Page 1

CRAFT FAIRS Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands pg 17 Village Art & Craft Fair pg 16

DINING GUIDE Your Passport to Discovering the Best Restaurants pgs 26-28

Frog Level • ArtFest 2014 • Art After Dark Interview with Waynesville Fine Artist

Jenny Buckner

pg

11

pg

9


FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

pg. 18

J

63 Haywood St. • Asheville, NC • 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon-Sat 10:30-6

July 17-20 Juried Artists Craft Demonstrations Live Regional Music

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm

Becky and Steve LLoyd

Admission: $8 children under 12 free

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928 pg. 18

V

2 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11


pg. 33

RC

eason

2014

45t

hS

SWANNANOA

Warren Wilson College in the Kittredge Theater July 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29

WAYNESVILLE

Beautiful North Carolina Venues World-Renowned Musicians

Join us for any of five different programs

Performing Arts Center July 6, 13, 20, and 27 Concerts begin at 7:30

Enso String Quartet

Jasper String Quartet

www.SwannanoaChamberMusic.com

(828) 771-3050

C o t t o n M i l l S t u D i o S F e at u R e D a Rt i S t

Akira Satake Ceramics

A

Akira Satake considers the act of creation a collaboration between the clay, the fire and himself.

Collaboration means finding what the clay wants to be and bringing out its beauty in the way that the beauty of our surroundings is created through natural forces. Undulations in sand that has been moved by the wind, rock formations caused by landslides, the crackle and patina in the wall of an old house — all these owe their special beauty to the random hand of Nature. The fire is the ultimate random part of the collaborative equation. Akira hopes the fire will be his ally, but he knows it will always transform the clay in ways that he cannot anticipate.

www.akirasatake.com Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

pg. 18

S

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 3


Downtown Asheville's Longest-Established Fine Art Gallery

“Worlds Apart”

by Hal Boyd

Works by Peggy Horne Taylor

Reception: July 4, 2014 5:00 - 8:00 pm Show runs July 1 - 31, 2014 Monday - Saturday 10:00 am - 5:30 pm Sunday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

The Asheville Gallery of Art opened for business in 1988 and marked its 25th anniversary in 2013. From the beginning, AGA has been exciting, significant, and successful because of its cordial, welcoming commitment to the hundreds of residents and visitors who come each year to look or to buy. A major presence in this city of 86,000, AGA is easily located on College Street, across from Pritchard Park. The gallery is a popular art destination for tourists as well as for art-conscious locals. With top-quality two-dimensional original art as the gallery's focus, membership is coveted for miles around. Each of the gallery's 28 artists applies his or her own distinctive vision, concept and techniques to offer a diversity of work sure to please every discerning taste.

Asheville Gallery of Art

16 College Street Asheville, NC 28801 828-251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Asheville, NC 28801

pg. 18

H

pg. 32

MB

pg. 10

WH

4 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

we love this place Teatro del Gusto:

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

Feast for the Senses 2014

Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Eleven

JULY 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jack Boyd, Lee Ann Bubrowski, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Parker Davis, Kelly Denson, Amy Downs, Chall Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Brandon Hunter, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Sarah Larson, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, April Nance, T. Oder and R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Shari Riendeau, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Heather West, Liz Whalen, Stephanie Wilder. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Advertising Sales Manager Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, July 2014, Vol. 17 No. 11

On the Cover:

Painting by Waynesville artist Jenny Buckner. PAGE 11

6 Columns

Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Peter Loewer – Curmudgeon. . . . . 12 James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . . 14 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 22 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Bill Walz – Mindfulness . . . . . . . . . 25 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 25 Business in a More Beautiful World 35

6 Music

Nightmares on Wax . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival 7 Amici Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Phish n’ Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Dead Fingers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

On Sunday, July 13 The Orange Peel debuts a fresh new Circus Cabaret, featuring diverse performers and a live music showcase series. These events are a collaboration between the always zesty Orange Peel, and Madame Onça, producer of Asheville’s annual Americana Burlesque & Sideshow Festival, and purveyor of fine international cabaret talent. Enjoy an evening of aerial arts, comedy, acrobatics, juggling, stunts, and live music with visiting show hosts Paolo Garbanzo and Mark Slomski of Richmond, VA. Can this Old World Italian Impresario and Virginia’s Rascally Vaudevillian cook up a perfect night of entertainment before big boss Madame Onça busts their chops? Complimentary desserts and table service will turn the Orange Peel into an intimate cabaret experience. The quest for the perfect blend of Old World Cirque and American Roadhouse fun will be seasoned with aerialists, singers, and showgirl burlesque dancers to delight the senses. Each Teatro show opens and closes with an appetizing local band. In July, local rockers Red Honey take the stage.

9 Fine Art

ArtFest 2014. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jenny Buckner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Village Art & Craft Fair. . . . . . . . . . 16 Southern Highlands Craft Fair . . . 17 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 19 Artist Resource Center . . . . . . . . . 33

12 Summer Fun

Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch. Laugh Your Asheville Off. . . . . . . . Henderson County Events. . . . . . . Sourwood Festival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summer Reads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crossnore Craft Fair . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 18 20 24 24 34

13 Performance

Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . 13 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

“We are excited to partner with the Orange Peel in building this series for

SPECIAL SECTIONS Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 9-11 Downtown Asheville . . . . . pgS 18-19 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Dining Guide . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 26-28 River Arts District. . . . . . . . . . . pg 33

summers to come,” says Madame Onca, known as the Hardest Working Woman in Show Business. “The goal is to create the reputation this year as we introduce Asheville locals and tourists to a new and innovative option for downtown entertainment. Imagine where Asheville, known for both its vibrant arts and food culture, can take this concept as it grows! Maybe a longer evening, bigger production, perhaps even a seated dinner included with the ticket price. Let’s have a feast of the senses, Asheville!” Ticket holders can receive a 15% discount off their total bill at the following participating restaurants on Teatro nights, before or after the show! Proof of ticket required. • Storm, 125 S. Lexington, www.stormrhumbar.com • Chestnut, 48 Biltmore, www.chestnutasheville.com • Hana Japanese, 5 Biltmore, www.hanaasheville.com • Seven Sows Bourbon & Larder, 77 Biltmore, www.sevensows.com Tickets $15 in advance, $18 day of event. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets and more information at www.theorangepeel.net, or call (828) 225-5851.

We’re a Local & Responsible Publisher Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

26 Dining Guide

Lenny’s Sub Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 The Green Room Café . . . . . . . . . 27 Pint Nights + Bend and Brew. . . . 29

30 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

31 31 31 31 31

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience

N

The Legendary Nightmares on Wax

Nightmares on Wax celebrate their 20th anniversary with a massive stateside tour, hitting Asheville with special guest Aligning Minds. George Evelyn, the man behind Nightmares on Wax, began his musical adventure in Leeds, England, listening to soul artists like Curtis Mayfield, Quincy Jones, and dub and reggae music by age nine. It wasn’t long before he discovered rap music and quickly became obsessed with it. Nightmares on Wax dropped their first album in 1991, A Word of Science: The First and Final Chapter. Taking a break from recording for a few years after the first album was released, Evelyn ran a club in Leeds and started his own record label. Nightmares on Wax released their second album, the critically acclaimed Smoker’s Delight, in 1995, which introduced his music

for the first time to the United States. After he dropped another classic in the 90’s, Carboot Soul, Evelyn didn’t release another album until 2002, taking a few years to establish himself as a producer and musical consultant. He worked with many artists during that time, including De La Soul. Nightmares on Wax was quickly becoming internationally known and Evelyn became an in-demand DJ all over the world. His itinerary even included a residency at Las Dalias in Ibiza. It’s all about the live show for Nightmares on Wax: “Doing the live side proves there is more to the music. People have something more tangible to relate the music to and it gives us the chance to connect with the audience. Also, I’ve always had this idea of creating a big band – which is what we call our sound. “The main priority for Nightmares on Wax is to prove that we can perform music. But we’re not ignoring the fact that we come

WNC Jazz Profiles: Nancy Simmons “Nancy Simmons is a veteran singer whose impressive technique and command of a wide range of styles have made her a respected member of the Asheville music community. Her skills as a songwriter, pianist and leader of church choirs make her one of the most versatile vocal coaches in the area. From opera to soul, Nancy brings a wealth of knowledge, commitment and personal experience to the table.”

N

Nancy Jackson grew up in Canton, Ohio in a home filled with the sounds of Nancy Wilson, Frank Sinatra, Barbara Streisand, Tony Bennett, Joni Mitchell, Laura Nyro, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page and the Beatles. She dislikes being pigeon holed by style or genre and points out, “If you eat your favorite food every day, eventually you’ll lose your taste for it!” Nancy made her debut in second grade, placing second in a county talent competition singing Someday My Prince Will Come — and apparently he did when Phoenix bassist Jim Simmons changed her name to Nancy Jackson Simmons. Nancy received her Voice Degree from Arizona State University in 1980 and while there sang opera in seven languages, moonlighting in several jazz combos, plus the Arizona State Big Band. While at ASU, Nancy applied for and won a coveted position in a national talent search, allowing her the opportunity to study for a month with the industry’s best arrangers, managers, record execs and performers of that time, which opened the door for a guest spot in an Andy Williams show at Phoenix Symphony Hall.

~ Dr. William Bares, UNCA Jazz Studies “Nancy’s approach to music embodies the concept that music defies categories. She draws upon a wide variety of styles and influences in her creative arrangements, and with her vocal command, she claims her chosen material as her own.”

~ Bill Gerhardt, pianist/composer Because of Nancy’s ability to sing many styles, she quickly became one of the Phoenix area’s top vocalists. Nancy and Jim then opened what became the nationally known concert club Chuy’s in Tempe, AZ. They took Chuy’s through three expansions, starting with 2,500 square feet and ending up with over 15,000 and exclusive rights to the Hayden Square Amphitheater. Due to the popularity of the club, Nancy and Jim were put in touch with the nation’s best musicians on a daily basis, and Nancy refers to this experience as her “live classroom.” Because of its reputation, many larger touring acts began playing Chuy’s and it became where musicians would go following their own shows, knowing they’d find a great act, as well as possible after-hours jamming.

6 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

BY

SAM KATZ

from a studio, technical background. We just want to mix the old with the new. That’s why, at the moment, I don’t have a live drummer. The sound of the beats is what makes Nightmares.” Nightmares on Wax perform live in Asheville for the first time ever on Monday, July 14 at Asheville Music Hall, with local electronic duo, Aligning Minds, opening the show. For tour dates, music videos and more, please visit www.nightmaresonwax.com IF YOU Nightmares on Wax, Monday, GO July 14 at 9 p.m. 21+. $15 adv.; $20

day of show. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Avenue. For more details visit www.AshevilleMusicHall.com

George Evelyn, the man behind Nightmares on Wax.

BY

EDDIE LESHURE

lesson in music. “Nancy’s beautiful music has a true artistic voice — crossing many styles including Jazz, R&B, Pop and Soul. Her music making is definitely compelling, moving… her soulful renditions of jazz classics to pop and her musical artistry is Nancy Simmons Photo: Frank Zipperer truly captivating to the spirit. What an amazing talent — a must see for all!” “Jaco Pastorius, Mike Stern and I played every Joni Mitchell song we commonly knew ~ Joe Lulloff, Distinguished until 4 a.m. after one of Jaco’s shows. They Professor of Saxophone, were like a harmonic machine, while I hung on piano as best I could. I just kept on singing Michigan State University and thinking, ‘I’m singing with Jaco Pastorius, don’t pinch me! Jaco taught me the most valuable lesson in music that night when he told me to always ‘remain childlike’.” Eddie LeShure produces Nancy brings an irrepressible soul to all “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” she sings. She is known for her vocally playful each Wednesday 7-10 p.m. and passionate approach, which is evident in on MAIN-FM (103.7/mainher original material too. “A lot of times musifm.org), plus the monthly cians can get up in their heads, or throw chops White Horse Cabaret Jazz at you, but that fun factor HAS to be there for Series in Black Mountain. me!” Her four-octave range makes for a sizable Eddie LeShure also produces a playground for both inventive phrasing and a comprehensive website on local jazz, sultry, pure tone that drives the emotional conwww.ashevillejazzunlimited.com, which tent of her songs. Nancy’s band name Green includes a weekly newsletter and Eggs & Nan comes from her favorite childongoing WNC jazz calendar. hood book, always reminding her of its greatest


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

performances Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival 2014

T

The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, one of the longest running chamber music festivals in the United States, presents its 45th season to the listeners of Western North Carolina. The five week festival will perform concerts in Swannanoa in Kittredge Theater on the Warren Wilson College campus on July 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and in Waynesville at the Waynesville Performing Arts Center on June 29, July 6, 13, 20, and 27. For the first concert we welcome back the Enso String Quartet, pianist Inessa Zaretsky, and Bill Hoyt on horn. After opening with a Haydn string quartet we will hear the rarely performed Quintet for Horn and String Quartet by famous American songwriter, Alec Wilder. The quartet will then join Inessa and perform the famous Piano Quintet by Schumann. Flutist George Pope, oboist Cynthia Watson, clarinetist David Bell, and bassoonist Lynn Hileman return to the festival and along with Hoyt open the second program with a lovely baroque quintet by Rameau. The Enso Quartet then joins Inessa for the unique Quintet in G Major for piano (for left hand alone) and string quartet by Franz Schmidt. This piece was written for the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein, who lost his right arm in WWI. The program ends with the Enso

Quartet performing the third of the famous “Razumovsky Quartets” by Beethoven. The third week is a celebration of American music. It features the wind players, pianist Zaretsky, and guest soprano Felicia Moore. The concert opens with Nine Anniversaries by Leonard Bernstein arranged by flutist Pope for woodwind quintet. Inessa then joins the quintet for the Concerto for Piano and Wind Quintet by Wallingford Riegger. Sandburg’s Corner, a set of songs for piano, flute and soprano was written Jasper Quartet Photo: Vanessa Briceno-Scherzer by pianist Zaretsky and features poetry by Carl Sandburg, a resident of Western North Carolina. Love Songs Without Words is hauntingly beautiful Twilight Music by John a witty arrangement of songs by Cole Porter. Harbison for violin, horn, and piano. The The final piece on the program is a world Jasper Quartet then ends the season with the premier of an arrangement by Hoyt of one of lovely, romantic String Quartet in G Major the most beautiful pieces of the 20th century, by Dvorák. Knoxville: Summer of 1915 by Samuel Barber for woodwind quintet, piano, and soprano. We welcome back the Jasper Quartet for IF the fourth program along with bassist Philip YOU All concerts begin at 7:30. Ticket GO prices are $21.40 for individual Alejo as they join some of the wind players tickets and $80.25 for a series ticket. for the titanic Octet by Schubert. This masFor more information about the programs sive, classic piece of chamber music will be and musicians, please visit our web site at preceded by the delightful Caprice sur des airs swannanoachambermusic.com. If you would Danois et Russes by Saint-Saens. like to contact us in Swannanoa, phone (828) The final program opens with an early 771-3050 or e-mail chamber@warren-wilson. Beethoven quartet, the Opus 18 No. 3. Next, edu. In Waynesville (828) 452-0593. pianist Paul Nitsch returns to perform on the

World-Renowned Musicians ~ Five Different Programs ~ Beautiful NC Venues Program 1

Program 2

Program 3

Program 4

Program 5

Music of Haydn, Wilder, and Schumann.

Music of Rameauu, Franz Schmidt, and Beethoven.

Music of Saint-Saens and Schubert.

Music of Beethoven, Harbison, and Dvorák.

June 29 at 7:30 p.m.

Waynesville Performing Arts Center

July 6 at 7:30 p.m. Waynesville Performing Arts Center

Music of Bernstein, Riegger, Zaretsky, Cole Porter, and Barber.

July 13 at 7:30 p.m.

July 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Waynesville Performing Arts Center

July 27 at 7:30 p.m.

July 1 at 7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater-Warren Wilson College

July 8 at 7:30 p.m. Kittredge Theater-Warren Wilson College

July 22 at 7:30 p.m.

July 29 at 7:30 p.m.

Waynesville Performing Arts Center

July 15 at 7:30 p.m.

Kittredge Theater-Warren Wilson College

Kittredge Theater-Warren Wilson College

Waynesville Performing Arts Center Kittredge Theater-Warren Wilson College

Impressionism and Rock Piano – Exploring Connections

A

AmiciMusic will present pianist Chappell Kingsland in a unique and original show.

U2, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Fleet Foxes. As a pianist, Dr. Kingsland specializes in 20th- and 21st-century piano literature and has performed concerto “Impressionism and Rock repertoire by John Adams, Piano” highlights interesting conPaul Hindemith, and Joaquin nections between musical genres Rodrigo. He writes arrangeand reveals how the power of ments of rock, jazz and world music can connect between culmusic for everything from sotures and styles to communicate loists and chamber musicians with us at the deepest level. Chappell Kingsland, pianist to choruses and orchestras. Kingsland, a graduate of the As a composer, his most recent project Eastman School of Music and Indiana School is The Discovery of Fire, a chamber opera for of Music, will perform an eclectic mix of young audiences commissioned by Roundmusic that includes Debussy, Pearl Jam, Ravel,

about Opera for Kids. He was a founder of New Voices Opera, the student-run opera company in Bloomington, Indiana which produced his two-act opera Intoxication: America’s Love Affair with Oil. Dr. Kingsland is Adjunct Professor of Music Theory at the Lamont School of Music (University of Denver).

IF YOU Concert held Wednesday, July GO 2 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse

Black Mountain. Tickets are $10 and are available at the door. For more information, visit www.chappellkingsland. com or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living Milestones

Energetic action begets increased activity.

