

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LYDIA CARRINgTON

Serafina’s hunt leads her into the very forest that she has been taught to fear. There she discovers a legacy of magic that is bound to her own identity. In order to save the children of Biltmore, Serafina must not only face her darkest enemy, but the secrets of her own past.

Wednesday, July 29 at 7 p.m. DASHA KELLY, Almost Crimson, family ties. Thursday, July 30 at 7 p.m. MARGARET BRADHAM THORNTON, Charleston, love story. Friday, July 31 at 5:30 p.m. Find Waldo Finalé Party. Treats, prizes, and other fun!

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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For more information on the author, visit www.robert-beatty.com

IF YOU Robert Beatty reading and booksigning GO for Serafina and the Black Cloak,

Saturday, July 25 at 3 p.m. at Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.

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JAZZ DIVAS JULY 11

Paula Hanke

JULY 18

Serpentine Arborvitae

JULY 25

Wendy Jones

$44.99 per person includes four-course dinner with live jazz Reservations at 828-452-6000

pg. 24

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20 Church Street • Waynesville, NC

www.classicwineseller.com SPONSORED BY HAYWOOD TOURISM AUTHORITY WWW.VISITNCSMOKIES.COM

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Vineyard Wine Dinner

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Chestnut and Addison Farms Vineyard will host a local wine and dining experience on Thursday, August 13. This five-course wine dinner will give guests a preview of the upcoming Asheville Wine and Food Festival. Chefs Joe Scully and Joe Mitchell have created a locally-focused menu that builds upon the subtle notes of local winemaker and fourth generation farmer, Jeff Frisbee. “It is our privilege to pair our wines with the creative and distinctive flavors that Chef Joe has created. We look forward to enjoying this meal and sharing the experience with others,” shared Jeff. Joe Scully and Jeff Frisbee, along with their wives, will be dining with guests and sharing thoughts and anecdotes about food, farming and wine. “It is exciting and a little surprising,” said Joe Scully, Chef Owner of Chestnut, “to have a great little vineyard and winery so close at hand. We are just not used to getting wine of this caliber from local sources. We look forward to

cooking to accompany Addison Farms!” The wine dinner will feature five of Addison Farms Vineyard’s seven wines. Addison Farms Vineyard is growing seven historically French and Italian grape varieties locally, and they produce and bottle their own wine. The evening will begin with Smoked Sunburst Farms Trout Caviar on City Bakery Rye and Bitterballen with Shredded Hickory Nut Gap Pork and Lusty Monk Mustard, paired with Gwinn, a crisp Pinot Gris; continue with Molasses Glazed SC Quail paired with Crown & Plough, a refreshing Sangiovese Rosé; Hickory Nut Gap Pork Belly Glazed with Mocha Stout BBQ Sauce paired with Five Twenty-Nine, a robust Barbera; Carolina Bison Flank Steak paired with Coming Home, a Cabernet Blend with notes of black currant; and complete the evening with a Peach Tart with Local Blueberry Compote and Vanilla Sorbet paired with Gratitude, Addison Farms’ rich dessert wine. “This is a great pairing of local terroir,” stated Bob Bowles, Director of The Asheville Wine and Food Festival. “This is why Asheville is such an exciting place to host this festival!”

Addison Farms Vineyard’s Jeff Frisbee is a fourth generation farmer.

For more information on Addison Farms Vineyard, call (828) 712-7735 or visit www.addisonfarms.net. IF YOU Five-course wine dinner, Thursday, GO August 13 from 6:30-9 p.m. at

Chestnut, 48 Biltmore Ave. in Asheville. $75 per person. Reservations required. Call (828) 575-2667.

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Cafe 64 – At Your Service

e BEST Hot Dogs, Sizzling, Juicy Burgers, Fresh, Crispy Seafood, Hand-Cut Fries, and Homemade Onion Rings. Our food is FRESH, delicious, and cooked to order.

Indian ~ Nepali ~ Tibetan Himalayan Cuisine

pg. 37

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808 Greenville Highway Hendersonville Mon-Sat 10am-8pm • Sun 11am-3pm T.Cote@morrisbb.net • 828-697-2266

www.greatamericandog.net 30 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

You know us for our great breakfast and lunch specials along with some of the best coffee drinks in Asheville. But did you know we’re also an excellent source for all your summer catering and picnic outings? No matter the size and needs of your event we can create the perfect food and beverage menu to complement your specific goals. So, when you really want to make a tasteful impression call on Café 64. For more information you can reach Gary at (828) 252-8333.

Real Food. Real Good.

