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68th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands pg

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Contemporary ELEGANCE at

Susan Marie Designs pg

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Local Dining Guide pgs 30-32 Reel Takes Movie Reviews pgs 12-15 ™ What to Do Guide pgs 34-35


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performance

JUNE 5 - 28

World-Class Opera Year-Round

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There is to be no more summer vacation for the Asheville Lyric Opera.

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pAT BARCAS

2015 will be the first official year of the group’s season being a year-round calendar model, with summer performances of Rigoletto kicking off at the Brevard Music Center and the Diana Wortham Theatre. General and Artistic Director David Starkey says the Opera’s goal was always to expand the program, and this summer’s performance was born out of a seed planted two years ago in the form of a summer training program. “It’s such a highly specialized career and skill set,” said Starkey, who likened the training program to a residency for a doctor at a hospital. “To become a profesDavid Starkey, Asheville Lyric Opera’s General and Artistic Director. sional singer at the operatic level, you’re doing as much training as any doctor or lawyer: studying five languages, music history, Rigoletto is incredibly dramatic music theory, and learning to play the piano, plus learning and powerful, and it has material to sing.” some of the most beautifully By moving away from the traditional operatic calendar and recognizable opera tunes. toward a year-round format, Starkey said the Opera will be able to bring unique projects to area audience, from the seasoned opera-goer to audiences all seasons of the year. He hopes this first timers. rigorous program will pay off when the curtain “This is a piece that challenges both orgadrops for Rigoletto, Giuseppe Verdi’s masterful nizations,” he said. “It’s incredibly dramatic opera. It’s the Lyric Opera’s first ever operatic and powerful, and it has some of the most collaboration with Brevard Music Center, and beautifully recognizable opera tunes. To take Starkey, an alumni of the center, says it will be the popularity of it and then to manage the a one of a kind presentation. dramatic challenges, not everyone can handle “We’re intermingling artistic forces of both it the way I think we will.” organizations and putting world class people Starkey said the moment he’s waiting for is together, which is just phenomenal,” he said. the audience reaction upon hearing the singers Starkey explained that the training center is meld with the orchestra for the first time. bringing up and coming talent to the perforHe explained that the most artistically mance, and the Lyric Opera is bringing world dynamic moment for him is the singer’s first class performers. rehearsal with the orchestra. There are two “It’s like mixing the Met roster and the pieces of the score – the instrumental and the Juliard kids together. It will be a dynamic that vocal – both practiced separately, which are people will never have seen before,” he said. then brought together in one moment. “The artistic resources of each company will “These people have never been together doonly be enhanced because we’re able to draw ing this, it’s one of a kind,” said Starkey. “I get upon each other’s strengths.” to have the sneak peak at rehearsal, but I really For Rigoletto, Starkey said the opera get excited when the audience is introduced brings a really eclectic blend of traditional and to that never dying magnitude. I’ve already contemporary styles that will appeal to any seen and witnessed the impact, and I can’t wait to just give the cue and boom...they go. That enthusiasm is never a lesser moment for me. That moment never dissipates, it just builds.”

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine pg. 23

BY

Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

IF YOU Rigoletto can been seen at the Brevard GO Music Center’s Porter Center on

June 25 and 27, and also at the Diana Wortham Theatre in Asheville on July 2 and 5. Tickets can be purchased online at www. dwtheatre.com or by calling (828) 257-4530.


Connecting Global Rhythms 4th Annual Asheville Percussion Festival June 19-21

workshops • drumming • dancing • performances

Workshops

Masters Concert

Open to Percussionists of All Levels at the Odyssey Community School

Saturday, June 20

Diana Wortham Theatre • 8PM

Performance Techniques, Improvising, Composing, and Dancing Taught by World-Renowned Performers

Tickets Available at

www.ashevillepercussion.org

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www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue - Downtown Asheville

pg. 36

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performance Come ‘Share the Drum’

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Come engage in the rhythm and heartbeat of the Asheville Percussion Festival, June 15-21.

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA pg. 37

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100 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

original woodblock prints on handmade paper

April 1 (detail) • 10” x 6.5” • $80

Trees No. 28 (detail) • 10” x 13.5” • $95

Trees No. 5 (detail) • 4” x 8.5” • $80

Tulip Magnolia (detail) • 4” x 11” • $120 Inset: Homage No. 1 • 2.5” x 10” • $60 (framing additional)

pg. 36

MB 365 Merrimon Ave • Asheville 828.225.3117 • blackbirdframe.com

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BY

KELLY pEARCE

Experience a creative musical landscape of infinite transformation through the symphonic heartbeat of rhythm, dance, and song where percussionists, dancers, and musicians of all traditions gather from around the globe to explore, create, and innovate. The week-long Asheville PercusMonette Marino-Keita sion Festival hosts a thrilling line up this year, led by world-renowned Teaching Artists and performers who invite percussionists of all levels to Free Planet Radio join the likes of the most visible and recorded percussionists on the planet Bashiri Johnson, Monette MarinoKeita, Jeff Sipe, Miranda Rondeau, River Guerguerian, Adam Maalouf, Bharatanatyam dancer Apama Keshaviah, Suphala, Free Planet Radio, Billy Jonas, Brandi Mizilca, Matthew Richmond, and Kevork Guerguerian. Workshops will begin Monday, June 15, at the Odyssey Community Adam Maalouf Suphala Photo: Gerard Gentil School. The Master’s Concert will be held Saturday, June 20, at 8 pm. in the Diana Wortham Theater, featuring The drumbeat is beckoning. collaborative compositions by local Asheville favorites, award-winning percussionist Billy Come ‘Share the Drum.’ Jonas, River Guerguerian, and Free Planet Radio, voted “Best World Music Group in Western North Carolina 2013” by readers of IF Mountain Xpress. YOU Asheville Percussion Festival, June GO 15-21. Intensive program workshops Chris Rosser’s Free Planet Radio, and begin Monday, June 15 at Odyssey chamber music musicians The Opal String Community School. Many ticketing options Quartet, will premiere a composition of a are available. Masters Concert Saturday, June three-movement piece, given life through a 20 at the Diana Wortham Theatre at 8 p.m. Visit 2014 grant from the Chamber Music America www.ashevillepercussionfestival.com Classical Commissioning Program. For tickets and event/workshop information see www.ashevillepercussionfestival.com/tickets/

Country Music Tribute Series

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Friday, June 12 Sweet Dreamers: a Tribute to Patsy Cline

An homage to the legendary and unparalleled Patsy Cline. Features the soulful voices of CaroMia Tiller, Mary Ellen Davis and Cary Fridley. Join us for a night of magic and celebration of the one and only Patsy Cline.

Saturday, June 20 Welcome to Buckersfield: a Tribute to Buck Owens and Merle Haggard

Help us celebrate the Bakersfield Sound of Buck & Merle, as we focus primarily on the grittier sound of their seminal 1960s output. It’s all telecasters and steel guitars on this night of west coast country music.

Thursday, June 11 Butch Hancock of The Flatlanders

A world traveling troubadour with a long string of recorded songs and albums, Butch Hancock is acknowledged by his peers and critics alike as one of the premiere singersongwriters Texas has ever produced. His lyrical style has been compared to that of Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie and his songs have been covered by the likes of Emmylou Harris. IF YOU Doors open at 7 p.m.; show begins at 8 GO p.m. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church

St., Asheville. Call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Ten

JUNE 2015

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Amber Combs Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Pat Barcas, Hannah Barry, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Jenny Bunn, Doreyl Ammons Cain, James Cassara, Jeff Catanese, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Al Junek, Katie Kasben, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Dr. Deborah Louis, Tina Masciarelli, Kay Miller, Wendy H. Outland, Kelly Pearce, Lauren Pelletier, Dennis Ray, Michelle Rogers, Steven Samuels, Jeannie Shuckstes, Diane Stumm, Frances Tacy, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, J. & R. Woods, Anna Lee Zanetti.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, June 2015, Vol. 18 No. 10

2 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Asheville Percussion Festival . . . . . . 4 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Magnetic 375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Community Theatre . . . . 7

8 Music

New stories are added each month!

Making the Circle Round, written by Ashley English

Where No One’s Gone Before, written by RF Wilson

Mike Farris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Charlie Parr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

10 Fine Art

I’m Not a Baby Anymore, written by Mickey Hunt

Winton Manor,

written by Christopher Van Dyke

Clay Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands . . . . . . . . . 11 French Broad Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 ZaPow!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Susan Marie Designs . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Al Junek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

12 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

16 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 16 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Book Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 33 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

24 Noteworthy Passing the Music On. . . . . . . . . . . 24 YA Events at Malaprop’s. . . . . . . . . 29 Art in Bloom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Asheville Area Arts Council . . . . . 38 Franny’s Farm Fest . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Flow - The Physical Body, written by Ronya Banks

Street Food: Chiang Mai Sausage,

written by Jonathan Look

Hiking the PCT Back in My Cathedral, written by John Swart

Short Story guidelines are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

SPECIAL SECTIONS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 9 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . pg 17 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 19-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-25 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 37

ONLY ONLINE Sunburst Writers, a

group of women from all over the United States, have been writing poems, essays, flash fiction and creative non-fiction as members of Peggy Tabor Millin’s ClarityWorks writing programs. The group published their first book, an anthology in April. 13 contributors to the anthology are located in NC, seven reside in Asheville and the surrounding areas.

Jewelry Can Help You Physically, Mentally, or Emotionally,

by Linda Neff. Many healing modalities work in the same way: reflexology, Reiki, massage, acupuncture, and many more. The challenging

48 Hour Film Project will take

over the streets of Asheville from June 19-21 as hundreds of Asheville residents race to complete a film in just one weekend.

30 Dining Guide Wasabi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

On the Cover:

Painted clay owl by Mary Dashiell of Meadows of Dan, Virgina. Dashiell is a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. PAGE 10

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 5


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captivating performances HART PRESENTS THE SMASH MUSICAL COMEDY HIT

Pure laughter, led by a kick line of nuns.

Nunsense

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HART’s third show this season is the outrageous musical comedy Nunsense. Directed by Suzanne Tinsley and featuring some local favorites, Nunsense includes Leslie Lang, Lyn Donley, Karen Covington, Tabitha Judy, and Lea Parker. The show opened off Broadway in 1985 and holds the record as the second longest off-Broadway show in history, surpassed only by The Fantastics. There have been six sequels. The show has had more than 8,000 productions, and more than 25,000 women have been cast including: Edie Adams, Maxine Audley, Kaye Ballard, Honor Blackman, Pat Carroll, Peggy Cass, Phyllis Diller, Sally Struthers, Louise Gold, Maggie Fitzhugh, Georgia Ingle, Lee Meriweather, JoAnne Worley, and Rue McClanahan. The concept: five of the 19 surviving Little Sisters of Hoboken, a one-time missionary

Nunsense stars Leslie Lang, Lyn Donley, Karen Covington, Tabitha Judy, and Lea Parker.

order that ran a leper colony on an island south of France, discover that their cook, Sister Julia, Child of God, accidentally killed the other fifty-two residents of the convent with her tainted vichyssoise while they were off playing bingo. With the deceased nuns on ice in the deep

Grand Opening of Magnetic 375

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The Magnetic Theatre proudly announces the grand opening of its new home, Magnetic 375.

glorious experience. We had an enormously good time, as did the audiences, which were far larger than any we’ve played to before—on closing night, Located at 375 Depot Street there were more than 500 in in the River Arts District, the attendance! And it just made Magnetic Theatre opens with the everyone so happy, all I could world premiere of The Merchant think was, ‘I should write a play of Asheville (A Locally Sourced like that someday!’ And now I Comedy), written and directed have, literally. by The Magnetic Theatre’s artis“The rhyme scheme makes tic director, Steven Samuels. the proceedings as crazy as the “The Merchant of Asheville Steven Samuels plot—which includes a ceremony is designed as a celebration,” complete with a drum circle! I Samuels says. “A celebration of our longlove blending the past and the present, treating aborning new home, a celebration of the Asheville as worthy of classic comedy, which fulfillment-to-date of our dreams and schemes it is.” for this company and for my own professional The Merchant of Asheville features Samutheatrical aspirations, and a celebration of els in the title role, along with Tracey JohnAsheville, which has been so good to us and to ston-Crum, Darren Marshall, and Samantha me, particularly.” Stewart (all of whom appeared in Tartuffe), This contemporary comedy—a rare if not as well as two more Magnetic veterans, Kirby unique play not only set in Asheville but also Gibson and Joe Carroll, and Magnetic newabout it—concerns the family owners of a comer Badi Mirheli. Erin Owens, Jason Wilmodest bed and breakfast in Montford, who liams, Scott Fisher, Jim Julien, Mary Zogzas, are having a hard time adjusting to the ongoing and Kristi DeVille comprise the design team. changes in our fair city. Samuels, the author of When Jekyll Met IF Hyde, among other plays, and the director of YOU The Magnetic Theatre presents The dozens of plays for The Magnetic, including GO Merchant of Asheville. Discount the recent smash hits #OUCH! and Food and previews May 28 & 29. Opening night How To Eat It, goes on to say, “Last summer May 30. Performances Thursdays-Saturdays, June 4 through July 4 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets on sale was the turning point. I directed and appeared now at www.themagnetictheatre.org. Magnetic in a co-production with The Montford Park 375 is located at 375 Depot Street in Asheville. Players of Molière’s Tartuffe, and it was a

6 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

freeze, they decide to stage a variety show in the Mount Saint Helen’s School auditorium to raise the necessary funds for the burials. If you’re looking for an evening of pure laughter, led by a kick line of nuns, you can’t go wrong with Nunsense. Nunsense opened May 22 and continues through June 14, 2015.

IF YOU Nunsense, June 4, 5, 6, 11, 12 & 13 at GO 7:30 and June 7 and 14 at 3 p.m. There

are special student discounts for Sunday performances, and a Buy One, Get One free discount for Thursday performances. Tickets are available on line at www.harttheatre.org or by calling the HART Box Office, at (828) 456-6322 Tues-Sat. from 1-5 p.m. Performances are at the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

Forte at Crest Mountain

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KATIE KASBEN

Cabaret performance featuring humor, vocals, piano, bass, and percussion. Local singing sensations and theatre divas Katherine Sandoval Taylor, Liz Aiello, Carol Forte Duermit, and Beverly Todd are back in Asheville, for one night only, at the Crest Mountain Pavilion. Join us for a night of cabaret with Forte, WNC’s favourite ladies of song: if you love musical theatre, you will love this show! Crest Mountain Pavilion is a glassedin facility, seating up to 300, and includes a mountain-vista overlook and a spectacular view of downtown Asheville. A full bar, including non-alcoholic drinks, is available before and during the show. IF YOU Forte, Wednesday, June 3 at GO Crest Mountain Pavilion, 6

Celebration Place, Asheville. The show begins at 7 p.m., and doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets: $25 for adults; $20 for children under 17. Purchase tickets online at www.crestmountaindinnershow.com or call (828) 252-2637.


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The Great American Trailer Park Musical AT ASHEVILLE COMMUNITY THEATRE

The New Yorker called this show “more fun than a chair-throwing episode of Jerry Springer set to music.”

The New York Post added that it was “undeniable fun!” The Great American Trailer Park Musical is a wheel-spinning, mud-splattering good time of a musical that’s goodnatured – and recommended for those adults who don’t mind strong language. When Pippi, the stripper on the run, comes between the Dr. Phil–loving, agoraphobic Jeannie who hasn’t left her trailer in 20 years and Norbert, her tollbooth collector husband at Armadillo Acres, a trailer park in Central Florida, the storms begin to brew. Rounding out the cast of The Great American Trailer Park Musical is Betty, the leasing manager of Armadillo Acres; a woman named Pickles who suffers from hysterical pregnancy; a third resident named Lin – short for Linoleum – who has a husband on death row; and Duke, a marker-huffing ex-boyfriend of Pippi’s. But these folks do not identify as white trash: “I do not work on my tan 365 days a year to be called ‘white’ anything,” explains Betty. The Great American Trailer Park Musical debuted in New York at The New York Musical Theatre Festival (NYMF) in 2004, which led to an Off Broadway run in 2005 and a national tour. This is the first time Asheville Community Theatre has produced The Great American Trailer Park Musical. Asheville Community Theatre’s production of The Great American Trailer Park Musical is directed by Mark Jones who last helmed ACT’s production of Little Shop of Horrors. Mark has appeared onstage as Lurch in The Addams Family, Corny Collins in Hairspray, and John in John and Jen, which

BY JENNY

BUNN

“Thrillingly Trashy” he also produced. Musical direction is by John Crawley. The Great American Trailer Park Musical stars Delina Hensley, Mandy Bean, Chelsey Lee Gaddy, Reeni Lindbloom, Kristen Lin (Reeni Lindblom), Betty (Delina Hensley), and Pickles Hipps, Dylan Murray (Kristen Hipps) are loving life in Armadillo Acres, a trailer park in and David Dowd. North Florida where a big storm’s about to be a-brewin’. The set is designed by Jill Summers with they’ll love it, so we want to offer them an costumes by Deborah Austin. extra incentive if they’ll be first in line.” “This show is just fun,” said director Mark Plus, there’s the opportunity to snap up a Jones. “Ever since I saw a touring production limited edition koozie with the purchase of of it, I thought it was a hoot and a half. You a beer! can’t leave without having a good time. The The Great American Trailer Park Musical, cast is just wonderful – they come ready to music and lyrics by David Nehls; based on the work and at every rehearsal we’re having fun book by Betsy Kelso. and laughing all the time. I think it’s going to take Asheville by storm. People are going to want to see it again and again – and they’ll IF want to bring more people with them when YOU The Great American Trailer Park they come back.” GO Musical, June 5-28. Performances Friday For opening weekend, Asheville Commuand Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $25; nity Theatre is offering the Wheelin’ Dealin’ $22 Seniors/Students. Opening weekend tickets: Special: all adult, senior, and student tickets $19.99. Tickets are available online at www. for all three opening weekend performances ashevilletheatre.org, over the phone at (828) 254are only $19.99. 1320, or in person at the Asheville Community “This is a show that’s unfamiliar to most Theatre Box Office, 35 East Walnut Street, people,” said Box Office Manager Waylon Downtown Asheville. Wood. “We know that once people see it,

The Underpants

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Though she pulls them up quickly, he thinks the incident will cost him his job as a government clerk. Louise’s momentary display does not result in the feared scandal but it does attract two infatuated men, each of whom wants to rent the spare room in the Markes’ home. Oblivious of their amorous objectives, Theo splits the room between them, happy to collect rent from both the foppish poet and the whiny hypochondriac.

Produced by Attic Salt Theatre Company at NC Stage Company. Attic Salt Theatre Company, the team who produced 2013’s comedy hit All in the Timing and 2014’s acclaimed God of Carnage presents the WNC debut of the farcical The Underpants, written by Carl Sternheim, adapted for the stage by Steve Martin. The cast is made up of local favorites Carin Metzger, Cary Nichols, Italo Medelius and Henry Williamson, and also features relative newcomers to the Asheville stage Elliot Weiner and Jim Wicker. It is directed by Jeff Catanese, who helmed Attic Salt Theatre Company’s All in the Timing and God of Carnage, as well as the recent hit, Private Lives at the Asheville Masonic Temple.

