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Blue Eyed Girl and others perform at the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands. PAGES 20-21

HART presents La Cage Aux Folles. PAGE 27

Folkmoot delivers diverse cultural performances. PAGE 4 PLUS INTERVIEWS WITH: Jason Rafferty, artist PAGE 12 Mary-Beth Akers, owner of The Village Green Cafe PAGE 38 Maria Pressley, owner of Maria’s Mexican Pueblo PAGE 37

Malaprop’s Bookstore Celebrates 30th Anniversary! Interview with Emoke B’Racz & Linda Barrett Knopp PAGE 3


2 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11


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asheville shops INTERVIEW WITH

Emoke B’Racz & Linda Barrett Knopp

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of Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café

alaprop’s celebrated their 30th anniversary last month. The bookstore was also honored and recognized by the publishing industry in 2000 as the best in the country. First in the South! That next year Nancy Olsen of Quail Ridge Bookstore in Raleigh was honored. Emoke B’Racz and Linda Barrett Knopp took time to share their enthusiasm for books, authors, and Asheville.

Rapid River Magazine: How did Malaprop’s come about 30 years ago?

Emoke B’Racz: I spent 10 years learning

what NOT to do in a corporate bookstore setting. I had to quit before I lost my soul there so I did. I spent a year traveling and thinking every day about *my* bookstore.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

ma Dykeman, Gail Godwin, Fred Chappel, John Ehle and many others. Malaprop’s just had to show the people that we indeed were here to serve this community to the best of our ability. I chose to concentrate our initial efforts in poetry and international literature until we were well versed in the most important part, Great Southern Literature – the learning of which has been a wonderful experience. My first books in English that I read were As I Lay Dying by Faulkner. I continued with Light in August August, and read Ellen Douglas’s The Rock Cried Out Out, which I now think made me whisper to myself that *I could, and want, to live in the South.* Took me awhile to get here, but here I am, and after 30 years I still love our Downtown Books and News (celebrating 24 years this July 1), and Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe (celebrating 30 years this past June). I can go on with praises for this community for making these bookstores this solid place to learn, teach, and entertain.

RRM: Tell us a little about

Malaprop’s and how it differs from the national book chains?

Linda Barrett Knopp:

We choose all the titles we stock, so we are able to offer our customers a hand-picked selection of Emoke B’Racz & Linda Barrett Knopp Photo: Erica Mueller the best new and classic titles available. We listen to our customers, incorporate When I got done with traveling I got their tastes into our title selection, and chalin the car again and spent time in looking lenge them with surprising offerings, too. at downtowns on the east coast. Asheville We bring in authors we know our cushad the mountains, the architecture, and tomers want to meet and support, and we empty buildings. I loved the mountains and create community events that will enhance the architecture immedeately. When I heard our city’s cultural life. Our staff are empowthat the good folks of Asheville voted down ered to contribute to title selection, meranother maniacal plan to cement downtown chandising, and event planning. You won’t over, I knew I could live and work here. find this kind of creative talent and responsiveness at a chain store. RRM: Tell us something about the history of Malaprop’s in Asheville. What role has RRM: What characteristics do you think a Malaprop’s played in the local literary comperson needs to be a successful independent munity? bookstore owner? What has been the key to Malaprop’s success? EBR: I think that it is important to note that Asheville already had a pretty deep literary LBK: I would say as someone who has and artistic heritage with Tomas, Zelda, Wil-

Continued on page 7

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 3


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stage preview Folkmoot Festival

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July 18-29

round mid-July, they begin arriving. Nearly 300 people from 9 countries will appear in Waynesville, NC to begin their Folkmoot experience. New Zealand, Indonesia, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Belgium, France, Serbia and Hawaii, USA will be the diverse cultures represented at this year’s Folkmoot Festival, July 18-29, 2012. Although we are so close to the start of performances, there is still so much to prepare. There are many beds to make, food orders to be placed, 60 staff and several hundred volunteers to be organized and 15 venues to coordinate. Most importantly, we need to get the word out, so we can sell tickets, so we can have a festival next year! All Group performances (all 9 groups at the same performance venue) have expanded considerably for 2012. This July Folkmoot will feature 8 all group performances — this is doubled from 2011. We also added two all group matinee performances. You asked for it and we listened!

Scheduled Performances Thursday, July 19 at 7:30 p.m. – Gala

Preview & Reception, Stompin’ Ground, Maggie Valley. Private event for Friends of Folkmoot, donors and sponsors. Call 877-FOLKUSA to join Friends of Folkmoot

and get two tickets. (All Groups)

Friday, July 20 at 7:30

p.m. – Grand Opening, Stompin’ Ground, Maggie Valley. (All Groups) Reserved seating: $30, $25; General admission $20; Children (12 & under) ½ price.

Saturday, July 21 at

7:30 p.m. – Haywood Community College, Clyde. (All Groups) Reserved seating: $30, $25; General admission $20; Children (12 & under) ½ price.

Sunday, July 22, 1:30

p.m. – Diana Wortham Theater, Asheville. (All Groups) General Admission $30, Children (12 & under) ½ price.

Wednesday, July 25 at 2:00 p.m. – Blue

Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. (All Groups) General Admission Adults $30, Children (12 & under), Students, Faculty: ½ price.

Friday, July 27 at 2:00 p.m. – Extravaganza

Matinee, Stompin’ Ground, Maggie Valley. (All Groups) Reserved seating: $30, $25; General admission $20; Children (12 & under) ½ price.

Saturday, July 28 at 7:30 p.m. – Haywood

Community College, Clyde. (All Groups) Reserved seating: $30, $25; General admission $20; Children (12 & under) ½ price.

Sunday, July 29 at 7:00 p.m. – Candlelight

Closing, Stuart Auditorium, Lake Junaluska. (All Groups) Reserved seating: $30, $25; General admission $20; Children (12 & under) ½ price. The Festival kicks off on Wednesday, July 18 at the Folkmoot Friendship Center for HomeTrust Bank’s Haywood County Family Night. This very affordable performance of two groups is family-centered and includes sodas, freeze pops and popcorn, all for $10 adults, $5 children. IF YOU For a full schedule of all 24 public GO events call 877-FOLKUSA or go to

www.FolkmootUSA.org.

PG. 36

WH

4 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11


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we love this place Spectacular Southern Appalachians

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Fifteen, Number Eleven

3Emoke Interviews B’Racz &

JULY 2012

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Linda Barrett Knopp . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Jason Rafferty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Maria Pressley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Mary-Beth Akers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Poetry Editor: Ted Olson Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

4Folkmoot Performance Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival 6

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Jane Falkenstein, Javier Folgar, Beth Gossett, Chall Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Amanda Leslie, Peter Loewer, Kay S. Miller, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Patty Smyers, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St. Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein.

9Riverside Fine Art Studios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9 Rapid River Magazine Receptions . 10

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Mary Webster and Associates . . . . . 22

13 Music Concerts at Biltmore Park . . . . . . .

13

Aaron Freeman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

13 Columns Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . .

13

James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 14 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. . 8 Ted Olson - Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 17 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 23 Max Hammonds, MD - Health. . . 33 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 18 Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . 19 Michael Parker – Food & Wine . . . 28

24 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 27 Stage Preview HART – La Cage Aux Folles . . . . .

24

Twin Bees on Coneflower © 2012 Karen Rowe

The Carolinas’ Nature Photographers Association – Asheville Region’s annual summer exhibit is on display at the Cradle of Forestry through July 31, 2012.

summer fun Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival July 1, 8, 15, 22

July 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29

New Magnetic Voices

The Cradle of Forestry is located in the Pisgah National Forest on Highway 276 near Brevard, NC. Visit www.cnpa-asheville.org, or www.cradleofforestry.com.

DramaRama at ACT

Have Fun, Do Good

Love to garden? Ask about community gardens in your town or at your church. Like to fish? How about adopting a stream or a section along a river? Think about supporting those organizations that protect and maintain the areas you enjoy. Begin your search at www.haywoodwaterways.org. Rapid River Magazine is on Facebook!

6

Shindig on the Green

The exhibit includes more than 50 images celebrating the beauty and wonder of western North Carolina’s landscapes, flora, and fauna. It conveys the group’s goal to develop a community that celebrates the beauty of nature through photography, and promotes an appreciation of nature within the region.

Like to fish? Love to kayak? Does hiking in our beautiful mountains make your day? Love to create a beautiful garden or grow your own food? Do a search to identify what local organizations offer activities that support and care for what you love.

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La Cage Aux Folles at HART July 6-29

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July 7-14

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Rapid River Magazine Art Receptions

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Friday, July 13 – Gallery 262 Friday, July 20 – Riverside Studios

Folkmoot USA July 18-29

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Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands July 19-22

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20-21

“Like us” and win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Rapid River Magazine Follow us online for the latest events www.rapidrivermagazine.com

27

NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

© Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, July 2012 Vol. 15 No. 11

34 What to Do Guide Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . .

Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

38 Shops Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe . . . . . . . On the Cover: Emoke B’Racz and Linda Barrett Knopp of Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café.

PAGE

35 35 35 35 35

38

Laughing Mask Candies . . . . . . . . . 29

3

Photo: Erica Mueller

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 5


THE FUTURE OF MONEY

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By PAT BOONE Our once great nation and economy are about to hit a wall!

Call Swiss America today at 866-709-3643 for your FREE copy of our “THE FUTURE OF MONEY” CD and, as a bonus... Mr. Smith’s latest 40-page White Paper, “RE-MAKING MONEY: Ways to Restore America’s Optimistic Golden Age”

Call 866-709-3643

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performance

Preparing for a Global Currency Collapse

After writing four important books accurately forecasting the future of Gold, Oil, the Dollar and Inflation, this new CD presents Mr. Smith’s vision to prepare Americans for a global crisis never before seen in history.

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Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

he Haywood County Arts Council announces its 18th season hosting the Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival. The series of five concerts showcases world-class musicians performing a variety of chamber music works. Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival co-directors Bill Hoyt, French horn, and Paul Nitsch, piano, have assembled an outstanding group of Swannanoa Chamber Players for the festival including: Inessa Zaretsky, piano; Cynthia Watson, oboe; Tracy Rowell, bass; George Pope, flute; Lynn Hileman, bassoon, Ricardo Almeida, French horn; and David Bell, clarinet. The Chamber Players are featured throughout the five-week festival along with two award-winning quartets: the Jasper Quartet (July 1) and the Enso String Quartet (July 8, 15, 22). Concerts take place Sundays, through July 22. All concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center, 250 Pigeon Street in Waynesville. For more information about the Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival visit swannanoachambermusic.com

BY

KAY S. MILLER

On Saturday, July 21 in Waynesville, the Jasper Quartet will conduct a strings workshop for area string and Suzuki students. For details about the Haywood County Arts Council’s 2012 Strings Workshop visit www.haywoodarts.org to download registration forms or email the Arts Council at info@haywoodarts.org.

The Jasper Quartet perform July 1.

IF YOU Tickets for the GO Swannanoa Chamber

Music Festival in Waynesville are available at the Haywood County Arts Council office and gallery at 86 N. Main Street or by calling the Arts Council office at (828) 452-0593. Tickets are $20 per person. Students 25 years old and under are admitted free of charge with valid student ID.

The Enso String Quartet perform July 8, 15, & 22.

Brief Encounters: New Magnetic Voices 2012

B

rief EncounBY CHALL GRAY ters: New Magnetic Voices 2012 Stewart, featuring is shaping the Latin Lover of up to be one of the your dreams. most exciting and At the varied theatrical weirder end of events of the sumthe spectrum are mer. The Magnetic Chris O’Leary’s Theatre’s second Just For the Haliannual evening of but, directed by original short plays Jason Williams, “Just For the Halibut” features new plays about a husband by well-known playwrights, as well and wife who have just given birth to as by writers whose works are being their first fish; and Mark Sullivan’s staged for the first time. I Had That Dream Again, directed The program includes nationby Peter Brezny. Rounding out the ally celebrated playwright Stephan de program is Knit, Purl, by local writer Ghelder’s Meeting Mr. Right, a tender Mesha Maren, an intense and sensicomedy with a surprise ending, directtively-written family drama, directed ed by Mandy Bean; Asheville-favorite by Mike Coghlan. Jim Julien’s The Dining, directed by “These writers represent a new Katie Anne Towner, which offers up a group of talents for The Magnetic celebrity chef on the verge of a mental Field, and for theatre in Asheville,” breakdown; and Jerry Lieblich’s hilarisays Katie Anne Towner, Associate ous Portrait of the Artist as a Middle Artistic Director and Managing DirecAged Woman, directed by Samantha tor of The Magnetic Theatre. “We re-

6 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

ceived scripts from all over the country, and we’re thrilled to have put together this fun, eclectic program.” The lineup includes an ensemble of hand-picked local actors: Magnetic Theatre veterans Darren Marshall, Trinity Smith, Courtney DeGennaro, Travis Kelley, Ryan Madden, and Laura Tratnik; as well as fresh-to-the-Magnetic-stage talents Joseph Barcia, James Curley, Carla Pridgen, Sean David Robinson, and Mike Willey. “If you want to see a cross-section of the best Asheville has to offer in terms of new playwrighting, directing, and acting,” said Magnetic Field Associate Artistic Director and playwright John Crutchfield, “this is a show you won’t want to miss.” IF YOU Thursdays through GO Saturdays, July 5-21 at 7:30

p.m. Tickets are $12/15 and can be purchased online at www. themagneticfield.com/events or in person at The Magnetic Field, 372 Depot Street, Asheville, NC.


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asheville shops ‘Malaprop’s’ continued from page 3

worked with Emoke for almost 24 years, that she is both a creative genius, and an excellent businesswoman. She is open to new ideas and empowers her staff to bring forward new ways of selling books, gifts, and running our café. If an idea makes financial sense and improves how we can serve the community and our staff, she’ll back it 100 percent. To me, the key to Malaprop’s success has been Emoke’s leadership and the uniquely talented and devoted staff who have given so much of themselves to the store over the years.

RRM: What do you most enjoy about being a bookseller?

LBK: I love connecting books with readers.

I love being surrounded by books, meeting writers, and spending my working hours in a creative pursuit of making Malaprop’s the best she can be for our customers and staff.

RRM: If you could have any writer, living or dead, read at Malaprop’s who would it be?

LBK: William Shakespeare. I will spend my whole life in awe of his brilliant work and contribution to our culture.

RRM: What do you think the future looks like for independent booksellers?

LBK: The future is uncertain because of

ebooks, though I am still very optimistic. We need customers to keep us in the loop for their ebook purchases through malaprops.

Photos by Erica Mueller, www.ericamueller.com

com. The sale of print books is still very healthy and can sustain an independent bookstore, but much depends on how much ebooks affect print sales in the future.

RRM: What advice do you have to offer to an author who would like to conduct an event at Malaprop’s?

LBK: Visit www.malaprops.com and choose

“Present an Event” from the Event’s tab. All you need to know is right there!

RRM: What kind of books do you person-

ally enjoy? What types of books sell best in

your experience?

LBK: My reading tastes are all

over the place these days, but I’ve always loved characterdriven fiction in which I feel, as a reader, that I learn something new about myself and the world. I’ve learned so much life wisdom from books, even from the silliest books, sometimes. You never know when an author will surprise you with the lesson you need to learn at that moment in your life.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS AT MALAPROP’S

Appalachian Fiction – Reading, Booksigning, and Concert Saturday, July 14 7 p.m. Meet Kimberly Brock, author of The River Witch, and Erika Marks, author of Little Gale Gumbo while you enjoy the music of Anna Kline and the Grits & Soul Band. Of The River Witch, author Joshilyn Jackson

says, “...a haunted landscape, authentically Southern, where the tragedies of the past and the most fragile, gorgeous kind of lovesoaked hope are equally alive.”

cracked, each time period and geographical location completely convincing, each life thoroughly absorbing.”

Novelist Melissa Senate offers equally high praise for Little Gale Gumbo: “With its irresistible settings — from New Orleans to an island off the coast of Maine — unforgettable characters, and heartfelt explorations of love, family, and secrets, [this] is one of my favorite novels of the year.”

Anne Freels Demonstration & Booksigning

The Pretty Girl Sunday, July 15 3 p.m. Debra Spark, a faculty member in the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers, will read from and sign The Pretty Girl: Novella and Stories. Author Monica Wood has written, “Each story is so different from the next, each character a little code to be

Malaprop’s bestsellers have always represented the authors we host, and the tastes of our community. I can see where Asheville’s at by looking at our bestseller list. This week you’ll find a mix of touring author books as well as fantasy, regional, and erotic fiction.

Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe 55 Haywood Street, Downtown Asheville (828) 254-6734 www.malaprops.com

Friday, July 20 7 p.m. Anne Freels, known for her colorful and contemporary flair on a traditional Appalachian craft, has published the first comprehensive illustrated book on how to make her specialty dolls: Making Colorful Corn Shuck Dolls. Meet Anne as she demonstrates techniques she has developed over more than three decades of crafting and selling her dolls worldwide. A booksigning will follow. Malaprop’s, 55 Haywood Street, (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com. Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 7


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the curmudgeon Far Too Much Noise

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ell,” said the curmudgeon as he established himself on the radiator to the left of the General Store’s front door, “I’m here to tell you that I am sick of NOISE!” “What,” shouted the Breadman as he began to stack the week-old pies in a separate pile from the new as though they were to be eschewed, “what did you say?” With that Storekeep dropped five six-inch carriage bolts on the top of an empty oil drum, slipped on the seventh, and crashed with deliberate speed into a pile of stovepipe in the far corner. He just moaned. “Noise,” repeated the Curmudgeon, “just plain noise . . . there’s far too much of it.” As though on cue, three motorcyclists stopped at the four corners outside the store, chatted for a moment, then lined themselves up with the largest cycle in front, followed by the smaller, then proceeded to zoom away with the whine and the roar of three giant bazookas. But their loathsome putt-putts were nothing to the cacophony of a big black helicopter that passed low over the store apparently looking for James Bond or the nearest office of the Agenda 21 Agency. “It’s as though,” said the Curmudgeon, “civilization measured its ability by the amount of pure racket it can produce. We are assaulted by noise morning, noon, and night—” He was stopped in mid-voice by the raspberry of “Eeeerk . . . fazzzz . . . urk!” put forth by the CB monitor originally set to

BY

PETER LOEWER

warn area residents of weather reports from the National Illustration by Peter Loewer Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather but unfortunately often interrupted a nearby magneto of unknown design that nobody could find. Storekeep turned down the volume but before he could complete the task, the old-fashioned radio (turned on back in 1967) blared out a soda commercial—the set was always on whether there was anyone listening or not—and because the station manager thought its listeners were lulled to sleep by the slipped-disco music it continued to play, he automatically upped the volume of all commercials except those devoted to public service. Out of deference to all those in the store, Breadman stopped sorting Moon Pies, went over to the radio, and turned the volume down but it was a useless gesture because, again on cue, three very large semi’s rolled by and tooted their horns at once to let everybody know that they were there and not to forget them. With a blurp of diesel they drove west into the sunset only to be heard in the distance at the next four corners. Over at the ball field across from the store, Cousin Victor began to mow the grass his mower whirring away at top decibel level.

