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HaRt sings hits by neil Sedaka in Breaking Up is Hard to do PG 4 andrew Charles gallery presents the art of Sandee Johnson PG 10 art after dark in Waynesville PG

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Celebrate the art

of Craft with the Southern Highland Craft Guild

River arts district Studio Stroll PGS 20-21 Jonas gerard Live painting performances PG 20

RAD Artist Cheryl Keefer explores Asheville through Art

PG

PG

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Belle • Godzilla • Million Dollar Arm • Only Lovers Left Alive • The Railway Man

PGS

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July 17-20 Over 200 Juried Artists Craft Demonstrations Live Regional Music

Becky and Steve LLoyd

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm

Silver with 18k gold in bright, matte and ruthenium textures

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

www.jewelsthatdance.com

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2 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO


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C o t t o n M i l l S t u D i o S F e at u R e D a Rt i S t

Nancy Hilliard Joyce

B “Through the Rain”

Best known as a contemporary mixedmedia artist who works with nostalgic subject matters, Nancy Joyce’s paintings are intricate in form and filled with layers of color, perspective, gestures and expression. Her paintings are most often created with a range of matte acrylic hues, various handmade papers and finished with touches of oil colors.

She will sometimes sand or wipe down layers to reveal under-layers and build up other sections creating texture and depth; a process that may go on for weeks or end in one day. Often times, Nancy will incorporate the wheel image throughout her work. From her perspective, the cyclical nature of the wheel represents the continuous flow of things in life.

You can see more of Nancy’s work by visiting Studio E on the 2nd floor of the Cotton Mill Studios, or visit her web site at www.NancyJoyceGallery.com “Black Birds”

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

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Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 3


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performance

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HART’s Professional Cast Shines in Two Musicals Packed With Hits

Breaking Up is Hard to do, Featuring the music of neil Sedaka, and Rogers and Hammerstein’s a grand night For Singing.

16,” “The Diary,” “Stupid Cupid,” “Betty Grable,” “Oh,” “Carol,” “Calendar Girl,” “Next Door to an Angel,” “Solitaire,” “Laughter in the Rain,” “My Friend,” “Stairway to Heaven,” “Little Angel,” and “Love Will Keep Us Together.” HART’s next two shows The show is being are sure fire crowd pleasers. directed by Mark Jones and Coming first: Breaking Up is the all-professional cast Hard to Do, a musical comedy includes Kier Klepzig, Leslie set in the Catskills at Esther’s Lang, Clara Burrus, Dominic Paradise Resort on Labor Day Leslie Lang and Kier Klepzig Aquilino, Emily Warren and weekend in 1960. in Breaking Up Is Hard To Do. Brad Mercier. Brad is one of Marge and her best friend our Guest Artists this summer, and you will Lois arrive on a vacation that was intended to see him in this show, Grand Night for Singbe Marge’s honeymoon – until the groom left ing, and Hello Dolly. He was last seen here in her at the altar. They of course get swept up Ave. Q. Emily Warren has performed on our in the atmosphere and Lois begins matchmakstage many times, most recently in Brigadoon, ing with the clubs lead singer, the ambitious but also in the title role in Jane Eyre. Clara Del Demonico. and Dominic appeared last summer in Ring Eighteen Neil Sedaka hits make up of Fire and prior to that in Light in the Piazza. the score of this romp. The songs include: Kier and Leslie are making their first appear“Breaking Up is Hard to Do,” “Lonely Night,” ance on our stage. “Where the Boys Are,” “Happy Birthday Sweet

Neil Sedaka has had a phenomenal career. He began as a songwriter in the 1950’s creating a series of hits for Connie Frances and continued to ride a wave of success until the British invasion in 1964 with The Beatles. He virtually disappeared for Leslie Lang, Clara Burrus, Dominic Aquilino, and Kier Klepzig sing almost a decade, but one of Neil Sedaka’s hits in Breaking Up Is Hard To Do. in 1973, having been dropped by his label, In June, you get another series of favorites RCA, he met Elton John at a party and John with Rogers and Hammersteins A Grand suggested he sign with his Rocket Records. SeNight for Singing. This Tony nominated show daka roared back with “Laughter in the Rain,” features familiar songs with new arrangements. which went to number one on the charts. It was conceived by Tony winner Walter From that point on he has never not Bobbie, who decided to take the songs out of been busy. He wrote for The Carpenters, The context and reinvent new situations to show Monkees, The Captain and Tennille, Sinatra, how timeless and versatile the works of Rogers Natalie Cole, and more hits for himself. He and Hammerstein are. continues to tour and perform in concert continuing his fifty-five year career in the business. continued on page 31

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Elephant in My Closet

this month, nC Stage is hosting another performance to add to their recent string of witty comedies.

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4 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

The double-entendre title, Elephant in My Closet, describes an awkward situation, a coming out story between father and son, but not in the pride parade kind of way. Rather, a predicament wherein a young man confesses, to his conservative father, his affiliation as a democrat. The autobiographical one-manshow, written and performed by the comedic actor David Lee Nelson, chronicles his journey and his transmutation, from a 22 year old conservative actor to a 35 year old liberal comedian with hilarious irony. If a solo show sounds daunting, or even dull, than know that Nelson is no stranger to braving the stage alone as this is his third monologued production. Elephant in My Closet arrives in Asheville after a sold out run in the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC, and a critically acclaimed tour through New York City; Dallas, TX; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Washington, DC. Now the New York City based duo, David Lee Nelson and Adam Knight, will bring their show to NC Stage. Having co-created several plays with Adam Knight, who is the current director as well as an experienced playwright from New York City, Nelson has refined his style and found his stride. How do the two long time friends describe their process? According to Nelson, “I write about my life, try to make it funny and interesting. Then I bring it to

BY

pARKER DAVIS

Adam, and he makes it a play.” Packed with political satire, clever epithets, and big laughs, the performance’s monologue feels a lot like stand-up comedy, yet, it’s grounded and guided by a narrative backbone with a deeper message to convey. While focusing on the history of the Republican Party and his own political past, Nelson’s story is rooted in the complex dynamic of the father and son relationship, and in the importance of coexisting with conflicting opinions. Most of the play is performed from behind a desk, strewn with papers and pencils like that of a political pundit; and from there, Nelson delivers the laughs with alacrity and ease, including such introductory quips as: “I was raised in Greenville, South Carolina... which is like the San Francisco of the right.” If you’re looking for a refreshing, earnest, true-to-life memoir about the chaotic reality of human relationships and politics, about switching sides and staying friends, then Elephant in My Closet is sure to please, and doubly sure to get you laughing. iF YOU Performances of “Elephant in My gO Closet” take place June 25 to 28.

North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in Asheville. For tickets and show times call (828) 239-0263 or visit www.ncstage.org.


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we love this place Susan Reinhardt Wins international publisher’s award

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Ten

JUNE 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Natalie Bogwalker, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Parker Davis, Amy Downs, Micki Cabaniss Eutsler, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Connie Hogan, Brandon Hunter, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Ken Krahl, Eddie LeShure, Marcianne Miller, Lindsey Mudge, April Nance, T. Oder and R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Bruce Sales, Chris Stack, Greg Vineyard, Anita Walling, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Advertising Sales Manager Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, June 2014, Vol. 17 No. 10

4 Performance

HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NC Stage – Elephant in My Closet . 4

6 Music

Tim Arem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Pavel Wlosok . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ASO’s MusicWorks! Program . . . . . 7 Beppe Gambetta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

6 Columns

Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Business in a More Beautiful World. .8 James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . . 24 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 26 Books & Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 28 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living. . . . . . . . . 29

9 Fine Art

Southern Highland Craft Guild. . . . 9 Andrew Charles Gallery . . . . . . . . . 10 The Satellite Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Joyce Schlapkohl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Art Mob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 & 23 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

11 Local Favorites

Mine & Yours Consignments . . . . 11 Frog Level Brewing. . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

12 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan. . 12

16 Noteworthy

Feed Your Funnybone . . . . . . . . . . The State of Things . . . . . . . . . . . . 7th Annual Firefly Gathering . . . . . ACDT Celebrates 35 Years . . . . . .

33 What to Do Guide On the Cover: asheville Rain, painting by Cheryl Keefer. PAGE 21

Asheville publisher, Grateful Steps, is pleased to announce that Susan Reinhardt was awarded a bronze medal by the world’s largest international and regional book awards competition. Reinhardt, Asheville’s beloved journalist, won an Independent Publishers Book Award in the Southeast Fiction category. Her book, Chimes from a Cracked Southern Belle, demonstrates her skill as a writer and humorist. It achieves what would ordinarily be a literally impossible literary task, that of presenting a tragic heroine in a continuously amusing light while never forfeiting sensitivity to the Southern Susan Reinhardt Photo: Randy Whittington woman’s plight.

SpeCiaL SeCtiOnS Downtown Asheville . . . . . pgS 17-19 River Arts District. . . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . pgS 22-23 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 30-32

Conducted annually, the Independent Publishers Book Awards honor the year’s best independently published titles from around the world. The competition, launched in 1976, brings increased recognition to the deserving but often unsung titles published by independent authors and publishers. A celebration party was held in New York city at the end of May, where Reinhardt was presented with a medal and certificate. She will also be recognized in major trade publications including Publisher’s Weekly and Shelf Awareness. Chimes from a Cracked Southern Belle is published by Grateful Steps, an Asheville-based nonprofit, traditional, independent publisher located in downtown Asheville. Chimes from a Cracked Southern Belle can be purchased at Grateful Steps Bookshop, and at Malaprops. It may also be ordered online at www.gratefulsteps.org, www.amazon. com, and www.barnesandnoble.com. For more information about the book or its author, please visit www.susanreinhardt.com and follow her on Facebook at Susan Gambrell Reinhardt, or Susan Reinhardt Author. For more details please call Grateful Steps, (828) 277-0998.

Bibliophiles Speed dating

On Saturday, June 28 at 7 p.m. join bookseller Justin for a night of laidback speed dating with fellow local bibliophiles. Find love, friendship and some good book recommendations. Registration is required. $10 includes wine, snacks and a coupon for $5 off any purchase. 21+. Email justin@malaprops.com for more details and to register. Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com

We’re a Local & Responsible publisher Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

16 28 37 38

Classes & Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

33 35 35 35 35 35

iF YOU gO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WnC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 5


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sound experience BeHind tHe SCeneS WitH JaMeS CaSSaRa

Tim Arem

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A Man for All Seasons

this month i am delighted to chat with tim arem. If you attend any live performance, festival, or eclectic gathering of artists and supporters you’ve likely encountered him. Arem has his own background in the arts but has for several years been one of the quiet “movers and shakers” in our local scene. In addition to his many other endeavors Arem publishes the Asheville Flyer, a free monthly publication geared toward kids and the kids among us. It’s certainly a favorite among the youngsters I know.

James Cassara: How about detailing your experiences in the arts. Am I correct in thinking that you’ve a background in theatre?

tim arem: My formal educational background is in Elementary education. My Circus Theater, performance, and acting training started in the late 70s.

Response to my “Behind the Scenes” series, which showcases those enthusiastic individuals who might not directly create music but are no less critical in furthering the entertainment scene in our area, has been wonderfully positive. So much so that I intend to keep it going and make it as regular a feature in Rapid River Magazine as time and space allows. These passionate music lovers contribute greatly to the local landscape, and typically do so with slight expectancy of financial reward. It is a pleasure to be able to support their efforts!

ta: Asheville came on my radar screen 12

years ago while in San Diego working on a summer youth leadership camp with Tony Robbins. One of his instructors was from Asheville and mentioned this unique city to me and that I should check it out. I followed up on his suggestion. Asheville has been my main residence for the last 11 years.

JC: Talk a bit about the School’s Out Party! It seems a logical extension of your efforts with the Asheville Flyer. Was the Grey Eagle your choice from the start?

ta: My business partner on the Asheville Flyer

for Kids is Stu Helm (creator/editor of the paper). He and I decided early on that hosting quarterly all ages parties would be a fun way to increase our brand and give back to the commu-

JC: So how did you come about landing in Asheville?

nity. To date we have produced three parties. One of our awesome ad partners, Mike Rangel from Asheville Pizza, has opened up a new venue in the South Slope area by the name of The Mill Room. He loved the idea of a “Dance Your Diaper Off” party, so we launched the first party there. We were not able to get this venue for June, so we approached The Grey Eagle for the School’s Out Party! Jeff Wentworth, the owner, is awesome to work with too.

JC: I’ll second that. He’s one of the business owners in our town who really supports the music scene.

ta: Indeed. These parties have been fun to or-

chestrate on several levels. Firstly they provide an opportunity for touring family-friendly musicians to have a venue to perform at. For the

WnC Jazz profiles: Pavel Wlosok

p

~ Elise Pratt, vocalist and event-planner Havel, borders opened up and a lot of Western art started pouring into our country without any restrictions or censorship.” Between August 2000 and 2002, Pavel served as the Director of Jazz Studies at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri. Then Pavel became associate professor of jazz and commercial and electronic music at Western Carolina University, where, besides his teaching and administrative duties, he has helped to establish, organize and participate in the annual WCU Jazz Festival. “Pavel is an incredibly fluid and natural jazz musician, tackling the most difficult repertoire with seemingly effortless facility. Hearing and watching him improvise is like watching someone breathe air - he is totally in his element whenever he is creating music.”

~ Jason DeCristofaro, percussionist In 1999 Pavel won the prestigious Gil Evans Fellowship, given to just one recipient each year and covering both the field of composition and arranging. In April, 2006 he

6 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

JC: As someone who has taught elementary school art for 25 years I can understand!

ta: One of the biggest fears as adults is speaking

in public. Our parties provide an opportunity for young ones to be comfortable speaking on stage, in front of an audience. For those future entertainers, they can include a professional venue that they have performed at. With all the talent shows that exist, this could be a helpful thing. continued on page 7

BY

“pavel Wlosok is a Czechoslovakian jewel gleaming in the woods at Western Carolina University. His polished versatility and professionalism in playing/composing/teaching music and in creating his photography, as well as his incredible life journey and outstanding educational accomplishments, make him shine in many directions. it’s a treat to hear him in solo concert or to make music happen in the moment with him, for he shares a process of preparation that always assures me that we’ll enjoy our performance time together!”

Czech pianist, composer, arranger, and educator Pavel Wlosok started playing piano when he was just five years old. He received his classical education in piano performance and composition at the Conservatory of Music in Ostrava, and he obtained his bachelor and master degrees in jazz studies at the University of North Texas. “I went in 1995 as an exchange student, originally just for one school year. I was 21 at the time and had just $1,500 in savings and one backpack with me!” While there, Pavel served as pianist-arranger for the One O’clock Lab Band and his work is included on four CDs produced by them. “Growing up, I listened to all kinds of music, including classical, folk, rock, pop – whatever was available behind the iron curtain. Jazz was not allowed much at all and I didn’t get into it until about 16. At that time, we students started the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, which took only six weeks to change the system from communism to democracy. After the election of our first democratic post-WWII president Vaclav

first three parties we featured local musicians. For our June 22 party, we are featuring Laura Doherty from Chicago, IL and Red Yarn from Portland, OR. Secondly these parties provide a safe, affordable, interactive, circus type party experience. As a side note, our most popular activity for these parties is the only open mic experience for children. You haven’t experienced a family party until you hear a 4 year old tell a joke in front of 250 attendees.

Pavel Wlosok Photo: Frank Zipperer

won the James Dooley Teaching Excellence Award, and since 2002 WCU Jazz and Combo Ensembles under his direction have performed for more than 2,500 high school students in North Carolina and surrounding states. “An invaluable musician, composer and teacher, Pavel Wlosok’s contribution to our local community and to students at WCU are incalculable. Pavel sets high standards and produces flawless recordings, inventive compositions and thoughtful solos. Devoted and passionate to sharing the art form, he’s also great fun to listen to and play with.”

~ Sharon LaMotte, vocalist and curator Pavel performs at many festivals and club venues in Europe each summer, among them Prague, Brno, Ostrava, Bratislava, Trnava, Banska Bystrica, Krakow and Berlin. He has performed and/or recorded with the likes of Bob Berg, Randy Brecker, Wycliffe Gordon, Tim Hagans, Ingrid Jensen, Victor

EDDIE LESHURE

Lewis, Dave Liebman, Joe Lovano, Jason Marsalis, Paquito D’Rivera, Rufus Reid, Gary, Bobby Watson, Kenny Wheeler and many other top artists. Pavel Wlosok’s contemporary compositions have been performed mainly in Europe and Japan. His newest jazz quartet release “Czechmate” features world-class saxophonist Joel Frahm, bassist and director of jazz studies at UNC-Greensboro Steve Haines, and drummer/composer Bill Campbell. Pavel’s album pending release this year features Grammy Award winning saxophonist Donny McCaslin, along with Mike Holstein on bass and Marian Sevcik on drums. “My writing and playing is directly related to expressing my own experiences as a husband, father of three, educator, and human being. However, I do like to listen to challenging music – one which makes me think and deepens my knowledge of these two art forms called jazz and contemporary classical as I still compose in both idioms today, although jazz is my primary focus.” www.pavelwlosok.com eddie LeShure produces “asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 7-10 p.m. on Main-FM (103.7/mainfm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.


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performances Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s MusicWorks! Program

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after receiving a $610,000 gift to fund an after-school program for underprivileged children in the asheville area, the aSO will commence the three-year musical program this fall. The MusicWorks! program is designed to teach life skills to school-aged children belonging to the underserved communities in the local area and was funded by a generous gift from the Leveer Foundation based in Waterbury, Connecticut.

The future of musical education looks promising.

Youth participants in MusicWorks! will have the opportunity to gain crucial skills and values including academic achievement, selfexpression, teamwork, personal responsibility, and engagement in their community. The program includes homework help, healthy snacks, and a broad approach to music through theory, movement, voice, and instruments. Focused on children with a limited financial situation, MusicWorks will be offered to the participants on a sliding fee scale, catering to the particular

‘Tim Arem’ cont’d from page 6

JC: Last year you organized a Father’s Day

event which seemed to go over well. Does this evening supplant it, or were you just looking to explore differing directions?

ta: Over the last 30 years I have been fortu-

nate to be able to do what I love. Along my life’s journey I have picked up years of experience that I have been sharing with families. I am always open to creating new opportunities for families that may not have existed before. The Asheville Flyer for Kids and Radio Active Kids are two examples. The projects I launched for the Asheville family market, the Asheville International Children’s Film Festival (four years) and the AVL Father’s Fest (two years) were stand-alone festivals. Both assets were sold last year so that I could devote more energy to my newest project, DJ T-Bone’s Music Mash-Up, a family music web series that takes place partly in Asheville.

JC: What are the logistics in organizing an

event such as this? I doubt many of us have a deep understanding of how much work is

BY

pARKER DAVIS

need of each individual family. The program will be held at Hall Fletcher Elementary and, before making the decision, the site selection committee considered an array of variables including test scores, free and reduced lunch percentages, facilities, and school and parent leadership. Also, the ASO has hired a full-time program director who will lead the initiative. The design and formula of MusicWorks! has been patterned after a successful program, named El Sistema, in Venezuela which was founded 38 years ago. More than 500,000 of Venezuela’s most vulnerable children are now learning in El Sistema, and due to its runaway success, it has encouraged the establishment of similar initiatives here in the United States, MusicWorks! being one of 40 El-Sistema inspired programs. With the new program director hired, everything is coming together smoothly for ASO, and, thanks to this generous effort, the future of musical education looks promising for the fortunate children who will participate in MusicWorks! For more information, please visit www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046.

