Page 1

The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival’s 44th Season of Concerts PAGE 6

Artetude Gallery Celebrates First Anniversary PAGE 13

The Fine Art Studio of Stephen R. Janton PAGE

PAGES

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Interview with Jonas Gerard

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The Great Gatsby • Iron Man 3 • Java Heat • The Reluctant Fundamentalist • Renoir • Star Trek Into Darkness

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Studio 375 Depot an eclectic group of artists an historic building a creative atmosphere a warm welcome

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fine art People Love Asheville IT’S THE ART – AND IT’S US!

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Even though small businesses in our fair city are open year-round – including a plethora of independent artists – with the change in the weather from Spring-ish to Summer-ish comes an increase in events throughout the Asheville area. We’re like a big garden full of amazing flowers. April kicks it off with the re-emergence of downtown art walks, followed by May’s outdoor craft and music choices, and an Asheville Tourists game or two. And who doesn’t love a farmer’s market or ten? And then the warmer months bring June’s River Arts District Studio Stroll, followed by Bele Chere downtown at the end of July. Each year I observe increased tourist flow, starting in mid-March with Spring Breakers, with a weekly up-tic in volume from there. By early May, we have non-stop

Love Asheville pastel by Greg Vineyard.

‘Asheville’ continued on page 8

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 3


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performance Internationally Acclaimed Tenor Stephen Mark Brown

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The Modern American Music Project presents internationally acclaimed tenor Stephen Mark Brown in recital, accompanied by pianist David Troy Francis.

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DAVID TROY FRANCIS

The New York City Opera. He recently starred as Cavaradossi in the Asheville Lyric Opera’s performance of Tosca. This quote from Luciano Pavarotti says all one needs to know about Stephen Mark Brown:

The eclectic program will include songs of Samuel Barber, Ned Rorem, and “Bravo! This tenor George Gershwin, along reminds me very Tenor Stephen Mark Brown with contemporary arrangemuch of myself.” ments of American folk, theatrical and cowboy tunes, for an excitIF ing and entertaining concert experience. YOU Stephen Mark Brown in recital, Sensational local soprano Ms. Simone GO Sunday, June 9 at 4 p.m. Diana Vigilante will make a special guest appearWortham Theatre, Asheville. ance for some heart pounding, glorious Tickets: $25 general seating; $35 reserved duets with Mr. Brown. seating. For more information call (828) In his extensive operatic career, Mr. 257-4530, or visit www.dwtheatre.com. Brown has sung at La Scala in Italy and

PG. 40

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4 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10


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we love this place CD Release Concert for Bliss of Being

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Ten

JUNE 2013

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Tom Baugh, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Maggie Cramer, Amy Downs, David Troy Francis, Beth Gossett, Lori Greenberg, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Heather Maloy, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, T.Oder, R.Woods, Dennis Ray, Melissa Reardon, Bruce Sales, Alice Sebrell, David Simchock, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Janelle Wienke, Ana Woodall. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, June 2013, Vol. 16 No. 10

3 Columns

Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 3 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 14 Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . 15 James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . 18 David Simchock – Photo Tips . . . . 26 Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . 27 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . 32 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 32 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 37

6 Performance

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival. . 6 Terpsicorps Theatre of Dance . . . . . 7 Community Choreography Projects .8

9 Fine Art

Bender Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Arrowhead Gallery and Studios . . . 10 Claymates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Asheville Art in the Park. . . . . . . . . 12 Hiking for Aurora Studio . . . . . . . . 13 Artetude Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

17 Music

Jonas Gerard, River Arts District Artist. PAGE 23

Musicians on the album include Adriana Contino - cello, Bob Hinkle, Dielle Ciesco, Kate Steinbeck, and Richard Shulman on piano. Cellist Elizabeth Gergel will also perform. Bliss of Being and The Pure Heart Ensemble, 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 1, at White Horse Black Mountain, 105 Montreat Rd. in Black Mountain. Phone (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Live Music in Asheville For such a small mountain town, Asheville is jam-packed full of creative folks who tend to make some pretty amazing music. www.ListenAsheville.com is a comprehensive website you can use to keep up with all of the live music to be heard in the downtown area. The site provides audio samples of the bands set to appear. A great way to discover local artists

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Dave Desmelik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Mountain Oasis Festival . . . . . . . . . 18

19 River Arts District

Janton Art Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Pittman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy Silver Fine Artist . . . . . . . . . Julia Fosson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara C.L. Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Photographer GD Whalen . . . . . . . Soli Deo Gloria Studio . . . . . . . . . Haywood 2013 Graduate Show . .

19 20 20 21 22 23 24 24 25

River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 19-24 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 33-35 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 42 Find It Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 40

Dueling Sopranos Eco-Opera A comedy with singing that involves two sopranos (Karen Svites and Simone Vigilante) who both want to land a role in a fictional opera company run by an eccentric impresario (Timothy Wilds) and a hungry accompanist (Vance Reese). Presented by Opera Creations at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 1. Price includes food and the show. Cash bar. Doors open at 6:30. Wysteria Event Center, 56 N. Main St. in Weaverville. Parking is plentiful and free. Purchase tickets online by visiting www.operacreations.org.

Growing Minds at Markets Growing Minds at Market is a space at the farmers markets set aside for children and families so that children can engage in fun projects focused on local food and farms. The summer series takes place Saturdays, June through August, at Asheville City Market Downtown, and both the North Asheville, and West Asheville Tailgate Markets. Activities slated for June at Asheville City Market include a garden story reading with Spellbound Children’s Bookshop, hula hooping with Hooping Hearts, edible plant parts education with the Girl Scouts, a collage craft with Rainbow in My Tummy, and more. For a full schedule of Growing Minds at Market activities visit www.growing-minds.org.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

28 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 28

38 What to Do Guide On the Cover:

An album of deeply relaxing and expansive music to dive into and return rested and in tune with your natural inner alignment.

or to catch a big name band stopping through town. With so many great venues, not a night goes by without live music, and www.ListenAsheville.com is the best way to find it.

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

39 39 39 39 39

42 Local Favorites

Mine and Yours Consignments . . . 42 The Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . 43

Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 5


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Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

The Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival, one of the longest running chamber music festivals in the United States, presents its 44th season to the listeners of Western North Carolina.

Celebrating 10 years of “Callie & Cats” in Rapid River Magazine! You’ll find your favorite comics every month in the What to Do GuideTM

Festival Schedule Program 1 Music of Mozart, Heiden, and Brahms

June 25 at 7:30 p.m. – Kittredge

Theater, Warren Wilson College

June 23 at 7:30 p.m. – Waynesville Performing Arts Center

For the first concert we welcome back the Emmy nominated Enso String Quartet. The Enso Quartet will be The Enso Quartet, www.ensoquartet.com. Photo: Richie Hawley joined by Inessa Zaretsky on piano and William Hoyt on performs two very different quartets, Fünf horn. After whetting the audience’s appeSätze by the Viennese composer Webern tite with the Mozart “Dissonance” quartet and an early Beethoven quartet, Op. 18, No. we will hear the rarely performed Quintet 4. The concert ends with the grand Sextet by for Horn and String quartet by Bernhard Dohnányi. Heiden. Members of the quartet will then We travel to Eastern Europe for the join Innesa with the famous Piano Quartet fourth concert. After a set of Ancient in C minor by Brahms. Hungarian Dances for woodwind quintet For the second concert we welcome the Jasper quartet presents the back flutist George Pope. One of the most dynamic Bartók 5th String interesting attributes of the Swannanoa Quartet. For the second half, Chamber Music Festival is the opportunity pianist Paul Nitsch returns to perform chamber music with rare comto collaborate with the Jasper binations of instruments. The first piece on Quartet on one of the chamber the program by Devienne is for Flute, Horn, music masterpieces of all time, Viola, and Piano. The second by Martinu the Quintet for Piano and is for Flute, Cello, and Piano. The third, Strings by Dvorák. Aesop’s Fables by Plog, is for Horn, Piano, For the final program and Narrator. We return to tradition on the of the season we present the second half of the program when the Enso Wind Spectacular. Joining the Quartet presents the famous “Harp” Quartet Swannanoa Chamber Player by Beethoven. winds will be Reid Messich, The third concert welcomes back the oboist, Rose Sperrazza, clariCleveland Quartet Prize winning Jasper netist, David Kappy, hornist, Quartet as well as oboist Cynthia Watand Saxton Rose, bassoonson, clarinetist David Bell, and bassoonist ist. The program will feature Lynn Heilman. The program opens with a various pieces for wind instrudelightful trio for Flute, Oboe, and Basments and is anchored by the soon by Cambini. The Jasper Quartet then Sextet by Beethoven and the dramatic Serenade in C Minor by Mozart, which was a model for Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. We’re proud to present the finest in chamber music to the audiences in Western North Carolina. The five week festival will perform concerts in Swannanoa in Kittredge Theater on the Warren Wilson College campus on June 25, July 2, 9, 16 and 23; and in Waynesville at the Waynesville Performing Arts Center on June 23, 30, July 7, 14 and 21. All concerts begin at 7:30.

Program 2 Music of Devienne, Martin, Plog, and Beethoven

July 2 at 7:30 p.m. – Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College

June 30 at 7:30 p.m. – Waynesville Performing Arts Center

Program 3 Music of Cambini, Webern, Beethoven, and Dohnányi

July 9 at 7:30 p.m. – Kittredge Theater,

Warren Wilson College

July 7 at

7:30 p.m. – Waynesville Performing Arts Center

Program 4 Music of Farkas, Bartók, and Dvorák

July 16 at

7:30 p.m. – Kittredge Theater, Warren Wilson College

July 14 at

The Jasper Quartet

7:30 p.m. – Waynesville Performing Arts Center

Program 5 Music of Canteloube, Beethoven, Schmitt, and Mozart

July 23 at 7:30 p.m. – Kittredge

Theater, Warren Wilson College

July 21 at 7:30 p.m. – Waynesville Performing Arts Center

IF YOU Ticket prices are $20 for individual tickets and $75 for a series ticket. If you would GO like to contact us in Swannanoa, phone (828) 771-3050 or e-mail chamber@warren-

wilson.edu. In Waynesville (828) 452-0593. More information is available by visiting www.swannanoachambermusic.com.

6 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10


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Terpsicorps, the untraditional ballet company who brings Asheville unique and theatrical professional dance every summer is celebrating their 10th Anniversary!

BY

CSA

HEATHER MALOY

Terpsicorps. The meat of the piece will utilize repurposed paper, wood, fabric, architectural artifacts and more to tell its poignant, thought provoking and often humorous tale. Music of Terpsicorps’ newest many styles and genres project, “Reborn", is a will also be employed. bold new ballet brought A different dancer to life with the fresh will be the focus of each energy of a new decade. scene, helping to broadPhoto: Zaire Kacz Inspired by the birth of en the audience’s view. choreographer Heather This does not represent Maloy’s son, a series of company photoone person’s journey, but the universal hugraphs by Zaire Kacz and quite literally a man experience. giant box of burgundy panty hose; this piece Also included on the program are will follow seven stages of life, told in part Terpsicorps favorites “Le Suil Go,” also by through the use of re-purposed materials. Maloy, and Aiello’s “The Waiting Room.” New life is given to the objects as we look at the human experience from the womb to death, reward after struggle, the IF Reborn, June 27-29, 8 p.m. at processes and miracles of life. This is an YOU GO the Diana Wortham Theatre in opportunity to collaborate with several Asheville, NC. $30; $28 seniors; talented visual artists, including local fashion $25 students; $20 ages 12-17; $12 designer R. Brooke Priddy, as the chorechildren. To purchase tickets, call (828) 257ographer delves deeply into the fast paced 4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com technical movement quality that defines

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Community Supported Art Now Selling Shares! 6 artists have been chosen. Each share will receive one unique piece from each artist. A share will include: a ceramic mug, a leather journal book, a handblown pint glass, a wooden cutting board, an embossed metal medallion, and a woven basket.

$200 a share Shares are limited!

Please contact Megan at 202.549.8277 or visit handmadeinamerica.org to purchase a share today! . 40 Website: HandMadeinAmerica.org LA Phone: 828. 252. 0121 Address: 125 S. Lexington Ave, Suite 101, Asheville, NC 28801 PG

*Find out more about the benefits of being a HandMade in America Member

Asheville Percussion Festival

The second annual Asheville Percussion Festival takes place June 14-16 at the Odyssey Community School in Asheville. Percussionists of all traditions, from around the globe, will gather to explore, create and innovate. The festival will be hosted by Asheville’s beloved ambassador of rhythm River Guerguerian. There will be workshops Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Workshop topics for all levels will include performing, improvising, and composing taught by world-renowned performers such as Layne Redmond, Kevin Spears, Edwina Tyler, Billy Jonas, Casey Driessen, and other national and regional teachers. The concerts will be held on Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Saturday evening’s concert will be a ‘Master Concert’ featuring the visiting and local performers and teachers.

After the huge success of the First Annual Percussion Festival, this years event is gearing toward a very affordable way to experience profound learning, sonic diversity, along with building relationships constructed upon the foundation of the love and necessity of creating and exploring music, the tribal joy of percussion and the rhythmic force of our rising percussive community. Billy Jonas

IF YOU Concerts on Friday and Saturday, GO June 14 & 15 at 8 p.m. Workshops:

Friday 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday 10 to 5 p.m. Odyssey Community School, Asheville. Tickets: All workshops and concerts, $150. Saturday Day Pass, $75. Friday or Sunday Day Pass, $50. Individual Concert, $15. More information is available by visiting www.ashevillepercussionfestival.com Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 7


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noteworthy The Decent Women of Calle 58 Using words that everyone seems to have an opinion about: prostitutes, putas, women of the night, sex servers, Susan and Giles Collard have created a controversial dance theatre piece.

Dancer Sharon Cooper. Photo: Giles Collard

Based on true stories of Mexican prostitutes, the mental images of eroticism, sensuality, darkness, and forbidden fruit are brought down to reality by these women’s poignant stories of hard lives and terrible events. For mature audiences only.

IF YOU GO: June 7, 8, & 9 at 8 p.m.

The Bebe Theatre, 20 Commerce St, downtown Asheville. Tickets: $15 in advance, $17 at the door. Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre/ White Dog Dance Project. Phone (828) 2542621, visit www.acdt.org.

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Secrets: Freeing The Hidden Story

On June 20, 21 and 22, On Community Choreography Projects shares real life stories of local people for a charitable cause. “If I were skinny I might like myself,” reads one handmade card. Another professes that someone was beaten by her husband but never told anyone. Other cards are humorous. The anonymous “Note-able Secrets” exhibit hanging at Jubilee on Wall Street is riveting, both in the sense that the messages are powerful and undeniably honest and because it’s real, local people who had the courage to pronounce their most private secrets. Though the display came down at the end of May, it’s part of a larger event taking place this month at Diana Wortham Theatre. June 20-22, Community Choreography Projects presents Secrets: Freeing the Hidden Story Story, a movement theater piece that features the distilled collection of stories and movements from 20 local cast members that have been collaboratively composed and structured into a choreographic style. Film vignettes by Erika Czerwinski and David Huff and storytelling by author Gregg Levoy

‘Asheville’ continued from page 3

visitors roaming around, all trolley tourstickered, maps and bags in hand, marveling over their experiences. I’m not kidding – people LOVE Asheville, and share stories every day about how much fun they’re having. Every year yields hundreds of stories about how cool Asheville is —and how nice the people are— as they eat, shop, dance, people-watch, hike, drive, stroll, and on and on. Our annual events, fun for locals and Second-Homers, of course, are also favorites with many of our tourist friends, who come to “ooohh” and “aaahh” at all the amazing arts and crafts and artists and people and brews and bands and street performers and… you name it, Asheville’s got it. And you can tell the season has arrived by the increased amount of time it can take to find parking. It’s kinda like how we predict winter weather by analyzing (and, at times, extensively discussing in large groups) the width of the brown band on the Wooly Bear Caterpillar (which becomes the Isabella Tiger Moth, by the way): the earlier in the year that parking becomes an annoyance, the

You name it, Asheville’s got it. better our daily receipts. So on days when I’m searching for a space, and whining about “rush hour traffic”, I remind myself that I am truly fortunate. Because so many of our events invite the greater populace to “Come On Down,” we need to keep in mind how we, as a loose collective of mini-communities, help each other out in our busy burg. While an occasional foot-stomper may come along now and then, most of Asheville’s entities do an admirable job of positioning their various events on the calendar in such a way as to not step on one anothers’ toes. Which is a nice way to go about it, as it’s really about sharing both opportunity and wealth. In order to do that, we must not fracture the main resource, which is, of course, People. Attendees. Shoppers. Creators. A good example of how we achieve this is how “First Fridays” downtown, “Studio Strolls” and “Second Saturdays” on second weekends in the River Arts District and

8 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

BY

MELISSA REARDON

“If I were skinny I might like myself.” Throughout the performance, the “Note-able Secrets” exhibit will be on display in the theater lobby, and proceeds from ticket sales benefit Four Seasons Hospice, a nonprofit offering end-of-life care to families in Western North Carolina. Photo courtesy of Community Choreography Projects

and spoken-word poet Griffin Payne will be interwoven. The subject matter is wide and deep, raising the questions of why we keep secrets and from whom, and what they really hold for us? According to Artistic Director Barrie Barton, this style of story sharing “conveys universal, ordinary, and extraordinary human messages, enabling participant and audience to see beyond stereotypes and perceived barriers to connect with others.”

Downtown After Five on third Fridays occupy slots that leave room for everyone to attend everything. Something else I have seen folks do that is helpful for everyone if we all keep doing it is to act like satellite Chambers of Commerce (Commerces? Commerci?), referring folks to wherever they may desire to go. If someone’s not finding that just-right item where I am, I hope they still shop in our region, as every dollar spent is helping the community at large, getting us all through another season, so that we can do it again next year. Even though there’s always competition in commerce, we are community partners engaging in a respectful referral system. If each business is a flower, and we are all watering just enough through our actions and conversations, the whole garden thrives. I want those who buy my art to feel a connection to yet another positive aspect about their time in the region, whether as residents or tourists. My home is filled with visual and functional art by locals and friends from my life and travels because I’ve viscerally connected with both the concept and the artist – and/or because the object

For more information about the Community Choreography Projects visit www.communitychoreography.com

IF YOU Secrets: Freeing the Hidden GO Story, June 20-22; Diana Wortham

Theatre, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Tickets: $18. For tickets and more information call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com

reminds me of a wonderful time I had. Like at a friend’s studio, or from a trip to Italy, or at odd places, like the Time Travel Museum in Los Angeles (where, by the way, I felt like I’d been before…). I get frequent feedback that Asheville is an awesome place to visit again and again because of the art as well as the artists. As one flower in the garden, and as a part of the greater community plot, I wish everyone a great season, fun events —and happy shopping!

Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville carries his illustrations, giclees and cards (www.zapow.com, www.gregvineyardillustration.com). Find his clay works at Gallery 262 in Waynesville and at Taupe Gallery in North Wilkesboro. He welcomes you to Constance Williams Gallery during this year’s RADA Studio Stroll, June 8 and 9 (www.riverartsdistrict.com)


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Alexander & Lehnert

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American Folk Art & Framing

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Appalachian Craft Center

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Ariel Gallery

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Artetude Gallery

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Asheville Art Museum

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Asheville Gallery of Art

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The Bender Gallery

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Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

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www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

Explore 25 downtown galleries, studios and museums f aturing changing exhibitions and opening receptions fe — all located within a half mile radius.