The play will be directed by Jeff Catanese, with performances from June 24 through July 5; Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30pm; Sunday matinees at 2:30pm. Carl Sternheim, comic actor and author of Picasso at the Lapine Agile, provides a wild satire adapted from the classic German play. Louise and Theo Markes’ conservative existence is shattered when Louise’s bloomers fall down in public.

IF YOU The Underpants, June 24 through July GO 5, 2015. Wednesdays through Saturdays

at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:30 p.m. For tickets or more information, contact the NC Stage box office, (828) 239-0263 and visit www. NCSTAGE.org. NC Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane, downtown Asheville.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 7


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sound experience Americana Artist Mike Farris

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AT THE ALTAMONT THEATRE

Fresh off his triumphant Grammy win for Best Roots Gospel album, awarded to him for his release Shine For All The People, Americana soul rocker Mike Farris will be playing the Altamont Theater downtown. It’s an ideal venue for an artist whose voice, while powerful enough to fill a larger venue – as he did three years ago while playing The Orange Peel in support of the legendary Allen Toussaint – deserves to be heard in a setting acoustically sensitive enough to fully showcase his range and control. Farris’ legendary, electrifying live performances have made him a favored son and standard bearer of the gospel tradition for the Americana music genre. His sound reinterprets traditional black spiritual music with a fusion of rock, blues, funk, and soul. His 2010 live release The Night The Cumberland Came Alive is an album worth revisiting time and again, and the promise of a new studio effort (to be reviewed in next month’s Rapid River) makes his reappearance in Asheville even more tantalizing.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Country music icon Marty Stuart calls Farris, “A secret weapon… He’s loaded with soul, singing notes that would make Patsy Cline and Mavis Staples cry and shout. He’s got it and that’s all there is to it.” After a successful 1990s run with the much loved and sorely missed Screamin’ Cheetah Wheelies, Farris embarked on a solo career by intertwining rock, blues and gospel. In 2008, he won the coveted Americana Music Award for “Best New & Emerging Artist” and later a Dove Award in 2010 for “Best Traditional Gospel Album of the Year” with SHOUT! Live. Farris has appeared at multiple festivals including Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Telluride Bluegrass, Strawberry Music Festival, The ACL Festival and Bonnaroo, wowing audiences with the impact of his live performances with his nine-piece band, The Roseland Rhythm Revue. The opportunity to see him again, in an intimate setting built to showcase his stunning stage presence, is one this music lover will certainly not miss.

Hearts for the Arts

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Dr. Joann Freeburg, founder of the “Hearts for the Arts,” and her husband, Keith, have shared a love of music for more than forty years. In fact, their romance began when she turned pages for Keith during a musical performance. Rita Hayes, Dr. Cobb, Keith Freeburg, and Morgen Cobb. Dr. Freeburg plays piano, flute and cello. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Education/Foreign Languages, a Pianos, and performed at the Master Works Master’s Degree in Christian Ministry/CounTheatre in Hendersonville. seling, a Doctorate in Theology, as well as a First, enjoy beautiful and dynamic solo variety of certifications. performances by John Cobb, Rita Hayes, She has used her love of music to work Hwa-Jin Kim on piano, Keith Freeburg, with all age groups as well as special needs soprano Gwenn Roberts, and Morgen Cobb. communities. Her gift for teaching and inspiThese remarkable musicians are teachers as rational speaking has opened the door for her well as great performers. They are leaders in to travel and help people around the world. As the crusade to bring top musical training to a creative blog writer, she gives readers a look the next generation of musicians in Western into the people and stories behind Freeburg North Carolina. Pianos and the wonderful world of music. Rita Hayes, Dr. Cobb, Keith Freeburg and This year Dr. Freeburg will present a rare Morgen Cobb will perform the exciting Secdouble feature extravaganza focusing on ond Suite for Flute and Jazz Trio by Claude the teachers that make it all possible for our Bolling. Bolling’s mixture of classical and jazz students. Inspired by a life-long passion to styles covers the entire gamut from cool jazz to encourage and honor talented young artists, hot jazz, and from Baroque classical to modern “Hearts for the Arts” is supported by Freeburg classical. Toe tapping is allowed.

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Mike Farris Photo: Anthony Scarlati IF YOU Mike Farris, Saturday, June 6 at 8 p.m. GO at the Altamont Theatre, 18 Church

Street in Asheville. Tickets are $22 in advance and $25 at the door. They are available through the Altamont’s website, www. thealtamont.com, or by visiting the venue’s box office from 3-6 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.

Christopher Tavernier The concert pianist and performing artist is a musical descendant of Franz Liszt. His pianistic lineage extends from Franz Liszt through his teacher, Dr. Cobb, who studied with Claudio Arrau, whose teacher was a pupil of Franz Liszt. Christopher is a dedicated chamber music player and is a member of the Rutherford Chamber Consort in WNC.

The evening includes a special encore appearance by the brilliant teenage soloists from last year, Grace and Kristi Kim, and a special appearance by Christopher Tavernier, the First International Perzina Artist in the company’s 144 year history! IF YOU Hearts for the Arts, Saturday, June 6 at GO 6:30 p.m. Concert is free and open to

the public. Master Works Theatre, 2314 Asheville Hwy., Hendersonville. For more details, please call (828) 697-0110 .


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Sue and Ben Green, owners of the Green Room Café have a full line-up of entertainment planned to take place outside every Saturday night (except during festivals). Their efforts are being supported by neighbor merchants who want to get more people to enjoy the beautiful streetscapes and varied offerings at the north end of Hendersonville’s Main Street. The Green Room Café, Mast General Store, Kilwins, All Nation’s Trading, The Dugout, Art Mob, Case Garden Designs, Beverly Hanks Realtors, Henderson County Art League, and Dad’s Collectibles will be supporting the program by committing to stay open later on Saturdays for shopper’s convenience. Sue Green says they picked Saturday night to round out the car shows and concerts that take place at the southern end of Main Street on Friday nights. Beverly Hanks will host an art exhibit once a month on Friday nights and Dad’s Collectibles will display vintage cars throughout the summer.

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514 N. Main Street, Hendersonville Facebook.com/AllNationsTrading • 828-698-4888 anita@spiritfeather.com • www.SpiritFeather.com

Saturday, June 13 Artist Ginny Bohanan, Jewelry, 12-2 p.m. Appalachain Fire, Blue Grass, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 27

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Kathy Gagnon, water color, 12-2 p.m. Jennifer Scott Trio, Jazz & Pop, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 4 Woody & Johnson Duo, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 11 Lynn Goldsmith & The Jeeder Mountain Band, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar

NEW Exotic Menu Items

$10

Saturday, July 18

Gift Certificate

Artist Sharon Carlyle, oil, 12-2 p.m. Elise Pratt Trio, Jazz, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/1/15.

With Purchase of $30 or more.

The music will run from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Bring your lawn chairs and enjoy a good time with family and friends. Creative Art Demonstrations will showcase local artists demonstrating their craft every Saturday (except during festivals) from 12 noon to 2 p.m. Visit TheGreenRoomCafe.biz for music and artist lineup.

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437 N. Main St.

www.champanc.com

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Clay Day at the Folk Art Center

Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

Milepost 382 - BlueRidge Parkway, Asheville, NC 828.298.7928

Clay Day features craft demonstrations and hands-on activities for children and adults. Celebrate Clay Day at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center on Saturday, June 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clay Day has been a favorite happening at the Folk Art Center for more than 20 years. Members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and invited guests demonstrate throwing on the potter’s

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70, Asheville, NC 828.298.7903

There are plenty of activities for children, including surface design and wheel throwing.

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wheel, hand building, surface design on clay, and other techniques. Odyssey Center of Ceramic Arts has generously donated wheels for visitors to learn the art of throwing. As an educational member of the Guild, Odyssey works to enhance creativity in the Asheville community with more than 40 artists, many who are Guild members. One highlight of Horsehair added to the day is the annual Raku Pots. “Make-and-Take” Raku, a ceramic firing process using fire and smoke to create unique patterns and designs. Attendees can purchase a pot for $10, glaze and watch as the experts, like Lynn Jenkins, fire it. Jenkins has been a member of the Guild since 1985, specializing in horeshair raku. “We pull a hot pot out of a gas kiln and then lay the horsehair on the pot. The burning hair leaves a black carbon line on the pot. It is like drawing with fire,” she says. “Clay day is a wonderful chance for the community to come learn and celebrate with clay artists first hand.”

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Artist Lynn Jenkins working with a Raku pot.

Man-Made

CONTEMPORARY MALE QUILTERS

New exhibit examines the unique aesthetics and techniques that men bring to a craft long-associated with feminine arts and labor.

26 Lodge Street, Asheville, NC 828.277.6222

WWW.CRAFTGUILD.ORG The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

Bride, Aaron McIntosh, Joel Otterson, Dan Olfe, Shawn Quinlan and Ben Venom. These artists are part of a loosely-knit, growing community of male quilters whose quilts utilize striking imagery and compositions to navigate their interests With backgrounds in and concerns. contemporary visual art, Though there are innumedia and fashion, the merable male quilters naeight artists featured in tionwide, these artists were the exhibition have been selected as significant conidentified as leading maktributors to the evolution ers whose quilts act as of the quilting medium non-functional art pieces. Killed by Death, quilt by through their unique Though quilting is Ben Venom training and experiences in culturally viewed as visual, media and design arts. “women’s work,” men have participated in quilting since the early 1800s in both professional and domestic capacity. IF The art quilt movement developed in YOU Man-Made: Contemporary Male the 1980s as a practice akin to painting, GO Quilters, on display Saturday, June led by professional artists rather than 27 through Sunday, December 27, domestic makers. 2015. Asheville Art Museum, 2 South The eight exhibiting artists are Joe Pack Square, downtown Asheville. (828) Cunningham, Luke Haynes, Jimmy Mc253-3227, www.ashevilleart.org.

10 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

York Haverkamp demonstrates throwing on the potter’s wheel.

While at the Folk Art Center, visitors have the opportunity to visit Allanstand Craft Shop, the Eastern National bookstore and Blue Ridge Parkway information desk, as well as three exhibition galleries. Outside the Folk Art Center, there are hiking trails, picnic tables, grassy areas for a picnic and free parking. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 to bring together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. IF YOU Clay Day, a free event, takes GO place on Saturday, June 6 from

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in East Asheville. For more information, visit www.craftguild.org or call (828) 298-7928.


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The 68th Annual Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands takes place at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville, July 16-19 and October 15-18, 2015. Nearly 200 juried artists of the Southern Highland Craft Guild will be selling works of clay, metal, wood, jewelry, fiber, paper, natural materials, leather and mixed media. With styles ranging from traditional to contemporary, the Fairs showcase the rich talent, diversity and craft mastery of Guild members. The Craft Fairs have a proud tradition and history of excellence by representing the Southern Highland Craft Guild, a non-profit organization formed in 1930. The Fairs began in 1948 as a way to provide a regional market for the mountain craftspeople. Since that time, the Craft Fairs have set the standard for fine craft shows across the country. Each year in July and October craft collectors and gallery owners from across the country come to Asheville to see the show. They are joined by western North Carolina residents and tourists who appreciate the quality and history of the show, knowing it is an ideal destination for shopping and inspiration. Nearly 20,000 visitors to the Fairs each year invest in the regional and local economies while supporting artists working in the Appalachian mountains, and by spending a summer or fall weekend in beautiful Asheville, NC. In addition to providing a retail market for juried members, the Guild hosts craft demonstrations during the Fairs. A strong part of the Guild’s mission is to educate the public about the history of crafts in this region, various craft techniques, and an appreciation for fine crafts. The July show features wet felting, sunprinting, natural dyeing, bamboo fly rods and blacksmithing. Visit www. craftguild.org for a complete list of scheduled craft demonstrations.

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Nearly 200 Southern Highland Craft Guild artists will be selling their crafts at the U.S. Cellular Center in downtown Asheville.

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Strand’s project, Ex.Change, celebrates the many remarkable ways that we can impact our community on a daily basis. ParticiCeramic artist Michael pants are invited Strand (Fargo, ND), to “Ex.Change” presents Ex.Change. five hours of work for one of Strand’s limited edition, handmade cups. Ex.Change is open June 5-27, 2015. Spaces of Production features three artists from different making backgrounds leading projects focused on community engagement. IF YOU Opening reception for Michael GO Strand’s Ex.Change, June 5 from 5-8

p.m. Artist Talk, Thursday, June 11 at 6:30 p.m. Benchspace Gallery & Workshop at The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, 67 Broadway in downtown Asheville. Admission is free. Open Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m to 6 p.m. Call (828) 785-1357 or visit www. craftcreativitydesign.org/spaces-of-production.

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Fly rod demonstration.

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Beginning on Friday during each Craft Fair, mountain musicians perform live on the arena stage. Since the first fair in Gatlinburg in 1948, the music of the area has been woven into the fabric of the Craft Fair experience. From old time to bluegrass, this tradition is kept alive today. Visit www.craftguild.org for a complete list of performances. Jan Davidson, Director of the John C. Campbell Folk School, stated, “Creating a world in which craft and other native talents can flourish – this is the Guild’s legacy. The craftspeople of Southern Appalachia are always aware of tradition and forever renewing themselves from the old sources of nature, family, spiritual life and the desire to share one’s gifts with others.” The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 with headquarters at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville. The Guild region covers the moun-

Jim Sams

tain counties of nine southeastern states from Maryland to Alabama, representing more than 900 craftspeople. The Craft Fairs are one of the ways in which the Guild fulfills its mission, which is to bring together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing, and conservation.

IF YOU The 68th Annual Craft Fair of the GO Southern Highlands, July 16–19

at the US Cellular Center, 87 Haywood St. in downtown Asheville. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adults $8, Children under 12 free, Group discounts available. More information at www.craftguild.org or phone (828) 298-7928 .

Plein-Air Painting Workshop

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Capture the rich landscape of the Blue Ridge Mountains in a four-day pleinair painting workshop. This June, Trail & Palette hosts two landscape painting workshops, for all levels, near Asheville. Artists from NYC’s Grand Central Atelier will teach 19th-century landscape painting in the spirit of the Hudson River School. IF YOU For more details on the plein-air GO painting workshops, call (912) 484-4295,

email trailpalette.info@gmail.com, or visit www.trailpalette.com.

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Avengers: The Rise of Ultron  ½

Short Take: An unbelievably convoluted plot, too many characters, and overbearing special effects made this a real endurance contest for me, but fans of the series will feel differently.

REEL TAKE: “The time has come, the Walrus

said, to talk of many things, of shoes and ships and sealing wax… and why are there so many superhero movies?” My apologies to Lewis Carroll but the time has come for me to ask such a question since there is now an onslaught of this type of film and I have to review them. The obvious answer is, of course, money. Now that the overseas box office has overtaken the domestic one, the studios release these movies there first and recover their costs before they ever open here. The Far East in particular can’t seem to get enough of them. It

Captain America (Chris Evans) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) are worried about their robot menace in Avengers Age of Ultron.

must be like martial arts on steroids for them. However, I have another answer as to why they are popular. I believe there is something cyclical going on here. Back in the 1950s, Cinemascope religious epics like The Ten

Commandments and Ben-Hur were all the rage. In the 1980s, it was mammoth biopics like Gandhi or Reds. Now 30 years later, it’s the superhero movie. Hopefully, it will be over soon and fortunately I won’t be around 30 years from now to see what the next “flavor of the month” will be. Well, enough of this digression and pontification, what of the movie itself? Avengers: The Age of Ultron is very big, it’s (too) long, and it’s (way too) loud! In other words, it’s a typical Marvel movie, full of big name performers (too many), overly dramatic music (makes Wagner sound like Chopin), and enough time devoted to computer generated imagery to make three old school B movies. There are also too many superhero characters for one film. If they were blood related, it would be considered incestuous. It reminded me of the old 1940s Universal Monsterfests that featured Frankenstein, Dracula, The

Wolf Man, and a mad scientist all thrown together. To quote a critical view of that type of film from the 1940s “too many ghouls spoil the broth.” The plot of Ultron, for those of you who care, is incredibly convoluted but I’ll try my best to summarize it. Tony Stark (Iron Man) implements Ultron, an artificial intelligence global defense system that decides the only way to save Earth is to destroy humanity. The numerous Avengers band together to destroy it, which they do, but only after massive destruction occurs. All of the old Avengers are back and this time around two new members are added which should provide plenty of material for future sequels. Fans of these movies will continue to flock to them, but if the budgets continue to climb (Ultron’s was $280 million), they’ll eventually reach the point of no return. Unfortunately for me, that won’t be soon enough. Rated PG-13 for sequences of sci-fi action, violence and destruction, and suggestive content.

THE MONTHLY REEL

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From Chautauqua to post apocalyptic action, June is “Pickford perfect.”

Hendersonville Film Society, Fresh off teaching a course hosted by our own Chip about one of the great pioneers Kaufmann, continue to offer of the movie industry, the Good a wonderful array of films. Of Professor Kaufmann has penned particular note this month is a terrific feature about Mary the AFS screening of Alfred Pickford. Unless you are a film Hitchcock’s Rope on June 17 at historian or total movie geek, Carolina Cinemas, and the HFS we guarantee you’ll be surprised screening of a little seen gem of a and possibly even moved by this film, So Long at the Fair, starring tenacious woman’s story. She Jean Simmons and Dirk Bogarde. was certainly a woman before her Mary Pickford As for current releases, Chip’s time; her success was remarkable in 1918. senses were so assaulted with the and her decline, cruel. latest chapter in the Avengers We should also mention that franchise, and with George Miller’s the good professor will be presentlong awaited fourth installment of ing a couple of Pickford flicks on Mad Max, that he went to see Hot Wednesday, June 3 as part of Pack Pursuit. (Color me surprised and Memorial Library’s Chautauqua knock my socks off – and no we series, held in conjunction with didn’t make him do it!) this year’s Chautauqua at Warren The action-comedy, starring Sofia Wilson College. More information Vergara and Reese Witherspoon, about the series is on page 15. has been resolutely slam-panned by As always, the Asheville Film critics, but taking it simply for what Society, hosted by Mountain it’s meant to be (and it doesn’t pretend to be Xpress film critic Ken Hanke, and the

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Review by Chip Kaufmann BY

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anything more than it is), Chip just let himself enjoy it. Meanwhile the clear cut critical winner for both of us this month was a new adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s classic novel Far From the Madding Crowd. The good professor is a big fan of the 1967 version staring Julie Christie, but I am not. The new version is beautifully filmed and wonderfully streamlined from its source material. It will, no doubt, be on my top ten list at the end of the year, and I was delighted to review it. At press time we were anticipating an onslaught of mainstream summer fare, some of which looks affable and enjoyable enough. There are a couple of smaller art house titles that we’re hoping will be a wonderful refuge from summer’s usual CGI action and gore fests, including Alan Rickman’s A Little Chaos, starring Kate Winslet and Matthais Schoenaert (see Far From the Madding Crowd review, and my DVD pick Bullhead), and Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s anime When Marnie Was There. Until next month, enjoy!