SWannanOa CHaMBeR MUSiC FeStivaL

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the Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, one of the longest running chamber music festivals in the United States, presents its 45th season to the listeners of Western north Carolina. The five week festival will perform concerts in Swannanoa in Kittredge Theater on the Warren Wilson College campus Enso Quartet on July 1, 8, 15, Photo: Richie Hawley 22, and 29 and in Waynesville at the Waynesville Performing Arts Center on June 29, July 6, 13, 20, and 27. All concerts begin at 7:30. Ticket prices are $21.40 for individual tickets and $80.25 for a series ticket. The festival features a variety of chamber music that should appeal to all tastes including works from the great classics to some rarely performed gems and even some world premiers. Musicians returning to the festival include the Enso Quartet, the Jasper Quartet, Inessa Zaretsky and Paul Nitsch on piano, flutist George Pope, oboist Cynthia Watson, clarinetist David Bell, bassoonist Lynn Hileman, and hornist Bill Hoyt. They will be joined by guest soprano Felicia Moore and bassist Philip Alejo.

If you would like to contact us in Swannanoa, phone (828) 771-3050 or e-mail chamber@warren-wilson.edu. In Waynesville call (828) 452-0593.

involved in putting everything together. Is this pretty much a one man show or are you working with others?

ta: Fortunately, I’ve been putting on these types of parties/events since the 80s so I’ve learned along the way. Basically volunteers make the party happen. Without them, events would be a one man show. My role is just to oversee the process and to step in where I’m needed. If the volunteers are having a great time, the parties flow smoothly and the attendees enjoy themselves, while having no idea the amount of planning that goes on behind the scenes. JC: What makes Tim Arem tick? No one

gets wealthy doing these sorts of things, but you obviously have a passion for the arts that supersedes all the other concerns.

ta: This is an interesting question. We lost

my dad last year at the age of 97 and since his passing I’ve had increasing thoughts on what I’d like my legacy to be. My feeling is that we all have a reason for being on this planet. The

iF YOU For more information, please visit gO www.swannanoachambermusic.com.

time we are here is relatively short. I made a choice early on that I would devote my life to working with kids and families. I figured out a way to combine the arts with education, information and entertainment. I hope my legacy is that I’ve touched families in a positive way through the many things I’ve been able to be part of. Being able to give back to society has been a big part of my life.

JC: Well said Tim. That’s why so many of us think of you as “One of the good guys.” Any final thoughts you’d like to share?

ta: Thanks for providing me with this

platform to share my views. I’ve been a firm believer that if you follow your passion in life, the financial and social rewards will follow.

JC: That seems like a good way to wrap this up. iF YOU School’s Out! All ages party at The gO Grey Eagle on Sunday, June 22.

Tickets are $10 for age 16 or over, kids under 16 are absolutely free. For more information visit the Asheville Flyer for Kids Facebook page.

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 7


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artful living Not All Resources Are Tangible

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It’s the subtle, ethereal concepts that help me feel ultra-connected to living.

BUt eveRYtHing iS USeFUL & iMpORtant

“When the most important things in our life happen we quite often do not know, at the moment, what is going on.” – C.S. Lewis, “Mere Christianity”

The older I get (You know that new dinosaur they just discovered? Yeah, I knew him…), the more aware I am of how much I relate to this partial quotation by the author of The Screwtape Letters and The Chronicles of Narnia, amongst many other familiar titles. A huge portion of our learnings are both on-thejob, as well as in hindsight. We gain quite a good bit of knowledge and experience from the daily efforts we put into things, even when we sometimes don’t necessarily see those benefits happening at the time. Lewis’s expanded point was that we grow up and realize we grew up. I think any given day, oft thought of as pedestrian or routine, really is another day’s progression toward

Art in Bloom the Black Mountain Center for the arts 8th annual art in Bloom takes place June 12, 13, 14. The threeday flowercentric event includes: a Gala Preview Party ($40, June 12 at 6 p.m.) with seated catered dinner, a gallery display of 22 Ikebana and Western floral designer’s interpretations of regional art work on loan from a dozen galleries, and, a two-day Cottage Garden Tour ($20, June 13 & 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Plein air painters will be creating fine art in the gardens, a display of their works can be seen June 16-18 at the Arts Center. Those who may not want to tour the gardens or attend the Gala party but are interested in the floral design interpretations in the gallery may purchase access for $5. The exhibit will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, June 13 and Saturday, June 14.

iF YOU gO: The Arts Center is located at 225 W. State Street. For more information call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org

alarm reminds me of both the luxuriousness BY gREg VINEYARD and fleeting preciousness of time. Intangible Number our future selves. Two: ENERGY. There’s Every day is actually physical energy, which I full of potential. It’s not nurture by eating, sleepabout winning the lottery ing and exercising apor crafting schemes; it’s propriately. Then there’s about another chance to the shared electricity tamp down the fears, get that comes from caring, out of bed, take care of sharing, listening and the cat, sweep the kitchassisting. It’s counter-inen, go to that meeting, Good Thoughts, 2014, tuitive, in that expendpastel by Greg Vineyard make that phone call, put ing physical energy (and forth one’s best efforts some time) actually generates mental energy. on the job, learn something, do something for Intangible Number Three: MEMORY. someone else. It’s about being a nice person Like singing, memory used as a resource for and spreading some joy. And on and on, with renewal increases my brain activity and mood. every little decision throughout the hours. As I often pick memories of my friend Ginny. In an artist, every day is also a chance to work on our several decades as friends, a huge percentmy creations, even when I think I don’t have age of our interactions and conversations have any ideas in my head. And experience shows included laughter. It’s like Beaches, only funny me that if the materials are in front of me, all the time. And it’s transformative. inspiration will come, and I WILL draw! Intangible Number Four: FEELINGS. Several examples of intangibles in my life Hey, no eye-rolls! I acknowledge my feelings come to mind. I’m sure there are many more, as being what they are, and I filter through but here’s a few: them as if I am panning for gold with a wideIntangible Number One: TIME. A humesh screen, letting the small, annoying grains man-made system that some could consider fall through, saving the bigger, happier nuggets restrictive, is a gift. All I have to do is get up in in my mental net. the morning. If I’d like more of this gift, I get Don’t get me wrong, I’m not opposed to up earlier. Hitting the Snooze function on my

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Things. Like money, resulting from someone purchasing my art or services. Or art supplies bought with that money so that I can keep drawing. Or that Star Trek: Into Darkness DVD so that I have another favorite thing to watch over and over again while I sketch out the next idea. These concrete articles one can touch are a bridge to the things one can’t: for example, finances can assist us with the pursuit of ideas. However, it’s the subtle, ethereal concepts that help me feel ultra-connected to living, no matter what’s going on for me out in my physical, feet on the pavement life. Whether you are working in a creative sector or not (and I think every career path has innovative aspects to it), I hope this inspires you to consider what unquantifiables are part of your daily existence, and to embrace, share and develop them with your community of peers. Important stuff is indeed happening – all the time!

greg vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in asheville, nC. zapOW gallery in downtown asheville, (www.zapow.com), carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

Listening as a Tool for Collaboration

BUSineSS in a MORe BeaUtiFUL WORLd

Recently in this column, nick andrea wrote about the “cosmic significance of every moment we inhabit.” His poem “the Context” reminds us of our interconnectedness and the beautiful synchronicities that bring us together. When we feel that connection, often we want to do more together, perhaps go deeper into that connection. Together our aspirations, dreams and visions have a better chance of becoming reality. Great things happen when we work together. By collaborating we can also help each other push through fears. A valuable and essential tool for deepening our connection and stepping into a collaborative relationship, is listening. Listening to your “self.” Listening to others. Listening for the resonance of the whole.

8 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

When we truly listen to ourselves — both our higher and lower ego — we’re also listening to our heart. The thoughts, ideas and images that “pop in” just might benefit the collaboration. You have a unique set of experiences, knowledge and expertise. You also have a unique set of fears and needs that should be acknowledged. While they can be valuable to illuminate short comings in what is being created, if you don’t acknowledge them, they may be running your show and you won’t be aware of it. Your fears may create roadblocks to collaboration. If you listen to the voice of your fears you might find they are the origins of your blaming or judging others, or feeling you know the best or only way. A feeling that wants to be expressed could be an inspiration, if it feels like it’s motivated by love and not fear. For collaboration to work we also have to listen to others and welcome their point of view. They have ideas and gifts that

BY

ANITA WALLINg AND KATHLEEN COLBURN

can add to yours to make a more beautiful whole. If we can appreciate what each is bringing to the table then we have an entity that can only be created by our being together. When we see this, collaboration becomes exciting and rewarding. iF YOU “Business in a More Beautiful gO World,” a monthly networking &

education event for those interested in a collaborative, heart-centered, purposedriven model of doing business. Every 4th Thursday, 6:30-9 p.m. Next event is June 26 at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville. Free to the public. Find out more about the people behind this column and the live events that we host at: www.meetup.com/Business-ina-More-Beautiful-World


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fine art & crafts Celebrate the Art of Craft with the Southern Highland Craft Guild

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Celebrate the art of craft this summer as the Southern Highland Craft guild hosts two annual events. Clay Day takes place at the Folk Art Center in June, and the highly anticipated Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands will be held at the U.S. Cellular Center in July. Clay Day at the Blue Ridge Parkway’s Folk Art Center is on June 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and features craft demonstrations and hands-on activities for children and adults. Admission is free. Some activities like the “make and take raku firing” require a small materials fee. Glassblowing has been added to the event, so join us for a full and inspiring day of craft education. Since 1948 the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands has set the standard for fine craft shows across the country as juried artists gather in downtown Asheville to connect with collectors and educate visitors about their work. The summer edition this year will be held

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“Make and take” raku firing during Clay Day. Photo: Diana Gates Photography

July 17-20 at the U.S. Cellular Center. Nearly 200 craftspeople will be selling their works of clay, jewelry, wood, glass, fiber, paper, natural materials, and mixed media. New Guild members exhibiting this year include Kim Thompson (jewelry), Catherine Murphy (metal), Matt Kelleher (clay), Erin Janow (clay), Ursula Goebels-Ellis (clay), Robin Ford (fiber), Linda Azar (jewelry). Invited artists will be demonstrating craft techniques such as heritage lace The Southern Crescent Bluegrass band will and crochet, random weave perform during the Craft Fair. basket making, woodcarving,

ApRIL NANCE

Craft Fair demonstration by woodcarver Ronnie McMahan.

blacksmithing, and sunprinting on fabric. Beginning on Friday during the show regional old time and bluegrass musicians take the arena stage. This year’s lineup includes: Southern Crescent Bluegrass, Carol Rifkin, Split Rail, Buncombe Turnpike, and Moore Brothers. Admission to the Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands is $8. The hours are Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. iF YOU Call (828) 298-7928 or visit gO www.craftguild.org for more

information, including a complete list of exhibitors, craft demonstrations, and scheduled music.

Two-For One Opportunity for Local Artisans

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the historic town of dillsboro will offer local artisans a booth in each of their fall festivals for the price of one! On September 6, Dillsboro will showcase quilters, basket makers, blacksmithing, gourd art, paper making, carving & whittling, embroidery, soap making, candle making, beekeeping, metalwork, pottery throwing and so much more. Artists will be demonstrating and selling their art/craft to celebrate the founding of the town in 1889. Fine crafts will also be offered as part

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Karen Cioce from Champion Credit Union presents a check for $450 to David Marker, to benefit the cash prizes to be awarded at Colorfest.

CONNIE HOgAN

of the sixth annual Colorfest, scheduled for October 4. This festival offers cash prizes, sponsored by Champion Credit Union, for the participating vendors. One fee will cover entry into both festivals. For applications and more information, please call (828) 506-8331, go to www.visitdillsboro.org, stop by the Jackson Chamber of Commerce, or Dillsboro’s Town Hall. Food vendors can also find an application on the website.

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 9


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Reuse. Rebuy. Relove. Relive. Reshop. Resale. Change the way you think about shopping. Get budget-friendly prices on apparel, home decór, furniture and jewelry.

pg. 36

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Now taking Spring & Summer consignments

234 New Leicester Hwy. • 828.251.9231 • Mon - Fri 10–6 • Sat 10–5 mineandyoursconsignments.com

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fine art Proliferation: the Art of Sandee Johnson

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On diSpLaY at andReW CHaRLeS gaLLeRY

WnC’s “new art destination,” the andrew Charles gallery, presents the varied work of local artist Sandee Johnson in a one-woman show titled proliferation, on view from May 31 through July 16, 2014. After living in eight cities on five continents, Johnson decided to return to her Southern roots and “nest,” so she relocated to the Asheville area from Europe via Virginia (her home state) mid last decade. She has worked and traveled as an artist and photographer/journalist in over 80 countries, and her mixed-media figurative and abstract paintings — ranging from monochromatic to vividly colorful — have been shown in over 200 group and solo exhibitions worldwide during the past 35-plus years. From her local studio she continues to produce work that is shipped from here to exhibition venues in places are diverse as France, Bulgaria, Hungary, the Philippines and Australia. She is represented by a European firm that places her paintings in corporate venues in London, Rome, Paris, Luxembourg, Berlin and Amsterdam, making her, arguably, the most internationally viewed artist working in Western North Carolina. Johnson is also possibly the most prolific artist in Unknown Scripts, mixed media by Sandee Johnson the Asheville area

Work Ethic 51, mixed media by Sandee Johnson

— hence the name of her current ACG show, “Proliferation.” She is constantly (practically 24/7) creating scores of images in acrylic, collage/montage/assemblage, watercolor, encaustic, and pen & ink. Johnson often combines these mediums in inventive and unexpected ways, frequently producing images in multiple series of themed works. Currently, she is focusing on an extended series of largeformat monotypes utilizing her own color-and-content enhanced portrait photography of local models. iF YOU There will be a wine reception for the artist at the gO gallery on Saturday, May 31 from 5 to 9 p.m. The

Andrew Charles Gallery, 60 North Merrimon Avenue, Suite 105, Reynolds Village. Hours are 10-5, TuesdaySaturday, or by appointment: (828) 989-0111.

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Texture and Color

Local artist Mark Bettis opens exhibition at the 5 Walnut Wine Bar.

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Mark’s paintings are a synthesis of color, line, texture and form. He applies multiple layers of oil paint mixed with Abstract by Mark Bettis cold wax medium, then cuts, scratches and smooths to let the painting evolve into an abstract interpretation of these elements. He paints in his open studio/gallery on the second floor of the Wedge Studios in the River Arts District.

iF YOU gO: Opening reception Thursday, June 5 from 5-8 p.m. pg. 36

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Partial proceeds to benefit TAPAS program in Asheville Schools. On display June 5-30 at the Wine Bar, 5 Walnut Street, Asheville. (828) 253-2593.


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asheville shops inteRvieW WitH LORi daWSOn, OWneR OF

Mine & Yours Consignments

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about

INTERVIEWED BY

Mine & Yours Consignments.

DENNIS RAY

Lori dawson: If you’re looking for a

warm friendly atmosphere to shop for gently used second hand treasures, this is your kind of place. We offer a large assortment of current fashions for the entire family. Wonderful décor for the home including lamps, rugs, dishes and furniture. Something for every room.

Wonderful décor for your home. Photo: Kelsey Jensen

RRM: What are your most popular items this spring?

RRM: What has been

Ld: With spring comes the demand of flip

your secret for running a successful business now for 14 years?

flops, sandals, shorts, capri’s and swimwear. We accept outdoor furniture; that includes patio sets, lawn chairs and also children’s large outdoor toys.

RRM: How did Mine & Yours initially come about?

Ld: Having a friendly, Lisa Wilson (L), store manager, and Lori Dawson, owner of Mine & Yours. Photo: Kelsey Jensen

Ld: It started in 1999 when I decided that

I wanted to work for myself. I woke up in the middle of the night with the vision of opening a consignment shop. I’m very supportive of re-

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When you walk through the door, you’ll be greeted by friendly, committed staff. Photo: Kelsey Jensen

cycling and reusing clothing, household items, etc… More and more people are involved in this lifestyle. I think it plays an important part in the environment.

Ice Cream and Happy Folk

the Hop ice Cream on Merrimon is hosting the Wilhelm Brothers’ cello-infused folk rock music show. While the Asheville-area-based band is announcing details on their current recording project during the event, the evening is about the people listening. The Wilhelm Brothers’ aim is to touch people’s heart. “Our music has been called happy folk,” says the band’s main songwriter and lead vocalist Chris Wilhelm. And cellist Cristof Ensslin adds, “It’s wonderful to see how the smiles spread through the room,” whether caused by the music or the ice cream. There was chemistry and musical sparks flying when The Wilhelm Brothers’ Chris Wilhelm (guitar/lead vocals) and Cristof Ensslin (cello/vocal harmonies/tamburin) hit off their first note together at a recording session for the song Trail of the Lonesome Pine in early 2012. Since then, they have been sharing the same dream: to play for crowds of 10,000 and more. Their energy is focused on this vision, playing over 200 shows per year. Highlights on their journey so far are recording their debut EP Lay Your Burden Down with Lenny Kravitz-producer Henry Hirsch (other credits inlcude Mick Jagger, Lionel Richie, Madonna), opening for nationally and internationally known artists such as Takenobu, David LaMotte and The Westbound

committed staff that works together as a team is one of the most important factors in a successful business. We make an effort to talk to each person that comes through the door. Also, the quality of our consignments is a must. Having loyal customers and consignors has helped our business grow in strides.

Mine & Yours carries a large assortment of clothes in all sizes. Photo: Kelsey Jensen

Mine & Yours Consignments 234 new Leicester Hwy, asheville Business Hours: M-F 10-6 p.m.; Saturday 10-5 p.m. We take consignments M-F 10-4 p.m. (828) 251-9231 www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

Spruce Street Outdoor Market

Held every Saturday, July 5 - September 20 in downtown Asheville, next to the new park and stage. The Appalachian Craft Center, located at 10 N. Spruce Street, in partnership with the Updraft Gallery, host more than 50 local and regional artists every Saturday. Great vending opportunity for artists. More details at www.sprucestreetmarket.com

The Wilhelm Brothers

Rangers, and receiving radio airplay including getting their own Pandora Radio channel.

iF YOU The Wilhelm Brothers, Tuesday, gO June 3. Live music starts at 6.30

p.m. It’s a one-hour long familyfriendly show. Admission is free. The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, 640 Merrimon Ave, at the intersection of Merrimon and Edgewood. Call (828) 254-2224 for more details.

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - the previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHip KaUFMann is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MiCHeLLe Keenan is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest RevieWS, tHeateR inFO and MOvie SHOW tiMeS, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRent BROWn is a graphic designer and illustrator. view more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Belle ∑∑∑∑∑

Short Take: Virtually perfect historical drama on the life of Dido Elizabeth Belle, an 18th century woman of mixed race who was raised as an English aristocrat.