Friday-Saturday 11-6 & by appointment

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The Edge Gallery

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Gallery Asheville

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The Haen Gallery

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Handmade in America

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Mora Designer Jewelry

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Mountain Made

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The Satellite Gallery

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Susan Marie Designs

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The Updraft

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W olworth Wa Wo W lk

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W rking Girls Studio & Gallery Wo

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A graduate of The Rhode Island School of design, Meris lives in Providence. Her work can be seen in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. Largely self-taught, artist William Zweifel became fascinated with the idea of weaving glass as a weaver Meditations examines would weave fiber. With the the enhanced perception of help of a friend, he learned reality and self that is revealed the principals of how fabric through meditation when is created on a loom through a state of higher consciousthe manipulation of warp ness is reached. The works and weft. Through experiprobe the interweaving of life mentation, the artist was able experiences through the knots to transfer this technique of a rope, the warp and weft to glass by utilizing the of fabric, and through the fluid movement that can be interplay of words. Elements achieved in the kiln and has Eve’s Grandmother of Asian philosophy and simperfected a true glass weave by Meris Barreto plicity of shape and structure which has become the keydefine the dominant theme of stone of his work. Meditations. William often juxtaposes Meris Barretto is showhis draped and folded weaves ing two bodies of work in the with cast glass, metal or stone exhibition: “Life Living Us” to create languorous sculpand “Nawa-do: The Way of tural pieces. In the works the Rope”. “Life Living Us” is shown in Meditations, the a series of artist books which artist uses woven glass to crehave a distinct Asian presence ate negative reliefs encased —minimal and subtle – that in cast glass. Amorous is a came from a fascination with sensual casting of ruby red Asian “rice” papers, calligglass folded back onto itself raphy, and writing. Eventuwhile Impressions is more Amorous by William Eifel ally the books evolved into angular; a crystal clear weave sculptural publications of the atop a casting of deep blue. artist’s own poetry and ultra-short stories. William’s work is a study in shape and Pieces such as Sakura Season have the structure. It consists of individual lines artists’ original Waka poetry sandblasted or working on different planes and heading silk-screened onto their sheet glass “pages”. in opposite directions, yet interlacing into The square format is a reference to joss a single entity. He states, “We are who we paper used in Buddhist temples, and the are as a result of the interweaving of many shattered glass is a reference to the randomlife experiences. The influence of outside ness of life altering experiences. pressures and our core beliefs determine The Nawa-do series is heavily influour character.” enced by the artist’s frequent visits to Japan William is a native of Chicago. After to see her daughter.’ I was intrigued by the selling his successful company fourteen artful way various objects in the Japanese years ago, he works out of his studio in rural culture are tied together with rope. BeautiWisconsin full-time. ful knotting (Shibari, “rope philosophy”) is used in the Shinto temples, in gardens, in IF packaging food and gifts, and even in speYOU A reception featuring both artists cialized human bondage. GO will be held on Friday, June 7 from Another inspiration was the architec5 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will be ture of Tadao Ando whose work has the on view at the gallery through August 31. Japanese sensitivity to light and space in The Bender Gallery, 12 S. Lexington combination with muscular, geometric Avenue in downtown Asheville, next door forms. Ultimately, I started binding these to the French Broad Chocolate Lounge. two ideas together in a new way of the The gallery’s hours are Monday through rope”. The Fates are three simple alabaster Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and cast glass slabs suspended from the wall, Sunday from 12 noon to 5 p.m. For more each intricately bound in dense rope. details visit www.thebendergallery.com

Otis

The Bender Gallery presents Meditations: What Lies Beneath the Surface, a sculptural exhibition of cast glass showcasing the work of artists Meris Barretto and William Zweifel.

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fine arts & crafts Arrowhead Gallery and Studios

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Something amazing has happened in Old Fort.

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The seed was planted about two years ago when a small group of creative folks, with Susan Taylor at the helm, became “A3L” (Arrowhead Artists and Artisans League) and people came to enjoy the once a month ArtSmart sales in the old train depot. Things don’t change much in Old Fort so people noticed when the old Parker Hosiery building sudArrowhead Gallery features an enticing array of beautifully denly looked like a hand crafted work and fine art. handsome man in a new suit —but few people knew what really was happening. We are open Thursday, Friday and And then, in twenty two days, beSaturday 11-5, Sunday 1-4. One of our tween March and April, as John and Helen artists will always be at the desk to welcome Sullivan led a team of volunteers through you and you can also enjoy meeting artists in a breathtaking whirlwind of activity, the one of the seven working studios and have a huge, dark interior of the warehouse was chance to see the creative process in action. transformed and the Arrowhead Gallery and Studios became a reality. Today the space is home to a large, bright and welcoming exhibition area, a meeting and classroom space and the seven working studios. Step through the door and you are guaranteed to find an enticing array of beautifully hand crafted work and fine art. On display in the spacious gallery is an arAnne Bevan Kim Hostetter ray of pottery, woodcrafts, metal sculpture, cast sculpture, fabric art, baskets, and hand-made jewelry and furniture as Arrowhead Gallery & Studios well. You can also discover beautiful two di78 Catawba Ave., Suite C-D mensional work in the paintings, drawings, Old Fort, NC 28762 and giclee prints by some of Western North Carolina’s finest visual artists. 828-668-1100 www.arrowheadarts.org

10 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10


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fun arts & crafts INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN HOCKMAN, OWNER OF

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Claymates

LOCATIONS IN DILLSBORO & WAYNESVILLE, NC

Create fantastic, colorful works! Claymates offers Glass Fusing.

Claymates is owned and INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY operated by Carrie and Brian Hockman. They currently offer Paint-Your-Own Pottery and DIY Glass Fusing. Daily, monthly, and ongoing specials and discounts are available, as well as specialty nights, group discounts, party packages, and fundraising opportunities.

Rapid River Magazine: Talk a little about how you first got into business.

Brian Hockman: It was an accident. Our Dillsboro store

was originally designed to showcase my nature photography (along with other local artists). ‘Claymates’ was merely a side project that my wife wanted to try using a spare corner in the gallery. Needless to say, Claymates soon gained momentum and within nine months we moved to a larger facility to accommodate the growing interest. Little by little the gallery was phased out as the popularity of ‘paint-you-own-pottery’ grew. In July, 2012, the start of our 4th year, we opened a second location in Waynesville (Hazelwood Ave.).

RRM: Tell us a little about what you have to offer. BH: For pottery, we offer a wide selection of plates, mugs,

Paint-Your-Own Pottery at Claymates. Photo: Liza Becker

bowls, figurines, picture frames, kitchenware, etc. You pick the piece from the shelf and choose your paint colors; we have dozens available. We’ll then glaze and kiln-fire your piece(s) so that they are durable, waterproof, and food safe. The process generally takes up to a week. Glass Fusing is new to most people. Basically, you start with a square or round glass ‘blank’ to which you glue colorful bits and pieces of glass your make the design of your

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‘Claymates’ continued on page 36

July 18-21

From start to finish... Jewelry Designer & Goldsmith Paula Dawkins

U.S. Cellular Center Downtown Asheville, NC Thu.-Sat.: 10am-6pm Sun.: 10am-5pm

Susan Marie Phipps

200 Juried Artists Craft Demonstrations Live Regional Music

Jewelry designed FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.craftguild.org 828-298-7928

PG. 40

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www.jewelsthatdance.com

just for you...

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 11


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Asheville Art in the Park

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All regional and local artists are invited to apply for the fifth season of Asheville Art in the Park. The art market will be held June 15, 22 and 29, and October 5, 12 and 19 at Pack Square in the center of downtown Asheville. 10 x 10 booth spaces are available for professional artists. Each year artists make more than $100,000 at the market and donate more than $10,000 to local arts non-profits. Asheville Art in the Park is accepting applications online at www.AshevilleArtinthePark.com

12 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10


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fine art Hiking For Aurora Studio & Gallery

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A HIKE OF 2,180 MILES LIGHTS THE WAY FOR AREA ARTISTS

What happens when two women What who are impassioned about people, the arts, and mental health join forces? A great deal of joy and creativity! This is what occurred when I met EJ Horrocks in December. EJ was just two short months away from leaving on her planned 2,180 mile hike on the Appalachian Trail, from Springer, Georgia to Katahdin, Maine, with

Alex Manfred and EJ Horrocks

BY

LORI GREENBERG

her childhood friend Alex Manfred. Me, I had been trying to figure out simple ways to network and fundraise for a new nonprofit. The nonprofit, Aurora Studio & Gallery, has the unique mission to provide a supportive art studio for artists in recovery from mental illness, addiction and homelessness, “A studio where artists heal, grow and thrive.” The idea was inspired by an artist I had met who lost her housing due to the downturn of the economy, which then was compounded by a flare up of her mental health symptoms. So, when I met EJ, she immediately endorsed our mission. And I immediately endorsed her effervescence and stick-toit-iveness. I instantly felt a strong bond with EJ, her spontaneity, and warmth were contagious. She was eager to do something for Aurora Studio and proposed that while on her hike that she and Alex raise money, by “Hiking for a Cause.” Then EJ came up with flyers and began to look to the community for support.

Artetude Gallery Celebrates First Anniversary

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Artetude Gallery will celebrate its first anniversary as a contemporary fine art gallery bringing the finest and most compelling art from local, regional and nationally recognized artists to Asheville. Founded by two physician-scientists, Margaret “Kenny” Offermann and Russell Medford, Artetude Gallery is committed to its growing family of artists and contemporary art collectors and the cultural and physical health the Asheville community. To celebrate, Artetude Gallery is pleased to announce “EquusArt” a new exhibition of extraordinary monoprints by New York based artist Alyson Markell, from 17 June to 14 July 2013. An open reception will be held Saturday, June 22 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. and will combine both a Gallery Anniversary Celebration and an Artist Reception with Alyson Markell. Alyson Markell’s artistic vision and technical mastery of the monoprint has enabled her to capture with emotional resonance the grace, power and fluid of motion of the horse. Markell’s artistic career spans 10 years using her creative and artistic talents at a division of Lucas Digital, where she created

EJ and Alex, both natives of Asheville, left for their adventure on March 1 and plan to arrive in Maine around August first. At this writing, they have traveled close to 900 miles. And thanks to technology the two have been able to blog, almost daily, on their wondrous adventure. It has been a heartwarming experience to live vicariously through A penny a mile (rounded up to $22) is the suggested donation their written words which for the hikers, who have traveled more than 900 miles. can be found at ejhorrocks.wordpress.com or studio space. While working on the compliAlex’s at www.postholer.com. cated tax-exempt paperwork, we have had The two have raised over $1000. the awesome pleasure to be sponsored by However, the project needs $100,000 to get our good friends at Arts2People. up and running. A penny a mile (rounded Look for a Welcome Home Party in up to $22) is the suggested donation for the September to be sponsored by the Hop Ice hike to support EJ’s enthusiasm and our Cream Cafe in Asheville! efforts to support wellness through the arts in Asheville. Contributions can easily be made Lori Greenberg, M.Ed, CSAC, lives in through the paypal account on our web-site Asheville with her two cats. When she is at www.aurorastudio-gallery.com or checks not working on Aurora Studio & Gallery, can be written to Arts2People, c/o Aurora she can be found kayaking on the French Studio & Gallery, PO Box 2094, Asheville, Broad RIver, hiking on the parkway, NC 28806. planting flowers in her garden, and Aurora Studio & Gallery was estabweaving with rags. She may be contacted lished in May of 2012 and is currently raisat lori_aurorastudio@hotmail.com ing funds to open an independent nonprofit

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Akira Satake Opening Reception

Running Horse by Alyson Markell.

animal and human characters for dozens of blockbuster hit movies. Markell has garnered a well-deserved reputation for capturing the likeness of animals and fanciful creatures on film and in fine art. As of 2006, Markell has focused exclusively on monoprinting. IF YOU Opening reception Saturday, June GO 22 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Artetude

Gallery, 89 Patton Avenue, downtown Asheville. Phone (828) 2521466 or visit www.artetudegallery.com.

Japan born artist Akira Satake now resides in Swannanoa, NC and is a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild as well as the Piedmont Craftsmen. He describes his work and the act of creating as “…a collaboration between myself, the Teapot by Akira Satake Platters by Akira Satake clay, and the fire. Collaboration means finding what the clay wants to be and bringing out is beauty in the IF way that the beauty of our surroundings is Opening Reception will take place YOU created through natural forces…” GO June 13 from 5:30-8 p.m. at the Beverly-Hanks, in collaboration with Beverly-Hanks office at One Town HandMade in America, features the work Square Blvd., Suite 140, Asheville, NC of a different WNC craft artist each quarter 28803 in Biltmore Park Town Square. On and hosts a reception in their honor. Artists display through July 10, 2013. featured in the past include Nathan Blank, For more information about HandMade Alex Bernstein, Bridget Fox, Matt Tommey, in America call (828) 252-0121, or visit and Chris Perryman. www.HandMadeinAmerica.org. Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 13


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books ~ poetry ~ readings Khaled Hosseini Reading & Booksigning

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JUNE 14 AT THE DIANA WORTHAM THEATRE

Khaled Hosseini, best-selling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, has written w ritten a new novel about how we love, how we take care of one another, and how the choices we make resonate through generations. Following its characters and the ramifications of their lives and choices and loves around the globe—from Kabul to Paris to San Francisco to the Greek island of Tinos—the story expands gradually outward, becoming more emotionally complex and powerful with each turning page. Khaled Hosseini was born in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1965. His father was a diplomat in the Afghan Foreign Ministry and his mother taught Farsi and history at a high school in Kabul. In 1976, the Foreign Ministry relocated the Hosseini family to Paris. They were ready to return to Kabul in 1980, but by then their homeland had witnessed a bloody communist coup and the invasion of the Soviet Army. The Hosseinis sought and were granted political asylum in the United States, and in September 1980 moved to San Jose, California. Hosseini graduated from high school in 1984 and enrolled at Santa Clara University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1988. The following year he entered the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1993. He completed his residency at Cedars-Sinai medical center in Los Angeles and was a practicing internist between 1996 and 2004. In March 2001, while practicing medicine, Hosseini began writing his first novel, The Kite Runner Runner. Published by Riverhead

Your Book Advertised Here $49/Month In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Books in 2003, that debut went on to become an international bestseller and beloved classic, sold in at least seventy countries and spending more than a hundred weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. In May 2007, his second novel, A Thousand Splendid Suns, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list, remaining in that spot for fifteen weeks and nearly an entire year on the bestseller list. Together, the two books have sold more than 10 million copies in the United States and more than 38 million copies worldwide. Hosseini’s much-awaited third novel, And the Mountains Echoed Echoed, was published on May 21, 2013. In 2006, Hosseini was named a Goodwill Envoy to UNHCR, the United Nations Refugee Agency. Inspired by a trip he made to Afghanistan with the UNHCR, he later established The Khaled Hosseini Foundation www.khaledhosseinifoundation.org, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, which provides humanitarian assistance to the people of Afghanistan. He lives in Northern California. Malaprop’s presents Khaled Hosseini at the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 14. Mr. Hosseini will read from And the Mountains Echoed Echoed, discuss his humanitarian work and answer questions from the audience. A booksigning will follow. Tickets are $15 each and come with a coupon for $10 off the purchase of And the Mountains Echoed. The booksigning is only open to ticket holders who have purchased a copy of And the Mountains Echoed from Malaprop’s. You must show your Malaprop’s receipt to the booksller monitoring the signing line. You are welcome to bring copies of Hosseini’s older books to be signed as well.

IF YOU Khaled Hosseini at the GO Diana Wortham Theatre in

downtown Asheville at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 14, For more details visit Malaprops Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville, call (828) 254-6734, or go online to www.malaprops.com

14 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

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The Poet’s Voice

In Silence, comes the Muse. [ silence ] Silence deserves a capital “S”. There’s so little of it. If you don’t believe me, read One Square Inch of Silence: One Man’s Quest to Preserve Quiet Quiet, by Gordon Hempton, (Simon and Schuster). Ruth Ozeki’s essay, “A Crucial Collaboration” in the May/June Poet’s and Writer’s magazine states: A character speaks — whispers — mutters, shouts — breaking the silence, and in doing so, calls the writer into being, and the writer responds.” [ ....... ]

And now, a word from Wendell Berry. Best of any song is bird song in the quiet, but first you must have the quiet. A Timbered Choir, Counterpoint Press, 1889.

The first two weeks of June, I will be in a cabin on Lake Kabekona in the North Woods of Minnesota. Eleven of us will be there (with one bathroom). Five of us will be under thirteen years old. Where will I find silence? Around a campfire? You know how it is, there you are, hot dogs or marshmallows on sticks, crackling/roaring fire (depending on how many boys there are), and then a sacred silence falls. [ ....... ] It may be brief, but this silence is where our souls may be heard, and find themselves on the page. I include a cinquain of my own:

Solitude At last, stilled alone. No guests, murmurs, chaos, news. Only pines, the lake, a pencil. Silence. A third grader once said, Silence reminds me to take my soul with me wherever I go. When this third grader grows up, I hope he/she will discover Rumi.

Rumi [ ....... ] Why are you so afraid of silence? Silence is the root of everything. If you spiral into its void a hundred voices will thunder messages you long to hear. In Kathleen Norris’ Cloister Walk Walk, (River Head books, N. Y. 1996), she writes: Liturgical time is essentially poetic time, oriented toward process rather than productivity. The rule of St. Benedict was written in the sixth century by a man determined to find a life of peace and stability. His first rule is LISTEN.

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

What is the main thing a poet does? The discipline of listening aims to still body and soul so that the words of a reading may sink in. Such silence tends to open a person. Once, when Kathleen was asked, “What is the main thing a poet does? She was inspired to answer, “We wait.” I imagine she waits [ ....... ] in silence. Musician/composer, John Cage’s, definition of music is, “organized sound and silence.” He wrote a piece titled, 4' 33". Yes. Four minutes and thirty-three seconds —of silence. A person comes on stage, bows to polite applause, and takes their seat at a concert grand piano —12 feet of shining curve. The pianist sits for four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence, stands, bows, and leaves the stage. Audiences laugh, cough, whisper, fidget. They are uncomfortable. They want their money back. John Cage doesn’t care. A room full of people have listened to four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence. He asks, “What if it had been five minutes? Would that have made a difference?”

This June, honor silence. [ . . . . . . . ] Scientifically, there is none. In total silence, we hear our heart’s rhythm, our bowels digesting breakfast, and the electricity of our brain. Acousticians have invented a soundproof chamber in which a person can hear, in this intimacy, his body perform. Right now it is quiet, not silent, at my house. (As soon as I wrote that, the furnace came on.) I hear at least three birds welcoming the day. My computer keys click in well-behaved sequences. I pick up my coffee mug. In the quiet, my ring clinks against pottery. [ ....... ]

A few Poets on Silence: Pablo Neruda’s, Keeping Quiet Billy Collins, Silence Fredrick Zydek, Praying into Stillness Jane Kenyon, Let Evening Come Wendell Berry, The Peace of Wild Things Mary Oliver, Invitation, from Red Bird I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings Inferno

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

E

WRITTEN BY DAN BROWN

Even author Dan Brown himself can’t top his famous novel, The Da Vinci Code C ode. How can you possibly come up with something better than a novel that claims to prove that Jesus Christ had children and the latest of his blood line is alive and well in France? So you can’t actually expect Brown’s latest novel, Inferno, to be as exciting as Da Vinci. Once you accept that reality, you’ll appreciate Inferno for what it is—a clever thriller that uses clues from ancient art, architecture and poetry to prevent a modern-day global catastrophe. With worldwide overpopulation threatening to destroy everything, would you Author Dan Brown kill off half the Photo: Dan Courtier world’s population in order to save our species? That’s the main question of Inferno, told in a relentless race against the clock, with a cast of characters who face death at every decision, and a super-spectacular climax that Hollywood must be drooling to put on the big screen.

JUNE

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS

The exciting climax of Inferno takes place in the underground chambers of the enormous Hagia Sophia in Istanbul.