Make a tasteful impression with food catered by Café 64.

Café 64 Open Daily, 8 a.m. ’til 3 p.m. 64 Haywood Street Downtown Asheville

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The Beer Relay

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BY JOSH

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

KRAVETZ

Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

The first ever beer drinking and trail running race! This fun-focused event for teams blends craft beer with the adventurous lifestyle at the Burning Can Festivals. Oskar Blues Brewery will launch the country’s first-ever trail running and beer drinking race series, The Beer Relay, in conjunction with its annual Burning Can Beer Festivals. Oskar Blues Burning Can Festival Designed by Adventure Fit, a Boulder-based event marketing company, to blend craft Following the Beer Relay is the Burnbeer culture with the adventurous outdoor ing Can Beer Festival. 50+ breweries from lifestyle, the Beer Relay takes place at across the country will offer samples of Oskar Blues’ REEB Ranch near Brevard their canned craft beer. on Saturday, July 18. A free concert at the REEB Ranch on Teams of two or more will run a 5K Friday evening, July 17, will be kicked off trail course, relay-style, running one or by progressive Southern rockers Porch more laps per person. Runners who drink 40, and headlined by local funk faves, Yo a 12-ounce Oskar Blues beer before their Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band. Starting at 2 lap earn a two-minute deduction from p.m. on Saturday, July 18, the Ranch will the lap time. The team that completes the be shaken to its roots by Travers Brothermost laps in six hours wins. ship, Jarekus Singleton, the Rebirth Brass For example, each person on a 4-person Band and the internationally-touring act, team will likely run a total of three laps Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. during the whole event. In between laps, Burning Can also features paddle trips, runners can watch other sporting events, group rides, and a premier dirt-jumping take a quick bike ride, or just relax. Prizes competition. To purchase tickets, visit will go to top teams in multiple categories. www.burningcan.com Register now at www.thebeerrelay.com The Beer Relay is designed to be a fun IF YOU The Beer Relay takes place at Oskar way for friends to get in some great runGO Blues’ REEB Ranch near Brevard on ning while enjoying craft beer, amazing Saturday, July 18. For more details music, and camping in the mountains. visit www.thebeerrelay.com.

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885 pg. 21

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

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50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

pg. 21

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Wireless Internet Access!

777 Haywood Road, Asheville

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

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(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

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Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Mother Earth Produce in Semifinals for National Competition

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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Local business Mother Earth Produce will face a shark this month – a business shark to be more exact. Mother Earth Produce is one of 30 semifinalists in the nation in the Miller Lite Tap the Future Competition. To compete, Mother Earth Produce submitted a business plan to the competition. A panel of judges then selected 30 businesses from thousands of applicants to move ahead to the semifinals.

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RACHEL STRIVELLI

Mother Earth Produce is an organic delivery service owned by Andrea and Graham Duvall. This month Andrea and Mother Earth Produce delivers locally Graham grown, organic produce. Duvall will travel to Atlanta to pitch their business to a panel of business experts, including Daymond John from ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. Mother Earth Produce delivers produce from local organic farms to homes in WNC and Upstate South Carolina. “We are committed to a greater awareness of sustainable values,” says Graham. “Our partnerships with farmers and community-focused businesses and nonprofits are showing us that supporting locallygrown is not just a healthier choice, it’s a choice that unites us as a community.” Mother Earth Produce is a socially and environmentally conscious farm-to-front-door produce delivery service in Western North Carolina and Upstate SC. They work with a network of regional farms to provide organic produce from the farm to your door. For more information about Mother Earth Produce, please visit www.motherearthproduce.com

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128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Tuesday - Sunday Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

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Needing Nothing “What, at this moment, is lacking?” ~ Linji (9th Century – Chinese)

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One of our dogs and I had been playing in a grassy field, she chasing and returning a ball until she was worn out with the joy of it, and then she lay down in the grass. I sat down next to her, and together we were just there, and it was perfect. After a little while, I too lay down beside her in the grass, just looking up at clouds passing in the sky, aware of my breathing, my body, the clouds, the blue sky, the breeze, the tree-tops dancing in the periphery of my vision, the fellow Being-in-a-dog beside me. No thought corrupted the perfection of these moments. After a while, I sat up, continuing with this deep present moment awareness. It reminded me of how it once was - when I was a young boy sitting in a grassy field with my dog. The awareness that was me now and the awareness that was that boy then were exactly the same - no matter how much else about me had changed. Time had stopped. The moment was entirely filled with the space of presence, all its contents, including this body that is thought of as “me” was one seamless experience. This is Zen. “The practice of Zen is forgetting the self in the act of uniting with something.” ~ Roshi Koun Yamada (20th Cent.)