ALL MOMENTS GREAT & SMALL

B

Bibliophiles will recognize that subhead as a nod to British veterinarian turned author, James Herriot. I grew up reading books I could not have predicted would stay in my thoughts throughout the years, yet they appear now and then like slow bubbles rising up through ancient tar. A favorite was an annotated version of Alice in Wonderland by Martin Gardner, where the margin notes told me things I never would have understood about Lewis Carroll’s story on my own. Alice’s misadventurous milestones represent many things we encounter on the path of life. I got to musing upon this topic because this column marks my five year anniversary (60 months!) of contributing to Rapid River Magazine, where I have continually revealed odd bits of myself while sharing about art and life. While I write in a variety of ways, THIS one is monthly, to a word count, maintaining a particular persona across a wide variety of creative thoughts. Readers (and my editors) have suffered through my age jokes (I’m not particularly

Come Out and Cosplay BY

BRANDON HUNTER

The Asheville Anime Regional Convention is holding its first event at the Crowne Plaza Resort Expo Center on Saturday, July 26. The concept of the Con is to allow fans of Anime, Manga, Sci-Fi, Fantasy and Gaming a new venue to express their love of the arts in Western North Carolina. Guests at the Con include Jade Saxton (voice actress), J.K. Barber (author), Jonathan French (author), and other likeminded entertainers. Cosplay, short for “Costume Play,” is encouraged in the spirit of the event. Guidelines for what is considered appropriate are available for view on the official website. No matter the media or medium, there will be something for everyone to express their enjoyment of during the day. Tickets are $15 for general admission, while kids 10 or below are free. $5 off general admission with appropriate costume. For more information visit www.ashevilleanimeregionalconvention.com IF YOU Cosplay, Saturday, July 26 GO from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the

Crowne Plaza Resort Expo Center, 1 Resort Dr., Asheville. Call (828) 254-3211.

BY

gREg VINEYARD

young, but I didn’t actually fill Lewis Carroll’s ink-well…), sci-fi references, bad puns, and weird acronyms (W.A.’s), not to mention a slew of made-up words that even inexperienced Scrabble players world-wide wouldn’t hesitate to challenge. Every column is a hardwrought marker of forward Reaching for The Gold Star, 2014, pastel by Greg Vineyard momentum. According to my GiNormous Webster’s, and looking past the first Illustration Gallery, I am ever-challenged to definition of a stone used as a mile-marker, improve upon my themes, techniques and my focus here for “milestone” is: “a significant breadth. In writing, there’s nothing like “wordevent or stage in the life, progress, developcount” to help you “kill your darlings” in the ment, or the like of a person…” final draft. Some of my most beloved sentences In addition to larger, life-changing events, will surface only during future biography sometimes the most significant milestones one work. I imagine a young researcher unearthing can hit are of the daily variety. Artist? Draw one of these gems, exclaiming: “Wow! WHAT every day. Writer? Write every day. Gardener? a sentence! And it’s … SO long!” Accountant? Star Fleet Captain? (There it Each month I see the results of the Rapid is!) Chef? Marketer? We advance every time River team’s strong, solid work and enthusiwe pick up a pen, brush, tool, keypad, ledger, asm, and in addition to being pleased to play child, and so on. Our daily activities and jobs my small part, I am grateful for the exercise in and passions ARE the progress. My inspiradiligence and mental acuity, and I am stirred to tions in the art, craft, design and writing continue onward. worlds worked at their respective crafts continIn any field, I believe that energetic action ually, and they encourage me to keep evolving. begets increased activity, and that creative And I think we do that for each other, too. efforts yield even more creativity. New Observing my fellow artists at ZaPow ideas show up all the time if we’re open and

Phish n’ Chips

T

The Thursday night Phish tribute band at The One Stop needs a new lead guitarist. Every Thursday at the One Stop at Asheville Music Hall, from 6-9 p.m., Duke of Lizards play the weekly event, Phish n’ Chips. They cover a variety of Phish songs and now have a rather large repertoire of songs they’ve learned and are capable of performing live. This is no small task if you’re aware of the complexity of most Phish songs. Recent events have now left the band guitarless, and being that Phish’s guitarist, Trey Anastasio, is an intricate part of the band and its music, Duke of Lizards needs a new guitarist to play the part of Trey! Hence, for the time being, until a proper fit is found, the band will open up Phish n’ Chips and try out a new guitarist each week. The new shows are aptly known as the Trey Trials, aka “Trey-Outs.” So you think you can play Trey? Are you Trey enough? Let the judges decide who will become the next Duke of Lizards! Each week, a different guitarist/vocalist will perform two sets during Phish n’ Chips.

8 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

BY

SAM KATZ

Who will become the next member of the Duke of Lizards? Our “Phriendly” judges will decide which of the would-be Treys will make it to the Trey Phinals! At the Phinals, each Trey will get to perform a mini-set of tunes to strut their stuff. The judges will decide who will become the new Asheville Trey! So, how do you become a judge or contestant? Simple, just email your residential Phishman at seanmasonmusic@ gmail.com. This is a first come, first served process. Don’t delay, get on it, hippies! More information on Facebook, www.facebook.com/ events/241122336077382/ IF YOU Phish n’ Chips, Free! All ages GO show from 6-9 p.m. at the One

Stop at Asheville Music Hall, 55 College Street, Asheville. Visit www. AshevilleMusicHall.com for details.

stimulated. I have found this to be true working in the corporate world, as well. The most technical of companies still need the individuals within them to brainstorm, innovate and stay on top of trends. These actions lead to potential new objectives, and can help to keep a business in business. In Wonderland, Alice follows something, has unexpected adventures, encounters weird characters and other lesson-granting obstacles, and finds her way. On my drawing table, and in my writing, I experience this, too. Moments can be fleeting, yet each day provides a chance to share and interact and produce in ways both large and tiny. Each moment is a record of a life. And here’s something really neat about milestones: they’re multitudinous. And endless. We can set them ourselves. We’re doing significant things all the time, whether it’s an initial fall down a rabbit hole, or following the path to which that seemingly clumsy action has led. I wish you great creative adventures in your world of art and culture – every day! Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville, (www.zapow.com), carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

FLASH MOB, BLACK MOUNTAIN STYLE BY

STEpHANIE WILDER

One Saturday morning as I was setting up the shop, I spotted a collection of aging hippies rushing to gather in front of the Dark City Deli, guitars and mandolins in hand. “Flash Mob?” I wondered. Yes... Flash Mob, Black Mountain style. I stepped out of the shop to get a closer look at the crowd. Patchouli was definitely in the air, and so was good old 60’s earnestness (My People!). They strummed away and sang every verse of This Land is Your Land. They invited the gathered crowd to join in, and I too sang that wonderful anthem, as apt today as it was when it was written during the Dust Bowl days in response to God Bless America. As quickly as they gathered, the hippies scattered, leaving me feeling groovy. Stephanie Wilder is the owner of Chifferobe Home & Garden, where you can discover great antiques, art, and gifts. Chifferobe Home & Garden, 118 Cherry Street in Black Mountain www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

WILD ABOUT

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

WAYNESVILLE

ArtFest 2014

R

T

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

pg. 10

WT

IF YOU ArtFest 2014, Saturday, GO July 19, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

on Main St. in downtown Waynesville. Visit the Haywood County Arts Council’s website at www.haywoodarts.org.

Come and “meet the world” on Waynesville’s Main Street.

Demonstration by July featured artist Jenny Buckner Friday, July 11 from 6-9pm during Art After Dark

preserve our mountain artistic heritage. The arts council looks forward to working with other local organizations, like Folkmoot, throughout the year to add to the cultural vitality of Haywood County. For vendors still interested in participating, please contact office@haywoodarts.org or call the office of the Haywood County Arts Council at (828) 452-0593. Booth fees range from $150-300 for artists and $240-480 for food vendors.

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

Guest Appearance by the

Folkmoot Dancers

Art After Dark

S

Saturday, July 19

The Haywood County Arts Council presents

ARTFest 2014

Downtown Waynesville 10 AM to 5 PM

Summer is in full swing, and what better way to celebrate than perusing art in downtown Waynesville on Friday, July 11. Our mountain town’s night life embodies “cool,” to aid in combating July’s heat. Wander through the galleries and working studios on Main Street, Depot Street, and Frog Level where festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries. Members include the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Burr Studios, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, Art on Depot, and the Village Framer. Historic Frog Level, home to the Mahogany House and Art on Depot is a short walk from Main St., where artists have working studios enabling viewers to chat with artists. Our group has grown to include more than 12 galleries, ensuring that everyone will find inspiration through the beauty of art! Haywood County’s Gallery 86 presents its Artists Members Summer Celebration Show, showcasing the diverse talent of its members. View

E

Performances by Folkmoot dancers!

The Haywood County Arts Council will present ArtFest 2014 (formerly International Festival Day) on Saturday, July 19 on Main St. in Downtown Waynesville. Over 95 artists representing a full range of media will demonstrate and sell artwork at ArtFest 2014. This festival is one of the arts council’s largest events of the year and it happens to coincide with the first weekend of Folkmoot, to give the attendees a chance to see a couple of guest performances from the international performers. When visitors come to attend ArtFest, they will experience everything that they experienced at International Festival Day and more…only the name has been simplified. It is the same vibrant festival full of life, art, food and music. Children can also enjoy the “Passport to the Arts” section where they will get to work with professionals to create intriguing craft projects. Come and “meet the world” on Waynesville’s Main Street as regional and international artists, food vendors, Folkmoot USA dancers, regional musicians and dancers, and festival goers totaling 12,000 to 15,000 converge on downtown. By supporting your local arts council, you raise the level of cultural arts for the entire community. The mission of the Haywood County Arts Council is to build partnerships that promote art and artists, explore new cultural opportunities, and

U

• Fine Arts • • Crafts • • Live Music • • Food • • Entertainment • Passport to the Arts

Bearing Down, painting by Jenny Buckner, on display at Twigs & Leaves Gallery in Waynesville.

works in wood, clay, oil, and paper by talented artists such as Chris and Patty Coulter, Brad Dodson, Kaaren Stoner, Betina Morgan, and many, many more. continued on page 11

For more information call 828.452.0593 or visit www.haywoodarts.org

Support the Arts! Come Meet the World on Main Street!

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 9


R

I

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

Yoga & Pilates Classes Massage & Bodywork Therapy

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

FROG LEVEL

Historic Frog Level, Waynesville, NC

Agriculture, lumber and tourism industries contributed to the popularity of the area as access to the west was opened up. It was given the name Frog Level by the local community because of flooding due to its low-lying location. After several decades of decline, Frog Level is now home to Panacea, a popular coffeehouse and roaster, the Frog Level Brewing Company, as well as several art and antique businesses. In 2003 Frog Level was added to the

WS

T

WAYNESVILLE

In Waynesville you can explore an area located along Richland Creek, northwest and downhill from Main Street, where railroad tracks were first laid in 1884.

Wg

R

MOUNTAIN SPIRIT WELLNESS

National Register of Historic Places for its contribution to the history of Haywood County and the architectural features of its buildings. Frog Level artist and business owner t.e. siewert says, “There’s a nostalgic feel to the buildings and an ambiance you can’t find everywhere – it definitely leaves an impression.” Her business, the mahogany house art gallery and studios, is located in a building built in 1925. It features Art Deco window glass trim, fall-away brick walls, original tin ceilings, and wood plank floors. It is the perfect backdrop for the art that graces its walls.

HISTORIC FROG LEVEL WD WS WH

Self-Improvement Workshops Nutritional Support

WG

WC

WR

245 Depot Street Waynesville, NC

Lynda Saffell

in the Historic Frog Level

813-629-1835

LMBT #9861

WT

WA WP

FROG POND DOWNSIZING 18 Commerce St. Waynesville

828-734-3874 Insured & Bonded

• Clean Out Service • Company Transfer • Estate Sales • Downsizing • Divorce

HELPING IN HARD TIMES

WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

We are Known for Honesty & Integrity

WG

WH

Check out our Estate Sales

WB WH

10 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

WD

Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

WILD ABOUT

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

WAYNESVILLE

R

E

INTERVIEW WITH FINE ARTIST

J

Jenny Buckner

Jenny Buckner is seldom without her camera as she travels around Western North Carolina, always on the lookout for a subject for a painting. Working from her photographs, Buckner applies her oil to canvas in a loose comfortable style suggestive of European impressionist painters. Buckner especially enjoys her animal and portraiture work, which allow her to bring her subjects to life by incorporating their emotions and movement. “Capturing the soul of the person is important in my portrait work,” she says. “I try to recreate what I see in the person, not just their likeness. I feel successful when my paintings stir an emotional response in the viewer.”

Rapid River Magazine: What’s your favorite subject or subjects to paint?

BY

INTERVIEWED DENNIS RAY

Jenny Buckner: I

love them all, but animals are my absolute favorite. The personality of the animal must shine through in the painting for me to be happy.

pg. 10

Wp

RRM: You capture

a real honest beauty Big Ass Canvas, painting Big Foot 2, painting by through barnyard by Jenny Buckner Jenny Buckner animals. What initially drew you you are in their space. I personally to paint chickens and cows and other call them “The Geese Police.” domesticated animals?

JB: Domesticated animals are available

and easy to identify with. They can be quirky, shy, friendly, coy, or even silly.

RRM: Do most of your paintings have

a story behind them? If so tell us the story behind the geese. It’s such a wonderful painting, my personal favorite of your work.

JB: I’m always

Cool and the Gang, painting by Jenny Buckner

‘Art After Dark’ cont’d from page 9

Come out to experience the talent found in our mountains! Twigs & Leaves presents the talented and renowned Waynesville artist, Jenny Buckner, known for her vibrant oil paintings of various animals. Jenny will be demonstrating at Twigs & Leaves Gallery during Art After Dark, Friday evening, July 11, from 6-9 p.m. One of the galleries favorites, Jenny’s body of work can be seen year-round.

on the lookout for interesting photos with good light and intriguing subjects. The geese are from Lake Junaluska and can be a little intimidating at times if they feel

Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano by Bill Stecher and delight in the savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs & Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC. Open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30 and Sunday 1-4; 828-456-1940, www.twigsandleaves.com. The Mahogany House and Art on Depot bring vibrancy and color to Frog Level, and are a joy to visit. The Mahogany House represents over fifty artists and has working studios. A must see

RRM: Do you have a personal fa-

vorite painting? What is it about that painting which makes it so?

JB: I have many favorites: ones of my children, my husband, my parents, and my own pets. I always look for great light and shadow in my paintings and a personal connection to the subject.

Jenny Buckner’s work can be seen at Twigs and Leaves Gallery, located in downtown Waynesville. The gallery features naturerelated art and fine crafts.

pg. 10

Wg

Twigs and Leaves Gallery, “Where Art Dances with Nature,” 98 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC. Call (828) 456-1940 or go online to www.twigsandleaves.com.

for all art enthusiasts! While strolling down to Frog Level, you can’t miss Grace Cathey’s Sculpture Garden and Gallery.

IF YOU For more information GO contact Twigs and Leaves

Gallery at (828) 4561940 or visit The Waynesville Gallery Association online at www. waynesvillegalleryassociation.com. pg. 10

WV

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

artful living THE CURMUDGEON BY PETER LOEWER Crying Out For Justice

C

Curmudgeon walked into the General Store and said to nobody in particular, “It’s started again.” “What?” asked Storekeep, Mrs. Storekeep, and brother of Cityfella. “That ubiquitous fog, you know the allconsuming early-morning mist that ruins golf shots and shopping, especially up here on our mountain top.” The store windows that once looked out on a mountain view with trees and clouds galore now looked out on that pearly mist and shrouded the view of that little piece of heaven that was part of the newly restored salute to elegant mountain living called Grandiose Manor. The mini-estates were carved from the Asheville holdings of Grover Clampert, who made his money in the first Florida realestate wars of 1892. “You know,” said Cityfella, who presently hailed from Atlanta, “you all promised my brother that he would adjust to the climate here. After all, we’re all only in Asheville three months a year—then it’s on to Greece, Madrid, London, Peru, and our own beloved LA.” “Thank heavens for that,” said Curmudgeon to himself as he stirred his freshly-

corner of the world, and setting his cup on their newly installed kitchen table made from one piece of hemlock left over from brewed coffee that warmed his the Big Bang that blew up agechilly hand. old hemlocks up at the Joyce “We are,” Cityfella’s Brother Kilmer Park he reached for added, “fortunate to be at home Storekeep’s hand and shook it here in Grandiose Manor, not for all he was worth. only because of our wonderful “In fact,” he continued, condo but for the fly-casting Illustration by Peter Loewer “I think it’s time we resurpond and the Labyrinth, all those rected the Big Balloon that we meandering footpaths, the waterhad planned on flying to Raleigh and give falls, the woods, and our beloved Koi pond.” them a piece of our minds. The world is just He paused to stir his coffee and spooned beginning to cry out for justice, not only for more twice-filtered fresh cane sugar into the teachers, but for miss-tried convicts, and small mix, “but I do wonder about that monster businesses that are continually losing out to who works daily in the center of the maze and big businesses, and not to forget saving small preaches that drivel about redemption and parks and big parks and building needed roads Mother Crete.” and bridges, in fact getting this great country “We all must work,” said Mrs. Storekeep, patched back up and once again, leading the “at whatever job we do best, and you must world in our continued fight for democracy--” admit our local minotaur is smashing in that And you could almost hear the mightioutfit made from imported wool collected in est Big Band in the world, revving up the the Ecuadorian Mountains and loomed in that buglers, and bringing tempo to the drums-charming little shop in Biltmore Village.” not to mention the sound of the pumps filling Mr. Storekeep stopped stacking shelves that old hot-air balloon with the gasses of the and began to butter his toast made from justatmosphere so it could once again fly over delivered bread, baked to perfection in Johnthe mountains, over the Continental Divide, son City and trucked over to WNC so folks down infamous I-40 and on to the capitol of never got hungry as they talked and talked the great state of North Carolina, and take about saving the environment. government back from the Unjust and give it “You know,” said the Postman as he back to the people! opened the front door of the store, “it’s really damp out there!” Suddenly, Curmudgeon was consumed with a desperate love for their small little

Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch

Y

You’all gather round now! Wonder what it is like to be a pillar of the community and live where, according to Dale Jones, “tie dye meets bow tie?” There will be laughter and secrets and awesome characters to meet in these personal stories told live in the Moth tradition. The fifth season of Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch continues on Saturdays in the Rhino Courtyard of Pack Place. July 5 stories will celebrate Latino Day, and honor the memory of civic activist Russell Boston Hilliard, Sr. Music, art, and stories will be presented by Carolina Silicel, Sandra Garcia, Althea Gonzalez, Sarah Nunez, and Victor Paladino. On July 12 Tim Lowry, national teller from Charleston, tells southern stories with an enigmatic smile. Appearing with Tim will be Shanita Jackson of Hendersonville, a teenager who wowed audiences last summer with her personal tales in rhyme. July 19 features stories from Emoke B’Racz, Hector Diaz, Howard Hanger, and Rezaz Setayesh. This performance is in commemoration of two staunch supporters of Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch, Dale Jones and Trina Mullen, both members of the Downtown Area Residential Neighbors whose passing during 2013 left a large void of home-

12 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

BY

Althea Gonzalez

Tim Lowry

SARAH LARSON

Howard Hanger

town spirit and support for stories. The Festival Kaleidoscope: Celebrating Diversity concludes Saturday, July 26 with stellar performances by members of the Asheville Storytelling Circle. The fun begins with a story in hula by Kaleo Wheeler, after which we will travel the mountains through homespun yarns, some of them personal stories and others folk tales, legends and myths. IF YOU Stories begin at 10:30 and are held GO rain on shine in the Rhino Courtyard

of Pack Place in downtown Asheville. Entrances are on Biltmore Ave. and Market St. Stories are free to the public.