A convenient plot “…one deception after another, plenty of device, since it keeps dangerous derring-do… and hard-won him on edge for much of the novel. clues from Dante’s Divine Comedy…” A mysterious genius medical doctor, who also happens to be a brilliant linguist as Vinci Code. Who cares? You’re not reading well as a terrific actress, Sienna Brooks, is Dan Brown for literary style, you’re reading taking care of him. him for a pulse-thumping story and you get Suddenly an assassin charges into the that. If you read the book on audio as I did, room and shoots dead the other physiyou also get a compelling narrator who’s cian and Sienna grabs Langdon’s jacket and facile with the mellifluous Italian excerpts. flees with him on the back of a motorcycle If you want a thriller with literary style, through the streets of Florence. They end up then go to Oslo writer Jo Nesbro (The at her spare apartment where Langdon calls Snowman) or anything written by Amerithe American consulate, only to learn he’s cans Dennis Lehane (Shutter Shutter Island Island) and triggered assassination attempts on himself. Harlan Coben (Tell No One). Or try HeWhat’s going on? How did he end up lene Wecker’s fantastical debut novel, The in Florence? Why are people, including Golem and the Jinnie. his own government, trying to kill him? There are several tangential benefits of What’s the truth about the mathematics Inferno. It serves as an accessible introducin the overpopulation issue? Who is the tion to poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) “Would you kill off half the older silver-haired woman who haunts and does indeed inspire you to seek out Landgon’s muddled memories? And why world’s population in order The Divine Comedy Comedy. The novel also is the beautiful Dr. Brooks completely inspires closer looks at the art and archito save our species?” bald under her blonde wig? tecture of Florence, Venice, and Instanbul, All will be revealed in time, with especially the incredible underground areas Along the way, Dante fanatics and one deception after another, plenty of danof the famous Hagia Sophia. WHO, the World Health Organization, gerous derring-do, and most interesting, lots Recommendation battle for the future of the planet, while a of hard won clues from The Divine ComIf I had more time to spend on this Mickey Mouse watch, a broken edy and the fascinating novel, I would have done research before I’d amulet, a baptismal font, the Black art and architecture that read it. Definitely learned more about Dante Death, the Seven Sins, and an surrounded his life and and his time and Renaissance art, as well as upside down head of Medusa take legacy. From Florence to the architecture of the three cities. their place in the speeding plot. Venice and on to Istanbul Brown does a yeoman’s job in describOur hero is Indiana Jones and the fabulous Hagia ing the various architectural structures, but in a tweed jacket, Robert LangSophia church/mosque/. having visual images of them would have don, PhD, a Harvard professor museum, Langdon and added immensely to my enjoyment of the of art—who also happens to be Brooks try to find the book. The internet is full of visual accoma professor of symbology, which horrible plague virus that paniments to the book, I discovered later, so isn’t even a word, but Brown uses a Swiss billionaire scienenjoy searching. it as a substitute for iconography tist has let loose upon the Inferno, written by Dan Brown, and makes symbology a highly world. narrated by Paul Michael. Random House Audio honored academic study. Don’t try to figure (2013), 17 hours, 14 CDs. Dr. Langdon finds himself out the logic of this story. waking up in a hospital room in There isn’t any. Nor is The oldest known portrait Florence, Italy. It seems someone of poet Dante Alighieri is by there any good writing. Marcianne Miller is an Asheville put a bullet in his head, causInferno is just as prosaiGiotto, in the chapel of the writer/reviewer. She can be reached ing severe short-term amnesia. cally written as The Da Palace Bargello in Florence.

Saturday, June 1 at 7 p.m. DIY Chicken Coops with Matt Wolpe. Thursday, June 6 at 9 p.m. DAVID SEDARIS, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls. Friday, June 7 at 7 p.m. The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, ANTON DISCLAFANI Saturday, June 8 at 7 p.m. PETER CARLSON, Junius and Albert’s Adventures in the Confederacy: A Civil War Odyssey. Monday, June 10 at 7 p.m. CHARLES GRAEBER, The Good Nurse. Tuesday, June 11 at 7 p.m. DEAN KING, The Feud, the Hatfields & McCoys. Wednesday, June 12 at 7 p.m. The End of Your Life Book Club, WILL SCHWALBE. Thursday, June 13 at 7 p.m. ELLIOTT HOLT, You Are One of Them. Saturday, June 15 at 7 p.m. VINCE VAWTER, Paperboy, mystery of stuttering. Tuesday, June 18 at 7 p.m. CHARLIE LOVETT, The Bookman’s Tale. Wednesday, June 19 at 7 p.m. JONATHAN RINTELS, Lifemobile, Aspergers. Thursday, June 20 at 7 p.m. DOROTHEA BENTON FRANK, The Last Original Wife. Saturday, June 22 at 7 p.m. JASMINE BEACH-FERRARA, Damn Love. Monday, June 24 at 7 p.m. YA TRIO: Nova Ren Suma, Beth Revis, Stephanie Perkins. Tuesday, June 25 at 7 p.m. ROSELYNN KATZ, The World & Wit of Dorothy Parker. Thursday, June 27 at 7 p.m. SHEILA HETI, How Should a Person Be? Friday, June 28 at 7 p.m. TRAVIS NICHOLS, The More You Ignore Me. June 29 at 3 p.m. Creative Adventures in Handmade Books, MARGARET COGSWELL.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 40 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

at marci@aquamystique.com.

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 15


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This has been an abundant month of music, especially in the independent realm of Kickstarter funded projects. It’s also been a particularly fruitful one, with some remarkably good discs emerging from bands with whom I was largely unfamiliar. Thus, the comments will be kept brief so as to spin my opinions (and that’s really all these are) on as many as is possible.

CD Reviews by James Cassara

Black Moth Super Rainbow Cobra Juicy French Kiss Music If 2009’s Eating Us gave a glimpse of how this Pennsylvania based collective might be headed away from the homegrown quirkiness that made them both tantalizing and frustrating than Cobra Juicy continues that move further into the world of melody, danceable groove, and pop pleasure that was previously buried beneath players of discordant sound effects. With tunes such as “Hairspray Heart” and “Windshield Smasher” relying more on crashing guitars, pulse beat drums, and pumped up bass, the sound is relatively mainstream, or at least as mainstream as BMSR would ever get. This is until the vocoder channeled voice of de facto bandleader Tobacco booms forth, at which point you’re quickly reminded that for all their wisely deliberate attempts at reaching a larger audience they’re still musical anarchists at heart. Sure the sound is considerably clearer and more upfront than ever before-sounding at times like Odelay era Beck-but there’s plenty for fans of their earlier lo-fi releases to groove to. “Psychotic Love Damage” is a marvelous bit of psycho folk-and my favorite track so far-while the synthetic soundtracks swagger of “Spray-paint” could well end up on the soundtrack to the latest hipster cable show. As it is Cobra Juicy is a bit of a risk for a band so closely associated with bargain basement (in all the best ways) but it might just bring forth a new cadre of fans without alienating the older ones. And for a band who so proudly wears their Do It Yourself credentials that’s no easy feat. ****

Paper Bird Rooms Boy-oh-boy do I love this band. Built around the vocal acrobatics of Sarah Anderson, Esme Patterson, and Genevieve Patterson (all of whom also play instruments) this seven piece assemblage is a jolt of lilting arrangements, playful engagement, and sheer energetic delight. Best exemplified by the lovely “As I Am,” which at last count had racked up nearly 12,000 You Tube views, Paper Bird — whose member’s play everything from trumpet to banjo to upright 16 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

bass — might best be described as The Roches meets Van Dyke Parks. “Hold It Down” and “Past the Sky” may be its two stand outs, but there’s not a serious stumble to be found. The playing is impeccable, the singing gorgeous, and the material so damn infectious it’s hard not to smile and tap along. While Paper Rooms isn’t quite perfect-it occasionally sacrifices structure for sheen, it’s the most pleasant listening experience I’ve had this year, which, given the amount of music that crosses my desk, is truly saying something. *****

Randall Bramblett The Bright Spots New West Records While best known as a sideman extraordinaire Randall Bramblett is equally comfortable with the spotlight shining directly on him. He’s always been one to share his affections for soul, blues, and R & B flavored roots rock, and both his solo work and the projects he’s chosen to attach himself to reflect that. That sort of eclectic diversity makes him a tough artist to pin down and the sort of dilemma that probably drives the marketing types crazy. For his ninth solo album — evenly spread over more than two decades — Bramblett wisely chose to avoid relying on the marketing skills (or lack thereof) of others and finance the project himself. He raised $30,000 via Kickstarter, gathered a bunch of his friends in his Athens, Georgia, home studio, and had at it. The result is a rather loose effort that might just be his best yet. The fluid nature of the band — virtually every track sports a different line up — keeps thing lively and unpredictable. As you might expect there’s a bit of everything, from funk-laden opener “Roll” to the straight-ahead blues rocker “Trying to Steal a Minute.” Best of the lot may just be the gospel fueled “John the Baptist” (buoyed by the unconventional pairing of baritone sax and electric sitar) and the swamp blues of “Whatever That Is.” But there’s really not a weak moment here, and if The Bright Spots sounds like a typical Bramblett album it’s only because his output has been so consistently solid. Randall Bramblett may be the consummate side man, but, if this record is any indication, he’d do just as well to step out front more often than not. ****

Standish Carlyon Deleted Scenes Felte Music The duo of Conrad Standish and Tom Carlyon both emerged from the late Australian band Devastations,, one of many such down under groups who flirted with but never quite achieved widespread success in our country. Their sound certainly veers in the direction of electro pop, but the dance floor factor takes a back seat to ambient rhythms, veiled jangle rock, and an ethos that pulses as much from the heart as it does the head. There’s a surrealistic tinge but there’s also enough straight ahead production that Deleted Scenes rarely feels like background noise. Much of it, particularly “Industrial Resort” and “New People” could have fit nicely onto any of David Bowie’s Berlin trilogy (not surprising since mixer/producer Denis Blackham mentored under Brian Eno) and while there are stretches where Deleted Scenes loses focus it’s by and large a surprisingly engaging and downright agreeable way to spend 60 minutes. ***1/2

Jon Hopkins Immunity Domino Music Best known as a producer and effects guru whose credits include stints with Herbie Hancock and Brian Eno, Jon Hopkins, who co-produced Coldplay’s monster successful Viva La Vida, has also released a steady stream of his own seductively ambient efforts. Those familiar with his work won’t be surprised by the carefully constructed-although somewhat mechanical arrangements found here, but you might be nicely taken aback by how melodic bits and pieces are. It’s still rather techno heavy (a genre I admit to having scant affinity towards) but there’s just enough breathing space to keep it interesting. “Sun Harmonics” has a sense of openness befitting the title while the title track closes things out with buoyancy I don’t typically associate with the form. My best advice is to sample a few tracks at www.jonhopkins.co.uk and decide for yourself if Immunity is up your alley. *** ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

Dave LETTING THE INSTRUMENTS Desmelik SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES

Alien Music Club Dosta My initial reaction to Jonathan Pearlman’s (AKA Alien Music Club) latest offering was strongly positive, and I am glad to say that repeated and more in depth listens have only reinforced that. Dosta works on so many different levels; its mix of psychedelic rock (Pearlman is a huge fan of Roger Waters), free spirit jazz (ditto Django Reinhardt) and classic rock (Beatles anyone?) is a pure joy to listen to. And if the preceding makes you dismiss Dosta as an opportunity for Pearlman to share his influences, that would be selling it far too short. What makes it so fascinating is the myriad and unexpected ways he weaves these threads into one, making such familiar but divergent sounds wholly his own. It doesn’t hurt that Jonathon Pearlman and I share similar musical deities (although to the best of my recollection we’ve never met) but that sort of musical symbiosis makes Dosta an even more pleasant sentimental journey. ****

The Kruger Brothers Some call it jazz. Some call it classical. Some call it bluegrass. Certainly, the music of the Kruger Brothers is all of that and more. Drawing on a rich cultural palette, theirs is a music that celebrates the best of what music can be: exciting, engaging, intelligent, and delightful. When you listen to the music of the Kruger Brothers, you can’t help but be amazed by the sheer depth of their artistry.

IF YOU GO: The Kruger Brothers, Wednesday & Thursday, June 12 & 13. Each Night: $25 in advance / $28 at the door. Doors open 5 p.m.; Show 9 p.m. Limited tables available with dinner reservations. Theater-style and balcony seating available on a first come first serve basis. Dinner reservations can be made by calling (828) 575-2737. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road, Asheville. Tickets available online at www.isisasheville.com

In a casual comment made several months back, Dave Desmelik, one of our area’s most highly respected singer/songwriters, mentioned he was working on an all-instrumental album of new material.

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“It’s something I’ve been thinking about for a long time,” he told me, likely sensing the skepticism in my reaction. “Now seems like a good time.” That uncertainty on my part no doubts stems from Desmelik’s reputation as a wordsmith extraordinaire, a writer with the inherent knack for dropping the right expression into a phrase, turning the everyday into invention. It’s been his bread and butter, and I seriously doubt too many of his fans show up at his shows to hear him remain silent. But meaning and circumstance and emotional response can emerge from many differing sources, and in the case of Instrumental Swim, they coalesce out of the many textures and tensions Desmelik has created. It’s an album of varying moods and swings, shifting from one train of thought to another in ways that lyrics might not. It’s certainly not for everyone, and I can fully understand if some of Desmelik’s audience finds it slightly aloof if not outright alienating. But in the end Dave Desmelik has made the album he wanted to make rather than the one some — although I suspect if they gave it an unconditional chance they would think otherwise — might wish to hear. That is certainly his artistic prerogative and Desmelik is a true artist: He’s also a cordial and affable friend who graciously took his time to chat about his latest goings-on.

Rapid River Magazine: Did Instrumental Swim emerge in part out of a growing confidence in your playing? It’s hard to imagine your making this record five years ago.

Dave Desmelik: There’s no doubt as the years have moved along, I have continued to grow more confident in my playing guitar and other instruments too. I’m not sure that I would say this album emerged wholly from that, but certainly in part. I actually wanted to make this CD many years ago, but for whatever reason it didn’t happen until now. Which is just as it should be I suppose. There was newly inspired material recently written as well as older material that was to me, aching to be recorded.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

RRM: I’m genuinely curi-

ous… did any of the songs at one time have lyrics? Was it a matter of “nice tune but the words aren’t coming together?”

DD: Not at all. The thing is,

all of these songs are what I intended them to be. Some are quite short, others Singer/songwriter Dave Desmelik. more drawn out, but this is the album I wanted to ing music probably more than he gives make. And I’ve recently written some more himself credit for. instrumentals — as well as other songs — so He makes good suggestions and has I guess it’s on to the next project. valid ideas for taking a song in a certain RRM: You’ve always been an assured guitardirection, but as with any artist who ist, particularly on acoustic. But I once stubbornly remains true to his or her described your piano playing as primitive vision, the final decisions come down to in a Neil Young fashion, which you took as the artist. I believe it is wise to listen and the compliment I intended. What was your use suggestions from others to benefit approach to making this record? the music, but in the end it is the writer/ artist’s ship to sail. DD: My approach was basically the same as past albums for me. This is my eighth fullRRM: Did you write the songs specifilength recording so I’m pretty locked into cally for this project, or had some been what I like to do in the recording process. percolating for a while? In a nutshell, it’s something like this…. DD: It’s a bit of both. There are songs on Vinny Constantine, who is an excellent this album have been lingering for many recording engineer and an old friend livyears and simply refused to go away and ing in Nashville, comes to my house with there are songs that were written through some gear. He sets up and when he’s done inspiration knowing this project was goI sit down and play. ing to become reality. They are all to me I tend to keep things simple and sparse powerful, personal, and a glimpse inside and pretty stripped down. There are defimy head and heart. My hope for the nitely some tunes that I play a number of listener is that this album can be heard instruments on and go for a nice full sound, intimately as well as casually. but generally speaking I lean toward letting the feel of the song speak for itself and try RRM: Talk about June 2 at the Grey not to let it get muddled up with sounds that Eagle; it certainly doesn’t sound like your don’t really need to be there. I really do think typical CD release show. that less can be more.

RRM: Talk a bit about Vinny and his contributions.

DD: I have been extremely fortunate to work

with Vinny on many recording projects dating back to the late 1990’s. We have seen each other grow immensely in the music world. Vinny has an incredible ability to capture the mood of a song through recording and always makes the artist feel comfortable. He excels at engineering and record-

DD: This show will be outside on the

patio at the Grey Eagle on Sunday, June 2nd and the music starts at 3 p.m. It is a daytime event, family friendly and free admission. There is a suggested donation of $10 (this includes a new CD), but everyone is welcome to come enjoy the tunes. The Grey Eagle is such a great venue and I always look forward to performing there. It should be a special day. ‘Desmelik’ continued on page 26

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 17


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sound experience Singing – and Playing – the Body Electronic

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When the MoogFest let it be known it was severing ties with AC Entertainment (a move both parties insist was amicable), speculation ran rampant regarding the future of an event that had become a cornerstone of the Asheville music scene. With the recent announcement of the Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit — essentially an AC

How to Destroy Angels, featuring Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor, his wife Mariqueen Maandig, and frequent collaborator Atticus Ross.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Entertainment event outside any partnership with Moog Industries — the picture has for the time become more clear. Slated for the weekend of October 25-27 (not coincidentally the same weekend MoogFest took place), the Mountain Oasis line-up promises to be radically different from what MoogFest might have been. Like its previous incarnation the three day music festival will take place in the heart of downtown Asheville. Advertised as “celebrating the creative spirit of musical exploration, along with the innovative spark that fuels all of the arts,” the festival will be more focused around the “twin threads of contemporary electronic music and the creative use of technology bold old and new,” rather than the iconic legacy of one man, i.e. Robert Moog. Unlike the previous two years of MoogFest, all Mountain Oasis Electronic Music Summit events will wisely take place indoors. Given the unpredictable weather of

late October the staging of outdoor concerts is at best a gamble. The festival promises to feature world-class performances by many of the greatest artists in contemporary music, along with talks, seminars, and panels by artists and others; interactive experiences for audiences; art installations and exhibitions, and more. Venues slated to host events include the ExploreAsheville.com Arena and the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium (both housed at the U.S. Cellular Center), the Orange Peel, Diana Wortham Theatre, and on a smaller scale, Asheville Music Hall. As for the music, headlining the weekend will be Trent Reznor. The acclaimed multi-Grammy Award winner will be performing with his own Nine Inch Nails as well as his offshoot band, How to Destroy Angels. Indy darlings Neutral Milk Hotel (performing for the first time in nearly 15 years), are among the big name draws which include BassNectar, Pretty Lights, Animal Collective, and electro pop legend Gary

WNC Jazz Profiles: Bill Bares

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~ Guitarist Billy Cardine players were there and I got a real ass-kicking. And I came into contact with several excellent European musicians who kindled a fascination with European Jazz.” Bill also met his German wife in Miami and after his graduation they moved to Bamberg, Germany to finish her education. “I met and played with several great Bavarian jazz musicians there, including guitarist Torsten Goods and drummer Dejan Terzic. We then moved to New York for two years where I gigged with too many musicians to count. My wife footed the bills those two years, so I could afford to go out every night to jam sessions and performances. Then I got full tuition plus a generous stipend to go to Harvard, so we moved to Boston.” During those ten years in Boston Bill didn’t play much, as most of his time was spent writing, researching and teaching while growing a family. He taught at Harvard, Brown, the New England Conservatory, Berklee College of Music and Suffolk University. Then Bill moved to Asheville after both he and his wife were offered jobs at UNCA.

18 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

Visit www.mountainoasisfestival.com for updates and additional information about Mountain Oasis 2013.

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“Bill Bares is an artist in the true sense of the word —an imaginative, inspired and joyful creator, a deeply educated, spectacular, yet organic, jazz pianist. On top of all that, Bill is a top notch educator. It’s rare to find this combination flowing so naturally from one person!”

