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RADical Daze

in the River Arts District.

Kenilworth

Art Studio Tour.

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QuickDraw

Western NC’s Live-Art Benefit.

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Sarah Sneeden Oil Painter.

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Local Dining Guide

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22-23 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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13-16 • What to Do Guide™

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The Art of Design

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA pg. 37

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2 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

100 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com


Fine Jewelry & Design Studio pg. 21

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue - Downtown Asheville

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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Nine

MAY 2016

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Short Stories: Kathleen Colburn Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Proofreader: Michelle Crosby Newmeyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Emi Battaglia, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Heather Boeke, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Tebbe Davis, Karen Donde, Amy Downs, Emily Ginsberg, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Sandra Hayes, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Tina Masciarelli, Ashley Van Matre, Ali McGhee, Dennis Ray, Hannah Richardson, Erin Scholze, Alice Sebrell, Lynn Stanley, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, David Whitehill, Allison Wilson, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, May 2016, Vol. 19 No. 9

On the Cover

Mountain Sunflowers by Sarah Sneeden. pg

24

ONLY ONLINE

6 Performance NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

9 Fine Art

Rings by Tom Reardon and Kathleen Doyle.

Kenilworth’s Art Studio Tour . . . . . 9 River Arts District Studio Stroll. . . 10 Trackside Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery . . . . 11 310 ART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Firefly Craft Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Johnnie Stanfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Jane Molinelli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Karen Keil Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Sarah Sneeden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Grovewood Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 QuickDraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Red House Studios & Gallery . . . . 37 Trinity Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

8 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 25 James Cassara – Spinning Discs. . . 26 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 28 Books & Authors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33

13 Movie Reviews

Jewelry & Metalwork Pop-Up Exhibitions

Grovewood Gallery in Asheville will host two pop-up exhibitions of artisan made jewelry and metalwork as well as artist demonstrations May 17-22. These exhibitions and demos are part of SNAGneXt, a new conference event for the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). The exhibitions include works by Tom Reardon & Kathleen Doyle, Audrey Laine Sawyer, and Alice Scott.

Women of the Smokies

What does it mean to be a woman of the Smokies? While author Courtney Lix spent more than five years researching and writing her way to an answer, the Gatlinburg, TN, naCourtney Lix tive – like Dorothy in Oz – actually knew the appropriate response all along.

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-16

22 Local Food O’Charley’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

27 Music

River Arts District . . . . . . . . pgS 10-12 Hendersonville & Flat Rock . . . pg 17 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . pgS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 30-31 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 37

Weaverville Art Safari

Local artists open their studios to guests Corey McNabb May 7-8. Using event maps, guests select routes to explore local studios. The event is self-guided with a relaxed pace that encourages guests to linger and talk with artists in a unique and personal way.

Americana Burlesque & Sideshow Festival

The pioneering neovaudeville festival celebrates its tenth anniversary with stellar performances, workshops, and more, May 27 through May 29. ABSFest emphasizes variety in entertainment, artistic empowerment and nurturing creativity. Candybox Revue

ASAP’s 2016 Local Food Guide

The growing season has arrived! Finding seasonal local farm products at farmers tailgate markets is certainly a sign of spring, along with local food at restaurants and roadside stands. It is also the time of year to pick up the latest edition of ASAP’s Local Food Guide to find the best sources for Appalachian Grown™ food.

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Minton Sparks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

34 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

38 Festivals Faerie & Earth Festival . . . . . . . . . . 38

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 5


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captivating performances Brave New World: The Musical

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NC Stage premieres a compelling new musical based on the dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley.

In Brave New World: The Musical, World Controller Thomas Mond (Justin Sargent) must maintain order when two of his genetically superior citizens, Lenina and Bernard (Marisa O’Donnell and Jason Edward Cook) leave their chemically engineered utopia to explore a savage reservation. The two return with a mysterious savage, John (Robby Haltiwanger), and his even more mysterious mother, Linda (Robin Skye), in tow. Unbeknownst to them, the very existence of John and Linda will rock the foundations of Controller Mond’s World State.

THE CAST Justin Sargent (Broadway: Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark, Rock of Ages) leads a cast that includes Robby Haltiwanger (National Tour: Ghost: The Musical), Marissa O’Donnell (Broadway: Shrek The Musical), Jason Edward Cook (Off-Broadway: Drop Dead Perfect) and Robin Skye (Broadway: Parade, Off-Broadway: Southern Comfort).

They are joined by Tyler McKenzie, Billy Steeves, Kaylor Otwell, Blake Logan, Alice Eacho, Maria Buchanan, Marthaluz Valez, and Sean Michael Jaenicke. Brave New World has a book by Ben Andron; music by Jonnie Rockwell and Grammy and Emmy Award winner John McDaniel; and lyrics by Tony nominee Bill Russell. The artistic team includes director Thomas Caruso (Southern Comfort at NYC’s Public Theatre, Dynamo: Seeing Is Believing in the West End, national tours of Matilda and Ghost), original choreography by Ryan Kasprzak (Off Broadway: Southern Comfort; So You Think You Can Dance), and musical direction by Brad Simmons (Broadway: Lysistrata Jones, Mr & Mrs Fitch). Joining this creative team will be a crew of local designers including Andrew Manion (set), CJ Barnwell (lights), George Martinat

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aLLISOn WILSOn

(costumes), Matt Nielson (sound), Jessica Tandy Kammerud (props), and Aaron Price (assistant to music department). IF YOU Brave New World: The Musical, May GO 11 – June 5. Performances Wednesday-

Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are available by calling (828) 2390263 or visiting us online at ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

My Intimate Companion, My Body

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Asheville-based Community Choreography Projects debuts My Intimate Companion, My Body, a movement theater presentation directed by Barrie Barton. Described as authentic theater, the performance interweaves personal story, movement and multimedia creating a montage of human experiences that are both personal and universal. “Whether we realize it or not, an The Community Choreography Project focuses on on-going never ending conversation creativity, performance and community. is chattering away inside each of us about our bodies,” says CCP Artistic Director Barrie Barton. “Too much ing work with the main goal of deepening evof this, too little of that, how do I look and I ery day conversations for both cast participants want that instead of this.” as well as audience members. The performance seeks to capture those Barrie Barton brings a wide-open, liberatinternal feelings, experiences and conversaing skill for creative expression to her role as tions into script and storytelling. Barton Artistic Director of Community Choreograexplains, “The Community Choreography phy Projects, dance educator and community Project’s creative process is to harness the unchoreographer. Her work invites participants spoken, the hidden, the unshared and transto artful play, exploration and expression form it into the spoken, seen and expressed through movement, stories, creative writing actions through the container of creativity, and choreography. Barrie believes that moveperformance and community.” ment is a vital celebration of life. Audience member, Rob Campbell writes, “that was a wonderful performance tonight – touched, moved and inspired! IF Barton has served as Artistic Director of YOU My Intimate Companion, My Body Community Choreography Projects since its GO premieres Sunday, May 15 at Jubilee! Community. Tickets are available at the inception in 2005. She has 30 years’ experience door for $10. The performance begins at 5:30 teaching, dancing, directing and choreographpm. Arrive early, the last performance sold out!

6 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9


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captivating performances Star Cellist Zuill Bailey Returns to Asheville Symphony

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Internationally renowned cellist Zuill Bailey returns to Thomas Wolfe Auditorium on Saturday, May 14, to perform a piece written specifically for him.

and his innate flair for the dramatic,” Meyer said. “The final movement, titled ‘The Sun Also Rises,’ artfully evokes Spain and its famed matadors as the soloist strums his instrument like a guitar.” Bailey has performed with symphony orchestras worldwide, including Los Bailey, who last apAngeles, Chicago, San peared with the Asheville Francisco, Detroit, HonoSymphony in September lulu, Milwaukee, Nashville, 2009, joins the ASO for the Toronto, Israel, Cape 8 p.m. concert under the Town, and the Bruchner direction of ASO Music Orchestra in Linz, Austria. Director and Conductor He has collaborated with Daniel Meyer. He will such conductors as Itzhak perform Michael DaughPerlman and Alan Gilbert, erty’s Tales of Hemingway, Renowned cellist Zuill Bailey and has been featured with a new work that the ASO Photo: Lisa-Marie Mazzucco musical luminaries Leon co-commissioned for Bailey Fleisher, Jaime Laredo, the with a consortium of other Juilliard String Quartet, Lynn Harrell, and orchestras across the country. Janos Starker. “Based on the fascinating life of the great The concert opens with Weber’s Der American author, this new cello concerto will Freischütz Overture. “Packed with impormost certainly display Zuill’s superb technique

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DaVID WHIteHILL

tant musical moments from this Romantic opera, this music manages to combine a jaunty hunter’s chorus with secrets from deep within the Wolf’s Glen and finish with a celebration of a heroine’s enduring love,” Meyer said. The ASO closes its season with Dvorák’s Symphony No. 9 “From the New World,” a piece inspired by the composer’s life and activity in America. “Dvorák pointed the way to the future of American music by insisting that composers tap into America’s rich Native American and African American cultures,” said Meyer. “His own example, Symphony No. 9 ‘From the New World,’ did just that, incorporating spiritual-tinged melodies, The Song of Hiawatha, and an exuberant finale that sweeps you away with its bold confidence.”

IF YOU Zuill Bailey returns Saturday, May 14 GO at 8 p.m. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in

downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22-$62 depending on seating section; reduced youth and student pricing available. Info/Tickets: Symphony Office (828) 254-7046, www. ashevillesymphony.org. Available at the U.S. Cellular Center box office at 87 Haywood St.

AmiciMusic Revives “Live at the USO” PLUS: THE DEMASI BROTHERS ON MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

AmiciMusic celebrates Memorial Day with a special toe-tapping program of music from the World War II Era entitled “Live at the USO.” The concert features vocalists Amanda Horton and Jonathan Ross along with pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser. The program includes scenes from “South Pacific” and “On the Town,” as well as songs such as GI Jive and Moonlight Serenade.

Live at the USO

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Thursday, May 26 at 7 p.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall at 743 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville. Fabulous food is available. Concert alone is $15. Reservations at (828) 575-2737 or www.isisasheville.com Saturday, May 28 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door. Discount for Veterans Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain. com or call (828) 669-0816 to purchase. Sunday, May 29 at 2 p.m. at The Nightingale Loft at 52 Broadway in downtown Asheville (www.nightingaleloft.com). $35pp includes light food and drinks. Veterans admitted for $25. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Buy at www.amicimusic.org or call Dan Weiser at 802-369-0856

Live at the USO features Daniel Weiser, Amanda Horton and Jonathan Ross.

The DeMasi Brothers

AmiciMusic will present three concerts on Memorial Day weekend featuring the DeMasi Brothers, world-class folk musicians who have appeared on Good Morning America and regularly on NPR radio. On Saturday, May 28 at 12, the DeMasi’s will team up with pianist Daniel Weiser and clarinetist Steve Loew in a fun and free family program at the Lord Auditorium at Pack Library. The concert will be a mix of jazz, klezmer, and folk music. Sunday, May 29 at 5:30 p.m. at Isis Restau-

rant at 743 Haywood Rd in West Asheville. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 at door. For reservations, call Isis at (828) 575-2737 Monday, May 30 at 3 p.m. in a special “Picnic for Peace” House Concert at the home of Steve and Robin Loew at 71 Crabapple Lane in the Beaverdam area of Asheville. Upscale barbecue will be served along with drinks. Cost is $30pp, with discounted $20 seats for U.S. Veterans. Reservations at www.amicimusic.org or by calling Dan at 802-369-0856. Joseph and John, the DeMasi Brothers, began their music career in the folk clubs and coffeehouses in and around New York City where they were born and raised. As part of the 80’s folk music revival scene they appeared and performed regularly at Greenwich Villages famed music club “the Speak Easy.” They shared the stage with such folk legends as Harry and Tom Chapin, Christine Lavin and Oscar Brand. In 1992 they joined forces with their lifelong friend Chris Burke, the award winning actor with Down syndrome best known for his starring role as “Corky” on the hit ABCTV show “Life Goes On.” The trio formed a group and recorded four CD’s for kids and families; their CD titled “Forever Friends” received a Parents Choice Gold Seal for Excellence Award.

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fine art The Sharks Underneath

INVESTIGATING MORE OF ONE’S ART STORY

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Not that anyone needs one bit more of proof that I’m kind of odd, but… every time I look at a beautiful seascape – you the know the type, a wide and high vista featuring two snorkelers or kayakers in turquoise waters – I immediately wonder how many sharks are in there, too. I’m not trying to be morbid – I’ve been in the water with sharks (um, never again, btw…!), and I think they are amazing creatures. My point is they are there even if we can’t see them. This got me to thinking about the art development process and what we may or may not know about a finished work. We often just see a final piece in a gallery or on social media, and don’t know much about what it took the artist to get to that end presentation. But even the simplest-seeming artworks contain personal experience and history and more, not just in physical development, but also in the genesis of the idea that led to making art in the first place. I see all these details as the sharks underneath. Artists ideate, gravitate toward themes, sketch, draw, tighten, erase, re-draw, start over, change materials, hone styles, finalize, collaborate and present. They wake up, make coffee, wrestle with kids and pets and cars and jobs and obligations. They laugh and cry and yawn and share with friends and eat good food and think about life and take out the garbage. Days are influenced by love and fear and appreciation and neutrality and more. There’s a lot going on every day for people, and all these fascinating or seemingly mundane little sharky things are behind the scenes when we look at the art they create. The sharks are there, beautifully swimming along, each carrying an element of a life. Some artists delve into all this, and some don’t. There’s certainly validity to a backstory being simply: “I tried (insert medium here) and liked doing it so now it’s what I do.” There are a lot of very skilled craft technicians out there, creating things we enjoy looking at. Personally, I like knowing more about artists and their lives and processes and the works. When we look at the history of artists, we learn about the influences of their time, their friends and relationships, how and where they worked, if they struggled in their days, what made them happiest, and more. It all informs what we’re looking at. Conceptual work requires digging deeper, paying attention to the little things throughout a process, and generating useful information. Creation involves both big and everyday emotions, reactions and actions, and not losing the feeling or the imprint of these minutiae in the final. Through information gathering, artists deepen their understanding of their own work, as well as gain focus and leap onward and upward to new growth in a series, or on to the next big idea. For example, at first glance, my illustrations appear to be just about whimsy and happiness.

8 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

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Summer Frolic, 2016, illustration by Greg Vineyard

Gain focus and leap onward and upward. In addition to those very real intentions, they also involve societal and personal psychology, desire for change, and an intention to settle on light over darkness. One may not get all that when they see a happy dancing cat in a field, but for those who want to know – and for future biographers – I have my information in order. Much of my work is about finding delight and hope right where one is at. Artists’ backstories aren’t always evident in the final product – and some folks may be concerned about overburdened, lofty-sounding overshares. But reality and truth aren’t usually as offensive as they are merely appreciated, especially to collectors. We express our wonderfulness in uncountable ways, shapes and forms – and even identifying just one shark underneath gives everyone more of the story, lending support to the shimmering scenes we present to the world.