Readings at Blue Ridge Books Saturday, July 5 at 3 p.m. Rose Senehi will read from and discuss her newest novel, Dancing on Rocks. A network of memories, secrets, and mutual dependencies twist through an isolated community of 112 at the foot of Chimney Rock State Park. This portrait of a small NC mountain town reveals how, by sticking together over the generations, the shopkeepers, innkeepers, and park people have kept this iconic village alive. Saturday, July 12 at 3 p.m. Lin Stepp will read from the sixth book in her Smoky Mountain series, Down by the River. The series is comprised of upbeat, sentimental contemporary romance novels. In Down by the River, recently widowed Grace Conley impulsively decides to buy a beautiful old bed and breakfast in the quiet mountain town of Townsend, TN. Her plan to sell and leave her family home in Nashville and to renovate and reopen an old Victorian inn in the Smokies, simply shocks and scandalizes her family.

IF YOU GO: Blue Ridge Books, 152 S.

Main St., Waynesville. (828) 456-6000, www.blueridgebooksnc.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

captivating performances

T

Asheville Lyric Opera Presents South Pacific

The classic story of South Pacific, after traversing the spectrum of art forms and earning success as a novel, a broadway musical, and a film, will debut this month in Asheville as an opera. The book, Tales of the South Pacific, was published in 1947 and premiered as a musical on Broadway before being adapted for film in 1958. Emerging as an immediate hit upon it’s release, the musical eventually ran for 1,925 performances and is now revered as one of America’s most successful plays, winning ten Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The plot centers on an American nurse stationed on a South Pacific island during World War II who falls in love with a handsome French plantation owner. Conflict arrises when the nurse discovers the frenchman is a father to mixed-race children and begins to struggle with her prejudice. A secondary romance, between a U.S. lieutenant and a young Polynesian woman, provides the framework for more internal conflict as the lieutenant fears the social repercussions of marrying his Asian bride. The issue of racial prejudice is candidly explored throughout the story and was written with the intention to challenge the beliefs

BY

pARKER DAVIS

of the American public. Upon its release across segregated, postwar America, the story incited racial controversy to which the authors were unapologetic. Asheville Lyric Opera hopes to highlight the social progress that has been achieved since the days of America’s virulent racism by capturing the parallels in the human spirit. Dr. Jon Truitt, professor of opera at University of Evansville in Indiana, will be returning to direct the production. Also returning to the ALO stage will be favorites Mark Owen Davis, Simone Vigilante and Grant Knox. Debut performances include soprano Michelle Seipel, portraying the female lead, along with music director Dr. Leslie Downs. Traditionally, musical theatre coincides with academic calendars and takes an interlude during the summer. However, Asheville Lyric Opera is following a developing trend amongst other performing arts organizations and now offers summer productions. This will be their third summer musical, following the success of Carousel in 2013 and Sound of Music in 2012. The intimacy of the Diana Wortham theater should provide an ideal setting for the evocative production, and a chance to relive one of America’s greatest musicals with the added

A

Asheville Creative Arts presents innovative theatre for children of all ages July 17-27 at NC Stage.

Mark Owen Davis

Michelle Seipel, soprano

Building on the success of ACA’s 2013 inaugural production of A Year With Frog and Toad, Artistic Director Robbie Jaeger says that, “Charlotte’s Web grows ACA’s creative vision...” Producing Director, Abby Felder says, “The book is very dear to so many generations of readers, and will be lovingly dramatized by an incredible team.”

majesty of opera. After a half-century of success, South Pacific now marks a turning point in American culture, the evolution from bigotry to tolerance, and exemplifies the all-conquering power of love within the human spirit. IF YOU South Pacific, Friday & Saturday, GO July 18 & 19 at 8 p.m., and Sunday,

July 20 at 3 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 South Pack Square, Asheville. Purchase tickets at www.dwtheatre.com/boxoffice or call (828) 257-4530. For more information about the Asheville Lyric Opera, call (828) 236-0670, or visit www.ashevillelyric.org

HART PRESENTS ROGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN’S

A Grand Night For Singing

H

Solve a Problem Like MaHART audiences get This is also a great ria,” becomes a love song for another series of a young man. dance show! favorites this month The show received rave reviews when it opened with Rogers and Off-Broadway in 1993, then transferred for a Hammerstein’s A Grand Night for successful run on Broadway and has been a hit Singing. with regional theaters ever since. HART’s production is directed by long This Tony nominated show features time HART choreographer Cord Scott, who familiar songs with new arrangements. It was sees this as a great dance show as well. His cast conceived by Tony winner Walter Bobbie, includes Alison Young, Brad Mercier, Ricky who decided to take the songs out of context Sanford, Calintha Briggs, and Carson Funk. and reinvent new situations to show how timeless and versatile the works of Rogers and Hammerstein are. For example, “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Out’a My Hair” is done with Andrews Sisters style harmonies. “Honeybun” is given a Modernaires swing. HART’s production features an all professional cast with many new faces. “How Do You

Charlotte’s Web

The show received rave reviews when it opened Off-Broadway in 1993.

This is an all professional cast with many new faces to HART’s stage and promises to be an evening of great entertainment. IF YOU Grand Night For Singing, July GO 5 at 7:30 p.m. and July 6 at 3 p.m.

Tickets: $24 for adults; $20 for seniors; students $10. Special $8 discount tickets for students for Thursdays and Sundays. Box Office hours Monday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.org Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville, NC.

Starring: Maria Buchanan, Jenson Lavallee, Allen Law, Carin Metzger, Jenni Robinson, and David Sebren.

Featuring a soundscape of live bluegrass-inspired music, puppetry and a cast of professional adult actors, children and adults will see this story about friendship, love and loss told as never before. Special discounts are available for camp and school groups of 10 or more, weekdays, and include a guide of activities for pre-and-post show fun created by honorary advisor, Lucy Hazlehurst. Charlotte’s Web: adapted by Joseph Robinette from the book by EB White; directed and choreographed by Robbie Jaeger; live music composed and performed by Jonesalee. Stage Manager, Jessica Tandy Kammerud. Costumes by Eric Grace. Musical Director / Sound Design by Gina Stewart. Lighting by Catori Swann. Sets by Gian Marco Lo Forte. Puppets by Abby Felder. Props by Chifferobe Home and Garden. A limited number of $30 VIP tickets, which include a light reception with treats for children and adults, and a chance to meet the cast, are available for the July 18 performance. Visit www.ashevillecreativearts.org IF YOU Charlotte’s Web, July 17, 23, GO and 24 at 1 p.m. Part of the NC

Stage Catalyst Series. Tickets: $10 (children 12 and younger) and groups (10 or more); $20 (adults). Contact Abby Felder at (914) 830-3000 or ashevillecreativearts@gmail.com for more details and to reserve tickets. NC Stage, 15 Stage Lane, Asheville.

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 13


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

T

S

&

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

An amazing month of music, highlighted by the welcome return of an underappreciated pop mastermind, a bevy of discs plumbing the catacombs of a band whose work set a blueprint for independents, and other assorted fun stuff. Sit back and enjoy!

Tina and the B-Sides Barricade Movement Records

Longtime fixtures of the Minneapolis music scene, Tina and the B-Sides — aka Tina & the B-Side Movement — had a solid fifteen years that ended, oddly enough, with the 1998 release of their only major label effort. A one-off 2009 reunion gig seemed to have reignited the spark for band leader Tina Schlieskie. She’s brought back the band with a renewed passion and musical purpose. Barricade is a solid 52 minutes of good old soulful rock, inspired by all the right influences (classic Stones, Sam Cooke, and Aretha all come quickly to mind), but able to stand easily on its own. Numbers like the straight ahead rocker “Call My Name” and the more experimental “More Than That” are the two obvious standouts, but with rare exception Barricades stays its course and delivers a variety of sounds and textures. The Dobro led “Let Me Make It Up to You” offers a welcome change of pace, while the Pink Floyd-like psychedelic passion of “Sweet Release” sounds entrenched in another era (which is, to my ears, a good thing). Bob Marley’s “Guava Jelly,” the album’s lone cover, features some lovely multilayered harmonies but does seem a bit miscast among the originals. Yet that’s a pretty minor quibble on my part, and more a matter of preference than a criticism. Barricades is my first exposure to the band — one can only squeeze so much listening in a lifetime — but, based on its gusto, diversity, and solid songwriting, it certainly won’t be my last. ****

REM Complete Unplugged Sessions

Warner Brothers

When REM made their first unplugged appearance in 1991 they were on the outer edge of a creative and commercial peak, still riding the high wave of 1988’s Green, and promoting the recently released Out of Time. Fast forward to their second appearance — a scant decade later — and the entire landscape had changed. Drummer Bill Berry is retired, the band’s reputation as a critical favorite has been tarnished by a series of weak efforts and changing trends, as what was once cutting edge is now passé. Yet even with that, the Complete Unplugged Sessions, which combines and expands the previous MTV release, is essential. Originally released as a quadruplevinyl Record Store Day exclusive (then later a

14 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

C

double-CD set) the two shows offer a glimpse at how nimbly REM was able to reinvent themselves. The earlier show, which adds half a dozen tracks to the original release, is most noted for the band’s willingness to toy with the set list, covering The Trogg’s lilting “Love Is All Around” with real affection while tossing in a pair of REM songs (“Fretless” and “Rotary 11”) that were initially regulated to “B” side status. As for rediscovery, the band replaces the faux studio rap of “Radio Song” with a stripped down version carrying far more punch. The 2001 appearance is equally strong; with drummer Joey Waronker replacing Berry — and touring stalwarts Scott McCaughey and Ken Stringfellow on board — the sound is sturdy and rich, bringing new life to older gems such as “Cuyahoga” (a joyful highlight) and “South Central Rain.” When Michael Stipe segues “Country Feedback” into a slowed-to-a-crawl-insertion of “Like a Rolling Stone” the moment becomes electrifying, evidencing the plucky go-forbroke attitude that typifies REM at their best. It’s another example of how REM consistently balanced their indy band creed with unparalleled commercial success. Like all great and enduring groups, they had their peaks and valleys, but as the Complete Unplugged Sessions aptly demonstrates, when the occasion called for it they nearly always delivered the goods. ****

REM Complete Rarities, Warner Bros. 19882011 Warner Brothers

Packaged similar to the 2006 set collecting the early I.R.S. years, this mammoth (131 tracks!) set might not have the daring of the band’s blossoming years, but what it lacks in swagger it sure as heck compensates for in sheer overindulgence. Despite it’s claim, it doesn’t quite include every oddity recorded during those years — it misses a handful of obscure instrumental versions available only on vinyl, as well as a few Record Store Day exclusives and live tracks given over to various charity collections. But such lapses are more evident of the band’s prodigious output than laziness on the part of Warner Brothers in putting this set together. It is of course aimed at the obsessed collector (guilty as charged!) but just looking at the set list brings back recollections of other times and places. However, the Complete Warner Bros. 1988-2011 is no mere trip down memory lane, but rather a stunning reclamation of the band’s reputation. REM bridged the gap between post punk and what later become known as college

rock, and they did so with unswerving integrity, musical insight, and a sense of adventurous fun that I doubt we’ll ever see again. *****

Bob Mould Beauty & Ruin Merge Records

There have always been three distinct aspects to Bob Mould’s career: the Midwestern punk Husker Du era, the blistering three piece power rock of Sugar, and his more subdued but no less penetrating solo work. While certain strands have run through all three, anyone familiar with Husker’s Zen Arcade might have a hard time believing the same artist could create the subdued ambience of Workbook. That stylistic tension has always sustained Mould’s career, and nowhere is it more evident than on Beauty & Ruin, his tenth, and quite possibly best, solo album. Written and recorded following the death of his father — whose misfortunes and addictions have always weighed heavily on Mould (himself a recovering alcoholic) and the songs he writes — Beauty & Ruin is an emotional powerhouse, a record that can at times demand more than the listener might be able to give, but in the end is worth it. While 2012’s Silver Age found Mould charging into his sixth decade with renewed vigor, here he sets aside such declarations and looks backwards toward the future. Anchored by his three piece band — bassist Jason Narducy, Superchunk drummer Jon Wurster, and Mould’s own powerful voice and thrashing if not discordant guitar playing, Beauty & Ruin is a wonderfully well-rounded effort, brimming with conviction, emotional force, and taut as wire songwriting. The opening measured pulse of “Low Season” hearkens back to Mould’s earliest solo work, but for the most part, the songs here veer to the heavy, stringing together, the serpentine power punk of Sugar, with the scorching rapid fire of Husker Du. And while the material may be, by nature, grave, the ebullient force of Mould’s delivery — he’s here to ROCK dammit! — keep things on an even keel. “Forgiveness,” in which Mould addresses his own mortality while recognizing how alike he and his father were, is as confessional a song as he’s ever written, and among his best. But, even the more upbeat numbers, especially “I Don’t Know You Anymore” and “Tomorrow Morning,” are couched in this new found self awareness. This is the true strength of this album, that Mould can lay bare his own emotional pain without ever wallowing in it. In a career that has always been remarkably consistent and bereft of miscalculations, Beauty & Ruin stands tall, a potent link between the damage of his past and the yet to be determined promise of his future. **** ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

The Fresh & Onlys House of Spirits Mexican Summer Music

House of Spirits, the fourth album from The Fresh & Onlys, takes them further away from the joyful mayhem of their roots and closer to a more measured tempo, one that better suits their new material and focuses on essence over enthusiasm. That’s not to say it’s any less appealing, only that the band — whose membership seems to have settled on Tim Cohen (better known with Black Fiction), Shayde Shartin, Kyle Gibson, and Wymond Miles — have continued the evolution that began with 2012’s Long Slow Dance. It’s a smart move on their part and one that should increase the band’s following. There’s still more than adequate jangle in the guitars, and while the quirky psychedelia that sustains their first two albums has been largely cast aside, House of Spirits can hardly be considered mainstream. Cohen’s voice has never sounded better — he seems to have mastered harmonizing wistful longing with dreamlike serenity — and the band capably switches gears as needed. “Madness” is a near perfect snippet of Brian Wilson-like subliminal pop, while the lay about charms of “I’m Awake” and “Ballerina” seem ideal for a hazy summer afternoon. Match that with the more direct rock of the feedback driven “Hummingbird” and the exquisite delight of “April Fools” and you’ve got a 45-minute gem of well thought out psychedelic pop that engages both the head and heart with equal authority. ****

Liam Finn The Nihilist

Yep Roc Records

Depending on your perspective, Liam Finn is either blessed or burdened with being the offspring of one of the finest song crafters of the past three decades. And, while he doesn’t quite share his father’s (Neil Finn of Crowded House and Split Enz fame) knack for insidiously catchy melodies attached to surprisingly deep lyrics, he, like his dad, is more than willing to ditch what comes easily and take a few risks. Or in this case, a lot of them. The Nihilist, his third full-length album, is that rare bird in which high ambition compensates for the occasional failing. It’s by no means a seamless effort, but you have to give Finn props just for trying. Finn abandons his customary classic pop sound in favor of construction that is unexpectedly quirky and at times off putting. Built over a series of bleary late night sessions, Finn produced, engineered, and mixed the album while playing a variety of instruments, ranging from bass, drums, various exot-

T

Dead Fingers at Jack of the Wood

BY

HEATHER WEST

The Dead Fingers play Asheville during their national headlining tour celebrating the release of Big Black Dog on sister labels Pipeandgun and Communicating Vessels.