A “military brat” who ended up in Omaha, Bill was originally a good enough trumpet player to make the McDonald’s All-American Band in High School, but a freak injury to his lip in college prompted his switch to piano. “I majored in Political Science at Amherst College, not music. While working on Capitol Hill after graduation, I would frequent D.C. clubs like Twins, Blues Alley and One Step Down. Eventually the music bug grew too strong, so I dropped everything, moved back to live with my parents in Nebraska and began the process of applying for graduate programs in music while playing in local clubs and spending a year “in the shed” —practicing six to eight hours a day.” Bill then attended the Jazz Performance Program at the University of Miami, whose alums included Pat Metheny, Jaco Pastorius and Bruce Hornsby. His piano teacher, Vince Maggio, had studied with Oscar Peterson and roomed with Bill Evans. “I like to think I have a nice lineage going. Many, MANY good

Numan. Additional acts will be announced in the coming weeks, with some 50-60 artists expected to participate. How this will all pan out is anyone’s guess, but, given the talent involved and AC Entertainment’s track record, there is reason to be optimistic. As for MoogFest, it too shall return in some as yet unspecified incarnation. There are no designs for a 2013 event, but MoogFest 2014, scheduled for the weekend of April 25-27, is already in the planning stages. At this point it looks like a win-win for the music lovers of Asheville! Weekend passes for Mountain Oasis 2013 can be purchased on line by visiting www.mountainoasisfestival.com. Be sure to visit the website for updates and further details as they become available.

Bill Bares Photo: Frank Zipperer

“It’s a great school and great place to raise a family. After twenty years in big cities, this is a breath of fresh air—literally. The music scene is great and our new BFA in Jazz and Contemporary Music delivers a first class education, plus opportunities for music students to get real-life experience enriching the local music scene. We’ve developed partnerships with local venues like Tressa’s, The Altamont and The Isis, all of which have featured our students. Plus, in these two years I’ve put together several projects that have been musically fulfilling: I performed “Rhapsody in Blue” as the piano soloist with Blue Ridge Orchestra in May 2012 and will be doing it again at Diana Wortham in August with the Russ Wilson Orchestra; I recorded a trio al-

EDDIE LESHURE

bum with Mike Holstein and a drummer from Boston; put together an innovative Radiohead Big Band concert with the UNCA Big Band; became the curator of the wildly successful Sunday Jazz Series at The Isis Music Hall which now features two shows per evening; lead one of the area’s best regarded jazz outfits The Hard Bop Explosion; there’s a new trio project called Billy the Kid and the Outlaws; and started popular ensembles at UNCA, including the “ECM Ensemble” and the upcoming “Ecojazz Ensemble. Stay tuned for more.” “It’s a pleasure to play with a pianist who has dedicated so much time to learning the tradition of the music and the characteristics of his predecessors. I feel at home playing any style with Bill. He’s a consummate pro, a hell of an educator and a nasty pianist.”

~ Saxophonist Jacob Rodriguez www.baresmusic.com

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently offthe-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.


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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

River Arts District Studio Stroll

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During the nationally known Studio Stroll, more than 180 artists from the River Arts District open their studios to the public.

Riverside Studios

Art collectors and enthusiasts come from around the world to view and purchase art as they tour studios in 25 of the district’s historic industrial buildings.

Ongoing wheel throwing demos, June 8 and 9 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

HIGHLIGHTS Desert Moon Designs Studios 372 Depot St., Suite 44

Saturday June 8 – 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. abstract expressive painting – Heidi Mayfield Sunday June 9 – 12 noon to 3 p.m. handbuilt sgrafitto pottery – Terri Friday

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JUNE 8 & 9, FROM 10AM TO 6PM Ongoing painting, mixed media, textile and sculpture demos Both June 8-9 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Potters Mark Studio at Cotton Mill Studios

Riverview Station MH Libman

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. woodturning demos

demonstrations, such as glass blowing, wheel throwing, wood turning, and more. This is the 19th year for this internationally known event. Located along the French Broad River, just minutes from downtown Asheville. Get an inside look at the artist’s way, learn how they make their work and invest in a piece of local Asheville.

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Planet Art @ 375 Depot St.

Ongoing chair caning demos Both June 8-9 from 10am-6pm Jonas Gerard Studio & Gallery

Live painting performance, June 8 & 9 at 2 p.m. Free trolleys run approximately every 15 minutes, bringing visitors to gallery shows, kid activities, and art

The Studio Stroll is produced by the River Arts District Artists. For more information, please visit www.riverartsdistrict.com or contact Shay Amber, Coordinator for RADA at riverartsdistrict@ gmail.com. RADA, PO Box 294, Asheville, NC 28802.

Janton Art Studio

Free trolleys run approximately every 15 minutes. Make your plans now, visit www.riverartsdistrict.com to download a complimentary Studio Guide.

Stephen R. Janton grew up in Wilmington Delaware, where he was exposed to the Brandywine School and the artists Pyle, the entire Wyeth family, and his friend and guide George Weymouth.

a good sense of form during his many years studying and working as a physical therapist. His works in still life and landscapes tend to be more experimental with a sense of realism. “I attempt painting what is real to me... what I see. In doing a portrait, I enjoy finding the Portraiture and the human composition that best describes form have always been Janton’s the individual’s personality and I main interest and he has developed include the person being painted in that process which makes for a more successful outcome.” “I frequently utilize the technique of a single light source in my portraits as it helps create greater depth. I rely primarily on the techniques of traditional oil painting but have tested my deepest level of patience by painting in egg tempera and appreciate the quality of skin tones created by the unique process.” “Artwork should stand on its own merits — or fail on its own shortcomings if it does Stephen R. Janton Photo: Erica Mueller

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RIVER ARTS STUDIO BUILDINGS

Sandy, portrait by Stephen Janton

not succeed in registering favorably upon the viewer’s sensibilities. Quality is the central issue, as it must be where art is concerned. I am doing my best and enjoying the process in my attempts at creating quality in my artwork.”

Janton Art Studio Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St., Studio #211, Asheville, NC 28801 www.jantonart.com

* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 19


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INTERVIEW WITH RIVER ARTS DISTRICT ARTIST

Jeff Pittman

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Jeff Pittman has been painting scenes of Asheville and the surrounding area for over a decade now and is primarily known for his use of vibrant color in both his street scenes around town or in his vast luminous skies over familiar mountain ridges.

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a

little about how you first got into painting.

Jeff Pittman: I didn’t pick up a

paintbrush until moving to the mountains of Western NC back in 1997. Ever since then I’ve been

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

inspired by the local scenery & have been refining my style ever since.

RRM: What influences your artwork the most each day?

JP: Sunlight & color mostly. I enjoy

observing the atmospheric effects of the sun, clouds & mountains for my landscape, and different vantage points and interesting shadows for my cityscape scenes.

RRM: Any new projects you care to talk about at this time?

JP: I’m juggling a couple of commis-

sions at the moment, but they’re still in the early stages. I am working on composition & ideas in my head while stretching the large canvasses needed. One is a large triptych for a family’s new home in South Asheville. They have the perfect spot in their foyer for the three panels depicting a single mountain view with blooming Rhododendron.

RRM: Talk a little about your style and how it has evolved over the years? RG

Jeff Pittman Photo: Erica Mueller

Appalachian Wilflowers by Jeff Pittman

JP: I realized early on that I couldn’t

really draw that well, but once I added color, I found I was on to something. I think my work has gotten more expressive over the years. I try not to be so literal with my subject matter, but loosen up, both with the brushstrokes and in color selections. Jeff Pittman’s studio is located in the heart of Asheville’s thriving River Arts District at 140-D Roberts Street. (828) 242-8014 www.jeffpittmanart.com

Nancy Silver Fine Artist

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As a native New Yorker exiled the lyrical quality found in water. to Ohio, Nancy’s night job was Her architectural choices tend to Charge Nurse in an inner city focus on qualities that reflect the pasemergency room, sage of time and silevel one trauma lent voices of those center, while art long gone. Her final became therapy. escape brought her She first to Asheville, fall of escaped the ER 2010, and into the into art school, Cotton Mill Studios while singing in the River Arts weekends as a District, along with cantorial soloist. singing a little jazz Her musical with friends. background Her work is translates into available in her stupainting landdio in Cotton Mill Still life by Nancy Silver scapes, especially Studios on River-

20 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

Nancy Silver, fine artist.

side Drive and at The Art Mob in Hendersonville, NC.

Nancy Silver Art Cotton Mill Studios, 122 Riverside Dr., Asheville (828) 713-8994 www.nancysilverart.com


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INTERVIEW WITH RIVER ARTS DISTRICT ARTIST

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Julia Fosson

Rapid River Magazine: What first drew you to encaustic art as your media of choice?

Julia Fosson: I was

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

proximately 200 degrees. With each layer that is applied fusing must occur to adhere the top layer of wax to the layers below. Fusing can occur with a heat gun or a blow torch. Most of my works have 15-25 layers of wax.

an oil painter and another artist said “your work is so much like encaustic.” I quickly responded by saying, “what’s encaustic.” After researching encaustic paintParty Chair by Julia Fosson ing and finding there RRM: Tell us a little was a company in about yourself as an New York, not far artist. from where I lived JF: I went to school at the time, I visited to become an Occuand took a workpational Therapist, I shop. I immediately then went on to be fell in love, but realcertified hand care ized it was an investworking primarily ment to get started, with hand surgeons so I sat on it for a treating traumatic year. I couldn’t stop Encaustic Palette and surgical patient thinking about the for 18 years. I medium and signed painted as a release starting probably in up for a more intensive, multiple day the early 80’s. workshop. That was it, no turning back. It wasn’t until I moved to ConI then began to define myself as an necticut that a patient talked me into encaustic painter. After several months I being juried into an arts community. At thought if I had to go out of state to learn that time 13 years ago I was working in I should write some grants to get enough every medium landing on encaustic in money for equipment and supplies to 2001. I draw my work from what is ratteach. I applied for two grants, got both, tling around in my head. I use chairs and and started teaching. simple house structures in my work. RRM: What artists have been major People often ask why chairs and I influences over your lifetime? tell them its about conversations as well there are many styles of chairs like there JF: Being a self taught artist I was nurare personalities of people. Painting lets tured by great artist out of Connecticut, me communicate through a visual conPatricia Carrigan. versation. I am inspired daily and hope RRM: Tell us a little about encaustic art. that the viewers enjoy listening visually. JF: Encaustic is a term from the greek word Enkaustikos, which means to heat or to burn. It is an ancient form of paintArtist Julia Fosson ing dating back more than 2,000 years. Hatchery Studio’s in Asheville’s Encaustic is the term for the medium I River Arts District use, it’s beeswax with damar. Damar is a 1 Roberts Street, Studio #201 resin produced by the Dipterocarpaceae family of trees in Indonesia. (860) 930-8166 Encaustic art is painting with www.juliafosson.com beeswax, damar and pigment. The wax, Studio Hours: Tues.–Sat. 11-4 p.m. damar and pigment are heated to ap-

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Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 21


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Barbara C.L. Perez

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When I was a child, I was constantly drawing or coloring.

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My mother showed me where clay was hidden under the grass, and I made tiny dishes and set them on the sidewalk to dry. It wasn’t until college, when I was taking art as an elective and saw pottery being made, that I changed my major and became involved with art as a possible career. One of my first design projects, a full length self-portrait in which I was part tree, was the beginning of the theme that still Is found In my work.

Barbara C.L. Perez

Several years after college, I settled Into a house and started a studio where I created pottery and taught all ages. I became the high school art teacher In my community, which caused me to broaden my skill level in many forms, Including prlntmaklng, painting, and sculpture. Later studies In sculpture made me think differently about my work and deepened my ability to communicate in clay. For more than seven years, I’ve had a great workspace at the Wedge. There Is a sense of community which Is nice, as most artists work In relative solitude. I like the storytelling part of art making. My sculptures are very sensual and organic In shape, with lush, flowing glazes or matte stony surfaces. I work with the figure, using it as a metaphor for the earth. One series uses partial figures.

22 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

“The Seaweed Woman” Is part female and part seaweed, representing this underwater plant as a person. This was Inspired by the environmental crises in our waters. Another piece suggests a figure unfolding like a butterfly from a cocoon. The tug of war between man and nature has played a prominent role In my art stories. My paintings, usually In pastels or oils, have a sculptural sense Works by Barbara C.L. Perez of depth, and often show the same organic I teach group classes at my nature as the sculptures. Exhibiting classroom space near the Asheville the sculptures and paintings together Mall. All classes begin again In Sepshows the same thought process, tember. General art classes for kids theme, and hand at work. They are Include a wide variety of mediums. the same Idea, expressed In two difI am offering adult classes In drawferent ways. ing and prlntmaking. On the functional clay work, I use leaf and rock textures. Pieces of shell, stone, string and found objects Perez Art Studio make Interesting impressions in wet 129 Roberts Street, 1st floor clay. Plates are shaped like boulders Asheville’s River Arts Distsrict and I often glaze landscapes across the middle as small reminders of our (828) 279-5460 mountains and valleys. They, too, tell www.perezartstudio.com a story of our connection to the earth. The man/nature story shows up again as very organic bowls with handles that look like industrial debris. I’ve been very slowly working on a series of life-sized busts, mostly of immigrants. For people who take a few moments to look and wonder, these portraits have the ability to make Only $75 per class, or take us think about relating to each other two classes for as a human family. $135. 10-4 p.m. Teaching has always been an imStart any time. portant part of my life In art. Whether June 6 & 20, teaching kids or adults, watching the Values; July 11 “aha” moment flash over someone’s & 25, Compoface Is wonderful. I’ve been an artist sition; August in residence on many community 8 & 22, Light projects. Connecting different groups, & Shadow. enabling them to create community Lorelle will guide you toward through art Is an amazing experience. mastery in portraits (people or aniBy designing collaborative projects, I mals), florals, landscapes or other subjects. present a way for people who are very diverse in ability and Interests to beClasses held at River’s Edge Studio at Riverview Station, 191 Lyman come a more cohesive unit, working St., #310, in Asheville’s River Arts toward a comrnon goal. In therapeutic District. Phone (828) 776-2716 for arts residences, I witnessed the arts more details. help heal broken spirits.

Watercolor with Lorelle Bacon


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INTERVIEW WITH RIVER ARTS DISTRICT ARTIST

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Jonas Gerard

Jonas Gerard’s art comes in all sizes. His paintings can be found everywhere from cozy kitchen corners to large corporate boardrooms. Creating large works of art is where his heart truly lies though. His abstract, gestural painting style has its roots in the time he spent as a dancer with the Nikolais Dance Theater in the 60’s, and painting on a large canvas encourages his creativity much like a dancer dancing on a large stage. When the impulse to work very large lights a spark and aligns with a beautiful space to hang grand works, magic happens. Such a convergence is responsible for an illuminating display of new art at the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center. During a recent trip to the Visitor Center, Jonas became inspired by the building’s architecture, geometry, light and purpose.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

The result is two new 12 ft. triptych (3-panel) paintings created expressly for that space. “When I was a young boy coming to America for the first time, I was greeted by the Statue of Liberty” said Jonas. “A place to greet visitors brings back warm memories, and creating these paintings is a way for me to again say thank you to a place that welcomed me, this time Asheville, NC.” Works by Jonas Gerard are currently on display at the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce, 36 Montford Ave., Asheville, NC. For more information, visit jonasgerard.com

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

about your new large triptychs on display at the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce.

Jonas Gerard: When the opportunity

came to create a pair of large works for the COC, I jumped at the chance. I love to paint large. Creating the two 12 ft. triptychs (3-panel paintings) was a very freeing experience. Whenever I work big like this, I feel like a cage has been opened and I can really spread my wings. Little did I know how big my wings could be. In French I would say “Quelle Belle Grandeur!” A large expanse of open canvas frees me in ways few other arts forms can. It is all so inspiring. It is very likely that you will be seeing many more large works from me in the future.

RRM: You’ve been an artist

One of two triptychs created for the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center.

your entire life. Painted many works from representational to abstract. President Ford honored you for your bi-centennial piece. You’ve created many sculptures and other forms of other art. What is it that makes you constantly want

Jonas Gerard

to keep changing and trying new ways to express yourself? And, are you ever tempted to just pull back and rest on your laurels?

RF

JG: My eyes are open to all influenc-

es from the worlds of art, nature and beyond. To force all that through a narrow funnel and limit myself to one style would be to limit creativity itself; I can’t do that. I create art in a multitude of styles and media because that is the way I experience life. Abstracts, Landscapes, Mixed Media, Silks, Sculpture… I must live a life of eclectic creativity or be consumed by the creative fire.

RRM: What art style/media has been the most challenging for you and why?

JG: Every medium I work with

has its own unique challenges. My recent work with silks is a good example. The dyes I use with them behave very differently than paints. Even more than acrylics, like the watercolor wet-on-wet technique, they have a mind of their own and I have to let go of control even more than is usual for me.

“YELLOW SPRING FLOWERS” 30”X40” OIL

ON

CANVAS

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RRM: Music plays a very important

role with your art. Has that always been so and how did the combining of the two come about for you?

JG: An important aspect of my ap-

proach is painting quickly, spontaneously putting inspiration on canvas and eliminating any opportunities for second thoughts or regrets. Music helps me with that. When I get lost in the music, I can’t overthink my painting process.

Jonas Gerard 240 Clingman Ave. in Asheville’s River Arts District (828) 350-7711 www.jonasgerard.com RP

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 23


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❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

Photographer GD Whalen

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Photographer GD Whalen is a traveler. The proof of this can be seen throughout his photography at his studio, Number 104 Gallery. Number 104, located at 191 Lyman St Suite 104, is like taking a walk around the world. Whalen’s photography transports you from Greece to Iceland, finally landing you on the beautiful beaches of St. Augustine, Florida. “His photography has something for everyone,” says Manager Heart Rose Corwin “People who have been to the locations relish in the authenticity and are instantly taken back to their memories of that place. People who have never been are in awe of the sheer beauty that nature creates.” Unlike so many photos you will find on the Internet, GD Whalen’s photography is not enhanced or manipulated. His brilliant eye for composition and mastery of a camera creates scenes you think only exist in paintings.

GD Whalen, www.gdwhalenphotography.com

RL

INTERVIEW WITH GRACE CAROL BOMER OWNER OF

G

Grace Carol Bomer’s work seeks to evoke both image and impression, the tangible world and the spiritual world.