Appalachian Trail Celebrates 75th Anniversary This August

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his year marks the 75th anniversary nus at Springer Mountain, Georgia, to its of the completion of the Appanorthern terminus at Katahdin, Maine. Over lachian Trail (A.T.), the longest 250,000 acres of contiguous Trail lands are hiking-only footpath in the world, protected and managed along the footpath. measuring roughly 2,180 miles in Hikers from across the globe are drawn length from Georgia to Maine. The annito the Trail for a variety of reasons: to reversary will occur on connect with nature, Tuesday, August 14, to escape the stress of 2012. city life, to meet new The original people, strengthen Trail took more than old friendships or to 15 years to build and experience a simpler was completed on life. About 2,000 August 14, 1937. The people attempt to A.T. travels through “thru-hike” the estifourteen states along mated 2,180 miles of the crests and valleys the Trail each year, of the Appalachian with only one out of mountain range from four completing the its southern termientire journey. McAfee Knob in southern Virginia. 8 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

…it took three of us to calm him down… “Oh, it’s not too bad,” yelled the Breadman, suddenly aware that he was shouting but for the first time in ten minutes the store was silent of noise. Outside of collective breathing all that could be heard was the slight whistle of the wind through the screen door and the soft beating of a moth’s wing, the insect trapped between two lights of a half-open window. “Reminds me of a city friend,” said the Curmudgeon, who came out from Asheville to my farm and thought something was wrong with his hearing ‘cause he heard the sounds of his own blood circulation for the first time in his life. Wanted to go to the doctor right away and it took three of us to calm him down and then—” The Curmudgeon’s next few words were lost in the whine of a very low-flying jet that had strayed from its flight path and was looking for Atlanta. “I’m beginning to see what you mean,” said the Breadman. “It’s bothersome,” continued the Curmudgeon, “like an empty diet soda can that rolls down the aisle of a bus when driving up a steep hill, and rolls its way back up to the front when the bus goes down into the next valley; gratuitous noise left by a slob.” “You could pick it up,” said Storekeep. “Next time I might,” said the Curmudgeon. Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

BY JAVIER FOLGAR

More than 99% of the A.T. is in public ownership. Not only is the footpath itself protected, but a corridor of land, averaging one thousand feet in width, is also protected. To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the completion of the A.T., the ATC will host a weekend celebration on August 11 and 12 at its headquarters at 799 Washington St., Harpers Ferry, WV. Highlights include guest speakers, workshops, activities, food, music and games. For more information about the 75th anniversary of the completion of the A.T., including ways to give back and local celebrations, visit www.appalachiantrail.org/75. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s mission is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail - ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come. For more information visit www.appalachiantrail.org.


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fine art Riverside Studios

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on’t be fooled by the quiet facade of Riverside Studios. Inside the large historic brick building on the edge of the River Arts District you will find an array of high quality fine art and, on occasion, you may hear some live music as well. The spacious studio/gallery with wooden floors and beamed ceiling has a feeling of ease and the light filtering in through the high windows gives the space its sense of warmth and beauty. Brit J Øie, a native of Norway and twenty year resident of North Carolina, has created her own technique combining textured papers and painting. Her current series, “The Mountains,” explores the physical and emotional impact of living in WNC.

Jon Graham, best known for his layered architectural paintings, received his BFA from East Carolina University. An example of his mural work can be seen on the exterior of Aabani Salon in Weaverville. Julie Miles starts each piece by listening to the stories preserved in the old, rural materials that are the foundation of her mixed media creations. The beauty of stillness and the humbleness of being human are predominant themes. John Stennett is an abstract painter whose aim in many of his recent works has been to create visual sound through

color and form. Lucretia Speas is a painter and mosaic artist whose work is realism based with focus on the human characteristics that she sees in everything. She has a Master’s degree in painting and studied mosaic in Italy. Julia Masaoka is known for her shrine art and mixed-media paintings. Her highly detailed work includes found objects such as hubcaps, bottle caps and roofing shingles. Tatiana Potts, originally from Slovakia, recently graduated from UNCA with a BFA in printmaking. The works on display include her engraving and etchings. The artists of Riverside Studios are a diverse group but in common they have a desire to create art that expresses their thoughts and vision of the world, affordable works that appeal to first-time as well as experienced collectors. They invite you to come in and enjoy the ongoing exhibit of works that line the walls of their large open space. In addition to the artists, you will meet art consultant Wendy H. Outland, President of Who Knows Art, who has an office located in the building. With more than 30 years of museum, arts council, and gallery experience, she provides consultation services to individual artists, galleries and art organizations. Riverside Studios is located at the intersection of W. Haywood Street and Riverside Drive, by the Craven

John Rountree Postcards Along the Way

Street Bridge. Make plans to have lunch at nearby White Duck Taco, and then walk across the tracks to the second building on the left.

Riverside Studios 174 W. Haywood Street in the River Arts District Hours: Mon-Sat 11-4 (828) 551-5045 www.riversidestudios-asheville.com

MESH Gallery presents Postcards Along the Way, black and white photography by John Rountree. This event is free and open to the public. Come by and enjoy hors d’oeuvres and beverages!

IF YOU GO: The show will run from Monday, July 2 through Friday, July 27, 2012. A reception for the artist will be held on Friday, July 6, 2012 from 6 -8 p.m. at MESH Gallery, located at 114-B West Union Street in downtown Morganton, NC.

Brit J Øie, from The Mountains series.

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magic of the smokies Join Us at These Receptions for Rapid River Magazine’s Winning Artists

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Gallery 262 Waynesville, NC

Riverside Studios River Arts District

Meet the Artists Vote for Your Favorite Artwork Silent Auction • Great Food & Fun!

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RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE’S MAGIC OF THE SMOKIES ARTISTS RECEPTIONS

Gallery 262 Hosts Reception Friday, July 13 Join us on Friday, July 13 from 6 to 9 p.m. Sample the Chocolate Bear’s finest chocolates at Gallery 262 in Waynesville, NC. We will be serving gourmet handcrafted chocolate truffles made with all natural ingredients. Each Chocolate Bear truffle is hand-rolled and twice-dipped in chocolate.

Friday, July 13 - Gallery

Rick Hills Photos: Erica Mueller

At the Taste of Opera Event, June 9, 2012.

262, Waynesville. Reception 6-9 p.m. On display through July 31.

Friday, July 20 -

Riverside Studios, West Asheville. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 7.

Friday, August 3

- Studio B, North Asheville. Reception from 5:30-8 p.m. On display through August 16.

Friday, August 10

- VanDyke Gallery, Asheville. Reception 5-8:30 p.m. On display through August 28.

Friday, August 17 -

Frame It To-a-T, South Asheville. Reception 5:30-8:30 p.m. On display through August 23.

The Finest Assortment of Chocolates, Candies, and Custom Gift Baskets

Saturday, August 25 - Great Smokies

Creations, Waynesville, NC. Reception 2-5 p.m. On display through September 4.

“not your ordinary...confectionary”

Thursday, September 6

170 North Main Street Waynesville, NC PG.

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10 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

- Neo Cantina Awards Party, Biltmore Village. Reception 5:30-9:30 p.m. On display through September 17.


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magic Join Us at These Receptions

Rapid River Magazine Celebrates Fine Art Riverside Studios Hosts Reception Friday, July 20

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iverside Studios will host a reception for Rapid River Magazine’s Magic of the Smokies winning artists on Friday, July 20. Bid on works by Julia Masaoka, Brit J Øie, and Tatiana Potts. The event will feature music by singer-songwriter duo Greg and Lucretia Speas, performing folk, blues and Americana. Julia Masaoka is known for her shrine art and mixed-media paintings. Her colorful work includes found objects such as hubcaps, bottle caps, and roofing shingles. Brit J Øie’s work features richly textured surfaces created by combining a collage of embossed papers and several layers of acrylic paint. The patterns and textures achieved are sometimes inspired by nature and other times discovered in the process of painting. Tatiana Potts’ favorite techniques in printmaking include engraving, line etching and lithography. She is also a potter.

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Tatiana Potts

Julia Masaoka PG. 36

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Upcycle: \ʼup-sī-kəl\: the environmentally

IF YOU Riverside Studios, GO 174 W. Haywood

Street in the River Arts District. Phone (828) 551-5045 or visit www. riversidestudios-asheville.com.

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driven process of converting discarded materials into useful products of better quality and value. Brit J Øie, from The Mountains series.

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Daniel McClendon at the Taste of Opera. Photo: Erica Mueller

The place for upcycled goods. 92 Charlotte St, Asheville, NC 28801

828.2553.2533

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Free Parking Next to City Bakery

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 11


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH

Jason Rafferty

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ason Rafferty was born in 1991 and started doing digital graphic design for fun around the age of 12. At 16 he began focusing on traditional work with drawing and painting. Recently he has studied the subjects at the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas in Asheville, in the BFA program at UNC Asheville, and at Studio Escalier in Paris, France. His latest work integrates many genres of visual art into cohesive compositions.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a bit about your work.

Jason Rafferty: Well it’s been quite

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INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

around with the traditional rules of tension, balance, color, etc. and also integrate my history with digital graphic design.

RRM: How do you approach starting a new project?

JR: Each piece is its

own animal and I’ve found there is no one approach. Some of them come right out quickly, others I pre-compose using thumbnails and small paint studies, still others are totally improvised and built up around say, a portrait on an empty panel. The long figure drawings are done very traditionally, from life. The ones from Paris are one-week poses, three hours a day. Art Spirit was composed in Adobe Photoshop, printed out onto an 8x10 sheet, and painted by eye from that. It varies a lot.

a journey already and I think the disparate nature of my current body of work reflects that. I’ve been studying the classical realist approach to drawing insatiably: figure drawing, portrait, still life, and very soon will begin to study oil painting. It allows me to populate the drawings and paintings with rich textures, dear friends, greek torsos... Anything that has strength to its expression. On the more experimental side, I’ve been doing improvised compositions that play Diplomat by Jason Rafferty

RRM: Do you have a favorite place outside of your workspace that you like to go to sketch?

JR: I almost always do the

life-drawing model sessions at the Fine Arts League twice a week, Mondays and Thursdays, 7-9 p.m. I also have done some sketching and easel painting downtown.

RRM: What are some of your sources of inspiration?

JR: Almost anything can be

a source of inspiration, and I keep a pocket notebook to write down quotes, composi-

ART EXHIBITIONS AT UNCA Lia Cook: Bridge 11

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Lia Cook applies digital imaging to fiber art, creating monumental works that blur the distinction between computer technology, weaving, painting and photography. Opening reception from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, July 26 at UNC Asheville’s Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, 1181 Broyles Road, Hendersonville. (828) 890-2050 or craftcreativitydesign.org/home.php

12 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

Jason Rafferty

Spurlock panel detail.

tions, color schemes, quick gesture studies, anything that feels significant. I read widely which is great inspiration. There are also some particular contemporary musicians that have had a profound impact on how I approach visual art: Avishai Cohen, Hiromi Uehara, Bela Fleck, and recently Esperanza Spalding. I resonate with their authenticity, skill, and individuality as artists.

RRM: Weapon of choice (favorite materials)?

JR: I’m partial to any good graphite

pencil, General’s black and white charcoal pencils, Canson mi-teines for tone paper, Golden acrylics, and any decent mid-upper range oil paints (which I’m still very new to).

Alchemy: Transcendence and Transmigration

Senior art majors Mary Claire Becker and Katie Johnson combine science and spirituality to enact a seemingly magical power or process. Exhibit on view 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays through August 1, in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union Gallery. Details at (828) 2516991 or cesap.unca.edu/calendar.

For more information please visit www.jasonrafferty.com IF YOU On Friday July 6 from 7-10 GO p.m. Jason Rafferty opens his

premier solo exhibition. The exhibit, Two Dispositions, will run from July 6 until August 1, 2012 at Izzy’s Coffee Den, 74 N Lexington Ave. in Asheville.


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sound experience Concerts at Biltmore Park

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ne of this area’s BY JAMES CASSARA better kept secrets is the wonderful and the Cowboys have been entirely free engaging audiences for outdoor concerts at the over 18 years. They play Biltmore Park commuprimarily in WNC but nity in south Asheville. have traveled extenUnder a beautiful night sively throughout the sky, surrounded by a Southeast, from Key wide range of shops and West to New York City eateries, the series, now and down to the British in its third year, has beThe Caribbean Cowboys Virgin Islands. Weams gun to attract larger and is a founding member more appreciative crowds. Upcoming shows of the Western North Carolina Parrot Head offer a glimpse of the variety of bands and Club and is unapologetic in his affection for genres that the folks at Biltmore Park are the music of Jimmy Buffett. bringing to the area. Mike Barnes is quite possibly the secOn July 7 the Caribbean Cowboys, ond most talented guitarist to emerge from one of Asheville’s longest running and most our town (few would argue that Warren popular entertainers, bring their brand of Haynes deserves the number one spot), an sing along fun to the series. Fronted by accomplished player who over the years has guitarists Mike Barnes and Steve Weams, shared his guitar skills with thousands of

Carolina Rex

students. Rounding out the foursome are drummer Jack Nitterauer and bassist Mike Rothacker. All four Cowboys sing, laying down levers of harmony that enrich and elevate the songs they (and likely you) grew up with. In addition to songs by Buffett the band performs material from such diverse voices as Jesse Winchester and Frank Sinatra, as well as their own calypso/reggae flavored original songs. On July 21 the good times roll on with the Texas Blues guitar driven rock of Carolina Rex. Better known as C-Rex to their

WNC Jazz Profiles: Chuck Lichtenberger “Chuck Lichtenberger approaches his creativity with an almost childlike exuberance! He creates music unlike anything heard before, drawing on a vast reservoir of diverse influences. He’s been an inspiration and mentor to me. I can’t say enough about his character and integrity, let alone his musical prowess, both as a composer and a producer!”

~ guitarist Jonathan Pearlman

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orn in Atlanta, Charles Clement Lichtenberger mostly grew up in Greensboro, NC. “I studied piano reluctantly until age ten, and enthusiastically after that as I then started writing my own material and understood that the better I got on the piano, the better my writing would become. I started out in the mid 80’s listening to Top 40, moving to rap in middle school, and settling into metal and grunge in high school. Van Halen has been my favorite band since age ten, as Eddie Van Halen is the epitome of virtuosity mixed with accessibility. In high school, my piano teacher turned me on to Thelonious Monk and I didn’t get it at first. I thought all the songs sounded the same. The first jazz album that grabbed me from the beginning was “Miles Smiles” by Miles Davis.” I asked Chuck who besides Van Halen have been his rock influences. “The Afghan Wigs (musically combining grunge and soul, which shouldn’t work, but in their case does), Anthrax, Megadeth, Radiohead and The Pixies, who are lyrically more concerned with the feeling and sound of individual phrases - the audience then creates their own story. I

also like Bjork (How to Make Passionate Electronic Music 101), Wilco, and Jar-e (local soul influenced keyboardist/singer/songwriter who bares his soul while you dance).” Chuck attended UNCA, studying classical and jazz piano. “In 1996, I started teaching students full time and began playing in area rock and jazz groups. 1998-1999, I toured the Southeast with The Goodies. I was Kat Williams’ piano player and band leader from 2000-2002. My main creative focus since 2002 has been Stephaniesid, a rock band led by my wife Stephanie Morgan.” Chuck hosted a jazz jam at Tressa’s that ran for 10 years. “That’s where I really learned how to play jazz and I’m now part of Alien Music Club, a collective of musicians that hosts the Thursday night jazz jam at Barley’s. I’m also currently fronting the jazz rock band the Archrivals, co-leading the swing band CryBaby, and playing keyboards in the R&B outfit Ruby Slippers.” Jazz influences? “Horace Silver is probably my biggest influence on piano. He seems to be creating pop hooks every time he solos. I also love Herbie Hancock - he never lets his virtuosity get in the way of making good music. Ben Folds is another influence.” I asked Chuck what inspires his writing. “Lately I’ve been composing away

fans, the five piece group is anchored by the twin vocals of Jacqui Fehl and Brian Shore. Rounding out the band is Alec Fehl on guitar and harmonies, and the rhythm section of drummer Harry Lewis and bassist Andy John. Having played here before, Carolina Rex is one of the mainstays of the Biltmore Park shows. They are a constant on the local scene, playing both original material and the classic sounds of Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, and more than a smattering of Motown. So there you have it: Absolutely free family friendly shows in a setting that is hard to top. What more could any budget minded music lover ask for?

IF YOU Outdoor shows at the Biltmore GO Park Pavilion with the Caribbean

Cowboys (July 7) and Carolina Rex (July 21). For more information about other shows and links to various band web sites go to www.biltmorepark.com.