When people talk of nonduality, this is it; not me and my dog, rather, me-and-dogand-grassy field-and–sky– and-clouds-and-trees, all one in the space of the moment. Importantly, even the literal space, the air about me, was palpable with subtle energy, connecting all the denser energy patterns of me and dog and trees. This was bliss shimmering on an early summer morning. The Rinzai school of Zen grew from the teachings of the Chinese Zen master Linji, known as Rinzai in Japanese. It is known as the “Buddha Mind School” and it teaches the realization of a person’s original pure mind before it has been shaped into an egoic identity. This concept is famously called upon in many koanic declarations, such as Huineng’s (7th cent.) “show your original face.” It teaches the purity of a moment and the realization that it is, and we are, of course, complete, perfect, needing nothing.

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“Original face” is consciousness before ego-identity and psycho-social programming. It is the awareness that came into this world with our birth, has experienced every conscious moment of our life and will experience our last conscious moment. It is who we are that never changes while we physically and psychologically age and change. Awareness sat in that field with my dog and with my body, once, as a child and now an adult, united with Life – needing nothing. The moment was perfect and complete. And – of course, I do have needs – just as my dog has needs. But – in a moment, any moment, there is only the moment, and it is complete and needs nothing. Only in time do we have needs. My dog and I need to eat – sometime. We need shelter – sometime. We need many things, me more than she because as a human I have complex social and psychological needs she doesn’t have, but many of my social and psychological needs are not needs at all; they are only the delusion of needs. I would

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How to Prevent Half of US Cancers: Join the Campaign

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The American Institute for Cancer Research kicked off World Cancer Day in the U.S. on February 4. On World Cancer Day, American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) launched a new nationwide campaign and special mini-website, offering evidence-based information and practical tools for lowering cancer risk. Their new educational tools use colorful, dynamic text-based animation to educate people about the links between everyday choices and cancer risk. Their regular website, www.aicr.org, will take you to AICR’s CAN PREVENT website (prevent50.org).

Visit the site and you can: Download a 30-day cancer prevention planner Use the interactive tool to see which factors link to risk of specific cancers Try AICR’s tested and delicious Healthy Recipes Find easily readable and shareable infographics and video, highlighting the latest research Take quizzes on diet, physical activity and cancer prevention

AICR estimates that about 1/3 of the most common cancers in the US (338,000 cancers) could be prevented if Americans moved more, weighed less and ate more healthfully. Add in not smoking and avoiding sun damage, and that figure climbs even higher. Nearly half of US cancers could be prevented by changing our everyday habits. This empowering and hopeful message hasn’t reached most Americans yet. According to AICR’s recent biennial Cancer Risk Awareness Survey, less than half of Ameri-

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cans realize that diet and physical activity play a role in cancer risk. Most blame factors like pesticide residue on produce and genetically modified foods. With the Can Prevent campaign, AICR wants Americans to understand that there are steps people can take to lower risk that offer real, measurable protection. You can help spread the word. Throughout the year, AICR will be promoting the CAN PREVENT site through social media using the #prevent50 hashtag. On Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, please share your pictures and stories of how you are working to reduce cancer risk. It could be a photo of your healthy lunch, steps on your pedometer, or a new vegetable you tried. Make sure to use #prevent50 to encourage and connect with others. On Instagram add the #pictureprevention hashtag. Reprinted from the February 2015 Newsletter from the American Institute for Cancer Research

Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 33


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The Naked Truth

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

Friday, July 3

Asheville in the Third Dimension

Third anniversary celebration features founding sculptors, Amy Medford and Leonid Siveriver together with iconic photographer Robert Asman. Meet the artists, food and drink, 5-8 p.m. On display until August 2. Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave., Asheville. (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com

Friday, July 3

Misprints

Works by Herod, Jensen, Armbruster, Mellick, Karolich, Annand, Prinsen, Dansie, Cutty, Kreckle, Findley, Spiceland, Shaffer, and Aucott. Opening reception from 5-8 p.m. On display through July 25, 2015. Asheville Area Arts Council, One Page Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 258-0710, www. ashevillearts.com

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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Ticket prices are $25 for individual tickets and $100 for a series ticket. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.scm-festival.com.

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Crossnore Craft Fair and 4th of July Celebration

10 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the parking lot of the Blair Fraley Sales Store. Locallymade wares, famous frog-jumping contest, a cake-walk, arts and crafts, face painting, a parade, homemade tamales, a tobacco spitting contest, and fireworks. www.crossnorenc.com.