RB

What is also unique about Number 104 Gallery is the size of the prints, some ranging up to 30 x 40 inches. These large masterpieces do not falter in detail but in fact are so crisp you feel as if you are actually there. Whalen uses an Arca-Swiss 4 x 5 large format camera, as well as a Hasselblad 3d-50 megapixel camera, to create these super sharp, yet still soft and artistic prints. It is easy to get lost in this big colorful world as seen through his lens. But Whalen doesn’t limit himself to landscapes. He also displays exquisite talent in portrait photography. What makes his photos different then a normal portrait studio is once again his ability to see more than what meets the eye. “I don’t believe in ‘point and shoot’ photography,” says Whalen. “When I take a portrait, I want to bring

out their personality, their inner beauty that most people don’t get with a simple snapshot.” It is this kind of passion that makes all of his work distinctive as well as relatable. Number 104 Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday and is a wonderful stop in the revitalized River Arts District. For more information call (828) 251-1717 or check out their website at www.number104.com

Soli Deo Gloria Studio Grace Carol Bomer:

There is a tangible world I can see and paint either realistically or abstractly. And there is also a spiritual world that is unseen, apprehended by faith. Both are real, and Her work has been I attempt to bring them called “a silent form of together in my work. poetry.” She views her It is labeled Abstract work as “a form of play Expressionism, but it rejoicing before the face is my faith in God’s of God” (Rookmaaker). word which explains my This is reflected in the union of realism and name of her Asheville abstraction, the seen and studio, Soli Deo Gloria unseen. Studio, located at 140 The Incarnation of D Roberts Street in Christ brings together Thirsting by Asheville’s River Arts these seeming dichotoGrace Carol Boomer district. mies: God / Man, Spirit / Flesh, and Word / Image. We live on Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a the edge of this extravagant mystery, little about your work. this amazing earthshaking event, the

24 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

Sedona by GD Whalen

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

union of the Seen and Unseen, The Incarnation, but we see as in a mirror, dimly. I live and paint in the ordinary and habitual. But I paint the ordinary, what I see, in metaphors and mystery. All of life is glorious subject matter. I have painted portraits, landscapes, and still-life paintings in my lifetime. All have value. But my central focus and concern is “the human condition surprised by the grace of God.” We are fallen and broken people. I want my expressionist work to offer hope and healing. We all share in the human condition. We are all “Incurables” but for the grace of God. I have explored many media, from printmaking to pastels and ‘Deo Gloria’ continued on page 25


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fine art Rapid River readers -

Haywood 2013 Graduate Show

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Celebrate the rising BY APRIL NANCE stars in the western North Carolina craft community by visiting the Haywood The program’s total Graduate Show in the Folk enrollment is about 60 Art Center’s Main Gallery, students. Classes are small, on display through June 23. allowing for one-on-one Graduates of Haywood’s student to teacher attention. Professional Crafts ProStudents come from the gram showcase their talents area, the nation and abroad. in wood, clay, fiber, metal They may or may not have Linda Azar and jewelry. The exhibition prior experience of their continues the historical relationship craft and many are pursuing crafts as a between the Folk Art Center and Haysecond or third career. wood, an Educational Center Member The course of study is challengof the Southern Highland Craft Guild. ing, combining craft concentrations Haywood Community College with supplemental classes in design, is located in Clyde, North Carolina, drawing, craft history, business, just west of Asheville. The college’s marketing and photography. Students Professional Crafts Program began spend the majority of their time in the in recognition of the region’s strong studio making their work. At the end craft heritage. It was envisioned that of the two-year program, graduates students would learn the basics of craft are awarded either a diploma or an Asmedia and how to transform that craft sociate of Applied Science degree. into a business. Haywood Community College The clay studio was the first to and the Southern Highland Craft open in 1974. With the addition of Guild share a history that documents jewelry, wood and fiber studios, a comthe role of craft education in preprehensive curriculum was in place by serving traditional culture, creating 1977. Students now have the benefit of economic opportunity and fostering learning in the new Professional Arts & professional practice. All of the artists Crafts Facility which officially opened represent the vitality and creativity of on HCC’s campus this year. craft practice today, which is the ulti-

‘Deo Gloria’ continued from page 24

power. I believe there is a foundational Word, eternal and established in the heavens. And yes, the world was created by The Word, but a world that rejects the Word of God. My Global City Babel Series (see Babel and the Baby), addresses this conflict between God’s Word and man’s words. My faith, as everyone’s, influences my work. And I hope my work allows the viewer to glimpse the transcendence of an eternally relevant story.

most recently oils, encaustics, and cold wax. I layer and embed various papers and text, graphite, gold leaf and other detritus into my work to create mystery and allow my mind and my imagination to work. Technical excellence and design are important, but they are servant to expression and biblical narrative. My pairing of text and image also references the Incarnation. Jesus is RRM: What inspires you to create? Word and Image of God. Words have GCB: As an English meaning and the Story major, my paintis important. Words are ings are inspired by necessary for commupoetry, great writers nication and narralike Tolstoy, CS tive. They also can be Lewis, and most manipulated for power, recently, Michael because we live in a O’Brien’s Island of broken world. the World. But most You may be important, my work familiar with the is inspired by the phrase,“The world is a Scriptures, the Word text,” which not only of God. refers to the imporThe Hebrew tance of words, but The Weight of Glory by word damah refers implies that they are Grace Carol Bomer. Oil and to a metaphor that to be manipulated for wax on panel.

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IF YOU The Graduate Exhibition GO will be on display in the Folk

Art Center’s Main Gallery through June 23. The Folk Art Center is located on the Blue Ridge Parkway at milepost 382, just north of the Hwy 70 entrance in east Asheville.

transforms, an art form that starts with a commonly accepted way of looking at the world and adds an unexpected twist that results in a new perspective. We are surrounded by metaphors that point us to the unseen world of faith and an eternally relevant story.

RRM: You were born in Alberta,

Canada, and went to college in Iowa. What brought you to Asheville?

GCB: Yes, I am a native of Alberta Can-

ada but have lived in Asheville since the early 1980s when my husband’s job brought us here from Kansas. LOVE these mountains!

See Grace Carol Bomer’s blog post on the Story We Already Know and a review of the The Life of Pi, www.gracebomer.wordpress.com.

Soli Deo Gloria Studio 140 D Roberts Street, in Asheville’s River Arts Distsrict

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(828) 545-2451 www.gracecarolbomer.com

Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 25


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Photography Tips & Tricks

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Travel Photography – Part 4 of 4:

This is the fourth and final segment of our “Travel Photography” focus. We’ve already covered “people” and “places,” so this month, we’ll round things off and take a look at the broad category of “things,” specifically, things of “nature.”

Flora Here in Western North Carolina, there is no shortage of opportunities to photograph endless varieties of flora, whether that be wild flowers in the Blue Ridge Mountains, or 90,000 tulips at the Biltmore every April. This is one area of photography that may require some specialty equipment: • Invest in a “macro” lens to capture super close-up compositions. Top: Daisy. Above: White Egret.

• Also invest in a sturdy tripod to keep things steady, and to keep your focal point precise. Supplement this set up with a cable release, or remote.

David Simchock is a professional photographer and instructor based in Asheville’s River Arts District.

Experiment with depth-of-field (DoF) by adjusting your aperture. Use your camera’s depth-of-field preview button (if

Photos by David Simchock

BY

DAVID SIMCHOCK

it has one) to check the DoF before you fire the shutter. Beware of the wind! As things move, so will your focal point. You may also fall victim to motion blur if your shutter speed is too slow. In most cases, avoid harsh sunlight. Overcast days are best, but if you must shoot in direct sunlight, use a “diffuser” ring to soften the light and to avoid extremely contrasty situations (i.e., deep shadows with blown-out highlights). Fill the frame! If you invested in a macro lens, this shouldn’t be a problem! Also, shoot “wide,” but be conscious of including too much subject matter in the frame, which can result in a confusing composition.

Wildlife Of course, animals and insects are also a part of nature, but they deserve their own “things” category here. Like its flora counterpart, photographing wildlife may require some specialty gear: • Use a lens with a long focal length to bring your subject closer (especially if it is a bear!). • If a long lens is out of your budget, your longest telephoto lens may be compatible with a “teleconverter.” Teleconverters magnify the power of your lens and typically

‘Desmelik’ continued from page 17

Biltmore Tulips Photo by David Simchock

come in 1.4x, 1.7x, and 2x sizes. They are much easier to carry around than a huge 500mm gun, but they do have their downside. Your maximum lens aperture will be reduced by up to two full f-stops, and there may be some optical quality loss, particularly with cheaper third-party components. If you are going on an African safari trip of a lifetime, but don’t want to invest a ton into a big lens, look into renting one for the duration of the trip.

RRM: Do you plan to mix older songs in

• Make good use of your auto-focus system to follow moving wildlife.

DD: I’m thinking the first set will be myself

• For small animals, get down low. Lie on the ground and get dirty if needed! This can be the difference between and okay capture and an awared-winning photograph.

with the new, or can you envision an all instrumental Dave Desmelik evening?

playing some instrumentals from the new CD as well as some instrumentals written recently and not recorded yet (yes, they keep coming). The second set will be some older songs and newer songs with vocals and possibly some friends joining me too. I can assure you I’ll play my heart out. IF YOU Dave Desmelik CD release event GO at the Grey Eagle on Sunday, June

2 at 3 p.m. A suggested donation of $10 gets you all the music plus a copy of “Instrumental Swim.” How can you possibly go wrong? The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave. Call (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com 26 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

Things

• For insects, make use of your macro lens and tripod. • Be kind to the habitat. Take only photos. Leave only footprints. Markets: Just a quick note on “markets.” Though considered “places,” markets are a fantastic place to photograph “things.” For more about this, check out the “Got f-Stop Photo Blog,” www.gotfstop.com

For more about David’s services, please visit www.DijonCreative.com.


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artful living Arising in Awareness

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“Who we are is the moment arising in awareness.”

I have a very unconventional and life-changing perspective to share with you. We can certainly all agree that we are persons. I’m a person, you are a person, all who read this are persons. And, with just a little insight, we can agree that we have awareness. The reading of this article is happening in awareness. The intellectual faculty with its capacity for reading and understanding words as representative of ideas is all occurring in awareness as you read, so we could easily agree that we are persons who have awareness. At this point, I would like you to pause and truly consider what you have just read, and see if you can bring this from an intellectual concept to living reality. (Take a few nice long and easy breaths.)

A very profound Zen practice is to ask: “Who is it that is aware?”

~ Eckhart Tolle

As you hopefully experienced a moment ago, body, mind, circumstances, situations, and time are happening in conscious awareness. Body, mind, circumstances, situations, and even time are all things, and they are happening in that which is not a thing. They are all boundaried concepts happening in that which has no boundary. They are many things happening in that which is only one thing. They are happening within that which is the essential nature of our existence – awareness.

“Who we are is awareness. But we block it with our self-centered thinking.” ~ Charlotte Joko Beck, Zen Master

As you think about being aware of what you are reading, of holding this paper, and of the mind that is comprehending this article, extend that awareness to your body – be aware of your body and its sensations. Do this for a few moments. (Continue being aware of your breathing.) Now, look about you – see and be aware of what you are seeing – listen and be aware of the sounds of the moment around you. (Again, for a few lingering moments along with awareness of breathing.) Now, a very profound Zen practice is to ask: “Who is it that is aware?” Realize – as you become aware of awareness, this awareness is you. (Pause…) Become aware of this you that is awareness… Feel and experience this truth. So now, we are very clear that we are people who have and are awareness, and perhaps, as Buddhism would have us realize, a deeper truth is beginning to dawn… that, far more fundamentally, we are awareness that has a person. Allow me to explain. A conventional perspective says a person is a body, a mind, circumstances and situations strung together in time. That makes sense, doesn’t it? But something very important is being left out here, and it is that which the body, mind, circumstances, situations, and even time happen in.

It could be said that all things arise in what is not a thing. The forms of existence arise in the non-form dimension of existence. And we experience it, and that experiencing is what awareness is. We are now at the threshold of this most remarkable realization: that who we are is awareness. Who we are is the forms of existence – body, mind, circumstances, and situations in time – arising in awareness, the many things in the one no-thing. Very challenging, I know. And I also know that you do know what I’m talking about, but your thinking is getting in the way of what you know, and there is a particular kind of thought that is getting in the way the most. The problem is that thoughts centered around “I” being this body and mental activity in situations in time pull us away from awareness of awareness – and therefore the realization – as Eckhart Tolle teaches, the “felt sense,” that you are awareness. awareness That’s what the Zen Master Joko Beck is saying. So I’m attempting to get you past thinking to what you already know. What we’re talking about here is nonduality, not non-duality as a philosophical concept, but as a living reality. And non-duality is very difficult for modern human-beings to understand because modern human-beings live within a mind that abstracts

BY

BILL WALZ

its experience out of its context in Nature into representations of our experience called thoughts. This is why Buddhism refers to thoughts as “mental forms,” and in abstracting our experience, we create duality consciousness with most every experience being separated into the thought form of “me” as the experiencer with “that” which I am experiencing being out there separated from me. This creates what is called “duality.” Every experience has at least two separate entities, the entity “me” and the entity, “that.” Hence, the experience is dual, made up of two. Non-duality is oneness. It is experienced as connectedness, the wholeness of existence, which is the truth of the way Nature and the Universe are, while duality is experiencing Nature and the Universe as made up of zillions of separate parts, and representing these zillion parts with thoughts, abstractions of reality, an artificial reality of bits of information much like what a computer does, which is a very real experience for us, but it’s just not the way the Universe actually is.

deeper Nature, is the heart of Zen. The required shift to enter the living reality of non-duality is the realization of the answer to the great Zen question, “Who is it that is aware?” That answer is: awareness that has a person the world knows as me. As for this “me” – as the Zen masters say: “There’s nobody here.” And there is. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

We are dualistic egocentric humans... In our experience of the many things, what is the one thing that holds them all together, that connects them, that makes for one experience, the experience of “Me?” Awareness. Non-duality is everything in the great oneness of the Universe, and so, since duality exists, non-duality contains duality, and from the perspective of duality, which is how most humans experience life, it seems impossible to achieve this “felt sense” of the non-dual oneness. It is, in fact, only very difficult – but not impossible – for a modern person to not only comprehend non-duality, but to experience it, and even live primarily from the perspective of non-duality. It requires a shift from within what can be described as the human-being paradox. We are dualistic egocentric humans, and we are beings, sharing universal natural beingness with all Nature. This perspective and experience of living within the duality of human experience within the greater perspective that is the beingness, the non-duality of Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 27


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

The Great Gatsby ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: Baz Luhrmann’s adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s iconic novel is a Roaring Twenties extravaganza and assault of the senses, befitting Fitzgerald’s own world of excess.

REEL TAKE: A little leeway must be granted with any film adaptation of a great novel. In the case of Baz Luhrmann’s recent adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, I reminded myself of this repeatedly. I didn’t particularly think the world needed another version of Gatsby, but if it was going to be done, one would need to make theirs stand out from the others.

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

That said, in Maguire’s portrayal, his love and admiration for his friend shines almost as brightly as the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock does for Gatsby. In the book (and in the ’74 version) Gatsby’s parties are legendary, but Gatsby himself is even more so. DiCaprio delivers a great performance (he was well practiced after affecting such gentlemanly manners as Calvin Candie in Django Unchained Unchained), but is slightly overshadowed by Luhrmann’s production values. Tobey Maguire, Leonardo DiCarpio, Carey Mulligan and Also overshadowed is the Joel Edgerton star in Bazz Luhrmann’s sparkling but romance and affair between Gatsby emotionally lacking adaptation of The Great Gatsby. and Daisy, which [perhaps done Indeed, Luhrmann’s creativity is given a intentionally] makes it more of an illuwide berth in his roaring twenties flapper sion than a reality and in turn diminishes extravaganza, and it certainly stands apart Gatsby’s unwavering hope and optimism from its predecessors. and any emotional depth. Visually Luhrmann’s Gatsby is a feast The characters perhaps best served by for the eyes and an assault on the senses. He the production’s lavish values are Daisy and upfits it for a 21st Century audience with a Tom. She is a difficult character—annoyingsound track produced by Jay Z. Story-wise, ly vapid, loved beyond measure by one man, Luhrmann actually stays pretty true to the betrayed by another, but ultimately cowardsource material, but takes one liberty in ly, materialistic and status quo. Tom (Joel particular for framing purposes. In his interEdgerton) is perfectly caddish as the Daisy’s pretation, Fitzgerald’s narrative voice, Nick philandering, bigoted and self serving, blue Carraway (Tobey Maguire), is a Fitzgeraldblooded husband. Rounding out the cast in like would-be writer. He relates the story of smaller parts, but in no small measure, are his friend, Jay Gatsby, while being treated Isla Fisher as Tom’s vulgar mistress Myrtle for alcoholism at an asylum. Wilson, Jason Clarke as Myrtle’s duped husIn the summer of 1922 Nick rents an band George, and finally Elizabeth Dibicki old gardener’s cottage on in the Hamptons as Daisy’s fellow socialite friend Jordan. on Long Island. Unbeknownst to him, he I believe Luhrmann’s right hand in the has moved next door to the most elusive spectacular visuals and beguiling artifice and most talked about man in New York is production designer Catherine Martin. City—Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio). Their vision is over the top and I think Nick and Gatsby live directly across the bay exactly as they intended it. The effervesfrom Nick’s socialite cousin, Daisy Buchancence of watching the film in 3-D certainly an (Carey Mulligan). Also unbeknownst to suits the desired effect. The interior shots him, Gatsby has long been in love with his of Gatsby’s home are truly spectacular, but beautiful [and now married] cousin. Nick [IMHO] the computer generated exterior is befriended by Gatsby and is drawn into a was just too ridiculous for words. To me it world of wealth and extravagance and a story looked like Hogwarts meets Robert Kinof obsession, hope and tragedy. caid—a cozily lit fanciful castle. The cast gives it their all. Toby MaThe Great Gatsby is one of my favorguire is quite effective as Nick, though I ite books. I will never forget being riveted never remember thinking of that character and devastated by its pages the first time I as weak and whiny in the book or in Sam read it. Luhrmann’s Gatsby entertained me, Waterston’s portrayal in the 1974 version. but it did not move me. While Luhrmann

28 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

stays true to his source material, the story is upstaged by razzmatazz, and the film ultimately lacks the essence that is, in a word, Gatsby. For me, The Great Gatsby still Gatsby remains greatest on the page. Rated PG-13 for some violent images, sexual content, smoking, partying and brief language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Iron Man 3 ∑∑∑ ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Iron Man 3 is everything a sequel seems to be these days… bigger, longer, louder, darker in tone, but unfortunately not better.

Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) dons the metal suit yet again in Iron Man 3.

REEL TAKE: After a restful month off

where the movies were good and watching and reviewing them even better, it’s back to business as usual. The Summer blockbusters are upon us, and Iron Man 3 gets the ball rolling in typical overkill fashion. I thoroughly enjoyed the first Iron Man movie. It struck just the right balance between storyline, characterization, humor and pyrotechnics. It also had a refreshingly droll antagonist in Jeff Bridges who grew in villainy and delivered the goods in the end. Iron Man 2 had the look of a hastily put together follow-up which planted the seeds of the bigger is better scenario which bears fruit here. It also had Mickey Rourke as a more classic comic book villain teamed up with evil CEO Sam Rockwell (Rourke shines in Java Heat, see review this issue).. For the third go-round, in addition to the tandem villain combo (Guy Pearce and Ben Kingsley) and the significant increase in ‘Movies’ continued on page 29


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CGI explosions, we get the curse of Christopher Nolan’s Batman series and that is serious title character angst. It works with Batman because it fits the profile of Bruce Wayne and Christopher Nolan is a remarkable director. Unfortunately, director Shane Black is no Christopher Nolan and he and co-author Drew Pearce lack Nolan’s writing skills as well. Iron Man 3 has a convoluted plot that takes too long to unfold and then is hard to follow when it does. Suffering panic attacks after nearly dying in The Avengers (some tie-in eh?), Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr) builds several Iron Man suits alienating him from girlfriend Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow). Terrorist attacks by the Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) bring him around but after his home is destroyed and he is believed dead, he then discovers the truth with the help of a rural boy in Tennessee (Ty Simkins). The real Mandarin is a rogue scientist (Guy Pearce) and he has plans to kill the President and rule through the puppet Vice-President. That is only a basic, watered down version of the storyline and leaves out most of the explosions but you get the idea. Comic book material “elevated” to the level of modern day dysfunctional family drama. Pretty soon all the joy will be gone from the genre and superhero movies won’t be that different from reality based television (I can hardly wait for Man of Steel where kryptonite is replaced by crying). In the end my biggest beef with Iron Man 3 was that I really didn’t have any fun and I couldn’t wait for it to be over. If I had known in advance about a post-credits gag, I would have stayed to see it. It appears to have summed up the movie perfectly. Having said all that, I have to admit that the movie wasn’t a total washout. It is well photographed, the pyrotechnics really are spectacular and the characterizations, for the most part, were solid enough especially Pearce and Kingsley who know precisely what to do with this type of material. Chances are you already know whether or not this type of movie is, to use the quaint old phrase, your cup of tea. Unfortunately since I am both old and quaint (as I have been told on more than one occasion), this is no longer my kind of film. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence and brief suggestive content.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Java Heat ∑∑∑∑ Short Take: This mid-price Indonesian action film is slickly made with quality editing and cinematography, and solid if not spectacular performances, with the exception of Mickey Rourke who is a classic villain in the grand tradition.