Greg Vineyard is a marketingcommunications professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com


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fine arts & crafts

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Kenilworth’s Art Studio Tour MEMORIAL WEEKEND – MAY 28 & 29

The eclectic and beautiful neighborhood of Kenilworth will again welcome folks in search of inspiration and wondrous works to the home studios of artists and craftspeople who live along the streets and cul-de-sacs of this historic residential area near central Asheville. adventure in visual delight, running from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. The Harvest House, a community recreational center that has been in neighborhood for over 50 years, is a tour stop this year. The center offers a variety of programs for adults of all ages including classes in furniture making, clay sculpture, weaving and mosaic glass plus exercise, dance, lunch outings, billiard tables, and various card and table games as well. The woodshop is open for public use on Thursdays and Fridays. Stop by anytime to see what Asheville Parks and Recreation has to offer! A Kenilworth Art Studio Tour brochure containing a listing of each artist and a map of the studio locations will be available throughout May at the Chamber of Commerce, The Harvest House and in stores and inns across Asheville. Batton Clayworks

In this off-square, hill-and-gully neighborhood, where most roads head up or down, the fresh works of 17 artists showing in 14 locations mirror the same kind of curvilinear eccentricity, intrigue and sheer fun. Traveling from studio to studio, you will be able to admire highly original works of art, including paintings, collages, pottery pieces and creatures, wood craft, hand shaped tiles, sculpture, fashion wear and artful jewelry, among other treasures. It will be an

Ann Squire Fiber Arts

Colin’s Creatures

Download this year’s tour map and other helpful information at www.kenilworthartists.org. IF YOU Kenilworth’s Art Studio Tour, GO Memorial Day Weekend, May 28 and

29. For more details, please visit www. kenilworthartists.org.

Grovewood Rocks! A Showcase of Artisan Made Rocking Chairs by 11 American Woodworkers OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, June 4 • 3-6pm June 4 – August 28, 2016

Project Handmade 2016

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ELEMENTS OF NATURE

Calling all textile artists and clothing designers working within a 100-miles of Asheville. Enter Local Cloth’s Project Handmade 2016-Elements of Nature, the organization’s third regional wearableart juried fashion show. The show will be September 22, 2016, at the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Asheville. Eligible entries include original garments, ensembles and fashion accessories, and collaborations among members of the regional fiber art supply chain are encouraged. Any textile or fiber art technique may be used in the creation of garments, including, but not limited to, weaving, knitting, spinning, dyeing, felting, printing,

stamping, painting, sewing, draping, stitching, tailoring and pattern making. Local Cloth is a Western North Carolina based 501(c)(3) organization that encourages and supports collaboration among textile artists, designers, fiber producers, suppliers and related small businesses. Its mission is to sustain and grow a thriving regional fiber and textile arts economy and bring locally grown and made textiles and products to consumers within and beyond the Blue Ridge.

IF YOU The entry deadline is July 10, GO 2016. Entries must include a

completed entry form, fees and digital images. A full prospectus is available at www.localcloth.org

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Adjacent to the Omni Grove Park Inn

828.253.7651 www.grovewood.com Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 9


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DONA BARNETT

Studio Stroll Meets Street Art and Skating, May 20-22.

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375 Depot St., River Arts District 828-772-6701 www.donabarnett.com

Photo: Misha Schmidecke

This May visitors to the River Arts District in Asheville can experience an exciting spectrum of artistic and cultural creativity. The always-popular Studio Stroll, with over 180 working artists with open studios in historic buildings, welcomes a nationally recognized performance of art on the street. A fundraiser for a local grass-roots skate park rounds out the weekend of art and energy. On Saturday, May 21 and Sunday, May 22 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the Studio Stroll invites the public to visit artists in their studios, learn about their artistic process through conversations with the artists, live demonstrations and hands-on workshops, and collect art at its source among the amazing displays of creativity from painting to sculpture, glassblowing to ceramics, fiber art, jewelry and more. The River Arts District of Asheville is a mile-long network of studios, galleries, shops and restaurants in the former industrial section of town, in last-century mill and warehouse buildings near the railroad tracks and along the bank of the French

D PATRICIA COTTERILL Riverside Studio 174 W. Haywood St. in the River Arts District

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patcotterill@yahoo.com

10 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

Photo: Misha Schmidecke

Broad River. During Studio Stroll, the Grey Line Trolley offers free transportation among the studio clusters. From Friday, May 20 through Sunday, May 22, at the Burners and Barbecue music and street art festival, more than 50 mural artists from all over the country will transform a rusted gray industrial site into a giant mural. Master graffiti artists who are proficient in more complex works of street art are known as Burners; classic mural artists and master street art writers will paint alongside the Burners to transfigure the Asheville Waste Paper Company’s continued on page 12

Best of Trackside

NEW ARTISTS IN RENEWED SPACE

During the month of May, an exhibition at Trackside Studios, 375 Depot Street, will showcase a reconfigured studio space and the new artists who have filled it.

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Teenagers: Purchased for HGTV’s Urban Oasis program in West Asheville

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RADical Daze in the River Arts District

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Lynn Stanley

the space work and greet visitors in the light-filled, browser-friendly studio area. Jewelry artist Terri Robinson enjoys working on her designs while visitors watch, and she’s Four separate art studios in Bloom, acrylic, Michael known for taking on-thethe historic 375 Depot Street Allen Campbell spot commissions from building have opened their those who see an irresistible bead walls to each other and become Trackside, combination on her worktable. A new home to fifteen artists working in a muladdition to the Trackside family is titude of media. The building dates from Sahar Fakhoury, a painter and sculptor the early 1900s, and has unique architecwho gives classes in her studio. tural elements that have been preserved in Portrait artist Chon Vinson holds the remodeling, such as the massive wood his audience in awe as he develops pillars now flanking the open walkways. his lifelike studies in oils and pastels. New features include extensive gallery Lynn Stanley enjoys doing impromptu lighting and large windows overlooking demonstrations of Asian brush painting, the railroad tracks behind the building; particularly for children coming into visitors are always invited to pause in their the studio with their parents. “Kids art viewing and watch the trains go by! The fifteen artists who now share

continued on page 39


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CINDY WALTON FINE ART

Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery

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Discover Unique and Diverse Artists

Wedge Studios Second Floor

Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery is a professional working art studio and gallery in the heart of the River Arts District. Featuring works by these unique and diverse local artists: Mark Bettis, Jacqui Fehl, Grant Penny, Constance Williams, and Vicki Rollo. A native of Chicago, Illinois, Mark Bettis relocated to sunny Sarasota, Florida. It was there that he became interested in the visual arts. After attending the Ring-

129 S. Roberts Street Asheville, NC 28801

828-776-3034 www.cindywalton.com RP

continued on page 39

JOSEPH A. PEARSON

ELIZABETH HENDERSON

Painter – Figures and Portraits RD

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Riverview Station, 191 Lyman

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Studio #217 + Gallery 310 Art

Pink Dog Creative, 348 Depot Street, Ste 120

Libets2@icloud.com

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ElizabethHendersonArtist.com

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in the River Arts District • 504 615-4998

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GRACE C. BOMER FINE ART

RICHARD C. BAKER

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Fine Ar t and Por traiture

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One Who Came on the Waters of Time

Pink Dog Creative 344 Depot Street, Suite 101 www.gracecarolbomer.com

SOLI DEO GLORIA

Abstract Expressionist Paintings

More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 11


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Riverview Station

ERIN KEANE Encaustic + Journals

Getting Waxy at the Studio Stroll

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When it comes to new trends in art, Asheville is the place to be.

Represented by 310 ART Gallery and Southern Highland Craft Guild pg. 11

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www.ErinKeane.com

Encaustic set-up.

Contemporary Fine Art Gallery Featuring the Work of 25 Local Artists

AT RIVERVIEW STATION

Art Instruction for Adults Year Round All Levels Welcomed We are the oldest independent fine art school for adults in the region. Oasis, oil by Fleta Monaghan

pg. 11

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310 ART • 191 Lyman Street #310 Ground Floor North • Asheville, NC 28801 Open Mon-Sat • 828-776-2716

310art.com

pg. 11

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12 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

One very old painting method made new again is painting with beeswax, called encaustic painting. A number of studio artists in the WNC region are now working using wax to create glassy smooth luminous painting surfaces as well as three dimensional sculpture. The artists in the district use wax for paintings, collage work, mixed media sculpture, handmade books, basketry and jewelry. Many visitors comment they have never heard of or seen this type of painting before. Encaustic artist Fleta Monaghan says, “Encaustic painting can only be found in some areas of the United States, but it is making a big comeback globally. Artists are always intrigued with finding new ways to express their visions. Working with wax paint offers so many challenges and today it is a wide opened field for experimentation. “The ancients used fire and spatulas to decorate vases, sculpture, boats, and paint portraits and murals. It is so durable, murals even survived in Pompeii. It is more durable that oil paintings! I got hooked when we began teaching encaustic methods in 2009 at 310 ART. Now we have a vital program with many different classes offered using wax, from painting, printmaking, bookbinding using wax pages and covers, sculpture methods and even using cold wax which does not require heating. “We have participants from all around the country come to us to learn these

‘RADical Daze’ cont’d from page 10

Days Warehouse, at 304 Lyman Street on the French Broad River, into Asheville’s largest public art installation, creating an artistic landmark for the River Arts District. Rounding out the trio of events is the Foundation Photo: Misha Schmidecke

Encaustic relief by Fleta Monaghan

methods, and we are always developing and sharing new ways to work with wax as paint and sculpture. We are a “hot bed” of waxy painting!” Visitors to the Studio Stroll in the River Arts District on May 21 & 22 will no doubt have the treat of both seeing a wide variety of encaustic work in many studios, but will get a chance to see some of the artists actually painting live in demonstrations. 310 ART at Riverview Station will be showing visitors how it is done at certain times throughout the weekend.

310 ART at Riverview Station 191 Lyman, Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 776-2716, gallery@310art.com www.310art.com

Fund(Hell)Raiser on May 21 and 22, an event benefiting the Foundation Art & Skate Park on the site of a former warehouse behind 289 Lyman Street. The park, called the Foundation Spot, is constructed on the concrete slab floor of a long-dismantled warehouse. The event will feature music and skateboarding exhibitions and contests; beer and food will be available on site. IF YOU Spring Studio Stroll, Saturday, GO May 21 and Sunday, May 22.

Studios open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, May 20 through Sunday, May 22, the Burners and Barbecue music and street art festival. For additional details, please visit www.riverartsdistrict.com


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

Criminal

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

 ½

Short Take: While Criminal is nothing special, it is well made and harks back to a time when that’s all most movies needed to be.

REEL TAKE: Criminal is just one more

example (and these examples are recurring with increasing frequency) where I find myself completely out of step with the general critical consensus. The overall critical rating on Rotten Tomatoes is abysmally low while the audience approval rating is around 60 points

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 - Forget entirely

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

higher. As is usually the case when this happens, I find myself siding with the audience. In fact I often side with the audience when the reverse is true. Having noted the discrepancy and having read most of the objections, I had a feeling that I would really enjoy this movie, and I did. The fact that there is nothing new here didn’t bother me at all. I’m now at the age to where I look forward to familiarity as long as it’s well done familiarity and Criminal is. It may be formulaic but sometimes that all you want from a movie.

THE MONTHLY REEL

The story may not be compelling but it is interesting, and when you add old familiar faces to it that makes it even more enjoyable. To be completely above board about this, I’ve always been a stargazer and have been attracted to movies that either contain stars I like or a collection of supporting players who play off well against one another. In Criminal Kevin Costner plays Jericho Stewart, a violent habitual criminal whose frontal lobes were underdeveloped as a result of a childhood accident. He has no sense of right or wrong and acts completely on im-

by

MICHeLLe Keenan

Rolling Down Thunder Road in the Merry Month of May It’s the merry month of May, dear readers! With the verdant nature of the season ever so intoxicating and baseball season underway, both the good Professor Kaufmann and I were hard pressed to get ourselves to the theatre in recent weeks. But we still managed to sneak a few movies in and we have an interesting array of films for your considerations this month. The good professor covers the yin and yang of the spectrum with reviews of Jon Favreau’s ‘live action’ remake of The Jungle Book and the action thriller Criminal starring the ever more grizzly Kevin Costner. I meanwhile take a look at the latest film from Tom Twyker, A Hologram For A King and Alan Rickman’s last film Eye In The Sky. Our DVD picks for the month dovetail nicely with our reviews. Chip decided to revisit the 1967 animated classic The Jungle Book after seeing the new film, and I took inspiration from both Tom Twyker and Alan Rickman and recommend an oddly fascinating film from 2006 Perfume: The Story Of A Murderer. Unfortunately we were unable to screen Miles Ahead or Elvis & Nixon before press time, but both looked quite promising. The big openings this month will be Captain America: Civil War and X-Men: Apocalypse. Mainstream titles will also include the comedy action flick Keanu,

Shot on location in Asheville almost 60 years starring TV comedy duo Keeganago, Thunder Michael Key and Jordan Peele and an Road was an adorable tabby kitten. For the more ‘indie film’ refined palate, art titles in town this ahead of its time. month include The Man Who Knew Thunder Road is back on the Robert Mitchum Infinity, Love & Friendship, A Bigger big screen at The Fine Arts stars as a Korean Splash, and Bigger Than Bombs. Theatre, May 11. War hero who Last month we reported that the returns to his Asheville Film Society (AFS), had found a Appalachian hometown to take over his new home with the soon-to-open Grail Movie family’s bootleg moonshine business and House, after the Carolina Cinema on Hendersubsequently has to deal with both the mob sonville Road was purchased by the Texasand the feds. based Corporation Cinemark. The Grail hasn’t Mitchum was fully committed to the quite opened yet, but we’re hoping we’ll have project. He produced, starred and was news about it next month and with it regular, rumored to have directed much of the film. monthly listings for AFS. In the meanwhile He also co-wrote and performed the film’s the Hendersonville Film Society is still offertheme song “The Ballad of Thunder Road.” ing up great movies every Sunday afternoon. Mitchum’s son James Mitchum co-stars in See this month’s schedule on page 14. the film as do Gene Barry and Keely Smith. Film lovers may also want to check out a If you’ve never seen this cult classica it’s special screening of Thunder Road on May worth the view. If you’re a Mitchum fan, 11 at The Fine Arts you won’t be disappointed. You can still Theatre, sponsored by recognize some of the locations, including the Mountain Xpress. the river district, the south slope and the Log Cabin Court. At press time, details for The People vs Fritz the screening were still pending, but just Bauer is just one of go to the Fine Arts Theatre website, www. the films screening in fineartstheatre.com, for details. this year’s Asheville Jewish Film Festival. See details and listings on page 15.

pulse. This makes him the prime candidate for Doctor Tommy Lee Jones’ radical new technique where a dying CIA agent’s memories are transplanted into those lobes where they take root and begin to alter Costner’s personality. This reason this is done is so that a CIA head operative (Gary Oldman) can finish the agent’s mission which is to locate a fugitive who has

Until next time, enjoy the show.