ReeL taKe: We are not even halfway

through 2014 and already I have 3 films that will currently go on my Ten Best list for the year. Of course that is subject to change but it’s hard to imagine easily finding 7 more films to

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

fill out the list much less remove any from my current list. For the record they are…1)The Grand Budapest Hotel, 2) Only Lovers Left Alive (see Michelle’s review this issue), and 3) Belle. When I first saw the trailers for Belle, I was wary. Yes it looked to be a sumptuously produced period piece about a little known historical figure but it also looked as if it could be potentially heavy handed (ala 12 Years A Slave) concerning its subject matter of racial inequality. I am happy to report that it was

tHe MOntHLY ReeL

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He’s ba-aaaaaack. Everyone’s favorite fire breathing, Tokyo snuffing, behemoth lizard made his 29th appearance in films. At press time America seemed to have a case of ‘zilla fever. The good Professor Kaufmann put together a special feature to mark the 60th anniversary of Godzilla’s first march through Tokyo. While entertaining, the latest Godzilla flick didn’t rank nearly as high as the rest of the movies we saw and reviewed this month — Chip was enamored with Belle and admired Railway Man. I, meanwhile, relished Jim Jarmusch’s latest film, Only Lovers Left Alive, and was pleasantly surprised by Million Dollar Arm. I also saw John Slattery’s (TV’s Mad Men) directional debut and for the life of me can’t figure out why it’s gotten such poor or indifferent reviews. Richard Jenkins and John Turturro are wonderful, and Philip Seymour Hoffman looks terribly unhealthy, but still turns in a fine performance. Unfortunately God’s Pocket will be long gone by the time this issue comes out, so we’ve not included it here, but I thought it was worthwhile. In truth, our only mainstream titles, Godzilla and Million Dollar Arm, may be the only ones still playing in local theatres by the time this issue comes out. We are fortunate to have both the Fine Arts Theatre and The Carolina Cinemas showing the arts and independent titles, but for many of the films, such as Only Lovers Left Alive and

Philip Seymour Hoffman and John Turturro in John Slattery’s God’s Pocket.

God’s Pocket, you’ll have to hurry to see them for they often play for just a week. Also supporting independent filmmaking this month (on a local level) is the Asheville Pizza and Brewing Company. They will once again host the 48-Hour film festival which comes to Asheville the weekend of June 20-22. Filmmakers from the Asheville area will compete to see who can make the best short film in only 48 hours. Yours truly will be one of the judges this year, and the premier screenings will be held June 24-26 at the Asheville Pizza and Brewing on Merrimon Avenue. All in all, 2014 is shaping up to be a banner year for quality films and we still are many months away from award season. Chip and I have given more 5-star ratings to films this year than in the past three years. I’m thinking being this spoiled is definitely going to skew the curve for the rest of the year. Bring it, Hollywood! Until next time, enjoy the show.

12 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

nothing of the As anyone who reads sort. Belle is a my reviews on a regular first rate historibasis knows, I rarely give cal drama that movies a 5 star rating. focuses first on My basic qualification for the character and that is a combination of then on any social two things. 1) I wouldn’t issues that have to change a thing about the be dealt with. movie and 2) does the Dido movie have mainstream Elizabeth Belle potential? Without that (1761-1804) was a the film cannot hope to be bi-racial woman, seen by enough people on raised as an a consistent basis to ultiEnglish aristocrat mately gain classic status. by her uncle who Belle easily meets both Gugu Mbatha-Raw shines as a bi-racial happened to be criteria and you should woman in 18th century England in the the Lord Chief seek it out and quickly for superb biographical drama Belle. Justice of England. “costume dramas” have The family considered her the equal of her their niche audience and don’t stick around cousin Elizabeth Murray but that was not the for long. case outside of the family estate. She eventuRated PG-13 for thematic elements and some ally married a Frenchman who worked in the language. local parish, had three sons, and was buried in REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN the Parish cemetery. Her last direct descendant died in 1975. Those are the known facts. Director Godzilla ∑∑∑1/2 Amma Asante, inspired by a painting of Dido Short Take: Expensive remake of the and her cousin Elizabeth (you can google it), original 1954 film attempts to return developed a screenplay around her life, added the series to its serious roots but is in certain historical occurrences, made certain overlong and doesn’t give the big guy changes (her future husband is not French but enough screen time. a vicar’s son concerned with social injustice) and wound up making a movie that has someReeL taKe: According to various sources, thing to say without that message getting in the this is the 28th Godzilla film (29 if you count way of the characters. the 1998 Roland Emmerich-Matthew BrodAiding the director immensely in this task erick effort which most fans don’t) and it is by are a series of wonderful performances headed far and away the most expensive having cost up by Brit TV actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw as $150 million. Even adjusting for inflation, Belle. Tom Wilkinson charms and intimidates that’s an outrageous budgetary increase and it as her uncle the Lord Chief Justice while is this added expense that keeps this version Emily Watson provides the backbone and the from being better than it is. Fortunately, it still conscience of the film as his wife. Matthew manages to be pretty good. Goode appears all too briefly as Belle’s father, The opening prologue, set in 1999, is rea commissioned Naval officer who is off to sea markable and gets the movie off to a fine start. and out of her life. A mysterious earthquake causes the complete This film is also beautiful to look at. The collapse of a Japanese nuclear plant (shades of cinematography is stunning, a real cut above the recent Fukishima disaster). This results in that seen in most period films with its vivid use the death of the mother (Juliette Binoche) of of color composition and employment of natuthe principal human character and the unhingral lighting. The costumes look like the real ing of his father (Ryan Cranston), an American deal and the performers seem quite comfortengineer working there. able in wearing them adding to the authenticity Move forward 15 years to the present. of what we are seeing and making it easy for us The father is arrested at a protest rally outside to be swept up in Belle’s story.

Movies continued on page 13


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film reviews Movies continued from page 12

the site of the former plant. With the aid of his son (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) who is now in the U.S. military, they secretly enter the quarantine zone only to discover that it contains no radiation whatsoever. We soon find out that there is a giant creature lying dormant under the ruins that feeds on radiation and this caused the plant to collapse. Meanwhile a Japanese anthropologist (Ken Wattanabe) named Dr. Serizawa (the name of the scientist in the original) knew of the creature’s existence and was hoping to keep it dormant so he could study it but now it’s time for it to wake up. The creature dubbed M.U.T.O. takes off for parts unknown and Serizawa wonders if Godzilla will reappear to restore the balance of nature (no reason is given for this). A second creature appears of the opposite sex and…you know the rest. Instead of Tokyo, first Honolulu and then San Francisco take the brunt of the creatures’ attacks with eggs being laid in the City by the Bay. Godzilla finally appears and, after various attempts to stop him fail, he receives a Navy escort and then battles both creatures. Much destruction ensues. Meanwhile Aaron TaylorJohnson goes after the eggs to avenge his father who died when the first creature escaped. The climactic battle is everything you would expect it to be and is rendered in state-of-the-art CGI which is actually quite impressive and not overdone. If you don’t know how it turns out then you’ve obviously never seen a Godzilla movie before. There a few new wrinkles added just to do something a little different, but in the end there are no real surprises.

Bryan Cranston and Aaron Taylor-Johnson see what they’re up against in the latest reboot of Godzilla.

What is surprising, however, is how lethargic the film is in places. After the brilliant opening, the movie bogs down in poorly paced exposition before the M.U.T.O. (an updated version of another classic Japanese monster, Rodan) appears and then we have to go through another slow stretch until Godzilla finally shows up one hour into the film. Long time fans of the big guy may find themselves a little disappointed but younger viewers used to CGI and familiar with Christophernolanitis (an overly serious approach to pop material) should be in their element.

With an opening weekend of close to $100 million, one can hear Godzilla’s sequel footsteps approaching. Rated PG-13 for sequences of destruction, mayhem and creature violence.

REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN

Million Dollar Arm ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Desperate to stay in business, a sports agent explores baseball’s final frontier - India.

Trap moment, it’s not overly saccharine. Playing Don Draper easily lends itself to infusing JB Bernstein as a man with definite room for improvement, and Hamm does a nice job. Alan Arkin and Aasif Mandvi are a delight as always. Lake Bell is a refreshing challenge for JB as his tenant and love interest, and Mittal, Sharma and Pitobash are charming as baseball’s newest transplants. Million Dollar Arm is just a good old fashioned feel good movie – no more, no less. Rated PG for mild language and suggest content.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Only Lovers Left Alive

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Short Take: Not your daughter’s ‘Team Edward’ vampire story, but rather a love story for the ages.

ReeL taKe: Only Lovers Left Alive

may be writer director Jim Jarmusch’s best work yet. It may also be one of the best vampire films to date as well as John Hamm and his hopefuls in Million Dollar Arm. one of the most unique. Jarmusch has been writing and directing unique films ReeL taKe: Made by Disney, based on a for thirty years. And while his work is always true story, and targeted for a main stream slightly offbeat, you can’t lump his films audience, many people are pre-disposed to imtogether stylistically, nor adequately describe mediately dislike and/or dismiss Million Dollar them (as exhibited by my feeble attempt here Arm. Truth be known, I was very pleasantly to review this film, and in my DVD pick of surprised. Million Dollar Arm is just plain the month, Jarmusch’s Dead Man). You don’t likeable. so much as watch his films as you let them John Hamm stars as JB Bernstein, a once envelop you. He fires on all cylinders – script, successful sports agent who’s on the verge of actors, photography, music, pacing – all worklosing his business. While channel surfing one ing together to create uniquely atmospheric night he catches a game of cricket and decides films that defy categorization. to go to India in search of the next great pitching sensation. He and his business partner (The Daily Show’s Aasif Mandvi) launch a nation-wide contest in search of a “million dollar arm.” JB’s rationale is that if you bring baseball to India, you bring 40 million new fans to baseball. Armed with nothing but a retired MLB talent scout (Alan Arkin) and a rag-tag crew who know little of baseball, JB sets out to stage a televised talent search and begins a journey that will change his life. After thousands of Tom Hiddleston and Tilda Swinton are lovers for young (and old) men try out, two boys the ages, and oh-so-civilized vampires emerge as pitching hopefuls, Dinesh in Only Lovers Left Alive. (Madhur Mittal) and Rinku (Suraj Sharma) and one young man, Amit Only Lovers Left Alive isn’t a vampire (Pitobash) turns out to be a great volunteer in movie about two lovers. It’s a movie about two the effort. Now JB (with Amit to translate), lovers who happen to be vampires. Taking it just has to teach them how to play baseball and a step further, it’s a movie about two people get them signed to major league teams in less whose love not only spans the centuries, but than ten months. whose observations about the world also span Once stateside, JB thinks his life will the ages. For all practical purposes Adam (Tom return to what it was – hot cars, hot models Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton) are a and lots of money. But when the boys have to wonderfully comfortable, old married couple. move in with the confirmed bachelor everyAt the film’s start Adam is a depressed thing changes. Adapting to a new country is musician living in Detroit (which, by the way, hard on the boys and adapting to the boys is makes an inspired backdrop for a couple of hard on JB. Because this is a Disney film and a vampires). Eve lives in Tangiers where she pals true story, we know that it all ends well. around with another immortal bloodsucker, Million Dollar Arm is entirely predictChristopher Marlowe. While the film never able, but with the exception of one Parent discusses whether Adam and Eve are the Adam

and Eve, Christopher Marlowe is the Christopher Marlowe and they do have fun at William Shakespeare’s illiterate ‘zombie’ expense. Zombies are what they call the humans. Given the state of the world, which is partly to blame for Adam’s great malaise, zombies is the appropriate term. Worried about Adam, Eve travels to Detroit. They enjoy a blissfully, languorous reunion until it is unceremoniously interrupted by Eve’s younger sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska). While Adam, Eve and Christopher are very civilized vampires, who prefer to drink their blood as we would a fine port or sherry, Ava is still a neck biting, blood sucking, party girl. Trouble is sure to follow and it does. Jarmusch’s script is absolutely delicious. Hiddleston, who is best known to American audiences as Loki in the Thor and Avenger movies, but is equally comfortable in a costume drama or doing a soft shoe a la Fred Astaire, is utterly transformed as Adam. Tilda Swinton is elegant and lovely as Eve. She is an excellent actress, but perhaps not as versatile as Hiddleston, as she only seems truly at home in a film like this or a Derek Jarman vehicle. Waskikowska is fine as Ava, but in playing this Lindsey Lohan-like vamp, the only person who could have probably messed it up would have been Lindsey Lohan. John Movies continued on page 14

theatre directory asheville pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (asheville) www.cinebarre.com

the Falls theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine arts theatre (asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

the Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 13


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film reviews HendeRSOnviLLe FiLM SOCietY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Back to five movies this month (including Father’s Day). There are three English language films from foreign directors, a romantic comedy involving Napoleon, and an upper class murder mystery with an all star cast. June 1:

Movies continued from page 13

Hurt is wonderful as Marlowe and Anton Yelchin turns out a really nice performance as Adam’s only zombie friend, Ian. Only Lovers Left Alive is wonderfully written. What surprised me about it was its warmth. This could easily be an esoteric Jarmusch expository, but for me it’s a much more beautiful, more elegant and ultimately more powerful statement because of its warmth and love. It’s wonderfully literary and appropriately tinged with sadness and occasional flashes of humor. Unfortunately Only Lovers Left Alive will likely be gone from theatres by the time this issue comes out. If anything written here sounds appealing, and certainly if you are a Jarmusch

fan, you must seek this film out. Only Lovers Left Alive will most certainly be on my top ten list at year’s end. Rated R for language and brief nudity.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Railway Man ∑∑∑∑1/2

Short Take: Harrowing but ultimately rewarding film about a tormented British P.O.W. and his confrontation with the Japanese officer who tortured him many years before.

ReeL taKe: Colin Firth is an actor who is

worth watching in almost anything he does. When he has really high quality material as he did with The King’s Speech and A Single Man

Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman in the powerful story of an ex-P.O.W. trying to get his life back together in The Railway Man. Movies continued on page 15

Hammett

Frederic Forrest stars in this Francis Ford Coppola produced drama about detective fiction writer Dashiell Hammett who must locate a missing Chinese girl while dealing with his erstwhile former partner. The film also stars Peter Boyle and Lynda Lei. DIR: Wim Wenders (Wings of Desire). 1982, USA, Color, 97 minutes. June 8:

the Legend of 1900 Italian director Giuseppe Tornatore made this wistful, bittersweet fable about an ocean liner’s pianist who never sets foot on land. Tim Roth, Pruitt Taylor Vince, and Melanie Thierry co-star. DIR: Giuseppe Tornatore (Cinema Paradiso). 1999, USA/Italy, Color, 125 minutes. June 15:

the emperor’s new Clothes

This variation on The Prince & the Pauper has the exiled Napoleon Bonaparte switch places with a look-alike commoner. Both men (played by Ian Holm) undergo significant changes. DIR: Alan Taylor (Thor: The Dark World). 2002, England, Color, 106 minutes. June 22:

atlantic City

This romantic thriller was French director Louis Malle’s second English language film. It tells the story of an aging, Atlantic City racketeer (Burt Lancaster) whose outlook is altered when a young woman (Susan Sarandon) enters his life. DIR: Louis Malle (Pretty Baby). 1980 Canada/ USA, Color, 103 minutes. June 29:

gosford park

An English aristocrat is murdered and there are suspects-a-plenty from the servants to those in his inner circle. The gulf between the lives and dreams of those who live below and the aristocrats they serve is well portrayed. The cast includes Helen Mirren, Michael Gambon, Maggie Smith, and Alan Bates. DIR: Robert Altman (Short Cuts). 2001, England, Color, 138 minutes.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence”

June dvd picks

Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (1983)

While I was watching The Railway Man (see my review this issue), I was struck by how similar it was to a JapaneseEnglish film that I had seen a number of years ago. That movie was Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence from 1983 and it starred Tom Conti and David Bowie. The film has just been released on Blu-Ray & DVD by Criterion and is readily available for viewing. Both films feature British P.O.W.s in Japanese camps and both are initially told from the commanding officer’s point-ofview. They also focus on an individual soldier and his effect on his Japanese captors and what happens to him and them as a result of that. Tom Conti plays John Lawrence, a British officer living in Japan when World War II breaks out. He is fluent in Japanese and acts as a go between for the prisoners. One of them, Major Jack Celliers (David Bowie), is rebellious and is hiding a secret from his past. The two Japanese principals are Captain Yonoi the camp commandant (Ryuici Sakamoto who also did the film’s haunting soundtrack) and Sergeant Hara (Takeshi Kitano) who is responsible for enforcing discipline. Naturally David Bowie’s character gets more than his fair share but why? Gradually the lives of the four men intersect more and more leading to some powerful personal revelations and ultimate tragedy as those revelations play out and the culture clash between the Japanese and the British become more pronounced. Unlike The Railway Man which shifts back and forth between the past and present, Lawrence takes place in only one time frame as we watch the story unfold. An epilogue takes place one year after the war when Lawrence visits Sgt. Hara in prison

14 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

and they reminisce about what happened there. While not as harrowing as Railway Man, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence is still a powerful film with a potent ending before the epilogue. If you were gripped by the former then you need see the latter. The reverse is also true.

Dead Man (1995)

Enthused by Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive this month, I thought it only fitting to pick a another Jarmusch film. Jarmusch’s 1995 film Dead Man is an old and eccentric favorite of mine. Knowing I was going to see Jarmusch’s latest film this month, I was compelled to revisit this macabre and darkly offbeat but also darkly comic little film. It had also been almost twenty years since I’d seen the film, and I wondered if it would be as disturbing to me today as it had been when I first saw it. As I suspected, it was not as disturbing. I’m sure this is in part due to age, and in part due to the desensitization of our viewing culture (e.g. what we see on television in thirty minutes of AMC’s The Walking Dead is far more brutal than what we used to see in the cinema). One thing Dead Man did do twenty years later is still provoke discussion. Dead Man takes place in late 19th century. Johnny Depp is William Blake, a naïve, young accountant heading to the outskirts of the frontier where he thinks he’s secured a position with a factory. The film’s brilliant open-

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Dead Man” ing sequence takes place on the train on his journey west and it sets the tone for the movie. We see what William Blake sees and with each leg of the journey the passengers become less and less civilized looking until he is surrounded by a carriage-full of pelt wearing, tobacco spitting trappers and buffalo hunters. When he arrives in the town of Machine, Blake is met with a culturally depraved rough and tumble world of which he has no understanding. Adding insult to injury, there’s no job waiting for him. At this point, he becomes inadvertently entangled in a love triangle, which leaves him wounded and left for dead, if not for the help of an Indian (Gary Farmer). The Indian named ‘Nobody’ thinks William is the great poet by the same name. Nobody is as much of a misfit among his own people as William is in the Wild West. Until he meets Nobody, William is apparently unaware of his famous namesake. Ironically the less civilized world they find themselves in and the dawning industrial age paint a picture the opposite of Blake’s words (which Nobody recites often). Dead Man is filmed in black and white and filled with remarkably bizarre and colorful characters. Robert Mitchum delivers his last performance as the factory owner and Lance Henriksen is memorable as a grisly, cannibalistic bounty hunter. The supporting cast also includes John Hurt, Gabriel Byrne, Michael Wincott, Iggy Pop and Jared Harris. Jarmusch’s photography and imagery is wonderfully striking. Neil Young’s score drones ominously in the background permeating every ounce of the story and complimenting Jarmusch’s efforts perfectly. Dead Man is not your run-of-the-mill movie or video rental material, but that’s what makes it worth your time.


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film reviews 60 Years of Godzilla: From Metaphor to Icon Who would have thought that a radioactive, fire breathing dragon, originally intended to be a metaphor for the firebombing of tokyo during World War ii, would have turned into a cultural icon known and loved (yes, loved) the world over? Certainly not the Japanese, but that’s exactly what happened with godzilla.