Mickey Rourke plays the dastardly villain to the hilt in the Indonesian made Java Heat.

REEL TAKE: It’s a safe bet to assume that

Indonesian performers Ario Bayu and Atiquah Hasiholan, however, are the heart and soul of the picture and are a real pleasure to watch. Of course the villain in a film like this is the plum role and Mickey Rourke doesn’t disappoint. In fact he was as much fun to watch as Javier Bardem was in Skyfall. He even gets to deliver several lines in Javanese (WARNING: subtitle alert!). Java Heat isn’t a great film and it has no pretenses about being one. It is simply good old fashioned entertainment that achieves its thrills for less than 1/10th the budget of Iron Man 3. Although IM3 is obviously a better movie in every department, I have to say that I enjoyed Java Heat much more and unlike IM3, I didn’t start to forget it the moment I left the theater. In fact it has had surprising staying power which only confirms the lesson that Hollywood needs to learn once more and that lesson is that money isn’t everything. But until the megabuck franchises start to tank at the box office, there’s just no hope of that.

the same audience for Renoir won’t be going out of their way to see Java Heat but those who do go will find a well made crime thriller/buddy movie with a touch of the exotic and an inside look at Indonesia’s people and its customs. This is old school filmmaking recalling the medium budget International thrillers of the late 1960s and early 1970s but successfully retooled here Rated R for violence throughout, language, and for the 21st century. sexual references. Java Heat is part of the new approach REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN to ActionFest at the Carolina Cinemas. Rather than have a weekend glut of “the film The Reluctant Fundamentalist festival with a body count”, the theater will ∑∑∑∑ screen one selected action film on the third Friday of each month. Last month it was Short Take: A young Pakastani living Beyond Outrage. Both films benefitted local the American dream finds himself charity Homeward Bound. Java Heat scored drawn back to his homeland in the wake of 9/11. well at its special showing last month and has settled in for a regular run although I don’t expect it to be here long trying to compete among the Summer heavyweights unless word of mouth gets out. The film opens with a suicide bombing at a lavish party resulting in the death of a Javanese sultan’s daughter. An American graduate student (Kellan Lutz) and an Indonesian detective (Ario Bayu) join forces to discover who’s behind the bombing. It turns out that the student is really an undercover marine and the daughter (Atiquah Hasiholan) isn’t dead but is being held for ransom by a ruthless Riz Ahmed stars in the thought provoking story criminal (Mickey Rourke) with ties to The Reluctant Fundamentalist. terrorists. The duo then set out to rescue the girl and the policeman’s family who REEL TAKE: My apologies, dear readers. have also been kidnapped. The full review for The Reluctant FunNo need to tell you how it turns out damentalist was lost in technical glitch although you should go and see for yourself. between my new [much smarter than I am The storyline may be predictable but the phone] and my computer—operator error to surprising use of split screen (echoes of Brian be sure! With our deadline at hand, I recreDe Palma), a refreshing lack of computer ated an abbreviated version of the review. generated effects, a normal running time and Based on a novel by Moshin the exotic Indonesian locales make Java Heat Hamid,The The Reluctant Fundamentalist is a more than just an effective way to spend a well intended and timely story, a crisis of couple of hours at the local moviehouse. conscience ripped right out of the headlines. Kellan Lutz as the American lead is The film starts off in 2011 with a young more than adequate for his role. Kind of like Pakistani man named Changez (Riz Ahmed) a young Arnold Schwarzenegger minus the trying to tell his story to an American jouraccent. He looks great in the buff as well. nalist (Liev Schriber). There’s even an amusing joke that pokes fun at his having been in the Twilight saga. ‘Movies’ continued on page 30

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special membersonly events and screenings.

Bureau of Missing Persons June 4:

(1933) Butch Saunders has been transferred to Missing Persons. When a young woman asks him to help locate her husband, he learns that she is wanted by Chicago police for the murder of her husband. Stars Bette Davis, Lewis Stone and Pat O’Brien. Directed by Roy Del Ruth. June 11:

Gentleman For a Day

(aka Union Depot, 1932) Travelers of different and varied backgrounds meet and interact on one night in a metropolitan train station and its environs. Stars Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Joan Blondell, and Guy Kibbee. Directed by Alfred E. Green. June 18:

Barcelona

(1994) Ted, a stuffy white guy is paid an unexpected visit by his cousin Fred, who is an officer in the US Navy. Stars Taylor Nichols, Chris Eigeman and Tushka Bergen. Directed by Whitt Stillman.

No Man of Her Own June 25:

(1932) Clark Gable plays a card cheat who has to go on the lam to avoid a pesky cop. While hiding out he meets a lonely, but slightly wild librarian. Stars Clark Gable, Carole Lombard and Dorothy Mackaill. Directed by Wesley Ruggles.

BIG SCREEN BUDGET FILM $5 for members, $7 general. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 19:

North by Northwest

(1959) A hapless New York advertising executive is mistaken for a government agent by a group of foreign spies, and is pursued across the country. Stars Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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Ten years earlier Changez was a young man on Wall Street with the American dream within his grasp when 9/11 occurred, forever changing the world and his life forever. In the wake of attacks, Changez found himself under suspicion and scrutiny on the basis of his ethnicity. Eventually he finds himself torn between the American dream, a hostage crisis and the draw of his homeland. The movie is beautifully filmed. It gets a little cluttered and is less than subtle as a message movie, but it is truly compelling and worthwhile. Ahmed gives a wonderfully layered and dynamic performance. Kiefer Sutherland, as Changez’s Wall Street boss, is steely perfection. No one in the cast really misses a note. However, while the characters in this film are interesting, various forms of fundamentalism are what’s really being explored and the characters are merely a backdrop for the conversation. Clearly director Mira Nair is hoping to instigate a healthy debate and dialogue. Rated R for language, some violence and brief sexuality.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Renoir ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: A leisurely paced but remarkably beautiful film about the final years of French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, his son Jean who would become a famous film director, and the young woman who inspired both of them.

REEL TAKE: It has been way too long since

I have seen a film that managed to push all the right buttons in me but Renoir was it. This makes the 5 star rating something of a subjective one for if you’re not into Impressionist art or classic art in general then you’ll probably find it slow and boring. On the surface it has all the qualifications that should make up a 5 star film. It’s well acted even down to the smallest bit part, the script is well written revealing layers to the characters over the course of time, the musical background enhances the setting and the cinematography is breathtaking as it should be in a film about an artist. It’s just not a film for most American tastes. The year is 1915. World War I is just starting to shift into high gear and the Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), now 74 and crippled by arthritis, has moved to the Riviera so that he can continue to paint. His middle son Jean (Vincent Rottiers) has just come back from the Front with a severe leg injury. He discovers that his father has hired a new model, Andree Heuschling known as Deedee (Christa Theret), who embodies the elder Renoir’s ideas about truth and beauty. He paints her not as she is but as he sees her. At first this concept is alien to her but

Andree Heuschling (Christa Theret), Pierre Renoir’s new model, poses for the artist in Renoir.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Grand Illusion”

slowly she begins to understand. When the son asks Renoir why he refuses to use black, he explains that his paintings are all about color and not about form. The world is dark enough so why should he add to it. He has even surrounded himself with many of his former models to constantly be reminded of the beauty of life. He also needs them to perform the daily tasks he no longer can because of his deteriorating physical condition. Eventually Jean becomes involved with Andree and she enables him to reexamine his father and his work as well as himself and his place in the world.

June DVD Picks

Grand Illusion (1937) Having just seen the new French film Renoir (reviewed this issue) about the last years of the French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, his son Jean who would become a world famous filmmaker, and the woman who inspired both of them, it seemed appropriate to revisit some of Jean Renoir’s films of which the greatest is La Grande Illusion (1937). This legendary film, which is set in a German fortress used for housing French prisoners during World War I, is one of the most stirring anti-war films ever made. Jean Renoir fought in the Great War and suffered a severe leg injury, so he came by his knowledge of conditions at the Front firsthand. However instead of showing battle weary soldiers at the Front ala All Quiet on the Western Front, he chose a prison setting and then chose to highlight the similarities rather than the differences between the two sides. It is the humanity of the characters that makes Grand Illusion so powerful. Instead of battles and people dying there are discussions on what it all means and a surprising civility between members of both sides. Of course some people do die and there are attempts to escape making this film a precursor to the more famous The Great Escape of 1963. The performances by all involved especially Erich von Stroheim as a crippled camp commandant are spot on and remain with you once the film is over. Once seen Grand Illusion is a difficult film to put out of your mind. Not being able to see the film almost became a reality as it was banned by the Germans and the Italians once World War II started and for years it was thought destroyed until a partial negative showed up after the war. Several years

30 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

later the complete print surfaced and has now been digitally restored for this Criterion DVD. Yes it’s old, it’s in French w/subtitles, and there are no battle scenes per se but it remains one of the great films of all times from a master filmmaker and you owe it to yourself to see it at least once. Due to its importance, Grand Illusion is readily available locally and you can also get it from Netflix. Try it. Those of you who prefer meat & potatoes (or tofu & sprouts since this is Asheville) to fast food won’t be bored or disappointed.

Silver Linings Playbook (2012) The Hangover III hit theatres recently. And while the first of the Hangover films was a truly a great comedy, the same cannot be said of its sequels. So if Hangover III isn’t your cup of tea, you may prefer another Bradley Cooper film instead. One of last year’s most acclaimed films, Silver Linings Playbook has just come out on DVD. If you missed it after all these months in the theatres, you’ve no excuses now. Silver Linings Playbook was one of the best films of 2012 and it claimed an Academy Award for lead actress, Jennifer Lawrence. The film is simultaneously edgy and dark, funny and touching. Pat (Bradley

After Jean decides to return to the Front, she leaves in despair, plunging the household into chaos. The father cannot paint, Jean cannot sleep, and the rest realize just how much she meant to everyone. Jean searches for her, finds her and brings her back. They would eventually marry and as Catherine Hessling she would appear in his earliest films. After 1931, when they divorced, she disappeared from public view and would die in 1979, the same year as Jean. Along with the basic storyline it’s the little details that keep Renoir so fascinating. I had no idea that brushes had to be taped to his hands so that the elder Renoir could ‘Movies’ continued on page 31

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Silver Linings Playbook” Cooper) is a former teacher with bi-polar disorder and anger management issues. At the beginning of the film his mother (Jackie Weaver) is springing him from the mental institution, where he’s spent the last eight months after violently attacking his wife’s lover. Pat is newly invigorated; inspired by his belief is a silver lining. He intends to win back his wife and rebuild his life. The problem is he’s still bat shit crazy. At a dinner party, he meets Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence). Tiffany is a young widow and the town tramp. Her issues are born more from insecurity, depression and pervasive loneliness than anything else. One of the film’s funniest scenes comes at the dinner party when Pat and Tiffany swap stories about psychiatric medications and their side effects, much to the dismay of their hosts. Tiffany is interested in Pat straight away, but Pat still has his sights on his wife Nikki (Brea Bee). Tiffany’s sister Veronica (Julia Stiles) is friends with Nikki, so Tiffany agrees to get a note from Pat to Nikki, but he has to do her a favor as well. She wants to enter a dance competition but needs a partner. What ensues is crazy, discombobulated, perfect match in the making. The ups and downs and twists and turns of our character’s personalities are a terrific ride. The supporting cast, including Robert DeNiro as Pat’s father and Chris Tucker as a fellow psych case, is great. The climax of the movie was more conventional than I would have expected, but I didn’t mind. Ironically by the end of the movie our bi-polar hero with violent tendencies is Mr. Sensitive, but then again they don’t call it a silver lining for nothing. It’s a story with chaos, pathos and above all, heart.


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paint. I may have known but had forgotten that Jean Renoir was seriously wounded during the war. No wonder his Grand Illusion of 20 years later (see this month’s DVD pick) is so powerful. It was also fascinating to learn that Father Renoir’s last model, immortalized in his paintings, would also be preserved on film by his son. Renoir is obviously not a film for the mainstream but it has its audience. When I saw it, 8 days after it opened, the showing was sold out. The vast majority of the people in attendance were much older than the usual target demographic but even the younger ones stayed until the lights came up. In our ultra busy media saturated world, it’s refreshing and exhilarating to watch people forget time and actually sit, absorb, and enjoy something. Rated R for art-related nudity and language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

I

Star Trek Into Darkness ∑∑∑∑

In 2001, the 48 Hour Film Project started as a local film challenge among friends. Since then, it has since evolved into a global phenomenon and the world’s largest filmmaking competition.

pleasing hit with Star Trek Into Darkness. Yes, in the second installment of the latest incarnation of the franchise, Abrams can coast a bit on the nostalgic legacy and popularity of the Enterprise’s original crew, but that only gets you so far. Led by Chris Pine as a young Captain Kirk and Zachary Quinto as a young Mr. Spock, this redux of the original Star Trek characters is building their own following, while ever tipping the hat to their predecessors. In this installment, the Enterprise has returned to Earth and the young Capt. Kirk has failed yet again to follow procedures to the letter of the law and disobeyed the Federation’s Prime Directive, with his superior

BY

BRUCE SALES

acter, a prop, and a line of dialogue they must work into their film. Films submitted even 1-minute late on June 23 will be disqualified. This year, Asheville will be one of a record 125 cities worldwide—from Beijing to Lisbon—competing in the 48 Hour Film Project. Submitted films will be screened for the public and judged by a panel of experts. The Best Film from Asheville will be chosen and winners will then be in the running for top honors in Hollywood, CA at Filmapalooza 2013, the 48 Hour Film Project’s annual awards.

Competition Begins Friday, June 21 Teams meet to receive details for their films. Friday, June 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Asheville Brewing Company, Coxe Ave. location.

Competition Ends Getting ready for a zombie clown attack. Love Sick, St. Louis, 2012

This year, the 48 Hour Film Project will tour nearly 125 cities, challenging more than 50,000 people to complete an entire film, from writing and casting, to filming and editing, in a mere 48 hours! In all, more than 4,000 films will be created as part of the 2013 competition. The challenge will take over the streets of Asheville from June 21-23.

How The Competition Works On June 21, participating teams will gather at Asheville Brewing Company where they will be given a genre, a char-

If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310.

REEL TAKE: J.J. Abrams scores a crowd

The 48 Hour Film Project

Hundreds of Asheville Residents Race to Complete Films in Just One Weekend: June 21-23

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY

Short Take: Beam me some popcorn and set phasers to fun as Kirk and Spock and the rest of the Star Trek Enterprise new [old] crew take on a new [old] foe in the latest installment of the franchise.

Teams meet to submit the films they’ve created. Sunday, June 23 at 7:30 p.m. Films must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. to be eligible! Asheville Brewing Company, Coxe Ave. location.

Premiere Screenings June 25 and 26 at 4 p.m., 7 p.m., and 10 p.m. Asheville Brewing Company, Merrimon Ave. location.

Prizes The best film from Asheville will be awarded a trophy and screened at the 48 Hour Film Project Filmapalooza. For more details visit www.48hourfilm.com/asheville

June 2:

The Great Gatsby Zachary Quinto as Spock, with Chris Pine as Kirk, in Star Trek Into Darkness.

citing, “You’re not ready for command yet.” Just as this goes down, a suicide bombing (current day parallels dually noted), leads Kirk not only back to the Enterprise but in hot pursuit of a villain who is, of all things, a Starfleet officer, or so it seems. ‘John Harrison’ (Benedict Cumberbatch) is a formidable foe. Best of all, he is a villain who needs not an ounce of prosthetic make up or CGI effects. He turns out to be someone whose [spoiler alert] wrath Capt. Kirk will come to know well. Cumberbatch throws himself into the role with wicked abandon. In the 2009 Star Trek Trek, Abrams and his team weirdly, but, in hindsight, smartly, integrated the original [and now aged] Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy), by having him change the past. I can’t even begin to explain how they explained it, but in doing so it allows future integration with the original Mr. Spock and allows the younger version of him and his fellow crew members to chart a different destiny. Kind of genius albeit highly illogical, don’t you think? But as these prequel Enterprisers hit their own stride, the ties to the original create a harmonious and effective synergy. Pine and Quinto have big shoes to fill and are pitch perfect. The rest of the cast is spot on and extremely likeable as well. The only thing that just seems totally out of step [with or without] the altered past is an affair between Mr. Spock and Lt. Uhura, but perhaps that’s why they did it. What really makes the film more than just enjoyable and will solidify this incarnation of the franchise are the moments when the crew is bickering, bantering and bonding with one another. Sci-fi blockbuster with action and special effects aside, human relationships is what Abrams does best in his work, and it’s the camaraderie between these characters that will take this crew where no man has been before and beyond. May they live long and prosper. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of sci-fi action and violence.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Now that the Baz Luhrman-Leonardo DiCaprio remake has opened, it’s time to revisit the Robert Redford-Mia Farrow version which was critically panned upon its initial release. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1920s milieu is meticulously recreated and this movie remains the most faithful adaptation of his novel. The film also features Sam Waterston, Bruce Dern, and Karen Black. DIR: Jack Clayton, 1974 June 9:

The Mill and The Cross

A unique film that tells the story of Flemish artist Pieter Breughel and how his celebrated painting The Way to Calvary was created. Rutger Hauer stars as Breughel along with Michael York and Charlotte Rampling. DIR: Lech Majewski, 2011

Strangers on a Train June 16:

A little something special for Father’s Day from Alfred Hitchcock. This classic thriller involves a tennis star, his unfaithful wife, an unusual train passenger and how their stories all converge after a chance meeting. The film stars Farley Granger, Robert Walker, and Ruth Roman. DIR: Alfred Hitchcock, 1951 June 23:

Whirlpool of Fate

This long lost silent feature was French director Jean Renoir’s first movie. It gives us the rare opportunity of seeing his then wife Catherine Hessling who is the subject of the recent film Renoir. The story concerns an orphan girl fleeing her abusive uncle and the people she encounters along the way. DIR: Jean Renoir, 1926 June 30:

Shakespeare in Love

When young Will Shakespeare suffers from a severe case of writer’s block, it takes an illicit affair, a woman playing a man, and the intervention of Queen Elizabeth (Judi Dench) to get things moving again. The film was the winner of seven Academy Awards. It stars Gwyneth Paltrow, Joseph Fiennes, and Colin Firth. DIR: John Madden, 1998

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Storekeep, Cityfella, Mrs. Storekeep, and the Curmudgeon were standing around looking at the new poster display for the local newspaper out of Asheville and wondering about the future of newspapers, the US Mail, and civility in general when a Tourist walked in and, we suspect, thought he had warped up to another space and time but in deference to being polite asked how to get to the Interstate going east to Black Mountain.