Kevin Costner shows that he is not a man to be trifled with in the well made and hugely entertaining action flick Criminal.

the power to hack into and alter any military code including the ability to detonate weapons. A Spanish terrorist (Jordi Molla) also wants the fugitive and it was he who killed Oldman’s agent (a brief turn from Ryan Reynolds). Concurrent with this story is one involving Reynolds’ wife (Gal Gadot) and young daughter (Lara Decaro) who are trying to adjust to his death when Costner shows up with some of Reynolds’ memories. The violent Costner is still there (“You hurt me, I hurt you worse”) but now the former agent’s personality is beginning to take over. Unfortunately it’s only a matter of time before Costner reverts to his true personality. Can he finish the mission? Since this is a formulaic movie made only for audiences, we already know the answer to that question but that’s not important. What is important is that we stay engaged until we get there. I certainly was, along with the audience I saw it with. Apparently the same is true of several imdb users as well. The actors work well together, the film is crisply shot and sharply edited, and director Ariel Vromen knows how to effectively stage his action sequences. While watching Criminal I couldn’t help but think of 1960s and 70s director Don Siegel, although old Don would have tightened things up a bit. Movies continued on page 14

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 13


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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used too, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Although there are five Sundays in May, one of them is Mother’s Day so there are only four movies this month. One is a Peter Sellers comedy classic then, after Mother’s Day, there will be three large scale period entertainments. May 1: A Shot In The Dark (1964) Peter Sellers’ second go-round as the bumbling Inspector Clouseau is considered the best of the Pink Panther series thanks to the title play on which it is based and the strong cast that accompanies him. George Sanders, Elke Sommer, and Herbert Lom co-star. Directed by Blake Edwards. May 8: Mother’s Day: No Movie May 15: For Whom The Bell Tolls (1943) This lavish adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s Spanish Civil War novel was one of Hollywood’s biggest movies during WW II. An American engineer helps Spanish partisans in their fight against Fascism. Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman star alongside Akim Tamiroff and Katina Paxinou. Directed by Sam Wood. May 22: Lady Sings The Blues (1972) Diana Ross dominates this award winning musical biopic about troubled singer Billie Holiday. The film also showcases some of the top AfricanAmerican talent of the 1970s while recreating Holiday’s world of the 1920s and 1930s. Directed by Sidney J. Furie. May 29: Australia (2008) Baz Luhrmann reigns in his flamboyance and delivers an old school, large scale romantic epic set in pre-WW II Australia. Nicole Kidman stars as a British aristocrat who takes over her husband’s cattle ranch Down Under and tries to make a go-of-it with the aid of an Australian cattle drover (Hugh Jackman). Directed by Baz Luhrmann.

Movies continued from page 13

Adding to the fun are similarities to the plotlines of Charly and Awakenings, along with an obscure reference to an Outer Limits episode where Robert Culp and his wife had a secret sign for communicating with each other. While hardly a great film, Criminal held my interest, and on this occasion, that’s all it needed to do. Rated R for strong violence and language throughout. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Jungle Book”

Eye In The Sky

 ½

Short Take: A powerful modern war room drama and real-time thriller that delivers thoughtful introspection on the rules of engagement and moral implications of drone warfare.

REEL TAKE: Eye In The Sky may have left first-run theatres by the time this issue comes out, but we decided to still include a review of it because it’s a beautifully made film and an important one. It also marks Alan Rickman’s final role before his sudden passing in January. It is an extremely timely and thought provoking piece of filmmaking from

May DVD Picks

14 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

limped along until revitalized by The Little Mermaid in 1989. I watched the 2007 40th Anniversary DVD. No doubt the success of the new version will prompt renewed interest in rentals and the film’s 50th anniversary next year will prompt a more deluxe version (and an even more deluxe price), so catch it now and revisit a more naïve and carefree time.

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (2006)

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Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Perfume: The Story of a Murderer”

The Jungle Book (1967)

Now that Disney’s new “live action” remake (see my review this issue) is in theaters and is on its way to becoming a worldwide megahit, it seems only fitting to revisit the original which will turn 50 next year. It was actually completed in 1966 and was the last feature personally supervised by Walt Disney before he died. I saw it when it first came out in 1967. I was 15 and had recently read the original Rudyard Kipling stories that it was taken from. I didn’t like The Jungle Book at the time but that did not keep me from enjoying the vocal talents of Sebastian Cabot (then in Family Affair), Sterling Holloway (a childhood favorite), and the inimitable George Sanders. What bothered me the most were the songs “The Bare Necessities” and “I Wanna Be Like You”. I knew nothing of Phil Harris and Louis Prima and was unfamiliar with scat singing. The Beatles like vultures were a nice touch. Disney wanted them but John Lennon said no so they became generic British Invasion characters. Looking at it now I can appreciate it for the interesting time capsule that it is. It features some of late Disney’s best animation with a grace and fluidity to the movements that went missing after Walt died. King Louis jumping rope with his arms and Shere Khan chasing Baloo around a tree are still wonderful to behold. Some elements have not aged as well as others especially the Brit vultures and (I’m sorry to say) the juvenile approach and humor. The ending where Mowgli meets the girl from the village is very much of its time and is likely to elicit groans from many women viewers today. Nevertheless it is the last great film in the classic Disney animated tradition. Walt fought hard to get it made and had it failed the studio heads were ready to shut down the animation department as too costly and outdated. It didn’t and they

The late great Alan Rickman stars as a general at the center of a drone strike caught in bureaucratic red tape in Eye In The Sky.

After a screening of A Hologram For The King I had a conversation about some of director Tom Twyker’s previous work - Cloud Atlas, Run Lola Run, and The International. But the film I kept coming back to was [perhaps a less familiar title] Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. It also happens to feature Alan Rickman (see Eye In The Sky review on this page), so it quickly seemed an appropriate choice for my DVD pick for the month. But before we got any further be forewarned, Perfume is not for everyone. It is not an easy film. It’s not even a particularly likable film, but it is a fascinating work. Based on the novel by Patrick Suskind, Perfume takes place in the mid-18th century and tells the story of Jean Baptiste Grenouille (Ben Wishaw), a solitary, unloved misfit born with super human olfactory senses. Left for dead and orphaned as an infant, unloved as a child, sold to a tanner as a teenager, one thinks this is

a natural setup to endear us to the protagonist, but we quickly learn that Perfume is not that kind of story. On his first trip to Paris his senses are stimulated by a new array of beautiful aromas. He marvels at a perfumery and the smells of a world outside the gutter. Tantalized by the scent of a young woman selling yellow plums, Grenouille becomes obsessed with capturing her essence, which he also believes is the essence of her soul. After proving his natural born skills to a famous perfumer, Monsieur Baldini (an oddly cast Dustin Hoffman), Grenouille apprentices and eventually sets out for Grasse, the Mecca of the scented world. There his quest to capture smell becomes a tangled tress of murder. This curious oddity of a film grows ever darker, ever more macabre, yet strangely enticing. Ironically Grenouille possesses no scent of his own. He is incapable of loving or being loved. He’s all but invisible to the world but, if he succeeds in his quest, he’ll be able to create an aromatic elixir that enraptures and enslaves anyone exposed to it. From Grenouille’s birth scene to the film’s surprising climax, Perfume is beautifully and uniquely directed. If there are three important components to a perfume, as Monsieur Baldini teaches Grenouille, Twyker has used them in his construction of the film as well. His stylistic flourishes are the head notes, the narrative (voiced by John Hurt) is the heart note and Suskind’s bizarre tale itself is the base note that lingers in the air long after the film finishes. Embarking on cinematic adaptation of this story was a daunting task. Twyker accomplishes what few could. His direction is complimented by his cast; Wishaw is eerie perfection as Grenouille. It is important to note that Perfume comes with a very heavy R rating, but every bit of what makes so is essential to the telling of the story. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer is wholly unlikable but entirely unforgettable.


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film reviews Movies continued from page 14

South African director Gavin Hood (Tsotsi, Rendition and X-Men: Origins). It does not espouse what is right or wrong. It does not take sides. Instead it invites a vital dialogue about the moral implications of drone warfare and collateral damage. Colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren) commands a mission to capture high level Al Shabaab extremists. Powell is located at Northwood Headquarters in Surrey. Her commander is in London, her eye in the sky is a drone pilot in Nevada, her eyes on the ground are field agents in Kenya, and the team that confirms identification of surveillance subjects is a team in Pearl Harbor. After a long pursuit it looks like a capture of several high ranking terrorists is at hand, and among them a young British woman turned extremist. But when intel confirms that a suicide bombing is imminent, Powell pushes for an immediate drone strike and seeks the approval from her superior, General Frank Benson (Alan Rickman) to kill instead of capture. Benson is observing the mission with members of the government as witnesses. Benson asks for their authorization, but as politicians often do, they fail to reach a decision and turf it to the Foreign Secretary, who in turn turfs it to the US Secretary of State. In the meanwhile a young girl has set up shop, selling bread at a table just outside the Al Shabaab safehouse, placing her in mortal peril if the missile is launched. With the collateral damage of an innocent girl now in the mix, the game has changed. Do they sacrifice one innocent life in order to save many? What’s legal? What’s not? What looks better for the government? The great debate, and the film is dialogue heavy, but Hood manages to keep the suspense ratcheted for maximum effect, while simultaneously coaxing each viewer to question their own position regardless of what it may be. Mirren and Rickman are fantastic as always. Mirren’s part, originally written for a man, is unapologetic in her mission. Rickman is spot on as the military brass at the center of the debate and he gets a strong last line. The rest of the cast is great too. There’s not a weak link in the bunch, but Aaron Paul (TV’s Breaking Bad) as the drone pilot and Barkhad Abdi (Captain Philips) as the field agent in Nairobi are particular stand outs. Hood keeps the film smart, taut, and provocative. The screenplay was initially written for television and occasionally it seems like it. It starts a little weak, and there are the trappings of manipulative dialogue here and there, but overall it’s much stronger as a cinematic piece. Ultimately Eye In The Sky never forgets to entertain us and you should make every effort to see it on the big screen. Rated R for some violence, images and language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Asheville Jewish Film Festival 2016

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The Fine Arts Theatre will once again serve as the venue for the Asheville Jewish Film Festival.

The month-long festival kicked off at the end of April and concludes May 20th. Tickets for the closing night movie and reception are $25 and available ahead of time online at www.brownpapertickets. com/event/2535106. Regular screenings are $9. Tickets can be purchased at the theatre box office before the show.

Apples From The Desert Thursday, May 5 at 7 p.m. Friday, May 6 at 1 p.m.

Rebecca Abravanel (a radiant Moran Rosenblatt) is an only child, living a cloistered existence with her strictly religious Sephardic parents in Jerusalem. Unhappy with the restrictive traditions of home and community, she secretly breaks taboos, attending dance classes where she forms a relationship with secular kibbutznik Dooby (the acting debut of Israeli singer and guitarist Elisha Banai). Suspicious and angry in the face of Rebecca’s growing acts of rebellion, her strict father (Shlomi Koriat) reacts by setting in motion a prearranged marriage to an older widower with children of his own. Rebecca’s mother (Reymond Amsalem) and aunt (Irit Kaplan) are appalled, but dare not defy the authoritarian man of the household. After Rebecca runs away from home, the family conflict culminates in a moment of truth, forcing them to confront their beliefs and one another.

The People vs. Fritz Bauer Thursday, May 12 at 7 p.m. Friday, May 13 at 1 p.m.

With its economy flourishing in the postwar 1950s, Germany grows increasingly apathetic about confronting its recent past. Against this backdrop, the implacable Attorney General Fritz Bauer In Search of Israeli Cuisine excites the taste buds with (Klaußner) is committed to holdmulti-cultural recipes passed on and elevated. ing leaders of the Third Reich to account. He is stymied at every In a gastronomical expedition, celebrity turn by authorities with chef-restaurateur Michael Solomonov Nazi ties, many of them zigzags Israel to savor a food revolution former higher-ups unrooted in centuries-old tradition. Israel’s der Hitler, now in top food scene is among the most dynamic government positions. in the world, extending beyond falafel While slandered and hummus to include tasty ethnic and in the court of public regional specialties. opinion by foes seekHaving won the James Beard award ing to silence him, the for embracing these authentic flavors, tenacious Bauer purIsraeli-American Solomonov returns to his sues a forbidden alliance with the Israeli spy homeland with Oscar-nominated docuagency Mossad to apprehend Holocaust masmentarian Roger Sherman to discover his termind Adolph Eichmann. Lars Kraume’s culinary heritage anew. From Tel Aviv’s propulsive direction, superb period set design most exclusive eateries, to street bazaars, and costumes, and moody jazz soundtrack to simmering pots in family kitchens, In give the sinister proceedings a noir edge. The Search of Israeli Cuisine excites the taste People Vs Fritz Bauer is a timely reminder buds with multi-cultural recipes passed on of how justice can still be corrupted by ecoand elevated. nomic interests. But even food is not immune to sectarian conflict, as Palestinian cooks chafe In Search Of Israeli Cuisine when their savory secrets are adapted by Jewish chefs. Equally eye-opening is the Closing Night Film and Reception story behind the ingredients that Israel Thursday, May 19 at 6 p.m. produces using both ancient farming techCatering by Suzy Phillips, Gypsy Queen Cuisine niques and high-tech innovations. Encore screening (no reception) Friday, May 20 at 1 p.m.

A Hologram For The King



Short Take: A washed up American businessman travels to Saudi Arabia to sell a holographic teleconferencing system to the Saudi government.

REEL TAKE: By all accounts David Eggers’ 2012 novel doesn’t lend itself easily to film. A Hologram For The King is an existential story of a washed up American businessman, in the midst of a mid-life crisis, who travels to Saudi Arabia in a last-ditch effort to jump start his career. With adaptations of Cloud Atlas and Perfume: The Story of a Murderer under his belt, director Tom Twyker clearly doesn’t let that stop him from taking on a project. As is often the case, the book is probably better, but as

Tom Hanks is a modern day Willy Loman in A Hologram For The King.

is also often the case, more people will become familiar with the story because of the film. Tom Hanks plays Alan Clay, our depressed

and stressed hero. The year is 2010 and Alan has been tasked with selling a holographic teleconferencing system and IT infrastructure to the Saudi government. Embroiled in a bitter divorce and unable to pay his daughter’s college tuition, Alan has altogether too much riding on this deal. After arriving in Jeddah, Alan finds his tech team holed up in a tent in the desert while they wait for the King, a meeting that is continually pushed off until Alan pushes back. A series of maladies and events take Alan on a wild ride, elevating Hologram from the typical ‘fish out of water’ story, and ultimately guide and shape his personal and professional journey. The best of these is the friendship he Movies continued on page 16