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Who also would have The original’s somber tone guessed that the 1954 Japawas carried over into an Amerinese original and its Americanized version that featured canized counterpart would new footage of a pre-Perry Mainspire at least 25 sequels son Raymond Burr as reporter and/or remakes up to this Steve Martin. This version was point with the newest one released two years later. Most of having just opened in movie the carnage was left in, but refertheaters all over the world? ences to the firebombing were This latest installment cost removed. The creature was also 150 times what the original renamed Godzilla for non-Japadid and, unlike the original nese audiences, and his distincoutside of Japan, it’s receiving tive roar (made by rubbing the The original 1954 mostly positive reviews (see strings of a double bass with a monster under his mine this issue). leather glove and then altering original name, Gojira. It all began when Japathe pitch) became his trademark. nese director Inoshiro Honda The movie was a worldwide hit. (no relation to the car comIn the best Hollywood pany) saw the 1953 American tradition, the Japanese rushed sci-fi flick The Beast from a sequel into production (even 20,000 Fathoms about a rathough Godzilla had been dioactive dinosaur awakened thoroughly destroyed at the end by atomic testing. Honda took of the first film) called Godzilla this basic idea and turned it Raids Again. It took 4 years to not only into a warning of the reach the U.S where it was redangers of atomic testing, but named Gigantis the Fire Monster also a direct allegory of the for copyright reasons. This is the firebombing of Tokyo by the first time that Godzilla would do Allies with its appalling numbattle with another giant monster ber of civilian casualties. which would become a cornerHonda’s version featured stone of the later sequels. Poster for the a highly stylized creature out Within less than a decade first major reboot, of Japanese mythology in the Godzilla had been transformed Godzilla 1985. form of a dragon that not from a fearsome symbol of only had a devastating breath man’s inhumanity into the savior of fire but was also radioactive. Originally of Japan (and by association the rest of the Free called Gojira in Japanese, Godzilla was World) by doing battle with various monsters an unparalleled destructive force with no and invaders and always emerging triumphant redeeming features. He destroyed ships at (except in 1962’s Godzilla –vs- King Kong sea, flattened cities and villages, and incinwhere Kong was allowed to win in the Amerierated women and children. can version).

Movies continued from page 14

then the result is something truly special. You can now add The Railway Man to that list. The film is set in 1980 and relates the true story of a British ex-P.O.W. interned by the Japanese during World War II who was systematically tortured and now, 38 years later, is trying to keep his life together. He has a passion for trains and through them meets his wife played by Nicole Kidman. Things are fine at first but quickly deteriorate after reunions with his former regiment, all of whom were P.O.W.s at the same Japanese camp, result in nightmares of his imprisonment. These are rendered in vivid flashback sequences (with a younger cast of

actors) that recall what happened. Their leader (Stellan Skarsgard) doesn’t know exactly what happened to him only that he was tortured and somehow managed to survive. After his condition continues to worsen, Kidman approaches Skarsgard to ask for help in getting Firth to face his demons. Skarsgard discovers that the officer responsible for torturing him (Hiroyuki Shanada) is still alive and passes this information on. Although reluctant at first, Firth, after receiving an unusual and powerful wakeup call from Skarsgard, tracks the officer to the very P.O.W. camp where he had been interned which has now become a war museum. Their initial confrontation and subsequent scenes together become the heart and

BY

CHIp KAUFMANN

Godzilla’s transformation from bad guy to good guy paralleled the rise of the Japanese economy in the 1970s and 80s and with success came formulaic repetiLobby card from Godzilla 2000. tion with the movies getting cheaper and cheaper and the character became little more than a live action cartoon with “the man in the rubber suit” origin of the character played strictly for laughs. He even uses kung fu in 1971’s Godzilla –vsthe Smog Monster. For his 30th anniversary in 1984 an attempt was made to return the series to its serious roots. For Godzilla 1985 he doesn’t battle anything else and proceeds to destroy much of Tokyo before being lured away and falling into a live volcano. Raymond Burr was even brought in to comment on the action. The film was not The latest (and most expensive) installment a success and Godzilla disappeared from as seen in the new Godzilla. movie screens for over a decade. After the success of Jurassic Park, a beginning with man’s stupidity concernwholly reinvented Godzilla was launched in ing nuclear power resulting in a disaster 1998 with Matthew Broderick in the lead and of spectacular proportions. Godzilla is New York standing in for Tokyo. The creature now a force of nature needed to save the looked nothing like the old one and the physiworld (mostly San Francisco) from two cal resemblance to Jurassic Park was quite prorampaging, energy sucking creatures that nounced. The story resembled The Beast from are updates of the second great Japanese 20,000 Fathoms and fans were not pleased. monster, Rodan. The Japanese were so offended that At $150 million it’s the most expensive they quickly made their own new version Godzilla movie yet and certainly the most Godzilla 2000 to restore the monster’s honor realistic looking although it was the lack of and integrity. While the American version realism that made the original series what it bombed (primarily due to its $100 million was. Godzilla may be 60 but with an openbudget) the Japanese one was a modest success ing weekend of almost $100 million there’s but it seemed that Godzilla had roared his last still plenty of life in the old boy yet. roar…until now. The new Godzilla goes back to the

soul of the movie. The performances from both men are pitch perfect while the revelations provide the audience with a powerful emotional roller coaster ride. These revelations are sometimes hard to take but, in the end, they prove to be ultimately rewarding. The Railway Man is not the first film to deal with British prisoners in a Japanese prisoner of war camp. The most famous is David Lean’s classic 1957 epic The Bridge on the River Kwai but the movie The Railway Man most closely resembles is Japanese director Nagisha Oshima’s 1983 English language film Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence with David Bowie and Tom Conti. Both films deal with brutalized P.O.W.s and the key element in both films is the discovery of a hidden homemade

radio. What sets The Railway Man apart is its theme of redemption and reconciliation. This is old school filmmaking of a very high order with a strong storyline, remarkable performances, and direction that doesn’t get in the way and lets those involved in their various departments do their thing. While not overlong, I did find it slow in places with an overemphasis on the torture sequences but that doesn’t keep it from being one of the year’s best films. Co-star Nicole Kidman was instrumental in getting this film made and for that we owe her a debt of gratitude. Rated R for disturbing prisoner of war violence.

REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN

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noteworthy

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Feed Your Funnybone

StORieS FROM BiL Lepp and andY iRWin

it can be persuasively argued that growing up Southern helps develops an ear for the musicality of the spoken word and its power to convey the humorous absurdities of daily life.

Bil Lepp is

sidesplittingly funny. Storytellers Bil Lepp and Andy Irwin embody that thesis in different but equally convincing ways. The two renowned yarn spinners join forces at the White Horse Black Mountain on Saturday, June 7 at 8 p.m. The stories of West Virginia native Bil Lepp are sidesplittingly funny in a wonderfully understated way. He combines the wry cultural awareness of Jeff Foxworthy and Bill Cosby’s exquisite family-friendly “wait for it” pacing with a bit of the laconic counterculture knowingness of Arlo Guthrie. The overall effect is an engaging folksy persona without preciousness, fully immersed in heritage and fully involved in the present. By contrast, the lanky Andy Offutt Irwin’s metro-Atlanta bred comedy exhibits a more overtly musical sensibility, stories interlaced with sound-effect laden “mouth

music” and song. Guitar in hand, he delivers pitch perfect commentaries that echo his observations on Southern life. Irwin’s tales, told in the voice of Dr. Marguerite Van Camp, Andy Irwin delivers pitch perfect commentaries. a fictional octogenarian alter-ego who entered medical school with friends to found the Southern White Old Lady Hospital when the garden club and bridge club proved unfillling, show his deep connection to the women who raised him. His mantra as a performance artist is “Dare to be amazing.”

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GeekOut 2014 will be held June 7-8 at UNCA’s Sherrill Center and Kimmel Arena, as well as other venues around Asheville. Gaming and workshops will begin at the Sherrill Center on Friday, June 6, with the main convention June 7 and 8, and plenty of additional events in Asheville all three nights. Celebrity guests will include Emmy-winning voice actor Rob Paulsen (Animaniacs, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles), Eisner winner Hope Larson (A Wrinkle in Time), Disney Imagineer Katie Correll (Sesame Street, King of the Nerds), nationally-acclaimed body paint artist Georgette Pressler, cast from AMC’s The Walking Dead, and dozens more. After two successful years as a one-day convention, GeekOut’s organizers decided to broaden the show into a weekend-long, festival-style format. Content at GeekOut has grown considerably, featuring eight new subject-specific schedules—or “tracks,” in convention jargon—of panels, workshops,

16 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

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BY

BRUCE SALES

asheville residents race to complete a film in just one weekend! In 2001, The 48 Hour Film Project started as a local film challenge among friends. Since then, it has evolved into a global phenomenon and the world’s largest filmmaking competition. This year, The 48 Hour Film Project will tour nearly 125 cities, challenging more than 50,000 people to complete an entire film, from writing and casting to filming and editing, in a mere 48 hours! In all, more than 4,000 films will be created as part of the 2014 competition. The challenge will take over the streets of Asheville from June 20-22.

www.leppstorytelling.com www.andyirwin.com iF YOU Saturday, June 7, storytelling gO with Bil Lepp and Andy Irwin. $12

adv./$15 door. 8 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road in Black Mountain. For more details please call (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

GeekOut 2014

Weekend-long convention brings guests, costumes, games, programming back to UnCa’s Sherrill Center.

The 48 Hour Film Project

BY

KEN KRAHL

and presentations throughout the weekend. KidzCon, a popular part of last year’s show that provides family-friendly schedules geared toward fans ages 5-11, will return. In addition to panels, performances, and workshops, GeekOut will feature vendors and artists from across the Southeast, combat and stunt demonstrations, live-action role-playing, and costume contests in adult, children’s, and group categories. Fan-built replicas of famous cars from Ghostbusters, Back to the Future, and Scooby-Doo will be on the scene. Other events include an Anti-Bullying “Pony Parade,” and even a real wedding. GeekOut hasn’t forgotten the nightlife. Friday evening catch Geektastic, a burlesque revue at Boiler Room. Saturday night producer 9th Phoenix presents Heart of Fire, followed by SHELLSHOCK, one of Asheville’s most popular dance nights. On Sunday evening, Cripps Puppets and Toybox Theatre present Wham, Bam Puppet Slam: GeekOut Edition. Admission to all after-hours events is discounted with a GeekOut Weekend Pass. tickets for geekOut are on sale now at www.geekoutavl.org

Team Gefilte Fish Eye shoots Damned Love in Tel Aviv in 2008.

How the Competition Works Teams are accepted on a first come, first served basis. The registration fee is $160 if teams register before Tuesday, June 10. After then, the cost is $175. On June 20, participating teams will gather at Asheville Brewing Company where they will be given a genre, a character, a prop, and a line of dialogue they must work into their film. Films submitted even one minute late on June 22 will be disqualified. Submitted films will be screened by the public and judged by a panel of experts. The best film from Asheville will compete for top honors in Hollywood, CA at Filmapalooza 2014. The competition begins Friday, June 20. Teams meet from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Asheville Brewing Company’s Coxe Ave. location to receive details for their films. The competition ends Sunday, June 22 at 7:30 p.m. SHARP. Teams meet on Coxe Ave. at Asheville Brewing Company to submit the film they’ve created. See the submited films for just $5 on June 24, 25, and 26 at 7 & 10 p.m. at Asheville Brewing Company’s Merrimon Ave. location. The best film from Asheville will be awarded a trophy and screened at the 48 Hour Film Project Filmapalooza in 2014. For more details about the 48 Hour Film project visit www.48hourfilm.com/asheville


A R T S   &   C U L T U R E

Asheville

Western North Carolina’s NEW ART DESTINATION

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Offering Modern Fine Art

Whiskers and Wagging tails – Saturday, June 14

New World Antiquities

Plus Ethnographic Art &

Buy art and zapow will give 100% of it’s commission to the asheville Humane Society. Animal Ambassadors and Art from 1-4 p.m. Meet adorable and adoptable dogs and cats. View new dog and cat art created by ZaPow’s talented artists. Opening Reception from 7-9 p.m., featuring new art inspired by dogs and cats. Free beer & wine. Live music!

iF YOU gO: ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. More details at www.zapow.net.

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Hours: 10 - 5 pm Tue - Sat or by appointment: 989-0111 At Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville Exit 23 off I-26, cross Merrimon & up hill to 1st building on right

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

The Fame Game Art Show at The Satellite Gallery

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the Fame game art Show seeks to discuss various issues related to the pursuit of fame in our current cultural landscape. S

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The process of becoming famous as well as the archetypes of fame itself. We explore the dual nature of fame and infamy, the envy, the desire and the fear associated with the subconscious reaction to experiencing fame. The whole world is made of symbols, some more transparent than

others. The messages in the symbols create a discourse, allowing us to interpret the myths of fame. The pursuit of fame, both intentional and subconscious, drives every one of us. That quest is for ultimate recognition and adoration – an example of our collective narcissism on steroids, absurd in its self absorption. The “Game” refers to various sub cultures’ pursuit of the “come up” of the king of the hustlers, pimp of the year and the “Capo di Tutti Capi.” It is here where fame is the rapture that

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makes you bulletproof. The classic American reverence for the rags to riches story, the whole American dream myth is propped up by this. There is one place where you earn fame - another where you inherit it. “The work in this show is about those who earn their fame; those that have invoked the power of the Gods, the warrior magicians. What is most important in Life? What do we seek in our heart of hearts? The commercial effort to continued on page 37

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Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Links. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071.

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More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

inteRvieW WitH Fine aRtiSt

INTERVIEWED BY

Joyce Schlapkohl

DENNIS RAY

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Rapid River Magazine: What are your favorite subjects to paint and why?

Joyce Schlapkohl: That’s always an interesting question. I

like what excites me about any subject. Often it’s the lighting on the image or an emotion that gets stirred or just a beautiful sight that I want to capture. I love to paint the ever changing seasons of the NC mountains. In the summer I paint a lot of my husband’s beautiful flowers of every variety. In the winter I paint the snow, the bare trees, and the lack of color. The spring and fall of course are absolutely gorgeous with the burst of color. Other subjects I enjoy painting are animals, old barns, trucks, houses, etc. Except for setting up a still life in the studio, I paint from my own photographs and sketches. As you can see I’m never at a loss for something to paint.

Garden Path, painting by Joyce Schlapkohl.

Field of Wildflowers, painting by Joyce Schlapkohl.

JS: It’s difficult to know all the influences that may alter

RRM: You are a very pro-

how you think and paint. I’m always reading and studying great artist’s work, going to art galleries, taking art workshops, and painting with other artists. Teaching also helps me clarify what I’m thinking. Most artists’ work evolves over a period of time and I would be disappointed if mine didn’t. You never stop learning and questioning. It’s an exciting journey that has twists and turns and hopefully you enjoy the ride.

JS: I don’t paint every day

Works by Joyce Schlapkohl on display at:

lific artist. What inspires you to paint every day?

but I’d like to. I’m completely content and happy when I’m in my studio with the music playing and I have oil on my brush ready to attack the canvas. I lose all track of time. It’s a great feeling.

asheville gallery of art, 16 College St., downtown Seven Sisters, 117 Cherry St., Black Mountain Cedar Hill Studios, 196 n. Main St., Waynesville

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visit www.joycepaints.com (828) 456-4600, joyce@joycepaints.com

RRM: Your style is very unique. How has it developed over the years?

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Jonas Gerard Studio Stroll Painting Performances

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At His New Riverview Station Gallery

BY CHRIS STACK Saturday & Sunday, June 14 & 15: Jonas’ first stroll performances in a vibrant new setting.

Jonas Gerard’s live painting performances have long been a favorite River Arts District event for locals and out of town visitors alike. Held on the 2nd Saturday of each month, they are a great vehicle for inviting people into the creative spirit, and the creative process. This sharing of the artistic space has helped shift many people onto a more creative life path over the years. The painting performances are also a fantastic experience for the art buying public. Jonas creates multiple paintings during each performance, and audience members often purchase them on the spot. This adds a special dimension for these intrepid collectors. Not only do they wind up with great paintings, but also they were there; they

A new video display and overhead camera give the audience a unique perspective.

saw them being born. They have a great experience to relate for years to come. There is now an exciting fresh dimension to Jonas’ painting performances. Since his new flow painting style requires the canvas to lay flat, a new video display and overhead camera gives the audience a unique perspective. Now spectators can see the art as it happens, from the same angle at which Jonas sees it! continued on page 39

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aSHeviLLe’S RiveR aRtS diStiCt The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. One can also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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v Fine Arts & Crafts v Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

Cheryl Keefer is Getting Out of Town

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Keefer recently took First Place at the 8th Annual Burnsville, NC Paint-Out for her 10x10" oil painting of the Samuel Burns statue that adorns the town square.

River Arts District Studio Stroll

Greensboro, GA and is now represented by the Magnolia Art Gallery there. The Left Bank Gallery of Art, St. Simons, GA showcases Keefer’s low country scenes. In April Keefer was juried and selected to participate That same day her plein air painting of in Charlotte’s Mint Garden Tour. Waynesville’s Laurel Ridge Country Club This month she will paint in the Black raised hundreds of dollars for Haywood Mountain Art in Bloom Garden Tour, Schools Arts Education Program, at the sponsored by the Black Mountain Quick Draw Auction in May. Center for the Arts. Keefer received This spring Keefer was juried into the an invitation to participate in the First Women Painters of the Southeast show in Annual High Point Plein Air Festival in September, a juried event. In between all this she is Keefer stands next to one of her paintings, which planning a painting excursion to are inspired by atmospheric light. Provence, where she will experience the same light and views as Matisse “Painting lavender and mustard and Van Gogh. “I am not a colorist, but fields in Provence will be a dream come I do relate to the French Impressionists true! But painting in Asheville and as a ‘modern’ impressionist and a painter Western North Carolina is my hearts whose work is inspired by atmospheric desire, and spending studio time with a light on the landscape...or cityscape.” large cityscape, not battling the wind and Still, Buncombe County is home. weather can be just perfect on a rainy day.” This spring Keefer received local grant For more information about money to demonstrate plein air painting Cheryl’s paintings and workshops go to on the banks of the French Broad River www.cherylkeefer.com for The Asheville Urban Landscape Project, a group of artists founded by Cheryl Keefer fellow plein air painter Lisa Blackshear. If she happens to be painting in town...and Wedge Studios, 129 Roberts St. indoors...Keefer can be found at her easel in the River Arts District in her light and airy second floor studio Oil painting of Burnsville’s Samuel Burns www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com in The Wedge. statue by Cheryl Keefer.

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June 14 & 15, from 10-6 p.m. During the nationally known Studio Stroll, more than 170 artists from the River Arts District, open their studios to the public. Art collectors and enthusiasts come from around the world to view and purchase art as they tour studios in 25 of the district’s historic industrial buildings. Free trolleys run approximately every 15 min, bringing visitors to gallery shows, kids activities, and art demonstrations, such as glass blowing, wheel throwing, wood turning, and more. This is the 20th year for this internationally known event; located along the French Broad River, just minutes from downtown Asheville. Get an inside look at the artist’s way, learn how they make their work and invest in a piece of local Asheville. If You The Studio Stroll is Go produced by the River Arts

District Artists. For more information, please visit www.riverartsdistrict.com

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — June 2014 21


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HendeRSOnviLLe & Flat Rock

Art Cover Show

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Mixed media paintings at art MoB Studios & Marketplace.

Enjoy a guided tour of Carl Sandburg’s home.

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Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

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The Art Cover Show is featuring James Davis’s stunning “Indian Summer” which has been selected to be the cover art for the Hendersonville Magazine 2014-2015 edition. James Davis is a standout among North Carolina’s many unique and recognized artists. James Davis’s Indian Mr. Davis mixes art media, Summer graces the including oils, acrylics, charcover of the 2014-15 coal and watercolor to achieve Hendersonville Magazine. a textured, layered surface that adds an abstract quality to his impressionistic subjects. Given his lengthy career, now over forty years, James has a good idea of what his viewer will respond to in his artwork. Unique to Davis is the extent of the toolbox he uses to generate that response. Creating thousands of shades in each painting, the shading is positioned as a series of highway signs to guide the eye to the true emotion of the piece. Mr. Davis sees the whole spectrum at every instant during his creative process and has a rare gift for picturing the final product from every angle. As a result, many of his works change aspect with every hour of the day in response to the changing light from sunrise to sunset. Working from his own inner vision rather than with initial studies, sketches or drafts, James Davis habitually prepares his canvases as foundations for the scenes he depicts. As base colors, he uses iridescents, most often silvers and gold with reds or blues, to add depth to the final piece. His goal is to draw viewers into his canvases, building perception of distance through subtly implied reflective backgrounds that change with the evolving light conditions throughout the day.