Since 2012’s eponymous debut on Big Legal Mess Records, Dead Fingers have had some time to take a step back and take stock of all of the dynamic changes their lives have undergone over the past few years. As new parents, Kate and Taylor have added a whole new perspective to their road weary travelogues and broke-beat folk/ country/blues hybrid, that speaks as much to their growing maturity as artists as it does to their innate ability to put their lives squarely in the fabric of their songs. “The album features lush instrumentation (blues guitar! harmonica!) behind pretty harmonic duets and alternating solos. Husband and wife each play guitar and sing, forging a more collaborative air than that of, say, She & Him. The melodies and lyrics aren’t surprising, but the beauty and emotion they carry certainly are. Much of the album recalls the collaborative work of John Prine and Iris Dement.” ~ Oxford American From Taylor’s earliest days as a lo-fi axe slinger — shredding J. Mascis by way of Johnny Thunders riffage on You Know That

ic guitars, keyboards, synthesizers, strings, and whatever else seemed to be laying around the Brooklyn studio he commandeered. The result is a stream of consciousness assemblage that lands somewhere between prime era Prince (The Nihilist almost feels like Finn’s tribute to the Purple One) and latter day Wilco. The R&B ballad “Snug as F*ck” even evokes Prince’s trademark falsetto, as Finn coo coos his way back into the graces of a former paramour. “Helena Bonham Carter” pays tribute to the actress — herself no stranger to character hopping and artistic idiosyncrasy — with a torching dose of piano driven frenzy that comes closest to mimicking his dad’s pop sensibilities. Not everything works so well; “Burn Up the Road” sounds like Coldplay light, while “Dreamy Droop” suffers from a weak melodic pulse and uncertain arrangement. But, while those slip-ups slightly derail the overall effect of the album, it’s almost charming to hear Finn shoot for the moon, even when he misses. The Nihilist is clearly a studio album, as Finn meticulously piles on layers of sonic ambience, and in truth it’s more than a bit messy and unfocused. But it’s also the work of someone willing to take chances (in that regards it reminded me of Beck) and not be dragged down by his past work or familial heritage.

Summer’s Coming — to his time spent touring with Conor Oberst and the Mystic Valley Band, to wrangling cosmic American music out of Mexican moorings, it’s easy to see why they needed some time away from the stage to think about a life removed from rock and roll. Kate’s skills stem from her lifelong tutelage in one of the most gifted musical families the Magic City has ever produced alongside her siblings Maria and Macey Taylor. From penning acoustic remedies for heartbroken scribes like the elegant “Pomp & Circumstance,” to the playful pretzel wordplay of “Twisted,” and the metaphysical longing of “Still Haven’t Been Satisfied,” there’s enough existential wisdom for people twice their age to revel in. Listeners will be struck by the standard Dead Fingers six string whiplash, making this one of the most exciting albums in either of their respective catalogs. Documenting their peculiar form of domestic bliss in tracks like “Shoom Doom Babba Labba” and “Free Tonight,” Big Black Dog stands as a new chapter in the careers of two of Birmingham’s most talented musicians and their struggle to find a balance between their art and home life and all of the mixed up semiotics that lie between the two.

Flawed as it might be, in its own perverse way it establishes Liam Finn as his own man, and one whose career is, irrespective of the last name, worth paying attention to. ***

Roddy Frame Seven Dials AED Records

How great is it to have Roddy Frame back? Actually he never fully went away. Since the 1995 disbanding of my beloved Aztec Camera, he’s kept a low profile, releasing a handful of (deliberately) lacking in ambition albums via his website, composing soundtracks for exceedingly obscure film projects, and dabbling a bit towards reformatting the Aztec Camera catalog. Following his last album by nearly eight years, Seven Dials is among the strongest collection of songs he’s ever assembled, matching the best of his former band, and demonstrating with startling clarity that, three decades into the game, his gift for intellectual pop is as keen and resourceful as ever. Backed by Edwyn Collins and Sebastian Lewsley, Frame covers a lot of ground with an economy of effort. There’s the trademark

Kate and Taylor are the Dead Fingers.

Listen to tracks from Big Black Dog at www.deadfingers.com IF YOU Dead Fingers perform live, GO Tuesday, July 22 at Jack of

the Wood, 95 Patton Ave. in Asheville. For details call (828) 2525445 or visit www.jackofthewood.com

pairing of melancholy sentiment and gorgeous melody (“From a Train” and “Rear View Mirror”), Frame’s primitive but engaging harmonica work (“Forty Days of Rain”), and plenty of the jangle pop and irresistible hooks that seem to roll off Frame’s tongue with disarming ease. “Postcard” veers perilously close to the world of cheeky pop (a not infrequent tendency for Frame), but the stunning guitar solo, recalling his masterwork song “Oblivious,” keeps things in check. Throughout Seven Dials, Frame sounds as if he’s reflecting on the past, but he does so with gratitude, clarity, and not a hint of regret. In a fair and just world, Aztec Camera would have been huge, and Roddy Frame a wealthy man. But he purposefully opted to never fully engage the music industry, only occasionally touring and presenting Aztec Camera as a band whose line-up changed with the wind. As such, he’ll always have the respect of those of us who admire the iconoclast; artists who follow their muse and let the rest fall where it may. Anyone who loves impossible to pigeonhole, guitar driven literate pop, delivered with passion, intelligence, and talent aplenty, would do well diving into the amazing work of Roddy Frame. ****1/2

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 15


R A P I D

August 9-10 Saturday 9-8 ~ Sunday 9-5 Sourwood Idol Contest • Friday, August 8 • 7-10 200 Vendors! More than 30,000 people from all over America!

Arts & Crafts Children’s Arena Specialty Items Great Food Wonderful Music Dancing

Downtown Black Mountain

FREE ADMISSION

www.sourwoodfestival.com

Honey and Bee Demonstrations Gourmet Sourwood Honey

No Alcohol • Call 1-800-669-2301 for more information

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

pg. 32

DC

Your Jersey and Shadowbox Custom Framing Experts

Located inside Omni Grove Park Inn 290 Macon Avenue Asheville

Hand thrown and hand carved “Arts and Crafts Collection” Narcissus vase, 7” tall, by Asheville artist Julie Calhoun Roepnack

~ Local and Regional Handmade Crafts Since 1984 ~ TOLL - FREE

(800) 692-2204 • (828) 254-2068

www.galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC pg. 32

Ng

1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway

1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com . 32 Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6 HK

pg

16 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

R I V E R

A R T S

arts & crafts 42nd Annual Village Art and Craft Fair

T

The Village Art and Craft Fair takes place August 2 & 3 on the grounds of the Cathedral of all Souls in Biltmore Village.

BY

SHARI RIENDEAU

In its 42nd year, the fair, sponsored by New Morning Gallery and Bellagio Art-to-Wear, continues a long tradition of bringing high-quality crafts to Biltmore Village. The fair hosts 114 artists from 16 states, representing the full spectrum of craft media - jewelry, ceramic, wood, fiber, metals, twodimensional art and more. The craft fair is a great opportunity to encounter new artists (26 are firsttime exhibitors), and to talk with crafters one-on-one. 30 artists are from WestVisitors are sure to find new treasures along with a few old favorites. ern North Carolina. Most exhibitors are not represented at New Morning Gallery, so visitors are sure to find new treasures along with a few old favorites. Over the years, our reputation as one of the finest craft fairs in the area has spread (along with the ubiquitous cat posters and T-shirts). Thousands of shoppers from all over the southeast arrive to stroll through the fair, discovering unique gifts for friends, family and themselves! Beginning with the 9th year, a cat has been in every poster design. John Cram, the fairs coordinator, says, “The public is always anticipating what the design will be as they anticipate the fair itself.” This year a long time favorite designer, Sherry Vintson has created the fanciful art work, her 11th craft fair design! In the early 1970’s, she also designed New Morning Gallery’s logo. Fair hours are Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday noon to 5 p.m, rain or shine. There is no admission fee. Homemade food and refreshments are available at church sponsored concession booths, with proceeds benefiting the Cathedral’s outreach program. IF YOU The 42nd Annual Village Art and Craft Fair takes GO place August 2 & 3 on the grounds of the Cathedral

of All Souls in Historic Biltmore Village. The New Morning Gallery is located at 7 Boston Way, in Asheville’s Biltmore Village. For more details please call (828) 274-2831.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

42 Village Art &

fine arts & crafts

J

ND ANNUAL

The 67th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands

Join us at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, July 17-20 and October 16-19.

BY

Craft Fair August 2 –3

ApRIL NANCE

The July show features blacksmithing, natural dyeing, basket making and woodcarving. Nearly 200 juried artists Beginning on Friof the Southern Highland day during each Craft Craft Guild will be selling Fair, mountain musicians works of clay, metal, wood, perform live on the arena Linda Azar jewelry, fiber, paper, natural stage. Since the first fair in materials, leather and mixed media. With styles Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has ranging from traditional to contemporary, the been woven into the fabric of the Craft Fair Fairs showcase the rich talent, diversity and experience. From old time to bluegrass, this craft mastery of Guild members. tradition is kept alive today. The Craft Fairs have a proud tradition and history of excellence by representing the IF Southern Highland Craft Guild, a non-profit YOU Craft Fair of the Southern organization formed in 1930. The Fairs began GO Highlands, at the US Cellular in 1948 as a way to provide a regional market Center, 87 Haywood St. in for the mountain craftspeople. Since that time, downtown Asheville. July 17-20. Hours: the Craft Fairs have set the standard for fine 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. Thursday – Saturday, and craft shows across the country. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults Each year in July and October craft collec$8, children under 12 free. Group discounts tors and gallery owners from across the counavailable. For more information, call (828) try come to Asheville to see the show. They 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org. are joined by western North Carolina residents and tourists who appreciate the quality and history of the show, knowing it is an ideal destination for shopping and inspiration. Nearly 20,000 The 67th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern visitors to the Highlands takes place at the US Cellular CenFairs each year ter in downtown Asheville. invest in the regional and JULY 17-20 DEMONSTRATIONS local economies Rita deMaintenon, of Fletcher, will demonwhile supstrate hairpin, broomstick, Tunisian and thread porting artists lace, and give visitors the chance to try out the working in the various techniques. Appalachian mountains, and Ronnie McMahan Carla Fillipelli, of Asheville, will share various demonstrates woodcarving. by spending a stages of the basket making process July 17-19. summer or fall Ronnie McMahan, of Black Mountain, will weekend in beautiful Asheville, NC. demonstrate woodcarving as a wildlife artist. Several new Guild members will be Guest craftsperson Lenny Moore will be outside exhibiting at the Craft Fair for the first time the U.S. Cellular Center at the forge demonin July including Matt Kelleher (clay), Ursula strating the craft of using heat to transform Goebels-Ellis (clay), Kim Thompson (jewelry), metal into art and functional objects. Erin Janow (clay), Robin Ford (fiber), Linda Azar (jewelry), Catherine Murphy (metal), Sandra Rowland, of Murphy, will demonstrate and Zan Barnes (clay). For a complete list of the process of using sunprint paint, found exhibitors visit www.craftguild.org. materials such as leaves, and sunlight to create In addition to providing a retail market for unique patterns and designs on fabric. juried members, the Guild hosts craft demonChildren’s Activities. Arts For Life will provide strations during the Fairs. A strong part of the an opportunity for kids and adults to experiGuild’s mission is to educate the public about ence hands-on craft activities. the history of crafts in this region, various craft techniques, and an appreciation for fine crafts.

SAT 10-7

SUN12-5

A High Quality Art & Craft Fair held on the grounds of the Cathedral of All Souls 120 Exhibitors Free Admission Rain or Shine

ASHEVILLE , NC

2014

BILTMORE VILLAGE

CRAFT FAIR T-SHIRTS $17.95 each, Sm to XL available in Carolina Blue, Gold Nugget, Cardinal Red and Black. Purchase at New Morning Gallery or by calling 828.274.2831.

pg. 32

BV

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands Demonstrations & Entertainment

JULY 18-20 ENTERTAINMENT

Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of scheduled craft demonstrations and performances.

Friday, July 18 11 a.m. – Ric Ledford & Reems Creek Incident. An Asheville based bluegrass band that special-

izes in a wide variety of traditional, not-so-traditional and original bluegrass music. 1 p.m. – Cane Creek Bluegrass Band. Musicians from Upstate South Carolina specializing in bluegrass and bluegrass gospel. 3 p.m. – Hot Duck Soup. Ladies and gentlemen, prepare yourselves for a jolt The Moore Brothers Band perform Sunday, July 20. to your funny bones. The Hot Duck Soup Novelty Vintage Jazz Band is about to assault your senses with wild and zany Sunday, July 20 tunes from the teens, twenties, and thirties! 11 a.m. – Mountain Friends. High energy American swing-grass. This is a strong team Saturday, July 19 that combines fine musicianship and pure joy, 11 a.m. – Southern Crescent Bluegrass. This giving audiences a highly entertaining show. band has been together for more than seven years. They play traditional bluegrass and occasionally country or rock with a bluegrass touch, along with some originals. They are a six piece band, with four members native to WNC. 1 p.m. – Split Rail. A great continuity of sound that can only be achieved from years of playing together. Strong vocal harmony is their trademark. 3 p.m. – Carol Rifkin and Friends. Original and traditional mountain music, their fine harmonies blending in an old timey style heavily influenced by the elders of the region, family, friends and diverse interests.

1 p.m. – Buncombe Turnpike. A variety of heartfelt tunes ranging from traditional and contemporary bluegrass to gospel and Buncombe Turnpike originals. With their crowd pleasing demeanor, seasoned musicianship, and powerful vocals, the band has made a name for themselves among traditional and contemporary listeners alike.

3 p.m. – Moore Brothers Band. Trio of musicians from Hickory who play Americana, Blues, Newgrass, Grass, Country, Jazz & Gospel Flavors.

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 17


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

8th Annual Laugh Your Asheville Off

pH

T

Laugh Your Asheville Off is the largest non-competitive comedy festival in the southeast. The five-day multi-venue festival spotlights more than 60 of the nation’s funniest up-and-coming and established comics. The comics have hopes of turning the heads of the major TV network casting agents, talent bookers, and comedy club owners that have traveled to the festival to discover stand-up comedy’s next crop of rising talent.

“We’ve received seven years of support from Asheville and we’ve been embraced by the national comic community, and have grown into one of the largest comedy festivals in the country. In return, we hope to continually raise the bar of world class entertainment while keeping ticket prices reasonable,” said Charlie Gerencer, festival producer and production company executive. Since submissions began this year, several hundred comedians from all over the country submitted stand-up clips hoping to secure one of the 60 performer slots.

O

BY

KELLY DENSON

The festival kicks off Tuesday, August 12, with the “Local Laughs for Brother Wolf” charity show at The Altamont Theatre. Proceeds from the show will be donated to Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. Individual show pricing: $16 IF YOU ticket. Cosmo Festival Passes are GO $66-$86 for access to all shows

(excluding “Local Laughs for Brother Wolf”). For more information, to purchase tickets, and to see the full lineup, visit www.LaughYourAshevilleOff.com

U L B

C

J T

M E

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com H S

S

K V

A

PH

C

Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Links. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071.

18 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Fabulous & Unique Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Asheville Gallery of Art Exhibits

W

WORLDS APART

Peggy Horne Taylor is a colorist whose subject is light. As a student at Cape Cod School of Art, in Provincetown, Massachusetts, she fell in love with painting on location. Peggy began painting more than 30 years ago and is inspired not only by the scene, but especially by the effects of color and light. She lived internationally for many years and has painted in numerous locations worldwide. She works in both

Painting by Peggy Horne Taylor

oil and pastel, layering her colors to achieve a scintillating effect. Peggy is the Asheville Gallery of Art featured artist for July 2014. Her exhibit, “Worlds Apart,” depicts places, people, and things she has encountered during her travels. Her opening reception takes place July 4, from 5-8 p.m., and will include several works that celebrate Americana and the American flag.

REFLECTIONS OF SUMMER Exhibition of works by Joyce Schlapkohl featuring landscapes, flowers, still lifes, and animals. Joyce is the Asheville Gallery of Art featured artist for August 2014. She transforms ordinary images into reflections of color and light. Opening reception, Friday, August 1 from 5-8 p.m. The exhibit will be on display August 1-31. View works by Joyce at www.joycepaints.com Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in IF YOU downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard GO Park. For more details, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Jce Schlapkohl Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown H

pg. 18

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain “Summer Rain” by Rick Hills

pg. 18

N

Porchoir painting with handmade bark frame

1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

pg. 18

U

MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

Cedar Hill Studios, Waynesville

pg. 32

MS

pg. 10

WC

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 19


R

HS

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock

Henderson County Events

J

July 1 - October 24 – Bearfootin’, a public art display featuring fiberglass outdoor bear sculptures decorated in different themes. On the sidewalks of Main Street. (828) 233-3216

Enjoy a guided tour of Carl Sandburg’s home.

July 2-6 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents the classic musical My Fair Lady, Wed.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Wed., Thurs., Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m. (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008

ST IN

HW

Y

MA

LE

ON

V IL

LO

N.