Far From the Madding Crowd

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Short Take: A beautifully filmed, streamlined adaptation of the Thomas Hardy novel.

REEL TAKE: If you’ve read Reel Takes for a while, you’ll know that we’re suckers for a good costume drama. But in the case of Thomas Vinterburg’s (The Hunt) adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd I was a little wary. I read the book (or at least the Cliff Notes) in an AP English class in high school and wasn’t crazy about it at the time. Our teacher had a penchant for classic novels with tragic, tortured and otherwise conflicted female heroines. It was a penchant that I did not share. Adding to my general aggravation with the story was the 1967 film adaptation starring Julie Christie. What some considered epic, I considered bloated. Fortunately all trepidation was wiped away by Vinterburg’s beautiful distillation of the Hardy’s story. The photography is sumptuous, the acting pitch perfect and the narrative is streamlined with respect to the source material, and due respect to running time. It not Movies continued on page 13


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“AMERICA’S SWEETHEART” AND SO MUCH MORE

Mention the name Mary Pickford to anyone and if they have heard of her at all, the image of “the girl with the golden curls” is what immediately comes to mind.

Matthias Schoenaerts and Carey Mulligan star in a stunning and streamlined adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s classic novel.

only surpassed expectations, but will no doubt be on my top ten list at year end. Far From the Madding Crowd tells the story of Bathsheba Everdine (Carey Mulligan), a strong-willed, independent young woman in Victorian England and her relationship with three suitors; the stoic yet quietly charismatic sheep farmer Gabriel Oak (Matthias Schoenaerts), the mild-mannered gentleman Mr. Boldwood (Michael Sheen), and the dashing but rakish Sergeant Troy (Tom Sturridge). Orphaned as a young girl and raised by an aunt, Bathsheba is educated but not a person of means. When an inheritance jettisons her position to a member of the landed gentry, she becomes an oddity for the age – a single woman and business owner, running a productive farm. Her new-found financial independence also gives her the ability to thwart marriage proposals. While she’s not eager to marry, she does not toy with the affections of her suitors. She is honest, candid and kind. However her fierce independence does not mean she possesses emotional intelligence. This is an attribute that comes with time, and lessons learned via poor choices and bad judgment calls. While romance may be at the heart of Far From the Madding Crowd, the story is made from all the richer layers of societal mores, prevailing attitudes and personal growth. I was unconvinced that Mulligan was the best choice for the role as Bathsheba, but she absolutely shines. It may be her best performance to date. Sheen gives a heartbreakingly delicate performance as the melancholy Mr. Boldwood. Sturridge is solid as the sword wielding Sergeant Troy. But it is Matthias Schoenaerts who damn near steals the show as Farmer Oak. The Belgian actor’s English accent has been criticized by some, but [for me] it matters not. Schoenaerts inhabits his character with a strength and grace that is positively arresting. You hinge on his every word (spare though they may be). He and Mulligan have good chemistry which serves the film’s narrative to great effect. Far From the Madding Crowd’s target audience is obviously the Merchant Ivory costume drama type; a demographic that will no doubt be pleased with the results. It may however interest younger filmgoers to know that Bathsheba Everdine was the inspiration for the Suzanne Collins’ Katniss Everdeen

the golden curls” as she beThere are countless variations on this came known because actors’ image much like Charlie Chaplin’s tramp Above left: Pickford lining up a shot in Sparrows (1926). names weren’t given out then. Right: Pickford, shown with Griffith, Chaplin and Fairbanks character. Chaplin is everywhere but Mary made her last BioPickford is forgotten which is unfortunate at the founding of United Artists in 1919. graph movie, The New York because Mary Pickford played a far more Hat, in 1912. She then moved to a fledgling important role in the development of what character.” Every attempt to break away company that decided to focus on feature length would become Hollywood’s Golden Age. from it in the early 1920s resulted in declinfilms. The company’s name was Paramount. Born in Toronto in 1892 (three years ing box office revenues. Her movies never By 1914 after the release of Tess younger than Chaplin) as Gladys lost money until the coming of sound but of the Storm Country, she was an Louise Smith, she became the they were starting to gross less and less. international star (before Chaplin) family breadwinner at the age of It’s an urban myth that Mary Pickford’s with her name above the title card. six when her father was killed in career ended with the coming of sound. She became so successful that she a work related accident. She did That’s because only one of her early talkies demanded and was given her own this by going on the stage as a (Coquette, 1929) is commercially availproduction company where she had child performer urged on by her able. She had a good voice having started complete artistic control. mother. Baby Gladys was a sucon the stage (she sounds like 1930s star The one thing she didn’t have cess and the family (her mother Jean Arthur) but her fans didn’t go to see was control over how her movies and two siblings) were able to her in adult roles and she made her last were released, so in 1919 she and move to New York where there movie Secrets, with the up and coming future husband Douglas Fairbanks, were far more opportunities. Leslie Howard, in 1933. Pickford as a Charlie Chaplin, and director D.W. In 1907, at the age of 15, The little girl roles she made famous Griffith got together to form United Gladys encountered David Belas- French chorus girl (A Little Princess, The Poor Little Rich in Kiki (1931) Artists. UA never had studios of co, the most powerful Broadway Girl, Rebecca Of Sunnybrook Farm ) their own, they were purely a releasing comproducer of the day and he cast her in one were remade in the sound era with Shirley pany which enabled a wide variety of films that of his plays. The name Gladys Smith had Temple while her great silent films (Stella the studios weren’t interested in (like Griffith’s to go and Mary Pickford (chosen from her Maris, The Love Light, Swallows) were Broken Blossoms) to be released. Irish ancestors) was born. She was a big completely forgotten. The male studio In addition to appearing in her films and success and never looked back. heads were secretly glad to have her out of being the highest paid performer in the world, The problem was that theater work was the picture. In a span of 10 years (1919Mary Pickford was also a creative producer. seasonal and Mary needed to work all the 1929) she went from being “America’s That meant that she supervised her movtime to support her family. In 1909 she Sweetheart,” and the most powerful ies from casting down to design to choice of went to the Biograph Company in downwoman in Hollywood, to becoming the director. She frequently co-directed without town Manhattan to make movies with poster child of an outmoded technology. credit. Her secret to success was simple. “Hire up and coming director D.W. Griffith. She died in 1979 at the age of 87. the best people, pay them well, and keep them Movies were only one reel then (roughly If you’d like to find out more, there are under contract.” Many of her production 15 minutes) and Biograph made two or several in depth books on Mary Pickford practices were adopted by the emerging Holthree a week. During her first year Mary currently available. Among the best are lywood studio system with highly successful appeared in over 60 short movies. Pickford: The Woman Who Made Holresults but their success coupled with an aging In 1910 she had the lead in Wilful lywood by Eileen Whitfield and Rediscovfan base and changing tastes in the 1920s Peggy, a variation on Taming of The ering Mary Pickford by Kevin Brownlow. would soon bring about an end to her career. Shrew, and it was an immediate success. There are also two biographies, Mary Mary was barely five feet tall and because Her subdued acting style, comic timing, Pickford: A Life on Film, and the PBS of her consummate skill (and by surrounding and overall feistiness delighted audiences documentary Mary Pickford. A number herself with taller performers) she could easily (especially young women). Griffith once of her classic silent films have been made impersonate a child. What started as a one shot said of her “all I had to do was start the available on DVD by Milestone Films. deal with The Poor Little Rich Girl (1917), camera rolling and she did the rest.” Soon wound up typecasting her as “that little girl audiences were asking for the “girl with

in the Hunger Games trilogy. Perhaps they’ll be motivated to explore the story that helped influence a beloved heroine for their generation. I myself will be revisiting the film and the novel without a thought of Miss Hubbard’s AP English class.

Mad Max: Fury Road  ½

Rated PG-13 for some sexuality and violence.

REEL TAKE: I am old enough to have seen the original Mad Max when it was released

Review by Michelle Keenan

Short Take: Director George Miller returns to the Mad Max franchise after 30 years and delivers a too over-the-top dystopian fantasy with a feminist angle thrown in for good measure.

back in 1979. I also was present at a number of Road Warrior parties during the early 1980s. I disliked Mad Max the first time I saw it but found it positively enchanting when Mad Max 2 (The Road Warrior) came out in 1981. I still haven’t seen Mad Max 3: Beyond the Thunderdome (1985). Movies continued on page 14

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. June 7: Empire of the Sun (1987) Steven Spielberg’s first crack at a World War II picture was this engrossing adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s novel of life in a Japanese internment camp as seen through the eyes of a young boy. The movie is also noteworthy as the film debut of Christian Bale. The film also stars John Malkovich, Miranda Richardson, and Nigel Havers. Directed by Steven Spielberg. June 14:

The Fantasticks (1995) This movie version of the long running musical was heavily edited upon its initial release which left many people scratching their heads. Now the complete uncut version with the restoration of two classic songs has been made available for the film’s 20th anniversary. Jean Louisa Kelley, Joe McIntyre, and Joel Grey co-star. Directed by Michael Ritchie. June 21: So Long at the Fair (1950) A children’s song was the inspiration for this period mystery of a young woman searching for her lost brother at the 1889 Paris exhibition. The film helped to launch the careers of Jean Simmons and Dirk Bogarde. David Tomlinson co-stars as the missing brother. Directed by Terence Fisher. June 28: Bewitched (2005) Nicole Kidman and Will Ferrell co-star in this updated version of the old TV show. Ferrell plays a conceited actor who unknowingly hires a real witch for his new sitcom. She proceeds to teach him a lesson or two with hilarious results. Joining him in the fun are Shirley MacLaine and Michael Caine. Directed by Nora Ephron.

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So now 30 years later and with two successful animated features (Happy Feet, Happy Feet 2) behind him, Australian director George Miller, having recovered from the fiasco of Babe: Pig in the City (1988), has decided to return to his roots and has given us Mad Max: Fury Road. Think of it as The Road Warrior on a combination of nitrous oxide and steroids. While we get some incredible set pieces, we also

Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron grapple with an apocalyptic future in Mad Max: Fury Road.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Mad Max”

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get them going on for far too long. I call this the IMAX factor where sequences designed to show off that process seem to exist for no other reason than to satisfy video game junkies who have moved on to harder stuff. We’re back in a dystopian future only this time the precious commodity

June DVD Picks

Mad Max (1979)

Having made it through Mad Max: Fury Road, the latest installment in the series (see my review), I went back and re-watched the original to revisit the character’s humble origins when he first hit the screen back in 1979. The original was made during the Australian New Wave of the late 1970s and 80s that gave us such thought provoking fare as Breaker Morant, My Brilliant Career, Picnic at Hanging Rock, and The Last Wave. No thought provoking content here, just pure non-stop action. Director George Miller, a former physician, decided to make an Australian Western with cars and motorcycles instead of horses. He copied the look of such biker movies as The Wild Angels and The Born Losers and then added the background of Shane and Bad Day at Black Rock. The film was shot for $650,000 and wound up grossing over $5 million. It introduced a 21 year old Mel Gibson to the world although he and all the other actors had their voices dubbed into American English for the U.S. release. The current DVD/BluRay release restores the original Australian soundtrack. Although set in the near future, the film lacks the apocalyptic background of its sequels and works purely as a hyperkinetic chase film with the classic Western revenge motive serving as the film’s centerpiece. We have good cop Max taking on a vicious motorcycle gang and their psychopathic leader after they kill his best friend and family. When Mad Max first appeared, I didn’t care for it. The anarchic nastiness of the motorcycle gang plus the relentless chase footage did not make a favorable impression on me. I didn’t see it again for 30 years. When I did, I found much to admire especially in its comparative restraint and remarkable ingenuity considering its tiny budget. There is much to be said for low budget filmmaking and the creative challenges that

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the filmmakers and the performers face. While the sequels (Road Warrior, Beyond Thunderdome, and now Fury Road) have each gotten bigger and more grandiose, they haven’t necessarily gotten better. If you’ve never seen Mad Max then you should, not only to see where the sequels came from but to see how influential it was on action movies of the 1980s and beyond. It’s also an adrenaline rush to experience real action sequences not generated by a computer.

Bullhead (2012)

Matthias Schoenaerts is the kind of actor whose performances stay with you. After seeing him in the newly released Far From the Madding Crowd (see review on page 12) I was struck by the depths of his talent and the breadth of his roles. Off the top of my head, I’ve only seen four of his films; Rust and Bone, The Drop, the aforementioned Madding Crowd, and Bullhead. Whether likeable or reprehensible, whatever character he inhabits leaves its mark; none more so than Bullhead. Bullhead, nominated for an Oscar in 2012 for Best Foreign Film, is the disturbingly dark and absorbing story of two men tied by a childhood trauma. It is a profoundly sad and gritty, yet moving drama. Writer director Michael R. Roskam (The Drop) made his feature debut with the film and it was the film that brought Schoenaerts international attention. I need to be careful not to give away too

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is water not oil (although fuel is still important). A disfigured cult leader, Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), stockpiles water so that he can hold the surviving community around him enslaved. He also has a harem of Playboy like lovelies to serve as breeders and his many sons do all the work that needs to be done. Everything is fine until a disgruntled warrior, Furiosa, with a mechanical arm (Charlize Theron) kidnaps the harem and sets out to find a legendary “green place” inhabited by women where they can all live in peace. Immortan Joe and his minions pursue them and that’s essentially it. Where is Mad Max you say? He Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Bullhead” much of the story because its impact lies in watching the story unfold. In a nutshell, the story is pitted in the relationship between Belgian cattle farmers (who are apparently generous and free-wheeling with the growth hormone injections) and meat traders, and their relationship to the drug dealers who provide them with the Barry Bonds juice. At the center of these tenuous alliances is a cattle farmer named Jacky Vanmarsenille, played beautifully by Matthias Schoenaerts. He is a quiet, brooding bull of man, constantly hopped up steroids and hormones (before you judge him, wait to see the reason). In the process of a shady deal, he is reunited with his childhood friend Diederik (Jeroen Perceval), whom he hasn’t seen in 20 years. The two are forever bound by a childhood trauma – an incident so devastating their lives are forever marred by it. As the story unfolds, a murder, within the wider ring of the hormone mafia, sets the police on Jacky and his family. As Jacky deals with the present situation and his past, he can no longer shut the memories down. He is filled with a feeling of foreboding on all levels. It’s as if he’s a time bomb, it’s not a matter of will he explode, but when. Roskam weaves the layers of the story, past and present, to create a world of crime, heartache, cruelty and vengeance. It is a strangely absorbing story, due in part to Roskam, and in part to Schoenaerts’ achingly poignant performance. It helps that the filmmakers photograph Schoenaerts to great effect, and that Schoenaerts knows how to make the most of it. Bullhead is not easy to watch. It is disturbing yet utterly moving. It is simultaneously quiet and calm yet raging with anger. Jacky is the victim of a heinous crime, but no one in this story is innocent. All have done something that they will have to pay for eventually. To that end Bullhead plays out in classic tragedian form. It is a fascinating film that you won’t soon forget.


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is chained to the front of a vehicle and acts as a human GPS. He does escape and joins forces with Furiosa to try and get the escapees there. Tom Hardy, in Mel Gibson’s star making role, really isn’t given a lot to do and he looks bored. While Hardy is certainly the better actor, at least Gibson was engaged. Theron makes the most of her warrior role and there is a definite feminist slant to the proceedings which is fine but it takes too long to get there. There are some number of surreal touches such as Immortan Joe’s face mask which looks like Bane from The Dark Knight Rises with a Buick Roadmaster grill attached and the use of Cirque du Soleil members as pole swinging cult members but they are only fleeting moments. There’s a great movie here, but this isn’t it. Rated R for intense sequences of violence and for disturbing images. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Hot Pursuit 

Short Take: Amiable comedy covers familiar territory but still manages to be an effective time killer made quite enjoyable by its two high profile stars.

REEL TAKE: Hot Pursuit is easily the weak-

est from a critical POV of the three movies that I reviewed this month but, paradoxically, it was the one I enjoyed the most. There were a number of reasons for this. 1 – It doesn’t run longer than it needs to. 2 – It’s

and a female Ricky Ricardo complete with outrageous mangling of the English language and you’ll have some idea of what to expect. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with predictability if that’s what you want. As might be expected, Hot Pursuit has received a critical drubbing but I’m surprised at just how much of one. It might even have garnered a negative number rating on Rotten Tomatoes by now. Lighten up folks! This is a simple, old Sofia Vergara and Reese Witherspoon in fashioned comedy that features tried and “disguise” in the action comedy Hot Pursuit. true situations and holds no surprises. If it works, it works, and Hot Pursuit certainly did for me and the people I was with. unpretentious. 3 – It is pleasantly though not I suspect the inclusion of gay jokes and outrageously funny. 4 – It features agreeable the broad ethnic humor may be partially performances from the two leads. responsible for this harsh reaction as our This movie is an excellent example of a society seems to be coming more and more film that is made to please a mainstream audithin skinned with overreactions being the orence. Judging from the audience that I saw it der of the day. There are really bigger things with (myself included), it succeeded. We had out there to get upset over. a good time. Chuckles instead of belly laughs I predict that Hot Pursuit will age gracewere the order of the day and everyone left fully and will be just as enjoyable years from happy. True, it was an older audience (no one now as it is today. Is it a great movie or a was silencing their cell phones or texting durgreat comedy? No, it is an old-fashioned type ing the movie), but there are very few movies of lightweight comedy, tailored to it stars’ that serve their needs these days. talents. The type of comedy that Hollywood Reese Witherspoon, making a welcome used to crank out by the dozens for an evreturn to comedy, portrays an uptight cop eryday audience who wanted nothing more who must transport a widow (Sofia Verthan to escape the daily grind for a couple of gara) to testify against the head of the drug hours. In that regard Hot Pursuit succeeds cartel her husband worked for. Naturally admirably and should not be penalized for there will be many trials and tribulations being exactly what it set out to be. along the way including double crosses, escape attempts, numerous costume changes, Rated PG-13 for sexual content, violence, and a final showdown. language, and drug related material. Think of Midnight Run with a female Review by Chip Kaufmann Barney Fife more neurotic than Don Knotts

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. June 2:

Only Angels Have Wings (1939) The manager of an air freight company is forced to risk his pilots’ lives in order to win an important contract. When a showgirl shows up, humanity threatens the gruff façade of the ragtag, fatalistic crew. Stars Cary Grant, Jean Arthur and Thomas Mitchell. Directed by Howard Hawks. June 9: That Man From Rio (1964) A young man comes to the rescue of his girlfriend who’s been abducted by thieves and brought to Rio; an extravagant adventure ensues. Stars Jean-Paul Belmondo, Francois Dorleac and Jean Servais. Directed by Philippe de Broca. June 16:

Twentieth Century

(1934) A flamboyant Broadway impresario who has fallen on hard times tries to get his former lover, now a Hollywood diva, to return and resurrect his failing career. Stars John Barrymore, Carole Lombard and Walter Connolly. Directed by Howard Hawks. June 23: A Zed and Two Noughts

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America at the Movies

Four free programs take place in the Lord Auditorium at Pack Library in downtown Asheville. The movies at Pack Library feature the four artists highlighted during this year’s Chautauqua, America at the Movies, which takes place June 16-19 at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa.