Saturday, July 4

22nd Annual Firecracker 5K

Takes place in Weaverville, beginning at PNC Bank, Weaver Boulevard. Sponsored by Kiwanis Club for North Buncombe High School student scholarships. Entry fee is $30. Register online at www.active.com. Call (828) 645-4656 for information.

Saturday, July 4

Open Studios at Grovewood Gallery

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free, self-guided tour of the artist studios on the Grovewood grounds. Visit grovewood.com/events to see which studios will be open. (828) 253-7651. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Road, Asheville.

Monday, July 6

Middle School Success Art Exhibit 40 works of art by area middle school students. Opening reception 3:30-6 p.m. On display July 1-31 in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith Art and Intercultural Gallery. Free and open to the public. Info: oscopp.unca.edu

Tuesday, July 7

Odyssey Cooperative Gallery Opening

New show celebrating the ceramic art of Denise Baker, Joanna Carroll, and other gallery members. Open Tuesday through Sunday 11-5 p.m. at 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville.

Tuesday, July 7 A roster of talented players bring the

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From farmers’ markets to the trendiest restaurants, this show has it all, including music, dancing, and lots of laughs! Presented by the Magnetic Theatre Thursdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. 375 Depot Street in the River Arts District. $18 advance/$21 at the door. www.themagnetictheatre.org.

Tuesday, July 14

Crimson Laurel Gallery

Friday, July 10

July 16-19

July 9-11 & 16-18

Food and How to Eat It

Ritual Runway

More than nine local designers, as well as local photographers, music and video producers, story tellers, and ritual dancers. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Ave., Asheville. Tickets at www.newmountainavl.com.

Fringe Summer Freak Out

Fringe Festival Fundraiser includes pop-up performances, free workshops. Tickets are $20. $15 for workshop participants. VIP tickets are $40. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Ave., Asheville. www.AshevilleFringe.org.

At the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, Children under 12 free. More information at www. craftguild.org or phone (828) 298-7928.

Wednesday, July 22

Five Of The Eyes

40 local designers compete in four categories: Tape, Nature, Inflatables, and Christmas in July. The audience selects the winners. Pre- and post-show party and silent auction. 7:30 p.m. Pre-show party at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $30. 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 2541320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Rock act from Portland Maine with Prog, Funk, and Latin influences. www.fiveoftheeyes.com. Two shows, 6:30 (all ages) and 10 p.m. (21+) $6 adv/ $8 d.o.s. The One Stop, 55 College Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 255-7777, ashevillemusichall.com.

Saturday, July 11

Friday, July 24

Second Saturday Event

The Odyssey Cooperative Gallery joins the River Arts District in the Second Saturday Event. Join us for demonstrations, music, refreshments, and a showcase of ceramic arts. Open Tuesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville.

Saturday, July 11

Appalachian Pastel Society

Free meeting and demonstration featuring Nancy Nowak. 10 a.m. to noon at Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River. Workshop from 1-4 p.m. Registration required. Visit www.Appalachianpastelsociety. org to register.

Saturday, July 11

Snorkel the Pigeon River

Free. Meet at the Jukebox Junction Soda Shoppe at 2 p.m. Mask and snorkeling equipment provided.

Auditions for Young Frankenstein

Musical adaptation of Mel Brooks’ cult comedy features a large cast. Open to all, no previous experience required. Directed by Jerry Crouch with musical direction by Chuck Taft. Auditions from 2-5 p.m. at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 254-1320, ashevilletheatre.org

through July 28 New work by featured artist Noel Bailey, Steve Hansen and Jeremy Randall’s show “Everything Old is New Again,” and Bonnie Seeman’s exhibit, “Ceramics and Glass.” On display until July 28 in Bakersville, NC. (828) 688-3599, crimsonlaurelgallery.com

Thursday, July 30

68th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

Friday, July 10

Costume Drama: A Fashion Show

Guitarist Clive Carroll

Through his distinctive acoustic guitar playing, Clive mixes altered tunings and plays everything from renaissance and classical harmony to delta blues and jazz. $10 at the door. Concert begins at 7 p.m. at St. Matthias Church, 1 Dundee St., Asheville.

Saturday, July 25

Splashing Waterfall Hike

Meet in Asheville at 10 a.m. and return around 4 p.m. Hike from Cat Gap Trail to Butter Gap Trail. Moderate/ Easy, approx. 4 miles. Two nice waterfalls.Learn about wildflowers and the protection of fragile streamside habitat. Kids who hike are welcome w/parent/ guardian. RSVP to Sierra Club leader Lisa McWherter at lisamcw2@gmail. com or (828) 713-4994.