HE

ST

HENDERSONVILLE - 28792 PA TT

AS

CU

ST

ST SEV

S IX T H

HM

ELL ST

EL CASEW

D

GR

OV

E

ST

GREE N V IL L

S P R IN G S T

T W H IT T E D S

ST

ST

E HW

W H IT E

S PA R T

A N BU

RG HW Y

July 11-13 – Carolina Mountain Ribfest, held at the Western North Carolina Agricultural Center in Fletcher. Professional barbecue rib vendors from all over the country, live entertainment, amusement rides, arts & crafts, and more. Fri. 4-11 p.m.; Sat. 11-11 p.m.; Sun. 11-7 p.m. Adults $7 (cash only). Children under 12 free with paid adult. Bring a chair. No coolers, backpacks, outside food or beverages. No pets allowed. (828) 894-8847 July 12 – Chalk It Up! Main Street. Sidewalk chalk art contest, all day. 6 blocks of colorful drawings by artists of all ages. 176 Rain dates July 19 & 26. (828) 697-6393 July 12 – Historic Village of Flat Rock Home Tour. Tour five private homes. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Advance tickets $25; day of the tour $30. (828) 698-9380 or (828) 698-0030

Y

HS

L ST

HR

D AV IS

HEBRON RD

July 10 – Henderson County Library presents Todd Holder, Jazz pianist, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. (828) 697-4725

ST

BA R N W

G ROVE

T K IN G S

T M A IN S

H ST

N ST

ST

CHURC

ON

IN G T O

ST

LY P

W ASH

NG

D ST

E ST

TTE

T IC

MMI

JU S

FLE

WHI

VE

ALLEN

July 3 – Team ECCO Ocean Center & Aquarium Concert series featuring Franklin Keel, cellist extraordinaire. The Melody Room at Two Guys Pizza at 7 p.m. $10. (828) 6928386

July 4 & 5 – Mountaineer Antique Auto Club Car Show, WNC Agricultural Center Fairgrounds, Fletcher. (828) 687-1414 or (828) 254-8681

HP

F IR S T A

July 2-27 – Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown presents the classic farce Boeing, Boeing. Wed.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m. (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008

July 4 – Fireworks display. View from downtown Hendersonville and near the intersection of Hwy. 25 and Hwy. 276. The fireworks will not be visible from Jackson Park. (828) 697-4884

HL

AV E

L IL

FH

VE

HC

T H IR D AV E

FLAT ROCK - 28726

HA

HG

AV E

VE F IF T H A F O RT H

ENT

64

K A N U GA R D

64

J U S T IC E S T

S

Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. Visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

F L E M M IN G S T

AV E E IG H T H

ARTS & CULTURE IN HENDERSONVILLE

July 2 – Henderson County Library presents Rohn Jewell, acoustic guitar playing classical and contemporary rock music at 6:30 p.m. (828) 697-4725

225

July 12 – Jump Into the Park at Carl Sandburg Home. Family fun; activity stations, live performances, demonstrations and free house tours. 10-3 p.m. in Flat Rock. (828) 693-4178 July 12 – Concert in the Park, featuring Steve Weems & Caribbean Cowboys playing beach music. Fletcher Community Park. 6-8 p.m. Free, bring a chair. (828) 687-0751 July 12 & 13 – Asheville Gun & Knife Show, WNC Agricultural Center Event Center. (828) 687-1414 or 770-267-0989 July 16 - August 24 – Flat Rock Playhouse presents the epic pop opera Miss Saigon. Wed-Sat 8 p.m.; Thurs., Sat. & Sun. 2 p.m., Flat Rock. (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008 July 17, August 21 & September 18 – Rhythm & Brews Concert featuring The Fritz, Azalea. Parking on King Street between 3rd & 4th Avenues, 6-9 p.m. Free, bring a chair. (828) 233-3216 July 18 & 19 – Asheville Invitational Horse Show, WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher. (919) 365-5149 FH

July 23 – Folkmoot Festival at Blue Ridge Community College, 2 p.m., colorfully costumed traditional dancers and continued on page 21

20 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11


R A P I D

R I V E R

A R T S

HENDERSONVILLE

MEHRI & COMPANY OF NEW YORK

Art in the Park…ing Lot

Estate & Designer Jewelry

A

Art MoB Studios and Marketplace will host a local art and jewelry show on July 12. Local artists will display and sell their work in the categories of painting, jewelry, photography, and pottery. This event is held the second Saturday of each month through September. “This is a wonderful opportunity to not only purchase uniquely crafted items, but to also meet the designers behind the work,” said Michele Sparks, owner of Art MoB.

Canvas & Corks

BYOB Painting Parties

Art in the Park...ing Lot 2nd Saturdays

124 4th Ave. East ~ Hendersonville ~

IF YOU Saturday, July 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the GO parking lot of Art MoB Studios & Marketplace,

124 4th Avenue East, Hendersonville. More details at (828) 693-4545, or visit www.artmobstudios.com.

Art & Fine Craft Classes

80+ Local Artists

828-693-4545 www.artmobstudios.com HM

for the

Free Concerts & Dances

M

AMERICAN SURVIVOR

MUSIC ON MAIN STREET

Free concerts are held every Friday through August 15. Plus, the Hendersonville Antique Car Club hosts a Classic Car Show. Great fun for the entire family! Friday, July 4 – Tom Brown / One Man Band. Enjoy the concert and fireworks (at dusk). Friday, July 11 – The Night Crawlers (oldies rock).

Unsurpassed craftsmanship brought to you from all corners of the world.

Friday, July 18 – Deano and the Dreamers (oldies rock & beach music). Friday, July 25 – Sound Investment (oldies rock)

Home Accessories • Silk Flower Arrangements Gifts • 26 years in the same location

96TH ANNUAL STREET DANCE SERIES Mountain heritage bluegrass music, clogging and square dancing every Monday from 7-9 p.m. through August 11.

501 North Main Street Hendersonville ❖ (828) 693-0887

July 7 & 21 – Appalachian Fire and the Southern Connection Cloggers.

Mon.-Fri. 10-5; Sun. 1-5; Closed Saturday

July 14 & 28 – Bobby and Blue Ridge Tradition, and the J. Creek Cloggers. IF YOU Bring a chair. No pets, alcoholic beverages or GO coolers allowed. Seating area opens after 5:30 p.m.

Check our our Brand New Archery Equipment

Early admission is prohibited. Concerts take place at the Visitor Center, 201 S. Main St. in Hendersonville, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Presented by the Henderson County Tourism Development Authority. More details at 1-800-828-4244 or (828) 6939708. Visit www.historichendersonville.org.

Blue Ribbon Framing

Over 90 Name Brands

Quality. Service. Selection. Since 1986

Made in America by Local Craftsmen

Owners: Bruce and Melissa Maurer

‘Hendersonville Events’ cont’d. from pg. 20

Professional Custom Framing for Your Pictures and Memorabilia

musicians from different countries. Live music and dance. Adults $30; Students/Faculty $15; Children under 12 free, Flat Rock. (828) 452-2997 July 31 - August 3 & 7-9 – Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown presents Music on the Rock: The Songs of the 60s. 8 p.m., Call (828) 693-0731 or 1-866-732-8008. For more details on any of these events, please visit www.historichendersonville.org

Honoring the word of God, not the word of man.

HC

234 Main Street ~ Hendersonville 828.697.0025 Hp

www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

HR

414-a Kanuga Road, Hendersonville Mon-Fri 9-5

Sat 9-3

(828) 693-7967

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 21


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

authors ~ poetry ~ books

T

The Poet’s Voice CRAFT HEAVEN

The cusp: a potter at her wheel, wood turner at his bench, weaver and loom, blacksmith and forge, fiddler and fiddle, glass-maker and fire, writer and page.

THE WRITERS’ WORKSHOP One-day intensive classes, for any level writer, meet Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 387 Beaucatcher Rd. Registration is in advance only, by mail or register online at www.twwoa.org.

Saturday, July 12: Dialogue and Characterization with Giles Carwyn Participants will learn practical tips for creating characters with their own unique dialogue and personalities. Discussion will cover archetypical personality profiles, shortcuts for sketching minor characters, driving plot with dialogue, and using action and tension to spice up exposition. Carwyn is a novelist, screenwriter, and manuscript consultant. $75/$70 members.

Saturday, July 19: Screenplay Writing with Nathan Ross Freeman The class will receive an overview of writing for the screen, and learn how to produce a film of your script. Various formats, structures and techniques will be discussed, as well as tips on creating interesting characters and realistic dialogue. Students may bring a screenplay idea or synopsis to the class for review. Freeman has written and produced several independent feature films. $75/$70 members.

FOR MORE DETAILS call (828) 254-

8111, email writersw@gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org. The Writers’

Workshop, 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville.

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

As I prepare to teach Crafting Words at the J. C. Campbell Folk School (August 2224), I am drawn to what unites artists. How does a poet meet a photographer? With awe and respect. We share ideals: perseverance, attentiveness, desire, delight, despair, communication, and the ability to acknowledge the muse and at times, let her have her way. We have Brasstown, Penland, Black Mountain, Saluda, Hendersonville, and Asheville in close range. These communities are small heavens open to ordinary and extraordinary people. Other craft communities I’ve known are Berea, Kentucky, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. We don’t have to travel to New Mexico for turqouise and silver. (Do go for the opera!) The heavens in our vicinity are everywhere: Grove Arcade, Biltmore Village, The Arboretum, The Folk Art Center on the Parkway, and downtown Asheville. In fact, there are more venues with crafts available than there are venues without crafts. What restaurant doesn’t have a water color or photograph of a waterfall? My dermatologist’s waiting room is a gallery of photographs. It almost makes a biopsy worth the trouble (almost).

WOMEN WHO RUN WITH WOLVES

A

A group discussion of Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés’ seminal work, Women Who Run With the Wolves. Andrea Olson wanted to host a book club salon because she wanted attendees to share their thoughts as well, providing an equal opportunity for everyone to openly discuss their opinions and feelings about the book. The salons will not only involve discussion of the assigned chapters, but each evening will integrate and allow all to experience the materials in the cantadora’s way. Andrea Olson studied Depth Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute and body mythology at Tamalpa Institute. She has produced and directed performance pieces on the woman’s story in San Francisco and currently teaches movement-based expressive arts and shadow work here in Asheville. Salon held every other Wednesday, July 9 & 23, at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s.

22 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

BY

CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

This is how we are supposed to be in this world: present and in awe.

Artisans are struck with awe by the weave, Anne Lamott (Bird by Bird) center, turn, piece, and color in their work. Writers are too. All crafters share tools: line, rhythm, form, articulation, color, The Painter Dreaming content, rhythm and melody. I get melody! You don’t have to have a in the Scholar’s House dulcimer to sing. I have known clay In memory of Paul Klee and Paul Terence Freely pots to sing to me, turned bowls to call my name (oh, so quiet they are); The painter’s eye follows the relation out. a shawl at the Folk Art Center swayed His work is not to paint the visible, my way once. He says, it is to render visible. How can I leave them behind? --I carry their song to the page. Poet For such a man, art is an act of faith: means ‘maker.’ Our craft is wordPrayer the study of it, as Blake says smithing. And praise the practice; nor does he divide The Poet Dreaming in the Artist’s Making from teaching, or from theory. House: Contemporary Poems About The three are one, and in his hours of art Visual Art, published by Milkweed There shines a happiness through darkest themes, Editions in 1984, is a romp of poems As though spirit and sense were not at odds. written by observers from Florence, Italy, to Chicago. Writers enter the artA section of a four verse poem by Howard ist’s realm, hook, line and sink there. Nemerov from “Poets Dreaming In The “We make a difference in what we Artist’s House” see,” suggest editors Emilie Buchwald and Ruth Roston. There is a long tradition of literary pictorialism. Add your name to the list. There is no lack of museums, galleries, shops, I want to meet you all, writers, dentist’s offices, restaurants, or studios where dreamers, readers and listeners. We you will be welcome to observe and respond. need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

SLAM ASHEVILLE YOUTH POETRY SLAM

S

Slam Asheville Youth is a community organization that was created to give youth from Western North Carolina a platform for their voices. Through participation in monthly poetry slams and free wordshops, youth are encouraged to develop critical thinking skills, to increase their creative writing and public speaking talents, and to become more engaged community members. Malaprop’s is partnering with Slam Asheville Youth this summer to provide a space for middle schoolers and teens to be able to share their poetry in a free space. Poetry slams start at 10 on Saturday mornings. The next slams take place July 19 and August 16. Open to the public. All poets, aged 12-21, are encouraged to participate.

IF YOU Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 GO Haywood St., downtown Asheville.

For more information call (828) 2546734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

ASHLEY ENGLISH

M

Meet and speak with Ashley English, known for her website, Small Measures, and her series of books on homemade living. She will present ideas from her newest book, Handmade Gatherings: Recipes and Crafts for Seasonal Celebrations and Potluck Parties.

IF YOU GO: Sunday, July 27 at 3 p.m. at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. (828) 456-6000, www.blueridgebooksnc.com

POETRIO Sunday, July 6 at 3 p.m. Readings and signings by three poets at 3 p.m. Featured poets are Pat Riviere-Seel (Nothing Below But Air), Maryann Jennings (Remember Me As a Time of Day), and Jean Cassidy (Toward the Clearing).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

authors ~ books ~ readings Discover the History of Asheville’s Albemarle Park

N

New to Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series is Asheville’s Albemarle Park.

ture and romantic landscaping, Albemarle Park was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 and as a local historic district in 1989. Through family archives, private collections, and ephemera, Asheville’s Albemarle Park showcases the history of this significant Asheville neighborhood. Highlights of Asheville’s Albemarle Park include:

The book, written by local authors Stacy A. Merten and Robert O. Sauer, contains 200 vintage images and text that capture the community’s history. Albemarle Park was enviVintage images highlight the sioned as a pictur• The Historic Rehistoric community’s past. esque mountainsources Commisside resort in north sion of Asheville Asheville. It was and Buncombe a great success due to the collaborative efforts County partnered with Pack Memorial Library of railroad executive William Greene Raoul to publish the images from the North Carolina and his son Thomas; Bradford Lee Gilbert, Collection. architect of New York City’s first skyscraper; • Emory University provided the images and Samuel Parsons Jr., landscape architect from the Raoul Family Papers and Jane Raoul for the City of New York. The Manor and its Bingham Papers gratis to benefit the Historic surrounding cottages served as an alternative to Resources Commission. standard late-19th-century Asheville hotels and boardinghouses. • The Albemarle Park Manor Grounds AssoDances, plays, bowling, archery, golf, mociation loaned the Historic Resources Comtoring, and equestrian events were available for mission all of their archival material. guests to enjoy, and meals were sourced from Available at area bookstores, independent The Manor’s own farm. Notable guests of The retailers, and online retailers, or through ArManor included Eleanor Roosevelt and Grace cadia Publishing at (888)-313-2665 or online. Kelly. It was also a film set for The Last of the A portion of the profits will be donated to the Mohicans. Consisting of enchanting architec-

E

The Stories We Tell

A NOVEL BY PATTI CALLAHAN HENRY

Eve and Teddy Morrison are Savannah’s power couple. They’re on every artistic board and involved deeply in the community. And they have the wealth and name that comes from being part of an old Georgia family. But things aren’t as good as they look. Eve and Teddy are fighting about her work, their marriage, and their daughter most of all. Teenaged Gwen is rebelling and Teddy is blaming

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED!

R

Rapidrivermagazine.com is expanding! Rapid River Magazine is expanding its online edition with a short story section. We’re looking for a variety of “shorts,” including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 categories. All work will be reviewed for appropriateness and once chosen will be subject to a collaborative editing process. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, will be managing the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to shortstories@rapidrivermagazine.com

this on Eve’s preoccupation with work. The Morrison marriage is taut with tension, but when Teddy is involved in a car accident with Eve’s sister, Willa, the questions surrounding the event bring the family close to the breaking point. Sifting between the stories, Eve has to find out what really happened-and just who she believes. Patti Callahan Henry is a full-time writer, wife, and mother, and the New York Times bestselling author of eight novels, including Between the Tides, Driftwood Summer, and The Perfect Love Song: A Holiday Story. She lives with her husband and three children in Mountain Brook, Alabama, where she is working on her next novel. “The Stories We Tell unfolds in surprising ways; Patti Callahan Henry understands the delicate balance of power inside a marriage. They can look so externally perfect they can even fool even the people living inside them.. for a little while. I loved her portrayal of a strong woman who isn’t afraid to be successful, even when others find it threatening, and who is bold enough to seek the truth, even when living inside the lies is safer and more comfortable.” ~ Sara Gruen, New York Times

BY

ERIN OWENS

Historic Resources Commission of Asheville and Buncombe County.

JULY

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS

Asheville’s Albemarle Park, written by Stacy A. Merten and Robert O. Sauer. Part of the Images of America series; $21.99; 128 pages, softcover.

Saturday, July 12 at 7 p.m. JEFF VANDERMEER, Authority, part of the Southern Reach Trilogy.

Arcadia Publishing is the leading publisher of local and regional history in the United States. Our mission is to make history accessible and meaningful through the publication of books on the heritage of America’s people and places. Have we done a book on your town? Visit www.arcadiapublishing.com.

Wednesday, July 16 at 7 p.m. LAURA LANE MCNEAL, Dollbaby. Coming-of-age.

IF YOU Stacy Merten & Robert Sauer book GO signing, Saturday, July 26 from 1-4

p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734 or visit www.malaprops.com

bestselling author of Water for Elephants “Patti Callahan Henry’s The Stories We Tell is a lyrical exploration of love and longing, secrets and suspicion, family and friendship, all told with the author’s trademark insights into the hollows and curves of the heart and mind of a working woman who must balance the demands of motherhood, wifedom, sisterhood, and yes, the deepest cravings for artistic expression. I always love the stories PCH tells!” ~ Mary Kay Andrews, author of Ladies’ Night “Patti Callahan Henry seamlessly combines mystery, family love, and personal journey all in one engrossing tale. From the intriguing beginning to the touching ending, The Stories We Tell is filled with the warmth, heart and compassion that have become the trademark of her novels.” ~ Diane Chamberlain, author of Necessary Lies

Monday, July 14 at 7 p.m. Writing workshop with ANNIE FAHY. Tuesday, July 15 at 7 p.m. SUZANNE PALMIERI, The Witch of Belladonna Bay.