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iF YOU Reception held June 28 from 5-8 p.m. at Art MoB gO Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue in East

Hendersonville. For more details call (828) 6934545 or visit www.artmobstudios.com.

The Folk Influence

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amiciMusic will present a concert featuring pieces for cello and piano influenced by folk music. Music performed includes works by Grieg, Bartok, Piazzolla, Dvorak, and de Falla. Franklin Keel on cello is the featured guest, along with Daniel Weiser on piano. Mr. Keel is the Associate Principal of the Asheville Symphony and member of the Opal String Quartet.

iF YOU gO: Saturday, June 28 at 7

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p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2021 Kanuga Rd. in Hendersonville. For more details, visit www.amicimusic.org or call Dan Weiser, (802) 369-0856.

Franklin Keel, cellist.


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HendeRSOnviLLe & Flat Rock

Art in the Park…ing Lot

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Summer series comes to Hendersonville the second Saturday of every month, May through September, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A unique opportunity is being created for regionally known artists, jewelers and craftsmen to sell their wares in downtown Hendersonville on a monthly basis. Michele Sparks, owner of Art MoB Studios & Marketplace is creating a destination environment for visitors to discover and purchase some of the newest art being created in this region. At the same time she is giving artists and craftspeople an additional Displays and demonstrations venue to show their work by local artists. and build their clientele. Ms. Sparks is a firm supporter of keeping the local economy alive and continues to create novel and affordable ways for artist to get their work out in the public eye. “We hope to build this show into something really spectacular for locals and tourists during the summer season. There will be extensive advertising; Bold Life, Hendersonville Lightening, Hendersonville Times News, Laurel Magazine, several surrounding area event calendars, banners, flyers and post card handouts to promote each event,” says Michele. “We are also partnering with the Hendersonville Farmers Market and will be promoting at each venue.” Artists set up their displays the second Saturday of each month. Some will be doing demos and will introduce you to new work. Enjoy this wonderful opportunity to not only buy some uniquely crafted items, but meet the designers behind the work. Artists are invited to apply to join Art In The Park….. ing Lot. There are a limited number of spaces for this event and first preference will be given to artists already working with Art MoB. Each artist must submit a vendor agreement application with payment, either via mail or in person and we welcome everyone to apply! Applications are due two weeks prior to show and should be submitted directly to Art MoB either via mail or in person. At that time artists can sign up for just one month or any show month they wish to reserve a spot for. Artists will be notified if they are approved. Current artists of Art MoB are pre-juried for products currently sold in Art MoB. Once approved, Art MoB artists Joannie Keokosky and Barb Wilcox will act as event coordinators.

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• Joannie Keokosky, beadroominthesky@att.net; cell (828) 702-6602. • Barb Wilcox, barbwilcox26@hotmail.com; cell (630) 518-7684. iF YOU Art MoB Studios & Marketplace parking lot is on gO 124 4th Avenue in East Hendersonville. It is is ½

block off of Main and 4th Street. For more details call (828) 693-4545, visit www.artmobstudios.com, or find Art Mob Studios on Facebook.

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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Buck ‘Em! The Music of Buck Owens (19551967) Omnivore Records

This doubledisc set is hardly your typical collection, but rather a hybrid assortment of non album singles (lovingly restored to their original mono state), live cuts, outtakes, radio station promos, and other rarities. As such it paints a far more interesting portrait of Owens’ most experimental and rewarding period than would your usual best of. 1955 through 1967 were his prime years, and Buck ‘Em! gives us the other side of that well documented coin. There are hits aplenty among the fifty tracks included here but they’re nearly all different versions than the ones you’re probably familiar with: “I’ve Got A Tiger By The Tail,” “Love’s Gonna Live Here,” “Second Fiddle,” “I Don’t Care (Just as Long as You Love Me),” and “Before You Go” are all in glorious mono, while an early live version of “Act Naturally” shows how Buck and the band road tested their material before heading into the studio. While there is many a Buck Owens collection readily available-some essential and others clearly not-this is one of the few to really explore the years prior to his signing with Capitol Records and creating what is today widely known as the “Bakersfield Sound.” It’s a wonderfully revealing look at Owens the rockabilly rebel and honky tonk hipster (long before the word entered into our mainstream lexicon). By the end of the period covered here Owens had become a superstar, and while some deride the hambone era of Hee Haw, which made him a television fixture to some and a laughing stock to others, I’ll go on record as having a tender spot for those years as well. Buck ‘Em! The Music of Buck Owens (1955-1967) may leave off a few of the hits and is clearly not intended for the casual Buck Owens fan. But the musical diversions and round about tunes it contains are a vital and fascinating part of a much larger quilt. ****

John Mayall

The widely recognized “Godfather of the British Blues” is now into his sixth decade as a touring musician and bandleader, and while his days as a true innovator may be past-he is after all 80 years old-he remains a force for the blues, an itinerant and consummate troubadour whose primary role is no longer as mentor to younger musicians (Clapton,

24 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

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This month there’s lots of great stuff to cover, from an eclectic compendium of a country legend to a few under the radar artists worthy of more press. I’m even stepping out a bit and covering a book about one of the most important bands this continent has ever spawned. So kick back and let’s dive in together. As always I welcome and enjoy your feedback so feel free to email me at jjcassara@aol.com with your own thoughts and suggests. What are YOU listening to these days?

Buck Owens

A Special Life Forty Below Records

Mick Taylor, Peter Green) but more likely ambassador to a generation of listeners. Over the course of his career Mayall has continually expanded the boundaries of the Blues, ranging from gutbucket acoustic to country tinged and jazz infused, but he’s never really strayed too far from his roots. He’s certainly slowed down a bit-as have all of us-but he still releases records at a steady rate, continuing to refine and build upon his legacy. A Special Life is his first studio recording in four years and the second to feature his current touring band of Rocky Athas (guitar), Greg Rzab (bass) and drummer Jay Davenport. It also guest features Cajun singer and accordion player Clifton Chenier on a pair of tracks that rank among its finest. The formula is typical Mayall: A pair of classic Blues numbers (with Albert King’s “Floodin’ in California” the stronger of the two) and several Mayall originals, most of which hit a groove, maintain it, and tend to be lyrically predictable and the expected drawn out jam. It’s interspersed with piercing harmonica solos (Mayall remains a master of the instrument), rollicking piano fills, and Athas’ sublime guitar playing. Chenier’s “Why Did You Go Last Night” is the one true highlight, anchored by a series of shuffling accordion swells, and while much of A Special Life seems like old hat to Mayall that’s not really the point. At this stage in the game anyone still paying attention to his career must love and appreciate the man and his music, and nothing here is going to change that. It may be run of the mill Mayall (although “World Gone Crazy,” his attack on religious fanaticism and the violence its propagates, is pretty heady stuff) but it’s the sort of down the center Blues that he’s done since 1964 and of which no one has yet to do better. ***1/2

Randy Jackson Empathy for the Walrus Red River Entertainment

Neither a former American Idol judge (the pleasant one who seemed to like people) nor a member of the Jackson Five, this Randy Jackson is a skillful musician with some pretty impressive credentials. As front man for the multi-platinum ‘80s band The Zebras, Jackson had a brief brush with genuine fame, and over the years, he’s worked with members of the original Jefferson Airplane and other well known names. He’s also a hard core Beatles fan; like many of his generation it was the music of John, Paul, George, and Ringo that set him on his way. Empathy for the Walrus is Jackson’s low key and loving tribute to the Fab Four. His straight ahead interpretations of Beatle songs, ranging from the best known (“Norwegian Wood”) to the relatively obscure (“Free As A

Bird”) reinforce what we already knew: That the band’s airtight songwriting and arrangements are damn near impossible to mess up and are still far ahead of their time. Jackson’s voice leans decidedly more towards John than Paul-which explains why seven of the ten songs here are generally associated with Lennon-while his guitar playing is supple and skilled enough to compensate for the lack of orchestral arrangements so essential to the original recordings. He wisely keeps things simple (why mess with a great thing?) and his love of the music comes through loud and clear. It all adds up to an album that pays homage to the greatest band ever while bringing back memories that have long since become part of our psychic blueprint. Even if you know every Beatle song by heart, and can readily conjure up even the most nuanced aspect of their songs, Empathy for the Walrus is still a worthwhile addition to your shelf. ****

Cyndi Harvell

Heartache and Revolution

Songstress Cyndi Harvell is the type of artist who drives music journalists crazy, and I mean that in a very good way. For those who crave easy categorization Harvell presents a dilemma of the nicest sort; she’s nominally grouped with other pop/rock females but there’s far more to her music than that. Heartache and Revolution, her third album and far away the most accomplished, is ample evidence of the stylistic range Harvell so readily summons. There’s plenty of Bangles styled effervescent pop, some straight ahead rock (“Avalanche”), more than a bit of country, and even a sampling of gorgeous baroque balladry (“Moonsweeper”). That level of confidence, and the talent to make such genre hopping seem entirely consistent, is part of what separates Harvell from the many other gifted voices out there. She also writes some of the most literate and catchiest tunes to be heard. Having recently located to Los Angeles, I see Harvell as filling the void left when Sheryl Crow moved back to Nashville. She might not have the sheer gravitas that Crow brings to the table-and she sure as heck doesn’t have the budget-but as the album opener, “Flood” aptly demonstrates she’s no slouch in the vocal chops department. Mid tempo rockers (“Burn the House Down” and “Backyard Dreams”) seem her strong suit but even a lighter weight number such as “Crazy Glue” is irresistibly jaunty. Heartache and Revolution might not set new standards but it constantly pushes the limits of those it embraces, and does so with a style and flair that makes it this month’s most surprising listen. **** ‘CD’s’ continued on page 25


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Johnny Beauford

A Pig Eating Past Love St. Cait Records

There is something immediately likeable about the EP format, the notion of an artist choosing half a dozen, give or take, of their best new songs and sending them out to the world. It lessens the pressure of releasing a full length album and allows the performer to assemble a package that (in theory) showcases only their best stuff. Let’s face it; physical albums are no longer a major source of income for any artist, so why even bother? Why not just kick out a few select tunes, hit the road, and hopefully sell a few copies at the shows? It’s a solid plan and one that works best for working musicians such as Johnny Beauford. Best known for fronting the Dallas rock band Bravo, Max! Beauford may be solidly rooted in North Texas but his sound is more broadly cast, owing as much to the Greenwich Village ruminations of Artie Traum than the dusty road weariness of Townes Van Zandt. Oft covered by other musicians, he splits his time between band and solo work, and spends at least 200 days a year on tour. The oddly named A Pig Eating Past Love (I have no idea what that refers to) is a lo-fidelity gem, a minimalist straight ahead romp that Beauford recorded almost entirely on his own. Between “Firefly,” which highlights his low growl to perfection, or the Springsteen like throwaway “Little Dance,” there’s a bit of something for everything. The title track is the longest and most adventurous song here, backed with cacophonous percussion and distorted yet oddly affecting vocals. “S Is For Schizophrenia,” with its catchy hooks and harmonies belying the undercurrent of the subject matter even sounds like some lost Robyn Hitchcock effort. All in all A Pig Eating Past Love is a concise and delightful listen, a snapshot of a talented artist of whom I was unfamiliar, an ideal complement to a quiet afternoon. ***1/2

The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music

Written by Craig Harris Rowan and Littlefield Press, 214 pgs.

Author Craig Harris was an insider with The Band, both chronicling their later years as a behind the scenes photographer and as a performing musician with various members and offshoot alliances of the group. As an educator, Harris has a master’s degree in music and has taught in a variety of school settings. As such he seems the ideal candidate to add to the tomes written by and about one of the greatest and most significant ensembles North America has ever produced: Which sets the bar unfairly high for this generally well researched and engaging volume. It also makes the book’s faults, readily balanced by a treasure trove of

Beppe Gambetta

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Beppe gambetta likes to think of a smile as “the key for reading the musical universe.” It’s a natural trait of his peoplethe Italian born musician still resides in Genova – and part of the disarming charm and irrepressible temperament he brings to his performances. Reading his biographical information – Gambetta and I are still to meet one another – you cannot help but admire and like someone so darned enthusiastic about life. He’s an obvious wanderer – both in the metaphysical and geographic sense – who thrives on new experiences and meeting new people. Gambetta tours North America on an average of three times per year, playing what he refers to as his “musical mosaic” of sounds and flavors. While distinctly Italian (a heritage he and I share) he is in love with American roots music as well as “the music of my native country.” Gambetta has travelled the world, performing in more than thirty countries (even playing behind what was once the Iron Curtain) and has, to date, recorded eleven CDs, a series of DVDs, and teaching books. He is a master of the acoustic guitar (a quick check of You Tube confirmed that fact!) who frequently collaborates with

details and revelations, all the more glaring. Harris opens the book in unique fashion, jumping ahead to The Band’s initial coupling with Bob Dylan-and the equal parts triumphant and catastrophic 1966 tour that ensued-and delving backwards into their origins and influences. It’s here the book shines, as Harris examines with a scholar’s acuity the burgeoning folk scene that brought Dylan and The Band together, as well as the collective musical strands they shared. Few realize that Dylan never really “went electric.” He started out as a Little Richard wannabe (piano was his first real instrument of choice), fell under the spell of Woody Guthrie and the protest movement, and eventually reawakened his rock and roll roots when the burden of being “the voice of a generation” became too much to bear. Harris’ examination of the folk era; from early 19th century giants such as Harry “Haywire Mac” McClintock, to 1940s era The Weavers, up to and including the initial days of the pivotal uptown Manhattan folk scene,

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other top flight musicians, including his own Beppe Gambetta trio. Throughout the U.S. and Canada, Gambetta has performed at such prestigious festivals as the Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, Kansas, Merlefest, Colorado’s Four Corners Festival, and Canadian Folk Festivals in Winnipeg and Edmonton. Gambetta has also Beppe Gambetta combines “the heart of Americana with played numerous radio shows the olive trees of the Mediterranean.” Photo: Dirk Engeland including NPR’s “All Things Considered” and “E-Town.” If area, Carrboro, and right here in Black such credentials weren’t enough to grab your Mountain. So why not treat yourself to an attention, how about his playing the Ryman artist whose music combines “the heart Auditorium in Nashville and the Metropolitan of Americana with the olive trees of the Museum of Art in New York? Mediterranean” in a venue known for its Still not impressed? A list of the musicians acoustics and listener friendly atmosphere? Gambetta has shared stages with is a veritable And, as my Grandmother Seraphina would who’s who of Americana including folk legends have said, Ciao! David Grisman, Gene Parsons, Doc Watson and Norman Blake. In an industry dominated by quickly passing trends and the “logic” of the market, Gambetta proudly prefers to let his iF YOU Beppe Gambetta solo music speak for itself, standing out for its “intigO performance at the White Horse mate emotions, communication, and research (105 Montreat Rd.) in Black in tone, sobriety and humor.” Mountain on Friday, June 13. The show Fortunately for us Gambetta has included starts at 8 p.m. For ticket information visit the Southeast as part of his upcoming North www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. American tour, with stops in the Atlanta

are fluid and fascinating. Ample space is deservedly given over to Pete Seeger as Harris spins a series of amusing anecdotes, including one that took place here in Asheville. Chapter Two explores The Band’s nascent years as backing hellions for Ronnie Hawkins (The Hawk!), circles back to Dylan and Woodstock (the town, not the concert) and the fabled Basement Tapes. The rest of the book covers their peak years of fame, fortune, and substance abuse-a period which has already been scrupulously detailed and to which Harris adds little-along with the post Last Waltz era of solo work, aborted reunions and the tragic suicide of Richard Manual and drug addicted decline of Rick Danko. The ongoing feud over publishing rights, which bankrupted Danko, Manual, Levon Helm, and Garth Hudson, while making Robbie Robertson a rich and detested man, is also attended to in some needed depth. In this, Harris wisely takes no sides, but the quotes from various members speak for themselves. It’s a tragic tale of ego, greed, and misplaced trust. There are already two seminal books about The Band: Barney Hoskyn’s near perfect Across the Great Divide and Helm’s own (co-written with Stephen Davis) This Wheel’s On Fire. Both paint a more complete and compelling picture of The Band while Harris’

entry-perhaps due to his closeness to the subject-is partly academic and partly observational without being fully successful as either. It also contains a number of egregious errors that undercut its importance. An early section misspells the last name of film directors Ethan and Joel Coen as “Cohen” while on page 146 the song Dylan offered up for the Eric Clapton album No Reason to Cry (on which The Band contributed heavily) is misidentified as “Seven Days” (covered at roughly the same time by Ronnie Wood) rather than the correct “Sign Language.” Both those mistakes were among a handful that immediately caught my attention and led me to wonder how many others I didn’t seize upon. They’re the sort of slip ups that simple fact checking would have avoided: Having said that, I still found this volume a more than worthwhile read. I consider myself reasonably well versed in our history of folk music, and yet Harris’ assessment of that genre and its relationship with the emerging civil rights movement both informed and entertained me. Harris clearly loves his subject and while The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music is at times frustrating, it still does this odd aggregation of rag tag musicians from the windswept plains of Canada and the sweltering hills of Arkansas proud.

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The Poet’s Voice

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CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

nOt a BOOK RepORt

tHe WRiteRS’ WORKSHOp One-day intensive classes, for any level writer, meet Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 387 Beaucatcher Rd. Registration is in advance only, by mail or register online at www.twwoa.org. Financial aid in exchange for volunteering is available.

Saturday, June 14: getting published with Laine Cunningham Essential information for fiction and nonfiction book authors. Writing query letters that capture attention; researching agents and publishers; creating universal pitch elements; traditional vs. self-publishing; and how to present a formidable platform to sell your book. Cunningham is an awardwinning author and publishing consultant at Writer’s Resource. She has helped authors write, revise and pitch their books to publishers. Students may submit a query and synopsis for review (by June 7).

national Writing Contests

Literary Fiction Contest – Deadline: August 30, 2014. 24th Annual Memoirs Competition – Deadline: November 30, 2014. 26th Annual Poetry Contest – Deadline: February 28, 2015.

FOR MORe detaiLS call (828) 254-

8111, email writersw@gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org. The Writers’

Workshop, 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville.