A Night at the (Silent) Movies

Wednesday, June 3 from 6-7:30 p.m. Local film historian and WCQS host, Chip Kaufmann, presents a showing of silent films. A Little Princess with Mary Pickford (1917, 62 min.) The Butcher Boy with Fatty Arbuckle and Buster Keaton in a parody of A Little Princess (25 min.) Orson Welles’ The Third Man

Thursday, June 4 at 3 p.m. The Third Man is a 1949 British film noir, directed by Carol Reed and starring Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, Orson Welles,

Walt Disney’s Saving Mr. Banks

Thursday June 11 at 3 p.m.

and Trevor Howard. It is considered one of the greatest films of all time, celebrated for its atmospheric cinematography, performances, and musical score. Novelist Graham Greene wrote the screenplay. Anton Karas wrote and performed the score, which used only the zither; its title music “The Third Man Theme” topped the international music charts in 1950.

Saving Mr. Banks is a 2013 period drama film directed by John Lee Hancock which depicts the development of the 1964 Walt Disney Studios film Mary Poppins. The film stars Emma Thompson as author P.L. Travers and Tom Hanks as filmmaker Walt Disney. Named after the father in Travers’ story, the film depicts the author’s fortnightlong briefing in 1961 Los Angeles as she is persuaded by Disney, who seeks to obtain the screen rights to her novels.

Gordon Parks’ The Learning Tree

Chautauqua

Tuesday, June 9 at 3 p.m.

Four performances highlight individuals important to the motion picture industry. These programs are held at the Warren Wilson College Morris Pavilion at 7 p.m.

Written and directed by Gordon Parks in 1969, The Learning Tree tells the story of a young African American growing up in rural Kansas during the late 1920s and early 1930s, when racial discrimination was a social norm and legally sanctioned in parts of the United States. It is the first Hollywood studio film to be directed by an African American.

Monday, June 15 – Orson Welles Tuesday, June 16 – Gordon Parks Wednesday, June 17 – Mary Pickford Thursday, June 18 – Walt Disney

(1985) Identical twins Oliver and Oswald Deuce are zoologists. When an accident leaves their wives dead, the threesome are forced to cope with their grief and a scheming doctor. Stars Brian Deacon, Eric Deacon and Andrea Ferreol. Directed by Peter Greenaway. June 30: The Man Who Played God (1932) After losing his hearing a musician uses lip reading to help others. Stars George Arliss, Bette Davis and Violet Heming. Directed by John G. Adolfi.

BIG SCREEN BUDGET FEATURE Tickets $6 for AFS members, $8 general. June 17: Rope (1948) Two young men strangle their classmate, hide his body, and invite his friends and family to a dinner party. Stars James Stewart, John Dall and Farley Granger. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 15


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Your Mission, Should You Choose to Accept It…

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IS TO WORK ON VISION AND MISSION STATEMENTS

“What are Vision and Mission Statements?” you may ask. Having Vision and Mission statements in mind versus not is like the difference between traveling to Thor’s Asgard via that weird, blasting transporter thingy, or trying to take an Earth-style elevator. It’s about using correct tools to achieve aims. Plus, it’s an analogy that allows me to reference Marvel AND sci-fi at the same time. And, you may also be shyly asking, “What are they?” A majority of us can take comfort in knowing that we are not alone in finding the definitions unclear. Vision and Mission can be a bit confusing because they are not as much of a focus as topics like Branding Plans. And they are often seen as something on which only a large company would spend time. But I think it can be a useful exercise, even for a company of one. Many refer to Mission first, then Vision, but I believe these topics should be approached from the opposite direction. Think of a Vision statement as an overarcing storyline for the whole future, and a Mission statement – or grouping of statements – as everyday objectives. A Vision is akin to a broader ideal to strive for, while a Mission covers near-term, tangible goals. Our society’s penchant toward “microwav-

ing” has affected how much we pay attention to things like this. We are used to having popcorn in 3 minutes or less, when, once upon a time, you had to get out rather old-fashioned equipment, like a pan, and oil. Oh, and a lid. If you are making popcorn this antiquated way, don’t forget the lid. I’m not saying I’VE ever forgotten the lid, I’m just saying… Of course, when I was a kid, we had to first GROW the corn, then dry it, and THEN cook it over a campfire the next season. Anyway, my point is that our culture has become a very speedy one, and creating things like Vision and Mission is not a quick process. And then living with what we’ve made is not super-fast, either. One needs patience. Additionally, it is important to remain flexible. While altering one’s identity, brand, plans or statements too broadly, quickly or often can result in a marketplace of consumers wondering what you’re about exactly, it is important to edit one’s plans along the way in an attempt to best stay on the path. Often experienced as a series of subtle course corrections over time, one example is adding a new core value to the mission parameters after uncovering another hidden kernel of truth in one’s activities. (Sorry, once I start thinking about popcorn I can’t stop with the bad puns; just ask my friends, they often get an… Earful.) Or, one might realize a particular activity doesn’t point toward the future vision, and then needs to be phased-out. Since every situation, person and

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business is different, it’s important to weigh any changes either way carefully. I want to share with you a solid Vision and Mission statement set that serves as an excellent, clean example, from one of our own awesome, local institutions, the Asheville Art Museum. Vision: “To transform lives through art.” Mission: “The Asheville Art Museum engages, enlightens and inspires individuals and enriches community through dynamic experiences in American Art of the 20th and 21st centuries.” Their declarations inform the public what they strive for long-term (Vision), and what they are currently focused on more specifically (Mission) to meet that goal. This overall framework sets the stage for all the planning that follows it. As with artist statements and branding plans, utilizing vision and mission statements can help a business - independent artists included - hold the focus, as well as help one’s target audience understand where one is coming from in both big-picture and daily ways. It’s easy to get started - one only needs a pen and paper. Oh, and maybe some popcorn. (And don’t forget the lid!)

Aww, Shucks!, 2015. Illustration by Greg Vineyard

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Networking is Vital

For many artists it’s not easy to “toot your own horn.” You may be talented, hard-working and determined to succeed, but you must also learn to network proficiently. One thing I’ve observed is that quite often the more outgoing artists are either from a large family or have parents who are business owners. They can chat up strangers with ease and leave them smiling. Others are more reserved and for them, it takes time and practice to get comfortable with the message they want to deliver. Do you have a successful friend or colleague in the arts that you admire? Ask them to listen to your prepared remarks and give you some feedback. Whatever approach you wind up using, it is important for it to sound natural. And be sure to tell the listener a bit about your education and experience. A few years ago I presented a workshop about networking at the Asheville Area Arts Council. The artists in the audience were

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asked, “On a scale of one to five, with one representing those who are very shy and five for those who are very outgoing, what number are you? Oh, and be aware that you cannot use the number three!” Obviously, that limited the choices and the audience was asked to make their decision within ten seconds. At that point, I asked for a show of hands. “Okay, how many of you are very outgoing? Great! Come on up here and please stand in a row to my right.” Next the somewhat shy (Group 2) lined up facing the first group. And then, to my left, the very shy (Group 1) lined up facing the somewhat outgoing (Group 4). Both groups had the same assignment: “You each have one minute to introduce yourself to

BY

WENDY H. OUTLAND

one another. Listen carefully, because you will be asked to repeat what you have learned about your partner.” It was surprising how much information each artist retained, when many of them had never met previously. And everyone was smiling when it was all over! At the end, I reminded the group that their initial chat with a new acquaintance should include the same basic elements that comprise an artist statement: What you do, how you do it, and why you do it. Beyond that, it is always wise to engage the listener further by inviting them to your next exhibit, or encouraging them to visit your studio. And of course, you must remember to exchange business cards. Ready? Go forth and network!

The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz


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RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

Who are those French Broads?

ANIMAL ART BY STEPHANIE GRIMES

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French Broad Artists Sahar Fakhoury, Sandra Brugh Moore and Virginia Pendergrass discussed whether their studio name might be misinterpreted to mean that the artists are French broads. But no, everyone knows the iconic French Broad River, which runs through the River Arts District right in front of their new studio — well, at least everyone in Western North Carolina knows French Broad means the river. On Saturday, June 13, the French Broad Artists are introducing themselves and their new studio during the Riverview Station Arts Adventure. The Arts Adventure will feature over 20 Riverview Station artists, working in various media, who are opening their studios to visitors from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on that day. Artwork by all three French Broad Artists will be on display, and their studio will host a watercolor landscape demonstration, “Mountain Sunset,” by Sandra Brugh Moore from 1-4 p.m.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

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Realistic Wildlife Art + Pet Portraits 344 Depot St., #103 • River Arts District ARTISTF.COM • 813 4641414

continued on page 18

French Broad Artists

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

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SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS

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NEW STUDIO IN THE RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

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RD Twisting, 11x9 in. oil painting by Sahar Fakhoury

Riverview Station #216 • Asheville, NC 191 Lyman St., South Entrance Painterly Watercolor Landscape Demonstration by

Sandra Brugh Moore • 1-4 p.m. during the

Riverview Station Arts Adventure, June 13 RV

Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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BARBARA WADE

Mixed Media Artist 140d Roberts Street

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 17


Plein-Air Painting 4-Day Workshop for All Levels

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trailpalette.info@gmail.com

(912) 484-4295

Register Today! Workshops take place in June near Asheville.

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Heartfelt & Memorable Same Day Service

www.thesingingtelegram.com

828.290.5715

FINE ART PRINTING

828.275.7028 pg. 36

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‘French Broad Artists’ cont’d. from pg. 17

Birthday Valentine’s Day Anniversary Get Well Retirement

DOT EDITIONS

PHOTOGRAPHY OF 2D AND 3D ARTWORK

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Songs & Comedy Skits Celebrating Life’s Special Events

Artists from NYC’s Grand Central Atelier will teach 19th-century landscape painting in the spirit of the Hudson River School. School

www.trailpalette.com

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Archival Pigment Prints Custom Framing & Stretchers

828-575-5534

www.doteditions.com

Asheville’s Full Service Fine Art Studio

2004 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, UNIT W. ASHEVILLE, NC 28804 Weddings, Graduations, Family Portraits, Nature and Scenic Photos

940-783-2027

AMBER COMBS PHOTOGRAPHY

Marion, NC amber_combs@aol.com

18 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

Other artists will also demonstrate their techniques throughout the day in other studios. Sahar Fakhoury, originally from the Mid-East, has lived in the Asheville area for 25 years. She works in both oil painting and sculpture. Her paintings remain reminiscent of her Mediterranean heritage, through her preference for rich warm colors of reds, oranges and yellow ochres. Fakhoury says, “I am inspired by observations of people everywhere, on the street, while traveling, or doing their daily chores. From their body language, their emotional state, and their movements, I create a series of paintings which depict them in motion, or at rest. A record of their movements in small, incremental progressions captures that moment in the daily life of the person.” Fakhoury graduated with a BFA from the University of North Carolina, Asheville. She has shown her work nationally and internationally, and has art in private and corporate collections in the US and abroad. Sandra Brugh Moore, a watercolor and pen and ink artist, has found a home in Western North Carolina depicting the beauty of the forever changing moods of the mountains. Many of her paintings depict seasonal transitions or early morning fog lifting from the valleys. Sandra notes, “The remarkable variety of light effects found in the mountains moves me to paint. Nature provides a lifetime of inspirational subject matter — pastoral landscape, wildflowers, color-intense sunsets, sunlit buildings — the subject matter is unlimited.” After graduating from West Virginia University with a degree in art education, Moore taught in public schools. She now offers watercolor and drawing classes in North Carolina community colleges, and privately. Her work has been recognized in juried shows with awards for excellence. Virginia Pendergrass describes her oil painting style as “contemporary impressionism. I like broader brushstrokes than the early impressionists; it feels more modern to me. I also have the advantage of more brilliant modern colors, and I don’t have to grind them myself, either. Color is almost always what first attracts me to my subject matter.” Pendergrass’ work has been accepted into regional and national exhibitions of the American Impressionist Society, Oil Painters of America, Paint the Parks, and Women Painters of the Southeast, where she has won awards of excellence. Her informal art training consisted of painting and drawing instruction at Old Lyme Art Academy in CT, Crealde School of Art, and Valencia Community College in FL and numerous workshops with her favorite artists.

Color-intense works by extraordinary artists.

Spring Botanical Gardens, watercolor by Sandra Brugh Moore

In Motion, oil painting by Sahar Fakhoury

The Botanicals, oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass IF YOU Watercolor demonstration by Sandra GO Moore, Saturday, June 13 from 1-4

p.m. For directions, go to www. riverviewstation.com. For more details about Arts Adventures, go to www.villagepotters.com.

French Broad Artists #216 Riverview Station (South Entrance) 191 Lyman St., River Arts District


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Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Works by Local Artist Cheryl Keefer

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Paintings by Cheryl Keefer are on display in the lobby level of the Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park, adjacent to the Pisgah Ballroom and will remain on display through midAugust.

BY

WENDY H. OUTLAND

707 Victory Lane • Hendersonville 828 890-5777     Cell:  828 606-4127 junekal60@yahoo.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Jce Schlapkohl

The paintings are for sale and a price list is available at the exhibit location and also at the front desk. “I paint landscapes en plein air,” states Keefer, “mostly in oils and somePromises in Darkness times watercolor. An evby Cheryl Keefer eryday scene, a lingering sunset, a misty mountain, rocks glistening in a stream; any of these may inspire a piece.” Cheryl’s work can also be seen locally at the Asheville Gallery of Art in downtown Asheville, and at Seven Sisters Gallery in Black Mountain. Visit her website at www.cherylkeefer.com.

CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of . 20 Art, Downtown 7 pg

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

pg. 37

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Cedar Hill Studios, . 23 Waynesville pg

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IF YOU Cheryl Keefer reception, Sunday, June 14 from GO 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park,

www.joycepaints.com

located at 43 Town Square Blvd. in Asheville. Refreshments will be served.

joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Kinetic Summer

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“French Cuisine“

A ZAPOW MEMBER ARTIST GROUP SHOW

The eclectic creative spirit of this group exhibit captures the feel of the streets and mountains of Asheville in the delightfully temperate days of June and July.

Works by Cheryl Keefer at: Wedge Studios 129 Roberts St. River Arts District By appt.

The ZaPow Artists have created vintage style travel posters; images of chakra aligned kayakers, bikers, campers, hedgehogs on bikes; put art on skateboard decks, and much more. Participating artists include: Fian Arroyo, Jill Coleman, Kasey Orr, Lydia Eloff, and many others. During the opening reception we will be serving Fresh Lime and Mint Wine Mojitos, Watermelon Wedges, Fresh Squeezed Lemonade, and S’mores brownies. IF YOU Opening reception, Saturday, June 6 from 7 to GO 9 p.m. Free! Attire: Summer Casual. ZaPow! 21

Battery Park Avenue, downtown Asheville. Visit www.zapow.com.

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Downtown

pg. 20

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Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

pg. 10

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pg. 20

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pg. 23

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828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 19


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JUNE 2015

Shops, Galleries & Restaurants Pack Square Park, Downtown Asheville The sculptural railing on Reuter Terrace was designed and built by Black Mountain artist Julia Burr.

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“Islands in the Sky” by Al Junek

Featured Artist for June

Opening Reception

5-8pm

Al Junek

Friday, June 5

Recent Works

On display June 1-30, 2015

Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

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First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 16 College Street, Downtown Asheville Monday-Saturday 10-5:30 p.m.; Sundays 1-4 p.m. 828.251.5796

www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

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20 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery

4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery

9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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PACK SQUARE

Patton Ave.

10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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The Asheville Gallery of Art features a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

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“Transparency” by Sahar Fakhoury oil on canvas, 24x 36 inches

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“I try to share the beauty of a particular place or moment in a way that will transport viewers to that spot so they can experience much the same sights or feelings that moved me to stop and take it in.”


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Contemporary Elegance at Susan Marie Designs

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When you walk into Susan Marie Designs in downtown Asheville, you easily see in goldsmith Susan Marie Phipps’ creations her many years of experience in designing and hand making fine gold jewelry.

ity and vibrant color. Most are cut by award winning stonecutters she has known for years, who do an excellant harmoniously unite nature’s most The contemporary elegance of her job bringing out the beautiful materials with excellent stunning designs, which she skillmaximum brilliance of craftsmanship. fully forms with clean lines throughout, each stone. Gemstones Every piece she creates is are especially important The stone held to the same high standrives the design. to Susan, being a major dards, whether made for the source of her inspiragallery or custom designed for tion as an artist. “Whenever I find a stone the tastes and needs of a particular I like, I design for it,” she explains. “The client. Says Susan, “I want my stone drives the design, leading me to do customers to be satisfied in every something that will complement it.” respect. They deserve the best I can give them. So I craft each piece to be as comfortable, durable and Susan Marie Designs beautiful as it can be.” Susan’s experience and atten4 Biltmore Avenue Asheville, NC 28801 tion to detail are also evident in (828) 277-1272 the natural colored gemstones, www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com pearls and diamonds she chooses Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for her designs. A G.I.A. Graduate Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gemologist, she buys only well cut Comfortable, durable and beautiful designs. gemstones with excellent clar-

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Stop in and view our new collection of nature inspired jewelry designed by Julia Peterson and Paula Dawkins

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO pg. 20

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www.jewelsthatdance.com

63 Haywood Street • Downtown Asheville 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon - Sat 10:30 - 6

Making Up for Lost Time

A latecomer to the world of art, I am doing all I can, after a career in engineering, to make up for lost time.

BY

AL JUNEK

impression of fine mist in my paintings. A water spray bottle replaces brushes in the process, although 3 and 4 inch brushes are sometimes used. I find the watercolor medium lends itself nicely to creating paintings which depict water in its various forms. Even so, I find much satisfaction working

Unlike many who began painting at an early age, I discovered my art talent toward the end of my other career. On finding this talent, I realized I really needed to focus, to become the best I could be after a delayed continued on page 38 start. In addition to painting whenever I can, I often take workshops with nationally known artists and experiment with various materials and techniques to establish my artistic identity. Primarily a landscape painter, my recent focus has been on atmospheric paintings including the capture of subdued, serene scenes set in mist or fog. Pouring watercolors onto paper and allowing them to randomly flow over Misty Morning, watercolor by Al Junek. the surface creates the

Trees in Mist, watercolor by Al Junek.

® Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

36 Haywood Street

Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

29 Biltmore Ave.

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044 pg. 20

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pg. 20

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www.vandykejewelry.com

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 21


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WAYNESVILLE

WILD ABOUT

Get it Local, Buy Haywood

Carryout + Catering

Fresh Southern Homemade Meals & Desserts 828-550-2265

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

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While we were all admiring BY TINA MASCIARELLI the first blooms of spring and enjoying warm sunny afternoons, Haywood County farmers were hard at work preparing the soil, sowing seeds, nursing young plants, birthing cows, coddling baby chicks, and harvesting early crops.

1092 N. Main Street • Waynesville, NC Mon-Sat 6am-2:30pm

Sun 7am - 2:30pm

pg. 36

WK

FEET HURT?