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film reviews Disney animated feature. That was then, this is now. We live in darker, less innocent times and by following the original forges with his ‘limo’ driver Yousef (Alexantone of the stories, Favreau has created a der Black). This relationship infuses the story film that is contemporary yet timeless. with humor and kindness and allows Alan to The storyline for this version follows experience Arab culture and social caste system the basic outline of the 1967 film as as few westerners do. baby Mowgli is left by the panther BaMeanwhile Alan’s stress literally manifests in geera with a pack of wolves to be raised the form of a golf ball size cyst on this back. In by them and to keep him protected from need of medical help after a bender on some lothe wrath of the man-hating tiger Shere cal hooch, he meets Zahra (Sarita Choudhury), Khan. Everything is fine for several Mowgli (12 year old Neel Sethi) and Baloo the Bear a female doctor in a male-dominated culture. years until Shere Khan returns to the (voice of Bill Murray) scope out the situation in They instantly sense an understanding with jungle and Mowgli (Neel Sethi) is now Disney’s “live action” remake of The Jungle Book. each other and share an unlikely attraction. old enough to leave the pack. Bageera Hanks is perfectly cast in Hologram. Both plans to take him to the Man Village the part and the story benefit from his everySeeing the movie however is a completely where he will be safe. man quality and from the blend of his comeRated R for for some sexuality/nudity, different experience than watching the In a complete about face from the earlier dic and dramatic chops. In the film’s opening language and brief drug use. trailer. That’s because you can’t get the story version, almost all of the comedy has been sequence, Hanks emerges from his suburban in the trailer. Review by Michelle Keenan downplayed in favor of a more realistic tone to home, lip synching to The Talking Heads’ Within 15 minutes of watching the movie match the state-of-the-art effects. I say almost “Once In A Lifetime,” while the bucolic I became completely immersed in the story The Jungle Book  ½ because one central character has been retained image of the American dream go up in puffs and forgot about the CGI. This is a testament from Walt Disney’s original. He is Baloo, the Short Take: Remarkable “live action” of brightly colored smoke. When he wakes, not only to Kipling’s characters but to the bear who is still a shiftless loafer, just minus remake of Walt Disney’s 1967 animated he’s in the middle of plane bound for Saudi cinematic storytelling of director Jon Favreau. Phil Harris’ scat singing. This Baloo is perversion is darker and much closer in spirit Arabia. Only Hanks could pull the scene off While not following the stories to the letter, he fectly voiced by Bill Murray. to Kipling than its predecessor. the way he does. manages to capture the essence of Kipling and Two other principal characters are given Twyker restrains himself from his usual imbues the film with it. REEL TAKE: I was not impressed with the significant makeovers. King Louis, the orangpenchant for heavy stylization and instead When Walt Disney made the animated film trailers for The Jungle Book. The completely utan, is transformed into a King Kong sized peppers the film with stylistic flourishes 50 years ago, he ordered his story writers to computer generated jungle and animals (only ancestor called a gigantopithicus. As voiced (the opening sequence being the biggest of jettison the darker aspects of the material and Mowgli is real) looked just like that. Heavy by Christopher Walken he is both comic and these). By and large these moments work as concentrate on turning it into a traditional handed, obvious computer generated images. menacing just like the actor. The tiger Shere Khan is transformed into a terrifying, vicious, but wily and extremely well spoken, predator. No George Sanders drollery here just Idris Elba with the film’s best voiceover. Ben Kingsley, as Bageera the panther, narrates the film much the way Sebastian Cabot did in the original only without the intentional The world premiere A night of music, community, and humor. The role of Kaa the python has been of the documenfilm with the world premiere of Julian greattly reduced but Scarlett Johansson’s voice tary, Julian Price, will makes the most of what she’s given. Her CGI Price, a documentary by Erin Durham. reveal his incredibly appearance is spectacularly awesome. diverse contribution to Meg McLeod and Rachel Price, along with So far, so good. However the interjection of the city. Public Interest Projects and the producers of “The Bare Necessities” and “I Wanna Be Like The Orange Peel, the newly released album, Asheville SymYou” (even if they’re not sung) seemed out of Malaprops, Salsas, phony Sessions invite you to enjoy an evening place. I understand why they felt like they had Mountain Xpress, of inspiration. Come see and hear the story to do it, after all it’s the songs that made the Self Help Credit of Julian Price and Asheville’s renaissance as Walt Disney animated features what they were, Union, The Laughing told by the dreamers who lived it, with live but the Disney live action remakes are totally Seed, the performances of original different movies. Fine Arts songs from the leaders of Still The Jungle Book shows us what comJulian Price, and his incredibly diverse contributions to Asheville, Theatre, and Asheville’s legendary local is honored in a documentary by Erin Durham. puter generated images are capable of and how many more music scene. they can disappear within the confines of great businesses Asheville owes its succinematic storytelling. The ending credits have benefited from his support. He cess to a collaboration of community,” says Selverne. “This evening will remind us that the movie was “filmed entirely revived abandoned buildings and business owners, philanbe a reflection of Julian’s ideals and efforts,” on location in Los Angeles, California” which filled them with thriving businesses thropists, and public offisays director Erin Derham. “It is a celebramakes the performance of the 12 year old Neel to make downtown livable again. cials who dared to dream to tion of collaboration and gratitude designed to Sethi even more remarkable. It’s meant as an “This album serves as a reinvent downtown into a inspire this unique community to nurture its inside joke but it’s one that plays well today soundtrack for the city,” says ASO thriving center for the cultiauthenticity.” and will continue to do so for future audiExecutive Director, David Whitehill. vation of community. The ences. Let’s hope that the already announced Thanks to the thoughtfulness of biggest dreamer of them all sequel will be just as memorable although Executive Producer, Jessica Tomawas Julian Price. that’s usually not the case. IF sin and album producer Michael On Thursday, May 26, YOU Julian Price world premiere, Thursday, Rated PG-13 for sequences of scary action and GO May 26. Doors at 6:30, event at 7:30. Selverne, this album will also be the philanthropist, Julian Price peril. Ages 18+. Tickets $25. For tickets visit soundtrack for Julian’s story. will be honored for his www.theorangepeel.net or 800-514-3849. The “I believe that we have created achievements by a new colReview by Chip Kaufmann Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) an incredibly musical record that laborative effort from AsheJulian walking up Walnut 398-1837. Street in Asheville. reflects the spirit and the soul of our ville’s creative professionals. Movies continued from page 15

catalysts for the Hologram, telling us what we need to know and developing the characters, without having to spend unnecessary time in back story. His artistic touches, an elegant reserve, and a bit of levity temper the weightiness of the source material and draw us closer to the characters. The filmmakers try take on a little too much and story ends up scattered at times. The love story works when it’s a cautious attraction, but flounders a bit in its actuality. But for me, the film’s positives outweigh its shortcomings. Ultimately A Hologram For The King is a remarkably thoughtful and kind film and [for me] it’s positives outweigh its shortcomings.

Envisioning Community

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Handmade Fine Craft

HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock

The little things that make living beautiful…

Firefly Craft Gallery

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In the heart of the Village of Flat Rock, there is a new fine arts and crafts gallery – the perfect location to find a one of a kind gift for yourself or someone special.

Great Gift

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2689 ‘D’ Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC 28731

The gallery carries handmade American fine crafts, fine art, pottery and much more. Firefly Craft Gallery 2689-D Greenville Highway, Flat Rock, NC 28731

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(828) 697-1300 • O PEN M ON-S AT 11AM-6PM

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Firefly Craft Gallery, located in the Flat Rock Post Office building, opened for business in November. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. or by appointment. Gallery owner Karen Kennedy grew up as a third generation antique dealer, so to speak. She learned the business first hand, working with her parents at their shop and at the many shows where they attended and showed their antiques. With antiques in her blood, Karen eventually opened her own antique shop in Florida. She also had a career as a teacher for ten years in Florida, where she educated 1st through 6th graders. With retirement came the move to Flat Rock with husband Mike. The gallery has long been a dream of hers. “I’ve always had a love for the arts and architecture,” says Kennedy. “After moving to the mountains, I fell in love with Folk Art and fine craft by visiting Oliver’s and Wickwire. I was lucky enough to work with Shirley Palmer-Hill, before she retired, and she taught me a lot about fine art and craft.” The gallery supports local artists, and carries handmade American fine crafts, fine art, pottery, sterling silver jewelry, handbags, folk art clocks, contemporary folk art, vintage vinyl floor mats, furniture and antiques, and Willa’s famous shortbread. The gallery also offers gift certificates and special orders. On the horizon for the gallery are trunk shows, and meet and greet occasions with artisans. The next meet and greet will be held on Saturday, May 22, from 2-4 p.m. Many of the local artists will be demonstrating their craft techniques. There are presently about 50 artists represented at Firefly Craft Gallery with over half of them local artists.

Come visit us in Flat Rock… at the corner of Greenville Highway & Little River Road, next to the Flat Rock P.O.!

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PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

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Asheville

Jce Schlapkohl

CHERYL KEEFER

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Gallery of Art

The Asheville Gallery of Art features a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

Asheville Gallery of Art 82 Patton Avenue Downtown Asheville

Works on display at the Asheville Gallery of Art and Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600 www.joycepaints.com

pg. 21

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Mary E. Decker

Composition in Blue, Yellow and Red, (Detail) 24”x30”

(828) 251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Works by Cheryl Keefer Available at:

Jane Molinelli

expressive contemporary painter

pg. 11

NorthLight Studios, Rn 357 Depot Street in the River Arts District

pg. 21

Asheville Gallery 6 of Art, 82 Patton Avenue, Asheville Seven Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry Street, . 25 MS Black Mountain pg

Mahogan House Mahogany Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville Up Against the Wall Gallery, 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

Asheville Gallery of Art • 82 Patton Avenue, Downtown

828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

pg. 21

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Chartreuse Moose Fine Art • chartreusemoose.com

t.e. siewert encaustic landscapes

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT: 310 Art, River Arts District pg. 21

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Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Asheville jmolinelliart.com

ELINOR BOWMAN ASHEVILLE, NC

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT:

pg. 21

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pg. 21

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Asheville Gallery of Art • 16 College St. tesiewert.com

18 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District

www.elinorbowman.com

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Asheville Gallery of Art 82 Patton Avenue • Downtown Asheville

Fishing Lure Paintings by Johnnie Stanfield

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JUST IN TIME FOR FATHER’S DAY

Fly fishing and lures study paintings are on display at The Asheville Gallery of Art.

Interested in his answer, I questioned him further. “Like what?” He said , “a boat or a fish or a deer or something like that.” I asked if he had any kind of reference material and followed This collection of colorful him out into the garage and detailed original waterwhere he began to show me color renderings of fishing fancy fishing poles, his new flies and lures will surely boat and his fishing tackle be a hit with any fisherman box full of lures, hooks, or outdoors person in your flies and sinkers. life. Johnnie, who loved to The colorful, fun, whimgo fishing with family and sical and artistically crafted friends as a child, started the flies and lures caught my art collection as a request attention and the rest is from her brother, who is an history. I’ve created more avid fisherman and hunter. than 22 original watercolor When I asked what he paintings in the last year in would like for a birthday gift, Fishing Lures Mini Study various sizes and fishing he replied, “Can you paint by Johnnie Stanfield themes. Many from my something a guy would like?”

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friend’s and client’s tackle box collections and some from those collectors who desired a commissioned painting of their own special collection. Others have offered me photos of their flies and lures as reference material. “I’ve even painted fish and river scenes to go along with the collection, expanding it into other painting mediums like acrylic and mixed water media,” said Johnnie. Her painting sizes as well as her style, varies with the media she chooses to render her paintings. The Fishing Flies & Lure Collection will be on display and available for purchase at the Asheville Gallery of Art for a limited time beginning in May 2016. These paintings are perfect gifts for your avid fisherman, family room, office or lake home. Sizes range from 18 x 24 inches

Fishing Lure Study #7 by Johnnie Stanfield

before framing, to 5 x 7, with many 8 x 10 and 11 x 14 sizes available. This collection is sure to go quick, so stop by the Asheville Gallery of Art today and purchase your original painting or order a fine quality print in a number of sizes. Prints in a variety of sizes may also be purchased online at www.johnnie-stanfield.pixels.com.

Jane Molinelli

How does it feel to be a contemporary painter in a landscape-kind-of town? Jane Molinelli believes there is room for all forms of artistic expression in Asheville, though she admits to sometimes feeling like an outlier. Her work—colorful, abstract, and sometimes textural—may not be for everyone, but she feels her work creates the needed space for a dialogue with those who appreciate work that is less representational and always expressive. “A painting is a notation of energy, whether found in an emotion, a reaction to a situation, or in the breath of nature. It is the sum of the artist’s approach to channeling this energy that creates a cohesive work,” she says. Molinelli likens her work to poetry, “Except, my work utilizes line, mark, and color to communicate with the viewer in an inner language without words.” Molinelli says she found her “art tribe” early, the group of painters with whom she most identifies. At a young age, she began to gravitate to the contemporary section of any art museum she visited. “The vitality, immediacy, and depth of emotion touched me like no other. Without knowing it at the time, I was captivated by how a work without a seeming subject could so profoundly speak to me.”

She began her work in visual arts as a fiber artist, both in weaving and batik. “While I have always been in love Dancing Away the with color, the Blues, by Jane energy and Molinelli. rhythm that painting conveys continued to intrigue me. When I turned to painting later in life, I found I could translate the texture of fiber and the layering of colors from my When All Is Said dye work to this and Done, by Jane medium. Of Molinelli. her process she says, “My one requirement has been that I remain open to the creative.” You can see the work of Jane Molinelli at Asheville Gallery of Art, and at 310 Art Gallery in the River Arts District. You may also view her work online at www.jmolinelliart.com. pg. 21

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Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 19


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville More of What Makes Asheville Special – The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Leftover Salmon’s Blue Ridge Jam

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Looking back over the past by eMILy gInSbeRg 25 years of rootsy, stringbased music, the impact of Leftover Salmon is impossible to deny. Formed in Boulder at the end of 1989, the Colorado slamgrass pioneers were one of the first bluegrass bands to add drums and tour rock & roll bars.

Earthlight – Paintings by Karen Keil Brown

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Asheville Gallery of Art’s May show, “Earthlight” will feature the work of Karen Keil Brown. This will be the first solo artist’s show in AGA’s new gallery space at 82 Patton Avenue. Keil Brown, known for her ethereal sky and mountain landscapes, will present

Friday, May 20 - New Mountain Theater at 8 p.m. Intimate Evening with Leftover Salmon & Junto. Saturday, May 21

- New Mountain Amphitheater at 3:30 p.m. featuring Leftover Salmon, Acoustic Syndicate and special guests. Leftover Salmon

Saturday, May 21 - Asheville Music Hall at 11 p.m. featuring Grass is Dead.

Sunday, May 22 - Asheville Music Hall at 1 p.m. Acoustic Salmon Brunch Jam.

IF YOU Leftover Salmon Blue Ridge Jam, May 20GO 22. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Ave.,

Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www. ashevillemusichall.com. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 785-1701, www. newmountainavl.com.

Fractions of light, acrylic 36 x 48 by Karen Keil Brown

SNAGneXt

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An Interchange and Exchange of the Many Facets of Making a Living in the Field

WNC’s Largest Selection of Pre-Owned Bikes and Accessories.

Probably the Oldest Bike Shop in the U.S.

FREE Downtown Parking

pg. 21

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(828) 253-4800

28 Ashland Ave • Downtown Asheville

The Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG) is excited to present SNAGneXt, an impressive selection of talks, demos, workshops and more May 18-21. SNAGneXt is a conference that seeks to inspire the entrepreneurial spirit by connecting people to the jewelry and metals community in new and exciting ways. SNAGneXt will feature speakers, moderators and presenters who are (or have been) fulltime makers, gallerists and people engaged in the business side of the jewelry and metals field – each willing to share inspiring stories, savvy approaches and sage advice. Don Friedlich, Melissa Joy

20 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

by

tebbe DaVIS

new work. “I’ve been influenced by my recent art workshops in New York City at the Art Earthlight, acrylic, 36 x 24 by Karen Keil Brown Students League. I’m painting in a paintings and photographs through more geometric style, almost cityscapes, out the southeast. Her work is and using blocks of colors suggestive of found in private and corporate colthe buildings in the city,” she said. lections across the United States. In creating the new work, Keil Brown She and her husband, Buster, live says of her process that she is using drips in North Asheville. and color blocks to create a composition of fragmented contrasts. The new work retains her signature atmospheric approach to landscape, but takes on a more IF urban, edgier feel. YOU The public is cordially GO invited to a reception on Of her work, Keil Brown says, “I like Friday, May 6, from 5:30 to to free up my imagination to provide 8 p.m. “Earthlight” runs from May unexpected opportunities for a more 1 through 31. creative process. I often use a dash of Karen’s work and that of the other red within the painting to represent my 29 gallery members will be on internal passion for each piece.” display and for sale during regular Originally from New Jersey, Karen hours, Monday through Saturday, was raised in Asheville, NC. She is a 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday 1 to graduate of the University of North 4 p.m. The Asheville Gallery of Art Carolina, Asheville, with a degree in Fine is located at 82 Patton Avenue in Arts. Karen was an art teacher for 10 years downtown Asheville, across from before getting back to exhibiting her Pritchard Park.