BY

EDDIE LESHURE

negative images for a from the piano. good portion of the This keeps my music-listening public. hands from fallI think the Jonathan ing into familiar Scales Fourchestra and patterns. I seem Archrivals are trying to to get a melody take that word back, so or a riff stuck in to speak, and make it my head first, okay again. then I go and try My future involves to work it out playing both music and on the piano.” basketball, and going on Chuck’s walks with Steph and first CD, Chuck Lichtenberger Photo: Frank Zipperer eating. Plus talking to “Chuck Limy dad on the phone. chtenberger”, And watching movies with Steph. And was a direct result of the now dormant mowing the lawn. Yeah!” Jazz Composers series put on by Sharon LaMotte. “Some of those songs had their “Chuck’s on-stage focus is constart twelve years before the recording. necting - with the band, with the I spent most of my twenties feeling bad audience. On stage, he’s laughing about myself for not being as technically and yelling like he’s at a basketball proficient as Herbie Hancock or Chick game. He’s an undisputed leader, the Corea and thought that there was no point glue of any project he takes on.” in performing jazz under my own name ~ vocalist Stephanie Morgan unless I was a virtuoso. The Jazz Composers series finally banished that ridiculous www.facebook.com/chuckandthearchrivals thought from my brain. There are so many other elements besides virtuosity that go into making an interesting artist. My second CD, “The Archrivals”, is a Eddie LeShure is a jazz rock CD with my vocal tunes, and my third radio host, currently CD, “The Archrivals II”, is an instrumental off-the-air, who album that would most easily be classified encourages all readers to enthusiastically under jazz fusion. Jonathan Scales and I support local jazz. have talked a lot about the term “fusion”. It’s become a word that conjures up mostly Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 13


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Welcome back to another “one to five stars” go round at sharing some of my favorite recent discs. Given the abundance of releases I am purposefully keeping my comments as concise as possible. As always be sure to legally purchase these albums from your local record store of choice. Without them Asheville would be a little less cool of a town. And away we go!

Small Faces Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake (expanded) Sanctuary Music For those who think the Small Faces – certainly the best British band to never hit it big over here – begin and end with “Itchycoo Park,” this incredible reissue of their 1968 magnum opus should open more than a few eyes and ears. When word of its imminent release (after a series of wretchedly mixed cheap CDs) began trickling out, I could only hope that this time things would be done right. I am thrilled to say that this triple disc set of the original album, in both mono and stereo, exceeds even my lofty expectations. The inclusion of more than twenty revealing outtakes and demos makes it otherworldly. While the Brit bands (unlike their U.S. counterparts) preferred to tell their stories through a series of character personas (Sgt. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band) Band or simply as third party observers (Tommy Tommy) the Small Faces took it much further, combining these elements and others to come up with a record that rivaled any of its days. Consisting of six songs and a lengthy whimsical fairy tale – outrageous even among the excesses of the era – it stood atop the UK Albums Chart for six weeks and has only grown better with time. Remastered by surviving members Kenny Jones and Ian McLagan (founders Steve Marriot and Ronnie Lane are deceased), Ogden’s Nut Gone Flake is no less the wonder now than it was 45 years ago. I envy anyone who will be hearing this album for the first time. For the rest of us it’s like it never went away. *****

Joe Bonamassa Driving Toward the Daylight J&R Music That Joe Bonamassa is a guitarist of extraordinary agility and taste – any number of his peers admits to envying his talent – is no surprise. What is revelatory is how dexterous a band leader he’s become, learning how to make solid records in a way that his earliest efforts never quite hinted at. Influenced more by the British blues rockers than their American counterparts, the ever prolific Bonamassa (this is thirteenth album in twelve years) is learning

how to work within his limits. Never much of a songwriter, he delights instead in resurrecting such relatively obscure blues covers as Howlin’ Wolf’s “Who’s Been Talkin’” and Willie Dixon’s “I Got All You Need”. He’s also willing to tackle songs from more contemporary songwriters, ranging from Bill Withers to Tom Waits, while giving them his own leather clad touch. Leaving his own road band at home, Bonamassa brings in a bevy of well known players, including Anton Fig and Aerosmith’s Brad Whitford: the result is an album that feels a bit less unified then I might have hoped, as well as one in which Bonamassa seems too eager to shine the spotlight on others. Turning the microphone over to Jimmy Barnes, whose over the top vocals sound right out of a Meatloaf album, is a bad idea, while the slick production strives too hard to make Bonamassa sound up to date, contrary to his well honed rep as a man out of time. But when things really cook, such as in the grinding gut bucket strum of “Dislocated Boy,” the grooves are relentless. While he really doesn’t have a distinctive style of his own – Bonamassa is clearly the sum of his parts – the sheer force of his playing can usually carry the day. I just wish Driving Toward the Daylight had more of the man and less of his esteemed friends. ***

Marty Stuart Nashville Volume 1: Tear the Woodpile Down Sugar Hill As much as Marty Stuart lives and breathes country music and all its sequined affectations, he’s never been particularly beholden to its musical traditions, preferring instead to respectfully explore the folk, blues, and gospel roots that helped form the genre. What sets Stuart apart from many of his generation is the superb musicianship he brings to the table. He’s not afraid to play the role of rhinestone cowboy but he knows damn well it’s the song that ultimately matters. Tear the Woodpile Down continues in the vein of 2010’s Ghost Train.. Once again backed by his touring band, the Fabulous Superlatives, Stuart offers a varied yet oddly cohesive set that bounces all over the sonic landscape without ever sounding contrived. The title track is a joyous romp through rockabilly string band territory while the revved up Jerry Reed stomp of “Hollywood Boogie” allows Stuart and

company to really let loose. “The Lonely Kind,” the album’s stand out track, is a classic country shuffle that would have sounded right at home on a mid-1960’s George Jones album. It merges the disparate strands that created country music into a sound that values tradition even as it pushes it in a new direction. In short, Stuart has learned the lessons of the genre’s history, making it (and us) all the better for it. ****

Blues Control Valley Tangents Drag City Music One of the most challenging (but rewarding) aspects of Blues Control is trying to categorize a band who continually defies categorization. They are most commonly referred to as “instrumental New Age jazz fusion rock” but that descriptor is too restrictive and wholly inadequate. With Valley Tangents the Queens based duo of Russ Waterhouse and Lea Cho further expand their musical horizons by introducing elements of prog and what, for lack of a better term, might best be described as danger rock. There’s a previously unheard edginess to the sound, a frenetic and dark undertone that beautifully captures the essence of the band. Nowhere is this better heard than on “Iron Pigs,” a synthesizer laden stomp that clearly references Black Sabbath while being texturally as far removed from heavy metal as can be. The extended groove of “Love’s a Rondo” hearkens to mid-period Weather Report (with guitar and tack piano supplanting horns) while “Gypsum” and “Walking Robin” show Waterhouse and Cho’s incipient flair for tuneful pop melody. And that’s what I love about this band. It doesn’t matter what style they choose to dabble in, it’s all done with a sense of adventure, playfulness, and pure joy. Those are traits too often missing from present-day music, and I for one am glad to see them not wholly left by the wayside. ***1/2

The dBs Falling off the Sky Bar None Music How does a band that’s been out of the limelight for more than two decades pick up right where they left off? For the dBs it’s simply a matter of putting the past aside ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15

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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

– although they broke up for reasons other than discord – picking up their instruments and finding the groove that brought them together in the first place. Falling off the Sky, their first new album since 1987 (and the first since 1982 to feature the original line up), retains that sense of audacious pop but fails to reignite the seamless buoyancy that marked their best days. Unlike their heyday records you can easily discern the individual styles or all four members: the ebullient pop sounds of Peter Holsapple or the psychedelic tinged ambitions of Chris Stamey don’t seem to mesh as well as they once did. Drummer Will Rigby contributes the fine “Write Back” while Gene Holder’s fuzz tone bass sounds as lethal as ever. That leaves us with Stamey and Holsapple who, despite having frequently worked together over the years, seem to have musically gone their separate ways: Think White Album era John and Paul. None of this detracts from the music and there’s no denying the fine songwriting that anchors the album. But despite the presence of longtime producers Scott Litt and Mitch Easter, Falling off the Sky still sounds like a warm up for the next big thing. Here’s hoping we don’t wait 20 more years for that moment to arrive. ***

The Tedeschi Trucks Band Live! Everybody’s Talkin’ Regardless of the myriad combinations they perform as, Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks have cemented their reputation as the first couple of the blues. Between the two, the amount of playing skill – one can only wonder at what their offspring might grow into – is astounding. Unlike previous releases, Live! Everybody’s Talkin’ is a more equal distribution of strengths; leaning a bit less towards the blistering guitar heroics of Trucks’ solo efforts and more towards the gospel tinged, slowly cooked blues that Tedeschi favors. Augmented with an 11-piece ensemble made up from individual bands – including a killer horn section – Tedeschi and Trucks pay tribute to songs they love while making them their own. The band transitions seamlessly between R&B, blues, rock, gospel, and jazz and never fall into the easy trap of mechanical jam band clichés. The two discs flawlessly balance the more subdued shorter tracks with extended solos, giving the band plenty of space to breathe and giving some sense of how well the pair pace their live performances. It’s hard to pinpoint highlights: Is it the rowdy strut of “Learn How to Love” (with its interplay between guitar and sax) or the astonish-

Aaron Freeman’s Marvelous Clouds Tour

BY JAMES

CASSARA

The name Aaron Freeman may not be a familiar one, but there’s a good chance you’re more than passing familiar with his former band Ween.

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ver the course of his twenty years with cohort Mickey Melchiondo – the pair adopted the names Dean and Gene Ween – Freeman released some fourteen albums (equally divided between live and studio), played thousands of shows, and amassed “an enormous number of home recordings” that have yet to see the light of day. The pair was the ultimate cosmic goof of the alternative rock era, a tremendously talented and deliriously outlandish combo whose work traveled far beyond the constraints of parody and novelty and dove straight into the heart of surrealism. Despite their mastery of a wide spectrum of musical styles Ween never allowed themselves to play it straight: they were the art house deconstructionists of their day, and played that role with demented glee. Even when their songs ventured into the realm of tasteless and offensive schlock – as they often did – you never knew if they were serious or not. Their output ranged from Parliament type funk to psychedelic folk to insurgent surf rock. And were that not enough, 1996’s 12 Golden Country Greats was recorded in Nashville with the cream of that city’s session players. Although Freeman and Melchiondo frequently collaborated with artists outside the Ween fraternity it came as a sur-

ing reading of John Sebastian’s “Darlin’ Be Home Soon,” which quite honestly ranks among the most stunning renderings I have ever heard. Either way this is exactly what a live album should be: a snapshot of two performers and their amazing band at the peak of their authority and artistry. ****1/2

The Mastersons Birds Fly South New West Records Who knew that some of the best altcountry being made today might emerge from the urban environs of Brooklyn? The husband-and-wife duo Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore may prefer Welch and Rawlings over Jones and Wynette but the stories they tell – broken down love and the debris it leaves for the rest of us to clean up

prise when, in 2012, Freeman announced the two had split. He’d just released his first ever solo project, Marvelous Clouds (Partisan Records), a thirteen song collection of music written by poet/songwriter Rod McKuen, and he clearly felt the need to explore new directions. Yes, that Rod McKuen. A man who in 1969 Time Magazine dubbed “the King of Kitsch” and who’s best selling poetry has been described by critics as everything from maudlin to “superficial and platitudinous and frequently silly”: in other words the ideal platform for Freeman. Produced by Ben Vaughn, who worked with Ween on the Golden Greats album, Marvelous Clouds is (given its source material) garnering unexpectedly positive reviews. The Wall Street Journal describes it as “performed with charm and reverence,” while Rolling Stone – in a four star review – called it Freeman’s “most straightfaced and emotional endeavor to date.” It seems Aaron Freeman is again having the last laugh. In support of the record he’s embarking on his first-ever tour under his own name, performing the disc in its entirety along with a host of favorites from the Ween catalog. Freeman, who hopes the tour will

– are as time honored as the Grand Ole Opry. This is Americana at its most feisty (propelled by up front vocals and Whitmore’s in your face fiddle), even thought the pair readily admit to coming into it second generation. The music is conversational, sorrowful, and tinged with just the right touches of truck stop diner wisdom. “Would It Really Be a Sin?” examines the intricacies of when and how to call it quits, while the elegant title track looks back at the decisions with equal parts regret and absolution. The chatty nature of the lyrics causes some of the songs to lose focus, but overall this is the sort of maverick debut that leaves you wanting more. ***1/2

Aaron Freeman

“prompt a reappraisal” of McKuen, who has spent the past three decades in Salinger like seclusion, brings his Marvelous Clouds tour to Asheville on Sunday, July 15. And while he’s been strangely tight lipped about the performances, there’s been no information as to whom he may or may not be sharing a stage with; he has made a single iron clad bold declaration: “A splendid evening is guaranteed!”

IF YOU Aaron Freeman and his GO Marvelous Clouds tour at the

Grey Eagle on Sunday, July 15 at 9 p.m. Tickets for this limited seating show are priced at $17 advance or $20 day of show and are available online and at our local outlets.

The Stray Birds This buzzedabout young acoustic trio draws upon the richness of American folk music traditions. The group’s signature sound lies in outstanding songwriting that soars in three-part harmony. The Stray Birds will release their first fulllength album this summer. For more information visit www.thestraybirds.com.

IF YOU GO: Thursday, July 26 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets: $8 at White Horse Black Mountain, 105C Montreat Rd. Phone (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 15


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poetry & poets

The Troubles and Their Aftermath JAMES B. JOHNSTON’S MEMORIES OF NORTHERN IRELAND

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hen he was a young man living in Belfast, Northern Ireland during the late 1960s, author and publisher James B. Johnston met his future wife Ann. He was Protestant and by background was culturally British, while she was Catholic and reared in the Irish tradition. By the early 1970s “The Troubles” (a period of civil strife in Northern Ireland between 1968-1998) made living in Belfast difficult, as heightened sectarian conflict between Catholics and Protestants all-too-frequently erupted in acts of violence. During 1972 and 1973, for example, over 700 people died in Northern Ireland from bombing and shooting incidents related to that conflict. Most of those who died were not personally involved in the fighting; they were simply victims of a conflict with deep historical roots and with no foreseeable resolution. The Johnstons had strong family ties and satisfying jobs in Belfast, yet the proliferation of violence made a future in Northern Ireland seem untenable, and in 1974 they immigrated to Canada. They became exiles, as many of their fellow countrymen and women had been before them. While welcoming the relative stability of the New World, they were far from home and painfully separated from loved ones. And like others from Ireland who lived in exile elsewhere, James Johnston began writing about his experience of being apart from his past. As he conveyed in the foreword to his 2012 poetry collection Exile Revisited, “[e]xile touches on the deepest emotions experienced by those who are separated, for whatever reason, from the people, places or things they love the most. In its early stages, it is characterized by a deep hunger for the past, a longing that, at times, is almost too much to bear. In such a context, exile places a premium on memory.” Exile Revisted is, then, a book of memories communicated as poems. Johnston published an earlier edition of this collection in 1997 as Exile (as he states in the aforementioned foreword) in order “to gain first-hand knowledge about publishing.” Indeed, his experiment in self-publishing his poems of exile has been successful—he ultimately turned his newfound knowledge into an independent press, Celtic Cat Publishing, which since 1997 has issued approximately 20 literary or history books by other authors. Recently, Johnston has returned to exploring his own perspective as an exiled person from Ireland living half a world away—presently, in Knoxville, Tennessee. In 2012, he issued two projects with Celtic

roadside. The poem succinctly presents the event in harrowing, detailed increments of information, while an adjacent photograph Cat Publishing: Exile Revisited, which illustrates a memorial marker representing features the contents of Exile along with the names of massacre victims. When juxtaadditional poems and a few essays, and The posed with photographs, Johnston’s poems Price of Peace, a novel about contemporary become like cairns, guiding readers toward a experience in Northern Ireland. The two deeper experience of the past. books are thematically interrelated in surIn Exile Revisited and in his new novel prising and meaningful ways, and I’ll herein The Price of Peace, Johnston chronicles the discuss them together. impact of The Troubles on the people of A poem by Johnston, entitled “Ann,” Northern Ireland. By the time of the ratifiserves as a visceral linkage between these cation of the 1998 Belfast Peace Agreement, two books—it appears as a central poem negotiated by U.S. Special Envoy for Northin Exile Revisited and is partly quoted on ern Ireland George Mitchell, 3,500 people the back cover of The Price of Peace. The in Northern Ireland had died and 40,000 poem is haunting, as Johnston remembers others had been injured in the violence. Ann Owens, his wife’s good friend who was Yet Johnston’s concern for the future of tragically killed by a bomb in 1972. Johnston Northern Ireland compelled him to examine a less often discussed outcome of the Peace wrote the poem from his wife’s perspective: Agreement: the mandated early reI look at my last photograph of you, lease from prison of Sitting on a cannon at Edinburgh Castle. many of the people How soon weapons of war would steal away our time. who committed When I visited in hospital after the first bombing, the earlier acts of You smiled and said, I’ve had my turn. violence. This is the I wish it was true. central concern of How little we knew. The Price of Peace. Since he personI think often of that Saturday, seven months later. ally understood the You phoned mid-morning and asked me to meet you in town. extent of the pain I couldn’t go, but you promised to visit on your way home. experienced by vicI remember the first phone call, late afternoon, asking if tims and their loved I’d heard about the bomb. ones, having had I brushed it off. I knew you weren’t near it. friends perish in the When your parents phoned to say you hadn’t arrived home, violence, Johnston I told them not to worry, traffic had been disrupted. was particularly But I was worried. aware of such inIt was unlike you not to phone. justice imbedded By bedtime I was in a panic. in the terms of the I asked my dad to call your parents one last time. Peace Agreement. When he said Oh Jesus Employing ficI knew you would never phone. tional characters and an imagined situation—the trial of a woman, made a widow through paramilitary Adjacent to that poem in Exile Revisited violence, accused of the revenge killings is a photograph of Ann Owens; other poems of the two men who had murdered her are similarly accompanied by illustrative husband—Johnston’s novel seeks to explore photos. Accordingly, the book is more than the moral dimensions of the all-too-real a collection of poems, as it has considerable situation of mandated releases from prison documentary value for anyone interested of convicted paramilitary prisoners—Rein the history of Northern Ireland or in the publicans (people, generally Catholic, who emergent academic field of Peace Studies. support the unification of Northern Ireland Another poem, “Last Ride,” recounts with the Republic of Ireland) as well as the 1976 massacre near the village of KingsLoyalists (people, primarily Protestant, who mills in County Armagh, when eleven mill favor the existing union between Northern workers were ordered out of a commuter Ireland and Great Britain). bus by gunmen who demanded they “state The Price of Peace is several things their religion.” One person cited Catholiat once: a potboiler legal thriller; an astute cism as his creed and was freed, while the portrayal of the complex legal system in other ten proclaimed their Protestant war-weary, socially divided Northern Irefaith and were shot beside the bus on the

16 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

BY TED

OLSON

PERMANENT CAMP Friday, July 13 at 7 p.m. Reading and signing by George and Elizabeth Ellison of Permanent Camp: Poems, Narratives & Renderings From the Smokies, their book in praise of the outer and inner landscapes within which we all reside.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore/

Cafe, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.

land; and an exploration of the philosophical implications of a peace accord that brings to mind the words of Junius: “The injustice done to an individual is sometimes of service to the public.” A fascinating aspect of this novel is that it encourages readers to speculate on the appropriate outcome of the trial of the defendant. At the end of Part I (on page 139), a note from the author invites the reader to log onto the book’s website ( www.thepriceofpeace.net) and to cast votes reflecting that reader’s personal opinions on the protagonist’s guilt or innocence. Part II of the novel features Johnston’s detailed and persuasive presentation of the court’s decision. For those who are visual learners, Johnston has produced a short, poignant video to accompany the book, and the video is posted on the book’s website and on YouTube. Readers of this column who view Johnston’s video—featuring sweeping cinematography and professional acting—will no doubt realize that The Price of Peace is no ordinary book; rather, it is a deep immersion into a complex historical era that many if not most Americans have heard about but that relatively few understand. James Johnston is one of the few people living in the New World who does understand The Troubles and their aftermath. Anyone wanting to know more about this story—and indeed to feel vicariously the real human impacts of those tragic events— should read Johnston’s two new books. Ted Olson is the author of such books as Breathing in Darkness: Poems (Wind Publications, 2006) and Blue Ridge Folklife (University Press of Mississippi, 1998) and he is the editor of numerous books, including The Hills Remember: The Complete Short Stories of James Still (University Press of Kentucky, 2012). His experiences as a poet and musician are discussed on www.windpub. com/books/breathingindarkness.htm

Poets who would like for their poetry to be considered for a future column may send their books and manuscripts to Ted Olson, ETSU, Box 70400, Johnson City, TN 37614. Please include contact information and a SASE with submissions.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Washed in the Blood

REVIEW BY

…a haunting combination of mystery and romance, meticulous historical research, and wild speculation.