Your Book advertised Here

loves the sound of words Send your pages into the this Book like I do, and because there submittable unknown. is a section in his book Read. Write. Send them I would like to release these pages My bookcase has two shelves of titled, “Toolbox.” out like children on their like a flock of doves who settle I have a toolbox too. first day of school. here, there, white on green grass, books by single poets, (akmatova My hammer, pliers, screwwhite on red roofs, zonatelli), one shelf of anthologies, Resources drivers, and scissors are white shifting down into gardens two shelves of resources, one decorated pink and purple, Chris Baldick, The with beads and glitter. I use of biographies, and a shelf of imagine the flutter of white Concise Oxford my toolbox in schools and Dictionary of Literary past your window children’s poetry. adult writing classes. These Terms pages dissolve at first reading There are six other large bookcases in the tools work. So do words. into your head John Drury, The Poetry house, but this one is MINE. These books Tools on Stephen King’s your heart Dictionary are my friends. Some of them came from an top shelf are vocabulary like a holy wafer John Fox, Finding What overseer’s house in Virginia. My father was (the bread of writing) and You Didn’t Lose ~ Carol Pearce Bjorlie raised with these leather-bound treasures. grammar. He is on my side Geof Hewitt, Today You I call authors by their first names. Poet, in regard to adverbs. He Are My Favorite Poet Robert Bly, admits to taking books off his writes, “The adverb is not shelves and kissing them. I hold them close Edward Hirsch, How to Read a Poem and your friend.” and give them hugs. Some of these books Fall in Love With Poetry Other advice? Make your reader a sensory were texts for my MFA program. One participant in your writing. He includes a line Paul Janeczko, How To Write Poetry semester I took two classes and read twentyfrom Tennyson’s “The Princess.” (Scholastic Guides) three books. I was in Heaven! I have poetry Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir “The moan of doves in immemorial elms dictionaries, “How To” books, The Discovery of the Craft and murmurings of innumerable bees.” of Poetry, etc. A list of them is included at the Ted Kooser, The Poetry Home Repair Manual end of this column. The alliteration Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird This is not a book tool’s in use here, but I report, but a book disStephen King’s book, can also hear these words. Frances Mayes, The Discovery of Poetry covery. I want to share He also suggests “On Writing,” is a Mary Oliver, A Poetry Handbook a recent finding about writers read. Read. Read. Mary Oliver, Blue Pastures memoir on craft. writing. This book is not Write. Write. Write. Turn Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet about poetry. It is not off the TV. Turn off the written by a poet. phone. Read at the dinner Strunk and White, The Elements of Style Two weeks ago I attended a Y/A writing table. (Don’t tell my mother!) Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write seminar at UNCA. I just had a Y/A trilogy Stephen King leans on intuition. His Eudora Welty, One Writer’s Beginnings accepted by 2nd Wind, a North Carolina press. books are based on situations, rather than William Zinsser, On Writing Well I’m revising Book three, and thought I’d enjoy story. After I read King’s book, I realized that an afternoon meeting writers in the Y/A genre. my trilogy is based on situation. The reason I A text recommended by Megan Shepherd, wrote three books is because I wanted to find facilitator, was Stephen King’s, On Writing. It out what happens to the girls in my first book. iF YOU Carol Bjorlie will perform at the is a memoir on craft, published in 2000. Maybe I am fond of them. This is not unlike poetry. gO Artisan cafe on June 19 and 26 at 7 you’ve already read it. As I read my poetry, I realize there are ‘situap.m. The Artisan Cafe and Coffee I liked this book because Stephen King tions’ in many of them. My most recent poem House is located at 1390 Sand Hill Rd., makes me laugh, because he is irreverent, beis about appearing in print, a ‘situation’ for Candler. Phone (828) 665-3800. cause he’s had a “real” life, because he worked which I am full of gratitude. in a mill, because he’s still married, because he This is not a book report. It is a discovery.

Summer Reads

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MaLapROp’S StaFF piCKS FOR SUMMeR Reading

$49/Month

Caroline: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin. This wonderful novel is a little peek into the life of bookstore ownership with some love thrown in – a quick, light, thoroughly enjoyable story, perfect for the beach or the cabin!

Call (828) 646-0071 today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Linda: Where’d You Go, Bernadette, by Maria Semple. The characters in the middle of a family meltdown describe an escalating crisis with equal parts hilarity and poignancy. We’ve all been there, but hopefully not so dramatically!

in print & Online!

26 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

Lauren n.: Rat Queens Volume 1: Sass & Sorcery. Kurtis Wiebe author; illustrations by Roc Upchurch. The Rat Queens are a hilarious band of butt kicking, wisecracking, sword swinging, booze guzzling, lady mercenaries. This refreshing new series will have you hooked! Christine: Vegan Finger Foods by Tamasin Noyes and Celine Steen. Fun and inventive recipes for all of your summertime soirees. Justin: Crapalachia by Scott McClanahan. Set in the impoverished coal country of West Virgina, Crapalachia is the (sort of) true story of McClanahan’s upbringing in this weird, seemingly backwards world. Underneath it all are hilarious, raw and touching stories about finding pride in what you came from.

i want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

pOetRiO Sunday, June 1 at 3 pm Monthly series of readings and signings by 3 poets at 3 p.m.! This month features Emilia Phillips (Signaletics), Nick McRae, and Zoe Harber (Remember Me As a Time of Day).

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Two Novelists: Elizabeth Gilbert & Jeannette Walls

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Malaprop’s bookstore will present two ticketed events this month. Catch Jeannette Walls for a discussion and signing of The Silver Star on June 6, and Elizabeth Gilbert for a discussion and signing of The Signature of All Things on June 27.

A deeply moving novel about triumph over adversity. Jeannette Walls: The Silver Star Jeannette Walls has written a deeply moving novel about triumph over adversity and about people who find a way to love each other and the world, despite its flaws and injustices.

Jeannette Walls Photo: John Taylor

Walls graduated from Barnard College and was a journalist in New York. Her memoir, The Glass Castle, has been a New York Times bestseller for more than six years. She is the author of a novel, Half Broke Horses, named one of the ten best books of 2009 by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. She lives in rural Virginia with her husband, the writer John Taylor. Walls’s visit takes place on June 6 at 7 pm at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe. This is a ticketed event. We highly encourage you to purchase

SHORt StORY WRiteRS Wanted!

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Rapidrivermagazine.com is expanding! Rapid River Magazine is expanding its online edition with a short story section. We’re looking for a variety of “shorts,” including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 categories. All work will be reviewed for appropriateness and once chosen will be subject to a collaborative editing process. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, will be managing the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to shortstories@rapidrivermagazine.com

tickets ahead of time, as we expect the event may sell out. Tickets are $10 and come with a coupon for $5 off of The Silver Star.

Elizabeth Gilbert: The Signature Of All Things The Signature of All Things is a beguiling novel of desire and discovery spanning much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Gilbert triumphantly returns to fiction with this novel, which is written in the bold, questing spirit of that singular time. Brilliantly researched and lovingly crafted, The Signature of All Things carries the reader breathlessly across the globe, from London and Peru to Tahiti and Amsterdam. It is a work of extraordinary faith and of deep scientific reflection. Perhaps above all, it is the story of an irrepressible woman, determined to satisfy her most powerful urges toward both love and knowledge. A novel immersed in all the great questions of the nineteenth century, The Signature of All Things is also very much a novel for our times. Elizabeth Gilbert is the acclaimed author of five books of fiction and nonfiction. Her 2006 memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, was a #1 New York Times bestseller; it has been published in more than thirty languages and has sold more than 10 million copies worldwide, and in 2010 was made into a major motion picture starring Julia Roberts. Gilbert’s first two books, the short story collection Pilgrims, and the novel Stern Men were New York Times Notable Books, and her most recent work, Committed – a memoir of marriage – was a #1 New York Times bestseller. In 2008, Time magazine named Gilbert one of the most influential people in the world. Gilbert’s visit takes place on June 27 at 7

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An author of the Southern experience, Fred Davis Chappell was born on a small farm in Canton, NC in 1936. He has written more than a dozen books of poetry as well novels, short stories and two books of critical prose. Chappell has received several awards for his contributions to literature, including the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Aiken Taylor Award and was named the Poet Laureate of North Carolina spanning 1997-2002. Chappell’s poetry and prose encapsulates the Southern experience. However, the work, Dagon, is a referential piece to H.P. Lovecraft’s story of the same name in the famed “Cthulhu Mythos.” For Dagon, Chappell was awarded the Best Foreign Book of the Year prize by the French Academy in 1972.

Bookclubs, as well as poetrio!

ReadingS & BOOKSigningS Monday, June 2 at 7 p.m. aaROn gWYn, Wynne’s War, set in afghanistan. Elizabeth Gilbert

Photo: Jennifer Schatten

A work of extraordinary faith, and of deep scientific reflection. p.m. at Lipinsky Auditorium, One University Heights, on the UNCA Campus. This event is presented in partnership with the Great Smokies Writing Program. This is a ticketed event. We highly encourage you to purchase tickets ahead of time, as we expect the event may sell out. Tickets are $20 and come with a paperback copy of The Signature of All Things. iF YOU Jeannette Walls, Friday, June 6 at gO 7 p.m. at Malaprops, $10. Elizabeth

Gilbert, Friday, June 27 at 7 p.m. at UNCA’s Lipinsky Auditorium, $20. For more information or to purchase ticekts, please visit Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, 55 Haywood St, Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734 or go online to www.malaprops.com

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Wednesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. MOniCa BYRne, the girl in the Road. Saturday, June 7 at 7 p.m. Lee zaCHaRiaS, the Only Sounds We Make. Sunday, June 8 at 3 p.m. HenRY nieSe, the Medicine is Sacred. Lakota Sioux. Monday, June 9 at 7 p.m. FeMFeSSiOnaLS – network and discussion group. tuesday, June 10 at 7 p.m. KaRen WHite, a Long time gone, Mississippi family. thursday, June 12 at 7 p.m. ROY HOFFMan, Come Landfall. Wednesday, June 11 at 7 p.m. Women Who Run With the Wolves, salon. Friday, June 13 at 7 p.m. an end to Suffering with KHenpO tSULtRiM tenzin. Saturday, June 14 at 7 p.m. nan Chase and deniece guest, drink the Harvest: Juices, Wines, Meads, teas, and Ciders. Sunday, June 15 at 11 a.m. SetH andReWS, deconverted: a Journey from Religion to Reason. thursday, June 19 at 7 p.m. deidRe ann deLaUgHteR, Reawakening Rebekah: the gift of the CLaMOR girls. Sunday, June 22 at 3 p.m. Brys Stephens, the new Southern table, classic food. Monday, June 23 at 7 p.m. LiSa HOWORtH, Flying Shoes, about family. tuesday, June 24 at 7 p.m. Kate SWeeneY, american afterlife: encounters in the Customs of Mourning.

Writers at Wolfe Series Features Fred Chappell

the thomas Wolfe Memorial State Historical Site is hosting author Fred Chappell on Saturday, June 7.

We host numerous Readings &

PARTIAL LISTING visit www.malaprops.com

BRANDON HUNTER

Chappell taught at the University of North Carolina-GreensFred Chappell, boro for over 40 years NC Poet Laureate and helped establish from 1997-2002. the MFA in writing program. Now retired, Chappell lives in North Carolina.

Saturday, June 28 at 7 p.m. Bibliophiles Speed dating. $10 includes wine, snacks, and a $5 coupon. 21+. Registration required, justin@malaprops.com.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM pg. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

iF YOU Fred Chappell will read selections gO from his work on Saturday, June

7 from 2-3 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial, 52 North Market Street, downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 253-8304 for more details.

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 27


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artful living SOUtHeRn COMFORt BY JUdY aUSLeY

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so much. Far too much death is happening to young people and children and women everywhere. What is the answer, I ask? Maybe, just maybe, every person should sign on for a 12trash forever. That freedom is step program of some kind and like no other, it feels wonderful clear your head. Stop settling your to enjoy the freedom of not being problems by taking a gun in hand. strapped in. If you are abusing any substance Have we really become the that has taken over your life, Time person we will be for the rest of Out! It is high time for you to seek BY JUDY AUSLEY our lives on earth or wherever we help, if you care deeply as I do may be in the future? We don’t about walking softly on this earth even have to worry because it takes little effort for a while longer. for some of us to just be. On June 5 I will be 74. About now I think I did several things the healthy way, acI should hesitate a moment and look around cording to my doctor. It does not seem to be the room, cause suddenly, I am feeling very true when I think about myself and socially I alone and a little weird at this moment. did not give a flip in the 60s’about what I did, Is this the end of Me? just wanted to feel good and have a good time, “Par-teeee---------!” I never smoked cigarettes. I drank beer Writer Judy ausley has and alcohol socially up until I turned 50 years been a reporter with old, but I stopped because around that time newspapers in nC for everyone was talking about getting healthy. So, 40 years. She retired yes I drank far too much, but now as I speak, I in 2005 and continues have not had a drink or the beer I loved, for 25 to freelance at her years before it became the “life blood of Ashehome in asheville. She ville, NC.” Good 12-step programs worked can be contacted by and I am grateful. e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. Today, in America and all around us, things are pretty sad. Many, many sad events if you know of a character in asheville are happening. Things that none of us could who has not had a conventional life, put have predicted or imagined when we were in them in touch with Judy for an article in college in the late 1950s. this column, Southern Comfort. My God, this old world has changed

Do We All Really Change With Age? Just let your thoughts take you back to a decade ago. Compare how you were then and how you are now. What is this, I wonder and often say under my breath. God, is this the person I have become? I am, I suppose, much like other friends. We all know that personalities, values, habits and tastes evolve continuously as we grow. Once I realized this, I thought about just what I will be like in another 10 years. Most writers and other like-minded friends and co-workers realize the fact that we really do not change that much over the years, we just feel like we have changed. And we look in the mirror and we clearly see the paths of our lives on our aging faces. Women do these things, I wonder if men do the same. Women I have known over the years and lived with, do this face “inspection” every night and again in the morning as they apply makeup to go to work. I have always loved the natural look, as we called it in the crazy 60s. I have not painted my face with anything to look a certain way. I think that also happened when I was into the feminism of the era and while protesters marched on Washington, we threw our bras out the apartment window or into the

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WCQS to Air WUNC’s “The State of Things”

Beginning June 2, the popular WUnC public affairs show hosted by Frank Stasio can be heard live on WCQS each weekday from noon to 1 p.m.

“This partnership gives us direct access to the people and the stories that make Western North Carolina unique.” The weekday addition to the WCQS programming schedule follows a successful collaboration between WCQS and “The State of Things” for two live broadcasts of the In production since September 2001 as program during the 2014 Moogfest in AsheWUNC’s flagship program, “The State of ville. WCQS and WUNC also plan to grow Things” covers many diverse issues and topics the partnership surrounding the broadcast of in North Carolina. Stasio talks with authors, “The State of Things,” eventually including musicians, politicians, policymakers and live reports from Western North Carolina as everyday citizens about subjects that matter well as the voices and stories of people who to North Carolinians. Read more about the live and work in the region. program at www.wunc. “Listeners across org/programs/state-things. Western North “WCQS has a strong Carolina are passionhistory of service in Westate about this region ern North Carolina,” said and this state,” WCQS Stasio, the former NPR Program Director correspondent who was Barbara Sayer said. named permanent host of “And we are all acutely “The State of Things” in aware that what our 2006. “I am happy to be legislators do in Raworking with an organizaleigh affects everyone tion that shares our values, in the state. which include a commitFrank Stasio talks with authors, “WCQS is ment to public service and musicians, politicians, policymakers and excited about the proseveryday citizens. quality journalism.

28 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

pect of not only sharing news from around the state with our listeners, but also about sharing the stories and issues of this region with public radio listeners throughout North Carolina.” Stasio said “The State of Things” plans to continue to engage its audience in active dialogue upon joining the WCQS broadcast schedule, inviting listener participation through calls, emails and social media. “I really hope we’ll be hearing from WCQS listeners,” he said. “We want ideas and suggestions for stories we should be covering and people we should meet.” WCQS and its translator stations serve more than 80,000 people in 12 counties. It is governed by an 18-member volunteer Board of Directors, with input from its Community Forum. For more information please call (828) 210-4800 or visit www.wcqs.org. “the State of things” brings the issues, personalities, and places of north Carolina to you. the live show wants to hear from listeners. Call 1-877-9629862, email sot@wunc.org, or tweet @ state_of_things. Follow them on Facebook or tumblr.


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artful living Experiencing One “We are not human beings having a spiritual experience; we are spiritual beings having a human experience.”

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– Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955)

Teilhard de Chardin was a French Jesuit priest, mystic philosopher, and paleontologist, a principle figure in one of the great discoveries in the evolutionary chain of human history, the discovery of Peking Man, a homo erectus predecessor to modern homo sapiens that lived approximately 750,000 years ago in China. While being an important figure in the world of field paleontology, Teilhard’s great mission in life was to resolve the gulf between religion and science that centered on the issue of evolution, for he was a man of both worlds, unique in so many ways, and absolutely brilliant. His perspective on evolution was radically visionary in a manner that put him not in conflict with his faith, but rather in confirmation of it. For him, the issue wasn’t that human beings evolved from a common ancestor as that of apes; this was only the most recent evolutionary event and only a superficial analysis of the much greater truth. For Teilhard de Chardin, what was evident was that human beings were the natural result of the evolution of the Universe. The only point of beginning for the human species, as with all life, could be the birth of the Universe, the Big Bang. From that moment, an inexorable process of increasing complexification of matter led to the inevitable emergence of consciousness, for, he speculated, as science is now confirming, consciousness is an inher-

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ent property of matter. As is being discovered in the field of quantum physics, sub-atomic particles behave in ways that can only be explained by attributing consciousness into the equation. This is supportive of Teilhard’s hypothesis that the Universe is a unified field of both matter-energy and consciousness-energy, what he called spirit, and that the Universe was a unified field of “spirit-matter, manifesting as objects within the field of universal energy which complexified in consciousness as it complexified in physical organization. In the known Universe, the most complex organization of matter is the human brain which then manifests the most complex consciousness. Teilhard wrote: “There is neither spirit nor matter in the world; the stuff of the universe is spirit-matter.” This perspective on existence is in keeping with many cultural traditions in which that which is called “God” is not the creator of the Universe in any kind of mechanistic and

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dualistic sense, as in God is in Heaven and the World is made “out there” but rather, God is the world, Divine consciousness infusing all Creation. In this mystical equation one plus one equals One and the many. There are infinite manifestations of one – stars, planets, comets, rocks, and at least on this planet Earth, many, many manifestations of life-forms, all making up the One that is the Universe, with consciousness permeating the One and manifesting as individual consciousness in the higher levels of organization called sentient beings. This is the Natural World. It is a system of unified energy manifesting infinite individual systems of energy, all still within the One. “When the energy simply flows through us, just as it flows through the grass and the trees and the ravens and the bears and the moose and the ocean and the rocks, we discover that we are not solid at all. If we sit still like the mountain Gampo Lhatse in a hurricane… then we are not this separate being.” ~ Pema Chodrin This intuitive realization of our individuality existing within a Great Oneness is the essential mystical spiritual realization. It is not adequate to hold this as an intellectual realization, it has to be intuitively experienced, a combining of subtle physical and mental perception of our Beingness, our essence as energy connected energetically with the multiplicity and singularity of Life.

Not Everything that Irritates is Gluten

the latest “fad” is to eliminate gluten from the diet – everything “gluten” is bad. Note the labels on tomatoes and bottled water: “Gluten Free” as if this is a sign that this food product is healthier than the competition. Truth #1: All tomatoes and all bottled water is gluten free – always has been. Truth #2: Not everything that irritates the bowel is gluten. For decades, people have known about lactose intolerance. Some people (less than 10% Caucasians, up to 75% other groups) lack the enzyme to digest lactose (a combination of two simple sugars – glucose and galactose) in the upper small bowel. Transported further down the GI tract, the molecule osmotically pulls water into the bowel and the molecule is fermented by bacteria. The water and the hydrogen gas cause flatulence and bloating of the bowel, causing swelling, pain and discomfort, bowel irritation and dysfunction – resulting in constipation and/or diarrhea. (This is NOT a “milk allergy” – which is due to a reaction to milk protein.) Much less common, a few people lack the

enzyme to digest galactose, one of the simple sugars in lactose. The symptoms: water retention and fermentation by bacteria resulting in hydrogen gas which bloats the bowel and irritates it, causing flatulence, swelling, pain, discomfort, and dysfunction – constipation and/or diarrhea. Only a few people cannot absorb as much fructose as other people. The result: water retention, gas formation from bacterial fermentation – flatulence, swelling and pain, constipation and/or diarrhea. Now consider FODMAPs – Fermentable Oligo- (a few), Di- (two), Mono (single)-saccharides (sugar combos) And Polyols (sugar alcohols). The most egregious of this group are lactose, fructose and short-chain fructose molecules (fructans), galactose and short-chain galactose molecules (galactans), and artificial sweetners – poorly digested sugars (xylitol, sorbitol, and others). These are all poorly absorbed by most people but are poorly tolerated by less than 10% of the people. The result: water retention, gas formation from bacterial fermentation – flatulence, swelling and pain, constipation and/or diarrhea.