Listen to This

Stories and original songs from locals. 7:30 p.m. Hosted by Tom Chalmers in 35below. Tickets are $15. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 2541320, ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday & Sunday, August 1 & 2

Village Art and Craft Fair

This high quality craft fair sponsored by New Morning Gallery and Bellagio Art-to-Wear, takes place on the grounds of the Cathedral of All Souls in Historic Biltmore Village. Fair hours are Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m., rain or shine. Free admission. Concessions available. For more information call (828) 274.2831.

Saturday & Sunday, August 1 & 2

LEAF Downtown AVL

Pack Square Park. Bootsy Funk Dynasty Day at New Mountain AVL on July 31. The LEAF Art Dash 5K and Family Relay, Saturday, August 1 at 9 a.m. More details at www.theLEAF.org

Now through August 24

Modern Quilts on Display

Wide selection of modern quilts and quilted textiles made by members of the Modern Quilt Guild of Asheville. On display at Handmade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave. in Asheville. Open Monday-Friday 10-4 p.m. (828) 252-0121, handmadeinamerica.org.

Every Thursday

Pink Dog Creative After Hours

The studios and shops of Pink Dog Creative will stay open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays throughout the summer. Live music, food, fine arts and crafts. Pink Dog Creative is located at 342-348 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. Visit pinkdog-creative.com.

JULY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

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July 25-26

Land of Sky Symphonic Band

Forty-three piece ensemble made up of skilled amateurs and professional musicians, Show begins at 8 p.m. $12 advance/$15 door. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

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Wetsuits and wool clothing recommended. Light refreshments provided. Shannon Rabby leads a No pets. snorkel outing. Limited to 18 individuals. RSVP by Wednesday, July 8 to christine.haywoodwaterways@ gmail.com or (828) 476-4667. www. haywoodwaterways.org

scores to life. Performers include Victoria Nelson, Corey Denham, Dave Fox and DeCristofaro. Show begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Saturday, July 4

Asheville Composer’s Percussion Concert

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what to do guide

Friday, July 3 New figurative works by Jonas Gerard. Meet the artist at the opening reception, 5 to 8 p.m. at The Asheville Loft, 52 Broadway St., Suite 3B. Exhibit open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. On display until July 27, 2015.

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Weekly artist market takes place every Saturday in July, August, and September from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the intersection of College and Spruce Streets in downtown Asheville. Details at www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

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Best in Show

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Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

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Diana Wortham Theatre

Diana Wortham Theatre 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

The Strand Theater LIVE MUSIC

Monday, July 6 – World Party w/ David Duffy, British pop, alternative rock. 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $17 adv. / $20 d.o.s.

Thursday, July 2 – Open Mic 6 p.m., music 7 p.m. Free. Thursday, July 9 – The Freeway Revival, Southern Rock, Funk, Soul. 8 p.m., $8 adv./$12 at door.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Thursday, July 16 – The Acatemy Awards. Funny cat videos at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5. Sunday, July 19 – Mike Ryan, Texas country. 7:30 p.m., $10 adv./$12 at door.

Sunday, July 12 – Organic Theater presents “Birthday Suits.” 7 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $15 adv. / $20 d.o.s.

Friday, July 24 – The Maggie Valley Band + The Sun Cans. 7 p.m. $10 adv./$12 at door.

MOVIES

Wednesday, July 15 – Randin Graves w/ Strings of Lumina, didjeridu showcase, performance, storytelling. 7 p.m. All ages. $15

American Sniper, 2 hrs. 14 min. • Friday, July 3 at 7 p.m. • Saturday, July 4 at 4 & 7 p.m. • Sunday, July 5 at 2 p.m. • Tues. & Wed., July 7 & 8 at 7 p.m.

Saturday, July 18 – Blindog Smokin’, Grammy nominated blues/funk. 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $20 adv. / $25 d.o.s.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Saturday, July 25 – The Secret B Sides & Sidney Barnes, soul. 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $12 adv. / $15 d.o.s.

Chasing Grace, 1 hr. 30 min. Filmed right here in Waynesville! • Friday, July 10 at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. • Saturday, July 11 at 4 & 7 p.m. • Sunday, July 12 at 2 & 4 p.m. • Tues. & Wed., July 14 & 15 at 7 p.m. Ex Machina – coming in late July.

Saturday, August 1 – Leftover Cuties, alternative/soul. 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $12 adv. / $15 d.o.s.