WRITTEN BY LISA ALTHER Are you washed, in the blood, In the soul-cleansing blood of the Lamb?

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he beloved Christian hymn, “Washed in the Blood,” was not written until 1878, but its theme of blood as purifier runs with great irony through the five centuries of Lisa Alther’s sprawling historical novel, Washed in the Blood. The author’s specific take on the history of the southeastern United States is that, no matter how fervently color-obsessed southerners want their family tree to be descended from proper lily white British immigrants, many of us are actually the result of a long and vigorous mixing of different bloods. While the founders of Jamestown (1607) imagined that the land to the west was inhabited by a homogenous block of indigenous peoples, the truth is far more interesting. Native Americans, Europeans (including Mid-Easterners) and Africans had been mixing their blood for decades since the French Huguenots (1562) and then the Spanish conquistadors started invading “La Florida.” The various human infusions into the native population came from runaway slaves, castaways, war captives, rapists and other unsavory progenitors, as well as that most unstoppable force in history—young lovers. The racial mixing was so complete that many southeasterners haven’t the foggiest idea where their ancestors really came from. With the rising popularity of genealogy however, more and more Americans are digging up their biological roots. Some are horrified to discover the different branches in their family tree, others revel in the diversity. Washed in the Blood is Tennessee-born Alther’s sixth novel. It takes place in three periods of time in the Appalachians, where Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky converge. This is the area now recognized as the hub of the Melungeons, a distinct tri-racial

MARCIANNE MILLER

JULY

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Saturday, July 7, 3 p.m. Mystery writer MARK DE CASTRIQUE, The 13th Target.

Tennessee-born author, Lisa Alther

group, characterized by dark hair and olive or swarthy skin. Though Alther never uses the word Melungeon in her novel, it’s obvious that she is using Melungeon lore to tell her story. Also, as a reading of her autobiographical journey reveals (Kinfolks: Falling Off the Family Tree: The Search for My Melungeon Ancestors, Arcade Publishing 2007), Alther also enhances true stories from her own family history to dramatize the novel’s larger story. DNA testing has shown that Melungeons can trace their ancestry mostly from Europe, but also from Africa and native America. They are known to suffer rare diseases of Mid-Eastern origin. (It’s fascinating that ancient Cherokee garb, with its turbans and toga tops, has an uncanny similarity to Turkish clothing.) This fact provides the springboard for dramatic details in the novel’s first story. In the 1560s, orphan Diego Martin is a swineherd from Galicia, the northern coastal area in Spain neighboring Portugal. He’s unaware that his parents were executed because they were conversos, Sephardic Jews who pretended conversion to Catholicism. He sails to the New World with a second wave of Spanish conquistadores, who followed the path of Hernando De Soto—the first European who traveled deeply into the interior of the new land (1539), so deeply, in fact, that archaeology excavations have attributed to his expedition the remains of a Spanish fort near Asheville. Before Diego left home he was given a pendant of a large black stone with veins of ruby. By the end of the 400+ pages of Washed in the Blood, this stone has been handed down for centuries to Diego’s distant daughters—who have long forgot-

…the characters in the story have no idea of their ancestry and are unaware they are bonding with their cousins.

ten the origin of the exotic stone or what their name Galicia means. Abandoned in the wilderness, Diego comes under the spell of an Indian girl, who has six fingers. This polydactyly re-appears among Diego’s far-flung descendants. The second part of the novel takes place in Virginia near Tennessee, during the late 1830s Trail of Tears tragedy, when thousands of Cherokee were rounded up and forced to emigrate to Oklahoma. Daniel Hunter is an idealistic Quaker, who comes to small town Couchtown to teach disadvantaged students—and falls in love with a woman named Galicia Martin who wears a red pendant around her neck. In the early 1900s, darkly handsome Will Martin, a baseball pitching wizard thanks to his six fingers, leaves his racially mixed outcast family on Mulatto Bald and marries spoiled town girl Galicia Hunter. By this time, the characters in the story have no idea of their ancestry and are unaware they are bonding with their cousins. Phrases such as half-breed, half-breed mongrel, Portuguese Indian and secret nigger flow through the narrative, as well as free people of color color, a concept that covered anyone with dark skin who wasn’t a slave. Alther writes in a compelling style, creating a haunting combination of mystery and romance, meticulous historical research, and wild speculation. It’s a can’t-put-down brew that offers entertaining adventures into the past, as well as triggers to inspire your own historical research.

Sunday, July 8, 3 p.m. CHRISTOPHER BENFEY, Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay: Reflections on Art, Family & Survival. Tuesday, July 10, 7 p.m. Reiki workshop with DEBORAH LLOYD, author of Believe and it is True. Wednesday, July 11, 7 p.m. CARTER PHIPPS, Evolutionaries: Unlocking the Spiritual and Cultural Potential of Science’s Greatest Idea. Thursday, July 12, 6-7 p.m. Cultivating Your Creative Life. Painting workshop with ALENA HENNESSY, registration required. Party and booksigning from 7-9 p.m. Friday, July 13, 7 p.m. GEORGE and ELIZABETH ELLISON, Poems, Narratives & Renderings From the Smokies. Saturday, July 14, 7 p.m. KIMBERLY BROCK, The River Witch, Erika Marks, Little Gale Gumbo. Music by Anna Kline and the Grits & Soul Band. Sunday, July 15, 3 p.m. DEBRA SPARK, The Pretty Girl: Novella and Stories. Tuesday, July 17, 7 p.m. The Art of Fermentation with SANDOR ELLIX KATZ. Wednesday, July 18, 7 p.m. ERIC G. WILSON, Everyone Loves a Good Train Wreck. Friday, July 20, 7 p.m. Making Colorful Corn Shuck Dolls, demonstration and booksigning with ANNE FREELS. Tuesday, July 24, 7 p.m. Dispelling Myths, Understanding the Reality of Disordered Eating with HEATHER WINGERT, LCSW.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

BOTTOM LINE: A readable, eye-opening

historical saga of the southeast that both natives and tourists will enjoy. Washed in the Blood; written by Lisa Alther; Mercer University Press (2011); 420 pp.; $26.

Visit www.lisaalther.com Marcianne Miller is an Asheville writer/reviewer. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 17


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southern comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

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Buck Dancing in the Mountains – a Tradition

ometimes I think old mountain traditions are gone forever. It surely is good to see people bringing back many of the “old ways of socializing on a Saturday night.” First time I saw what mountain-bred folks call buck dancing was at a street dance many years ago in Hendersonville. I was there for the summer, as was traditional in my family when my father was living. I have to tell you those days in the 1950’s were some of the best days of my growing up with my parents. Every summer my family packed up and headed to Hendersonville as many Florida families did in those days. A highlight of the weekends in Hendersonville back then were the street dances on Main Street. My eyes were always wide open in awe at the men and women as they flat-footed around to the music. They always attracted a crowd of people who formed circles to see the men perform. Many had reputations all over the mountain area as the best buck dancers in the country. Many of the men never missed a street dance in the summer. Some were single, but most brought along their wives to enjoy the fun. Many in their 70s were still dancing; age did not matter, they just wanted to have fun. Some of the dancers wore white, I

remember, but dress did not matter. For many mountain people who often held barn dances on their farms out in the country, coming to Hendersonville on Saturday was a very big deal. They had worked hard in the fields and were tired. Robert Dotson of Sugar Grove in Watauga County, a famous buck dancer I interviewed years ago, once said “Get a snort of liquor and the fighting would break out.” Laughing in memory, Dotson added, “We just like to have fun.” Wives and young girls and boys learn to dance too. “It is tradition,” Dotson explained. Buck dancing is a simple lesson, Dotson told me. “When I hear the music, I gotta dance.” With buck dancing, sometimes called flat-footin’ in the mountains, you keep your feet close to the floor, shuffle slowly and get faster as the music increases. He said some folks add to their dance by tap dancing and even do two-step and some line dancing. He said some folks in Tennessee call it “the walking dance.” It just depends on what part of the mountains you live in and what family you belong to. “You can even buck dance on dirt,” Dotson said. Years ago in these mountains along the Blue Ridge, communities and families would get together once a year for corn shuckings, bean stringings, and a picnic.

Celebrated Mountain Traditions Shindig on The Green

throughout the mounA showcase of the tains; and an extensive region’s rich heritage of line-up of dance teams. folk musicians and dancIF YOU GO: For more ers. The festival kicks off information call (828) its 46th season in Pack 258-6101 x345 or visit Square Park in downtown www.folkheritage.org. Asheville on Saturday, July 7, 14, 21; August 11, 18, 25; Songcatchers and September 1. Shindig Music Series on the Green is free. Sundays in July from 4 to Locals and visitors 5:30 p.m.at The Cradle of alike come together “along Forestry. Acoustic music about sundown,” or at 7 with roots in the Southp.m., to enjoy the stage ern Appalachians. Local show and informal jam sesmusicians are often on site sions. The stage shows take at 3 p.m. to jam before the place on the Bascom Lamar concert, which begins with Lunsford stage, named for The Southern Appalachian a warm-up at 4 p.m. the founder of the annual Cloggers. Photo: Jerry Nelson Concerts take place in Mountain Dance and Folk the wheelchair accessible, Festival in Asheville. covered outdoor amphitheatre unless storms Highlights include performances by move them inside the Forest Discovery The Stoney Creek Boys, the long-standCenter. Picnics are welcome. ing house band for Shindig on the Green; newly formed and long-standing bands from 18 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

Some of the older mountain folks will tell you their key to good health and longevity is buck dancing because it is good way to exercise. “Maybe we will be dancing until we are 100. Otherwise you will find us dancing in heaven on any Saturday night,” Dotson said, and a big smile covered his young face. Footnote: The Dotson couple were honored for their dancing when they received the prestigious North Carolina Folk Heritage Award from the state arts council in Raleigh in the 90’s.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

Songcatcher Performers

July 1: Ballad singer Joe Penland July 8: Fiddler Tim Gardner with Bucky and Micah Hanks

July 15: Mary and Bob Cox July 22: Laura Boosinger July 29: New Southern Ramblers old time string band

$6 for ages 16 and older, $3 for youth 15 and under and America the Beautiful pass holders.

IF YOU GO: The Cradle of Forestry in

America is located on Highway 276 in the Pisgah National Forest, 14 miles north of Brevard, four miles south of the Blue Ridge Parkway MP 412. For more information call (828)877-3130; www.cradleofforestry.org.

The Mountain Dance and Folk Festival The 85th Annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, a ticketed event, takes place nightly at 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, August 2-4, at Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place in Asheville.

IF YOU GO: Tickets are available from the

Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office at (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.


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fine art

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The Simplicities of Summer

MUSINGS ON THE DELIGHTFULLY MUNDANE

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t’s truly sumBY GREG VINEYARD mertime. Late nights on the porch, watching artwork by artists, fireflies drift up most of whom I and down with the know. Incredibly temperature. resilient aloe, jade Turkey hens and orchid plants and their broods round out the experoaming across the rience. Most of the yard, the adults like surfaces support my mechanical, predrawing efforts, and historic creatures, I envision my work followed by fluffy going out into other little children’s book peoples’ personal illustration chicks. worlds. Rains, usually light, Why the but also suddenly lengthy description Flora from a teensy yard, Asheville. torrential and movof my immediing sideways amidst ate surroundings? hugely cracking thunder. Songbirds, owls, Because all of what I’ve described serves as a rabbits, dragonflies, insects, bears, squirrels resource for renewal for me when I’m need... that’s the fauna, and then there’s still the ing to re-find my creative center, whether in amazing abundance of flora. I have, like, a art or writing. For some artists, the demands one square foot yard view, yet it’s teeming of our season, where visitors flock to WNC with gorgeous life. in droves, include crazy schedules combined The neighborhood itself buzzes with with increased inventory needs. It’s a good the collective sounds of everyday sumproblem to have, for sure, but it can be a mer activities... Yard equipment. Watering. little overwhelming at times. Nice neighbors calling out Hello’s as they go about their gardening and dog walking. Re-noticing the small stuff Folks literally stop to smell the roses. The can ignite a spark. soft thumps of car doors signal peoples’ trips and returns. There’s also that slightly faraway whooshing sound of cars on a seemRecently, I have been re-reading a ingly distant — but really nearby — thorfavorite author, and being in awe all over oughfare. again at nearly every sentence Eudora Welty wrote, I have felt undeserving to even pick up a pen. Over-inspired to the point of creFolks literally stop to ative paralysis, it is helpful for me to pause, smell the roses. breathe, take stock of what I can immediately experience in my corner of the world, Expanding outward, toward that major and come back to balance. street, I sometimes indulge my regular cravSo, in case you find yourself in the ings for vegan ice cream at The Hop. The midst of a summer doldrum, I share my scent and taste of Lavender Vanilla. I enjoy humble observations, in case you want to two scoops in a cup as I meander home try it, too. And I recommend SLLAB: “Stop, slowly, observing nooks and crannies in Look, Listen, Appreciate, Breathe.” Re-noold stone walls, which hover over narrow, ticing the small stuff can ignite a spark. The laugh-line cracked sidewalks. The noises simple things can inspire creativity deep of “over there” recede as the more familiar within. And somewhere in there, go have sounds of my own itsy block of safety and some ice cream. It is summer, after all! security increase. Back inside, I’m surrounded by relics Greg Vineyard is an of my past and possibilities for my future. artist, writer and creative Artists tend to collect odd things (and consultant in Asheville, perhaps too many of them). Writers seem to NC. Find his clay works have lots of books and stacks of papers and at Constance Williams articles about — what, exactly? Throw in Gallery in Asheville’s an admittedly bizarre predilection for thrift River Arts District, and store chair bargains, and my home starts his illustrations at ZaPow Gallery in to sound a bit ... overstuffed. But my space downtown Asheville. is also filled with memorabilia related to www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net. family and friends, as well as to hand-made

Custom Designed Jewelry Local Arts & Crafts Jewelry Repair

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Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044 www.vandykejewelry.com

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Appalachia in Oils Original Oil Paintings Giclee Prints Commissions Accepted

Aidan’s Walk

www.mountainbrushworks.com • 828-734-9304 Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 19


todd reed

since 1992

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Fine Jewelry and Design Studio PG.

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Tradition. Vision. Innovation. Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center MP 382 Blue Ridge Parkway Asheville, NC Open Daily 9am-6pm 828-298-7928

Featuring Jewelry by Molly Dingledine

For more fine crafts visit:

Guild Crafts

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70 Asheville, NC Open Mon.-Sat: 10am-6pm 828-298-7903

www.CRAfTGuIlD.ORG

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

20 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

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The 65th Annual Craft Fair

or 65 years the BY APRIL NANCE Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands has set the standard for fine crafts shows across the Southeast and the nation. Twice a year the finest craftspeople working in the Appalachian mountains come together in Asheville, to share their love of craft and sell their work to collectors who Mary Timmer come from all across the country to be inspired and support the creative economy. The dates for the 2012 editions are July 1922 and October 18-21 at the newly renovated US Nancy Kubale Cellular Center (formerly the Asheville Civic Center). All Craft Fair exhibitors have become members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild through a rigorous jury process, insuring the finTamela Wells est quality of work will be showcased. Exhibitors are residents of the Susan Link southern Appalachian region, representing nine states from Maryland to Alabama. Craft media featured are: clay, jewelry, fiber, wood, glass, paper, metal, mixed media, and natural materials. Styles range from traditional to contemporary. The Southern Highland Craft Guild has a rich history which continues to thrive through Steven Forbes-deSoule Michael Lightcap markets such as the annual Craft Fairs. The Fairs are not only a place to purchase fine crafts, but with education as an important factor of the Guild’s mission, IF craft demonstrations are a key element of YOU Craft Fair of the Southern the shows. In addition, beginning on Friday GO Highlands, US Cellular Center, of each Fair weekend, mountain musicians 87 Haywood St. in downtown share their love of old time and bluegrass on Asheville, July 19-22. the arena stage. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday As an organization, the Guild has been – Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. serving artists in this area since 1930. Admission: adults $8, children under 12 free. Group discounts available. For a complete listing of exhibitors, craft Styles range from demonstrations, and a full entertainment traditional to schedule please call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org contemporary.


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July 19-22

& crafts of the Southern Highlands JULY 19-22 CRAFT DEMONSTRATIONS

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raft demonstrations are a highlight at the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands. Watching and interacting with highly skilled craftspeople as they create is entertaining and educational. Throughout the show, visitors will have the opportunity to observe works by over 200 members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and learn about their inspiration and methods. There are also scheduled demonstrations to enhance the experience. Leniavell Trivette

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm Admission: $8 Children under 12 free Sandra Rowland

Schedule of Demonstrations: Dede Styles: natural dyeing and spinning

(Thurs – Fri).