BILL WALZ

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To hold the idea of oneness brings no peace, no sense of completeness and perfect belonging in the World; the conflict of competing individual forms and human egos (psychological separate forms) is too overwhelming. To experience and live this peace requires what Buddhists call the “felt sense,” and since what we are addressing here is the reality of our existence as “spirit-matter” energy, it can of course be felt. It is our hypnotic belief in separate solid bodies and individual minds that prevents the feeling being realized, numbing us to this experience of living within the Sacred One. This belief constitutes what Buddhists refer to as a “barrier” or “gate” of egoic delusion that blocks our opening to the felt sense. The realization certainly can be addressed at an intellectual level, as I am attempting here, and as mystical teachers throughout history (including Jesus) have attempted with their words. It is, however, with their presence, which embodies this unified connected energy much vaster than a single individual, that the true communication, or what is sometimes referred to as “direct transmission,” can occur, opening and unlocking the “gate.” We can feel peaceful because our presence continued on page 36

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Some people have gluten sensitivity. Others have gluten allergy. But the symptoms are the same as for the short-chain sugars. Less than 10% of the people have this problem. Notice: In North America, 10% of people are lactose-intolerant and should avoid milk and some dairy OR use lactose-free products. Very few people have intolerance to galactose or fructose – found mostly in fruits and some vegetables. Less than 10% of people are intolerant to FODMAPs which are found in a variety of foods: fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes. Less than 10% of people are intolerant to gluten – found in wheat, rye, and barley. Lesson #1: There are many types of food intolerances but few people who actually have these problems. Lesson #2: If you are not having these symptoms, DO NOT AVOID perfectly nutritious foods in balanced amounts from a wide variety of sources. Don’t buy in to the marketing hype. Think carefully; eat healthfully. If you have questions, ask your health professional and do your research. Don’t assume.

Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 29


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WaYneSviLLe Frog Level Brewing

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Frog Level Brewing has some of the smoothest craft beer to touch your tongue. From the bite of our IPA to the smokiness of our Scotch Ale and other fine recipes in between, you can get a pint of any of these flavors to drink in our tasting room or get a Croaker (2 pints) or a Growler (4 pints) to take with you. If you’re hungry, bring your own food and enjoy it with any of our fine handcrafted brews inside or on our back deck overlooking the flowing creek. continued on page 32

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~ Waynesville Has it aLL ~ Home Furnishings, Great Food, plus Live Music, and Fine Arts & Crafts.

30 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

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WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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Art After Dark

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iF YOU Art After Dark, June 6, July gO 11, August 1, September 5,

presented by the Waynesville gallery association, the next art after dark takes place Friday, June 6. A vibrant art scene brings color to Waynesville’s night life, and with four new gallery members, this is a night you don’t want to miss! Enjoy wandering through the galleries and working studios on Main Street, Depot Street, and Frog Level where festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries. Members include the Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Earthworks, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Burr Studios, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Grace Cathey Sculpture Garden and Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, The Mahogany House, Art on Depot, and the Village Framer. We are growing! Historic Frog Level, home to the Mahogany House and Art on Depot is a short walk from Main St., where many artists have working studios. With over 12 galleries participating, everyone is sure to find inspiration through the beauty of art! Gallery 86 is celebrating Appalachian Heritage Month with arts and crafts that have been passed down over the years, finding their place in contemporary arts. As part of the “Mountain Made” exhibit, the Bethel Rural Community Organization will have a display of prints and photographs depicting historic locations in the Bethel Community. Twigs and Leaves will feature Tracey McCracken Palmer’s unique artwork, “Dances with Wools”. Tracey will be demonstrating at Twigs and Leaves Gallery during Art After Dark, and viewers will learn how she creates her intricately designed

‘HART’ cont’d from page 4

“I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Out’a My Hair,” for example is done with Andrews Sisters style harmonies. “Honeybun” is given a Modernaires swing. “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria,” becomes a love song for a young man. The show received rave reviews when it opened OffBroadway in 1993, followed by a successful run on Broadway. It has been a hit with regional theaters ever since.

Dominic Aquilino and Clara Burrus in Breaking Up Is Hard To Do.

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October 3, November 7, and December 5 in Waynesville. For more information visit the Waynesville Gallery Association website at www. waynesvillegalleryassociation.com or contact Twigs and Leaves Gallery at (828) 456-1940.

Detail of Let the Sun Shine, by Tracey McCracken Palmer.

and felted wool landscapes. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Bill Stecher, and delight in the savory hors d’oeuvres. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786 Open Monday through Saturday 10-5:30 and Sunday 1-4 (beginning Memorial Day weekend) (828) 456-1940 www. twigsandleaves.com Find us on Facebook. The Mahogany House and Art on Depot bring vibrancy and color to Frog Level, and are a joy to visit. The Mahogany House represents over fifty artists and has working studios. A must see for all art enthusiasts! While strolling down to Frog Level, you can’t miss Grace Cathey’s Sculpture Garden and Gallery. Grace will be demonstrating her steel sculpture techniques, and viewers can watch her create morning glories and bees.

HART’s production is directed by long time HART choreographer Cord Scott, who sees this as a great dance show as well. His cast includes Alison Young, Brad Mercier, Ricky Sanford, Calintha Briggs and Carson Funk. This is an all professional cast with many new faces to HART’s stage and promises to be an evening of great entertainment. iF YOU gO “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do,”

June 6, 7, 13, 14 at 7:30 and June 1, 8 and 15 at 3 p.m. “Grand Night For Singing,” June 20, 21, 27, 28, July 5 at 7:30 p.m. and June 22, 29 and July 6 at 3 p.m. Tickets; $24 for Adults, $20 for Seniors, Students $10. Special $8 discount tickets for Students for Thursdays and Sundays. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville. Box Office Hours Monday-Saturday 1-5 p.m. For reservations call (828) 456-6322 or visit www.harttheatre.org.

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We were eager to advertise our new ownership of Bogart’s Restaurant in Waynesville. While we kept all the original menu items, we were excited about trying out new, homemade original dishes as well. Rapid River Magazine has been a great value for getting our message out to their readers. After running a coupon, we were pleasantly surprised at how well it was received. A big THANK YOU to all our awesome Bogart’s customers and to Rapid River Magazine!

~ Shelly Sneed, Co-Owner of Bogart’s Restaurant

Bogart’s Restaurant, 303 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313, www.bogartswaynesville.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 31


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Located just minutes from downtown Asheville, or Brew City USA, Frog Level Brewing is worth the trip. Whether you are walking by or driving, come in and enjoy the best beer in Western North Carolina. We have a dog friendly place. Tadpole Porter pg. 30

Frog Level Brewing

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56 Commerce St, Waynesville t-W 2-6:30 p.m.; th-Sa 2-9 p.m. (828) 454-5664 • www.froglevelbrewing.com

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classes ~ workshops ~ lectures FiRSt FRidaY aRt WaLKS

Friday, June 6 from

5-8 p.m. Stroll galleries, meet the artists and enjoy refreshments. Hendersonville’s Arts District through December in downtown Hendersonville and Flat Rock.

aRt in tHe paRK...ing LOt Saturday, June 14 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. See

local artists and jewelers in the parking lot of Art MoB. Applications accepted for artists, jewelers & craftsmen. Booth fee is $35. Second Saturdays through September.

CLaSSeS

Canvas & Corks – Share a bottle of wine

and paint with friends. Many different fun classes. Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m., or Tuesday afternoons. $35, supplies included.

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JOHn MaC KaH StUdiO – LandSCape OiL painting WORKSHOpS

June 13-15

Painting the mountains has special challenges and pleasures. Join me for an adventure and expedition to paint an icon! We will start from the studio and then travel via the Blue Ridge Parkway where there is a grand view of Cold Mountain and Shining Rock Wilderness. Paint one view in morning light, another in the afternoon or sunset if we are lucky. Pack your lunch and bring your portable easel. $200. Enroll by June 1, 2014.

Basket Weaving – Weave a small eco market basket. Call for dates and times. $48, supplies included. Instructor: Teresa Jordon.

Rug Hooking – Learn the basics. June 26,

July 3 & 10, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond.

Bob Ross painting – Instruction on painting landscapes. Call for dates and times. $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry.

Silk painting – Learn different methods to paint on silk. June 17, 12-3 p.m., $45, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display.

zendoodle Mini Workshop – Lines, designs and doodles! Create a small abstract piece. Call for dates and times. $30, supplies included. Instructor: Catherine Langsdorf. gourd art – Different techniques taught in each class. June 8, painting, June 30, 1:304:30 p.m., $42, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display.

Watercolor gouache Resist painting – Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. Call for dates. $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display.

in tandem with the expressive use of drying oils and varnish mediums.

Painting a Mountain, Cold Mountain Expedition

June 29-July 12 Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts, Gatlinburg, NC

A rare opportunity to paint on location in the Great Smokies. We will start in the studio and get theory before practice, then take a safari into the mountains to experience the wonder and challenge of true color in nature. Color mixing and color relationships are covered

ReSOURCeS, SUppORt, and FUndRaiSing tOOLS FOR aRtiStS

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The New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) is coming to HandMade in America on the evening of Thursday, June 5 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Sarah Corpron, Program Officer from Artspire, a project of NYFA, will present their fiscal sponsorship program, and extensive research, fundraising, and support programs of Artspire and NYFA. Their opportunities are for individual artists and arts organizations at all stages nationwide. This presentation is geared to individual artists across all disciplines and for emerging arts organizations. Craft, visual, performing, literary artists,

filmmakers, and any related arts organizations are all encouraged to attend. Fiscal Sponsorship is a critical way for individual artists, artists’ collaborative projects, and emerging arts organizations in all disciplines to apply for funding usually available only to organizations with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status. NYFA Source is the most extensive national online directory of awards, services, and programs for artists. Listings include over 11,000 arts organizations, award programs, service programs, and publications for individual artists across the country.

Students can deepen and develop painting skills while working from life on site to become adept at handling the principles of painting with oils. Designed for all levels, this class offers foundation information in the use of materials and craft of oil painting. Visit the Arrowmont website to find out more and register: www.arrowmont.org. John Mac Kah Studio 122 Riverside drive, asheville (828) 225-5000, www. JohnMacKah.com

everything Old is new again – Learn basic

book art principles. June 23, 24 & 25, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., one class/$45, three/$40 each. Instructor: Kate Stockman. From Childhood Stories to Adult Reflections: altered Board Books. Create your own story from a child’s board book. July 26, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., $45. Instructor: Kate Stockman.

Home Sweet Home – box. Create mixed

media pages and cigar box wooden covers. June 14, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $45. Instructor: Kate Stockman.

art MoB Studios & Marketplace

124 4th avenue east in Hendersonville (828) 693-4545, www.artmobstudios.com

Beginning CLaY SCULptURe

For more information on NYFA, the Fiscal Sponsorship program/Artspire and our resources for artists, visit www. NYFA.org or email sponsorship@nyfa.org. The presentation will allow room for Q&A and follow-up with participants. The NYFA presentation is free, open to the public, and will be held on Thursday, June 5 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at HandMade in America, 125 S. Lexington Ave, Suite 101, Asheville. The entrance is on Hilliard Avenue between Church/Lexington. Please RSVP for the presentation by contacting Lindsey Mudge at lmudge@handmadeinamerica.org or (828) 252-0121 x303.

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tuesday, June 3 Eight-week class. Learn the basic construction techniques for making clay sculpture while having a good time. Class intended for beginners and intermediates. 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., at Asheville Parks & Recreation Harvest House, 205 Kenilworth Road. $80 for Asheville residents, $90 for non-residents. Class limited to eight. Call (828) 350-2051.

StRetCH YOUR SOLeS & tOeS

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a 2-hour class all about your feet takes place from 4-6 p.m. Saturday, June 7.

One Center Yoga will host “Stretch Your Soles & Toes” with Nicole Kintz. It’s important to have healthy feet because they are the foundation for the rest of your body. If you have pain in your feet, or if they are unstable, weak, or mechanically unsound, this can affect your knees, hips, and lower back. Learn simple techniques and yoga poses to decrease pain,

every Saturday – Beginning Art classes from 2-4 p.m. with art instructor Chris Baschon.

every thursday – Mandalas workshops from 6-8 p.m. with Chris Baschon.

For more information, or to register, call (828) 699-0240.

the art House gallery and Studio 5 Highland park Road east Flat Rock, nC 28726 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Mosaic Mirrors – Create a small mirror

using fun items. Call for dates and times. $75, supplies included. Instructor: Linda Pannullo. Work on display.

adult art Classes at the art House

increase mobility and strength, and explore how to take better care of your feet. You only get one pair in this life: give them lots of love! All levels welcome. If you are new to yoga, this class is a great way to get started! $30 prepaid registration. $35 day of the event. Register by calling (828) 225-1904 or go online to www. onecenteryoga.com.

One Center Yoga 120 Coxe avenue, Suite 3B downtown asheville

arrowhead artists and artisan League every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave, in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for details.

this is Colored pencil! Saturday, June 7 – This versatile medium

can be combined with other media. No drawing skills needed. Beginning and intermediate. Great for summer sketching and travel. 10-4 with Lorelle Bacon. $95 includes all materials. Call (828) 776-2716 or email gallery@310art.com for more details. River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. Visit www. 310art.com

Classes & Workshops Listings with Rapid River Magazine List your class or workshop in print and online for just $14.95 for 35 words. Add 20 cents for each additional word. 60 word limit per event. Longer listings can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email info@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number submissions we get, we can not accept entries that do not follow our publication’s format. You must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description, contact details, and location. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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what to do guide Saturday, May 31

proliferation

Mixed-media paintings by local artist Sandee Johnson. Artist’s wine reception 5-9 p.m. On display through July 16, 2014. The Andrew Charles Gallery, 60 N. Merrimon Ave. at Reynolds Village, Suite 105. Open Tues-Sat 10-5, or by appointment. Call (828) 989-0111.

Saturday & Sunday, May 31 & June 1

Brevard Short Film Festival

First annual film festival hosted at Brevard College. Screening Adonis, James Snyder and Cooper Harris. of more than 40 short films. Begins at 11 a.m. Saturday and runs through Sunday night, with the last group of shorts scheduled for 3 p.m. For details, call (828) 885-5354 or visit www.brevardshortfilmfestival.com.

Sunday, June 1

the Southern appalachian Chamber Singers

Select ensemble composed primarily of Mars Hill University professors, students, and alumni from the celebrated Mars Hill

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Choir. The concert will include the Fauré Requiem, Fauré’s Cantique de Jean Racine, and selections by Brahms and Morten Lauridsen. 4 p.m. at the Central United Methodist Church, in Asheville. Contributions accepted.

in Amazement at their Wondrous talents! 6-8 p.m., ZaPow! 21 Battery Park Avenue, Suite 101, Asheville NC. www.zapow.net

Friday, June 6

Ruth ilg, espressioni

Sunday, June 1

percussionist Mario gaetano

Concert at 4 p.m. at the Asheville Masonic Temple. The recital will feature contemporary music written for solo percussion instruments, including marimba, vibraphone, and drums. Dr. Gaetano will be joined by colleagues performing music for viola and percussion, flute and percussion, horn and vibraphone, and marimba and percussion. Tickets are $10; a portion will support the Asheville Masonic Temple. For more details call (828) 575-4171.

Sunday, June 1

a Short History of the piano

Pianist Daniel Weiser presents music of the early Romantics, including Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, and Schumann. Incredible solo piano music along with great stories about the composers. $15 adv.; $20 door. 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Monday, June 2

“take 2” Jazz duet Series

Pianist Bill Bares and steel pan virtuoso Jonathan Scales, jazz. $12/ $6 students with ID. 7:30 p.m. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

tuesday, June 3

Odyssey Cooperative art gallery

New show celebrating the ceramic art of Chiwa Clark, Isis Dudek, Scott Cameron-Bell and other gallery members. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 11-5 at 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville.

thursday, June 5

Representational and abstract paintings on display from June Appassionata 1-30. Opening by Ruth Ilg reception 5-8 p.m. during the City Art Walk. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. Call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Friday, June 6

an american affair

Tim Schwarz and Daniel Weiser of AmiciMusic perform chamber music for violin and piano. 7:30 Tim Schwarz p.m. $15 advance/ $20 door. White Horse, 105c Montreat Rd., Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Friday, June 6

Fully exposed

Exhibition of mixed media paintings and black and white photographs by David Holt. Opening reception 6-8 p.m. On display June 6 to July 31, 2014. Pink Dog Creative, 348 Depot St., Asheville. Details at www.pinkdog-creative.com.

Saturday, June 7

Clive Carroll Concert

Solo concert by English guitar virtuoso. Distinct acoustic guitar player mixes altered tunings, renaissance, and classical harmony to delta blues and jazz, making it all sound natural and effortless. $10 at the door. 7 p.m. at St. Matthias Church, 1 Dundee St. in Asheville.

2nd annual Soumu

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longer hike with Gracia Slater. $35 for members; $60 for non-members who will receive a one-year membership. To register call (828) 452-0720 or visit friendsofthesmokies.org/hikes.html.

Wednesday, June 11

trae pierce and t-Stone

Progressive funk by bass ace Trae Pierce and T-Stone. 7:30 p.m. $12 at the White Horse, 105c Montreat Rd., Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Saturday, June 14

Ceramic art demonstrations

Pottery, sculpture, refreshments, and a showcase of ceramic arts. The Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Open Tuesday through Sunday 11-5.

Saturday & Sunday June 14 & 15

River arts district Studio Stroll

More than 170 artists from the River Arts District will open their studios to the public from 10-6 p.m. View and purchase art; tour studios in the district’s historic industrial buildings. Free trolleys run approximately every 15 minutes. Enjoy gallery exhibits, kid activities, and art demonstrations, such as glass blowing, wheel throwing, wood turning, and more. More details at www.riverartsdistrict.com

Saturday & Sunday June 14 & 15

Jonas gerard Live painting performances

In our new gallery at Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St., #144., Asheville. 2-3:30 p.m. both days. (828) 350-7711, www.jonasgerard.com

June 14, 21, 28

asheville art in the park

Downtown art market. More details at www.AshevilleArtinthePark.com 2007 Honda CB 919 Bike For Give away. This is a clean bike. Well kept in Garage. Excellent condition.Email Davidmanning05@live.com for details.

Saturday, June 14

Studio Show and Sale

A celebration of African music, dance, food, and art. Featuring: Zansa, Barakissa Coulibaly, Lisa Zahiya, Mande Foly. 7 p.m. at the Orange Peel. All ages. $12 adv.; $15 at the door. Food not included in ticket cost. For tickets go to www.theorangepeel.net, email zansamusic@gmail.com, or call (828) 774-2277. Visit www.zansamusic.com.

Amazing producer, vocalist, and DJ combines elements of hiphop, EDM, and R&B. At the Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com.