Manning, and Amy Weiks and Adam Whitney of The Smith Shop will kick off the conference by headlining as the keynote speakers. SNAGneXt will outline four themes: Wellness and Holistic Practices, Finding Your Voice (Product Development), a Multi-Pronged Approach to Making and Selling, and Bridging Art & Fashion. Simultaneously, there will be a myriad of other captivating events like NeXtup a fast paced slide presentation of work by conference attendees. The SNAGsale, also known as the annual trunk show, is free and open to the public. It is an enjoyable way to obtain one of a kind jewelry and metalwork by skilled SNAG members. Conference goers may also participate in the 2016 Tool in the Hat and Silent Auction to bid on tools, jewelry, artwork, and much more. Attendees also have the option to explore Asheville on the SNAGcrawl. This year’s exhibition crawl is jam-packed with over 15 amazing Asheville galleries,

exhibitions, and artist’s studios. Asheville sites include: Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design, the Masonic Temple, OnBroadway, Asheville Art Museum, and the Orange Peel. The Vendor Room will be open daily throughout the conference. There, attendees and the public will have the opportunity to purchase tools, supplies, gemstones, books and more. Conference participants don’t want to miss the Swap and Shop, an entertaining way to kick off the SNAGneXt event by swapping handmade pins with other attendees! IF YOU SNAGneXt, talks, demos, GO workshops and more, May

18-21. To register, view the conference schedule, look up travel information, or to view rates, visit www.snagmetalsmith.org.


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville More of What Makes Asheville Special – The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Baroque Vibes

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A unique and swinging ensemble!

Join Pan Harmonia for a fabulous 16th season finale concert; “Baroque Vibes.” In a spell-binding program that transcends the boundaries of the traditional Baroque setting, BVibes creates a unique, heart-felt, and swinging mosaic through the music of the Baroque masters and beyond. Harpsichord, vibraphone, flute, and bassoon, and create sound combinations that are beautiful and exciting, and take the music in a sweet and creative direction that is sure to delight. Works by GP Telemann, JS Bach, Corette, Rammeau, and dances from 17th century England, and more will be featured. Season Finale – Baroque Vibes, Sunday, May 22 at 3 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church St. downtown Asheville.

IF YOU Baroque Vibes, Sunday, GO May 22 at 3 p.m. at First

The Baroque Vibes Photo: Frank Zipperer. Not shown: flutist Bradford Malbon.

Presbyterian Church, 40 Church St. downtown Asheville. For more information about Pan Harmonia, please visit www.panharmonia.org, or call (828) 254-7123. If price is a barrier, contact us at write office@panharmonia.org to volunteer.

Barbara Weiss, harpsichord; Bradford Malbon, flute; Rosalind Buda, bassoon & Scottish smallpipes; and Byron Hedgepeth, vibes & percussion Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 day of, $5 students, plus handling (for credit cards only) and 7% sales tax. Available online at www.panharmonia.org/shop

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue 21 828.277.1272

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m. O C

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Illustration and Pop Culture Art

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21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 21


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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celebrity chefs, including Scott Conant (Chopped TV star), Jamie Gwen (national radio personality), and Jose Andres (James Beard award winner).

Festivities include national book authors and mixology gurus, an expanded “ELIXIR” event highlighting an ever expanding pool of local talent, as well the largest industry-only Distilling Expo in the Southeast.

The renowned mixologist, chef and author will join us with his cocktailthemed books to share his lifetime of secrets and stories at 6 p.m. Enjoy a meal prepared by the Award winning chef John Fleer and his renowned restaurant Rhubarb, for an intimate, yet lively gathering of food, spirits and fun. Warren Bobrow is the celebrated author/bar man and mixologist responsible for the forthcoming book, Cannabis Cocktails. This book which takes the tack of healing over being just another stoner book is certain to make some waves in the formerly stoic liquor world. Warren is a published food writer as well as a mixologist. A long strange trip it’s been. He writes for the “Fabulous Beekman 1802 Boys” as their cocktail writer.

Spirit Dinner with Warren Bobrow May 5 at Rhubarb, downtown Asheville.

SCHEDULE • May 1-8, Best Bloody Mary Contest (Full Week) • May 4, Cocktail Theatre Featuring Rob Floyd at The Historic S&W Cafeteria, with Effen Vodka • May 5, 2016 Spirit Dinner with Warren Bobrow with Knob Creek at Rhubarb, downtown Asheville

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Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar NEW Exotic Menu Items

$10

Gift Certificate With Purchase of $30 or more. With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/30/16.

Open Daily for Breakfast and Lunch Featuring the Freshest Food from Local Suppliers.

pg. 21

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64 Haywood St ◆ Downtown Asheville

3 Biltmore Ave.

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885 pg. 21

Open Daily 8am-3pm pg. 36

www.champanc.com

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food

pg. 26

828-252-8333 ◆ www.cafe-64.com

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Eat, Drink, Love

The Asheville Wine and Food Festival is expanding its celebration of spirits and mixology to a dedicated week-long event.

The week kicks off May 4 at 7:30 p.m. with Cocktail Theatre featuring “Molecular Mixologist” Rob Floyd. Rob’s traveling troupe will entertain the crowd while serving creative concoctions. Food, Spirits and entertainment are included in the ticket price. Rob Floyd is the founder of Cocktail Theatre, a luxury tactile branding concept. He delivers a unique performance mixing live entertainment with an unforgettable cocktail experience. Rob also consults with top

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Asheville Cocktail Week May 4-8

Cocktail Theatre Featuring Rob Floyd, May 4 at the Historic S&W Cafeteria

pg. 21

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437 N. Main St.

Hendersonville, NC 828-696-9800

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• May 5, Cinco de Mayo Crawl with Beam Suntory & AfterPartywith Hornitos at Sovereign Remedy, The Imperial Life, and Southern Kitchen & Bar • May 6, Book signing with Warren Bobrow at Malaprop’s • May 6, Southeastern Distilling Expo at the Historic S&W Cafeteria • May 6, Asheville Wine and Food Festival’s ELXIR bar competition at the historic S&W Cafeteria • May 7, Hangover Brunch at the Imperial Life with r Cathead Vodka Bloody Mary Bar • May 7, Asheville Cocktail Tours guided by Eating Asheville • May 7, Asheville “Derby” Party with Maker’s Mark at Smoky Park Supper Club • May 7, Old Fashioned Nightcap with Knob Creek at Ole Shakey’s • May 8, Best Bloody Mary Contest Results

IF YOU Asheville Cocktail Week, GO May 4-8. For more

details, please visit www. ashevillewineandfood.com

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Eat, Drink, Love

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food

Come to O’Charley’s for Mother’s Day Brunch

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Almost 120 years ago, long before anyone waited in line to feast on eggs benedict and French toast, the word brunch appeared in print for the first time in the US. “The latest ‘fad’ is to issue invitations for a meal called ‘brunch,’ a repast at 11 o’clock a.m..” a column in the New Oxford, an old Pennsylvania newspaper, explained in 1896. Originally conceived for the wealthy as a drawn-out, elaborate affair, brunch soon went out into the mainstream.

A FEW SELECT MENU ENTREES Strawberries & Cream French Toast Fresh strawberries in a sweet strawberry sauce, sweetened cream cheese and whipped cream on top of our cinnamon French Toast. Served with your choice of applewood-smoked bacon or ham steak and fresh fruit.

Bananas Foster French Toast

Cinnamon French Toast with sliced bananas in a warm, caramel rum flavored sauce with candied pecans and topped with fresh whipped cream. Served with your choice of applewood-smoked bacon or ham steak and fresh fruit.

Cinnamon French Toast

Cinnamon French Toast topped with fresh Sundays are even better with brunch. Especially when Bananas whipped cream Foster and Strawberries & Cream French Toast are on the menu. and a side of warm syrup. Served with applewood-smoked bacon or ham steak and fresh fruit. O’Charley’s Restaurant & Bar

Savannah Scramble

pg. 30

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2 Kenilworth Knolls, Asheville (828) 281-0540

Four eggs scrambled with smoked ham, diced tomatoes, broccoli, onions, cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese and topped with creamy Hollandaise sauce served on top of parmesan brunch potatoes. Served with fresh fruit and your choice of white or wheat toast.

Hours: Mon-Thurs. 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri & Sat. 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Veggie Omelet

Four fluffy eggs with peppers, onions, mushrooms and cheese. Served with parmesan brunch potatoes, fresh fruit and your choice of white or wheat toast.

Overloaded Brunch Platter

Our fresh 6-oz. USDA Choice sirloin, two eggs any style, three slices of applewood-smoked bacon and half a waffle. Served with parmesan brunch potatoes and fresh fruit.

Everyone is Talking About Our

Southern Style Sunday Brunch served until 2 p.m.

SEAFOOD! Scallops Oysters Shrimp Fish-N-Chips Great Maine Lobster Roll

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order

$2.00 OFF

Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

With Coupon • Expires 6-30-2016

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

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fine arts & crafts Sarah Sneeden

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OIL PAINTER

A North Carolina resident since 1967, Sarah Sneeden is a native of Pennsylvania.

Art You Watch + 1-Hour Sprint + Artists on the Block = Philanthropy x FUN!

Saturday, June 4 4:30 p.m. Tickets: $60

Live Art Hour & Auction

Laurel Ridge Country Club, Waynesville

www.WNCQuickDraw.com

She graduated from Centenary College in New Jersey, the Famous Artists School, the New York Institute of Photography, and the Portrait Institute of New York. Annual workshops in the West have added experience and new ideas to her painting repertoire. A voracious reader, Sarah’s extensive art library keeps the art world at her fingertips. Sarah’s 40 years of experience, distinctive style and versatility are evident in her original and innumerable works of art. She likes watercolors, prismacolor pencils, and pastels for sketching but prefers the permanency of oils for her finished pieces. When she can find a sunny spot, Sarah’s favorite way of working is en plein air – working out-of-doors on location where she can study firsthand the play of light on her subject. Interpreting reality with sure brush strokes, rich color and verve, Sarah experiments with

Mountain Sunflowers 16 x 20 by Sarah Sneeden

the season and the subject, always seeking that play of light. Larger pieces are completed in her studio. IF YOU Works by Sarah Sneeden are on GO display at Twigs & Leaves Gallery, 98

North Main Street, Waynesville. Sarah will be demonstrating in the gallery in July during Art After Dark. (828) 456-1940, www. twigsandleaves.com

Grovewood Gallery

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A Celebration of Mothers & Makers.

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On Saturday, May 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, May 8 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., visitors can enjoy special displays of artisan made tableware, kitchenware and jewelry created by local and regional craftsmen. Mother’s Day gift sets start at $20 (available through May 8). Katie Lauver from The Herbal Spectacle will be on location Saturday, May 7 from 10 am to 2:30 pm, and on Sunday, May 8 from 11 am to 3:30 pm. Sample Lauver’s “Grovewood Blend” tea and purchase her herbal tinctures, body products, and bath herbs. Guests can also enjoy an afternoon of flowers and fun with master gardener and floral designer ChrisTea towels by Patch topher Mello on Design Studio. Sunday, May 8 from 1-3 p.m. Christopher will demonstrate how to create beautiful bouquets and artful floral arrangements in pots and planters. Grovewood is a family-owned, fine crafts destination located in a beautiful historic setting adjacent to The Omni Grove Park Inn in North Asheville. The gallery showcases traditional and contemporary craft, all handmade by American artisans.

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aSHLey Van MatRe

Grovewood Rocks! Art meets function in Grovewood Rocks! - a showcase of artisan made rocking chairs by 11 American woodRocking Chair by workers, includLibby Schrum ing six from North Carolina. Rocker styles will range from traditional to contemporary and reflect the creative diversity and unique personality of each maker. This exhibition will be celebrated with an opening reception on June 4 from 3-6 p.m. Grovewood Rocks! is curated by Russell Gale, who began managing Grovewood Gallery in 2015. Participating artists include Fatie Atkinson, Brian Brace, Curtis Buchanan, Alan Daigre, Brian Fireman, Joe Godfrey, Andy McFate, Libby Schrum, Leslie Webb, Seth Weizenecker, and Mark Whitley. IF YOU Mothers & Makers, Saturday, May 7 GO from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday, May

8 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Grovewood Rocks! opens on June 4 from 3-6 p.m. On view through Sunday, August 28, 2016. Grovewood Gallery, Adjacent to the Omni Grove Park Inn. To learn more, visit grovewood. com or call (828) 253-7651.