Cassie Dickson: flax to linen (Sat - Sun). Leniavell Trivette: heritage crafts. Carla Filippelli: random weave basketry. Lin Oglesby: spinning and knitting.

John Geci Glass

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

Sandra Rowland: sunprinting. Arts for Life: children’s activities.

JULY 20-22 ENTERTAINMENT Friday, July 20 11 a.m. Cary Fridley and Down South: honky-

tonk guitar, bluesy pedal-steel and hot Appalachian fiddle stylings. 12:30 p.m. Blue-Eyed Girl: an all-girl band steeped in old time mountain music traditions. 2 p.m. Hot Duck Soup: Kazoos, slide whistles,

banjos, guitars, ukes, an antique cornet, washtub bass, and the Cacophonium!

3:30 p.m. Timberline: Smooth folk harmonies

featuring guitarist Gene Holdway. Saturday, July 21

11 a.m. Bear Down Easy: contemporary

bluegrass picking, original compositions and classic country vocals. 12:30 p.m. Carol Rifkin and Paul’s Creek:

traditional music and dance forms featuring fiddle legend Arvil Freeman. 2 p.m. Whitetop Mountaineers: Martha

Spencer and Jackson Cunningham perform Southwest Virginia oldtime music. 3:30 p.m. Buncombe Turnpike: featuring Tom

Godleski and the banjo picking of teenage sensation Seth Rhinehart.

Moore Brothers Band

Sunday, July 22 11 a.m. New Broad River Band: Julian Pinelli

on fiddle and Judo Aaron Allison on banjo along with Monique (Pinelli) on bass and David Pinelli on guitar.

12:30 p.m. Split Rail: Strong vocal harmony

is their trademark. A crowd favorite at the Craft Fair for nearly 20 years.

2 p.m. Chompin’ at the Bit String Band: spir-

ited young pickers continuing the strong music traditions of Brasstown, NC.

3:30 p.m. Honey Holler: An all-woman string

band that captures the traditional sound of Southern Appalachia with spirited songs and fiddle tunes.

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fter many years of study, Mary Webster received her MFA from Tufts University and the Museum School of Fine Arts in Boston. Armed with a passion for painting and rent to pay, she was faced with the question, “How can I earn a living as an artist?” Webster chose to add muralist and decorative painter to her repertoire. It was a wonderful choice! Mary Webster with 5' x 15' Art Deco Mural. Oil on canvased wall, Mary Webster and Asaccented with white and yellow gold leaf. sociates specialize in public and private murals. They range in size and complexity. They also have the abilities to transform spaces from fine to fabulous with custom paint, glazes and faux finishes. Webster has painted miles and miles of commissioned work. It has been Murder at Dawn by Mary Webster. Oil on canvas, 12" x 36" a wonderful journey and continues to be a challenging and interesting way for her to make a living. A few years ago, Webster started getting a “yearning” ... a little voice in her ear that said, “it’s time to paint personal work too.” She began to paint when she wasn’t painting murals! Many of these personal paintings are still lifes, where she loses herself in shadow, detail and reflective light. Most pay tribute to the artists of the “Golden Age” of painting. A few years ago, Webster restored the ceiling and decorative painted borders of a Greek Cathedral in Springfield, MA. They Motmot Pruning by Mary Webster. were so pleased with the results that they Oil and white gold on maple, 9" x 12" asked her to paint and gild a large icon for their entrance. When the job was complete, Webster’s latest painting of birds is Webster had a couple of books of gold leaf titled “Murder at Dawn.” As you may know, which weren’t used. That was the beginning more than 12 crows is called a murder. of her beautiful animal icons. They are mostWebster composed a piece titled “Murder” ly birds and look magical by candle light. underlining the sociable and personality packed crow. If you would like to see more of Webster’s work please visit www.marywebsterandassociates.com. You can also schedule an appointment to meet with her in her studio in the River Arts District or at your location.

Mary Webster and Associates Warehouse Studios, 170 Lyman Street in the River Arts Disrict PG.

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22 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

Mary Webster and Portrait of Charles. Oil on canvas, 30" x 40"

www.marywebsterandassociates.com (828) 505-1562


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artful living Entering Into Stillness “Whenever you deeply accept this moment as it is – no matter what form it takes – you are still, you are at peace.” ~ Eckhart Tolle

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n Zen teaching, emphasis is given to embracing the present moment without holding conditions on the content of the moment. This means that from the perspective of spiritual and psychological enlightenment, of one’s calm and balanced presence, a moment in a divinely beautiful setting in nature is fundamentally no different than a moment stuck at a traffic intersection, or being diagnosed with cancer. There is, however, a Buddhist saying that “enlightenment is easy for the person with no preferences,” implying full realization of how seemingly inhuman this perfect equanimity would be. We all have preferences. How could we not? This perfect equanimity must seem like a strange and impossible notion to embrace, and it may well not even seem like a state to which one would choose to aspire, but, as with all Zen teachings, the direction in which it points, though perplexing, is a very valuable path for us to explore. Buddhism teaches us that our emotional suffering is caused by our resistance to the realities of life. We want life to be the way we want life to be. We grasp after those things that bring us closer to the realization of our desired experiences and goals, and we avoid as much as we can those circumstances that frustrate our desires. This seems self-evident, but its importance is in the insight that the emotional ups and downs of our lives are the result of this search for desire fulfillment, and that it is possible to gain a larger perspective that allows for far greater peace, wellbeing, profound sanity and happiness within life’s ups and downs. If, like all of God’s other creatures, our desires were limited to the very basic necessities of life, we wouldn’t face emotional turmoil. For a squirrel, a fish or a bee, to have the basic needs of biological survival is enough, but for humans it isn’t. It particularly isn’t enough for modern people living in technological societies driven by a consumer economy. Oh, the suffering of a status-conscious teenager who doesn’t have the newest must-have possession. Oh, the suffering of an ambitious adult passed over for promotion, blocking the purchase of that new home and car. Oh, the suffering caused by arguments among family, a failed love relationship, financial instability or a crisis of health. Oh how we suffer over insults and slights, real and imagined. What separates the human from the squirrel? Quite fundamentally, it is a more

elaborate brain structure capable of abstract thought and sense of self. Certainly, many species of animals have the instinct of hierarchy, and dominance competition is common, but straightforward biologically-ingrained processes resolve such issues, and then everything settles down. For humans, struggles of status and significance are very different. Humans anticipate this struggle, form strategies and devices to give them advantage, and live in reflected dissatisfaction with the results even when we win – the triumph is always tenuous and temporary, never complete. No squirrel lives in a remembered world of triumph or defeat. No squirrel worries about whether their status is sufficient, about whether they are sufficient, about whether they will gain or lose status or happiness in the future. Humans are obsessed with such matters. It is an abstract sense of self and its time-line story, what psychology calls ego, creating this suffering that is unique to humans. Buddhism teaches that identifying with, and being driven by, the desires of the ego is what causes our emotional suffering. We want what we want, and we suffer when we don’t get it. We want an entire story line of “me” that is made up, not of moments in the here-and-now, but a continuous flow of moments all strung together creating the time-line of our lives. This time-line is the ego’s story. We live in a blurred cacophony of moments remembered and anticipated all built around our need for significance.

BY

BILL WALZ

“This moment is a perfect moment. This moment is my refuge.” ~ Thich Nhat Hanh

Bring awareness into your sensory experience of the moment. Begin with awareness of the gentle rhythm of your breathing. Pay particular attention to the release of tension that comes with the exhalation. Then experience the bright clarity of perception that is a conscious inhalation. The mind will begin to quiet. It will begin to focus; it will take on a rare quality of stillness, a dynamic stillness that is the quality of a calm ocean, a forest glen. Allow into perception only what is present, without its antecedents and its future, and a world of mystery that is life and Creation in its true form begins to be revealed. Stillness is the key, a dynamic stillness that is the fabric of Nature, of the Universe. As we become increasingly capable of sustaining contact with the dynamic stillness of the moment, not needing, or feeling compelled, to move on to something else, we likewise become increasingly the master of our own mind, and the saner (and happier) we become. Stillness becomes the ever-present background while we live the activity of our lives. Awareness that all activity arises and passes back into stillness becomes our greatest insight. We learn that we can enter the stillness of this moment by choice and use it, as Thich Nhat Hanh suggests, as a context and a refuge. We can learn from within stillness how petty and unnecessary are most of our attachments and ego cravings, the noise of our lives, and so, how unnecessary “This moment, what is lacking?” most of our suffering is. Stillness is the realm ~ 9th Century Zen Master, Rinzai of meditation and mindfulness. Stillness is the place This moment experienced in its purity where we learn that we are not imprisoned has no past and it has no future. It only conwithin our thoughts and emotions, and thus, tains what is present. There is no timeline victim to their vicissitudes. This stillness is to this moment. There are antecedents and where we learn that all things are managethere will be a future to this moment, but able when framed from within this moment. this moment held in stillness is completely Stillness is the doorway through which we pristine, and ego cannot dominate experican glimpse eternity and Creation. Stillness ence without its storyline.

is the doorway to perfecting psychological and spiritual balance and understanding.

This moment, held in stillness, lacks nothing, for in it, we and the Universe unfold, are one, and are complete.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Visit www.billwalz.com

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 23


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter ∑∑∑

then they must be dispatched accordingly. Some of the Short Take: Beautifully deaths are mounted, immensely downright unsatisfying mix of sadistic. history and fantasy The storythat takes itself WAY line, taken from too seriously. a book, is rather REEL TAKE: As a clever even if native Southerner, I it’s completely should have been greatly absurd. The offended or at least anU.S. ca. 1819 noyed by the Abraham is overrun with Benjamin Walker is a different kind of “Honest Lincoln: Vampire Huntvampires. You Abe” in Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. er. Abraham Lincoln has er can’t tell them always been a polarizing from any ordifigure for old school Southerners. When nary citizens as they are out in the daylight I lived in Charleston SC in the late 1970s, and have jobs just like anyone else. The Old an acquaintance once told me of a man she South is where most of them live although knew who refused to use pennies, $5 bills or they can be found everywhere. For nondrive a Lincoln automobile. payment of a debt a vampire kills the young I have heard many theories over the Lincoln’s mother and he swears vengeance. years about why the Civil War was fought. Many years later Honest Abe (BenjaSlavery, economic supremacy and the conmin Walker) meets Henry Sturges (Dominic cept of unity at any cost are among the most Cooper), a good vampire who also wants repopular. The idea of the Confederacy as a venge. He trains Lincoln how to fight them. nation of vampires that wanted their own The vampire leader is called Adam (Rufus country with slavery designed to give them Sewell). He is over 5,000 years old and hides an unlimited food supply was one theory I behind the guise of a wealthy slave owner hadn’t heard. complete with GWTW style plantation. The In many ways ALVH reminded me vampires dream of a country of their own of one of my favorite TV series from my and so…cue the Civil War. Lincoln fights childhood The Wild, Wild West (which was the vampires, marries Mary Todd (Mary made into a really bad feature film a few Elizabeth Winstead), eventually destroys years back). For those of you unfamiliar Adam and his equally evil sister (Erin Waswith that show which ran in the late 1960s, son), and then heads off to Ford’s Theater to it involved the U.S. Secret Service during attend a play. the era of President Grant. James West was I really wanted to like Abraham an agent who uncovered and foiled many Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. It’s beautifully a sinister conspiracy against the U.S. Govatmospheric, historically of interest, and ernment. These conspiracies were always well acted by all the principals. However its outrageous, sometimes supernatural, and poker faced approach coupled with its exwere treated with a wry sense of humor. cessive violence kept that from happening. There are two major problems with That didn’t seem to bother the two couples ALVH. One is its complete and utter lack of who had brought their young children to any sense of its own absurdity. It treats the see the film. That was the most disturbing material as if it were a documentary by Ken thing of all. Burns. The other is the graphic and unreRated R for violence throughout and brief lenting violence done in the best slow mosexuality. tion video game style. Since the vampires are REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN depicted as loathsome, fearsome creatures,

24 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Hysteria ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: The heretofore untold tale of the invention of the vibrator and birth of a sexual revelation, if not quite a revolution.

REEL TAKE: Any woman who has ever

been to a Passion Party (the Mary Kay of sex toys and pleasure products) would never think that the origins of electronic self pleasuring began in Victorian England. It is rather ironic that in a society that prided itself on such prudishness, the electro magnetic vibrator was born (perhaps proving once again that necessity is the mother of invention). One might also think that a film about such a contraption would be rather tacky and tawdry. Hysteria is precisely the opposite – warm, charming and funny. Back in the day, “hysteria” was the over-used label used for all manner of female complaints. As the story goes here a Dr. Darymple (Jonathan Pryce) specializes in treating women of means who have been diagnosed with “hysteria”. He also came up with a manual treatment involving his well oiled fingers and their … well, I don’t think I need to spell it out for you. Exhausted from his lucrative efforts, he brings the young Dr. Mortimer Granville (Hugh Dancy) and soon the practice is the busiest place in London. So busy is he in executing the treatment, he suffers terrible hand cramps and seeks relief. As a matter of fortuitous happenstance, Granville’s best friend and benefactor, Edmund (Rupert Everett), is a tinkerer and inventor. When his most recent invention, an electro mechanical ‘feather duster’, offers Granville’s nearly crippled hand much needed relief, Granville thinks the concept may actually provide his clients relief as well. Edmund creates a prototype, they test it on a randy hooker turned maid to great success. While the birth of the vibrator is underway, the sub stories involve Granville and Darymple’s two daughters. Emily (Felicity Jones) is the very modicum of a proper English lady. The other, Charlotte, (Maggie Gyllenhal) is a feminist ahead of her time, a champion of the less fortunate, and an embarrassment to her righteous family. At first Granville is taken with the

good daughter and appalled by the other. But of course (spoiler alert), he is in love with the wrong sister. Everything unfolds delightfully, comically, and just rather wonderfully. This is interesting in the fact that everything is entirely predictable, but is still utterly beguiling. For me this was due to a collective effort – a sparkling, a director with an obviously clear vision and its players.

Maggie Gyllenhall and Hugh Dancy share some good vibrations in Hysteria.

While Pryce and Dancy both turn in fine performances, it is Gyllenhal who charms and Everett who is the stealth scene stealer. Gyllenhal is lit from within, and seems to have as much conviction about her performance as Charlotte does about her convictions. Everett is subtle, mostly in the background and has all the great throw away lines. He’s clearly having a great time and is a joy to watch. I was stunned to see that Hysteria has only earned a 55% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Perhaps Hysteria isn’t an important film or a blockbuster, but it is a witty, charming and lovely diversion, the kind of movie they don’t make very often. This is a prescribed comedy for Anglophiles, but has broad appeal in spite of its period costumes. Be sure to stay for the end credits to see a pictorial history of vibrators. Rated R for sexual content.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN ‘Movies’ continued on page 25


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film reviews to get better with each new installment. fairly neutral on him, with the exception of Along with the clever storyline and the The Squid and the Whale, which I loathed amusing and interesting new characters, and The Fantastic Mr. Fox, which I adored. Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Madagascar 3 is loaded with crackerjack 3D With his latest effort, Moonrise Kingdom, Wanted ∑∑∑∑1/2 effects. I usually no longer go to movies in I didn’t know what to expect. I am happy Short Take: The third installment of the 3D as the novelty has worn off and many to report not only did I enjoy Moonrise popular Madagascar series has Alex of them are simply enhanced (shot flat and Kingdom, it may just be my favorite film of and friends hiding out in a rundown then altered afterwards) and that does make the year thus far. It’s certainly not for every European circus while trying to get back a difference in perspective. Animation is palate, but it definitely has broader appeal to New York. usually a safer bet because of than many of Anderson’s films. the artificial perspective and Moonrise Kingdom takes place the this movie is one of the few summer of 1965 on an island off the coast that is worth the extra bucks. of New England. Two twelve year olds fall No Madagascar movie in love, become pen pals, and hatch a plan would be complete without to run away together. Sam is an orphan a colorful and memorable and the least liked member of the ‘Khaki soundtrack and this one is Scouts’. Suzy is the brooding, troubled no exception. Along with daughter of two lawyers (Frances McDorthe infectious Like To Move mand and Bill Murray). Both are misfits It (reworked here as Afro who identify with each other the moment Circus) and We Speak No they set eyes on each other. Americano, Frances McDorAmericano They run away armed with a camp set, mand brings down the house his Khaki Scout wilderness skills, a suitcase with her rendition of Edith full of fantasy books, a plastic portable record Officer Chantal Du Bois (voiced by Frances McDormand) is the animals worst nightmare in Madagascar 3. Piaf’s Non Je Ne Regrette player (with Francoise Hardy 45’s and The Rian which is sung in the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra), a REEL TAKE: I have seen all three of the style of Les Miz. kitten in a fishing creel and a pair of binMadagascar movies so far and I can honestly Now that Summer is here and big movoculars. In hot pursuit of our underage love say that I enjoyed this one the most. The ies will be coming at us from every direcbirds are her parents, Scoutmaster Ward previous two were also enjoyable but this tion, those looking for an ideal family film (Edward Norton), the local sheriff, Captain one was more so. In the original Madagasneed look no further than Madagascar 3 and Sharp (Bruce Willis), a social services agent car, a lion, a zebra, a giraffe, a hippo, two Disney/Pixar’s latest offering Brave. This (Tilda Swinton) and a bunch of khaki scouts. chimpanzees, and several penguins are being movie will be a box office success regardless We are aware of an approaching storm, so we shipped back to their native habitat from the of its quality but it’s nice to report that it’s know the storm will of course hit the island Central Park Zoo when they get stranded truly deserving of its success. in the climatic moments of the story. on Madagascar. In Madagascar 2 they make Moonrise Kingdom is part offbeat Rated PG for mild action and some rude humor. their way to Africa where they try to fit in kitsch and part fractured fairy tale, the comREVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN with the regular animal inhabitants with bination of which is affected and precious mixed success. but also somehow rather charming. AnderMoonrise Kingdom ∑∑∑∑1/2 The plot of Madagascar 3 has them son’s attention to detail is brilliant and serves Short Take: Wes Anderson’s latest longing to return to the Central Park Zoo the story well. He has also created characters effort tells the tale of two adolescents but this time they end up in France where that we actually like; from Sam and Suzy to in the summer of 1965 who fall in love, they are pursued by an overzealous French Scoutmaster Ward and Captain Sharp. In make a pact and run away together animal control officer, Chantel DuBois, the end we are all misfits in way or another with a parental unit and the assorted along with her army of gendarmes. They looking for love. authorities in tow, all on an island off hide out in a travelling European circus that The two unknowns as our young hethe coast of New England. has seen better days. They try to help the roes do a great job, completely circus animals regain their self respect but free of child actor precociousthat is easier said than done. Meanwhile ness. Edward Norton, who Officer DuBois is hot on their trail and she isn’t taking himself too seriplans to NOT “bring’em back alive”. ously these days, looks like he In addition to old friends Ben Stiller, had great fun with the part (in Chris Rock, David Schwimmer, Tom spite of the slightly disturbMcGrath, and Jada Pinkett Smith, new ing scoutmaster uniform) and voices this time around are Jessica Chastain, turns a wonderfully comic Martin Short, Bryan Cranston, and Frank performance. Bill Murray as Welker as the circus animals with Frances the madras wearing, alcoholic McDormand positively stealing the show dysfunctional dad is spot on, as Officer DuBois who comes across as without stealing scenes from a hilarious combination of Madeline and his co-stars. Bruce Willis turns Newcomers Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward prepare to Cruella De Vil. in a an understated but darkly run away together in Moonrise Kingdom. In addition to providing a new environcomic performance. The narment in which to put the central characters rative by Bob Balaban rounds (the run down circus fits them like a glove), out our fractured fairy tale and they all live REEL TAKE: When it comes to Wes Anderthe writing and added vocal talent make happily ever after. The End. son films (Rushmore, The Royal TenenMadagascar 3 an improvement over its prebaums, The Fantastic Mr. Fox Fox) there’s little Rated PG-13 for sexual content and smoking. decessors. In fact this is one of the few of the grey area. Typically people either love or REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN recent animation franchises that continues hate his work. I’m one of the few who errs ‘Movies’ continued from page 24

Prometheus ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: When a clue about the origins of mankind takes crew of scientists on corporate financed trip to space, it’s anyone’s guess where Ridley Scott’s intelligentsia sci-fi adventure will take them.