Thursday, July 17 at 7 p.m. JEREMY B. JONES: Appalachian culture & song. Saturday, July 19 at 7 p.m. DOUGLAS STEVENSON, The Farm Then & Now. Tuesday, July 22 at 7 p.m. VIRGINIA PYE, River of Dust. Early China. Wednesday, July 23 at 7 p.m. D.B. JACKSON, A Plunder of Souls, fantasy. Thursday, July 24 at 7 p.m. CHRIS BOHJALIAN, Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands. A teenage girl survives a nuclear disaster. Friday, July 25 at 7 p.m. William Matthews Poetry Prize winners celebration, hosted by KEITH FLYNN. Saturday, July 26 at 7 p.m. The Battle for Justice in Palestine, ALI ABUNIMAH Tuesday, July 29 at 7 p.m. BILL MORRIS, Motor City Burning. Hard-boiled thriller. Wednesday, July 30 at 7 p.m. BARBARA J. TAYLOR, Sing in the Morning, Cry at Night. Stories of a family tragedy. Thursday, July 31 at 5 p.m. WHERE’S WALDO, winners and celebration. Thursday, July 31 at 7 p.m. Your Story as an Agent for Change with MATTHEW SANFORD.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

pg. 18

M

IF YOU Patti Callahan Henry reading and GO book signing, July 10 at 7 p.m. at

Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 2546734 or visit www.malaprops.com

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 23


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

summer fun 37th Annual Sourwood Festival

W

The 37th Annual Sourwood Festival takes place on August 9 & 10 in Black Mountain, “The Little Town That Rocks.”

and tempest ride. There will also be a rock climbing wall, moon walk, and other fun children’s activities and free games in the Kids Fun Park.

“Sourwood” is a free, GOT TALENT? non-alcoholic, family-oriented The Sourwood Idol festival with over 200 vendor The festival is a local and Contest is an amateur singing booths, free entertainment, regional favorite, drawing competition that opens the children’s area, and more. Local more than 30,000 people. festival on Friday, August 8 at residents and visitors from all 7 p.m. The contest is open to over the Southeast enjoy the non-professional individual singing performers festival so much, they return year after year. with no entry fee and the chance to win cash This year’s festival items include gourd prizes. art, pet treats and accessories, jewelry, art, phoWhile you’re in town for the festival, tography, pottery and glass, hand-turned wood experience Black Mountain “The Little Town bowls, birdhouses, and plants. Children’s That Rocks.” Relax in one of our many rockitems include toys, books, clothes, hair bows, ing chairs displaying beautiful scenic photograand novelty items. phy from the area. Cool off in the new Town The array of food and drink at Sourwood Square’s Rotary Splash Fountain, or sit by the satisfies every taste. Foods include festival waterfall. Black Mountain offers shops, gallerfavorites – blooming onions, funnel cakes, ies, and over 40 restaurants. cheese cakes on a stick, gyros, turkey legs, philly cheese steaks, ribbon fries, fried apple Visit www.exploreblackmountain.com pies, home-made ice cream and more; as well for a complete guide to the area. as delicious new foods – grilled kebabs, crab For a festival map and a list of vendors cake sandwiches, grilled shrimp, cream of crab please visit www.sourwoodfestival.com soup, and many vegetarian options. Free entertainment in the big tent IF includes old favorites as well as exciting, new YOU Sourwood Idol Contest, Friday, performers: bluegrass, country, folk, cloggers, GO August 8 at the Big Tent next to the square dancers, gospel, and rock & roll – a difDepot from 7-10 p.m. Sourwood ferent act about every 30 minutes. Performers Festival, Saturday, August 9 from 9 a.m. are regional artists who donate their talents for to 8 p.m. Sunday, August 10 from 9 a.m. to the pleasure of festival attendees. 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Carnival rides by TCS Amusements inBlack Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of clude a Ferris wheel, swings, merry-go-round, Commerce at 1-800-669-2301.

Summer Reads

M

MALAPROP’S STAFF PICKS FOR SUMMER READING

Kendra: Lost Lake, by Sarah Addison Allen. Light summer reading that manages to be so much more, Lost Lake marries all of those things that make Allen great – spun-sugar romances, firecracker characters, fairy-tinged settings – with a heartfelt exploration of the process of grieving, the difficulty of letting go, and the value of community. You’ll emerge from Lost Lake feeling braver and more willing to believe in the magic of the world. Justin: Viviane, by Julia Deck. Part psychological thriller, part exercise in style, Deck’s Viviane is the – for lack of a better word – neatest little novel I’ve read this year. Deck flexes her creative muscle by diving into the paranoid mind of a murderous mother, flipping between different points-of-view inside our titular narrators words (shifting from third-, second- and third-person), and slowly unfolding a story that becomes ever more complex.

24 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

The real thrill here is Deck’s acrobatic style, and with its Paris setting and questions of identity and personality, Viviane reads like some forgotten Polanski film. Lauren H.: Come Landfall, by Roy Hoffman. Based on a true family event and set along the Gulf Coast, Come Landfall explores the forces that shape the lives of three women – love, loss, war, and hurricanes. Hoffman handles the characters with a sure hand and an understanding eye, letting the humanness of each individual shine. Laura: We Were Liars, by E. Lockhart. We Were Liars is my pick for the perfect summer read for young adults or adults! I found it to be wonderfully twisty, and mysterious and it has an ending that will absolutely knock your socks off! Follow the story of the Sinclair family’s summers on their private island off Massachusetts and discover the truth behind all of the lies. This modern, sophisticated suspense novel will keep you up late into the night. If you are reading by the pool – be sure to use extra sunscreen because you won’t be able to put it down!

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALKS

Friday, July 4 from 5-8 p.m. Stroll galleries, meet the artists and enjoy refreshments. Hendersonville’s Arts District through December in downtown Hendersonville and Flat Rock.

ART IN THE PARK...ING LOT Saturday, July 12 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. See local artists and jewelers in the parking lot of Art MoB. Applications accepted for artists, jewelers & craftsmen. Booth fee is $35. Second Saturdays through September.

CLASSES

Canvas & Corks – Share a bottle of wine

and paint with friends. Many different fun classes. Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m., or Tuesday afternoons. $35, supplies included.

Basket Weaving – Weave a small eco market basket. Call for dates and times. $48, supplies included. Instructor: Teresa Jordon. Rug Hooking – Learn the basics. July 3 & 10, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond. Bob Ross Painting –

Instruction on painting landscapes. Call for dates and times. $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry.

Silk Painting – Learn different methods to paint on silk. Call for dates and times. $45, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display. Zendoodle Mini Workshop – Lines, designs and doodles! Create a small abstract piece. Call for dates and times. $30, supplies included. Instructor: Catherine Langsdorf.

Gourd Art – Different techniques taught

in each class. Call for dates and times. $42, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display.

Watercolor Gouache Resist Painting – Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. Call for dates. $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display.

Mosaic Mirrors – Create a small mirror using fun items. Call for dates and times. $75, supplies included. Instructor: Linda Pannullo. Work on display. Everything Old is New Again – Learn basic

book art principles. Call for dates and times. One class/$45, three/$40 each. Instructor: Kate Stockman.

Altered Board Books – From Childhood Stories to Adult Reflections. Create your own story from a child’s board book. July 26, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., $45. Instructor: Kate Stockman. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace

124 4th Avenue East in Hendersonville (828) 693-4545, www.artmobstudios.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living

L

Like Clouds In The Sky

Looking up into the sky, we see a constantly changing vista. Some days, the sky is clear blue, or at night, blue/black and star-filled from horizon to horizon. More often, there will be formations and layers of clouds, drifting and changing. Some days, there is no clear sky at all; the vista is filled with darkness, cloud layered upon cloud, or one cloud, seemingly endless from horizon to horizon. Buddhism has long found the sky to be a useful metaphor for the mind, and the way we experience our mind is really quite analogous to this metaphor of the sky. Sometimes clear and bright, sometimes dark and stormy, while most of the time some mix of clarity interspersed with drifting, morphing, changing content. Following this metaphor, as regards mind and our sense of self and identity, we live in a culture that causes us to confuse the clouds of mind - thoughts and emotions - with the essence of mind. As a result, we experience our minds pretty much constantly filled with this drifting, morphing, changing content. We believe the thoughts and emotions that fill our mind are the essence of our mind, and this is a fundamental error. We then compound the error by believing that who we are is this collection of thoughts and emotions, when this is only one dimension of mind, the ego, and it is a rather limited dimension at that. This causes problems in our relationship with ourselves and the world because then our sense of self is based in this drifting, morphing, changing content of the mind. There is no stability, reliability, predictability to our experience of self or the world. To make matters worse, although we identify this mental content with ourselves, the

source of the vast majority of this content is, of course, from other people. Our minds are filled with what has been told and taught us by our parents, the people we grew up around, our friends, teachers, society, culture, media, etc. Even our emotions are often learned, in that angry parents will likely generate angry children, anxious parents will generate anxious children, etc. It’s quite remarkable that we tend to be so defensive about our opinions and emotions when, in a very real sense, they are not ours at all. When we believe that our minds, and who we are, is the content of our minds, it’s no wonder our minds are filled with constant and obsessive chatter. This ego-self sustains itself with a wall of mental activity. One rather paranoid person I worked with accused me of trying to make a fool of him for suggesting there could be moments when the mind was quiet, for such a concept was impossible for him to grasp. Most of us aren’t that totally identified with the contents of our minds, but we aren’t far from it. This illustration is important because while don’t all tend toward paranoia, the ego-mind is always defensive to a greater or lesser extent, and the wall of thought is the primary line of defense for the ego. Most people when they begin a meditation practice find it difficult to believe that their mind could be quiet a significant amount of the

New Research, Old Conclusion

C

Cancer is one of the scariest words in the dictionary.

BY

BILL WALZ

time. How wonderful it is when they discover truth in the assertion that the basic essence of our mind is like the vast, open sky but also, like the sky, its nature is to have contents within it. Just like there are clouds in the sky, there are thoughts and emotions in the mind, but these thoughts and emotions are no more the essence of mind than the clouds are the essence of the sky. Also, as it is the nature of the sky to contain some measure of clouds most of the time, so it is the nature of the mind to contain some measure of thoughts and emotions most of the time. Our experience is really quite pleasurable when there is some limited dimension of thought and emotion giving texture and dimension to our experience of life just like the weather is quite pleasurable when there is some cloud structure giving texture and dimension to the sky. This marks an appropriate and effective relationship to our minds, but from our mistaken perspective that thought and emotion is the mind, we compulsively fill our minds from horizon to horizon with content, and so our experience of life is like a stormy day when clouds fill the sky, sometimes erupting into thunder, lightening and rain. We live far too much of our lives in a cloud-filled and often stormy climate. It does not have to be this way. The metaphor continues when we explore what the optimal experience in relationship to our minds truly is. Pleasant weather

BY

• Maintaining ideal weight reduces cancer risk 50%.

No one wants to hear that word – ever, whether referring to themselves or a family member. Yet how do we avoid such an encounter? The rates of cancer occurrence (except for colo-rectal cancer) have continued essentially unchanged for the last two decades. The rates of cancer deaths also continue unchecked. Some types of cancer can actually be conquered. But for many cancers, the only therapy is palliative. The only hope is to prolong life for a few months. The only treatments are seen by many as worse than the disease. The answer to cancer is to prevent cancer from gaining a permanent residence in your body with lifestyle choices. The truth is: 80% of cancers can be prevented.

Known carcinogens include Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), smoking, highly heated fats, sunburn, radon, environmental heavy metals among others. Known-effective screenings for cancer include screenings of breast, prostate, colon, skin, cervix, and lung. These two strategies for cancer prevention are well publicized and practiced by a large majority of people – who are reminded of the need for these strategies by their health care professionals frequently. But the third strategy – maintaining health through lifestyle choices – is more problematic. Why? Because the lifestyle choices are personal choices made by individuals on a daily basis.

Cancer prevention is a three step process:

• Exercise 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week reduces cancer risk by 33%.

All of these, when taken together, can prevent 80% of cancers. The most recent additional information came from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) in their Continuous Update Project (CUP). They report that 120,000 cases of cancer occurring each year in the United States are attributable to excess body fat – in the areas of the ovary, breast, endometrium, kidney, gall bladder, esophagus, pancreas, and colon. One-third of adults are obese and another one-third are overweight – adults and children are doubling their cancer risk. Aside from not smoking, maintaining ideal body weight is the one most important action you can take to reduce your cancer risk. Lifestyle choices do matter. They are a question of life or death.

1) Avoid exposure to known carcinogens. 2) Participate in the known effective cancer screenings.

continued on page 32

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

3) Maintain a healthy body through lifestyle choices.

The three major lifestyle choices are:

is a mix of clear sky and clouds, and for our day-to-day lives, a mix of spacious clarity, interspersed with thought and emotion is also the best relationship to mind. It could also be said that just as we must have rain for the world to be lush and fertile, times that are the mental equivalent of rain are necessary to bring us the darker, more soulful experience of life. These stormy times challenge us and nourish our basic, earthy humanity, helping us to grow in understanding, skill and wisdom. After all, is it not Life’s challenges that cause us to stretch and evolve into more complex, aware, resourceful, and hopefully, compassionate people? A well-known Zen saying tells us, “obstacles do not block the path, they are the path.” But, oh those days we call glorious, when there isn’t a cloud in the sky! This is the same as the open, clear experience of mind that makes for the spiritual connection, the experience of far-seeing clarity and deep insight, and it is this ability that can be deliberately cultivated through meditation and mindfulness. This is egoless awareness, what Zen calls No-mind. Likewise, as the vast, clear sky is always above and below the clouds, no matter how

• Eating a well-balanced plant-based diet reduces cancer risk 33%.

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 25


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

Dining & Restaurant Guide

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

Lenny’s Sub Shop Would Make Dagwood Proud

P

Pile it on! Never have the words “More Food, More Taste, More Personality,” ever rang more true. After years of dainty panini domination for lunchtime sandwiches here in Asheville, Lenny’s Sub Shop moves the trend toward the big, the overflowing, and the incredibly stuffed. Their large version is 15 inches long and contains about a pound of meat and cheese. The result, the best sandwich I’ve ever had. I eat out a lot. I avoid fast food. I cannot stomach it anymore, not like I could 20 years ago — the fat, the bland taste, the smell of grease washing over you immediately upon

pg. 10

WB

BY

DENNIS RAY

opening the front door. A good tasting, healthy, customer friendly restaurant has always been on my radar. Now when I’m within fifteen to twenty miles from Biltmore Village and hungry for an incredible lunch, I’ll head to Lenny’s Subs. To say it’s the best sub shop in Asheville is easy. It’s Authentic Philly Cheesesteaks. definitely my favorite. I’d be willing to say they make the best chicken salad sandwich anywhere. I’m not exaggerating. They make an incredible chicken salad. I tell everyone I know or meet, when our conversation turns toward food, as it usually does, to try for themselves the best chicken salad sandwich ever. I’m usually met with a nod and a look that says “But you’ve never tried my mother’s or aunt’s or someone’s version.” I then say, “But my mother’s a gourmet cook, my father owned a deli until I was fifteen. I know good food!” A reluctant friend took me up on my suggestion. A few weeks later I ran into him and he said not only was the chicken salad sandwich the best ever, so were a half-dozen other sandwiches. He now regularly goes there for lunch. Lenny’s Subs, although a chain, is more like my continued on page 28

pg. 32

BL

pg. 20

HL

26 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11


R A P I D

R I V E R

A R T S

&

C U L T U R E

M

Dining & Restaurant Guide

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food in Western North Carolina

The Green Room Café

A

Are you looking for a dining experience that includes: scrumptious food, made fresh with local ingredients, prepared and served to you with personalized service, in a cozy relaxing ambiance? You will find exactly that and more at The Green Room Café.

Hendersonville’s premier live dinner music venue, The Green Room Café, specializes in artisan crafted food, featuring signature dinner entrees, gourmet sandwiches, homemade soups and salads, breakfast, and baked treats. We offer premium beer and wine, Fair Trade, locally roasted, premium espresso and coffees and an assortment of loose-leaf teas. Join us for live dinner music on Friday and Saturday nights starting at 6:30 p.m. We gather the freshest ingredients and make each breakfast, lunch

and dinner entrée to order. Our thoughtfully created dinner menu offers a selection of choices: Succulent Sea Scallops pan seared in garlic butter and seasonings then topped with our balsamic glaze; tender cuts of pork tenderloin topped with Raspberry Chipotle Sauce; filet wrapped in applewood smoked bacon, grilled and served with blue cheese aioli. You can top your meal off with one of our spectacular homemade desserts – award winning cheesecake, key lime pie and old fashioned apple crumb cake, to name a few. The Green Room Café features nightly dinner specials in addition to the full menu. Join us Wednesday for Seafood Sensation; Thursday night Mama’s Lasagna is served; Prime Rib Fridays, and Saturday nights are Chef’s Choice. Our lunch menu offers a selection of gourmet sandwiches with homemade sauces, homemade soups and salads. A couple house favorites include the Souvlaki Wrap – marinated pork tenderloin tips, lettuce, tomato and onion served on toasted pita with Tzatiki sauce, and the Vegetarian Cuban – roasted red bell peppers, mushrooms, spinach, caramelized onions, olive salad, cheddar and swiss cheese, with chipotle mayo on pressed focaccia bread. A favorite salad is the California Chicken Salad – fresh mixed greens with candied pecans, strawberries,

Ben & Sue Green, owners of The Green Room Café.

cranberry-cherry mix, blue cheese crumbles and balsamic vinaigrette dressing topped with marinated grilled chicken breast. We have delicious options, for a dinner that lingers, and a quick working lunch. Or pop in for an ice cold beer or a glass of wine paired with one of our delicious appetizers. Gather your friends and come try our favorites and hang out for an enjoyable time at your downtown Hendersonville premier gathering place. Visit us at www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz for hours, live music schedules, menus and much more!