CK

Walk-In Foot and Ankle Clinic Monday - Thursday 1-4pm

WAYNESVILLE 289 Access Road 452-4343 ASHEVILLE 573 Merrimon Avenue 254-7716

Swiss Chard at Haywood’s Historic Farmers Market. WC

www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

WS pg. 36

WA

The fruits of their labor have finally arrived at farmers markets, tailgates, roadside stands and on-farm markets across Haywood County. The month of June brings a plethora of seasonal crops including kale, Swiss chard, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, mushrooms, potatoes, summer squash, green garlic, herbs, and some early tomatoes. Farm fresh eggs, meat, poultry, trout, and artisan products will also be abundant. Looking for a fresh way to avoid the mid-week mealtime slump? Try infusing a simple meal with garden fresh herbs. Whether you grow your own or buy them from local farms, cooking with fresh herbs is a wonderful way to get great flavor without adding unwanted fat or sodium. The best part is that herbs grow in our area yearround, offering a multitude of opportunities to explore the world through different flavor combinations! Haywood County farmers markets, tailgates, and plant nurseries have fresh herb plants for sale. It is the perfect time of year to start your own herb garden—whether in a proper Potager (kitchen garden) or in a series of pots on a sunny patio.

WO WT WG

CLYDE

WM

WW

WP WA

All Types of Major Appliances Bonded & Insured

828-456-4989

CK

Fax: 828-456-7021 Mark1462@Att.net

WH pg. 36

WV

A listing of Buy Haywood partners can be found at www.BuyHaywood.com or by picking up a printed “Find your Adventure! 2015 Agritourism Guide” available at area visitor centers and other locations.

Mountain Top Appliance Service Mark Atkinson • Reputable Repairs

91 Smokies Ridge, Waynesville, NC 24 Hour Emergency Service 828-646-7422

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

22 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

Buy Haywood Market Development Project c/o Haywood County Economic Development Commission, 144 Industrial Park Drive, Waynesville (828) 456-3737, www.buyhaywood.com


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WAYNESVILLE

Art After Dark

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SHUCKSTES

Summer is really heating up in the mountains, and our adorable mountain town has some cool art to soothe the soul. The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present the June edition of Art After Dark, happening Friday, June 5. Art After Dark transforms Downtown Waynesville into an exquisite visual, culinary and performing arts center, making it a perfect night to explore Waynesville’s cool galleries, restaurants and gift-shops. Festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries, such as Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studios, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery. Burr Studio’s Art After Dark will feature the oil and wax paintings of Waynesville artists Zoltan Kollat and Silvia Cabrera Williams. Besides their individual works they will also offer a few collaborative pieces to celebrate

Photograph by John Kimball

the opening of Cuban-American relations. Join Z and Silvia from 6 to 9. Refreshments will be served. For more information call 456-7400. Photographer John Smith of Hendersonville will be at Twigs Beech Trees In Fog, photograph by John Smith and Leaves Gallery for Art After Dark Friday evening, June 5, 6-9 p.m. His featured body of the digital age, using Photoshop and work, “Mountain Paradise Splendors,” has Lightroom. The software has opened up captured Western North Carolina’s maga whole new world within his work, with nificent beauty. Created using a unique colors and tones reminiscent of an old photographic paper processing technique, master’s painting. Smith’s images have an amazing depth and quality. Friday evening, as you stroll through IF the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artYOU For more information call ists, enjoy piano music by Waynesville’s GO Twigs and Leaves at (828)4561940 or find us online at www. Diane Wolfe and delight in the savory waynesvillegalleryassociation.com. hors d’eurves. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street in Waynesville. Open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30; Sundays 1-4 p.m. (828) 456-1940, www. twigsandleaves.com. The Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86 presents The Art of Wood and Metal, an exhibition of local fine artists. The exhibit features the work of Steven Metzger of Burl Wood Gallery, Rick Hills of Rapid River Magazine, and Michael Dodson of Life Span. A reception will be held during Art After Dark on Friday, June 5, and also on Friday, June 19 from 6-9 p.m. Visit www.haywoodarts.org The Village Framer will be featuring local photographer, John Kimball. He is a photographer from Balsam, North Carolina and Ridgeway, Ontario Canada. His main loves are Landscapes and Abandoned farm buildings. John’s work integrates

B&C Winery Locally Crafted Wines 828.550.3610

145 Wall Street Downtown Waynesville pg. 23

WW

SATURDAY JUNE 13 10 am-5 pm • Main Street

Featured Artist for June

John Smith

Photographer Demonstrations from 6-9PM during

Art After Dark Friday, June 5

pg. 23

WT

98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

www.BCWINERYNC.com

A Heritage Themed Event in Historic Downtown Waynesville

Mountain Music & Dance • Storytelling • Demonstrations & Displays Arts & Crafts • Local Authors • Traditional Food & More! Special Guests:

Michael Reno Harrell Whitewater Bluegrass Mean Mary JAM Musicians • Radio Hill Boys • Mike Pilgrim • Productive Paranoia The Pressley Girls • Clogging • Rob Gudger & Wolf Tales • Spencer Bolejack • Jim Bordwine Sponsored by DowntownWaynesville.com  828.456.3517 Funded in part by Haywood County TDA   800.334.9036   visitNCsmokies.com    Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 23


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Passing the Music On

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BY

DOREYL AMMONS CAIN

An afternoon of old time mountain music, clogging, storytelling, mural art, and a cakewalk, Sunday, June 14, from 2-5 p.m.

pg. 23

121 North Main Street, Waynesville

WS

Catch the Spirit of Appalachia, a WCU Mountain Heritage Award winner, has brought together some wellknown local entertainers to celebrate the mountain folk heritage as a fundraiser for the nonprofit organization. “In this, our 26th year,” says Doreyl Ammons Cain, cofounder of the arts and heritage organization, “we wanted to have some fun by sharing some of the entertainment we experienced as children. Like the old mountain music we used to hear on the front porch; shape note, hymn, and the

(828) 452-3611 • www.shopatstyle.com Betty Brown and Brady Powell with friends.

The Art of Wood & Metal EXHIBITION OF LOCAL FINE ARTISTS

RICK HILLS of Rapid River Magazine STEVEN METZGER of Burl Wood Gallery MICHAEL DODSON of Life Span

Gala Receptions • 6-9 p.m.

Friday, June 5 + Friday, June 19 Catering provided by Nettie’s Bakery On display June 3 - July 31, 2015

Haywood County Arts Council’s GALLERY + GIFTS

86 N. Main Street • Waynesville

pg. 23

Wg

Presented by the Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org 828.452.0593

Massie Furniture Company 45 North Main Street, Waynesville 828-456-3311 • Hours: M-Sat 8:30am - 5:30pm Massie Furniture is proud to support the Waynesville Art Association’s presentation of the most recent acrylic paintings by local artist

Take Advantage of Our

SUMMER SPECIALS 25% OFF

Rick Hills

Suggested Sugges Retail Price

pg. 23

WM

Delivery in WNC is Always FREE!

On display June 1 - July 30 at Gallery + Gifts on Main Street. We Offer Expert Decorating Services Serving WNC Since 1920

24 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

Additional paintings by Rick Hills are available across Main Street. Please stop by.

ole time call and response singing in church; the clogging we did in school; and cakewalks that raised money for good causes. Of course, we would have some storytelling with spontaneous art as my sister, Amy, and I have done for these many years!” Opening the program as Master of Ceremonies is Richard Hurley, from Canton, who produced the album, My Mountains, My Songs. The Ammons Sisters from Jackson County are mountain storytellers who have entertained thousands of children and adults throughout their tours. Mike Nichols, assistant director of the WNC Community Chorus, will lead the audience in a mountain-grown traditional harmony of shape-note. This old time style of singing originated in 1801, and is designed to facilitate congregational and community singing. Betty Brown, a guitar teacher with the Jackson County Junior Appalachian Musicians (JAM) will demonstrate “Hymn Lining” (old time call and response singing). This celebrated tradition dates back to slavery, where hymn lining incorporated African tonal languages and rhythmic and percussive hand clapping and stomping. The high stepping J. Creek Cloggers will perform. Based out of Haywood County NC, the team is keeping alive the old mountain tradiJ. Creek Cloggers tions of clogging, audience participation square dances, and broom dances. Members will demonstrate buck dancing, flat-footing, and clogging under the direction of Kim Ross. The “house band” will be the popular Bill Cole and Blackberry Jam Band. The band will perform and then will also be playing for the cakewalks which will be happening many times throughout the afternoon, sandwiched in-between the young musicians who will be featured. To add to this old time gathering will be homemade cakes, cookies, coffee and tea! IF YOU GO

Passing the Music On, Sunday, June 14 from 2-5 p.m. at Folkmoot USA Fellowship Hall, 112 Virginia Avenue in Waynesville. Admission is $10 per adult; $3 for children under 9 years. $1 per cakewalk ticket. For more information, call (828) 293-2239.


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June series highlights Americana, Jazz, Country, and Pop. The Classic Wineseller is Waynesville’s premier small plate restaurant, retail shop, and intimate live music venue. The Classic Wineseller presents local, regional, or national talent each week on Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m. The retail shop opens at 11 a.m., Tuesday through Saturday. The kitchen opens at 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday serving tapas, small plate entrees, appetizers and desserts. On Friday, June 5, Saturday, June 13, and Friday, June 26 at 7 p.m., Joe Cruz (piano, vocals) performs the music of the Beatles, Elton John, James Taylor, and Simon & Garfunkel.

Sheila Gordon

Joe Cruz

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Cruz grew up in New York City where he began singing and playing piano in church as a young child. After becoming a regular on the club circuit in New York City in his 20s, Cruz’s band toured internationally opening for Chicago, Bonnie Raitt, The Jazz Cats Richard Shulman Santana, and Average and Sidney Barnes White Band. Joe Cruz lives in Maggie Valley with his and Don Mercz on Friday, June 12 at 7 p.m. wife and two daughters. Pilgrim and Mercz have been playing music Nashville recording artist Lacy Green together for more than 30 years and share an (guitar, vocals) performs Saturday, June 6 at 7 affinity for the passionate and exhilaratingly p.m. Tickets are $6 up-tempo Gypsy jazz music. per person. Lacy Waynesville-based singer and piano player, has completed her Sheila Gordon, and multi-instrumentalilst and first radio tour, vocalist Chris Minick, perform an evening of recorded a Top Carole King favorites based on King’s Living 100 country radio Room Tour. The music begins at 7 p.m. on single, and has Friday, June 19. song cuts in sevSidney Barnes (vocals) and Richard Shuleral independent man (piano) will appear Saturday, June 20 at 7 films. Visit www. p.m. Barnes has recorded solo works such as lacygreen.com. Standing In the Safety Zone, which became a Enjoy an evenorthern soul cult favorite. In 1964, he was the ning of Gypsy Jazz Lacy Green lead singer of The Serenaders, who recorded with Mike Pilgrim the Motown classic, If Your Heart Says Yes on the V.I.P. label. His 2001 production of Standing On Solid Ground became his biggest northern soul record. Pianist Richard Shulman has recorded twenty-three of his own albums as well as more than two dozen other recordings for BY ANNA LEE ZANETTI which he has provided compositions, performances and/or musical production. irreparable damage to The Jazz Cats trio will perform at Saturhigh-elevation grassy day, June 27 at 7 p.m. The group’s members balds by uprooting are Bonnie Rossa (flute, vocals), Brad Keller vegetation. The Hog (piano, vocals), and Jean Bolduc (drums). Control Program funds thermal imaging units, a ADDITIONAL EVENTS new source of technolWednesdays, June 3, 10, 17 & 24 - W.O.W. ogy, which is used to (Wine on Wednesday), drop by 6-8 p.m., monitor wildlife for FREE Wine Tasting with dinner ($15 min.) or removal. $6 per person. Friends of the Smokies hikes are offered on Thursday, June 18 - Lebanon Wine Dinner the second Tuesday of featuring wines from Lebanon paired with each month. Guided Lebanese cuisine. 7 p.m., $39.99 per person, Classic Hikes are $35 reserve at 828-452-6000. and include a compliDinner and music reservations are taken mentary membership to anytime by calling (828) 452-6000. Seating is Friends of the Smokguaranteed until 7 p.m. on non-ticketed live ies. Current Friends music nights. After 7 p.m. seating is on a first members receive a discount and hike for $10. come, first served basis. Members who bring a friend hike for free.

Hike to Hemphill Bald, Cataloochee Ranch

Join Friends of the Smokies on Tuesday, June 9 and enjoy the breeze atop highelevation peaks on a guided hike to Hemphill Bald. This 8.8 mile hike is moderate in difficulty and has a total elevation gain of 1,900 ft. It is led by hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein. Judy Coker of Cataloochee Ranch, which borders the park along the trail, will join the group. Coker will share stories about the relationship of her family over generations with Great Smoky Mountains National Park, conserving land, and entertaining mountain guests. The Hemphill Bald Trail follows the spine of the Cataloochee Divide offering stunning vistas on a clear day and spring wildflowers long gone at lower elevations. Hikers will learn how donations made to Friends of the Smokies help fund the Smokies Hog Control Program. Feral hogs have caused

All registration donations benefit the Friends’ Smokies Trails Forever program. IF YOU GO

Hike to Hemphill Bald, Tuesday, June 9. To register for the hike and to view a complete listing of hikes please visit friendsofthesmokies.org/events/

For additional information visit www.classicwineseller.com

The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street Waynesville, NC 28786 828-452-6000

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 25


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I’m back again with the usual monthly assortment of music worth buying. Be sure to check our online version for more reviews and tidbits!

by James Cassara

The Kennedys West

The hardest working couple in show biz – seriously, just check out their touring, workshop, producing, and recording schedule – return with their first studio album in three years, one of the longest breaks since their 1995 debut. Pete and Maura Kennedy continue to revel in Byrds by way of Teenage Fan Club jangle pop, and few do it better. West (the first of three albums planned for this year) showcases Pete’s extraordinary guitar work and throaty singing, Maura’s more expressive vocals, and the sort of instinctive interplay that only comes with two decades of touring and marriage. All the trademarks are here – gorgeous harmonies, irresistible hooks, and irrepressible energy – making West a more than solid effort. The strongest tracks, the powerful title cut and “Jubilee Time,” are written by Pete, while the collaborative “Bodhisattva Blues” and “Travel Day Blues” (nicely placed one after the other) give the album a bit of welcome oomph. Things tail off a bit towards the end with a pair of sugary thick love songs that would have been better spaced apart, but that’s a relatively slight misstep on an otherwise excellent listen. If you haven’t yet heard The Kennedys than West is an excellent jumping on point. If you’re already a fan I doubt you’ll need much convincing. ****

Jack Tempchin Room to Run

BLUE ELAN RECORDS

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

This nifty four song sampler by famed songwriter Jack Tempchin (best known as having written “Peaceful Easy Feeling” and “Already Gone” for the Eagles) provides strong evidence that as he enters his seventh decade, time has dulled neither his musical acumen nor ability to tell a story in four minutes or less. While penning songs for Johnny Rivers, Chris Hillman, Tanya Tucker and many others, Tempchin has maintained a steady solo career, touring with his band and keeping himself remarkably active. The title cut is classic Tempchin – the sort of chorus that will linger in your head for days coupled with a gentle vibe – but the star track is “Summertime Bum” a catchy tune that would be a perfect fit for Jimmy Buffett. His voice might lack the distinctive tone needed in today’s market but given his proud history I doubt Tempchin much cares. Nor should he! ***1/2

26 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

Brian Lisik

Curtisinterruptedus

CHEROKEE QUEEN RECORDS

On his fourth album – and the first with his new band The Unfortunates – Ohio based songwriter Brian Lisik serves up a healthy plate of grassroots power pop, straddling a territory somewhere between pre-Born To Run Springsteen and The Raspberries. Fourteen tunes, with nary a weak link among them, cover as broad a range of topics as you’re likely to hear on any given disc. Not many songwriters would risk getting inside the mind of a wrongly convicted man, but Lisik does just that in “About Me Back Home” written from the perspective of Clarence Elkins, who spent decades in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. On the somber “St. Patrick’s Day” Lisik assumes the persona of a fan mourning the death of power pop icon Alex Chilton, whose own Memphis soul meets the top forty, certainly influenced Lisik and his band. What helps set Curtisinterruptedus apart from the many perfectly acceptable albums made by other bands is the way in which Lisik nimbly shifts the mood from joyful to solemn and from naively optimistic to cautiously resolute. Not just in his thinking man’s lyrics but in the manipulation of sound; fortunately his band is more than able to pull it off. A few nice touches around the edges might be in order, and at times Lisik’s voice is lost in the mix, but all in all Curtisinterruptedus is a fine step forward for an artist definitely worth seeking out. ***1/2

Paul Kelly The Merri Soul Sessions

Rightly revered in his native Australia, Kelly has never quite been able to break big in America. That’s a real shame; as a songwriter he can go head to head with any of them and while his mid range vocals might not set the world afire they are more than sufficient to his material. Throw in a crackerjack band – currently anchored by his nephew Dan Kelly – and there’s much here to admire. Following a lengthy tour in support of 2012’s Spring & Fall, his nineteenth studio album, Kelly took a much needed sabbatical, dabbling in stage production, producing a few efforts by his fellow countryman, and recording a live album with Neil Finn. So much for taking time off! The Merri Soul Sessions, initially funded by a PledgeMusic campaign, began as a series

of 7” vinyl singles that are difficult to find down under and darn near impossible to locate here in the states. Recognizing this, and not wishing to alienate his US fans, Kelly wisely decided to collect them into a proper release, add a few more tunes, and release the whole kit and caboodle in its entirety. Released under the banner of “Paul Kelly Presents” The Merri Soul Sessions are in no way a typical Kelly album. While the songs are his (some newly written and others reconstructed from his vast catalog) he serves largely as bandleader, playing rhythm guitar and taking lead vocals for only two of the 11 cuts. Most of the lead vocals are taken by some of Australia’s best known singers, including many whom Kelly has previously worked with. Half the songs are sung by woman – Kelly is one of the very few male artists who convincingly write from a feminine perspective – which gives the album a peculiar feel. Despite its strengths, including the diversity of musicians involved and the sheer force of Kelly’s songwriting, The Merri Soul Sessions sounds more like a Paul Kelly tribute album (of which there are already a few) than a new entry into the register. Longtime fans (those most likely to buy this record) may be a bit perplexed but while The Merri Soul Sessions doesn’t noticeably add to the Paul Kelly canon it certainly serves as a nice refresher course. ***1/2

Todd Rundgren / Hans-Peter Lindstrøm / Emil Nikolaisen Runddans

Small Town Supersound Recordings Todd Rundgren, in tandem with eccentric ambient artist Emil Nikolaisen, and free form Sun Ra devotee Hans-Peter Lindstrøm, join forces to create what might be one of this year’s strangest efforts and yet another head scratching moment in Rundgren’s long and often perplexing career. Originally conceived in 2014 the album took a back seat to Todd’s solo career and the extensive and much ballyhooed Utopia reunion tour. As such, and given the massive amount of pre-release attention it was given, Runddans seems almost destined to fall short of its lofty expectations. Recorded both in Nikolaisen and Lindstrøm’s native Norway, and Rundgren’s own Hawaiian home studio, it’s a 40 minute excursion – divided into 12 unequal segments – that began as a series of improvisational nods but gradually coalesced into… well, a slightly less erratic collection of whatever Todd and his erstwhile companions tossed at continued on page 29