REEL TAKE: Ridley Scott has returned to

the genre he helped define with films such as Alien and Blade Runner Runner. Just in case you haven’t heard, Prometheus is the prequel to Alien. However, you don’t need to have seen, or even liked, Alien to enjoy and appreciate Prometheus. The year is 2093. After a team of scientists stumble on to a clue about the origins of mankind, they are sent on a corporate financed trip to deep space to follow the clues to discover the origins of the species and ergo prove or disprove God. Tucked between sci-fi adventure and plenty of gore, Scott set some lofty, rather intellectual goals here, tackling life, God, faith, biological experiments gone wrong, and big money corporate enterprise. He may, in fact, have set those goals just a little too high, trying to cram a few too many messages into the film. That said the intellectual elements of ‘Movies’ continued on page 26

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

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the rather complicated plot, along with the talented and well cast group of actors, were the aspects of the film that worked for me. We are first introduced to Dr. Elizabeth Shaw (Naomi Rapace from Sweden’s Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) and her partner/lover Charlie Holloway (Logan Holloway Green) on a research expedition on Isle of Sky in Scotland. There they make a significant scientific discovery when they find a pictograph that bares a key similarity to ancient pictographs from other ancient civilizations. It seems we have alien ancestors beckoning us home. Fast forward two years, our heroes are on a space expedition to find the source of the pictographs and perhaps mankind. The

expedition is being bankrolled by the Weyland Corporation. With big money involved in so-called scientific research, you know the motives are not going to be altruistic, and all is revealed in good time. Oddly enough for a scifi blockbuster, Scott does take his time telling the story, but fear not Alien fans, there are orifice popping and cavity splattering creatures to spare. The cast is strong even if they are a rather archetypical array of characters - the mercenary, the too cool pilot, the cold as ice princess captain, and other assorted (a.k.a. expendable) one dimensional characters. The space suit Charlize Theron wears is the fabric equivalent of the liquid she bathed in as the wicked queen in Snow White and the

Michael Fassbender is a robot that holds the origins and fate of mankind in Prometheus.

Huntsman. She is suitably and purposefully aloof, but after her turn as said queen, this performance feels like she phoned it in.

The most interesting of the characters on board the vessel is David, a robot (the ‘Hal’ of Prometheus) made to look and seem human to make the humans comfortable in his presence. David is played by the versatile Michael Fassbender to great and rather fey effect. He is fascinated with the film Lawrence of Arabia and by the dreams of humans when they sleep (he is ever watchful over them), and wistfully laments the absence of the soul that the humans are said to possess. Prometheus is good, quite good in parts, but oddly enough for a movie about the dawning of life, something organic is lacking. It also has two endings. I was happy with the first, and would have preferred that Scott stop there, but Alien fans will love the second - the punchline. Rated R for sci-fi violence, including some intense images and brief violence.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Vampire Circus”

July DVD Picks

Vampire Circus (1972) Having sat through Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (see review this issue), I came out longing for the B movie vampire flicks of yore where the built in limitations of a low budget often led to tighter scripts, more colorful performances, and a more creative use of visuals. No other vampire movie that I know of better fulfills these requirements than the 1972 Vampire Circus which happens to be the first old Hammer film to be given a Blu-Ray release along with the standard DVD issue. It was a film that I had heard of for years but had never seen until this release. It became one of Hammer’s rarest titles due to distribution problems and one of their most unusual films thanks to its long prelude, surreal circus settings and the fact that many of the victims are children (just as in the new Hammer’s Woman in Black Black). Shortly before being dispatched, a vampire count (not Dracula) places a curse on the villagers and their children who brought about his destruction. Many years later the village is ravaged by plague and cut off from the rest of the world. Nevertheless a small travelling circus miraculously appears and children start disappearing after attending performances. The count’s curse is being fulfilled but by whom? The town elders desperately try to figure it out before no one is left. The performances by Hammer stalwarts Laurence Payne, Thorley Walters, and Adrienne Corri are all first rate and newcomers Anthony Higgins and David Prowse (Darth Vader) make their

mark as well. The film transfer is gorgeous and the DVD comes with loads of extras that give background on Hammer and the making of the film. At 87 minutes there is no padding or wasted footage. If you want to see one of Hammer’s best, you need go no further than here.

Humpday (2009) After seeing My Sister’s Sister and getting the chance to talk with its writer/director Lynn Shelton, it seemed only fitting to pick one of her other films as this month’s DVD pick. I even asked her which one of her films she’d pick. Her first film, We Go Way Back Back, is not yet on DVD, so that wasn’t an option. She has a special affection for her second film, My Effortless Brilliance, because it’s where she really began developing the collaborative improvisational style of her filmmaking processing, but she thought Humpday would be a great over all pick. Humpday is a ‘bromantic’ comedy of sorts. It tells the story of two college buddies, once inseparable, who are now at two totally different stages of life. Ben (Mark Duplass) is married planning on starting a family, while Andrew (Joshua Leonard) has partied and traveled his way through life.

26 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Humpday” As both are having mini life crises about what they have and haven’t done in life and fearing their lives will become rote, they wage an alcohol induced bet daring each other to star in a gay porno film. They think two straight guys having sex together in a gay film would make them the hit of festival (remember comes about in drunken conversation). Strangely enough, the next day neither backs down and they embark on their ‘artistic experiment’ jeopardizing Ben’s marriage and their dignity. OK – so yes – it’s an awkward sounding premise, but really what’s going on is two straight men talking about making a gay porn film and the awkwardness is a launch pad for humor. Along the way they find out more about who they really are. Ben is not relegated to a life of white picket fences and domesticity (and all the fears he has with that), nor is the other as beatnik as he thinks. It’s a film about growing up, facing fears and communication. Shelton guides her actors (herself included) through some amazing ad lib scenes. The result, as ludicrous as it sounds given the premise, is once again a very natural feeling and at times hilariously funny film. In the hands of any number of other directors and writers it wouldn’t have worked, but with Shelton it comes off like real people just trying to figure things out, real people trying to connect. Like Your Sister’s Sister Sister, it’s a small ensemble talking their way through a relatively unscripted movie and it works.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Snow White & the Huntsman ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Potentially interesting take on the old fairy tale eventually bogs down in its Lord of the Rings approach despite a delicious performance from Charlize Theron as the Wicked Queen.

REEL TAKE: Snow White & the Huntsman

is the second movie this year to deal with the Snow White story. Earlier there was the Julia Roberts vehicle Mirror, Mirror which was considerably lighter in tone and tanked at the box office. Huntsman takes a different approach and turns the fairy tale into a clone of The Lord of the Rings complete with remarkable landscapes, a pastoral sanctuary, and, of course, an epic battle sequence. Most critics can’t and/or won’t forgive Kristen Stewart for appearing in the Twilight series and have randomly dismissed her performance as the titular character out of hand. While she is certainly not a great actress, I felt that her limited range suited the somber nature of the film that was chosen by director Rupert Sanders. The other titular character, the Huntsman, is portrayed by Chris Hemsworth as if he were Thor in medieval clothing which is exactly what he is. Whether this is because of the director’s concept or the actor’s limited ability is hard to tell although I suspect the latter. On the other hand he doesn’t harm the film in any way but it’s a shame that he and Kristen Stewart have zero chemistry together. The real reason to see Huntsman is for Charlize Theron and her portrayal of the Wicked Queen Ravenna. It’s obvious that from the scriptwriter’s and the director’s point of view, she is the central character as she gets the best lines and has the most ‘Movies’ continued on page 27


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film & stage reviews rector Lynn Shelton (Humpday) Humpday) creates a Humpday conventional cinematic sense. What makes story so real, so natural, one feels like a fly this film so impressive and sets it apart on the wall. from the pack is what it accomplishes on interesting back story. Theron clearly Your Sister’s Sister is essentially an talent, collaboration and trust in lieu of relishes her role and while playing it larger extended dialogue between three people, budget. This film does far more with its than life (as all good villains are), she keeps Jack (Mark DuPlass), his best friend Iris raw resources and effort than most films it grounded in reality and manages to make (Emily Blunt) and her sister Hannah do with budgets five, ten, a hundred times you feel sorry for the character on occasion. (Rosemarie DeWitt). The film takes bigger. Maybe this makes Your Sister’s Sister place a year after the death of Jack’s significant if not important. brother Tom. Iris was Tom’s girl Shelton creates a safe atmosphere for friend. At a gathering marking a year her players. They have a general idea of since Tom’s passing, Jack makes off what’s to happen in each scene, but she lets putting remarks about his brother. the actors improvise their way through it. Sensing his troubles, Iris sends him This would be challenging for many actors, on a retreat to her father’s house on but the result here is utterly organic and an island in Puget Sound. refreshingly real. This type of experiment Instead of spending a solitary could give way to pretension with some get-to-know-yourself retreat, he filmmakers, but not in this case. Instead finds Iris’ sister Hannah already Your Sister’s Sister delivers vulnerability, there nursing a broken heart after honesty and comedy. breaking up with her girlfriend. The The three characters are in near contwo spend a drunken night together stant conversation, but unlike some indie Charlize Theron makes a magnificent Wicked Queen in that culminates in a very brief sexual films, Your Sister’s Sister is an emotional the revisionist Snow White & the Huntsman. encounter. The next morning Iris farce that never falls prey to slacker angst or shows up, confesses her feelings for being too impressed with itself, and thereAs is often the case with movies of this Jack to her sister, and the rest of the film is fore never grows tiresome for the viewer. type it’s the supporting players who keep three well meaning but flawed people feelThe film is well paced and engaging. There’s things interesting and Huntsman really ing their way through an awkward situation. enough evolution of the story to keep things delivers in that department by giving us Is this an important film? Not in the interesting, though a late in the game plot Bob Hoskins, Ian McShane, Ray Winstone, Toby Jones, and other distinguished British character actors as the 7 dwarves. Of course some serious CGI trickery was needed to pull this off. HART presents the Tony Award Winning Best Musical While there are a number of very good elements in Snow White & the Huntsman, its impact was considerably lessened for me by the battle sequences at the end which were not only derivative but way too extended. Just cut the hordes of CGI minew theaters in the region take the to the film so they went ions being done away and go straight to the kind of risks HART does and this to the original source, confrontation between Snow White (in full summer is no exception. On July setting the show on the armor like Joan of Arc) and the Queen. This 6, the 1983 Broadway blockbuster French Riviera. is Charlize Theron’s great moment and she La Cage Aux Folles opens in Fierstein was comdoes not disappoint investing Ravenna with Waynesville for a four week run. La Cage ing off a Tony sweep equal parts of fury and pity. Aux Folles, translated as The Bird Cage, for his play Torch Song I hate to sound like an old geezer but won the Tony for Best Musical, then two Trilogy. Herman was the it really annoys me to see Saturday Matinee Best Musical Revivals for a total of 23 wunderkind of Broadway type material like The Magic Sword (1962) Tony nominations, 11 Tony Awards, and in the 1960’s, having creor Captain Sindbad (1963) turned into a dozen Drama Desk awards. ated the hits Mame, and something “weighty” and expensive as if Despite its pedigree, however, few Hello Dolly. But he struck out with The it were Lawrence of Arabia. While Mirror, theaters are willing to take a chance doGrand Tour, Mack and Mable, and A Day in Mirror, is clearly the inferior movie overall, Mirror ing the show. La Cage is the story of a Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine (based it was a far more enjoyable movie experience gay couple, George and Albin, who run on the Marx Brothers). Herman needed for me than Snow White & the Huntsman. a night club in San Tropez. Albin is the a hit. They brought in director Arthur star. George has a son, Jean Michelle, Laurents, best remembered for West Side Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action and who has become engaged to the daughStory and Gypsy Gypsy, and set out to fashion a big violence and for brief sensuality. ter of a hyper conservative politician. bright funny piece of entertainment. REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN From this situation the comedy erupts The original production opened in as Albin first tries to pass himself off as Boston and just before the performance Your Sister’s Sister ∑∑∑∑ the boy’s uncle, and failing that, as his Herman had a panic attack fearing the Short Take: An engaging bare bones matronly mother. conservative Bostonians would object to indie flick that revolves around two girls The story began first as a 1973 the show’s gay characters. As it turned out and a guy. French farce, then as a 1978 French he didn’t need to worry. Staid Boston loved REEL TAKE: Your Sister’s Sister is one of film which became very popular at fine it. The Broadway show became a spectacuthose ‘little’ films you hear me reference arts cinemas around the country. Five lar hit staring George Hearn (the original from time to time. Not little in a diminuyears later the play was adapted to the Sweeny Todd), and Gene Barry (best know tive or lesser sense, but one of those films stage by Harvey Fierstein and composer as TV’s Bat Masterson) as the leading couple that does so much with so little. Writer/DiJerry Herman. They couldn’t get rights – Hearn played the outrageous Zaza, star ‘Movies’ continued from pg. 26

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La Cage Aux Folles

Mark DuPass, Emily Blunt, and Rosemarie DeWitt talk it out in Your Sister’s Sister.

twist feels less organic than the rest of the film. Most importantly, however, you (the fly on the wall) care about the characters. You want them to be ok. Most films these days cost millions upon millions of dollars to make and offer little in return for your $10 box office fleecing. In contrast, Your Sister’s Sister offers the viewer something to savor. Rated R for some language and sexual content.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

of the club La Cage. Revivals featured Robert Goulet and most recently Kelsey Grammer. The non-musical American film version of the original play was made in 1995 and set in Miami. With Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, and Gene Hackman, the film became a monster hit. Even with that success few theaters are willing to take a chance on a show with such non-traditional subject matter. HART held off for many years, fearing the community might not be ready, but actors and audience members alike kept requesting it. So once again HART is trusting that if done well it will win the hearts of theater goers in Western North Carolina. The cast of HART’s production will feature a number of new faces and great voices. George is being played by Rod Leigh, last seen in HART’s Putnam County Spelling Bee, The Full Monty Monty, and as the lead in Floyd Collins. Albin is Eric Martinez, an experienced actor new to our stage, along with WCU BFA candidate James Hendley who is playing the son, Jean Michelle. ‘HART’ continued on page 38

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 27


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restaurants & wine White and Pink and Where to Drink - AND SUGGESTIONS FOR WHAT TO THINK July 2012 Events at The Weinhaus Thursday, July 19 The Grovewood Café is located behind the Grove Park Inn, in one of the seven historic Biltmore Industries buildings. The thick stone walls covered with historic photographs offer an elegant setting for our “Wines from the Old World Dinner.” Chef Larry Waldrop and his staff always present sumptuous courses which are expertly served. We look forward to you joining us for the evening. Time: 7:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus. Price: $65. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453. Friday, July 27 Friday Night Flights presents G’day from Down Under. It has been quite a while since we have featured an all Australian tasting. Despite the proliferation of inexpensive bulk wine that is exported, there remain solid producers who continue to turn out exceptional wines throughout the ebb and flow of global wine trends. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:307:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

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here is a joke that asks, “What’s Irish and comes out in the springtime?” The answer: patio furniture. There’s another joke, an unintentional one, spoken at wine tastings. “This is a nice patio wine.” Those who say it are not joking, they are selling, but what the hell does it mean? Not to be confused with “a nice picnic wine,” this wine is not as good as it could be, or you could do better, but drink this one efficiently on your patio while you sweat and swat bugs? I have to ask, “Many of my readers have a balcony. Do you have any balcony wines? I happen to have a deck. It’s a huge deck. What would you recommend for that? For those with small decks, do you have a bigger, racier, or more suave wine that would compensate?” There is no doubt they are trying to encourage more frequent easy drinking because frequency means increased sales. And of course it is necessary to distinguish a casual drinker from wines made and meant to go with food. The word choice can be awkward, both recommending and downplaying the same wine, but I reserve the right to ridicule. This sort of talk reminds me of a frequent complaint about hiring in the service industry: while job ads consistently call for applicants with “extensive wine knowledge,” the managers who place those ads are actually reluctant to hire such knowledge. Often enough, their egos are to blame, but I have noticed another factor. There is a worry that those with extensive wine knowledge are prone to talk too much. I blame the wine reps who pour at trade shows, the very ones who give us not only such lines as “patio wine,” but also the endless blabber about soil, slope, sun, shade, season, storage, stewardship, and shipping.