The Strand Theater 38 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786 www.38main.com

Altamont, 18 Church Street, Asheville www.thealtamont.com

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

310 Art Classes

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and childrens classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort NC.

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Folkmoot USA presents two performances: Sunday, July 19 at 1:30 p.m.; and Sunday, July 26 at 1:30 p.m.

Altamont Theatre

Sunday, July 19 – Freddy Jones Band w/ The Freeway Revival, pop, rock. 8 p.m. All ages. $15

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MOTION Dance Theatre presents New/ Now/Next, Friday & Saturday, July 10 & 11 at 8 p.m.

HART, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.com

Friday & Saturday, July 10 & 11 – Acoustic Syndicate, Americana / acoustic / bluegrass. Doors: 8 p.m. Show: 9 p.m. All ages. $20.

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Asheville Lyric Opera and the Brevard Music Center present Rigoletto, Thursday, July 2 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, July 5 at 3 p.m.

The 39 Steps - Opens June 19. Directed by Julie Kinter.

Thursday, July 9 – Shine, Baby, Shine a onewoman play. 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $15 adv. / $20 d.o.s.

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Opening at HART Oklahoma! – Opens July 10. Directed by Steve Lloyd.

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Classic Wineseller

Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 35


Find It Here

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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps Al Junek (828) 890-5777 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com All Nations Trading www.SpiritFeather.com Amber Combs Photography (940) 783-2027 Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com The Asheville Loft www.theashevilleloft.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com Jonas Gerard Fine Art www.jonasgerard.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814 Kornerstone Kafe (828) 550-2265

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Laugh Your Asheville Off www.laughyourashevilleoff.com

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

LEAF www.theleaf.org

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com Folkmoot USA www.folkmootusa.org French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net HART Theater www.harttheatre.com Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 High Country Style www.shopatstyle.com Ichiban (828) 252-7885

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

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Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Massie Furniture Co. (828) 456-3311 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us Mountain Dance & Folk Festival www.folkheritage.com

Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

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awareness realizing self in consciousness – not All there really is, in body, mind or peris one moment; sonal story. Consciousness is this moment in this moment. the Universe where self is found in a grassy field with a dog. Nothing more is needed. That other moments – driving a car, working at the office, shopping at the store, lying sick in bed are not also perfect is the delusion of the story of me in time that Zen teaches us to penetrate, expand and experience in the purity of presence. In returning to just this moment in the Universe, needing nothing – even the air around us is rich with the energy of Life and non-duality. Perfect. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com.

Smoky Mountain Foot Clinic, PA www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

HENDERSONVILLE RD.

KATHLEEN COLBURN

She can be reached by email: rrshortstories@gmail.com

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

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Waynesville Craft Beer www.waynesvillebeer.com Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com

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Think good thoughts!

NORTH ASHEVILLE

Village Art & Craft Fair www.newmorninggallerync.com

Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com

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WNC OVERVIEW

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

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Recently I’ve been helping a client transition to a different way of eating. Not a drastic change, but this person is keenly aware of what works and it’s got me, well, thinking. Back in my 20s I was introduced to “health food” and began the journey of a healthy lifestyle and my work as a personal chef. Throughout the years I have encouraged people to simply pay attention to how they feel. Sometimes it helps to experiment a little too. For me, gluten is not well tolerated these days. Sadly I’m finding that many healthy, gluten-free baked goods are also not tolerated. It could be the alternative “flours” or the type of fat or the sugar load, but I know this - the discomfort in my gut is just not worth it. These days I’m drawn to very simple, clean, fermented foods. I’m loving the aroma changes of quinoa as it soaks and slowly ferments over a couple days. And I know that this process with my seeds, grains and veggies too, helps my body digest everything much better. I plan to experiment with making sweet treats from the fermented grains. Maybe that’ll work!

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival www.scm-festival.com

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Kathleen is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects.

Spruce Street Market www.sprucestreetmarket.com

Stephanie Grimes www.artist-f.com

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Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

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I’ve been thinking about foods that work and those that don’t.

Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

PATTON AVE.

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‘Needing Nothing’ cont’d from pg. 33

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com

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artful living

International ArtFest www.haywoodarts.org

B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com

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Zapow www.zapow.com

36 July 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 11

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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530 N. MAIN STREET, HENDERSONVILLE HD

(828) 697-1300 • O PEN M ON-S AT 11AM-6PM

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Duo, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

The Arts Council of Henderson County is looking for artists who are interested in demonstrating and selling their art or craft at the 56th annual Art on Main Festival, which will be held October 3 & 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Saturday, July 4 – Woody & Johnson

Call for Creative Art Demonstrations

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Outdoors on the sidewalk in front of the Green Room Cafe, 536 N. Main Street in Hendersonville.