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artful living Freedom “The meaning of freedom can never be grasped by the divided mind. If I feel separate from my experience, and from the world, freedom will seem to be the extent to which I can push the world around, and fate the extent to which the world pushes me around. But to the whole mind there is no contrast of “I” and the world. There is just one process acting, and does everything that happens. It raises my little finger and it creates earthquakes.” ~ Alan Watts

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Freedom is a much abused and misunderstood concept, and a person’s perspective on it tends to come with considerable bias and baggage, and there are people who talk a lot about freedom who seem to have very little understanding of it. These are people who usually mean that they seek freedom to do what they want, to “push the world around,” and this is often at the expense of someone else or at the expense of the natural world. Some people want the freedom to amass as much wealth, and privilege as they can and they seem to not care if this places others in the position of lack and want. Some people want the freedom to exploit nature’s resources not caring about the damage to the environment, other species and future generations that will be the cost of their indulgence. Some people want the freedom to say, write, broadcast whatever they want, no matter how incendiary or hurtful to others and the general comity of society. Some people want the freedom to carry guns, and the freedom to hunt and kill whatever wildlife is legal to kill with those guns, and to even kill other humans in the name of self-defense, or even in defense of freedom as they define it. This point of view places many guns in the world, instruments whose purpose is death, and it opens the way for these guns to be used for illegal killing, but these people see this as just an unfortunate byproduct of protecting their freedom. Some people want the freedom to take away the freedoms of others through enforcing bigoted or dogmatic ideas onto others, and these people believe any restriction of this is an infringement of their “freedom.” Many people have their minds divided into me and mine against what is not me and mine. They use the word freedom in these ways, but there is no freedom here, only enslavement to closed-mindedness. Only the mind that is open is free. This mistaken notion of freedom fosters anger and anxiety; it creates the tension of separateness from others and from life that leaves those pursuing this kind of freedom as chronically unhappy and dissatisfied no matter how much of what they want they manage to acquire. Happiness is always around the bend of “more.” It is bound to getting and keeping what is believed as entitled, and there is never enough and the supposed happiness that is the goal of this militant assertion of freedom is as

short-lived as the moments of ego-victory that come from their fleeting triumphs, dominance and acquisitions. Freedom is in fact the path to happiness, but it is not the kind of freedom people usually associate with the word. We could just as easily reverse the order of words and have a better idea of what real freedom is. Happiness is, in fact, the path to freedom. This is happiness that is not fleeting but rather a character virtue and it is not in getting something or avoiding some undesired circumstance. True happiness is a state of mind free of circumstance for its wellbeing, and freedom is in being one with what is – “to the whole mind there is no contrast of “I” and the world.” Following this path to happiness is the path to freedom and this path to freedom is the path to happiness. Obviously, we are not talking about the giddy kind of happiness or the adrenaline rush of victory or getting what we want. We are talking about happiness as equanimity, peace, deep well-being. This, as Watts noted, is the result of an undivided mind, a mind that sees that it is an expression of the universe in its wholeness experienced through the separateness of a human form. It is not a human being believing it is the source of consciousness separate from all other consciousness; rather, that consciousness is the source of this human being experienced as “me” also giving rise to the human being experienced as “you,” and giving rise to the tree and the squirrel and the earth and the sky and the rivers and the sun and the stars. All are expressions of the universe – uni-verse – that story that is one thing appearing as many. All these forms are seemingly separate when experienced from the separateness of “me,” and this separateness is like a prison causing isolation, and with isolation comes anxiety, fear, anger, pride, greed, jealousy, mistrust, the desire to possess, to make more of “me.” This brings neither happiness nor freedom. Enduring happiness and freedom as traits of character occur only when all these forms are experienced as united in the field of consciousness, and “me” is recognized as that field of consciousness, and thus the mind is undivided. “Me” becomes “I” – not separate

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bILL WaLZ

and insecure, rather, as in “I am,” an expression of the universe, of God, if that is the language that has meaning for you – who identified as “I am that I am” when Moses asked the name of the Infinite. This “I” has no insecurity for this one knows itself as an expression of The One. “I am” needs nothing more to fulfill or justify itself. This is freedom. Happiness and freedom come not from killing a deer with one good shot so that its head can grace your den; it comes from loving the living grace and beauty of the deer and feeling that grace and beauty within ourselves as the sight of the deer fills our consciousness. It doesn’t come from the political party you identify with winning an election or a revolution so that your ideas about what society ought to be can be imposed, it comes from transcending differences to stand together as a human society where everyone’s perspective is honored and no one is trampled, where peace and security are assured. It comes not from chain-sawing a tree, but from planting one and watching it grow. It comes from the inner strength that allows you to face physical illness, even death with equanimity because you feel your existence does not begin with birth or end with death, but rather is, always has been, and always will be the universe expressing itself as an individual, just as the ocean expresses itself through the forms of waves or the sky through the forms of clouds. The forms come and go but the source is infinite and always, and just like the waves and the clouds, every living form is connected in and an expression of its infinite source. We are all the one universe expressing itself through many forms, and the many forms expressing the one universe. To feel at one with life in all its expressions, the balmy breeze and the ferocious hurricane, sunny and rainy days, easy and difficult times; in all expressions of life - in the plants, animals and fellow human beings, the rivers, the woods, the mountains and deserts, the furry kitten and the dangerous spider. To be OK, to not be in rejection of any aspect of life, is freedom, and this requires a sense of connection with the sacredness of all life. That’s what sacredness means – connectedness. Freedom of religion is not in holding to or imposing any dogmatic belief on another. Freedom of religion is the freedom to worship life, the Creation that is the Creator, the miracle that “raises my little finger and… creates earthquakes,” and this felt sense cannot be taken away by any despot or political

“I am” needs nothing more to fulfill or justify itself. tyranny. “There is no contrast of ‘I’ and the world. There is just one process acting.” In this is peace, and in this peace is happiness and freedom, not as something given or taken, but as who you are. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz. com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs at www.billwalz.com

Cheri Huber and Ashwini Narayanan

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Reading & Booksigning. Cheri Huber and Ashwini Narayanan wrote their latest book, The Big Bamboozle: How We Are Conned Out of the Life We Want, to examine how we achieve our greatest dreams through the teachings of Zen Buddhism. It’s a practical, light-hearted guide that brings together the voices of two great teachers to illuminate and inspire. Cheri and Ashwini previously co-authored I Don’t Want To, I Don’t Feel Like It: How Resistance Controls Your Life and What to Do About It. IF YOU Saturday, May 7 at 7 p.m. at Malaprop’s GO Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St.,

Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

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spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

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I’m still trying to catch up with the ever growing stack of discs to be covered (review one more and two shall take its place!) so brevity remains the name of the game. Remember, two stars or five, anything mentioned here is worthy of your time and money. And away we go!

Darcy Malone and the Tangle ‘Still Life’

On her debut album Darcy Malone and the Tangle serve up a nice blend of British Invasion rock mixed with Memphis Soul. For instance, Freddie and The Dreamers had been fronted by a powerhouse female vocalist and backed by a kickass horn section. It’s an album that revels in sound as much as song, which in no way is a bad thing, creating a unified groove that rocks and rolls its way through the everyday of life. Malone’s vocals are the foundation. Her impassioned call to an unknown lover to step up and “Be A Man” is certainly the album’s highlight, but the trio of songs sung by guitarist Chris Boye (Malone’s husband) offer a nice change of pace that keeps the album from settling into a singular direction (“Together Tonight” is a guitar and brass driven delight). As debuts go, this is as good as it gets and I found myself playing Still Life even when other albums were awaiting my ear. ****

Hospital Ships ‘The Past is Not a Flood’

the group, moved to Austin Texas and started all over again. What results is an album 180 degrees from anything he’s done before, certain to alienate long time fans, but an ideal jumping-on point for a newbie. Gone are the layer-upon-layer textures, jarring juxtapositions of sound and purposeful anthems that marked their past two albums. That’s not to say The Past Is Not a Flood is any less vital. In fact it may be more so, but it’s a statement that caresses your spirit rather than grabs your attention. Subtly constructed from samples culled from Geiger’s previous recordings and enhanced by keyboards and atmospheric percussion (the guitars are mostly mere hints) it intentionally brings to mind the work of minimalist composer Steve Reich. Geiger has said as much-and seems comfortable in its role as background noise. The fragility of Geiger’s vocals,heavily influenced by fellow Austin resident Daniel Johnston, along with the deeply personal nature of the lyrics, suggests an internal crisis that Geiger feels best exorcised in song. It’s not always comfortable, in fact the sinister “Oh My Light” is anything but, yet as a standalone entity, it works well for what it is. Discerning what that means is both part of the mystery and charm of this most puzzling testimonial. ***

Bob Mould

GRAVE FACE RECORDS

While 2013’s Destruction in Yr Soul set a pretty high bar for the band, it also reinforced the unfair comparison between Hospital Ships and The Flaming Lips. That’s a standard to which few bands would come out favorably, at least up to the point when Flaming Lips went off the rails. It seems to have served as a wakeup call to Hospital Ships founder and front man, Jordan Geiger. Geiger essentially disbanded

‘Patch The Sky’ MERGE

Folksy explorations not withstanding, Bob Mould has always been a rocker at heart. From Husker Du to Sugar Mould has long embraced the limitless potential of the power pop trio, finding joy in the endless variations that can be built upon a singular theme.

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Asheville

Mon-Sat 10-6; Sun 11-4 ~ Plenty of Parking

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~ S  ~ 26 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

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.AB.

--

Again aligned with his touring band of drummer Jon Wurster and bassist Jason Narducy, Mould has the luxury of returning to his roots. Having worked through the death of his father (as well as facing his own mortality) with 2014’s confessional Beauty and Ruin, Mould is now set to push toward the future and he does so with a fervor rockers edging towards 60 aren’t supposed to have. Like the best of his albums Patch the Sky has plenty of dark moments. Half of the songs deal with the inevitability of aging and the heightened awareness of having lived more years than you likely have left. Rather than surrender to the gloom, Mould embraces it, resisting the temptation to set his creative impulse on auto pilot. The result is an album that ranks among his finest, a nimble and seductive listen that builds upon riffs of energy, pulses with urgency, while highlighting some of the loveliest melodies he’s ever constructed. “Life affirming” is not a term typically associated with the artistry of Bob Mould (a musician whose work I’ve followed for more than three decades). With Patch The Sky he’s found a near perfect symmetry of past and present. For a guy whose played in two major bands, released some 15 solo records and has time and again pushed the boundaries of conventionality, that’s no mean feat. ****1/2

David Wiseman ‘Panes’

DA6D MUSIC

Burnsville resident, David Wiseman, is a throwback in all the best ways. He is the sort of troubadour who a century ago would have traveled the winding roads of Western North Carolina for a place to set his feet and sing his songs. Armed with his trusty Gibson acoustic, a warm and soulful voice and any number of tales to tell, Wiseman guides us through a snapshot of his life and heritage. Be it the historic Swannanoa flood of 1916 or a “Ride to Terre Haute,” Wiseman conveys his message with a straightforwardness that never gets in the way of a good story. Much like fellow North Carolinian Bruce Piephoff, Wiseman relishes in making the everyday seem extraordinary and the personal collective. As enjoyable an experience as Panes is – and I found its comforting tone ideal music for the evening hours – it’s the sort of songwriting best heard live. Here’s hoping David Wiseman comes down the mountain and pays Asheville a visit. ****

Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine!


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Minton Sparks

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CaSSaRa

Listening to the Nashville based poet, Minton Sparks, you quickly get the sense her world view of storytelling and music allows ample room for both literary allusions and simple down-to-earth traditions. Sparks’ delivery, sometimes sad, often sprightly and always engaging-,speaks readily to the mundane occurrences of Southern living. When bordered by the low-key Appalachian music she was raised on (and readily embraces) those tales become even more appealing. Like many Appalachian folks, Sparks grew up in a household “surrounded by music and story. Dolly and Reba were on the radio while Flannery O’Conner was on the nightstand.” It was a world both hardscrabble and deeply enriched. Sparks followed in that tradition. She’s been described as a “backwoods Lucinda Williams” but in truth she has taken the traditional framework of Southern storytelling and carved out a niche for herself. Along the way, she’s released a trio of studio albums, a live audio/DVD release (2010’s highly recommended Live at the Station Inn) and contributed to a number of compilation projects. She’s also been recognized as a celebrated poet, playwright and a prose author. She has been invited to such prominent events as the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival and Berry College’s Southern Women Writer’s Conference (where she performed alongside Maya Angelou and Kaye Gibbons) and the Lincoln Center. She served as the storyteller in residence at the Jonesborough National Storytelling Festival, been extensively featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and selected as a Fellow at the Vanderbilt Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy. Since 2014 she’s been an artist in residence at the Banff Performing Arts Center. On the musical side, Sparks has shared the stage with country and folk heavyweights like

The New Stew

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Corey Glover, Roosevelt Collier, Yonrico Scott, Dave Yoke, Jared Stone, and Matt Slocum Come Together as ‘The New Stew’ to Re-Imagine Bill Withers - Live at Carnegie Hall. The New Stew is a “super group” of a handful of fine musicians from all genres of music that features Corey Glover (Living Colour, Galactic) on vocals, Roosevelt Collier

Minton Sparks

Rodney Crowell, John Prine, Nanci Griffith, and the Punch Brothers. Yet for all of her accomplishments, Sparks, a Tennessee native, former social worker, divinity school dropout, first ever Spoken Word Award recipient at the Conference on Southern Literature and founder of The Nashville Writing and Performance Institute, still loves performing on an intimate stage to an audience that really listens. Her often hilarious, humble and heartbreaking tales of characters like Giddy Up Gibson and Wicked Widow Pots are best told in close proximity. As John Prine (himself no stranger to telling a grand story) aptly puts it, “Minton Sparks is a great storyteller—humanity with humidity, all told humorously with humility.” Her May 1 performance at The Altamont Theatre in Asheville (and I can think of no better venue for such a show) is your opportunity to hear what Minton Sparks is all about, and watch firsthand a master raconteur doing what she does best. IF YOU An Evening with Storyteller/Poet/Musician GO Minton Sparks, Sunday, May 1 at 7 pm.

All ages, general admission, doors opening at 6pm. Tickets are priced at $15 in advance, $18 day of show, with $25 VIP guaranteed best seats. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St, Downtown Asheville. (828) 782-3334.

(The Lee Boys) on Lap Steel/ Pedal Steel, Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band, Royal Southern Brotherhood) on percussion, Dave Yoke (Susan Tedeschi Band, Dr. John, Scrapomatic) on guitar, Jared Stone (Stone’s Stew) on drums, and Matt Slocum (Oteil and the Peacemakers, Col. Bruce Hampton & Aquarium Rescue Unit, The Lee Boys) on piano. This project was formed with one focused goal, to pay respect to those recordings that influenced the players and to re-imagine recordings that they feel should be heard and experienced in a live setting. IF YOU The New Stew, Wednesday, May 11. GO Doors 7 p.m.; show 8 p.m. $25 adv; $28

dos. 18+. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

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The Poet’s Voice

SPREAD THE WORD: PEACE

My new mantra, less is enough, consumes my world. My poetry has become “succinct.” Restore and Goodwill’s shelves are full of my burger belongings. I give away books. (Free libraries rejoice). Less IS enough. Consider a world with fewer guns, tanks, uniforms, shields, violence, fear, eruptions of rage, jealousy, frowns and harsh voices. Thich Naht Hahn wrote, “Peace is every step.” Wendell Berry shows this in a poem. There is a day when the road neither comes nor goes, and the way is not a way but a place

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CaROL peaRCe bJORLIe – tHe pOet beHInD tHe CeLLO

Roget’s Thesaurus, one of my favorite writing tools, a lot like the trowel I use in the garden to get at the root of things, has these synonymns for peace: harmony, accord, serene, calm, armistice, quiet, order, nonaggression, and truce. This poem, by Robert Bly, a Minnesota poet. Indeed, this poem is the reason for this month’s column. It is his fault. I read his poem, Call and Answer, and was filled with the duty to “cry out.”

Peace for the earth and its creatures peace for the world and its peoples peace for our fathers peace for our mothers peace for our brothers and sisters. The peace of heaven’s vastness the peace of ocean depths the peace of earth’s stillness to bless us in the night to bless us this night. ~ from Praying with the Earth by John Philip Newell

Call and Answer

Shalom – Carol Bjorlie

August 2002 Tell me why it is we don’t lift our voices these days And cry over what is happening. Have you noticed The plans are made for Iraq and the ice cap is melting? I say to myself: “Go on, cry. What’s the sense Of being an adult and having no voice? Cry out! See who will answer! This is Call and Answer!” We will have to call especially loud to reach Our angels, who are hard of hearing: they are hiding In the jugs of silence filled during our wars. Have we agreed to so many wars that we can’t Escape from silence? If we don’t lift our voices, we allow Others (who are ourselves) to rob the house. How come we’ve listened to the great criers - Neruda, Akhmatova, Thoreau, Frederick Douglass - and now We’re silent as sparrows in the little bushes? Some masters say our life lasts only seven days. Where are we in the week? Is it Thursday yet? Hurry, cry now! Soon Sunday night will come.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Consider compassion. The Dalai Lama wrote, “With kindness, with love and comby Robert Bly passion, the essence of brotherhood and sisterhood, one will have inner peace.” Oscar Romero adds, “Peace is generosity.” Peace is on my mind. Imagine how it would be if families were at peace (a good place to I could not finish without one of my favorite begin.) Suppose we built bridges instead of William Stafford poems. walls? I live in Asheville. I seek peace out doors, our garden, mountain trails, the This is the field where the battle did not happen, Arboretum. Wendell Berry writes: where the unknown soldier did not die. Best of any song This is the field where grass joined hands, is bird song where no monument stands, in the quiet, but first and the only heroic thing is the sky. you must have the quiet **** Birds fly here with any sound, Where can we find quiet? This is unfolding their wings across the open. one noisy world! Again, Wendell is No people killed - or were killed - on this ground on it! hallowed by neglect and an air so tame The world of machines is running that people celebrate it by forgetting its name. Beyond the world of trees Where only a leaf is turning by William Stafford In a small high breeze

Consider compassion. Suppose we built bridges instead of walls?