The Green Room Café 536 North Main St., Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 Breakfast: Tuesday - Saturday, 8:30 - 10:30 a.m. Lunch: Everyday, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Dinner: Wednesday - Saturday 5:30 - 9 p.m. pg. 10

WR

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients Gourmet Sandwiches & Wraps • Desserts

Homemade Soups • Salads Seafood • Steak • Chicken Pork Tenderloin • Pasta Vegetarian Co Espresso • Coffee • Teas Beer • Wine Daily Food Specials Kids Menu Outdoor Dinning

pg. 20

Hg

828.692.6335

pg. 18

Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Wed-Sat 5:30-9 pm

K

Live Dinner Music Fri & Sat Nights

pg. 18

C

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 27


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

Restaurant Guide

E

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food ‘Lenny’s Sub Shop’ cont’d. from pg. 26

father’s deli from my childhood than anything with the word “franchise” attached to its masthead, offering heaping crisp vegetables, meats and sauces in quantities and freshness I haven’t seen in over 30 years. They slice their meats and cheeses fresh to order and pile Good service and good food.

them high on fresh baked bread. Breads made and baked that morning in-house, along with the chicken salad chuck full of chicken, and their famous potato salad that rivals anything my Aunt Rose could make, and believe me, my Aunt Rose could turn any meal into a special event and wonderment for the taste buds. The first Lenny’s Sub Shop opened in 1998 in a suburb of Memphis, TN to satisfy cravings for authentic subs and Philly Cheesesteaks. Though Lenny’s Sub Shop was originally planned as a single unit restaurant, the Owner, Assef tremendous reception Alnasraween from guests at the first location prompted rapid growth and the concept soon became franchised. It’s not just good food that makes a good dining experience. It’s good service from people who take pride in what they do. It’s the cleanliness of the dining room, the fresh baked bread smells, the friendly hello and welcome back from the cashier. On this, so many other Asheville restaurants could take a lesson.

pg. 32

BC

We were eager to advertise our new ownership of Bogart’s Restaurant in Waynesville. While we kept all the original menu items, we were excited about trying out new, homemade original dishes as well. Rapid River Magazine has been a great value for getting our message out to their readers. After running a coupon, we were pleasantly surprised at how well it was received. A big THANK YOU to all our awesome Bogart’s customers and to Rapid River Magazine!

Lenny’s Sub Shop pg. 33

RT

645 Biltmore Avenue Assef Alnasraween, Owner www.lennys.com

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order

~ Shelly Sneed, Co-Owner of Bogart’s Restaurant

Bogart’s Restaurant, 303 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313, www.bogartswaynesville.com

Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com 28 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

pg. 18

B

Wireless Internet Access!


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

beer city

S

Wednesday Pint Nights

Sierra Nevada will be featured during Wednesday Pint Nights at Thirsty Monk locations throughout July, culminating in a Grand Finale event at Thirsty Monk Biltmore Park, July 31. The Thirsty Monk, a leader in Asheville’s beer scene and increasingly recognized regional and national beer destination, is partnering with Sierra Nevada, one of America’s premier craft breweries, to present a special Tap Event at the Thirsty Monk Biltmore Park on July 31, celebrating Beer Camp Across America and featuring all twelve Beer Camp brews on tap. Immediately following, Thirsty Monk is launching Sour Fest, an annual celebration of sour beer featuring extremely rare selections on tap August 4-8 at their downtown location. Leading up to the Beer Camp Across America Special Tap Event, Sierra Nevada will be featured at Pint Nights each Wednesday from July 9-30 at Thirsty Monk locations in Asheville. Those who attend will have the opportunity to enter a raffle drawing for tickets to Sierra Nevada’s highly anticipated Beer Camp Across America Festival, taking place

RHYTHM & BREWS CONCERT SERIES Thursday, July 17 Rhythm & Brews is a free outdoor concert series in downtown Hendersonville, featuring a variety of live music and local breweries and wineries. Live music by the Fritz at 5 p.m. Limited seating.

August 3rd at their new Mills River brewery. The winner will be announced at the Special Tap Event, July 31, at Biltmore Park. “We’re thrilled to be able to kick off Sierra Nevada’s final stop on their Beer Camp across America Festival tour with beer on tap from some really great breweries that aren’t normally available here, such as Russian River, Ninkasi and numerous others,” says Thirsty Monk Vice President, Chall Gray. “It’s an exciting time to be a beer lover in Asheville.” Coming hot off the heels of Beer Camp, Thirsty Monk will host their fourth annual Sour Fest August 4-8. Head to Thirsty Monk Downtown for a week of daily releases of extremely rare sour beers, including BFM Vintage Bon-Chien, The Bruery - Sour in the Rye, Birrifico Del Ducato - Baciami Lipsia, Leipziger Gose, Boulevard - Saison Brett and many more. Sour beers are one of the fastest growing trends in craft brewing, with brewers pushing the envelope in building beers that range from slightly to significantly sour. Due to limited supply, these beers will go quickly, so Sour Fest is a not-to-miss event for local and visiting beer fans. Keep up with Thirsty Monk online at www.monkpub.com for the Sour Fest schedule.

T

The Travelling Yogini will be holding weekly beginner-level yoga classes at local breweries followed by a beer tasting. These classes are part of a nationwide trend that has been taking place in cities such as Charleston, Denver, Boulder, Seattle, Philadelphia, and LA. Bend & Brews take place at four different breweries at different times throughout the week. 91 Biltmore Ave, Asheville

Photo: Edgar Ward

IF YOU Rhythm & Brews takes GO place from 5-9 p.m. in the

Azalea parking lot at the corner of Third Ave. and King St. in Hendersonville. For more details visit www.historichendersonville.org

The Beer Camp Across America collaborative 12-pack features 12 different beers made alongside 12 different breweries, including collaborations with Allagash, Ballast Point, Bell’s, Cigar City, Firestone Walker, New Glarus, Ninkasi, Oskar Blues, Russian River, 3 Floyds and Victory, and a beer from the Asheville Brewers Alliance. These collaboration beers will be featured at The Thirsty Monk, July 31, and at every Beer Camp Across America festival stop.

PARTY TOO HEARTY? Call a taxi! Don’t let friends drink and drive. In Asheville, call: • Beaver Lake Cab, (828) 252-1913 • Checker Cab, (828) 254-1155 • Metro Cab, (828) 254-1155 • New Blue Bird, (828) 258-8331 • Red Cab, (828) 232-1112 • Yellow Cab, (828) 253-3311

(800) 829-4872 | www.1800taxiusa.com

Thirsty Monk

www.monkpub.com Downtown Asheville 92 Patton Ave., (828) 254-5470 Gerber Village 20 Gala Dr., (828) 505-4564 This location closed Sunday & Monday Biltmore Park 2 Town Square Blvd., (828) 687-3873 Reynolds Village 51 N. Merrimon Ave., (828) 424-7807 Hours: Monday-Thursday, 4 p.m. - midnight Friday & Saturday, noon - 2 a.m. Sunday, noon - 10 p.m.

“Bend and Brew” Yoga at Local Breweries

Wicked Weed Brewing

Rhythm & Brews Concert

The Beer Camp Across America Twelve Pack

Highland Brewing Company Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m. 45 minutes of beginner level yoga followed by a tasting of select Highland’s very best brews such as the yearround Gaelic Ale or Black Mocha Stout or a seasonal brew such as Little Hump Spring Ale. At Highland Brewing, you’re sure to be amazed at something that tastes “Just a Wee Bit Different.” Weather permitting.

Catawba Brewing

Beginner yoga classes followed by a beer tasting.

Saturdays at 11 a.m. 45 minutes of beginner level yoga followed by a tasting of select Wicked Weed ales such as Freak of Nature Double IPA or Hop Burglar Blood Orange IPA or a seasonally rotating selection of open fermented Belgian saisons. Wicked Weed always keeps on tap 20+ brewed beers. Weather Permitting.

Hi-Wire Brewing 197 Hilliard Avenue, Asheville Sundays at 12:15 p.m. 45 minutes of beginner level yoga followed by a tasting of select HiWire beers such as Hi-Wire Lager, Prime Time Pale, Bed of Nails Brown, and Hi-Pitch IPA. “Come Walk on the Wire Side” at Hi-Wire.

BY

12 Old Charlotte Highway, Suite H, Asheville

63 Brook Street, Asheville

Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. beginning in mid July. 45 minutes of beginner level yoga followed by a tasting of White Zombie White Ale, Farmer Ted’s Cream Ale or possibly a seasonal like Hooligan’s Scotch Ale. The cost for each Bend & Brew is $15 per participant, cash only. No reservations necessary. All participants should bring their own mat. Classes are offered on a first come first served basis, so be sure to get there a little early to guarantee your spot. For more information please visit www.facebook.com/travellingyoginiyogatours

KELLY DENSON

About Travelling Yogini At Travelling Yogini yoga tours, travellers learn about local commerce, while finding areas to stretch and breathe among the picturesque open-air settings immersed in culture and community. Travelling Yogini yoga tours don’t focus solely on history or common facts about the area, but provide a one-of-a-kind experience for patrons looking to connect with their bodies and their community. We want travellers to discover the beauty within, while discovering the beauty all around. Yoga and exploration propel travellers through the heart of the city as well as through all of its charming nooks and crannies. The tour begins with standard beginner-level poses that gradually become more energized, ending with a cool down and meditation. You can join us for one of our regularly scheduled Yoga Tours, Asheville Wellness Tours, and Bend and Brew, or schedule your own yoga tour, perfect for special occasions like birthdays, bachelorette parties, reunions, or team building. For more details please visit www.yogatours.net

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 29


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide Tuesday, July 1

Ceramic Art Exhibit

Works by Mary Jimenez and Ed Rivera, and other Gallery members. Open Tue-Sun 11-5. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville’s River Arts District.

Park, downtown Asheville. Stage show and informal jam sessions. Free. Bring a lawn chair or blanket, instruments, family and friends. (828) 258-6101 x345, www.folkheritage.org

Monday, July 7

Costume Drama: a Fashion Show

July 1, 15 & 29

Summertime Music Series

Performances by young musicians of exceptional talent, as well as members of the Brevard Music Center. 7 p.m. $10; $6 for members of the museum. Asheville Art Museum, 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. For tickets and more details, (828) 253-3227, www.ashevilleart.org

Lobby and cash bar opens at 6:30 p.m., show begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20. Asheville Com2013 design munity Theatre, 35 by Tess Miller East Walnut Street, Asheville. Details at (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

Friday, July 4

Monday, July 7

Independence Day Celebration

2 to 10 p.m. in Asheville’s Pack Square Park. Festivities for families, and an evening of music followed by fireworks. The celebration begins at 2 p.m. There will be bounce houses, music, beer and food! Produced by the Asheville Downtown Association, www.ashevilledowntown.org

Shindig on the Green

SimplyPickin.com

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Saturday, July 12

Jeff VanderMeer Reading

Jeff VanderMeer will read from Authority, book two in the bestselling Southern Reach trilogy. Free. 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville.

Saturday, July 12

Invasive Exotic Plant Workday

Tuesday & Wednesday, July 8 & 9

9:30 a.m. at Lemon Gap, NC. Meet at 8 a.m. at 160 Zillicoa St. in Asheville to carpool. Individuals or groups interested in volunteering or carpooling should contact Rhys Brydon-Williams, rbrydon@appalachiantrail.org, (828) 254-3708. For more information visit www.appalachiantrail.org/events.

Cades Cove Experience

Thursday, July 17

Themed Drag Show. Pageant begins at 11 p.m. $5, 21+. 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Scandals Nightclub, 11 Grove Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 505-1612, www.scandalsnightclub.com

Friends of the Smokies’ guided hikes led by outdoor author, blogger, and hiking expert, Danny Bernstein. $10 for members, $35 for non-members. Special overnight engagement. Contact Brent McDaniel at Outreach.NC@ FriendsOfTheSmokies.org or call (828) 452-0720.

July 5, 12, 19 Traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers on Saturday evenings at Pack Square

Miss Firecracker Pageant

on “The Art of Promoting Art” by gallery director and curator, Karlota I. Contreras-Koterbay. At Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River. Non-members welcome. Call Suzy Hart at (845) 986-3653 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org for more details.

Friday, July 11

Ben Wilson Concert

Let’s Explore Africa

Quiz competition about Africa. 3-7 p.m. at AB Tech, Ferguson Auditorium, 340 Victoria Road, Asheville. Free and open to the public. For details visit www.letsexploreafrica.net.

Friday, July 18

Evolution of the Landscape

Performing during Art After Dark, from 6 to 9 p.m. Fun and refreshments! At the Mahogany House Art Gallery, 240 Depot St., Historic Frog Level in Waynesville. (828) 246-0818, www.themahoganyhouse.com

Artetude Gallery presents the work of three of the gallery’s artists: Ramona Bronkar Bannayan, Jo Ridge Kelley, and William Vandever. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 252-1466, www.artetudegallery.com

Saturday, July 12

July 18-27

North Asheville Tailgate Market

34th anniversary celebration of the market, held on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon at UNC Asheville Campus (Lot C). Live local music, cooking demos, dietitian talks, art demos, and face painting. More information at www.northashevilletailgatemarket.org

Saturday, July 12

Shape Note Singing

10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pot luck dinner at 12:30 p.m. Free. Please bring Christian Harmony song books and a covered dish to share. Davidson Hall, John C. Campbell Folk School, 1 Folk School Rd., Brasstown, www.folkschool.org

Saturday, July 12

Appalachian Pastel Society

Meeting from 10 a.m. to noon with a free presentation

International Folklore Festival

Dancers and musicians from Chinese Taipei, Trinidad, Colombia, Russia, Turkey, Romania, and Hawaii, along with groups representing Appalachian and Cherokee cultures perform at 14 different venues throughout Western North Carolina. For more information, or to purchase tickets, go to www. FolkmootUSA.org or call 877-FolkUSA (877-365-5872).

Saturday, July 19

No More Wishy Washy Watercolor

Lorelle Bacon can help you to create sharp deeply colorful images with watercolor! Tuition: $110 includes all materials. No drawing skills needed. Beginning and intermediate. 10-4 p.m.

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. Call (828) 776-2716 or visit www.310art.com for more information.

Thursday, July 24

atre in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $20; children 12 and under $10. Three night package $54. (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com. More details at www.folkheritage.org.

Business in a More Beautiful World

Friday, August 1

Friday, July 25

Works by Miriam Hughes and Sandee Setliff. Opening reception 7 to 9 p.m. at Jongo Java, 117 S. Main St. in downtown Hendersonville. Open Mon.Fri., 7-7, Sat. 8-7, and Sun. 9-4. Visit these local artist’s studios year-round at Art MoB Studios & Marketplace.

Free monthly networking and education event for those interested in a collaborative, heart-centered, purposedriven model of doing business. Every 4th Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Ave.

Cabaret Jazz Series

Peggy Ratusz performs songs from women in blues history, past to present. With Duane Simpson, Michael Hynes, Jeff Knorr, Peggy Ratusz Patrick Armitedge Photo: Frank Zipperer and Jesse Barry. 8 p.m. Optional buffet dinner (6:30-7:30) by Black Mountain Bistro. $15; $8 for students. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 6690816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Saturday, July 26

Carolina Film Institute Open House Learn about the next 40-week Total Immersion Film Program, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Student film screenings at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. www.facebook.com/ carolina.filminstitute. 1-800-940-3546, www.carolinafilminstitute.com.

Saturday, July 26

The Luminous Surface

Group exhibition of media, cinematic, and audiovisual art. Closing reception from 6-9 p.m. at the French Broad Institute, 68 N. Main St., Marshall. On display through July 27. (917) 650 7321, http://themissionfortemporalart. blogspot.com

July 26 - September 19

Natural Building School

Hands-on activities, workshops, classes, presentations and field trips. Learn how to design and build using locally-sourced clay, sand, straw, bamboo, wood and other materials. Details and registration, www.ashevillage.org/ natural-building-extravaganza

Thursday-Saturday, July 31, August 1 & 2

Mountain Dance and Folk Festival The 87th annual event showcases the best of the region’s traditional and old-time musicians, ballad singers, mountain dance groups and cloggers. 7 p.m. nightly at Diana Wortham The-

Caffeinated Art

Saturday & Sunday, August 2 & 3

42nd Annual Village Art and Craft Fair

This high quality craft fair sponsored by New Morning Gallery and Bellagio Art-to-Wear, takes place on the grounds of the Cathedral of All Souls in Historic Biltmore Village. Fair hours are Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m., rain or shine. Free admission. Concessions available. For more information call (828) 274-2831.

Canvas & Corks

BYOB painting classes. Get some friends together and have some fun! $35, all supplies included. You bring the wine! Great pictures to choose from. Private Parties by request. Call (828) 693-4545 for more details. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue East in Hendersonville, visit www.artmobstudios.com

Call for Artists

Hickory’s Oktoberfest is accepting applications for Arts and Crafts vendors. The annual festival will be held October 10, 11, and 12 in downtown Hickory, NC. Registrations accepted until August 1. Booth fees are $200, electricity available for an additional $25. Applications and guidelines at www.hickoryoktoberfest.com.