Visit TheGreenRoomCafe.biz for music and artist lineup.

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North Main Music & Art Demonstrations

The music will run from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Bring your lawn chairs and enjoy a good time with family and friends. Creative Art Demonstrations will showcase local artists demonstrating their craft every Saturday (except during festivals) from 12 noon to 2 p.m.

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Art On The Wall Studios

Saturday, July 11 – Lynn Goldsmith & The Jeeder Mountain Band, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Saturday, July 18 – Artist Sharon Carlyle, oil, 12-2 p.m. Elise Pratt Trio, Jazz, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

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Art On The Wall Studios invites creative input from the community to add to their own creations. They offer critiques, space to show work, monthly openings, and a forum on how to gather much needed help for high school boys and girls who need art supplies and mentoring. 64 Art On The Wall Studios displays paintings, sculptures, fiber arts, contemporary paintings, and jewelry.

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It’s not always what you BY pAM SEgAL create in the studio, but what you can create with the community.

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Local Studio Brings Art Alive

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514 N. Main Street • Hendersonville, NC

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HT 828-698-4888 • anita@spiritfeather.com Facebook/AllNationsTrading • www.SpiritFeather.com

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Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar NEW Exotic Menu Items

$10

Gift Certificate

M. Rathsack demonstrates raku pottery processes.

With Purchase of $30 or more. With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 9/1/15.

Artists will be juried and are required to submit three images of finished pieces. Booth fee is $50. Deadline is Friday, August 7, 2015. Applications available at www.acofhc.org. For more information contact the Arts Council at (828) 693-8504 or acofhc@bellsouth.net.

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3 Biltmore Ave.

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885

437 N. Main St.

www.champanc.com

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Hendersonville, NC 828-696-9800

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fine arts & crafts

‘Art After Dark’ cont’d from page 24

Dark flags designates participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery.

Weddings, Graduations, Family Portraits, Nature and Scenic Photos

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Burr Studio presents mixed media artist, Carol Blackwell, who will be exhibiting nature inspired artwork at Burr Studio for the month of July. Meet Carol and enjoy refreshments on Friday, July 3 from 6-9 p.m. For further information call (828) 456-7400. Burr Studio, 136 N Main Street, Waynesville. Cedar Hill Studios is showcasing the work of Gail Holt. Gail is a doll maker and will be demonstrating how she makes her fairies and dolls using cloth. The studio will feature music by Lynn Hendricks. Stop by for food, drink, friends, and lots of fun. Haywood County Arts Council’s ‘Gallery & Gifts’ will be hosting their junior mountain bluegrass band, Junior Appalachian Musicians, on Friday, July 3 from 6-9 p.m., at 86 North Main Street in downtown Waynesville. Come and join in the fun while simultaneously enjoying the festive atmosphere of the newest exhibit at the gallery, “The Art of Wood and Metal,” featuring paintings by Rick Hills, Burl Wood Studio’s hand crafted and

‘Spruce Street’ cont’d from page 20

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new pavement and more trees, making it an idyllic destination for vending some of the region’s great artistic talent. The market is a partnership between the Appalachian Craft Center, (located on Spruce Street) and Muddy Knees Design and Production, the producer of the popular Asheville Art in the Park event series in Pack Square. The Market will coincide with some other big events this year including the Ingles Independence Day Celebration, LEAF Downtown and many other events held on the stage and in the park. This vending opportunity is available only to businesses producing their own products in the region and hosts open enrollment all season. Visit www.SpruceStreetMarket.com for more information, or email info@sprucestreetmarket. com with any questions you may have.

‘Greenberg’ cont’d from page 21

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The artist states that her interest in art began when she was five years old. During the winter of that year, she watched an artist paint a mural that was to be the centerpiece behind the bar at her father’s New Jersey restaurant. “From that point on, I knew I was going to be an artist,” Greenberg said. It is a path she has pursued throughout her life. Greenberg received a BFA in art and an MFA in painting and was a college art instructor in the 1970s. Starting in 1976, she traveled the art-show circuit for 28 years where she sold her paintings across the country. She participated in her final show in 2004, after having settled in Asheville in 2001. Greenberg is a member of the Asheville Gallery of Art, the Portrait Society of America, and the Appalachian Pastel Society. She also runs the open studio at the Red House in