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Charlie Parr at the Grey Eagle

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the wall of sound and stuck. It’s a true mutual effort; while Rundgren is certainly the most internationally celebrated of the three, both Nikolaisen and Lindstrøm have a significant European following. What results is a trippy, off beat, ever shifting collage of sound, texture, and atmosphere. It’s only when he assumes lead vocals (on an album that is largely instrumental) does it sound vaguely like a “proper” Todd Rundgren album; he still has that majestic voice and can play one heck of a guitar. The bits of sampling – ranging from Little Anthony style doo wop to Hawaiian slack-key Reggae – are interesting enough but the sum is often less than the parts. At the end of the day Runddans is no more or less arresting as any of Todd’s many other music diversions. But it’s hard not to give them some points for trying. ***

as the eye could see. “As a kid I thought it was kind of boring, but now I go and visit my mom and I think it’s the most beautiful landscape there is.” Much like such stark environs his music also reflects a specific ascetic simplicity. He avoids the typical studio settings, opting instead for warehouses, garages, basements and storefronts, using only vintage equipment. It gives his work the historic feel of field recordings, not because he wants to sound like he was discovered 75 years ago by Alan Lomax, but because most modern recording studios make the perpetually reserved and self-effacing Parr feel uncomfortable. After a health scare a few years back, he lives very simply; no alcohol, a vegan diet (ironic for one raised in Hormel land) that finds him often cooking up rice and beans on his engine manifold during the lonely, cross-country drives. He doesn’t go much for fashion and frills and lives simply on the road, usually sleeping in his car. “My songs are inspired by family members, the Bible, overheard conversations and places in my life” he adds. Parr draws sustenance from the surprisingly large, thriving and mutually supportive music scene of Duluth: Keep Your Hands on the Plow, his 2011 album of traditional songs featured local players and friends, including his wife Emily, old-timey banjo/fiddle band Four Mile Portage, and Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker of the traditional band Low. As for the songs – dating back to his 2002 debut Criminals and Sinners and weaving their way through the recently released Stumpjumper (with a dozen albums in between) – they

Jack Bruce

The 50th Birthday Concerts (DVD) MIG MUSIC

Since Jack Bruce turned 50 back in 1993 it’s obvious how long this coveted set has been lingering in the vaults of the German television program Rockpalast; the cynical among us might assume it’s finally seeing the light of day to cash in on Bruce’s October 2014 passing, but no matter. Regardless of the motives it’s a terrific set, a grand sampling of the range of Bruce’s prodigious talent and a testament to why any musician worth their salt begged to collaborate with him. Who else but Bruce could open with an acoustic bass rendering of J.S. Bach’s “Minuet No. 1”, glide easily to piano and vocals before

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There are musicians who play traditional music – set in a style that peaked long before they were born – and there are those who live such music, whose very essence is born of a sound and style that predates them. Duluth, Minnesota native Charlie Parr is one such entity, a throwback both in sound and substance, a performer whose approach to making and marketing music would fit nicely to a bygone age. Parr’s unfiltered sound has been described as “percussive and raw, the sort of songs that could have been lost field recordings from another era.” A self taught instrumentalist Parr’s blistering picking – deftly switching between acoustic guitar, Dobro and banjo – is ideally matched to his voice, an inimitable cry that is part whoop, part growl, and all conviction. It’s a tradition that began by listening to the records found in his father’s collection-artists ranging from Charley Patton to Lightnin’ Hopkins, Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly, and has worked its way into a sound that is all his. Parr’s heartfelt and plaintive original folk blues and traditional spirituals don’t strive for authenticity, they embody it. Parr’s inspiration is drawn from the alternately fertile and frozen soil of Minnesota; his songs exude a Midwestern sensibility and humility that is the essence of those who live there. He grew up in the Hormel meatpacking city of Austin, Minnesota (population 25,000) where the world’s most favorite tinned meat, Spam, is still manufactured. The combination of growing up with both of his parents working proud – and now threatened – union jobs in an industrial meat factory, and his largely rural environment had a broad impact on him. “Every morning you’d hear the [factory] whistles blow. When I was a kid they had the stockyards and animals there, so you were surrounded by this atmosphere,” Parr says. Out the back door were soybean fields, as far

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Charlie Parr Photo: Peter Lee

reflect his complex relationship with his Methodist roots. “(Many of) the songs I’ve written seem to rely on God being a kind of big brother who shows up one day after you’ve been getting your ass kicked all over town by bullies and he takes care of business. I know, it’s juvenile, but take a close look at a lot of legitimate hymns - ‘when I die I’m gonna tell God what you did to me’ comes to mind.” Parr embraces those roots but his recollection of the staid and repressive services is less generous. “It was more like, let’s get the service over quick so we can get downstairs and drink coffee and have pie!” Still that faith, however undefined, underlines his music, both in the listening, the covering, the writing and performing. Stumpjumper is a somewhat different beast. It’s his first record made outside of Minnesota - choosing instead the friendly confines of a farm in Hillsborough, North Carolina - and the most energetic album he’s made. Recorded with a full band (another first) its eleven tracks were cut in a mere three days. There’s an emphasis on “murder ballads” (“Evil Companion” and “Delia”) which is offset by the keen humor of “On Marrying A Woman With An Uncontrollable Temper”

bringing out a who’s who of rock and blues royalty? And what a gathering it is: guitarist supreme Gary Moore, saxophonist Dick Hecksatll-Smith (whose friendship with Bruce goes all the way back to the Alexis Korner years) keyboardist Bernie Worrell, along with a slew of singers and players. And oh yeah, some cat named Ginger Baker takes reign of the drum kit. With so many guests on stage you’d think Bruce might get lost in the mix but such is the power of his voice and playing – few bassists can match him for pure technique and audacity – that such perennial favorites as “White Room” and “Sunshine of Your Love” sound as vibrant as lesser known gems including “Bird Alone” and “Golden Days.” It’s a fine tribute to an artist whose contributions cannot be overestimated, and are already sorely missed. ****

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which gets my vote for best song title of the year. Having followed his music for some time I say with certainty that not only is Stumpjumper his strongest release yet it’s the one most reflective of his current direction and where he might be headed. The album, as well as his upcoming Asheville performance (squeezed in between several festival appearances), are highly recommended for those who love traditional music with an authentic and quirky spin. IF YOU GO

Charlie Parr, Wednesday, June 24 at 7 p.m. Doors open at 8 p.m. for this all ages, seated show. Tickets are priced at $10 in advance and $12 day of. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com.

Tellico Releases Relics and Roses Tellico takes you on a journey through the modern Appalachian soundscape, with masterful storytelling and memorable instrumental and vocal performances that wed tradition with a contemporary Americana sensibility.

Telllico Photo: Jennifer Callahan

Relics and Roses, Tellico’s debut album, features the singing and songwriting of Anya Hinkle (guitar, fiddle), Stig Stiglets on bass, Aaron Ballance on dobro and pedal and lap steel, and Jed Willis on mandolin and clawhammer banjo. IF YOU GO: Tellico, Friday, June 5, Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

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COPYEDITING &

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PROOFREADING SERVICES A sharp eye for the big picture and the small details. Books • Websites Short Stories • Cookbooks Assistance with Self Publishing

Kathleen Colburn www.aptitudeforwords.com

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Rapid River Magazine Web Exclusive

Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. Visit her website, www.aptitudeforwords.com

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

THEY PAVED PARADISE!

“There is only one question / How to love this world.” ~ Mary Oliver 828-581-9031

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Mary tells us how with this three line poem, from “Sometimes” Pay attention Be astonished Tell about it. The writers and poets whose words are in this column TELL. Mother Earth deserves planetary justice. We must embrace and practice, “radical pastoralism,” no clear-cutting, fracking, continent-long pipelines, DDT, light pollution, or water dismay. I’m on a roar. This has been coming on for some time, and I’ve peaked. It is a poet’s job to be brave. I’m reading Thomas Rain Crowe’s, Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods. I’m taking his writing class at the Arboretum. The class is Writing In Place. After our first session, I feel responsible for every parking lot in Asheville! The poetry books on the shelf next to my desk are huffing and puffing to jump into my hands. Now I have offended Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, James Wright, William Cullen Bryant, Thoreau, Emerson, AND Hopkins because they aren’t on my list. They each want to get a word in – or a poem. To pay attention means to Stop. Look. Listen. When Mary Oliver wrote her fist line, “Pay attention,” I wish she’d included an exclamation point. Mr. Crowe asked us to consider our bio-region. This is Eden, and the garden is disappearing faster then you can quote e. e. cummings’ poem, “i thank you god/for most this amazing day.” The last line of Wendell Berry’s poem, Mad Farmer’s Liberation Front, ends with “Practice Resurrection.” Read the entire poem this month and pat yourself on the back when you join Green Works. Writers, make yourself heard! I’m listening.

From Luther Burbank

“Think of yourself as nature. Nature is our only reliable and authentic teacher.”

POETRIO Sunday, June 7 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: Therése Halscheid (Frozen Latitudes), Maggie Anderson (Windfall: New and Selected Poems), and Terry L. Kennedy (New River Breakdown).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

28 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

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CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

TIME Slow down! Where are you going in such a rush? To the supermarket of your last dime? Is the sound of pencil-lead on paper too much for your ears? At fifty miles per hour the butterfly on the rose by the side of the road is as invisible as a wish for the answer to prayers. As you run through your best years watching the road. Faster than the speed of life.

~ by Thomas Rain Crowe

QUIET WATERS There are quiet waters where a berry dropped by a bird flying starts ripples that from the center of the pond spread in concentrics, dying in silence at the feet of the blue reeds. I now know where these waters are.

~ by Eugene McCarthy

BLAKE saw them glittering in the trees, their quills erect among the leaves, angels everywhere. we need new words for what this is, this hunger entering our loneliness like birds, stunning our eyes into rays of hope. we need the flutter that can save us, something that will swirl across the face of what we have become and bring us grace. back north, i sit again in my own home dreaming of blake, searching the branches for just one poem.

~ by lucille clifton

From Thomas Merton

What a thing it is to sit absolutely alone in the forest at night, cherished by this wonderful, unintelligible, perfectly innocent speech, the most comforting speech in the world, the talk that rain makes by itself all over the ridges, and the talk of the watercourses everywhere in the hollow. It will talk as long as it wants, this rain. As long as it talks I am going to listen.

From Sallie McFague

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“We must decenter ourselves as the goal of creation and recenter ourselves as the caretakers of our planet. “If justice means, most basically, fairness, then ecology and justice are inextricably intertwined, for on a finite planet with limited resources to support its many different kins of beings, both human and non human, sharing fairly is an issue of the highest priority.

“We are dealing with a wily, crafty enemy: ourselves, as the perpetrators of our ecological crisis.”

From John Muir

“No American wilderness that I know is so dangerous as a city home with all the modern improvements. One should go to the woods for safety, if for nothing else.”

From T. S. Eliot

“Where shall the world be found, where will the word resound? Not here, there is not enough silence.”

From Aldo Leopold

This was written in 1948. “Wilderness is the raw material out of which man has hammered the artifact called civilization. Wilderness is a resource which can shrink but not grow. The Wilderness Society was organized in 1935 ‘for the one purpose of saving the wilderness remnants in America.’ The Sierra Club is doing yeoman work toward the same end. “We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. There is no other way for land to survive the impact of man.”

Resources Sallie McFague, The Body of God: an Ecological Theology, Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN, 1993. E.M. Foster, The Discipline of Solitude. Annie Dillard, The Annie Dillard Reader, Harper Perennial, 1944. Wendell Berry, Timbered Choir, Counterpoint, Berkeley, 1998. lucille clifton, the terrible stories, BOA editions, 1996. Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac, Oxford University Press, 1949. Joni Mitchell, Big Yellow Taxi. Thomas Rain Crowe, Zoro’s Field, University of Georgia Press, 2006.

IF YOU Reading by Carol Pearce Bjorlie from GO Impossible Brightening, her recent

collection of poetry. There will also be music. All proceeds from this reading go to Calvary’s discretionary fund. Sunday, June 28 at 4 p.m., Calvary Episcopal Church, Hwy. 25, Fletcher, NC 28732.

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings

Jacksonland

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WRITTEN BY STEVE INSKEEP

Steve Inskeep, acclaimed host of NPR’s Morning Edition, is one of the most widely heard and respected voices in journalism. Known for probing interviews with everyone from presidents to warlords to musicians, he has passion for stories. In Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab, Inskeep has found a great story: Two men—Andrew Jackson, politician, war hero, and finally President; and John Ross, a mixedrace Cherokee politician and diplomat, who became Jackson’s cleverest opponent—locked in a twenty year battle over who would own much of what is now America’s Deep South. One man we recognize: Andrew Jackson, whose face graces our $20 bill. John Ross however remains half-forgotten. Representing

REVIEW BY

CINDY NORRIS

one of the Five Civilized Tribes who had adopted the ways of white settlers— plowing farms, publishing a newspaper in their own language, and sending children to school—Ross was educated, and he used the United States’ own legal system and democratic ideals to oppose Jackson as he extracted immense wealth from his armies’ conquest of native lands. The depths of Jackson’s clandestine dealings in real estate have rarely been examined, and Inskeep brings these dramatic charges shockingly in focus. Ross championed the tribes’ cause all the way to the Supreme Court. He gained allies like Senator Henry Clay, Chief Justice John Marshall, and even Davy Crockett. In a fight that seems at once distant and familiar, Ross and his allies made their case in the media, committed civil disobedience, and benefited

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from the first mass political action by American women. Their struggle contained ominous overtures of later events like the Civil War and even the Civil Rights movements of the 20th century. Using the lives of these two individuals, Inskeep builds an exhilarating double-narrative that spans the frontiers of the growing American republic. By unpacking the enduring questions of American life—of liberty and citizenship, manifest destiny and constitutional equality—through the individuals who experienced the conflicts first hand, Jacksonland delivers an unexpected historical masterpiece. Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab, Steve Inskeep, Penguin Press, hardcover, pp. 448. IF YOU Steve Inskeep reading and book signing GO for Jacksonland, Monday, June 1 at 7

p.m. Tickets are $15 and come with a $10 coupon toward the purchase of the book. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.

Focus on Young Adult Readers this Month at Malaprop’s

Y YA Panel

Saturday, June 6 at 7 p.m. Featuring Becky Albertalli, Jasmine Warga, and Aisha Saeed. Dealing with a range of issues from hidden sexuality, to suicide, to arranged marriage, these ladies offer fresh voices to the YA pantheon. Of Becky Albertalli’s Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, Andrew Smith (Grasshopper Jungle) says, “Delightfully funny and at times heart-wrenching.” My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga is “Subtle and impressive... reminiscent of Judy Blume novels,” according to NPR. Aisha Saeed’s novel Written in the Stars was called “a powerfully emotional book with a hard-earned, satisfying ending” by MTV.

Alan Gratz Book Launch Tuesday, June 9 at 7 p.m. Dragon Lantern, the new League of Seven book, is here. That means more alternate history, more steampunk adventure, and more monsters! Gratz is also the author of Samurai Shortstop and Prisoner B-3087.

Dangerous Ladies: YA Authors Friday, June 12 at 7 p.m. Megan Shepherd, Carrie Ryan, Renee Ahdieh, and Gwenda Bond talk about their new books.

Shepherd is the author of the The Madman’s Daughter trilogy. Her latest is The Cage, the beginning of a new sci-fi series where humans are the exhibits in another world. Carrie Ryan is the author of The Forest of Hands and Teeth series. According to Ally Condie, author of Matched, Daughter of Deep Silence boasts “heart-stopping suspense, fine writing, and a heroine who finds and owns her true strength.” Renee Ahdieh’s The Wrath & the Dawn was inspired by A Thousand and One Nights and is “lushly imagined and powerfully characterized... a potent page-turner of intrigue and romance” according to Publisher’s Weekly. Gwenda Bond’s novel, Lois Lane: Fallout ,garnered this starred review from Kirkus: “A lighthearted and playful tone permeates the novel, making for a nifty investigative mystery akin to Veronica Mars or Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”

Laurie Mckay Reading & Signing Sunday, June 14 at 3 p.m. Laurie McKay’s new middle grade series, The Last Dragon Charmer, is set in Asheville, only not the Asheville you and I see. On a quest to slay a dragon, Prince Caden goes through a magic hole and winds up in foster care and middle school. What seems like a magicless environment soon proves otherwise and the real adventure begins.

Sarah Dessen Reading & Signing

JUNE

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, June 1 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s 33rd Anniversary celebration! 25% off sale. Tuesday, June 2 at 4 p.m. Sherri Lynn Wood, The Improv Handbook For Modern Quilters. Tuesday, June 2 at 7 p.m. CINDY HENRY McMAHON, Fresh Water from Old Wells. Thursday, June 4 at 7 p.m. NORMANDI ELLIS, Imagining the World into Existence, Egypt. Friday, June 5 at 7 p.m. ROBERT MORGAN, Dark Energy, poetry. Monday, June 8 at 7 p.m. JENNIFER BEAN BOWER, North Carolina Aviatrix Viola Gentry. Wednesday, June 10 at 7 p.m. JOHN CONNELL, Ruins of War, mystery. Thursday, June 11 at 7 p.m. MICHELLE MILLER, The Underwriting, office politics. Wednesday, June 17 at 7 p.m. STEPHEN WITT, How Music Got Free. Thursday, June 18 at 7 p.m. DOROTHEA BENTON FRANK, All the Single Ladies.

Saturday, June 20 at 7 p.m. Saint Anything is “quintessential Sarah Dessen” according to Entertainment Weekly. Weekly To join the signing line after the reading, purchase Saint Anything or any of Sarah Dessen’s books from Malaprop’s.

Friday, June 19 at 7 p.m. NIC BROWN, In Every Way, unexpected motherhood.

Southeast Summer YA Book Bash

Saturday, June 27 at 7 p.m. BENJAMIN HEDIN, Search of the Movement: The Struggle for Civil Rights Then and Now.

Sunday, June 21 at 3 p.m. Featuring Lynne Matson, Lindsay Cummings, Anne Blankman, Paula Stokes, and Tonya Kuper. Matson follows up her debut novel Nil, of which VOYA said, “a unique twist to a survival story… a strongly written fantasy,” with Nil Unlocked. Cummings, the author of several YA and middle grade novels, will discuss The Death Code, the second in her Murder Complex series. School Library Journal calls Anne Blankman’s A Conspiracy of Blood and Smoke “a powerful story full of mystery, intrigue, romance, and edge-of-your-seat terror and suspense.” She is also the author of The Fog. Prisoner of Night and Fog The author of The Art of Lainey, Paula Stokes’s new novel is Liars, Inc., Inc. which Kirkus Reviews calls “captivating to the very end.”

Monday, June 22 at 7 p.m. MARY LAURA PHILPOTT, Penguins with People Problems. Wednesday, June 24 at 7 p.m. PATTI CALLAHAN HENRY, The Idea of Love.