Friday, June 6

tuesday, June 10

The Red House Studio Artists sale. Chat with the Denise Geiger artists and watch them work. 10% discount on all studio sales. Featured artists are Michele Hamilton and Denise Geiger. 10-5 p.m. in the historic house next to the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain. Visit www.svfalARTS.org/events.

Friends of the Smokies Hike

Saturday, June 14

geekOut Kick Off

Party and Artist Demos at ZaPow! Meet the originators and presenters of The Most Marvelous Illustrations on Earth! Witness the amazing drawing ability of ZaPow artists in action! Gasp

Enjoy a boat ride across Fontana Lake for an interpretive hike to Hazel Creek in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Two hiking opportunities. Easy hike, total distance of 4 miles, or take a

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Family-friendly summer celebration. Farm Fest is an entire day of fun on the farm, featuring local vendors, a swin-

gin’, twangin’, rockin’ musical line-up and local food truck, Farm to Fender. Jabe Fisher, Wayne Buckner and more! 12-8 p.m., $5 donation; kids under 12 free. Car or tent camping $10; must be set up by noon Saturday for ridgeline car camping. Call Franny at (828) 2162836 or www.frannysfarm.com

tuesday, June 17

Workshop with patti Clayton

Generating, Deepening, and Documenting Learning through Critical Reflection in Service-Learning. 2 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union, room 104. $75. Details and registration at keycenter.unca.edu or keyctr@unca.edu.

tuesday, June 17

Bringing it Home

An award-winning documentary film about industrial HEMP, healthy houses, and a greener future for America. NC filmmakers, Linda Booker and Blaire Johnson, will be attending for a post-screening discussion with Asheville resident Anthony Brenner, whose 2010 story in USA Today inspired the film. Tickets are $10. 7:30 p.m. at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www. ashevilletheatre.org.

Friday, June 20

downtown after 5

4:30-9:30 p.m. Music by Drivin’ n Cryin’. North Lexington Ave. between Hiawassee and the I-240 overpass. 100 N. Lexington Ave. in downtown Asheville. Details at www.ashevilledowntown.org

Saturday, June 21

the Carolina Ceili Band

Summer solstice concert in the HandMade in America building at 8 p.m. Celtic tunes and songs on traditional acoustic instruments (fiddle, mandolin, guitar, bodhran/Irish drum), and delightful 4-part vocal harmonies. Irish dance, storytelling, and other related art forms. 125 S. Lexington in Asheville. Visit www.carolinaceili.com.

Friday & Saturday, June 20 & 21

Why not now

Womansong, Asheville’s long-established women’s community chorus, hits a high note with their first public concert of the 2014 season. 7:30 p.m. at Warren Wilson College’s Kittredge Theatre. Tickets are available from Womansong members and at www. womansong.org. $15; children 12 years and under, $7. Proceeds from the concert will benefit Womansong and the New Start Program, providing scholarships and financial assistance for women in transition.

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what to do guide Friday, June 27

the Black Jacket Symphony

Best in Show

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Friday, June 27

Opera talks at OLLi

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by Amy Downs

Friday, June 6 & Friday, June 20 – Americana,

Pop, and originals by Carrie Morrison on vocals and keyboard; Steve Whiteside on acoustic guitar.

Friday, June 27 – Sharon

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

LaMotte on vocals, Matt Dingledine on guitar; Jazz, Blues & Pop.

Carrie Morrison

Saturday, June 14 & Saturday, June 28 – Jazz by Elise Pratt on vocals, Mike Holstein on guitar. All performances 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Elise Pratt

the green Room Café

536 north Main, Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 www.thegreenRoomCafe.biz

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Saturday, June 28

Stories on asheville’s Front porch 2014

Kaleidoscope: Celebrating Diversity, featuring Bobby Norfolk, three time Emmy Award winner. 10:30-11:45 a.m., Rhino Courtyard, Pack Place. Rain or shine. Free. Seats are limited.

asheville arts alive

Free events and artist directory featuring unique portfolios. The Asheville Arts Alive web portal is for you and it’s free! Entries/profiles are being collected now and the launch will be in June. Sign up at www.AshevilleArtsAlive.org to see a list of criteria and to request an account.

are you in Big trouble with the iRS?

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

11-4 at Mountain Made Art Gallery, inside the Grove Arcade, downtown Asheville. View the works of our featured artists at www.mtnmade.com/blog. Details at (828) 350-0307.

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800867-6028.

Medical guardian

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Saturday, July 5

the Slide Brothers

Concert by the greatest living musicians who embody the sacred steel tradition, Calvin Cooke and Aubrey Ghent. 9 p.m.; 21+; $20 adv.; $25 at the door. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave. www.AshevilleMusicHall.com.

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Nello Masci

48th annual Shindig on the green

Live art demonstrations

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pianist Mark Sherren perform Rag Time, Jazz & Pop.

June 28; July 5, 12, 19; august 9, 16, 23, and 30

Saturdays in June

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Hendersonville’s premier live dinner music venue, The Green Room Café, specializes in artisan crafted scrumptious food made fresh from local ingredients. Featuring signature dinner entrees, gourmet sandwiches, soups and salads, breakfast and baked treats, premium beer & wine, Fair Trade, locally roasted, primo espresso & coffees, and an assortment of loose-leaf teas. Live dinner music on Friday and Saturday nights starting at 6:30 p.m.

Run For Shindig on the green

A joyously spontaneous celebration of traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers on summer Saturday evenings. Stage show and informal jam sessions. Pack Square Park on the Bascom Lamar Lunsford stage in downtown Asheville. Bring your instruments, lawn chairs or blanket, family and friends. Free. More details at www. folkheritage.org or (828) 258-6101 x345.

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the green Room Café Live Music Line-Up

Saturday, June 28 5K Race & Fun Walk/Run benefit for Shindig on the Green. 5K Race begins at 8:30 a.m. and the one-mile Fun Walk/Run begins at 8:35 a.m. at Carrier Park in Asheville. Register online at www. active.com until Thursday, June 26. 5K $25; Fun Walk/Run $10. Day-of-race registration 7:30-8:15 a.m.; 5K $30 day-of-race. For more details visit www.folkheritage.org or call (828) 258-6101 x345.

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Performing Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon at the Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave. Asheville. 8 p.m., 18+. Tickets $28 & $23; available at www.etix.com, by phone at 1-800-514-etix, at the Orange Peel Box Office, Harvest Records in West Asheville, or the Aloft Hotel in downtown Asheville.

Performance by Asheville Lyric Opera Summer Artists Training Program. 3 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Free and open to the public. Info: (828) 251-6140 or www.olliasheville.com.

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the tax doctor

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CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 10 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — June 2014 35


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Jonas gerard Fine art www.jonasgerard.com

andrew Charles gallery (828) 989-0111

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

ariel gallery www.arielcraftgallery.com the art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Kathmandu Cafe www.cafekathmanduasheville.com Ken Wilson Ford www.kwford.com

art in Bloom www.BlackMountainArts.org

Kenilworth artists association www.kenilworthartists.org

art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com

Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814

art on depot (828) 246-0218

Lime Leaf thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com

asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org BlackBird Frame & art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967 Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com grace C. Bomer art www.gracecarolbomer.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com the Cantina www.cantinabiltmore.com the Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Lenny’s Subs, www.lennys.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Massie Furniture (828) 456-3311

“For the Zen Buddhist, everything that exists, apart

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com Mountain top appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com north Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

River arts district artists www.riverartsdistrict.com

double exposure giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Satellite gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com

Frog Level Brewery www.froglevelbrewing.com

Soapy dog www.thesoapydog.com

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Southern Highland Craft guild www.craftguild.org

the green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz HaRt theater www.harttheatre.com

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BiLtMORe ave. n. aSHeviLLe BL

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Starving artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com Susan Marie designs www.susanmariedesigns.com thai Spice www.ThaiSpiceWaynesville.com

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town Hardware & general Store www.townhardware.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

tpennington art gallery www.tpennington.com

Jewels that dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

twigs and Leaves gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

the Writers’ Workshop www.twwoa.org vavavoom www.vavavooom.com

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BiLtMORe viLLage HendeRSOnviLLe Rd. BC

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(828) 646-0071

LeiCeSteR HWY.

pattOn ave.

Spice & tea exchange www.spiceandtea.com

great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

MaCOn avenUe

MeRRiMOn ave.

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com On demand printing www.ondemandink.com

gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

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and the presence of the universe are exactly in the same place. This is what we call wholeheartedness or “with your whole mind.” ~ Dainin Katagiri “God” is everything and no-thing since all things are only appearances of spirit-matter, all of which is The One that is Life. Only humans can create an artificial reality with their highly complex self-aware consciousness in which we experience as our primary reality our separateness. This is what led Carl Jung to say, “‘God’ is “a word for the non-ego.” For mystically awakened Buddhists, or the American or Australian indigenous peoples, there is no anthropomorphic “God,” Life itself is the source of all and experienced as sacred. They live in the reality of Teilhard’s spirit-matter.

Mehri & Company (828) 693-0887

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

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‘Experiencing One‘ cont’d from page 29

Octopus garden www.theOG.us

Frog pond downsizing (828) 734-3874

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

12 Bones (828) 253-4499

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from man – animals and plants, stones, earth, air, fire, water – lives undemandingly from the center of being, without having left it or being able to leave it. If man, having strayed from this center, is to know security and innocence of existence… he must go back… and return home to the “house of truth… He must become… like forest and rock, like flower and fruit, like wind and storm.”

~ Eugen Herrigel (The Method of Zen) Born to have a human experience, not a squirrel’s, a daffodil’s or a bird’s, The Flowing River of Universal Energy contracts to a one, humbly, awkwardly, vulnerably emerging with the first breath inhaled. Air and earth combine, animated with the spark of The One, a story begins, the story of one. A human being begins, lost in the teeming, bumping, yearning, struggling, loving, hating, striving, hoping, despairing sea of humanity, all looking for their place. Insecure, often afraid, sometimes full and triumphant, then again, beset by incompleteness, frustration, fear. Growing, learning, striving, asking: “Is this my place?” “Is this my place?” So many to challenge for “the place.” So many to sow confusion about what is “the place?” The one who struggles, the one who seeks, has never been taught of the One who already, always is the place This watcher, this experiencer that is the experience, not the one chasing after experience, chasing after place. – We must come to know the One who is more than one,

who is the One watching this human experience. And if from birth the watcher is an ancient one, they carry the knowing of I Am, and they live their human experience struggling to remember what they already know. And if they seek the quiet, the still voice within, the remembering occurs, and the human experience carries less and less angst, less and less suffering, more and more knowing the place is here, right where I always am . There is an awakening into I AM who was not born, who does not die. The KNOWING grows, the place is HERE, the HERE that is the flowing energy of the Universe - everywhere. And when their story of one comes to its last breath, in the last exhalation there is a sigh – “Home.” And The River takes them back to The One they had never left. And when time and space and soul are ready, from The One, again the soul sets out to experience being one – A squirrel, a daffodil, a bird, a human being, swirling, dancing in The One that looks like many.

To realize our wholeness, we must, as the mythic mystic master, Yoda, said, “unlearn what you have learned.” And as Obi Wan said to Luke, “You must reach out with your feelings.” Then and only then, can we experience “The Force” that is us all, one experiencing One.

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 edgewood in asheville. By donation. information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


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artful living 7th Annual Firefly Gathering

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at the Firefly gathering, you’re sure to find bare feet, buckskins, and bows and arrows. Alongside classes in trapping and foraging, you’ll find organic gardening, beekeeping, permaculture, super-hero smoothies, solar power, relationship skills, mead making, urban homesteading, and much more. And beyond that, you’ll find a community of caring people co-creating a place-based, ecologicallysane way of life. Set up camp for four days of classes, cooking over fires, singing songs, trading hand-made wares, gazing at the stars,

BY

NATALIE BOgWALKER

sampling herbal meads, and discussions on cultural revival. At Firefly, you can learn how to raise rabbits in your backyard or weave a belt, how to throw a tomahawk or grow ginseng, how to make a survival shelter or how to use and care for a scythe.... and that’s just a few of the options for Thursday morning! This year we’ll have more engaging fun for kids with classes like natural soda making, natural camouflage, clay bead making, and snake identification.

iF YOU gO: June 12-15 with post-

camp intensives June 18-21. 20 minutes north of Asheville at Bell’s Cove in Barnardsville. Full Pass $150-400 sliding scale. Day Pass $55 -$150. Reduced rate for children age 8 to 12; under 8 free. More details at www.fireflygathering.org

A Moment in Time

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ananda Hair Studio Fashion Show benefitting Handmade in america.

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BY LINDSEY MUDgE In an effort to illustrate the diversity of hair and fashion through time, stylists from Ananda Hair Studio will be teaming up with designers, makeup artists, and models for A Moment in Time, a dynamic fashion show. Categories in the show include: Primordial Earth, Ancient Greece, War of Scottish Independence, Sail Age, Victorian Invention, and Punk Rock Glam. This is the second year Ananda has hosted this fashion show. Last year’s show, the World Fashion Show, featured hairstyling and fashion from around the globe. Due to the success of the show and the valuable funds it raised for last year’s non-profit, Build Bridges of Asheville, the event’s organizer, Charlotte Murphy, has brought the fashion show back for a second year.

For more information about Ananda Hair Studio, call (828) 232-1017, or visit www.anandahair.com. For more information about HandMade in America, call (828) 252-0121, or visit www.handmadeinamerica.org. A Moment in Time, Sunday, June 15 at 7 p.m. at the iF YOU Mill Room, 66 Asheland Ave. in Asheville. Purchase gO tickets at the door: $15 for seats; $10 standing room.

‘Fame Game’ continued from page 18

promote a cult of personality inverted and re-purposed. New propaganda and agendas are formatted and personalized. The near fanatical fascination with fame seduced by stardom. “Fame makes our super-heroes our royalty. The very thing people want above all else and will pursue with all abandon for. Then there is the duality of the nature of fame itself that is examined by the work. The infamy aspects or evil side of fame, the respected and feared side. The fame that intimidates and intoxicates with the twin aphrodisiacs of money and power. In conclusion art about fame as alchemy, glitter and luck.”

~ Yamabushi

The Fame Game, feauring works by Yamabushi and iF YOU Ishmael. Opening reception Friday, June 6 at 7 p.m. gO The Satellite Gallery, 55 Broadway St., downtown

Asheville. For more details, please call (828) 505-2225, or visit www.thesatellitegallery.com.

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noteworthy ACDT Celebrates 35 Years of Modern Dance

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“Looking for Frida,” an original modern ballet, is the selected piece for the 35th anniversary of asheville Contemporary dance theatre (aCdt).

collaboration with Cuban dancer Nelson Reyes in 2004. Now, Susan and Giles Collard have put their creative energy together to recreate this heartbreaking dance adventure into the passionate lives of Frida, Diego, and Trotsky.

The week long celebration includes six Looking for Frida, June 20, 21, iF performances of the ballet, Mexican cuisine, YOU 27, 28 at 8 p.m. and June 22 & drinks, live music, art discussions, and a Frida gO 29 at 6 p.m. General admission: look-alike contest. $16 in advance, $18 at the door. For 35 years, ACDT has been creating, Seniors and students- $11 in advance, teaching, hosting, touring, and performing $13 at the door. “Frida” show + “Frida modern dance locally, nationally, and interFiesta” $25. *Come dressed like Frida and nationally. Its success has been in its constant get $2 off the price of any Frida event. development of choreographic work based in June 25 at 8 p.m. “Art of Frida Kahlo and Latin American spirituality and the aesthetics Diego Rivera” exhibit by Jennifer Goff. No of dance theatre. charge. From its inception under the direction June 26 at 8 p.m. A Frida Fiesta. Frida look of Susan and Giles Collard, ACDT has been alike contest, eat and drink like Frida w/ performing and choreographing internationMexican cuisine. Music by Jim Arrendell. ally as well as creating exchanges that have $10 in advance, 12 at the door. been bringing celebrity choreographers and Frida Kahlo portrayed by Jaime Scott performers to the Asheville community. Held at The Bebe Theatre, 20 Commerce McDowell Photo: Toby Maurer ACDT’s current company of 10 dancers St., downtown Asheville. For more details will perform “Looking for Frida,” a modern call the Asheville Contemporary Dance ballet based on the life of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, choreoTheatre at (828) 254-2621 or visit www.acdt.org. graphed originally by Susan Collard in 1998, and later revised in

3rd Annual Percussion Festival

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Hosted by asheville’s beloved ambassador of rhythm River guerguerian, and jazz vocalist and recording artist Lizz Wright. The June 20-21 events will take place at the Diana Wortham Theater. Saturday evening’s concert will be a ‘Master Concert’ of original compositions featuring visiting and local performers and teachers.

On Sunday, June 22, participate in a family rhythm workshop with local favorite Billy Jonas. Custom retreat packages based on the theme ‘A Return to Our Natural Rhythms’ for June 16-22 are also available through the OM Sanctuary. There will be percussion workshops throughout the weekend. Workshops for all levels include performing, improvising, and composing taught by worldrenowned performers such as David Kuckhermann, Sameer Gupta, Ferenc Nemeth, Lionel Loueke, Marla Leigh, Billy Jonas, Naghmeh Farahmand, DJ Rimarkable, Adam Maalouf, Adama Dembele and other national and regional teachers. iF YOU 3rd Annual gO Asheville Percussion

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38 June 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 10

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KACHINA DAVINE

Sameer Gupta

Marla Leigh

Festival, June 20-22. Workshops: Fri 3-6:30 p.m.; Sat 10-6:30 p.m.; Sun 11-5 p.m. Concerts: Friday & Saturday 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theater, 2 N, Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 257-4530 Sunday, OM Sanctuary, 87 Richmond Hill Dr., Asheville. Call (828) 252-7313, www.omsanctuary.org/events Tickets: Weekend Pass $75; VIP $150 (includes all workshops, concerts, special seating, access to week-long residency, Afterparty); Individual concerts $25; Individual workshops $20. Solstice After Party at the Millroom $10 adv./$15 door. More details at www.ashevillepercussionfestival.com


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‘Jonas Gerard’ cont’d from page 20

During the semi-annual River Arts District Studio Stroll Jonas doubles up on the creativity and does two painting performances; one on Saturday and another on Sunday. Since this is the first stroll since the opening of his spacious new studio and gallery at Riverview Station, both performances will be held there. There will be two trolleys providing shuttle service throughout the River Arts District during the stroll, and both his Riverview Station and Clingman Avenue galleries will be open. Visiting each stop at fifteen-minute intervals, the trolleys provide Jonas uses varied tools an easy, restful and techniques. and scenic way to travel back and forth to each gallery and throughout the district. This promises to be a great Studio Stroll, with much to see and do everywhere. Plan ahead, arrive with open minds and hearts… and soak up the inspiration.

Jonas Gerard Live Painting Performance

iF YOU Jonas Gerard - Studio Stroll Live gO Painting Performances take place

Saturday & Sunday, June 14 & 15 from 2-3:30 p.m. at Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St., Studio #144. For more information, visit www.jonasgerard.com

Jonas gerard Fine art is located at 240 Clingman avenue, asheville, nC, 28801 – in the heart of the River arts district. Studio and gallery are open every day from 10-6 pm. Jonas gerard at Riverview Station is located at 191 Lyman St. #144, asheville, nC, 28801 – in the heart of the River arts district. Studio and gallery are open Mon-Sat from 10-6 pm. Open Sundays by appointment.

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June 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
June 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: RAD Artist Cheryl Keefer..p21; Inside: The Southern Highland Craft Guild..p9; River Arts District Studio Stroll..p20-21; Jonas...

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