28 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

Authors for Action: Kill The Bill

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An evening of readings, chat and laughter.

Some of your favorite authors will be on hand to sign your favorite books! Tickets are $20. Nibbles plus a cash bar. Special VIP Meet and Greet ticket secures your admittance to a pre-cocktail gathering to rub shoulders with some of your favorite writers. Price includes admittance to the show with preferred seating. VIP Tickets are $50. IF YOU Authors For Action: Kill The Bill, GO Wednesday, May 18 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s

Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www. malaprops.com.

POETRIO Sunday, May 1 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: Gary Hawkins (Worker), Sally Keith (River House), and Jordan Zandi (Solarium).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Malaprop’s Mother’s Day Buying Guide

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My birthday falls near or on Mother’s Day every year, which I like to think of as either a made-to-order gift or a cosmic joke for my dear mother (mostly it’s the first one. I think.). It only makes sense that they put a day celebrating all of the hard work moms do in the middle of Spring, which is, after all, the Most Pleasant Season. You could just go out and pick a few flowers from your neighbor’s yard to give to mom. Or, you could pair those flowers with a little something for her to read while she hides out in the bath with a glass of wine. This Mother’s Day, why not pick up a handselected, vetted title from us? We’ve got something for everyone, including the pickiest of matriarchs. To help you figure out which book will have your mom signing your praises from on high, I’ve created a curated list of books that all types of mothers will enjoy. Read on to find your mother’s perfect match. And if you are a mom, print this list out and put it somewhere obvious for your family to find. Be sure to circle the one you want.

For the New Mom The 4th Trimester Body Project is a beautiful book celebrating new motherhood through pictures and stories of mothers and children from around the world. It’s a gorgeous, deeply authentic and heartful book that compiles the experiences

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of moms through pregnancy and childbirth; through pain, trauma, love, and healing. The book is an extension of photographer Ashlee Wells’ online project of the same name.

For the Bohemian Artist Your mom has always been up to amazing stuff. She introduced you to all of your favorite music and gave you a copy of On the Road when you turned 12, and you weren’t even cool enough to understand it. She’s always ahead of the curve and on to the newest thing (that you didn’t even know was a thing yet). She both is—and is constantly in search of—inspiration. This Mother’s Day, give her a copy of Gill Heriz’s A Woman’s Huts and Hideaways, a pictorial guide to over 40 amazing sheds, cabins, boathouses, gypsy caravans, and other rooms of one’s own that will inspire her to create (or maybe redecorate) her favorite spot. The book includes anecdotes from the owners of said hideaways, like Anita, a former computer clerk who now works as a pet massage practitioner and aromatherapist and whose gorgeous tiny home is decorated with exotic Indian fabrics.

For the Snarky Fashionista Cultural critic and former NY Times Critical Shopper Cintra Wilson’s irreverent, hilarious history of American fashion, Fear and Clothing, is a gonzo journalistic account of style trends from explicit belt buckles to “mildly subversive” zebra print t-shirts from

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aLI MCgHee

J.C. Penney. Wilson is incredibly witty (she titles each area she visits in particularly clever ways: Miami is “The Sand Belt,” Utah is “The Chastity Belt”) and takes no prisoners in her anthropological excavations and analyses of how our fashion choices “tell everyone instantly who we are, where we came from, where we feel we belong, what we want, where we are going, and how we expect to be treated when we get there.” Now your mom will have even more ammunition when she lovingly criticizes your wardrobe choices.

For the Perfectionist Your mom actually loves to clean. Like, really. The house is always spotless, the hum of the vacuum puts you to sleep, and there’s always a fresh bouquet on the table. She’s got her eye on perfection, and nothing less will do. She’s already read and implemented marie kondo’s life-changing magic of tidying up—three times. It’s time for the sequel: spark joy: an illustrated master class on the art of organizing and tidying up. With tips on everything from whether to save instruction manuals to how to shelve books to what to do with plastic grocery bags, it gets into the nitty gritty of cleaning in a way only matched by a toothbrush scrubbing bathroom tiles. continued on page 33

John Hart’s Newest Novel, Redemption Road

New York Times bestselling author and North Carolina native John Hart has a new novel, Redemption Road.

It’s John’s first book in five years and his first ever with a female protagonist. In Redemption Road (Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press; May 3, 2016), John Hart delivers what book critics and avid fans have come to expect — brilliant writing, complex and compelling characters, and a gripping plot packed with stunning twists and family secrets — plus more. Set in small town North Carolina, this eagerly anticipated novel features Hart’s first female protagonist, Elizabeth Black, a dedicated, driven, and deeply troubled detective. A preacher’s daughter, even though she’s estranged from her father, Liz has always been respected for her instincts, judiciousness and restraint. That is, until a brutal shooting — and doubts from her past — shake her up and turn her edgy, dark, and unpredictable. Liz is torn between her fierce protectiveness for a 14 year old boy set on avenging

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the death of his mother and her unsettling feelings for the cop who was convicted of killing her. For thirteen years, Liz has kept her faith in Adrian Wall’s innocence. Why is she so drawn to this tormented ex-con? To find answers, Liz must face her demons, and a monster. Deep in the forest, on the altar of abandoned church — the church where her father once preached — a young woman is experiencing the unthinkable…. “People in publishing have always known that John Hart can flat-out write,” as David Baldacci observed. With each successive novel—four New York Times bestsellers, and more than 2 million copies in print—more and more readers have come to know it too. His novels, Down River and The Last Child both received the Edgar Award for Best Novel, earning him the distinction as the only author in history to receive this coveted prize for consecutive literary thrillers. At the time, in a glowing review of The Last Child, The Wash-

ington Post declared: “Hart is still far too young for The Last Child to be called a crowning achievement, but the novel’s ambition, emotional breadth and maturity make it an early masterpiece in a career that continues to promise great things.” Since the 2011 publication of Iron House, people in publishing and fans around the world have been waiting for John Hart to return and affirm what reviewers and readers alike have repeatedly declared: Hart’s writing and storytelling gets better with each book.

MAY

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, May 2 at 7 p.m. RENEE AHDIEH and ROSHNI CHOKSHI, YA authors. Tuesday, May 3 at 7 p.m. F.T. LUKENS, The Star Host, SF with a LGBTQ spin. Wednesday, May 4 at 7 p.m. COURTNEY LIX, Women of the Smokies. Thursday, May 5 at 7 p.m. LESLIE BOYD, Life O’ Mike, memoir. Friday, May 6 at 5:30 p.m. WARREN BOBROW, Cannabis Cocktails. Saturday, May 7 at 7 p.m. CHERI HUBER & ASHWINI NARAYANAN, The Big Bamboozle. Friday, May 13 at 7 p.m. JASON MILLER, Origins of the Dream. Monday, May 16 at 7 p.m. SHARYN McCRUMB, Prayers the Devil Answers. Tuesday, May 17 at 7 p.m. SALLY MANN, Hold Still!, photography. Thursday, May 19 at 7 p.m. JOHN LANE & BRONWEN DICKEY, Pit Bull. Friday, May 20 at 7 p.m. LYNN MARIE RINK, Wrap Your Heart Around It. Saturday, May 21 at 7 p.m. PHILIP GERARD, The Dark of the Island, suspense. Tuesday, May 24 at 7 p.m. JEFF HALPER, War Against the People: Israel. Wednesday, May 25 at 7 p.m. RIEN FERTEL, The One True Barbecue, cooking. Friday, May 27 at 7 p.m. RICK YANCEY, The Last Star, ticketed event. Saturday, May 28 at 7 p.m. HARRISON SCOTT KEY, The World’s Largest Man: A Memoir. Tuesday, May 31 at 7 p.m. ELIZABETH CARLSON, NC String Music Masters.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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IF YOU John Hart reading and booksigning, GO Monday, May 9 at Malaprop’s

Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www. malaprops.com.

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Whole Bloomin’ Thing

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Waynesville heads into craft show season. As spring slowly reveals itself, a wonderful excitement spreads throughout the small town of Waynesville, and smiles begin to bloom on all of our faces. Spring’s arrival drives annual events, such as continued on page 36

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Featuring Local Sunburst Trout

WR WO WT

Burr Studio

128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

Gallery of American Art & Craft

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00 pg. 26

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

pg. 26

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828-456-7400

WG

FROG LEVEL WP WA WF

136 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC WH

10 REASONS TO BUY LOCAL 1. Keep money in the neighborhood 2. Embrace what makes us different.

3. Get better service. 4. Enjoy a more diverse range of product choices. 5. Create more good jobs.

6. Help the environment. 7. Buying local supports community groups. 8. Invest in the community.

30 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

9. Your taxes are put to good use. 10. Show the country we believe in WNC.

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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Wild About Art After Dark

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Art After Dark transforms downtown Waynesville into an experience of visual, culinary and performing arts. Festive Art After Dark flags designate participating galleries: Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86, Burr Studio, Earthworks Gallery, The Jeweler’s Workbench, Twigs & Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios, the Village Framer, and Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery. Studio SG, home of Suzanne Gernandt’s mixed media textiles studio, is a new member and the studio is located in Historic Hazelwood. The opening reception for Contours takes place at the Haywood County Arts Council and features works by Michael Dod-

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A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

firsthand where their food comes Fraise, referred to by the from and how it grows; and studFrench who were the first to cultiies show they’ll be more likely to vate them in the eat their fruits and early 1300’s, come vegetables if they in many varieties have a hand in the with varying levels harvest. of sweetness. There What a perfect is no better way to date for a sunny celebrate the return afternoon! Legend of the delicate has it that if you heart-shaped berry break a double than to visit a Ustrawberry in pick farm! half and share it You can enjoy with someone fresh air and sunspecial, you will shine while choosfall completely ing the best quality and madly in love. fruits and vegetables U-Pick strawberry farm at Make a date with a Ten Acre Garden. at the peak of ripeHaywood County ness. There are so U-pick this season many benefits to picking your and fall in love with a local farm. own. You’re reconnecting with Visit our Farm Fresh blog for nature, supporting your local strawberry recipes, both sweet economy, and getting to know and savory. local farmers. A visit to a U-pick For a complete list of Uniquely farm is a great learning opporLocal—Farm Fresh partners, visit tunity for kids. They experience www.BuyHaywood.com.

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BREAKFAST

Leaves Gallery, 98 son, Brian Fireman, North Main Street, Jo Ridge Kelley, and Waynesville. Open Trish Salmon. Whether Monday through the contours of the Saturday 10-5:30. human body, the shapes For more details: formed of wood or clay, (828) 456-1940; or the texture of brushwww.twigstrokes showcasing sandleaves.com. nature, each highlights Cedar Hill their creativity in celStudio is kicking ebration of the forms in Painting by Barbara Brook off the first Art our world. There will After Dark of the be snacks and wine, so season with a fascinating demonstration don’t miss this beautiful show! by Barbara Brook and her exceptional rice Oil painter Patti Best will paper, and watercolor paintings. Come be demonstrating at Twigs and enjoy the demonstration, yummy snacks, Leaves Gallery during Art After and the wonderful guitar music by Renee Dark Friday evening, May 6, Mullinax. What a great night it will be! 6-9 p.m. A native of Haywood county, Patti’s hardwood panels evoke the beautiful landscapes, waterfalls and woodlands we IF YOU The Waynesville Gallery are blessed to live amongst. GO Association presents Art After Dark Friday evening, as you stroll on Friday, May 6. For more details through the gallery’s 150+ call Twigs and Leaves at (828) 456-1940, primarily regional artists, enjoy or visit waynesvillegalleryassociation.com. piano music by Waynesville’s Diane Wolfe and delight in the savory hors d’eurves. Twigs and

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U-Pick Strawberries

May marks the return of sweet, delicious local strawberries.

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Breakfast Buffet Thurs - Sat Lunch and Dinner Mon - Sat Sunday Brunch 10am - 4pm

828-246-9881

Open 7am, 6 days • Open Sunday 9am

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67 Branner Ave. • Waynesville, NC Like us on Facebook/WaynesvilleBreakfastHouse

E L E G A N T & U T I L I TA R I A N , H I G H F I R E D S T O N E W A R E

Plottware Pottery Cory Houston Plott Clyde, NC (828) 550-2516 plottwarepottery@gmail.com

PlottwarePottery.com

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721 Art After Dark, May 6 featuring oil painter Patti Best Reception from 6-9PM

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

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fine arts & crafts A Room with a Hue and a Heart

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ARTISTS AND GUESTS PARTNER FOR TEACHING

Want to watch a colorful event, do good works, and score a vivid memory that lives on your wall? On June 4, artists and spectators converge to spark creative combustion on behalf of teachers at QuickDraw, western NC’s spring live-art benefit. The annual event offers attendees the chance to partner with artists, to support art teaching in public schools, to help kids go to college, and the eye-popping opportunity to witness stages of art in the making. This year, thirty juried artists step up to visually demonstrate their support for art teachers. Setting up their studios in the picturesque rolling hills of the Laurel Ridge Country Club, artists flex their creative muscle as they challenge a sixty-minute time clock. Strolling onlookers are amazed to watch the marching progression of composition, color, hue, form, finish while the artists intently work. The live-stopwatch artists embrace the timer, and will complete their original – start to finish – before the buzzer, and then frame it for the evening’s auction. Without the luxury of time, live-action artists zero in on pure execution, rejecting internal second-guessing.