Sold to the highest bidder. “Won’t do you no good,” said Curmudgeon, “if the new Republican owners of Western North Carolina have anything to say about it, that reservoir over in Black Mountain will be sold to the highest bidder.” “What reservoir?” asked the Tourist. “Pay him no mind,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “he’s referring to the recent political changes around here that happened when an ill-informed public cast out the North Carolina Democrats in office and replaced them with some new faces.” Immediately, Curmudgeon said: “Same thing happened at the end of the Civil War, only instead of Quantrill’s Raiders, we now have the two M&M’s in the person of Moffitt and McGrady who are joined at the hip with one Nathan Ramsey. “And most people don’t know Quantrill’s Raiders were a loosely organized bunch of pro-Confederate partisan raiders known as bushwhackers who fought in the Civil War and became a lawless bunch of do-nogooders after the war was over.” “The new Republicans,” volunteered Cityfella, “hate Asheville and have passed a regional water and sewer bill that takes the ownership of Asheville’s water supply

BY

PETER LOEWER

away from the city—without due process of law or compensation—and are Illustration by Peter Loewer giving it to the Metropolitan Sewer District, and most folks around here are a bit upset about it.” “I only want to visit my sister in Black Mountain,” said the Tourist. “Well,” said Cityfella, “in this general store you have to keep up with all kinds of folks and politics, and this water deal had kind of taken front stage compared to the dozens of things going wrong around here.” “I thought,” said the Tourist, “that North Carolina ranked up there with the better states in the Union, but you make it sound like kind of a lawless place, especially when you mention putting a sewer department in charge of an area’s water supply. I’ll have to ask my sister—if I ever get to Black Mountain.” Unknown to the folks in the store, the Breadman had stayed out late the night before, losing a bit of money in a stacked game of Monopoly, and had dozed off while straightening up a pile of Ring-Dings waking up to the sudden louder voices on the other side of the counter and woke up. “What is the talk about?” he asked, stifling a yawn. “This gentleman,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “came in for directions to Black Mountain and innocently became involved with a discussion about Asheville losing control of its water supply and the fear that once done, all that valuable land and water will be privatized, reflecting a number of such happenings around the country.” “The hell with the water,” said the Breadman, “how about their attempted theft of the Airport?” “Anything else?” asked the Tourist. “They tried for the Ag Center,” said Curmudgeon, “and to do all sorts of things to the local schools and education in general—in fact working towards this state being below Mississippi in rank.” “Have you got a map of the area that I can purchase?” asked the Tourist. Whereupon, Mrs. Storekeep took pity on the poor man and led him out the door and down the steps to his car, and give him instructions on how to get there. “Give our best to your sister,” shouted Mrs. Storekeep and the tourist drove away. “Good thing there are no volcanoes in Black Mountain,” said Cityfella with a knowing sigh. Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

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southern comfort

COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

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Two of My Favorite Poets

Two of my favorite poets and masters of the written word in the literary world are gracing us with new books this summer. Literary greats, Maya Angelou and Alice Walker have each written new books. When I received MS magazine this week, I found the announcement of new books from writer, Alice Walker and Wake Forest University’s own Maya Angelou, poet and writer in residence. Both obviously have not completely stopped writing. I pray neither one does in the near future. There are truly people who we never want to loose. We just want more good books from them. I was amazed to read that Alice Walker is back with A Cushion In The Road, published by The New Press in a wise and funny collection of letters, poems, and personal reflections. The Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Color Purple meditates on politics, spirituality, the Alice Walker wonderful pleasures of pet ownership and her conflicting desires to remain engaged and retreat into contemplation. I could not have said it any better than she said it, “retreat into contemplation.” That is square on it and I am going through the same feelings. Only this week, I was online investigating buying an RV and just leaving with no destination in mind. Just driving, listening to great CD’s and wandering around the country. I did this in 1961 when I was 21 and I may end up doing this after I turn 73 on June 5. I get totally into the idea just contemplating doing it. I certainly am as free as a bird in flight and can do whatever I want to do. Since I am contemplating the rest of my life, I cannot wait to read Walker’s new book. Maya Angelou’s new book is a big surprise for many of her fans including me. Her new book, titled Mom & Me & Mom, is published by Random House. It is about her relationship with her mother. Described as a heartfelt account of their long journey toward forgiveness, sympathy and love. I am looking forward to reading this as well. Many of us do not ever get the

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

opportunity to write about our relationships with our mothers. I have mentioned in past columns the difficulty I had with knowing my mother. It just never happened. Maya Angelou My brother and I now think our mother could have been bipolar. Mother’s rages were out of control and if anyone saw Silver Linings Playbook Playbook, you know what I am talking about. It was always dangerous when the rages occurred. Her words alone could kill when she was in a rage. That A long journey is one toward forgiveness, reason, sympathy and love. more or less, that I shut her out of my life when I moved to North Carolina. Most of the communication we had was via phone. She had changed so much from when my brother and I were young – she was a great mom. But, when my father died so young, she turned her rage mainly on me because she just could not get to a good place in her head that her only daughter is gay. She died with cancer in 2004 and I have forgiven her for all the bad times. And, I feel sorry for any family dealing with bipolar family members. Hopefully, when I read Angelou’s book about her mother, it will shine some good light on all of us who had to deal with our Mother’s mental stress. Angelou is the interview I never got the privilege of doing when I was working as a reporter. I guess it is not too soon to forget. Maybe someday soon.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


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INTERVIEW WITH MICHAEL FLANIGAN, OWNER OF BLACK MOUNTAIN’S

Trailhead Restaurant

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The Trailhead is the dream and vision of Michael Flanigan, a long time restaurant veteran.

Their food is cooked fresh and to order, offering everything from bar food to elegant seafood dishes. They proudly serve organic handcrafted brews from Black Mountain’s own Pisgah Brewing Company. They use local produce whenever possible. Their bread is fresh from City Bakery in Asheville.

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RRM: Talk a little about your live

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music.

MF: Wednesday and Thursday nights

are my favorite. Local musicians playing with and for anyone who walks through that door. Lots of our staff make their way to the stage those nights to take part. We are fortunate to have so many local musicians in the area (Kevin Scanlon’s Old Time Jam Wednesday and Steve Burnside’s Zydeco Jam Thursday). Thursday nights take on a cajun theme which makes it fun for the kitchen to come up with different specials.

RRM: You’ve got some

of the best beer on top what are your best sellers?

MF: All local brews sell

Menu items are fresh and homemade.

very well. It’s great to see the brewery boom in our area. There’s is a lot to choose from out

there. We try to have something for everyone. Including Gluten Free bottled beers.

RRM: Tell us about some of your

personal favorite meals you serve?

MF: The mussels are a tough one

to beat. We are still a very young business and strive to make things better as we go along. We make over 90% of our dishes from scratch to keep things home made and fresh. The daily specials and soups are a collective effort from the staff and keep us inspired to do what we love.

The Trailhead Restaurant 207 W. State Street, Black Mountain, NC

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(828) 357-5656 www.thetrailheadrestaurant.com

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about how The Trailhead Restaurant came about.

Michael Flanigan: After moving

to from Taos, New Mexico about 8 years ago my wife and I moved to the Asheville area. We had a one year lease & once it was up we instantly knew we were ready to move to Black Mountain. Both of us have worked in the area since. Since then we have bought a home here and began to raise our family. Working in the business for years opened up a opportunity to get something going of my own. Living in our small town & building relationships absolutely helped us get the ball rolling. We wanted to create a friendly menu with a family atmosphere.

ART IN BLOOM 2013 marks the 7th year of Art in Bloom in western N.C. In addition to the amazing display of art and flowers in the main building, this three day event also includes a GALA Preview Party on June 13; a Concert by Joe Penland on June 14 and a Garden Tour on June 14 and 15 with Plein Air Painters in each garden. Tickets are available by calling (828) 669-0930. This year’s Honorary Chair is David Holt. The works of art that will be used for interAIB 2011, Terri Todd pretation by our amazing floral designers will feature pieces from regional and world-renowned artists on loan to the Center from 16 area galleries. Both our Ikebana and our western floral designers will be participating by invitation in this spectacular and synergizing annual event. For more details visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

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Harry Seidler: Architecture, Art and Collaborative Design

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“As much as the needs of fact, the needs of the spirit and the senses, must be satisfied. Architecture is as much a part of the realm of art as it is of technology; the fusion of thinking and feeling.” PG. 34

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BY

ALICE SEBRELL

haus principles of design in his architectural practice. The exhibition traces AusThe Julian Rose House, Design/Completion trian-born Seidler’s key role in 1949-1950, Wahroonga, Sydney, Australia. bringing Bauhaus principles to Steel structure, timber infill. Australia and identifies his distinctive place and hand within and bereasons why Seidler is important yond modernist design methodology. ~ Harry Seidler, 1963 and why he will always be imporThe fifteen featured projects— tant. First, it is his love for architecArchitecture, Art and Collaborfive houses and five towers in Sydney, ture, his position on following his ative Design is a traveling exhibition and five major commissions beyond convictions to which he was always celebrating the ninetieth anniversaSydney—focus on Seidler’s lifelong true and a mission to make the ry of the birth of Harry Seidler, the creative collaborations, a pursuit he diworld a better place where archileading Australian architect of the rectly inherited from Bauhaus founder tecture is a big part of it.” twentieth century. Walter Gropius. This retroSeidler’s work spective exhibition is presented through IF illuminates Seidler’s architectural models, YOU Opening reception from architectural legacy sculpture maquettes, GO 5:30 to 7:30 pm on Friday, as Australia’s most photographs, films, June 14. On display important moderncorrespondence, through September 7, 2013. ist architect. Harry books, scrapbooks, Admission is free for members and Seidler studied with periodicals, drawings, students, $3 for non-members. Josef Albers at Black and original sketches. Black Mountain College Museum Mountain College Exhibition cura+ Arts Center, 56 Broadway, in the mid-1940s tor Vladimir Belogodowntown Asheville. For more Walter Gropius (left) and and became a major details call (828) 350-8484 or visit lovsky states, “I would Harry Seidler. www.blackmountaincollege.org. proponent of Baudraw attention to two

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Black Mountain Events

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Black Mountain is “The Little Town That Rocks” with 65 rocking chairs painted by area artists. Walk around town to see them while enjoying all the great shops, galleries, café’s, and pubs. Visit the www. thelittletownthatrocks.org for a preview and more details.

Until June 24 – All Creatures Great & Small Gallery Exhibit at Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League. Red House Studios and Gallery. Gallery Hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

June 1 – Rockin’ Around the Square Concert The Hackbirds. Free. 2-4 p.m. on site of future Town Square. Bring a blanket or chair to sit on.

June 1 to June 2 – Black Mountain Arts & Crafts Juried Show 9-5 downtown on Sutton Avenue. Free. Craft vendors, food, music

June 8 – Transition with a Mission!

June 13 to June 15 – 7th Annual Art in Bloom An exhibit of fine art and floral interpretations, along with Gala, Garden Tour, and Concert. Various times at Black Mountain Center for the Arts. Details by calling (828) 669-0930 or visit www.blackmountainarts.org

June 17 to June 21 – Art in Bloom Gallery Show Pleine Air Painters. Black Mountain

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and more. Contact The Old Depot Association, (828) 669-6583, www.olddepot.org

Benefit ride for Swannanoa Valley Transitional Housing. 10 a.m. until 12 noon. $20/bike 1 rider; $30/bike, 2 riders. Refreshments and raffle prizes. Register online at www. svtransitionalHousing.org

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June 22 – Howl In Tour begins at 3 p.m. at Full Moon Farm Wolfdog Sancturary. Optional potluck dinner for $5 per plate – you bring side dish. Call or email for details and directions. Contact info@fullmoonfarm.org, (828) 664-9818

June 28 – Jazz Cabaret Dinner Concert Top regional jazz vocalist and instrumentalist. Optional dinner by Black Mountain Bistro 6:30 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. Reservations required. Details at (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

WEEKLY EVENTS

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Park Rhythms

Sean O’Neill Exhibit

Free out-door concert at Lake Tomahawk. Thursday evenings at 7 p.m. Food available for purchase. Contact: Blk. Mtn. Recreation & Parks (828)669-8610

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Chifferobe Home and Garden will open a show of works by Sean O’Neill on June 1. The show will hang for the entire month of June, and the public is encouraged to come to the opening as well as later to enjoy the work. Refreshments will be served. Sean is a talented English teacher at Charlotte Country Day School who has stimulated the interest of his students by incorporating art into their study of literature. As they finish their discussions of works of literature, Sean directs the students to create a group mural of the images they recall from the work. The murals they create help engrave the ideas of the literature into the memories of the students. Sean is the father of four sons, all talented artists, and it is from the two youngest ones that Sean draws inspiration. Sean loves how the

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Wine Tasting

Painting by Sean O’Neill

boys take pleasure from drawing images of the world around them. Their pleasure is reflected in the simple forms, flat surfaces, and joyful colors of their work. Sean’s work shares their aesthetic in its playful, colorful style and clean lines. IF YOU Sean O’Neill opening GO reception Saturday, June

1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Chifferobe Home and Garden, 118 Cherry Street, Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-2743 or visit the website, www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Great sale prices at The Artisan Gourmet Market Wine/Coffee Bar in Cheshire Village. Thursday evenings from 5 to 6 p.m.

Farmers Market Saturdays, 9 a.m. to noon, behind First Baptist Church, Montreat Rd.

“First Friday”of each month

Homestyle Gastropub Fare 19 Beers on Tap Live Music Open 11-10 10-12 Bar Menu

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At the Monte Vista Hotel. Art, music, drink specials from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce 201 E. State Street Black Mountain, NC 28711 (828) 669-2300 Toll Free: (800) 669-2301 www.exploreblackmountain.com

(828) 357-5656

207 West State Street Downtown Black Mountain www.thetrailheadrestaurant.com

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Live Music Every Friday & Saturday

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WAYNESVILLE

‘Claymates’ cont’d from pg. 11 Saturday, June 15 7pm - Live Jazz + Dinner with “The Flo Sistas” featuring Sheila Gordon, Alice Carroll, Ken Brown.

choice. We teach you how to use our glass cutting tools to gets the desired shapes. After everything is glued in place, we kiln-fire Claymates is a great place to host a birthday party. your project and Photos by Liza Becker ‘fuse’ everything together. We can take it one step further if you choose, and re-fire it over a mold so that it takes on one of a variety of shapes we offer. Sun-catchers, jewelry pendants, candle votives, bowls, and nightlight are just some of the projects we offer.

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Saturday, June 29 7pm - Summer Jazz Festival Kick-off featuring Michael Jefry Stevens, Rick Dilling, Zack Page. Limited seating, reservations required. Dinner and concert $39.99pp before tax and gratuity.

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

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RRM: It’s a great place to hold a birthday party. What does this all include?

BH: Birthdays are a popular choice (which is one of the reasons we

initially moved to a larger facility!) For $100, we offer two hours in the party room, eight pieces of pottery off our ‘party shelf’, a dinner plate thumb-printed by all the party guests (with the birthday child’s handprint in the center), and a friendly staff member to help orchestrate the event. You are welcome to bring food, decorations, clowns, ponies, you name it!

RRM: What are the most popular items or projects you offer? BH: Handprints and footprints on pottery are very popu-

lar. They make great gifts for the family. As for particular pieces, owls, zombies and painted on mustaches are very trendy right now, don’t ask me why. Flattened wine bottles are popular, too. You bring us a wine bottle and $5 (it’s ok if it’s full, we’ll empty it for you!),

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healthy lifestyles

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If You Have Had Cancer

If you have had cancer – sounds like a bad way to begin a positive and helpful suggestion for a healthful lifestyle. The truth is: if you have had cancer, you are like everyone who has had some life-changing health problem – a heart attack, a kidney stone, or an ulcer. You are no longer like everyone else. You must now address your uniqueness and take the appropriate actions to offset the risks that you have – which others do not have. If you have had cancer, you should address your unique risks with appropriate behaviors.

WHAT ARE THE AREAS OF INCREASED RISK? 1. The body’s immune system is

attuned to recognizing “foreign” proteins and other molecules that are

‘Claymates’ continued from pg. 36

and we’ll flatten it in our kiln. They are very useful for spoon holders, cheese trays, or just to commemorate a special occasion.

RRM: Any specials or events you would like to share with us?

BH: We offer specials nearly every day including discounts for seniors, good grades, collegiate students and staff, hospital employees, etc. Check out www.claymatespottery.com. As for events, our most popular is our monthly Ladies Night; we alternate month to month between the two studios. We provide free hors d’oeuvres, and discount pottery and glass by 20%. Other specialty events we’ve hosted include Wine & Dine (where I cook for everybody!), Margarita Nights, Mommy & Me days, and Kid’s Nights. We are also very excited to announce our first ever Painting Techniques Class at our Dillsboro location. Mark Sundie, a Duncan Paints Seminar Ambassador, will be travelling in from Knoxville on Saturday, June 15 to teach a three hour class. Call us at (828) 631-3133 to register.

Claymates Pottery 31 Front Street, Dillsboro, NC (828) 631-3133 460 Hazelwood Avenue, Waynesville, NC, (828) 246-9595 www.claymatespottery.com Follow us on Facebook!

not normally found in the body. This includes cells that you might make which do not look like normal cells, i.e., cancer cells. Everyone makes occasional cancer cells which the immune system detects and kills. Having one cancer is a warning shot across the bow that your immune system needs some help to work more effectively.

2. The extremely effective – and toxic

– chemicals and radiation used to destroy cancers can also destroy the ability of the immune system to detect more cancers – of the same kind or of different kinds. Therefore, the risks of getting a different kind of cancer after having had chemotherapy or radiation is quite high.

3. If you have had cancer, it’s like

any other traumatic life experience with the possibility of post-traumatic stress disorder – increased anxiety, nightmares, flashes of anger, difficulty sleeping, irritability, withdrawal from social interactions.

4. We never say that cancer is cured.

We say that we are in remission – 5 years or 10 years or 15 years. Cancer is a chronic disease with the danger – like other chronic diseases – of allowing the cancer to govern your life choices and life style. If you have had cancer, offset these increased risks: • Make good lifestyle choices: diet, exercise, weight control, regular and adequate sleep

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Offset the psychological effects by exercising and engaging socially. • Faithfully get or do all the recommended cancer screenings • Offset the psychological risks with exercise, engaging socially, talking to significant others – increase your Faith Factor by seeking a relationship with God, personally and corporately If you have had cancer, don’t assume that everything will go on normally. You are now different. Take control. Live life to the fullest, but do it thoughtfully and purposefully.

OM SANCTUARY’S GRAND OPENING Ribbon cutting celebrating the first phase of reconstruction for a center for holistic education. Food, refreshments, a raffle, door prizes, and a short presentation.

IF YOU GO: Thursday, June 6 from

4-6:30 p.m. 87 Richmond Hill Dr., Asheville, NC 28806. For more details visit www.omsanctuary.org.

Appalachia Opens at Gallery 86

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BY ANA WOODALL Haywood County Arts Council’s artist reception for the exhibiregion of North Carotion, Appalachia, will lina. The exhibit features feature the musical talent works of Appalachian artof Betina Morgan, a local ists Doc Welty, Patti Best, folk harpist. Sandra Brugh Moore, Betina began perJames Smythe, Crystal forming on the harp at Allen, Mike McKinney, the age of twenty four. Matt Tommey, Caryl She found a wonderBrt, Susan Balentine, and ful blend of voice and Kaaren Stoner. strings, and so began her lifelong love of the folk IF YOU GO: Appalachia Betina Morgan artist reception from 6 harp as an instrument of to 9 p.m. during Art After Dark on accompaniment to her repertoire of Friday, June 7 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. many well-loved songs. On display through Saturday, June 29, Appalachia is on display at Gallery 2013. Gallery 86 is located at 86 N. 86 through Saturday, June 29, 2013 Main Street in Waynesville, NC. and celebrates the many forms and techniques of art in the Appalachian

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what to do guide Saturday, June 1

June 4 - October 20

Mountainsto-Sea Trail

Experiments in Animation

Presentation by Danny Bernstein includes slides of her hike; one thousand miles from Clingmans Dome to the Outer Banks. 3 p.m. at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786. Visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com or call (828) 456-6000.

Saturday, June 1

Cory Bradley Reception Brightly colored, large-scale oil paintings. Reception from 6-9 p.m. The Flood Gallery, 109 Roberts Street, in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more information call (828) 254-2166, or visit www.floodgallery.org.

Monday, June 3

Senior Trip to See the Elk The Waynesville Parks and Recreation Department offers a trip for seniors ages 50 and above. Departs from the Waynesville Recreation Center at 2 p.m., returns by 9 p.m. $5 for members, $7 for non-members. For more details call (828) 456-2030 or visit www.townofwaynesville.org.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Friday, June 7 & Friday, July 5 The Downtown Asheville Arts District hosts First Fridays from 5 to 8 p.m. every month through December. More than 25 galleries and museums in downtown Asheville will host receptions and exhibitions. Complimentary trolley service during the event. Park at the Asheville Visitors Center and hop on!