They have “extensive wine knowledge,” do they not? (Well, no, not all of them, but they do repeat well.) I’ll bet good wine money that those who do the hiring have been annoyed enough by such broker/wholesaler wine talk that they do not realize there is an alternative wine knowledge – the abridged kind that sells at the retail level, custom tailored as customers are profiled at the shelf or table. Please pardon my extensive wine knowledge as I profile my readers and suggest these pretty patio and al fresco wines:

Cavicchioli, Lambrusco ($10) Did you just

say, “He has to be kidding”? Yes this is sweet red, but definitely not the bottled candy advertised in 1980s TV commercials. Cavicchioli makes it the right way, the way they did 90 years ago. Good on its own, before or after a meal, or with light snacks. Patio.

Domaine Sainte Lucie, MiP* Made in Provence, rosé 2011 ($20) Yes this is

worth the money because it is one of the best rosés, ever. Made from Cinsault, Grenache, and Syrah, this wine is amazingly light, both delicate but structured, rosé but barely pink at all. It drinks like a finely crafted Sauvignon Blanc. Worth the money. Balcony, facing west.

Man O’ War, Sauvignon Blanc, Waiheke Island, North Island, New Zealand 2010 ($15-ish) Move over, Marlborough! The

Waiheke Sauvingnon is downright elegant, with two interesting factors: it is 15% Semillon and has some residual sugar. This is not a grapefruity Sauvingon like so many from Marlborough. Good acidity makes it good with food, the sugar gives it body without standout sweetness, the Semillon will sustain it longer in the body. Big deck, al fresco dining.

Great values & styles FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

28 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

BY

MICHAEL PARKER

Dama de Toro, Malvasia, Spain 2011 ($13) Clean is the first word that came to mind at first taste. Not too fruity, not too citrusy. Simple but well made. This is definitely meant to be drunk young – within its first two years. Also, like the MiP*, the color is almost not there. Patio.

Tahbilk, Viognier, Nagambie Lakes, Victoria, Austrailia 2011 ($15) For a

while, Viogniers were being made with fullblown flower-power, and it got to be too much. Tahbilk’s style is milder-mannered, appetizing, and even alluring. Floral notes, touch of peach, nice texture. I like their Roussanne as well. Patio, beside lots of little flowers.

Acrobat, Rosé of Pinot Noir, Oregon 2011 ($12) This rosé is downright pretty,

a lovely color of pink. Nuances include kiwi, watermelon, lychee, raspberries, and pomegranates. This is a wine for which I reserve the word viscous - round mouthfeel, long dry finish.

No She Didn’t Lisa Zahiya and Kathleen Hahn present No She Didn’t: Good Girls Gone Bad and the Dances That Happen. The show will utilize modern, hip hop, world dance, burlesque, and more. July 20, 21, 27, 28 at 10 p.m. at the Magnetic Field in the River Arts District. Tickets are $17 in advance, and $20 at the door. Details at www.themagneticfield.com.


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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH

Maria Pressley Owner of Maria’s Mexican Pueblo

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aria’s Mexican Pueblo offers authentic Mexican cuisine with all food cooked in-house. They use no preservatives or any chemicals in their food and they have a large vegetarian selection.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Maria’s Mexican Pueblo.

Maria Pressley: Maria’s Mexican

Pueblo specializes in true Mexican food, most of it is central Mexican style. All from scratch, and most dishes are things that have been around for generations, some are my mothers, others are my own. My salsa is unique. I also sell it bottled, by me here at the restaurant.

RRM: How did you get into the restaurant business?

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

MP: I got into the busi-

ness out of the need to help provide extra income for my family. When I came to North Carolina in 1975, along with my husband who is a native of this area, and our two little girls, work was very scarce, economically we had hit rock bottom, so I became a professional caterer over night. I began to cater for groups of ten or more and did all the cooking in their homes, and the idea took over very well. Later on I started a small carry out place in Maggie Valley for a couple summers, but Maggie wasn’t enough to carry us through the winter, so in 1984 we opened Maria’s Mexican Pueblo in Waynesville and have been here ever since.

RRM: What makes Maria’s Mexican Pueblo so popular?

MP: Besides the food, I have to say, it’s

dishes here at the restaurant?

the salsa.

MP: My favorite dishes? Chiles rellen-

RRM: Tell us a little about your menu? MP: All food is prepared here, with no

Photo: Liza Becker

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I enjoy cooking, and most of all, I enjoy watching people enjoy my food.

RRM: What are your personal favorite os, carne asada, huevos rancheros, as well as huevos con chorizo and refried beans. Well, I like food a lot — all of the dishes on my menu are my favorite. I guess that is why I am in this business. I enjoy cooking, and most of all, I enjoy watching people enjoy my food.

Laughing Mask Candies

aughing Mask Candies is run by husband and wife team Anna and Joshua Sachar. Recent Asheville transplants, they were drawn to the city’s warm vibe and booming culinary scene. Laughing Mask Candies is a classic pound candy store with a playful carnival theme, inspired by Joshua’s collection of Mardi Gras and Venetian masks. Their goal is to provide both kids and adults with a confectionary meeting place by showcasing local candy

Photo: Liza Becker

artisans; creating a space for workshops, birthday parties, candy-making demonstrations, and get-togethers; and of course, providing ample candy deliciousness. The couple met in San Antonio, Texas, while Anna was interning and Josh was working as a line cook at one of SA’s finest restaurants. Anna was headed to culinary school, and Josh couldn’t bear to let her leave, so he followed her to San Francisco. From there, their journey took them to jobs

additives, MSG, or any artificial flavors or fillers. We offer generous portions. Here you’ll get your money’s worth.

RRM: What do you offer on your menu that other Mexican restaurants do not?

MP: In all honesty, I don’t know what

other restaurants offer. All I can say is, I always try to offer the best I can, be the best cook, and lost of TLC!

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo 67 Branner Ave, Waynesville, NC (828) 456-6413

A candy shop Asheville can call its own. at Michelin-starred restaurants, winery resorts, an organic food distributor, and even a culinary mushroom farm, but ultimately, they knew they wanted to return to their Southern roots. They were looking for somewhere to start their own mom-and-pop shop — a place where people shared their interest in local food culture and community—but also a place where

PG. 36

VA

‘Candies’ continued on page 31

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noteworthy

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sheville Community Theatre is debuting DramaRama, an entire week of unique, affordable, fun events that redefines fundraising for the downtown theatre. DramaRama events will run from July 7-14, with seven different events including a kick-off party honoring ACT groundbreakers, a fashion show, and two variety shows. Tickets are available for all events and range from $10 to $25. DramaRama kicks off with a staged reading and champagne reception, and continues throughout the week with: a fashion show at the Renaissance Hotel; a theatre trivia night hosted by Michael McMurtrey at Olive or Twist; a Sing-a-Long movie night – Grease at the Fine Arts Theatre; a storytelling night – Best of Listen to This hosted by Tom Chalmers; and two variety shows, a junior version and an adult version. “It’s a full-on celebration of Asheville, our community, and theatre,” said Jenny Bunn, Marketing Director at Asheville Community Theatre. ”

D a i ly S p e c i a l S M OnDay -F riDay 11 aM

tO

3 pM

Let Us Cater Your Next Event!

Paninis Salads Soups Desserts Seasonal Drinks D ine -i n :: C arry -O ut

389 w walnut Street Waynesville, NC 828-273-2635

IF YOU GO: For more information and ticket prices call (828)

Limited Delivery ~ Call for Details PG. 36

WA

www.villagegreencafe.com

DramaRama

254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. PG. 36

H

PG. 36

BC

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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED BY

Mary-Beth Akers

tastes so much better and is so comforting! I don’t understand the psychology, but that is my theory. Sandwiches are appealing because of the extensive combinations that can be put together just by altering one or two things. Regional variations and creations are also fun to try even if a little intimidating. For example, our Reuben gets plenty of positive comments, which is a huge relief to us because that is often used as a standard by which a “deli” is evaluated.

DENNIS RAY

Owner of Waynesville’s The Village Green Cafe

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apid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about The Village Green and how it came about?

Mary-Beth Akers: The Village

Green Café is a casual and quirky lunch spot that offers simple fresh foods at very reasonable prices. Our mission is to offer food that is a healthier lunch alternative to fast food without any pretension. We want every patron to feel comfortable ordering a Panini or trying hummus instead of typical chips or fries. Of course, we do offer options that can be loaded down with cheese, all-natural meats, and dressings! There are options for both meat-lovers and vegetarians. The café was not exactly what I had in mind when I began my business plan over six years ago. I knew I loved food and I worked in the food service industry while in college and even after graduating. My true passion for simple and all-natural foods came while working for a well-known all-natural grocery store in the Durham area. My original plan was to open a deli with gourmet charcuterie and hand cut cheeses, which may still happen down the road! The sandwich and salad idea came to me after midnight about two years ago. I remember waking my husband up to tell him and we immediately began the exciting “dream” phase (e.g. coming up with names, menu descriptions). My husband actually pegged the final name, after hearing a song by Billy Joel, “Scenes from an Italian Restaurant.” Billy sings about hanging out on the Village Green. Plus, our space is in the Walnut Village Plaza so it fit. We opened this past winter. It wasn’t an easy time of year to open a new business, but so far our customers have been very loyal, returning often and bringing friends.

‘Candies’ continued from page 29

they could raise a family. Asheville fit the bill perfectly, and they promptly moved here and got married. At Laughing Mask Candies, they’ve created a fun, carnival candy environment with local sweets and treats, giving tourists and locals both a spot to indulge a sweet tooth. The couple also plans to host special events, including holiday gingerbread house workshops, birthday parties, and seasonal celebrations. Along with their mobile woodburning oven, the Dancing Flame, Laughing

RRM: What would you consider the perfect lunch here at The Village Green?

MBA: A perfect lunch for me is walking

Locally grown produce and all-natural meats and cheeses. In fact, our customers are, without a doubt, the major push behind our success.

RRM: What are your most popular dishes? MBA: Our fresh made chicken salad is popular and very consistent. Also, people really enjoy the Panini options. Our Roman Holiday Panini which is filled with spicy Italian ham, salami, and cheese with pepperoncini is a big hit. Our most popular vegetarian option is The Socrates with sprouts, cucumbers, red onion, tomato, feta and cheddar cheese wrapped inside Naan and pressed on the grill. The fresh fruit is cut very soon before it is served and customers frequently comment on the freshness and variety.

RRM: What drew you to creating this restaurant?

MBA: Right before my husband and I

Photos: Liza Becker

hard to get! That, coupled with my interest in locally grown produce and all-natural meats and cheeses, led us to create a menu built around salads and sandwiches. Furthermore, the space we chose is not equipped to accommodate fryers so by default we don’t serve burgers and fries.

RRM: What is your favorite sandwich? MBA: I really like our Carolina Club which

has turkey, bacon, swiss, guacamole and sprouts. Also, the Bella Ciabatta is a great summer sandwich and very fresh. It is the classic combination of fresh mozzarella, basil and tomato. My husband, Steve, fancies the Chloe Panini, which is piled with roast beef, swiss and bacon.

RRM: Why do you think people like sandwiches? What’s the appeal?

began working on concepts, we went out to a local spot for lunch. My daughter was 9 months at the time and I ordered her a side of fruit. It was canned and so chewy she had trouble eating it. I remember thinking that fresh fruit should not be so

MBA: The funny thing about a sandwich is

Mask Candies hopes to provide Asheville with a candy store it can call its own. Anna grew up in San Antonio, Texas, where she absorbed the rich culinary history along the Texas/Mexico border, her mom’s excellent cooking, and enough breakfast tacos to last a lifetime. She has a B. A. from Franklin and Marshall College and an Associate degree from California Culinary Academy. She is also the winner of the 2005 San Pellegrino “Almost Famous Chef” award. After taking a break from the restaurant world, she received her bookkeeping certificate and worked as a numbers lady

for Sonoma Organics, a major supplier of organic and specialty food in Napa and Sonoma Valley. Joshua Sachar was born and raised in Alabama, where he learned to cook through years of sweat and culinary school. He spent 10 years as a chef in kitchens from Alabama to Texas to California — including 2 years at Michelin-starred Jardiniere in San Francisco. While taking a break from the restaurant world Joshua spent time as a fungal farmer at an organic, culinary and medicinal mushroom farm.

that it always tastes better when someone else makes it! One can put ham, cheese, mayo and mustard on bread and it tastes okay. When someone else takes the same ingredients and puts them on bread, it

into the open, clean space and ordering a Blackberry Izze all-natural soda, half of a Carolina Club Panini and half of an Athena Greek Salad with pita chips and hummus as a side. All for under ten bucks. Then, sitting down with a newspaper and waiting for the friendly staff to bring my yummies. (By the way, the tables are made out of trash cans!)

RRM: Tell us about your limited delivery. MBA: We do offer daily delivery within the

Waynesville City Limits. However, those delivery times fill up quickly so we may not always be able to accommodate everyone during the peak lunch times. It is best to call early! In addition to our lunch, we offer a very tasteful catering menu. It is perfect for business luncheons and we are happy to deliver to Haywood, Jackson and Buncombe if given at least a 24 hour notice. Our Facebook page is a great way to see our daily specials and is listed as “The Village Green Café.” We are currently working on our website which is at villagegreencafe.com and it should be up full-time within a few weeks.

The Village Green 389 Walnut St., Waynesville, NC Hours: Monday-Friday 11-3 p.m. (828) 273-2635 info@villagegreencafe.com www.villagegreencafe.com

Still a chef at heart Joshua loves to cook, go mushroom hunting, and spend time working in the garden.

IF YOU Laughing Mask Candies grand GO opening party. A day-long

celebration with face painting, balloons, a raffle, mask crafts for kids, and candy! Saturday, July 7 from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Laughing Mask Candies, 84 N. Lexington Avenue, downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 505-4081.

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 31


The Green Light Cafe Homemade Vegetarian and Vegan Meals

www.GreenLightCafe.com

PG. 36

WM

PG. 36

WB

18 N. Lexington Ave. Downtown Asheville (828) 250-3800 Dinner Monday – Saturday Tues.-Thurs. 11:30-8pm Fri.-Sat. 11:30-9pm Sunday Brunch 11-4pm Closed Monday

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32 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

www.rapidrivermagazine.com


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healthy lifestyles Beware the Epidemiologic Dragon

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recent online health service noted: “40% of cancers are due to avoidable life choices… Tobacco causes 23% of [cancer] cases in men and 15.6% of cases in women. The next largest cause of cancer in men was lack of fruits and vegetables in their diets…” Hold it right there! When someone says that a certain activity “causes” another event to occur, it should be backed up by some very good studies in one of two ways. One method is for a group of people to be given activity A and to be watched for specific result B, and then the same group of people not to be allowed activity A and again watched for result B. Or (as in the case of smoking or eating fruits and vegetables where the time is too long for the appearance of cancer and the appearance of cancer cannot be taken away in order to do the second phase of the study) two groups of people, as alike as possible (to rule out other causes), are selected, one of which is given activity A and the other group is not, then both groups are watched for result B. As you can imagine, it is impossible and probably unethical to have one group of people specifically smoke or one group of people specifically not eat fruits and vegetables just to see if they get cancer. The next best thing is to find groups of people as alike as possible (to rule out other interfering variables) one group of which already does and the other group already does

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not do activity A, then watch them over time to look for result B. The less desirable study is to find people who have suffered result B and to compare them to people who have not suffered result B, trying to isolate what activities are different about those who did and those who did not suffer result B. Comparing groups of people to each other or to information gathered on the population in general is the stuff of epidemiology, an attempt to ferret out possible relationships between known activities and observed results. The epidemiologist is looking for probable “cause.” But these kinds of studies do not prove “cause.” Just because a person does activity A and gets result B does not mean that A caused B. There might be another activity C (which might or might not be related to activity A), that activity A people were also doing, which caused result B. While statisticians try to eliminate these possibilities with statistics, epidemiologic studies cannot prove that activity A “causes” result B. Be careful! Don’t just dismiss these studies. Pay attention, because they tell us and the researchers where to go looking for probable cause. While in some cases (like making people smoke to see if they get cancer) these studies cannot be done in people, the studies are done in animals that closely approximate people and the results theorized to have the same effect in people.

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Does eating fast food “cause” depression? “Over 6 years, Spanish researchers found that those who ate the most fast foods and processed pastries were 37% more likely to develop depression.” Does eating fast food “cause” depression? Does that make any sense? People who have a stressed life style, who are pressing for time and demanding perfection in the work place, who have no time to prepare healthy food, might also be prime setups for depression, especially if they don’t succeed or burn out prematurely. But there is no direct causal link between fast foods and depression, as the authors of the article did point out. “Each 4 point increase in BMI (being overweight), increases the risk of heart disease by 52%.” Does this make sense? The researches went on to say that “higher BMI influences wellknown risk factors like hypertension and type-2 diabetes.” The researchers note that BMI (activity A) influenced activities C and D which are known to “cause” heart disease (result B). When you read the studies or hear them on the news, ask yourself – “does this make sense?” Did they prove that activity A actually “causes” result B? Or is there just a suspicion and more well-controlled studies are called for? Read carefully and thoughtfully. Don’t assume causality. But don’t ignore the warning either.

SolA - Asheville’s Therapeutic Salt Cave

sheville’s first and only therapeutic salt cave opens this month in downtown Asheville. A visit to the cave will provide guests with 45 minutes of pure relaxation and rejuvenation as all five of their senses are engaged by the healing power of nature. SolA is a unique oasis, a salt-enriched microclimate which allows the body and mind to regain rehabilitation and balance. The power of salt therapy has been known for centuries to be beneficial in the treatment of respiratory ailments, cardiovascular issues, nervous system disorders, skin problems and digestive complaints. Utilizing this type of treatment can also neutralize electromagnetic and radioactive smog caused by such

things as cell phones, computers and microwaves. Upon entering the cave, you are surrounded by 17 tons of salt rocks and crystals mined from deep beneath the earth’s surface — by far the purest salt available on Earth, uncontaminated by any toxins or pollutants. “The water of the ocean is a natural sole (so-lay) which has the same concentration of water and salt

that is found in our bodies and in the amniotic fluid in the womb,” said owner Jodie Appel. “When you are depleted in any of the trace minerals, and stress is placed on the body, disease sets in. As the 84 trace minerals found in our salt are inhaled and absorbed into the body, the body’s PH is leveled and returns to the healthy state of homeostasis. Water and salt are the essence of life.” SolA is located at 10 Eagle Street in Asheville. Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call (828) 236-5999 to make an appointment. Details at www.solasaltcave.com

Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 33


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what to do guide July 1, 8, 15 & 22

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

Kram at (828) 456-4880, or visit www. haywoodcommunityband.org. The next regularly scheduled free concert will be held in Maggie Valley on Sunday, July 15. Jasper Quartet

World-class musicians performing a variety of chamber music works. Concerts are Sundays at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville. Tickets are $20. Phone (828) 452-0593.