Monday, June 29 at 7 p.m. MATTHEW QUICK, Love May Fail, quirky and delightful. Tuesday, June 30 at 7 p.m. JANET SURREY, The Buddha’s Wife: The Path of Awakening Together.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

“Best of” Wasabi

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MICHELLE ROgERS

“Rio” by Duran Duran was playing as we entered Wasabi at 6:30 on a Thursday evening.

pg. 20

Yummy Wood Fired Pizza Creative Salads • House Made Pastas Fresh Seafood • Fine Meats p

1 Page Ave. in the Grove Arcade Downtown Asheville

Sun-Thur 11:30- 9:30 • Fri and Sat 11:30-10 Closed Daily from 4-5 • 828-225-4133

It was still quiet enough to hear the music overhead. Soon, the restaurant would fill its tables and the bustling sounds of waitstaff and happy customers would envelop the music, a clear sign that Wasabi is a hit in Asheville. I’ve been to Wasabi several times before with small and large groups and I always have a great time, no matter the occasion. The place is hip, fun, casual, and this time around our server was above and beyond our expectations. Hannah helped us decide what to order, giving us all the nitty gritty details of the menu even though she had no idea I was there to write an article. After Hannah’s description, we decided on the tuna dumplings as an appetizer, and I am so glad we listened to her. The dumplings arrived looking like two pink purses of fresh, velvety tuna, and were topped with wasabi tobiko (fish roe). A sweet chili sauce pooled beneath the fish. It was unclear as to the best method to eat this huge dumpling – fingers? chopsticks?

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Tuna dumplings topped with wasabi tobiko.

We dove in and used both. The first bite exploded with flavor and crunch. Inside the dumplings were spicy, crunchy fresh scallops. The sauce was a nice, sweet complement and the tobiko added more crunch and spice. I will definitely order this again. After much deliberation of what to order next (how could anything follow the tuna dumplings?) the manager let us know Sushi Deluxe – salmon, tuna, white tuna, and yellow that the Godzilla roll is a house tail, with tuna rolls. favorite. This was something to remember for next time as generous in portions), we shared the Sushi Hannah pointed us in the direction of the Deluxe – the chef’s selection of incredibly special roll for the night, The Earthquake fresh fish. The long, slender, well-sliced Roll. Once again we took her suggesfish overlapped the small mounds of rice, tion, and the plate arrived as a beautiful, offering ample servings. This nigiri sushi colorful display of Wasabi’s artistry. Fresh was a nice palate cleanser to the heavier, mango was rolled in rice and seaweed fried shrimp of The Earthquake Roll, with a layer of spicy tuna, then shrimp which did a great job of filling us up and tempura looking like they dove head-first rocking our worlds. from a diving board into the roll. This This dish however, was a clean return to beautiful display was sprinkled plentifully calmer waters and simpler flavors. The red with a tangle of fried crabstick strings, tuna was so delicate and fresh that it pulled green and red tobiko, then drizzled with a apart in segments. The white tuna, salmon, house special sauce. and yellow tail were also delicious and From my experiences at Wasabi, the tasted like the ocean, not fishy. The nigiri tempura is always a winner, lightly batsushi was served alongside the traditional tered and an amazing crunch. The shrimp pickled ginger (natural color, not dyed) tempura in The Earthquake Roll added and wasabi. We asked one of the chefs how a nice crisp texture as a counterpoint to everything was so fresh and he said that the fresh, delicately smooth tuna. There the fish is delivered to the restaurant every was plenty of sauce and crunch to flavor other day. the rice and fish. This roll was a mouthful After this meal, I can see why Wasabi has and delightfully messy to eat. won so many sushi awards over the years. Unsure of how much more sushi They’ve won “WNC’s Best of” every year we could eat (as the first dishes were since 2005. They certainly serve fresh sushi with stimulating visual appeal. I would cast a vote for “Best of” Service award as well.

Wasabi

Indian ~ Nepali ~ Tibetan Himalayan Cuisine

19 Broadway, downtown Asheville 828-225-2551 www.WasabiAsheville.com

GREAT FOOD! GREAT BEER! GREAT SERVICE! ANYWAY YOU LIKE IT! pg. 36

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33 Town Square Boulevard, Asheville • 828.651.8481

30 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

Michelle Rogers works with independently-owned, small food businesses at Blue Ridge Food Ventures. She has worked in the culinary industry since 1997. She enjoys freelance writing and exploring the outdoors. Contact her at milyro@ gmail.com.


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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Downton Abbey Afternoon Tea Tuesday, June 23 – Benefit for the Ca-

shiers Valley Community Council. Guest speaker is costume historian, wedding folklorist, and author Cornelia Powell. 2-5 p.m. at the High Hampton Inn Pavilion in Cashiers, NC. Tickets are $75. For more information, contact Diane Stumm, (828) 226-4411.

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Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005 California Chicken Salad 828.692.6335

TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 • Lunch: Everyday 11-3 Afternoon Happy Hour: Thurs, Fri & Sat. 3-6 pm pg. 36 Dinner: Thurs, Fri. & Sat. starting at 5 pm Hg

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse

July 11 Paula Hanke

e BEST Hot Dogs, Sizzling, Juicy Burgers, Fresh, Crispy Seafood, Hand-Cut Fries, and Homemade Onion Rings.

Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885

July 18 Serpentine Arborvitae

JULY 25

Our food is FRESH, delicious, and cooked to order.

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

Wendy Jones $44.99 per person includes four-course dinner with live jazz Reservations at 828-452-6000

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808 Greenville Highway Hendersonville Mon-Sat 10am-8pm • Sun 11am-3pm T.Cote@morrisbb.net • 828-697-2266

Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

www.greatamericandog.net Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

777 Haywood Road, Asheville

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

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(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 31


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

June Marks Lex 18’s One Year Anniversary

B&C Winery Launches New Web Site

To celebrate they have planned fantastic dinner shows, special events, and parties. Lex 18 offers the Premiere Afternoon Tea Temptation. Lex 18 ranks as one of the best afternoon tea experiences. Each week we delight our guests palates, and their interest, with stories, history and information on teas and etiquette. Love history? Stop in to learn about Whiskeys, Whiskys, and Appalachia Moonshine.

Over the last year B& C Winery has been creating wines and trying to expand. You can visit the new web site at www.BCWineryNC.com to find out what is happening, what new wines will be released, and when to place your orders. Cheers! Chris Choinski, President B&C Winery

Lex 18, 18 North Lexington Ave., downtown Asheville. Visit www.lex18avl.com

145 Wall Street, Downtown Waynesville (828) 550-3610, www.BCWineryNC.com

B&C Winery

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128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

Open Tuesday - Sunday Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

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a Culinary Gi Shop 8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com 32 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

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Living in Balance “Your life’s journey has an outer purpose and an inner purpose. The outer purpose is to arrive at your goal or destination, to accomplish what you set out to do, to achieve this or that… the journey’s inner purpose… has nothing to do with where you are going or what you are doing, but everything to do with how. It has nothing to do with future but everything to do with the quality of your consciousness at this moment.” ~ Eckhart Tolle

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Buddhism is sometimes referred to as “The Middle Way.” By legend, the Buddha was born a prince, a person of wealth and privilege. Having experienced that the vast majority of people did not live such sheltered lives and suffered many woes and calamities, he dedicated himself to understanding and overcoming the nature of human misery and chose to live the life of an ascetic, rejecting all of life’s comforts, even necessities, to follow a life of meditation, yoga, self-denial and retreat from the world of humanity. After thoroughly mastering the arts of the ascetic, he realized this path was also false; it would not lead to the answers he sought. He realized there must be a middle way, a balanced way that was neither luxury and wealth as life’s purpose nor the rejection of the material world through extreme spiritual practices. As we in the West now commonly live lives with levels of material luxury and security approaching the equivalency of a prince of old, and find it lacking in the emotional well-being and security our society promised, the Buddha’s story has great relevance for us. Buddha realized that neither of the paths his life had trod would lead him to the secret

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of perfect peace; they were both expressions of the self-centeredness he now realized was the source of humanity’s suffering. It didn’t matter if one was a prince in the world or an ascetic in rejection of the world; both were about being something special and apart from the natural everyday life of human beings. The path he next chose was the simplicity of everyday life, however, lived consciously in the perfect design of life-as-it-naturally-is imbued with sacredness. He realized humanity’s fall was its belief in and clinging to its own separate specialness, and its salvation was in awakening into its true and balanced place within the sacred web of Life. The true spiritual path is nothing special, and truly spiritual persons do not conceive of themselves, or desire for themselves, to be something special. The secret, he found, is in everyday life lived in consciousness and celebration of Life’s miraculous interconnectedness and interde-

I Have a Hole in My Heart

Many people have been told that they have a “hole” in their heart. What does that mean – exactly? Wouldn’t a “hole” allow the blood to run out and they would die? Where is the “hole”? The heart has four chambers. On the right side is a small upper chamber (right atrium) which receives blood from the body and empties through a one-way valve into the larger lower chamber (right ventricle). This chamber empties under low pressure through a oneway valve into the pulmonary artery and into the lungs to pick up oxygen. On the left side is a small upper chamber (left atrium) which receives blood from the lungs and empties through a one-way valve into the much larger lower chamber (left ventricle). This very large chamber empties under high pressure through a one-way valve into the aorta and into the rest of the body. While still in the mother’s womb, the fetal heart has a by-pass “hole” through a flap valve between the two upper chambers (foramen ovale in the atrial septum). This “hole” allows

blood to pass directly from the right side into the left side of the heart without going to the non-functioning fetal lungs. A second “hole” for the same purpose of by-pass is a small channel (ductus arteriosus) between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, kept open by hormones from the mother’s placenta. At the moment the child takes it first breath, the pressure drops in the right upper chamber. The higher pressure in the left upper chamber closes the flap valve, closing the first “hole” (foramen ovale). When the umbilical cord is clamped, the hormones from the placenta are cut off. With rising levels of oxygen from breathing and hormones from the infant lung, the second “hole” (ductus) closes. As the lungs expand, the blood flows in from the right side of the heart. In 25% of people, the foramen ovale does not close. This can be one way for blood clots from the legs to cross from the right side to the left side of the heart and potentially into the heart or brain circulation. Rarely does the ductus arteriosus remain patent. But when it does, the infant shunts

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pendence. When once asked, “Are you a god, an angel, a saint?” the Buddha answered, “No.” When pressed further to explain his radiant presence, he answered, “I am awake.” “God is simply a word for the non-ego,” wrote the famous Swiss psychiatrist and fountainhead of archetypal psychology, Carl Jung. This brilliant statement observes exactly as does Buddhism, that only the human mind’s capacity to extract itself (ego) outside of the perfect harmony of the Universe is humanity’s fall from Grace. “God” is a word in a thousand language variations to express the universal archetypal intuitive experience of the perfect harmony of the source of all that is, an intelligence that balances all the Universe. Human ego creates an artificial universe of human society and the individual’s place within that matrix that places itself outside of Nature. It doesn’t matter if what is being created are shopping malls, temples, arcane spiritual rituals or retreats from the world. If a person or a society is looking to find their own unique specialness in things or the rejection of things, they are missing the mark. It must be realized that the Universe has generated the human ego, but not as a source of individual and collective specialness and

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identity, rather, as a means for conscious participation and shaping of the material world. It is a tool, just as our hands with opposable thumbs are special tools generated by the Universe to literally grasp the world while our minds abstractly grasp it. Those abilities to shape the world used for ego enhancement, however, are graceless. As Eckhart Tolle noted, we must connect to our inner purpose as guide for our outer purpose, and our inner purpose is to be an instrument of the intelligent unfolding of the Universe in perfect harmony and balance. “Realize that there is a vast realm of intelligence beyond thought, that thought is only a tiny aspect of intelligence… All the things that truly matter – beauty, love, creativity, joy, inner peace – arise from beyond the mind.” ~ Tolle Zen often talks about how “doing” must be shaped and guided by non-doing. Thought is the doings of the mind, and while a most valuable tool, it is not the source of all that is truly intelligent, insightful, creative and spiritual. These gifts arise from the silent mind, the intuitive mind, the realm of pure undivided consciousness that is the Universe. It is a truth continued on page 36

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

blood from the high pressure left side into the low pressure right side, overloading the right side of the heart, causing difficult breathing and eventually heart failure. A third “hole” in the heart is a malformation and can occur between the two lower chambers (ventricular septal defect). This defect causes the high pressure left ventricle to shunt blood into the low pressure right ventricle, causing overload of the lungs and increasing the pressure in the right heart causing heart failure and difficult breathing in the infant and in the adult who still has it. Most heart “holes” close spontaneously. Most remaining “holes” cause little or no problem. But a few require some type of intervention to repair and close them before permanent damage is done to the lungs and the heart. Fortunately, the majority of people do not have a “hole” in their heart and they make the amazing switch of circulation at birth when – by design – all of their “holes” close.

Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 33


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Plein-Air Painting Workshops

Trail & Palette will host two plein-air painting workshops near Asheville in June. NYC-trained artists and Montana geologist offer a Hudson River School approach to landscape painting. Details, registration at www.trailpalette.com.

Tuesday, June 2

Ceramic Art Show

The Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery opens a new show celebrating the ceramic art of Ginger Graziano, Kat McIver, Diana Gillispie, and other gallery members. Open Tuesday through Sunday 11 am to 5 pm at 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801.

Friday, June 5

Asheville Gallery of Art

Recent works by Al Junek. Opening reception 5 to 8 p.m. On display June 1-30. View Junek’s work as well as the works of the 27 other gallery artists. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville. (828) 251-5796, or www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

June 5-28

The Great American Trailer Park Musical

Directed by Mark Jones with musical direction by John Crawley. Music and

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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lyrics by David Nehls; book by Betsy Kelso. Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m., Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $25 Adults, $22 Seniors/ Students. Opening weekend tickets: $19.99. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, June 13

Asheville Art Museum Benefit Gala

Visions + Visionaries: A Marriage - O’Keeffe + Stieglitz. Features an exciting live auction offering a variety of fine art and vacation packages. Asheville Art Museum, 2 South Pack Square, Asheville. Visit ashevilleart.org

Sunday, June 14

Saturday, June 6

Clay Day

Craft demonstrations and hands-on activities for children and adults. Free. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in East Asheville. For more information, visit www.craftguild.org or call (828) 298-7928.

Saturday, June 6

Crimson Laurel Gallery

New work by featured Artist Chris Pickett; Steve Hansen and Jeremy Randall Jeremy Randall present, Everything Old is New Again; and Bonnie Seeman’s show of Ceramics and Glass. 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC. (828) 688-3599, www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com

Saturday, June 13

Second Saturday Event

In the River Arts District. Galleries offer demonstrations, music, refreshments, and a showcase of arts and crafts. Visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Saturday, June 13

Riverview Station Arts Adventure

More than 20 Riverview Station artists, working in various media, open their studios from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Artwork by French Broad Artists, Sahar Fakhoury, Sandra Brugh Moore and Virginia Pendergrass will be on display. Watercolor landscape demonstration by Sandra Brugh Moore, 1-4 p.m. Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St. in Asheville’s River Arts District.

Jimmy Landry and James Vandenberg

House concert featuring two of Asheville’s musical jewels. Jimmy is a phenomenal singer and songwriter. His music is sweet, poignant, dramatic and funny. James is a gorgeous guitarist and accompanist. Come at 6 p.m. for potluck - music starts at 7. Seating is limited. Reserve your seat by sending $15 to Majo Madden, 11-D Old Candler Town Rd., Candler, NC 28715. Call or email 582-9822, heymajo@gmail.com

Monday, June 15

Sirius.B

Absurdist Gypsy folk funk punk ensemble performs at UNC Asheville’s Concerts on the Quad at 7 p.m. Free admission. Details: cesap.unca.edu/ concerts-quad or (828) 251-6674.

June 15-21

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Marquita Someliana, jazz pianist

Saturday, June 13

Film School Open House

Saturday, June 20

Hops & Howlers Craft Brew Fest

Over 30 breweries from the region plus food vendors. Live music from Ancient Cities and Blue Mother Tupelo. 4-9 p.m. at the Market Pavilion on Remsburg Drive, Abingdon, VA. For tickets and more information visit hopsandhowlers.com, or contact scardinale@ abingdon-va.gov.

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Summer Youth Art Classes Fridays, June 17 & 26, and July 5 & 12 from 1-3. Come learn art with Mr. Jake and have fun creating art the way real artists do! Four classes, $50. Limited space. Call soon to register your children. (828) 668-1100. Any medium, any subject. Beginners through advanced. Tuesdays from 9:30 to 11:30. Four classes: $65 for members; $75 for nonmembers. To register, call (828) 668-1100.

raphy. Gourmet drinks and snacks will be available. Blacksmith demonstration, wine tasting, and a music pickin’ parlor. Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday noon to 5 p.m. Free. Tigg’s Pond Retreat Center, 212 Fiddlehead Lane, Zirconia, NC. For more details, please visit www.davidvoorheespottery.com

Local Potters Wanted

June 23-25

Art Classes with Lorelle Bacon

Seeking potters to teach classes at Arrowhead Gallery and Studios in Old Fort. Teachers and students would have access to our classroom and our kiln. In addition to the classroom and kiln, very affordable studio space is currently available. If interested please contact Lorelle Bacon, (828) 595-6007. Arrowhead Gallery 78 Catawba Rd., Old Fort (828) 668-1100

48 Hour Film Project Screenings

The best film from Asheville will be chosen. Screenings at 7 & 10 p.m. at Asheville Brewing Company, Merrimon Ave. For more details visit www.48hourfilm.com/asheville

Saturday, June 27

Run For Shindig on the Green

4th annual 5k Race and Fun Walk fundraising benefit. 5K Race begins at 8:30 a.m. The one-mile Fun Walk begins at 8:35 a.m. Register online at www.active.com until Thursday, June 25. Cost: 5K, $25; Fun Walk, $10. Day-of-race registration is $30 between 7:30-8:15 a.m. (828) 258-6101 x345, or visit www.folkheritage.org.

Saturday, June 27

Shindig on the Green

Saturday, June 20

Front Street Arts & Crafts Show

In the historic town of Dillsboro, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Over 40 juried artisans, plus food and demonstrations. Live entertainment featuring the J Creek Cloggers, and Dusk Weaver and the Junior Appalachian Musicians. For more details, email Tunnel Mountain Crafts, chogan4196@gmail.com.

Saturday & Sunday, June 20 & 21

Solstice Arts at Tigg’s Pond Retreat Center

David Voorhees and Molly Sharp along with Rev. Posy Jackson host a two day indoor arts and crafts event. Wide range of artwork, pottery, jewelry, stained glass, watercolor, pastel and oil paintings, metalwork, bookarts, felt, weaving, wood working, and photog-

Traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers. Free. Downtown Asheville, on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford stage in Pack Square Park. Bring your instruments, lawn chairs or blankets, family and friends. Summer dates: July 11, 18, 25; August 15, 22, 29, and September 5, 2015. For more details, www.folkheritage.org or (828) 258-6101 x345.