Wednesday, June 5

Cheryl Keefer Exhibit

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

$2.50. Reservations required. Visit www.cradleofforestry.org or call (828) 877-3130 for more details.

Friday, June 7

Wednesday, June 5

The Get Right Band and The Mike Dillon Band Two of the hardest grooving bands join forces for a powerful night of music. 9:30 p.m. at The One Stop, 55 College Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 255-7777.

Wednesday, June 5

SART’s 2013 Season Begins The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, A Tennessee Walk (a world premiere), Gypsy, The Sunshine Boys and Blithe Spirit Spirit. For more details and to order tickets call (828) 689-1384, or visit www.sartplays.org. Performances at the Owen Theatre in Mars Hill, NC.

Thursday, June 6

Music, Song, and Dance Fiddle phenom Rosie Shipley teams up with guitar master David Brown and Highland bagpiper EJ Jones. 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $12. White Horse Black Mountain 105 Montreat Rd. Black Mountain, NC. Info: (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Friday, June 7

Matthew Zedler Opening Sixteen works by contemporary artist Matthew Zedler, on display through June 30, 2013. Reception from 6-8 p.m. The Eclipse Salon & Gallery, 16 Wall Street in downtown Asheville. Visit www.eclipseasheville.com

June 6 to August 1

Woodsy Owl’s Curiosity Club Thursdays from 10:30 a.m. to noon; 1:30 to 3 p.m. Nature series for children ages 4-7 years old. Outdoororiented activities and forest related themes. $4 per child for each program. Accompanying adults admitted for

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John Anderson Wee Ones New Whiskey Paintings, a series of miniature watercolor and ink/watercolor paintings. On display through June 30, 2013. Opening 5-8 p.m., 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For more information, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Friday & Saturday, June 7 & 8

I Got the Music in Me Womansong combines humor, harmony and colorful visuals. Songs from the 1960s and ’70s. 7:30 p.m. $15 in advance; $18 at the door; $5 for children under 12. At Unity Center, 2041 Old Fanning Bridge Road, Mills River, NC. Details at (828) 891-8700, or visit www.womansong.org.

Saturday, June 8

Ben Lovett’s “Black Curtain” Wealth and vice in the underbelly of high society during the early 1900’s. Limited dinner reservations with VIP seating. Doors open at 7 p.m. with cocktails in the upstairs lounge and a gallery of themed portraits and photos by Nate Dorn. Screening at 9 p.m. Leading lady Mandy Lauderdale will close with a performance at 9:30 p.m. Call (828) 575-2737 for reservations. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road, Asheville. www.isisasheville.com

Saturday & Sunday, June 8 & 9

Painting in the Fresh Air Noted plein air artist, Amy Evans of Breckenridge, CO will present a plein air painting workshop in Marshall, on Blannahassett Island from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. The cost for the two day workshop is $200. For more details visit www.madisoncountyarts.com or call the Madison County Arts Council, (828) 649-1301.

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2nd Sunday @5 Pan Harmonia presents Elizabeth Gergel, cello and Christian Aldridge, Elizabeth Gergel and violin. Tickets: Christian Aldridge $12 advance; $5 for students; $15 at the door. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, downtown Asheville. More details at www.myaltamont.com.

Friday, June 14

Zansa Show & Video Shoot Videographer Aaron Putnam films a music video for the song “Mi Wa,” sung in the Bambara language of West Africa. $5, Ages: 21+. Doors open 9 p.m. Show 10 p.m. Tetrus Hookah Lounge, located above the Arcade bar, 130 College St., downtown Asheville. (828) 407-0172.

June 14 & 15

Spoon River Anthology Adapted by Charles Aidman from the poetry of Edgar Lee RoseLynn Katz Masters. Directed by RoseLynn Katz, produced by The Autumn Players. 2:30 p.m. at 35below. Additional performance held on June 16 at 2:30 p.m at UNCA’s Reuter Center. Tickets are $5. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Saturday, June 15

Painting Techniques Class Mark Sundie, a Duncan Paints Ambassador, will teach a 3-hour course from 10-1 p.m. at 31 Front Street, Dillsboro, NC 28725. $25 per painter. Reservations required. Call (828) 631-3133, www.claymatespottery.com.

Saturday, June 15

Twilight Firefly Tour Enjoy the magical evening forest and learn about these fascinating insects. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Park and meet at the

Call for Entries: Mitered Exhibition Deadline: June 17, 2013 HandMade in America and the Buncombe County Deeds Office will present a regional quilt exhibition on display in the Deeds Office lobby on display through January 5, 2014. Entry form at www. handmadeinamerica.org. Phone (828) 252-0121 x 321.

Pink Beds Picnic Area on Hwy. 276, located next to the Cradle of Forestry entrance. Bring a flashlight. $6 for adults and $3 for youth. Call (828) 877-3130 or visit www.cradleofforestry.org for more details.

Sunday, June 16

Night Beds Lead singer Winston Yellen possesses a knock out talent. 8:30 p.m. at the Emerald Lounge, 112 N. Lexington Ave., downtown Asheville. Ticket cost $8. Call (828) 232-4372 or visit www.emeraldlounge.com.

Sunday, June 16

Free Father’s Day Concert Pan Harmonia’s Kate Steinbeck, flute; Brian Hermanson, clarinet; Rosalind Buda, bassoon. Chamber music beginning at 4 p.m. Pretty Place Chapel, YMCA Camp Greenville, 100 YMCA Camp Rd., Cedar Mountain, NC 28718. Visit www.campgreenville.org

Monday, June 17

Lazy-Lady Living Online permaculture course in sustainability. Traditional wisdom, simple living. Visit www.lazyladyliving.com

Thursday, June 20

The Sweetback Sisters Sweetback Sisters Emily Miller and Zara Bode’s precise, family-style harmonies recall the best of country music. 8 p.m. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets and show times call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com

Thursday, June 20

Zansa CD Release Party Asheville’s only Afropop band releases its first album. Five-piece ensemble led by Ivorian djembe master Adama Dembele performs West African rhythms blended with contemporary sounds and instruments. Pisgah Brewing Co., 150 Eastside Dr. in Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-0190, or visit www.pisgahbrewing.com.

June 20-23

6th Annual Firefly Gathering Four-day educational event, offering a wide range of classes in the skills and knowledge necessary to feed, clothe, shelter, and entertain ourselves. Bell’s Cove, Barnardsville, NC. Full Pass $150-400, sliding scale. Day Pass $55 -$150. Reduced rate for children ages 8-12, under 8 free. Visit www.fireflygathering.org for more details.

JUNE EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

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1st Friday Gallery Walk

Artists include Roger Beebe, Heather Freeman, David Gatten, Jodie Mack, Evan Meaney, Charlotte Taylor. On view in the New Media Gallery through Sunday, October 20, 2013. Asheville Art Museum, 2 S. Pack Square. Call (828) 253-3227 or visit www.ashevilleart.org.

Recent works on display at Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street. Visit www.CherylKeefer.com, www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

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Best in Show

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Annie Get Your Gun: Classic Broadway

musical. We’re looking for children and adults. Come prepared to sing. Tuesday, June 25 and Wednesday, June 26 from 6-8 p.m.

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Saturday, June 8 - Kevin Lorenz, classical

Dragin

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guitar

Friday, June 14 - Joe Cruz: piano, vocals Saturday, June 15 Live Jazz + Dinner with Sheila Gordon, Alice Carroll, Ken Brown.

Friday, June 21 - Ben

Fundraising benefit for Shindig on the Green. Carrier Park in Asheville. 5K Race begins at 8:30 a.m.; one-mile Fun Walk/Run begins at 8:45 a.m. Register online at www.active.com until Thursday June 20. Day-of-race registration from 7-8:15 a.m. 5K $25; Fun Walk/Run $10. For more details call (828) 258-6101 x345, or visit www.folkheritage.org.

Wilson, music of Beach Boys, Jimmy Buffet.

Sheila Gordon

Saturday, June 22 - Kevin Lorenz, guitar Friday, June 28 - Gypsy Bandwagon Saturday, June 29 - Michael Jefry Stevens, Rick Dilling, Zack Page.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Pottery, jewelry-making, basketry, painting, and woodturning. More information is available at www.thevillagepotters.com or by calling (828) 253-2424. Riverview Station, 191 Lyman Street, #180 in Asheville’s River Arts District.

The Classic Wineseller, (828) 452-6000 20 Church Street, Waynesville, NC www.classicwineseller.com

Jazz Cabaret Dinner Concerts June 28: “Love, Lies and Liasons” - Wendy Jones, Michael Jefry Stevens, Zack Page, Rick Dilling.

Saturday, June 29

July 26: “Straight From the Heart” -

47th Annual Shindig on the Green

Rockell Scott, Bill Bares, Zack Page, Justin Watt.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

White Horse Black Mountain 105c Montreat Road, (828) 669-0816

Hard Times Writing Contest Deadline: June 30, 2013 Write about a difficult experience in your life, how you overcame this obstacle, and how you were changed by it. 4,000 words Reading fee $25. Writers’ Workshop, Hard Times Contest, 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville, NC 28805. Full guidelines at www.twwoa.org.

54th Annual Art On Main Deadline: June 28, 2013 The Arts Council of Henderson County is looking for artists who are interested in demonstrating their art or craft along downtown Hendersonville’s historic Main Street, October 5 & 6, 2013. Applications may be submitted to Arts Council office at 401 North Main Street, 3rd Floor, Hendersonville, NC 28792. For more information call (828) 693-8504 or visit www.acofhc.org.

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featuring Sheila Gordon: piano, vocals

Run For Shindig on the Green

A joyously spontaneous celebration of traditional and old-time string bands, bluegrass, ballad singers, big circle mountain dancers and cloggers. Stage show and informal jam sessions. Pack Square Park, downtown Asheville. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Free. Details at (828) 258-6101 x345, www.folkheritage.org.

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Saturday, June 1 - Joe Cruz, piano, vocals. Friday, June 7 - An Evening of Carole King

Saturday, June 22

Village Potters Classes and Workshops

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A retail wine and craft beer store, small plate restaurant. The kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evening, music starts at 7 p.m.

Monday, June 10 and Wednesday, June 12 from 6-8 p.m.

June 24-29

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Steel Magnolias: Seeking 6 women.

Asheville Community Theatre 35 East Walnut Street, Asheville www.ashevilletheatre.org (828) 254-1320

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Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Juried Exhibit: Cremation Urns Deadline: August 2, 2013 Shine On Brightly is seeking artists to design and create lidded vessels and containers for a juried exhibition at Blue Spiral I Gallery in Asheville. Accepted media: Ceramics, Glass, Metal, Mixed Media, Paper, Textile, Wood. $20 entry fee. Visit www. shineonbrightly.com for full guidelines. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 39


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find it here AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Chifferobe

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Jonas Gerard Fine Art www.jonasgerard.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Arrowhead Gallery & Studios www.arrowheadarts.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Julia Fosson Fine Art www.juliafosson.com

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Swannanoa Chamber Music Festival

Asheville Art In The Park www.ashevilleartinthepark.com

Claymates www.claymatespottery.com

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Lorelle Bacon Fine Art www.lorellebacon.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

HandMade in America www.handmadeinamerica.org

Karen Keil Brown www.karenkbrown.com

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

C.W. Worth House www.worthhouse.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

Perez Art Studio www.perezartstudio.com

Black Mtn. Center for the Arts www.BlackMountainArts.org

David J. Simchock www.vagabondvistas.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Black Mtn. Iron Works www.BlackMountainIron.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Mine & Yours Consignments

Red Rocker Inn www.redrockerinn.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Downtown Asheville Art District

Stephen Janton Art Studio www.jantonart.com

Mountain Top Appliance

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

R. Bruce Brennan www.rbrucebrennanfineart.com

Explore Black Mountain

www.ExploreBlackMountain.com

Jeff Pittman Fine Art www.jeffpittman.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Faison O'Neil Gallery www.faisononeil.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

The Spice & Tea Exchange www.spiceandtea.com

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Fresh Wood-Fired Pizza www.freshwoodfiredpizza.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

TUNNEL ROAD

LEICESTER HWY.

www.mineandyoursconsignments.com

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www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Trailhead Restaurant

www.thetrailheadrestaurant.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com Updraft Fine Art Gallery www.updraftgallery.com

Place Your Classified Ad Online Right Now! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

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Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

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www.SwannanoaChamberMusic.com

DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE - 28801 BT

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RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

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unique shops Chocolate Swan Sculpture Makes a Splash

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$SSOH79  Š

Artist and chocolatier Elizabeth Foley of The Chocolate Fetish created a chocolate sculpture to benefit the Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre’s international artists touring program. The incredible work of art, inspired by ACDT’s performance “Swan Lake with a Splash� was made entirely of delicious chocolate, stood over two and a half feet tall, and weighed more than twenty pounds. Drawing on her experience as a fine artist and her training with some of the world’s most accomplished chocolatiers, Elizabeth Foley, a former student of the New Studio of Custom chocolate swan created by Dance, brings her Elizabeth Foley. The Chocolate Fetish passion for art and can make your next event chocolate together truly decadent. in the creation of one-of-a-kind chocolate showpieces. Every sculpture is made entirely from high quality chocolate without supports of any kind. Each of these chocolate creations are as delicious as they are beautiful. “Swan Lake with a Splash,� presented by The New Studio of Dance, is a contemporary interpretation of “The Stolen Veil,� a classic story of swans, humans, and transformation. The performance featured dancers of all ages. Asheville Contemporary Dance Theatre is a non-profit professional dance company created in 1979. ACDT performs up to 80 times a year in Asheville, the southeastern United States, and abroad. ACDT’s international program links Asheville to the international art scene by bringing foreign artists, teachers and performers to Asheville and by sending native dancers and artists abroad. ACDT is located at 20 Commerce Street Downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 254-2621. The Chocolate Fetish is renowned for its artisan chocolates. Discriminating chocolate lovers have been enjoying quality, award winning, handmade chocolates from The Chocolate Fetish since 1986. To experience all the delicious chocolates that The Chocolate Fetish has to offer, or to see more amazing chocolate art, stop by the Haywood Street store in downtown Asheville or visit their website at www.chocolatefetish.com

The Chocolate FetishÂŽ 36 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville (828) 258-2353 www.chocolatefetish.com www.facebook.com/chocolatefetish

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Rapid River Magazine Our Monthly Magazine is iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly! www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

Liza Becker Photography

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Best Selection of Bikes & Accessories in Western North Carolina. Top-Notch Service Dept.

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Vol. 16, No. 10 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — June 2013 41


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local favorites

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INTERVIEW WITH LORI DAWSON, OWNER OF ASHEVILLE’S

Mine and Yours Consignments

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us

a little about Mine and Yours Consignments and the expansion of the store.

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Lori Dawson: As of March 1, 2013 we expanded an additional

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1400 square feet in order to take furniture on consignment. This was the best move that I have ever made. It did not take long to fill up the space with wonderful household items and affordable furniture. Mine & Yours is now 3,800 square feet and one of Ashevilles largest Consignment stores. My manager Lisa Wilson stongly encouraged me to take a leap of faith and expand the store. She has been employed at the shop for five years. The success of this store is due to the hard work of the employees. We have an outstanding team. Melody Ellege has been here as our tagger for nine years. Traci Davis that handles all the research and pricing of our jewelry has been here nine years. Katie Stewart that has been here almost a year is a prefect fit with our team.

Lisa Wilson, store manager, and Lori Dawson, owner of Mine & Yours. Photo: Liza Becker

Mine & Yours is now 3,800 square feet. Photo: Liza Becker

I firmly believe it is not about the quanity of employees you have but the quality of the employee. We all work together to get the job done. We also care a great deal about each other outside of work. This business would not succeed without this awesome team! I feel so blessed.

RRM: How did Mine and Yours come about? LD: At the end of 1999 I was working for a local financial

business and decided that I wanted to go into business for myself. At the time I did not know exactly what kind of business that I wanted to open. It came to me in the middle of the night. I woke with the vision of opening a consignment shop. I have plenty of retail experience and loved the thought of recycling. I thought this would be an excellent way to offer people a great price on gently used or new clothing and household items. It started out very slow for me but I had faith and prayed A LOT for success. Thirteen years later we are still growing.

RRM: What consignments are you currently accepting? LD: We are currently accepting spring and summer clothing,

and furniture and household appliances. Monday thru Friday from 10-4 p.m., and Saturday by appt.

Mine and Yours Consignments 234 New Leicester Hwy., Asheville

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Business Hours: M-F 10-6 p.m.; Saturday 10-5 p.m. We take consignments M-F 10-4 p.m. PG. 40

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42 June 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 10

(828) 251-9231 www.mineandyoursconsignments.com


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local favorites

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The Classic Wineseller WINE, DINE, BE ENTERTAINED

Tucked away in an people. Everyone underground cellar off is seated around Main Street in historic tables, with front downtown Waynesville row tables for two, is an unassuming retail to other table conwine and beer estabfigurations that cater lishment named The to larger groups. Classic Wineseller. The menu inFor 15 years, cludes a stellar list of founder and owner local and imported Richard Miller has cheeses, appetizers, been strategic in adding salads, soup, flatto the shop’s inventory bread, entrees, and which now boasts over Dine, drink, and relax at the Classic Wineseller. desserts. Discrete Photo: Erica Mueller 12,000 bottles of wine waitstaff provide and more than 100 craft beers. table service throughout the performances, Wine prices start at $5.99 (less for beer) fetching wine and craft beer orders, tasty and can reach more than $2,000 for highly small plate fare, tantalizing desserts, and a collectible or rare wines. Miller’s shop also selection of all-natural sodas, tea, and coffee has some of the best vertical collections (including the Irish varietal). around, as well as large format bottles, and a The Classic Wineseller is well worth room dedicated solely to port. a venture out (and underground) with On weekend evenings the Classic Wifriends. Dine, drink, and relax to an evening neseller is also an intimate live music venue of music, from Piedmont or Delta Blues, to and small plate restaurant. The kitchen American Roots, Rock and Roll, Classical opens at 5:30 p.m. and the music starts at 7 and Jazz, played on the Steinway piano. p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Imagine a Harlem speakeasy in the 1920’s — a secret venue where you can escape to a cozy atmoIF sphere, and where the performers are within YOU For more information about arm’s reach. GO live music events, wine and The Classic Wineseller is evocative of beer tastings and dinners, and Hollywood movies about that era, but with special jazz evenings visit www. classicwineseller.com,www.facebook.com/ European styling and Old-World charm. theclassicwineseller, or call (828) 452-6000. The restaurant can hold approximately 50

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~ VOLUNTEER ~ PROOFREADER

Photographer Needed

Do you like finding mistakes? We need your help! A volunteer is needed to help proofread each issue. Fast turn-around. Word docs sent via email or Dropbox. Work from home.

INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071 or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Send samples to info@rapidrivermagazine.com. Or call (828) 646-0071.

Recipe for Olive Oil Ice Cream

Ingredients • 5 Tablespoons EV Bonsecco Olive Oil from Tuscany • 3 egg yolks • 3/4 cup whipping cream • 1/2 cup milk • 1/3 cup sugar • 1/2 vanilla pod • 1 tablespoon butter

Preparation Mix the egg yolks with half of the whipping cream in a bowl. Heat the milk, the remaining cream, the opened vanilla pod and sugar in saucepan. When the sugar is dissolved, add the egg yolk mixture and heat while constantly stirring. Heat to just below boiling point. Strain the mixture into a (metal) bowl. Heat the EV Bonsecco Olive Oil with the butter until melted and add to the mixture.

Try this cool and refresshing treat, made with olive oil from Oil & Vinegar Asheville. Allow to cool in the refrigerator. Use an ice machine for 20 minutes or put in a freezer of -4 °F for two hours. Then mix every hour (approximately 4 times) each time crushing the ice crystals. Put the mixture in a blender and mix until smooth. Store in a plastic container in the freezer.

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June 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
June 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

River Arts District Artist Jonas Gerard..p23; plus eight other artists!

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