Wednesday, July 4

Haywood Community Band Free Concert Join the celebration and enjoy memorable patriotic music, and a musical salute to our Armed Forces. 2 p.m. on the court house lawn in Waynesville. For information, call Rhonda Wilson

Richard Shulman Concerts Sundays, July 1, 15, 22, & 29

– Music at the Center for Spiritual Living, 2 Science of Mind Way, Asheville. (828) 253-2325

Thursdays, July 12, 19, & 26,

from 8 - 11 p.m. – Piano with the Heather Masterton Quartet at Olive or Twist, 81 Broadway in Asheville. For more details call (828) 658-9604 or visit www. RichHeartMusic.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Friday, July 6

Biltmore Park Concerts Outdoor shows at the Biltmore Park Pavilion. For more details go to www.biltmorepark.com

July 7 – The Caribbean Cowboys July 21 – Carolina Rex

Karen Keil Brown Reception The public is cordially invited to an opening reception from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Look and See The exhibition “The Edge” features contemporary abstract landscapes. On display through Tuesday, July 31, 2012 at the Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville. Call (828) 251-5796 or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

July 6-29

La Cage Aux Folles This smash Broadway musical, based on the French film “The Birdcage,” is shocking, daring, and hilarious. Music and lyrics by Jerry Herman; book by Harvey Fierstein; directed by Steven Lloyd; music direction by Chuck Taft. Tickets: adults $24; seniors $22; students $10. Haywood Arts Regional Theatre, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville, NC 28786. Phone (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.com

Friday, July 6

South of the Sahara: Portrait of Africa

town Asheville, NC. Stage show and informal jam sessions. FREE. Bring a lawn chair or blanket, family and friends. Info: (828)258-6101 x345 or www.folkheritage.org.

July 7-14

DramaRama Asheville Community Theatre is debuting, an entire week of unique, affordable, fun events that redefines fundraising for the downtown theatre. Seven different events including a kick-off party honoring ACT groundbreakers, a fashion show, and two variety shows. Tickets are available for all events and range from $10 to $25. Details at www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Sunday, July 8

Pan Harmonia The Opal String Quartet will perform crosscultural contemporary favorites by Glass, Kodaly, and Baumbusch. Concert begins at 5 p.m. at The Altamont Theater, 18 Church St., downtown Asheville. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Buy online at www.pan-harmonia.org.

July 10 & 17

Haywood County Arts Council presents an exhibition of photographs by John Rolland celebrating life in Sub-Saharan Africa and exploring the uncommon richness of this vibrant land. Reception from 6-9 p.m. in conjunction with downtown Waynesville’s Art After Dark. On display through Saturday, July 28, 2012. For more information visit www.haywoodarts.org.

July 7, 14, 21; August 11, 18, 25

Shindig on the Green A joyously spontaneous celebration of traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain Photo: Jerry Nelson dancers and cloggers on summer Saturday evenings at Pack Square Park on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford stage in the heart of down-

Brevard Music Center Summer Festival Mini Series In conjunction with the Brevard Music Center’s beloved Summer Festival (now in its 76th season), the Asheville Art Museum is hosting a series of three special performances. Concerts will take place at 7 p.m. in the Museum’s new Art works PRIMED East Wing Gallery. Tickets are $6 for Museum Members; $10 non Members. 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Phone (828) 253-3227, visit www.ashevilleart.org, or www.brevardmusic.org.

Wednesday, July 11

The Magnetic Song Series Monthly songwriter music series takes place the 2nd Wednesday of every month at 8 p.m. beginning July 11. Cost: $5. The Magnetic Field, 372 Depot St., in Asheville’s River arts district. Visit www.themagneticfield.com

Friday, July 13

Animalia Summer puppetry fun! Internationally award-winning master puppeteer Hobey Ford and his Golden Rod

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NC Stage Performances July 13-15 – Mark Twain Now Now,

by Paul Newell. Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. All tickets are $15.

July 18-22 – Hard Travelin’

with Woody Woody, by Randy Noojin. Wednesday - Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 on Wednesday, all other performances $18. For tickets or more information please call (828) 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org. Puppets present a special summer performance for young audiences at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. Performances open to the public, families, camp and summer education groups. Tickets $6-$7 at Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office: (828) 257-4530 or at www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, July 14

July 18, 19, 20

Portrait Workshop with Steve Hue Participants will learn the fundamental principles of painting portraits from life. Red House Studios and Gallery, Black Mountain, NC. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $120 for the three days. Contact Eileen Ross to register, (828) 669-7363 or by email to eileenross@charter.net.

July 19-22

Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday - Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: adults $8, children under 12 free. For a complete listing of exhibitors, craft demonstrations, and entertainment please call (828) 2987928 or visit www.craftguild.org. Michael Lightcap

Friday, July 20

Downtown After 5 Sol Driven Train takes the stage following local opener, Common Foundation. This free event takes place from 59 p.m., on the 3rd Friday of the month through September, at N. Lexington Avenue and I-240.

Free Planet Radio & The Billy Sea

Saturday, July 21

World & Americana Music Fusion Concert & Workshops. Concert 8 p.m. Workshops 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. All events take place at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. (828) 348-5327, www. myaltamont.com. Tickets: Concert $15; Workshops, $25 for all three; $15 for individual classes. Workshop and concert package, $30. For more info www.sharethedrum.com

From 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. in historic downtown Waynesville. The highlight of regional performances by international folk dancers and musicians from Folkmoot USA which takes place July 19-29. For more information visit www.haywoodarts.org or call (828) 452-0593. For information about Folkmoot USA visit www.folkmootusa.org, call (828) 4522997; toll free 1-877-FOLK-USA.

Saturday, July 14

Meeting of the Appalachian Pastel Society From 10 a.m. to noon with a free demonstration of using mediums with pastels, “Pushing the Limits!” by Lorelle Bacon. Continuing workshop from 1-4 p.m. ($45 members/$55 nonmembers). WNC Ag Center, Youth Building, Fletcher, NC. For more information visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org or call Miriam Hughes at 610-389-0058.

Tuesday, July 17

Asheville Quilt Guild Meeting From the Carolinas to California, award-winning quilt artist, Ellen Guerrant, talks about her “Journey as a Quiltmaker,” 10 a.m., Folk Art Center, Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway, www.ashevillequiltguild.org.

International Festival Day

Meet the Authors Writing Contest Deadline: July 30, 2012 The top five winners will meet National Book Award-winning authors E.L. Doctorow and Peter Matthiessen in New York, September 13-14, 2012. Ten Honorable Mentions will receive recognition. Submit an unpublished story or chapter (fiction or creative nonfiction) of 4,500 words or less. The entry fee is $30 per story. This annual contest is sponsored by The Writers’ Workshop. Full details at (828) 254-8111, email writersw@gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org.

JULY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11


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what to do guide AmiciMusic Concerts

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

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Curated by Asheville sculptor Eric Knoche, the exhibit will Peter Callas be held at the Crimson Laurel Gallery, 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC 28705. Phone (828) 688-3599 for more details.

An American Craft Week Exhibition, August 24 - November 16, 2012. This exhibition will celebrate craft artists living in the 25 counties of Western North Carolina as defined on our website. The theme of the exhibition is functional craft objects made in Western North Carolina. Craft is defined as made from clay, glass, fiber, metal, wood, recycled/ reused materials, and natural products.

Details at exhibitions@handmadeinamerica.org or visit www. handmadeinamerica.org.

BMCA Bag Lunch Series Dragin

by Michael Cole

An hour of literary presentations from noon to 1 p.m. Bring a bag lunch. Donations accepted.

Friday, July 13 – Judith Toy lecture and book signing for Murder As a Call to Love.

Sunday, August 5

From Friday, July 20 through Friday, August 10, internationally renowned jazz musician Michael Jefry Stevens and his wife, poet Tina Barr, will present Jazz Poetry and Music: Passionate Meetings.

45th Annual Juried Exhibit Opening reception for the Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Members exhibit. 2-4 p.m. at the Red House Studios and Gallery in Black Mountain. The show runs through August 3, 2012. The judge for the exhibit is Constance E. Richards, writer, author, and Director of the Grand Bohemian Gallery in Asheville. Visit www.svfalarts.org

At the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For more information call (828) 6690930 or visit www.blackmountainarts.org.

Grassroots Subgrant Applications and Grant Workshop

through July

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

through July

The Arts Council of Henderson County is accepting applications for NC Arts Council Grassroots Arts Program subgrants through August 16. Applications are available for non-profit organizations whose purpose is to promote and develop diverse cultural arts programming in Henderson County. Projects must occur between July 1 and June 30, 2013. There will be a grant writing workshop at the Arts Council, 401 N. Main St., 3rd floor, in downtown Hendersonville on Thursday, July 19 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. More information and applications are available by calling Patty Smyers at (828) 693-8504, or by email to acofhc@bellsouth.net.

Silent Echoes Paintings and masks by Nancy Silver are on display at the Congregational Church of Christ, 20 Oak Street. Weekdays from 9-12. Visit www.nancysilverart.com.

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All entries must be functional. Entries will be judged on technical proficiency, innovative/creative use of medium, and relevance.

Tickets on sale now for the nation’s longest running folk festival! This three-day event showcases the best of the region’s old-time and bluegrass musicians, mountain dance groups, cloggers, and ballad singers.

Exhibit at the Red House Studios & Gallery, next to the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain. Working Artists Studios will also be open. On display through July 29. Gallery hours: Thursday through Sunday 11 a.m to 6 p.m.

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Entry deadline July 13‚ 2012

85th Annual Mountain Dance and Folk Festival

Visions of Summer

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Call for Entries – From Hand to Hand: Functional Craft in WNC

August 2-4

Thursday - Saturday, 7 p.m. nightly at Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place in downtown Asheville. Tickets (828) 2574530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

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An International Exhibition of Wood Fired Sculptural Ceramics. Artist’s reception Saturday, July 7 at 6 p.m. Exhibition features works from the United States, Australia, Denmark, Japan, and Poland.

Saturday, July 14 – House Concert in Hendersonville at 7:30 p.m. Reservations are required. $35, includes great food and drink. Seating is limited. For more details or to make a reservation contact Daniel Weiser at (828) 505-2903, email daniel@amicimusic.org, or visit www.amicimusic.org.

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Friday, July 13 – Thrilling

Threesome features flutist Sergio Pallottelli, violinist Joanna Becker, and pianist Daniel Weiser in a program that includes Joanna Becker works by Schumann, Mozart, Shostakovich, Navarra, and Nino Rota. 7:30 p.m. at the White Horse in Black Mountain, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com or call (828) 669-0816. Tickets: $15.

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www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 35


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find it here Alan Deutsch Photography alandeutschphotography.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Amici Music www.amicimusic.org

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

ArtEtude Gallery www.ArtetudeGallery.com

Ceramic Song www.ceramicsingingbowl.com

Asheville Lyric Opera www.ashevillelyric.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Beads and Beyond (828) 254-7927

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

Bistro 1896 www.bistro1896.com

Double Exposure Giclee Fine Art Printmaking www.doubleexposureart.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Sanctuary of Stuff www.sanctuaryofstuff.com

Magnetic Field www.themagneticfield.com

Sagebrush of Waynesville (828) 452-5822

Mangum Pottery www.mangumpottery.com

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Maria’s Mexican Pueblo (828) 456-6413

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Mary Webster and Associates marywebsterandassociates.com

Studio B www.galleryatstudiob.com

Michael Hofman www.livelifeartfully.com

Susan Marie Designs (828) 277-1272

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Mr Frogs Soul & Creole Kitchen www.mrfrogs.com

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

Daniel McClendon Fine Art www.danielmc.com

Green Light Cafe (828) 250-3800

Neo Cantina www.neocantina.com

Guild Crafts www.craftguild.org

The New York Studio of Stage and Screen www.nys3.com

El Charro Mexican Restaurant (828) 277-2248 Foundry www.digfoundry.com Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery Two Six Two www.gallerytwosixtwo.com

Jack of Hearts Pub & Restaurant www.jackofheartspub.com

Low Weekly & Monthly Rates

WEAVERVILLE VC VA

The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com Woolworth Walk www.woolworthwalk.com

NORTH ASHEVILLE

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BILTMORE VILLAGE

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Jimmy John’s www.jimmyjohnsrestaurant.com

P.H. Best Fine Art www.mountainbrushworks.com

Karmasonics (828) 259-9949

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

La Carreta Mexican Restaurant (828) 225-4600

Riverside Studios www.riversidestudios-asheville.com

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36 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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noteworthy 9th Annual “Bring Us Your Best”

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ring Us Your Best, BY PATTY SMYERS an all media visual art exhibition, will of which we are all a part. be opening with an In addition a “People’s awards reception Choice” award will be on Friday, August 10 from selected from the votes of 5-7 p.m. This popular show gallery visitors. This award has grown considerably will be announced on the since its inception in 2004, final day of the show. now drawing artists from Artists can find the throughout western North prospectus with additional Carolina, upper South CaroSummer Breeze by Barbara information at by contactlina, and eastern Tennessee. Sammons, 2011 Photography ing the Arts Council at A juried and judged Category Award Winner. acofhc@bellsouth.net, competition, Bring Us Your (828) 693-8504, or www.acofhc.org. Best IX will offer greater prize monies than ever before. First, second, and third place cash prizes will be awarded in each of four IF categories: two-dimensional work, threeYOU The exhibition will be hosted by dimensional work, fine craft, and photograGO Blue Ridge Community College, phy. 180 West Campus Drive, Flat A “One Planet, One World” prize will Rock, in the Conference Hall of the be selected by the Unitarian Universalist Technology Education & Development Fellowship of Hendersonville and awarded Center. The show will run from to the artwork that best exemplifies respect Wednesday, August 15 through Saturday, for our interdependent web of all existence September 1, 2012.

investing in the souls of our city

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Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 37


Guided Fly Fishing Trips

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unique shops ‘HART’ continued from page 27

Others in the cast include Lyn Donley, Laura Gregory, Frances Davis, Steve Turner, Bryan Nichols, Ricky Sanford, Alexia Grant, Susan Rudniak, Sean Bruce, Dan Dutterer, Ben Tetreault, Charles Marth, Oliver Marth, Hope Peterson, Mandy Wildman, Wayne Porter, and Emily Tetreault. HART’s productions of The Producers, Chicago and Kiss Me Kate, return for this show, along with music director Chuck Taft. The show is being directed by HART Executive Director Steve Lloyd.

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Waynesville Fly Shop

IF YOU HART presents La Cage Aux Folles July 6, 7, 12, GO 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays

178 Waynesville Plaza 828-246-0306 www.waynesvilleflyshop.com

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July 8, 15, 22, and 29 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $24 for adults; $22 for seniors; students $10. Special $7 discount tickets for students for Sunday’s and Thursdays. Box Office hours Mon-Sat 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Tickets available at www.harttheatre.com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC.

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38 July 2012 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 15, No. 11

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August & September 2012 Our Annual 2012-2013 Performing Arts/Theatre Preview Call for Reduced Ad Rates • Web Banners (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com “Like us” on Facebook and win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions.


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stage preview NC Stage Hosts American Icons on Stage

Mark Twain & Woody Guthrie Come to Life in New Plays

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his month, North BY AMANDA LESLIE Carolina Stage Company celebrates American to make it clear that this history with two is a theatricalized invenfascinating portrayals of tion: that we are imagining American icons. Mark what he might say, not reTwain and Woody Guthrie enacting what he did say,” shared a deep love of counsays Newell. try, but neither was afraid to Hard Travelin’ use their brilliant, biting wit with Woody combines to take on injustice and abthe words and songs of surdity where they found it. Woody Guthrie for a Beginning July 13rousing and eye-opening 15, NC Stage hosts Mark evening of theatre. Randy Twain Now Now, written by and Noojin, familiar to local starring Paul Newell, then audiences through his July 18-22, Randy Noojin work at Southern AppaRandy Noojin portrays Woody Guthrie in Hard Travelin’ portrays Woody Guthrie in lachian Regional Theatre, with Woody. Hard Travelin’ with Woody Woody. provides far more than an Both events are part of imitation of the famous NC Stage’s Catalyst Series, an eclectic mix musical icon. Of his New York Fringe Festhat in the past has featured original works, tival performance, Backstage wrote “Randy music, comedy, burlesque and dance. AcNoojin invests Hard Travelin’ With Woody cording to Managing Director Amanda Les… with topicality and urgency, rescuing it lie, “We didn’t set out to make July a month from mere homage and transforming it into of American icons, but when we started talka call for united action against the greed and ing to Paul and Randy about these projects, selfishness of the rich.” the serendipity was appealing.” In Mark Twain Now Now, Paul Newell imagines Twain as a present–day social critic IF and satirist. One hundred and two years YOU Mark Twain Now, by Paul after his rumored demise, Mark Twain GO Newell. July 13-15; Friday and takes on, race, war, and the Gilded Age, past Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 and present. The show takes the form of a p.m. All tickets are $15. Hard Travelin’ with Woody, by Randy Noojin. July 18-22; lecture-circuit appearance: a venue popularWednesday - Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday ized by Twain himself and made familiar to at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15 on Wednesday, all modern audiences by Twain re-enactors like other performances $18. Hal Holbrook and others. But don’t expect Mark Twain Now to For tickets call (828) 239-0263 or visit be a full-out impersonation of Twain. “I try www.ncstage.org.

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Vol. 15, No. 11 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — July 2012 39


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July 2012 Issue  

Emoke B’Racz & Linda Barrett Knopp..p3, Jason Rafferty..p12, Maria Pressley..p29, Mary-Beth Akers..p31, Folkmoot Festival..p4, Swannanoa Cha...

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