Call for Entries: Crafting Civil (War) Conversations Deadline: October 31, 2014 Juried exhibition of contemporary craft at McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina. Entries sought from artists working in clay, fiber, glass, metal, and wood to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and the reconciliation between former slaves and former slave owners. $25,000 in purchase awards will be given. Submit up to five images to https://McKissickMuseum. slideroom.com. Exhibit dates: February 2 through May 30, 2015. More details at http://artsandsciences.sc.edu/mckissickmuseum

JULY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 30 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

E


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

what to do guide July at Pack Memorial Library

Best in Show

E

M

G

A

Z

I

N

E

by Phil Juliano

Wednesday, July 2 - Three Amigos!, starring Steve Martin, Chevy Chase, and Martin Short, will be shown at 3 p.m.

The Green Room Café Live Music Line-Up The Green Room Café specializes in artisan crafted scrumptious food, made fresh from local ingredients. Signature dinner entrees, gourmet sandwiches, soups and salads, breakfast and baked treats. Premium beer & wine, Fair Trade, locally roasted, espresso & coffees. Live dinner music on Friday and Saturday nights beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 10 at 6 p.m. - Exploring

the Jazz Standard. Concert featuring Michael Jefry Stevens on piano and percussionist Byron Hedgepeth on vibraphone.

Tuesday, July 15 at 6 p.m. - Get Your

Kicks Clogging! Rodney Sutton shares the history of the Appalachian step-dance known as clogging. All programs are free and held in the Lord Auditorium at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. Details at (828) 250-4700, or email library@buncombecounty.org.

A

Callie & Cats

Saturday, July 5: Nello Masci, vocals, and pianist Mark Sherren perform Ragtime, Jazz & Pop.

by Amy Downs

Friday, July 11: Kevin Lorenz, Nello Masci

www.buncombecounty.org

acoustic guitar Jazz, Pop, Ragtime, Bossa Nova & Classical.

Saturday, July 12: Jazz with Elise Pratt on vocals, Mike Holstein on guitar. Friday, July 18: Americana by Carrie Morrison on vocals & keyboard.

Summer Arts Camps

Saturday, July 19: Lake &

Have fun this summer by exercising your creativity. Children and adult, arts-related half-day themed camps.

July 14-18; 21-25; August 4-8. Traditional arts camp – dancing, music, and crafts for kids ages 3-5, and 6-9, led by dancer Amy Maze and musician Linda Metzner. $125 per week.

Moore, acoustic guitar duo playing Folk & Americana.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

All performances 6:30-8:30 p.m.

The Green Room Café

536 North Main, Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

July 14-18. Adult Clay

For more information or to register, please call (828) 669-0930.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Every Saturday – Beginning art classes from Every Thursday – Mandalas workshops

from 6-8 p.m. with Chris Baschon.

For more information, or to register, call (828) 699-0240.

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS?

The Art House Gallery and Studio 5 Highland Park Road East Flat Rock, NC 28726 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-867-6028.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800892-4631.

Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for more details.

The Tax Doctor

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

Adult Art Classes at the Art House 2-4 p.m. with art instructor Chris Baschon.

Black Mountain Center for the Arts 225 W. State St., Black Mountain www.blackmountainarts.org

Medical Guardian

Carrie Morrison

vocals, Mike Holstein on guitar.

Appalachian String Camp for children ages 9-13 taught by professional picker Cary Fridley. Cost is $125. Camp with potter Maureen Joyce. No experience required. $200 fee includes clay, glazes and firing.

Lindemann, Singer/Songwriter, Indie Pop.

Saturday, July 26: Jazz with Elise Pratt on

July 14-18 from 1-4 p.m.

Cary Fridley

Friday, July 25: Bethany

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 31


R

Find It Here

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Andrew Charles Gallery (828) 989-0111 Appalachian Survival Gear & Knife Company www.AppalachianSurvivalGear.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

Ariel Gallery www.arielcraftgallery.com

Kathmandu Cafe www.cafekathmanduasheville.com

The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Ken Wilson Ford www.kwford.com

Art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com

Lenny’s Subs, www.lennys.com

Art on Depot (828) 246-0218 Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967 Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Grace C. Bomer Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814 Lime Leaf Thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Mehri & Company (828) 693-0887 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

The Cantina www.cantinabiltmore.com

Satellite Gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com Sourwood Festival www.sourwoodfestival.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Frog Level Brewery www.froglevelbrewing.com

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival www.SwannanoaChamberMusic.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Thai Spice www.ThaiSpiceWaynesville.com

Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

TPennington Art Gallery www.tpennington.com

The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

The Writers’ Workshop www.twwoa.org

Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org

VaVaVoom www.vavavooom.com

DC MB

PATTON AVE.

(828) 646-0071

N. ASHEVILLE

PA

NG

Village Arts www.newmorningnc.com

BILTMORE AVE. BL

NF

TUNNEL ROAD

BILTMORE VILLAGE BC

TC

HENDERSONVILLE RD. BV

HF

WNC OVERVIEW GET ON THE MAP, CALL

REYNOLDS VILLAGE

MERRIMON AVE.

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Frog Pond Downsizing (828) 734-3874

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

stormy it may be, so too, behind, beneath, surrounding the thought-clouds of mind can be experienced the crystal-clear realm of awareness. This requires the knowing that we are the awareness and the cultivation of awareness-of-awareness. With this knowing, peacefulness and clarity are always available to us. It isn’t that the turbulent content isn’t there, but that we no longer identify with it or get lost in it. Instead, we realize that the clarity of pure awareness, like the clarity of the deep sky, is our true self. We are no longer lost, identifying with the unstable and changing nature of our cloud-mind, our thoughts and emotions, but rather, with the unclouded awareness that witnesses the passing phenomena of mind and life. The legend of the Buddha is of a man, Siddhartha Gautama, living 2500 years ago in India, a prince who left the comfort of his palace and discovered the vast stormy world of humanity.

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

V

M

HK

MA

RC A

MS

CANTON

BD WA

A

‘Like Clouds‘ cont’d from page 25

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

R

R

T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

12 Bones (828) 253-4499

E

CF H

32 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

MB MK

He saw suffering and required of himself that he understand its cause, nature and cure. Like a physician, a scientist, he embarked on a journey of exhaustive research. He spent many years as an ascetic mastering the meditative arts, living with a mind accustomed to deep quiet and profound insight. Intuiting the ascetic life however as another egoic pose, a reaction to the suffering of human society, he left it, to find a “middle path.” Neither materialistic and worldly, nor in scorn of the world, this path is deeply, subtly aware of both the beauty and tragedy of the world, realizing they create the intricate dance of unity, it maintains perspective and insight; in compassionate love with humanity and existence. In deep meditation Buddha penetrated through all “clouds” of mind into the realm of pure awareness, even beyond the cloudless sky, for even the blue sky is not empty of particles, but is an illusion of emptiness, filled with atoms and molecules and the energy that connects all phenomenon; and its placement as “up there” is likewise an illusion, for in truth, we live within the sky. It is as much beneath the clouds as it is above, it is all around us. We are in it as is this Earth we live upon. There is just This. It is as if Buddha penetrated beyond the concept of sky and mind, completely breaking past the boundaries of the Earth into the true realm of our existence, the Universe that we are all within and expressions of. There he discovered the true nature of our existence, a more profound sense of emptiness, that is, empty of the delusions of certainty and separateness that this world of cloud-thoughts tell us about itself and us. He went beyond all “illusions” of a sky or mind that confines us to realize the Universe “out there” is mirrored perfectly “in here,” in the vast clarity of human consciousness not obscured by the false belief in individual separateness as the only reality. There is and there isn’t an “out there” or “in here.” There is just This. This world of separateness, this world of egoic clouds of thought and emotion that morph and drift, often racing through our awareness is not who we are. We are the awareness, the clear open “sky” of pure consciousness. We are, as the great Orientalist, Alan Watts once wrote, “The Universe looking into itself.” We are – just This. This was Buddha’s “awakening” and the word “Buddha” translates as “awakened one.” For this, millions worship him like a god, but he absolutely insisted he was merely mortal and that this ability to see clearly, to realize we are that which sees, is in every human being. The physician diagnosed the sickness of “egoic delusion” and prescribed the cure. He taught us how to transcend the boundaries of human perceptual and cognitive limitation and achieve true clarity, to awaken beyond the clouds of mind into the essential realm of Being. Yes, our mortal form lives like clouds in the sky, being born, morphing, drifting and sometimes racing across the sky of our lifespan, then disappearing. Yet there, within the forms of the world and the suffering that comes with form, we can realize as did Buddha, the cure to suffering, to realize enlightenment into our true nature as awareness – that which is eternal, like the vast sky itself, which holds, witnesses, and does not judge, does not react to or resist the moment as it is, and sees its perfection as the truth of who we are.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


R

A

v

P

I

D

R

Fine Ar ts & Craf ts

I

v

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

Unique Restaurants & Breweries

C

U

L

T

U

R

v Warehouse Studio Spaces

E

v

Artist Resource Center

T

The Artist Resource Center is a multi-purpose space which can be used for exhibitions, educational opportunities, and events. The Artist Resource Center was created in partnership with the River Arts District Business Association, Mountain BizWorks, Wendy H. Outland, arts business management consultant, and Asheville Buncombe Technical Community College. Free and affordable professional development opportunities, classes and workshops, and business management programs for creative industry professionals are offered throughout the year.

RB

RF

RS

The Creating Opportunities workshop with Wendy Outland covered how to attract more attention to your work and get more visitors to your studio.

The Asheville Area Arts Council is working with local educational institutions to promote and support registration for professional development and creative workforce training opportunities across the region. The Artist Resource Center also makes available a variety of artists resources, expensive to own equipment, computers, and creative software. For more information about the Artist Resource Center visit www.ashevillearts.com

RC

RP

RP RG RJ RT

RB

RL

RV

ASHEVILLE PAINT-OUTS

RD

Paint-Out with the Asheville Urban Landscape Project First Baptist Church – Tuesday, July 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. First Baptist Church, Oak Street, downtown Asheville. French Broad River Park – Tuesday, July 8 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. French Broad River Park, Asheville. For more information, contact art@lisablackshear.com or visit www.ashevillearts.com/asheville-paint-outs

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

RS

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 33


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

noteworthy Charlotte Street Computers Partners with Asheville Community Theatre

F

Fundraising Opportunity Charlotte Street Computers has partnered with the Asheville Community Theatre for its fifth year to offer an exceptional fundraising opportunity for local non-profit organizations, and is currently seeking applications for new participants.

BY

LEE ANN BUBROWSKI

Through this program, Charlotte Street Computers will donate 50-100 tickets to four ACT Mainstage Productions (The Addams Family Musical, Charlie Brown Christmas, A Streetcar Named Desire, and The Great

American Trailer Park Musical), which nonprofit organizations may sell to their donor base, retaining 100% of the proceeds. Not only an excellent opportunity to generate funding, these private performance events foster camaraderie and cross-promotion among organizations which might otherwise not work together. For more information, email the Director of Marketing for Charlotte Street Computers at marketing@charlottestreetcomputers.com. Charlotte Street Computers is an independent computer repair company founded in 2002. Today the company has grown to a staff of 20 team members, including 10 of the top service technicians in the area. CEO Jennifer Mayer operates the company with a continued focus on customer satisfaction and philanthropic marketing.

Charlotte Street Computers provides upgrades, networking, troubleshooting, and repairs for home computers and small business systems for both Macs and PCs. The company also provides daily computer classes, one-onone tutoring, and on-site service. Charlotte Street Computers is a one-stop shop for exceptional repair and retail, and sells the full line of Apple computers. Charlotte Street Computers is located at 252 Charlotte Street in Asheville, and is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. For more information or to register for classes, call (828) 225-6600, visit www.charlottestreetcomputers.com.

First Annual Crossnore Craft Fair

H

HandMade in America teaches business and craft fair skills to empower Crossnore’s female craft artists.

pg. 18

O

34 July 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 11

HandMade in America has brought their Appalachian Women Entrepreneurs (AWE) program to the women of Crossnore, NC, to provide them with the tools to create their very first craft fair. In partnership with the Crossnore Community Enhancement Committee (CCEC) and volunteer fire department, this craft fair will be an important addition to the town’s annual Family Fun on the Fourth celebration. The craft fair, located in the parking lot of the Blair Fraley Sales Store, will allow the small town of 192 people to showcase and sell their locally-made wares as an added attraction to the holiday festivities on July 4. HandMade’s Appalachian Women Entrepreneurs (AWE) program teaches women in rural WNC communities the important business, creative, industry, and access-to-market skills necessary to develop and manage small businesses in today’s economic climate. The AWE Program provides these women with an important network of peers and fellow female artists, access to resources and educational materials, and opportunities to gain experience and implement skills learned. In January 2014 Crossnore became the newest community to participate in HandMade’s AWE program. The energetic women of Crossnore began with a goal to develop their skills and implement this knowledge immediately through a project benefiting their entire community. “Crossnore’s annual Independence Day celebration usually brings in around 2,000 people and is known to have the best fireworks show in the region,” said Linda LaBelle, Entrepreneurship Program Manager at HandMade. “With this celebration being the town’s largest

BY

LINDSEY MUDgE

event of the year, we felt it was fitting for the women’s first craft fair to be featured as part of the day’s activities.” The Volunteer Fire Department’s regionally recognized Family Fun on the Fourth celebration includes very unique activities, like the famous frog-jumping contest, to very traditional activities, such as a cake-walk around the fountain. The celebration will also feature arts and crafts for kids, face painting, the Crossnore Elementary Art Show, a parade, a gun raffle, an Honorary Veterans ceremony, a watermelon give-away, the new craft fair, and fireworks. Families return to Crossnore year after year to participate in this great America tradition. The CCEC and HandMade in America believe the added craft fair will draw an even larger crowd this year. To learn more about the AWE program’s work in Crossnore and Family Fun on the Fourth please contact Linda LaBelle at (828) 252-0121 or email llabelle@ handmadeinamerica.org. HandMade in America grows economies through craft and creative placemaking, transforming both individuals and communities through education, entrepreneurship and economic development. HandMade in America has a 19 year tradition for pioneering innovative ways to empower the people and towns of Western North Carolina through programs that educate and facilitate the needs of creative entrepreneurs and communities. Additional information is available online at www.handmadeinamerica.org. IF YOU Family Fun on the Fourth takes GO place Friday, July 4 from 10 a.m. to

7 p.m. For more information about Crossnore visit www.CrossnoreNC.com.


R A P I D

R I V E R

A R T S

artful living BUSINESS IN A MORE BEAUTIFUL WORLD

A Collaborative Model for Healthcare Professionals

W

BY JACK

BOYD, STRUCTURAL INTEgRATION THERApIST

We need each other. And with conscious collaboration we can truly help each other. As a health care professional, I want to empower community health where everyone can thrive, fully alive, sharing their gifts. I am at a personal cross-road where I realize that I cannot do this alone. We need to partner to empower our community’s ability to grow a thriving culture of wellness. We need everyone to contribute with their unique gifts. We all need to be the change we wish to see in the world. To do this we must first ask some difficult personal questions. Why do we allow our gifts to remain hidden from the world? What illusions stop us from being an international leader? What holds us back from changing the world right now? What is worth doing, even when we fail? I believe people are naturally designed to be collaborative. We may have had painful or scary experiences with collaboration in the past, but with a new model of conscious collaboration we can expand our sense of connection. To do this we need to expand our sense of vulnerability as well as our sense of self. A wellness model, shared by many health care professionals, addresses the domains of physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, social, environmental, financial, occupational, and cultural health. Imagine how clients would benefit, with their wellness team collaborating in these domains. A personal client advocate could help clients navigate their integrated health care options. Collaborating practitioners can share front-end and backend practice management services. Shared front-end services could include consolidated marketing and branding, reception, scheduling and intake. Shared back-end services could include Electronic Health Records management, billing, collection and bookkeeping. By collaborating, practitioners have more billable time to do what they are trained to do. They can also enjoy team support, cross-training, and peer feedback. Collaborating with a team of like-minded professionals is just more fun and more effective. This model of running a health care practice contributes to the revitalization of business in a more beautiful world. Find out more about the people behind the column and the live events that we host by visiting www.meetup.com/Business-in-a-More-Beautiful-World Business in a More Beautiful World, a monthly IF YOU networking & education event for those interested in GO a collaborative, heart-centered, purpose-driven model

Advertising Sales Representatives Rapid River Magazine is Seeking Sales Personnel Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses in these areas: Black Mountain, North Asheville, and Weaverville. Great for retirees needing extra income. Set your own hours – potential earnings are up to you! Some experience necessary. Seniors are encouraged to apply.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071,

or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

MA

YOU CAN SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 PER MONTH FOR 12 MONTHS WITH ENTERTAINMENT AND ABOVE.

Per Mo For 12 Mos. After Instant Rebate With 24-mo. Agreement

Rapid River Magazine (828) 646-0071

Free web links • Free ad design • Easy monthly billing

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

CF

pg. 32

of doing business. Every 4th Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Next event is July 24 at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville. Free to the public.

Advertise with

pg. 32

ORDER NOW AND LOCK IN 2 YEARS OF SAVINGS CHOICE™ AND ABOVE.

DON’T WAIT

CALL NOW!

800-871-6763 ALL DIRECTV OFFERS REQUIRE 24-MONTH AGREEMENT.** Offer ends 7/23/14

pg. 32

pA

Vol. 17, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2014 35


pg. 18

E

®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com 36 Haywood Street

pg. 32

HF

Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

pg. 33

RC

pg. 32

TC

pg. 32

BK

July 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
July 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Fine Artist Jenny Buckner..p11; Inside: ArtFest & Art After Dark..p9; Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival..p7; Asheville Lyric Op...

Advertisement