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beautiful furniture, and Michael Dodson’s eye catching attractive sculptural works. The Jeweler’s Workbench is featuring Kabana, an artist who specializes in sterling silver. Stop in for complimentary wine and live music. Twigs and Leaves Gallery presents renowned oil painter Jack Stern, from Tuckaseegee, NC, during Art After Dark Friday, July 3, from 6-9 p.m. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music and delight in the savory hors d’eurves. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville. (828) 456-1940, www.twigsandleaves.com. The Village Framer presents the work of Sylvia Cabrera, an artist skilled in multimedia, fluid acrylics and oil and wax. Sylvia explains that her paintings “reflect my reactions to my life’s experiences as they affect my inner feelings. I paint from the imagination. I like to portray feelings of peace, fun and a colorful world.” While viewing Cabrera’s colorful artwork, listen to James Hammel titillate with his jazz guitar and vocals. Surely a feast for the senses!

IF YOU For more details call Twigs and GO Leaves at (828) 456-1940, or visit www.

waynesvillegalleryassociation.com.

Black Mountain, giving artists the opportunity to draw live models. The show will run July 1 through 31. The public is invited River Reflections to the opening by Frances Greenberg reception on Friday, July 3, from 5 to 8 p.m., where they can view Greenberg’s work as well as the works of the 27 other gallery artists. IF YOU Asheville Gallery of Art is located at 16 GO College Street, across from Pritchard

Park in downtown Asheville. Regular gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, please call (828) 251-5796, or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.


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Concerts on the Quad at UNC Asheville

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Performances by local “popnoir” band stephaniesĭd and popular bluegrass band Chatham County Line. The free concerts will be held on Monday evenings from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on the UNC Asheville Quad, and will wrap up the 2015 season of Concerts on the Quad. On Monday, July 6 “stephaniesĭd Covers the Great American Songbook” will take place. Described by Billboard Magazine as “difficult to classify but easy to love,” stephaniesĭd performs emotional music combining jazz, pop and rock. Chatham County Line will perform Monday, July 13. The Raleigh-based four-piece string band has toured extensively in the United States and Europe, and is known for combining traditional bluegrass instrumentation with contemporary, rock-influenced songwriting. “This music isn’t a product of its era,” writes Joe Tangari of Pitchfork, “but neither is it married to a bygone

‘Campbell & Williams’ cont’d from page 27

Helm’s final three albums; Williams, as an essential band member, frequently brought the house down. The new record is an extension of that time, featuring material honed on the carpet of Helm’s barn, under the gaze of grateful fans. Songs like the Muscle Shoals-inflected opener “Surrender to Love,” heart-wrenching ballad “Another One More Time,” and boot-stomper “Bad Luck Charm,” feature the distinctive texture of two entwining voices who’ve been through a lot together—the good, the bad, and the joyous. “It was the most pure musical experience I’ve ever had,” Larry says of their time with Helm. “It gave me the template for how to make music for the rest of my life: no egos, no agenda, and no petty stuff. I looked forward to every gig I ever did with him, I loved doing it, and when it was over I couldn’t wait for the next one. I got inspired to write more songs for us to work up.” “I don’t remember a time not singing in front of people,” Williams adds. “I sang in church, at school, everywhere, but I didn’t know anything about making records. And that’s were Larry was able to step in.”

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one. It’s essentially timeless….” Attendees are invited to bring chairs, blankets and picnics to enjoy the music. Smoking, alcohol, and pets are not permitted. IF YOU For more information on GO Concerts on the Quad, contact

UNC Asheville Cultural Events & Special Academic Programs at (828) 251-6674, and visit https:// cesap.unca.edu/concerts-quad

Following Helm’s 2012 passing, they grieved, celebrated his life, and got to work finishing the record. They had the tunes, and with drummer (and recording engineer) Justin Guip and Ramble Band member Byron Isaacs on bass, they had a tight road-worthy band. Additionally, a list of talented friends sweetened the pot considerably: Helm’s daughter Amy on vocals, Little Feat co-founder Bill Payne on piano, and the last recorded work of Levon Helm himself. Make no mistake, this duo not only brings a lot to the table, they bring the table itself—plus the house, the still, the church, the marriage bed, the sawdust-covered floor, and abiding, unconditional love, all carried in two voices harmonizing across hills, hollers, porches, and fire escapes. Those close harmonies ride atop music made in a mountain refuge, far from the madding crowd, connected to a spirit that lives on in song.

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Vol. 18, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2015 39


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July 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
July 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Dill Falls by Jack Stern..p18. Inside: LEAF in Downtown Asheville..p8; Mountain Dance and Folk Festival..p9; Village Art and C...

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