Sunday, June 28

Autumn Players Readers Theatre

The Autumn Players will perform The Vanishing Point, by Beth Ely. 2:30 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Admission is $6. Details at (828) 251-6140 or olliasheville.com

Hard Times Memoir Contest

Deadline: June 30, 2015 Stories should be previously unpublished, and should not exceed 5,000 words. $25 entry fee per submission. Sponsored by The Writers’ Workshop of Asheville. More details online at www.twwoa.org

JUNE EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

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Arrowhead Gallery

Intensive program workshops begin Monday, June 15 at Odyssey Community School. Masters Concert Saturday, June 20 at the Diana Wortham Theatre at 8 p.m. Tickets and more details at www. ashevillepercussionfestival.com

Saturday, June 20

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Asheville Percussion Festival

Performing at the Haywood County Public Library at 3 p.m. in the meeting room. Free. Haywood County Public Library, 678 S. Haywood St., Waynesville. Visit www. haywoodarts.org for more information.

Student Film Screenings from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. See what CFI offers teenagers exploring their love of film and adults seeking experience in the film industry. Summer Teen Camp begins July 20; year-long adult program starts September 28. Free and open to the public. Carolina Film Institute, 518 Hunts Bridge Rd., Greenville, SC 29617.

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Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

HART, 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.com

Callie & Cats

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The Strand Theater Saturday, June 13 – The Snyder Family, bluegrass, southern rock, blues, Texas swing, and newgrass. 7:45 p.m. $15 adv.; $18 door. Sunday, June 14 – Blue Ridge Big Band, 2 p.m.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins Darin & Brooke Aldridge

Friday, June 19 – Darin & Brooke Aldridge, husband and wife duo. Gospel and Bluegrass. 7 p.m. $18 adv.; $22 at the door.

Sunday, June 28 – The Malpass Brothers, traditional country music. 7 p.m., $20 adv.; $25 at door. Movie Show Times Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, 7 p.m.; Saturday 5 & 7 p.m.; Sunday 2 & 4 p.m. June 5-17: Interstellar Free Kids Movie, Saturdays at 12 and 2 p.m.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Boost Your Business

The Strand Theater 38 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786 www.38main.com

Classic Wineseller

FREE Consultation Learn all about branding. Discover the best ways to position yourself to succeed.

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by Amy Downs

Saturday, June 20 at 7 p.m. Sidney Barnes and Richard Shulman at the Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. Dinner and music reservations at (828) 452-6000.

RichHeartMusic.com

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Diana Wortham Theatre 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

Thursday, June 11 from 9-11 p.m. playing with the Michael Gamble - Russ Wilson Big Band at 11 on Grove for swing dancing. 11 Grove St., Asheville. (828) 505-1612.

Saturday, June 27 from 10 p.m. - 1 a.m. Jazz & Blues. Playing keyboard with Los Lobos Latinos Latin band featuring vocalist Liley Arauz. Tressa’s Downtown, 28 Broadway St., Asheville. (828) 254-7072

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Thursday - Saturday, June 25, 26 & 27 – Terpsicorps Theatre of Dance presents The Elements at 8 p.m. Gala Night takes place Thursday, June 25 at 7 p.m.

Oklahoma! – Opens July 10. Directed by Steve Lloyd.

Friday, June 19, potluck then concert. 6:30 p.m. Composers’ Concert at Streamside Concerts, 721 Streamside Dr., Arden. Email salire@yahoo.com for information and tickets.

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Saturday, June 13 – Land of the Sky Chorus presents “Harmony, By Two and More” at 7 p.m.

The 39 Steps - Opens June 19. Directed by Julie Kinter.

Friday, June 12 from 8 - 11 p.m., playing keyboard with Los Lobos Latinos Latin band, featuring vocalist Liley Arauz. Olive or Twist, 81 Broadway Street, Asheville. (828) 254-0555.

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Nunsense – May 22 - June 12. Directed by Suzanne Tinsley.

Richard Shulman Performances

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Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Call for Artists

Call Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 or email rick@rapidrivermagazine.com.

10th Annual Come to Leicester Art Tour to be held in August. We are looking for new artists to join the tour. For more information write to cometoleicesterstudiotour@gmail.com.

Art Classes

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

Classes in painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 35


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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps Addison Farms Vineyard www.addisonfarms.net Al Junek (828) 890-5777 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com All Nations Trading www.SpiritFeather.com Amber Combs Photography (940) 783-2027 Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Percussion Festival www.ashevillepercussionfestival.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610 Barbara Wade 140d Roberts Street BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Heart & Soul www.thesingingtelegram.com High Country Style www.shopatstyle.com Ichiban (828) 252-7885 Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

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One Center Yoga Classes

One Center Yoga is now offering late evening and early morning classes. Inspired by the high standards and long-time experience of Cindy Dollar, our teachers are dedicated to helping each student learn and practice yoga in a safe, intelligent, mindful, and compassionate manner. They demonstrate the postures, explain the benefits, and often customize the poses to meet the individual needs of students. Pranayama, All Levels – Mondays, 8-9:30 a.m. Alignment, Intro, Level I – Mondays, 5:30-7 p.m.

Kornerstone Kafe (828) 550-2265

Alignment-based Vinyasa, All Levels – Tuesdays, 7:15-8:30 p.m.

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Purna Yoga, Level II – Thursdays, 5:30-7 p.m.

Massie Furniture Co. (828) 456-3311

Gentle Movement Yoga, All Levels – Thursdays, 5:30-6:45 p.m.

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Anatomy Focus, All Levels – Thursdays, 7:15-8:30 p.m.

Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany

Modesto Trattoria (828) 225-4133 O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

Champa www.champanc.com

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Ron Maffett (828) 450-2177

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

Seven Sisters Gallery sevensistersgallery.com

Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com

Smoky Mountain Foot Clinic, PA www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com

Stephanie Grimes www.artist-f.com

French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Tom Roberts (336) 577-5711

Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net

Trail & Palette www.trailpalette.com

The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

HART Theater, www.harttheatre.com Haywood County Arts Council www.haywoodarts.org

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

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artful living

Kirk’s Collectibles (770) 757-6814

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine

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Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com

BT’s Burgerjoint www.btsburgerjoint.com

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

Alignment, All Levels, by donation – Saturdays, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

that, as Orientalist philosopher Alan Watts expressed it, “We are the Universe looking into itself from billions of points of view.” We are apertures of consciousness into points in space and time, into the world of form – if you will, of the mind of God. When we mistake that consciousness as our own individual separate self, we are in a self-absorbed conceit that shrinks and limits the Universe down to me and my likes and dislikes. We live inside our thoughts, and thought can be anything. Great and wonderful thoughts have inspired us, and likewise, human history has shown how insane, unbalanced and destructive human thought can be. Often it seems there is no balance in our lives, for we have cut ourselves off from the perfect harmony and balance of the Universe, of Nature. The consequence, or karma, if you will, is imbalance, confusion and suffering. This moment – what is it? It is this right in front of us and it is our outer purpose of shaping this world in the manner we will it. It is also the vastness of an intelligent and harmonious Universe generating the human species in its evolution of consciousness manifested. Our great purpose is to realize the vast harmony that is our source and inner purpose, and let it guide our outer purpose so that our individual and collective human lives manifest the same balance and harmony as does all of Nature.

IF One Center Yoga,120 Coxe Avenue, Suite 3B, in YOU GO downtown Asheville. For more information please call

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations, at (828)258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com.

(828) 225-1904 or visit www.onecenteryoga.com.

MERRIMON AVE.

NORTH ASHEVILLE NF

Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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WNC OVERVIEW BILTMORE VILLAGE

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Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com

‘Living in Balance ’ cont’d from pg. 33

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Zapow www.zapow.com

36 June 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 10

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071


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Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

9th Annual Art in Bloom

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Ticket holders can’t decide which part of Art in Bloom they like the best. Is it the incredible floral arrangements? Is it the Gala Party with delicious dinner and VIP vibe? Is it the cottage garden tour? Or is it the opportunity to do everything associated with the event while spending three days immersed in flowers and art? The fundraising event takes place on June 18, 19 & 20 and includes a Gala Interpretation of Karen Paquette’s Preview Party with The Budding Earth by floral designer Laura Felt. Photo: Ray Mata catered buffet dinner, a gallery display of Ikebana and Western floral designs, a two-day Cottage Garden Tour, plein air painters in the gardens followed by a display of their works, and a reading by Honorary Chair NC Poet Laureate and fellow flower lover Fred Chappell. The Black Mountain Center for the Arts selects artwork from regional galleries specifically for Art in Bloom. These works are on display in the gallery until June 20. The Upper Gallery is open and free to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Floral designers, some of whom are professional florists, are matched with one of the works of art. On June 18 the floral designers create arrangements that capture what they see as the essence of the artwork they are interpreting. These arrangements are spectacular, creative, sculptural works that challenge the viewer to see the correlation between the art work and the floral designs, some feel literal, some abstract, some almost spiritual or deeply personal; all are beautiful. View the gallery filled with floral designs for only $5 on Friday and Saturday. If you buy a ticket for the Garden Tour, entrance to the gallery is free.

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Black Mountain Events

June thru October – 3rd Annual Public Art Rocker Crawl – More than forty rockers displaying local works of art for your rocking pleasure. Come Rock & Shop in Black Mountain! “Rocker Riddle Crawl” and “Fan Favorite” activities. For more details visit www.thelittletownthatrocks.com

Breakfast

Saturday & Sunday, June 6 & 7 – 18th Annual Black Mountain Arts & Crafts Show. The Old Depot Association. Visit www.olddepot.org for details.

601 W. State Street

Thursdays, June 25 to August 13 – Park Rhythms. Black Mountain Recreation & Parks. Details at www.blackmountainrec.com

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

$40. Two-day Cottage Garden Tour, June 19 & 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $20. Reading by Fred Chappell, Saturday, June 20 at 3 p.m.; by donation. The Arts Center is located at 225 W. State Street. For more information call (828) 669-0930 or visit BlackMountainArts.org

in Black Mountain

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Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

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craft gallery 117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5 MB

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107

FAISON O’NEIL Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

Rock & Shop in Black Mountain! 3rd Annual Public Art Rocker Crawl

June thru October. Over forty rockers displaying local works of art. “Rocker Riddle Crawl” and “Fan Favorite” activities. www.thelittletownthatrocks.com

18th Annual Black Mountain Arts & Crafts Show June 6 & 7. Old Depot Association. www.olddepot.org

9th Annual Art in Bloom – June 19 & 20. IF YOU Art in Bloom, June 18, 19 & 20. Gala GO Preview Party, Thursday, June 18 at 6 p.m.

in the Mountains

Black Mountain Center for the Arts. www.blackmountainarts.org

Night in the Mountains by Linda Johnson

128 Cherry Street

Park Rhythms – Thursdays, June 25 to August 13.

Black Mountain, NC

Black Mountain Recreation & Parks. www.blackmountainrec.com

info@faisononeilgallery.com Winter Hours: Wed-Sat. 11-4; Closed Sun-Tues 828.357.5350

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com (800) 669-2301 Presented by the Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

Queen’s Guard by Dan Reiser

www.faisononeil.com

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noteworthy ‘YA at Malaprop’s’ cont’d from page 29

Tonya Kuper shares her debut novel, Anomaly. Kirkus says, “Kuper’s sleek prose – saturated with pop-culture references – invites both nerds and the uninitiated into the world of the Oculi.”

Joanne O’Sullivan Presentation & Signing

pg. 36

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Saturday, June 27 at 3 p.m. Local writer Joanne O’Sullivan is the author of several books for kids and adults. Her latest is Migration Nation: Animals on the Go from Coast to Coast from the National Wildlife Federation. Recommended for grades 4 to 8, the book discusses the migratory trips made by creatures of land, sea, and sky from whales to antelopes to monarch butterflies. O’Sullivan is also the author of A Dog Walks into a Bar...: Howlingly Funny Canine Comedy. IF YOU Held at Malaprop’s Bookstore & GO Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville.

(828) 254-6734, malaprops.com.

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Asheville Area Arts Council

Design and Marketing Symposium

On Friday, June 19, at A-B Tech’s Enka campus, the AAAC presents its first Design and Marketing Symposium, featuring local Boomer professionals in digital meSassman dia and online marketing. Topics will cover image manipulation, using digital media, branding, reaching target market powerfully, marketing online, creating marketing materials with digital media, and the overall benefits of technology, Jenny Fares cloud tools, and the internet for your arts based business. Attendees will have the opportunity to choose three of the four classes being offered: Technology & Your Business, with Boomer Sassman of Big Boom Design Brand Yourself & Establish Target Markets, with Jodi Rhoden of Birds Eye Business Planning and Consulting Graphic Digital Media & Branding to Grow Your Business, with Jenny Fares of Sound Mind Creative

‘Al Junek’ cont’d from page 21

with pastel and pencil as well. For the month of June I will be the featured artist at the Asheville Gallery of Art. On display will be some pencil drawings, my atmospheric landscapes with watercolor and pastel on paper along with some experimental watercolors on birch panel and canvas. The show is titled “Recent Works.” I try to share the beauty of a particular place or moment in a way that will transport viewers to that spot so they can experience much the same sights or feelings that moved me to stop and take it in. The public is invited to the opening reception on Friday, June 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. where you can see my work as well as the works of the other 27 gallery artists. Asheville Gallery of Art is located at 16 College Street, across from Pritchard Park in downtown Asheville. In July I will have an exhibit at Carolina Village in Hendersonville. That will be followed by participation in the free, self-guided Open Studio Tour of Henderson County, September 19 and 20 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. where my home studio can be visited for demonstration and viewing.

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IF YOU Recent Works by Al Junek on display GO June 1-30, 2015. Opening reception,

Friday, June 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Social Digital Media, with Kimberly Daggerhart of JB Media Group

Kimberly Daggerhart

Admission is $15; includes lunch; $10 students. For more information email johanna@ashevillearts.com or visit ashevillearts.com/aaac/design-andmarketing-symposium/

Artist Business Brainstorm Sessions

Artist Business Brainstorm (ABB) Sessions are FREE one-on-one brainstorming opportunities Jodi Rhoden where a skilled professional meets for 30 minutes with artist entrepreneurs who are seeking advice and professional skills needed to grow their business. To view the entire ABB Sessions schedule visit ashevillearts.com/artists-curriculum IF YOU Asheville Area Arts Council, 1 Page GO Ave., downtown Asheville. Monday-

Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call (828) 258-0710, and visit www.ashevillearts.com

Al Junek A native of Texas, Junek began painting in 1989 after formal training at the Baton Rouge Fine Arts Academy. He has continued his studies in workshops taught by nationally known artists. His works hang in numerous private and corporate collections as well as in museums. Junek resides in Hendersonville, having moved to the area in 2000 after retiring from a career in engineering. The artist is fascinated by light and its resulting values, which are captured in many of his works. Junek attributes his affinity for painting atmospheric effects to having lived in coastal areas over the years and now living in the Blue Ridge.

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street, downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. Hours: Mon-Sat 10-5:30; Sun 1-4 (828) 251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com


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noteworthy

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing

3rd Annual Franny’s Farm Fest

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Popular music festival returns BY FRANCES TACY to celebrate local talent, food, beer, recreation, and independent businesses. Franny’s Farm Fest is a family friendly music festival featuring top regional bands, local food and drink, an array of outdoor recreational outfitters and other local vendors. In the spirit of supporting sustainable farming, local businesses, and conservation, Franny’s Farm Fest will donate a percentage of proceeds to Food Connection, a group helping stop food waste and ease hunger in our community and WildSouth, who helps protect our natural resources. Featuring music by Soul Funk Revival, Red Honey, Leigh Glass, David Earle and the Plowshares, The Bread & Butter Band, and The Buchanan Boys. This year brings a focus to local outdoor recreation and participants include ENO (Eagle Nest Outfitters), Zen Tubing, Second Gear, Curtis Wright Outfitters, Asheville Outdoor Center, and others. Camping is available and encouraged. Sunday morning the festival will have a fun ending with an open mic and breakfast served up by local favorite food truck, Farm to Fender. This is a family and youth friendly festival and all are invited to attend and camp!

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Come for the live music and camp overnight. IF YOU Franny’s Farm Fest, Saturday, June 6, noon till. Music and GO festivities all day Saturday! Camping available! Franny’s

Farm Fest is sponsored by Local Flavor AVL and New Mountain AVL to benefit Food Connection and WildSouth. Tickets: Day Pass $20; Camping $10; Children under 12 Free; $25 day of. Purchase tickets at www.newmountainavl.com. Franny’s Farm, 38 Came Sharp Rd, Leicester NC 28748. Located 20 minutes from downtown Asheville. Leicester Hwy 10 miles, left on South Turkey Creek one mile, turn right onto event location. Look for the signs along the way.

Hard Times Benefit Concert in Yancey County

A broad array of local musicians will be performing at the Parkway Playhouse in Burnsville on Tuesday, June 16 from 7-9 p.m.

All proceeds from the concert will benefit Reconciliation House to support their mission of providing emergency and other assistance to neighbors in need in Yancey County. The theme of the concert is Hard Times, High Hopes, and Helping Hands: Celebrating the Everyday Working People of the Mountains. The concert will feature traditional, regional, folk, and popular genres and styles with various combinations of guitar, mandolin, banjo, harmonica, fiddle, bass, flute, and percussion accompaniment. The roster of performers includes Bob Byrd, Buz Cody, Ash Devine, John Ford, Dean Gates, Yves Giraud, Ron Greene, Elijah Gullak, Linda Jarvis, Open jam in Micaville on Saturday mornings. Deb Louis, Pete & Kim McWhirter, Smokey Joe Peoples, Ron & Minnie Powell, Susan Scoggins, Greg & Lucretia Speas, Cory Steinmetz, Kare Strong, David Wiseman, and Eric Witherspoon. The Micaville Jam is the hub of this concert’s musician network. The jam is open to the public – come play or listen, while enjoying a cup of tea or coffee and a sinful sweet from Maples, next door! Every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the OOAK Gallery, on the Micaville Loop, where Rt. 80S meets Rt. 19E.

Your Jersey and Shadowbox Custom Framing Experts

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DR. DEBORAH LOUIS

IF YOU Hard Times, High Hopes, and Helping Hands, Tuesday, GO June 16 from 7-9 p.m. Tickets are $10, general admission,

and are available at: Parkway Playhouse Box Office, 202 Green Mountain Drive in Burnsville. Thurs-Sat 1-5 p.m. Credit card purchases can be made by calling (828) 682-4285; OOAK Gallery in Micaville, open seven days a week, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Send $10 to drlouis@northmountains.org via paypal.com. Include mailing address or ask to hold for pickup on concert night. If not sold out, tickets will be available at the door.

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

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Reflexology ~ Reiki ~ Reiki Drumming Bowen Training Instructor ~ Reiki Master / Teacher

One Hour Session: $40 FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

Health & Healing are Just 2 Feet Away

Linda Neff, NCBTMB #582633-09 pg. 36

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68 Sugar Grove Ct., Clyde, NC 28721 513-675-2819 • 828-565-0061 Vol. 18, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2015 39


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June 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
June 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Owl by Mary Dashiell, Southern Highland Craft Guild..p10; Inside: Asheville Percussion Festival..p4; Nunsense at HART..p6; The...

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