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32 May 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 9

by

SanDRa HayeS

Sarah Sneeden of Cedar Mountain paints in oils at QuickDraw 2015. Photo: Robert Ludlow

against the clock. With the room’s energy and encouragement, artists achieve intuitively fresh work, free of cliché. Artists frame the works on the spot for Pottery by Cory Plott at auction, and silent auction. personally speak at the podium before the gavel rises for a lively fundraiser. Afterward at the post-auction buffet, guests rub elbows with artists as they catch their breath and relax with new collectors. A longtime favorite that attracts attendees from across the region, QuickDraw is a true collaboration between art and observer. QuickDraw showcases artists who step outside the studio and out of the box for art QuickDraw Artist Kelly Lanning education. High school art students volunteer as artist assistants while they watch and Phipps, Fletcher, NC learn from thirty artists making thirty differPhoto: Robert Ludlow ent flavors. Art teachers show off student classroom art funded by QuickDraw artists At the same time, demonand guests. Artists donate half or more of the strator artists using more auction sale to directly fund art teacher classprocess-intensive media room grants and student college scholarships. design a piece in progSince 2001, QuickDraw artists and guests have ress, and talk with guests funded $75,000 in art teacher classroom grants while they create. The and $43,000 in scholarships. demo artists show off their The June 4 event includes the signature techniques using fused clock challenge, a small works gallery, live art glass, jewelry, wood, colauction, and a meet-the-artists buffet dinner. lage, clay, acrylic on metal, Tickets are $60, and include auction registrastained glass, watercolor tion, the live art hour, and the buffet dinner collage, and fiber. for you and a teacher. Live artists work in oil, acrylic, watercolor, colored pencil, inks, pastel, enIF caustic, and mixed media. YOU QuickDraw – Art in the Making, GO Saturday, June 4 from 4:30-9:30 Onlookers gain a sense p.m.; shotgun start live artists 5 p.m. of style and technique as Laurel Ridge Country Club, 49 Cupp Lane, they watch admired artists Waynesville. Tickets $60. Tickets, artists, embrace dual challenges of schedule at www.WNCQuickDraw.com working live and working


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artful living

Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

To Smoke or Not To Smoke

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May 31 is World No Tobacco Day – which will have a variable impact, depending on which part of the world one lives in. In the United States, the number of smokers has remained steady at about 20% of the population. But this number is increasing in young males, 18 to 25 years of age who have only a high school education or less. For those who want to quit smoking on May 31 or on any day, many drugs and paraphernalia have been marketed, the most recent being e-cigarettes. Originally marketed by its Chinese inventor, Hon Lik, in 2004, the e-cigarette vaporizes a liquid (propylene glycol and glycerin) containing nicotine – without the more than 100 harmful chemicals created by burning tobacco. Although it was intended to be an alternative to smoking, some have promoted it as a way to stop smoking. As the various devices caught on, more and more people – especially young people – adopted the e-cigarette and its various derivatives for recreational

use, especially in places where tobacco smoking is forbidden. As a result, health organizations have begun to worry: Are these devices safe? Or are they harmful? Vaporized smoking certainly avoids the multiple carcinogens produced by burning tobacco. In that regard, e-cigarettes are regarded as safer than smoking tobacco. However, those who use e-cigarettes are 28% less likely to stop smoking than those who quit without them. And – the vaporized product – produced at high heat – contains some toxins, some carcinogens, some small particles of heavy metal, in addition to nicotine, water, and flavorings, and is dispersed in ultra-fine particles, the size that can travel all the way down into the lungs. Consequently, the immediate side effects of inhaling the vapor is irritated linings of the mouth and throat and increased airway resistance (asthma-like), similar to smoking tobacco cigarettes. In addition, the inhalation of nicotine has the same effect, whether from tobacco or from a “vaping” device. Nicotine is addictive and has toxic effects on the heart, blood pressure, blood

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

by

MaX HaMMOnDS, MD

vessels, and kidneys. In addition, the nicotine causes increases in cholesterol, increased arterial plaque formation, increased blood clotting, and increased blood sugar – as well as the acute toxic effects of nicotine: nausea, vomiting, anxiety, elevated blood pressure, restlessness, anger and irritability. In summary: Yes – inhaling nicotine in an e-cigarette avoids the many carcinogens of tobacco smoke. No – inhaling the nicotine-laced vapor does not help people quit smoking. Yes – using the device is a gateway for many young people to take up smoking tobacco cigarettes. Yes – “vaping” nicotine produces the same toxic and addictive effects as tobacco smoking, except the user is lulled into thinking that it is a safe habit. The most recent opinions in the general medical community is that e-cigarettes on the whole are a harmful habit – to be avoided, just like tobacco smoking. Consider the evidence for yourself. Is it a fad, is it an effective medical device, or is it another gateway to addiction? What do you think?

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09 One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

pg. 26

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pg. 36

‘Malaprop’s Mother’s Day Buying Guide’ cont’d from pg. 29

For the Homesteader Your mom recently got some chickens. There’s always a flame going in the woodburning stove. She’s started eating seasonally and keeps mentioning compost toilets. It’s time to take this next level. Give her Woman-Powered Farm by Audrey Levatino. She’ll probably be out of the house more during her farm internship and classes (chapter 1), but by chapter 8 (“Farm Animals”) you should have lots of baby goats to play with in her absence. And remember, there’s no better way to bond than by wrangling cattle.

For the Mother-in-Law You sometimes have to (or feel the need to) go the extra mile for your mother-in-law. Your own mom will openly tell you that she hates your gift, but your mom-in-law might seethe silently for a while, increasing your already higher-than-usual levels of anxiety when you’re around her. Because of the slightly more distant relationship here, we think it’s best to sidestep the possibility of giving her something she doesn’t want (and avoiding the re-gift on your next birthday) by just making her something nice for dinner. Get inspired by Bridgette A. Lacy’s new book Sunday Dinner. It’s Lacy’s ode to the weekly sit-down meals that were such an important part of family life for previous generations. Filled with nostalgic recipes like fragrant Sunday chicken with olives and apricots, Nilla wafer brown pound cake, and classic New York challah, there’s something in here that’s going to bring back some memories and make her mouth (and yours) water.

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Evicted

WRITTEN BY MATTHEW DESMOND

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Spoiler Alert: What this is: sociology porn.

ReVIeWeD by

HannaH RICHaRDSOn

What this isn’t: a warm & fuzzy read for/about mothers. Instead, it’s about the importance of having a reliable, physical home. Of course, for many of us, home is where your mom is. I feel like a bit of a curmudgeon suggesting this as good Mother’s Day reading, but it is an important one, especially before we dive into the cushy Beach Reads of summer. Evicted follows the journey of eight families living in some of the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee. While not all of these families are headed by mothers, it is clear that the vast majority of people caught up in the cycle of poverty & constant stream evictions are single mothers and their families. Through heartfelt narration, we follow the day-to-day struggle as each family must weigh the importance of food vs. warmth vs. safety vs. pride, all the while balancing the relationship with their landlords. The fight to keep families together is of top priority, yet the effort seems almost futile. Nothing comes easily. I am a firm believer in literary balance and the importance of letting important concepts settle. Read it slowly and keep an Anne Tyler novel by its side. Your mom will be proud.

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 33


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what to do guide April 30 & May 1

Sunday, May 1

Tom Turner Pottery and Art Sale

Guitarist Marc Yaxley

19th century pottery and stoneware, jugs, churns, and jars. 20th century Studio Art Pottery from all over the United States Japanese, Chinese, and Korean pottery back to the Sung Dynasty. Antique tools and farm items, oxen yoke, barn beam drill, plank saw. Some paintings, prints, and photos. Antique 1963 Clark 100 Yardlift forklift, 10,000 pound capacity. Call Tom at (828) 606-0416 for details. Tom Turner, 381 Turner Lane, Mars Hill.

May through June

Best of Trackside

Featuring a representative piece from each of the 17 artists at Trackside Studios that highlights their work. “Best of Trackside” will be on display at Trackside Studios, 375 Depot Street, through June. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. For further information, email tracksidestudios375@gmail.com or visit www. tracksidestudios375.com.

Sunday, May 1

Appalachian Pastel Society

Member Show opening reception, 10 a.m. On display through May 13, 2016. Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Rd., Mills River, NC. Visit appalachianpastelsociety.org.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Benefit concert for the Arts Council of Henderson County. Jazz, classical, and flamenco guitar. 3 p.m. at the Cummings Memorial United Methodist Church, 3 Banner Farm Road, Horse Shoe, NC. Contact the Arts Council at (828) 693-8504.

Sunday, May 1

Asheville Cello Choir

Featuring Judy Handley, Brynn Heyes, Carolyn Konnert, and Ron Lambe. The program will include works by Bach, Handel, Dvorak, and Haydn and will be held at St. Matthias Church at 3 p.m. A free-will offering will be taken for the restoration fund for the historic church. It is located across from the Public Works Building on So. Charlotte and Max Streets, at 1 Dundee St.

Sunday, May 1

stephaniesid

Pop-noir trio combines jazz, rock and pop in an outstanding mix of highly original tunes in an irresistibly infectious live performance. Proceeds from ticket sales benefit area children through Diana Wortham Theatre’s Youth Education Scholarship (Y.E.S.) Fund. 7 p.m. Tickets: Regular $35; Student $30; Child $20; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

May 5-28

Death of a Salesman

The Magnetic Theatre presents Arthur Miller’s extraordinary story of a traveling salesman. Magnetic 375 (375 Depot Street in the River Arts District). Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. $21 online; $24 at the door. $10 student rush tickets. Tickets: www.themagnetictheatre.org. Info: (828) 239-9250.

Friday, May 6

Contours Exhibit

The art of Jo Ridge Kelley, Michael Dodson, Brian Fireman, and Trish Salmon. Artist reception 6-9 p.m. Gallery & Gifts, 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville. Call (828) 452-0593 or visit HaywoodArts.org.

May 6-22

I’ll Eat You Last

A play by John Logan, starring Betsy Puckett, directed by Waylon Wood. Tickets $15. Performances Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. 35below, Asheville

Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., downtown Asheville. (828) 2541320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

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Tuesday, May 10

Classic Hikes of the Smokies

More than seventy new parodies of famous movies, tv shows, and cultural icons. Opening reception 7-9 p.m. Prizes for best space inspired costumes. Live music. Free beer from Asheville Brewing. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville. zapow.com

Saturday, May 7

Tuesday, May 10

Space POP!

The Music of the Living

Auditions for Good People

Celebrate the strength of the human spirit with the Asheville Choral Society. 7:30 p.m. at Central United Methodist Church, 27 Church Street in downtown Asheville. Tickets can be purchased at ashevillechoralsociety. org or by calling (828) 232.2060. $20 adults; $10 students; $25 at the door.

The Autumn Players will hold auditions from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Good People, a comedy, will be performed as reader’s theatre. No previous experience required. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www. ashevilletheatre.org

May 7-8

Friday, May 13

Weaverville Art Safari

Explore Weaverville’s eclectic art scene with a self-guided tour of 53 local artists’ studios. Art sales, demonstrations, and door prizes offered. For details and map visit weavervilleartsafari.com

through May 8

The Winter’s Tale

Shakespeare’s story of redemption. April 29, 30, May 5, 6, 7 at 7:30 p.m.; May 1 & 8 at 2 p.m. HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in downtown Waynesville. Call (828) 456-6322, Tues.-Sat. from 1-5 p.m. www.harttheatre.org.

Sunday, May 8

Mother’s Day Luncheon

Cafeteria style Greek gourmet dishes like Lamb Shank, Pastichio, Spanakopita, Chicken Origanato, Dolmathes, pastries, etc. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center, 227 Cumberland Avenue in Asheville. Greek folk dancing. Carry-outs from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call (828) 253-3754 between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. to order in advance. Or call (828) 2547424 on the day of the luncheon.

Monday and Tuesday, May 9 & 10

Auditions for Jesus Christ Superstar

Come prepared to sing with sheet music. An accompanist will be provided. There are roles for men, women and children of all ages. 6:30 p.m. HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in downtown Waynesville. The production opens on July 8 and runs through July 31. Rehearsals begin May 23. (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.org.

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Eight-voice a cappella group performs from a wide variety of literature, from classical to jazz. Admission and parking are free. 7 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Church Street. (828) 2539361 or visit www.trinityasheville.org.

Saturday, May 14

Zuill Bailey

The star cellist and audience favorite joins the Asheville Symphony in its season finale, performing Michael Daugherty’s Tales of Hemingway. The ASO will also perform Dvorák’s iconic Symphony No. 9 “From the New World.” The concert opens with Weber’s Der Freischütz Overture. 8 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22-$62 (prices vary depending on seating section; reduced student pricing available). Tickets/Info: (828) 254-7046 or www. ashevillesymphony.org.

Saturday & Sunday, May 14 & 15

The RAW-(Material) Project

Performance, workshop, video and installation. Saturday 7 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. By donation. Weaverville Yoga studio, 7 Florida Ave., Weaverville.

May 18-22

South East Regional Folk Alliance Conference

Celebrating Folk Music and Professionals. Clinics and workshops ranging from songwriting to the business of music. Montreat Conference Center, Black Mountain. www.serfa.org

Friday, May 20

Apprentices: The Next Generation

Developing work of Sarah Thurmond,

Jenay Martin, Hannah McGehee, and Tori DiPietro. Opening reception 4-7 p.m. The Village Potters, 191 Lyman Street, Asheville. (828) 253-2424, thevillagepotters.com.

Saturday, May 21

Garden Show and Sale

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Monte Vista Hotel, 308 W. State Street, Black Mountain. Free. Perennials, annuals, herbs, vegetables, native trees, shrubs, maples, iris, daylilies and garden accessories. Demonstrations. Details at blackmountainbeautification.org.

May 21 & 22

Faerie and Earth Festival

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. $15 Adults; $10 Seniors (55+); $5 Child (5-15). Cash. Silent auction to benefit the Center for Honey Bee Research. Highland Lake Cove Retreat & Learning Center (www.highlandlakecove.com), 217 Rhett Drive, Flat Rock. Details: John Springer, 407-704-2320; www.enchantedwalkabouts.com or www.facebook. com/fairyandearthfestival.

Friday, May 27

Art in Bloom

Floral artists interpret art. Preview gala from 5 to 8 p.m. $25 each; $40 couple. Best in Show and People’s Choice awards will be announced. The Studios at Flat Rock. www.studiosflatrock.com, (828) 698-7000.

May 27-29

Americana Burlesque & Sideshow Festival

Pioneering neo-vaudeville festival features stellar performances, workshops, and more. Full schedule at www.ABSFest.com.

Sunday, May 29

Asheville Flea For Y’all

Vintage, antiques, mid century modern, machine age, danish modern, rustic and industrial decor and lots of handmade art. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Salvage Station, 468 Riverside Drive, Asheville. www.ashevillefleaforyall.com

Sunday, May 29

Asheville Young Musicians Club

Fifth annual benefit concert at 6:30 p.m. at Bent Creek Baptist Church, 1554 Brevard Road in Asheville. $20 adults; $10 students. (828) 681-9732 or aymc2011@gmail.com.

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Hike to Hyatt Ridge in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The guided hike is led by outdoor enthusiast and author Danny Bernstein. Hyatt Ridge Trail is 9.5-miles roundtrip and is moderate in difficulty with a total elevation gain of 2,000 feet. $20 for Friends of the Smokies members. New members may join and hike for $35. Visit www.Hike.FriendsoftheSmokies. org to register.

Saturday, May 7

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what to do guide John Mac Kah Studio

Best in Show

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Classes, Workshops, Private Instruction Oils & Acrylics.

Blue Ridge Ringers

New! Portrait Drawing with Nicholas Raynolds. Wednesdays.

Fifteen ringers, 61 handbells and handchimes. From jazz to gospel to classical. Sunday, May 1 at 4 p.m. First Baptist Church, Brevard.

Drawing & Painting. Monday & Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Friday, May 13 at 7 p.m. Woodlands at Furman, Greenville SC.

Children’s Art with Alisa. Tuesday & Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Sunday, May 15 at 4 p.m. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Brevard.

Studio Painting, Thursdays 6-9 p.m.

Sunday, May 22 at 4 p.m. First Baptist Church, Tryon.

Landscape, Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Addison Farms Vineyard Plein-Air Painting, May 13-15, 2016. Includes catered lunch, wine tasting. Leceister, NC.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

(828) 692-4910 blueridgeringers@gmail.com

Fusion Painting, May 22-28. Crossover techniques, acrylics & oils. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC. folkschool.org JMK Studio 236, Riverview Station 191 Lyman, Asheville (828) 225-5000, JohnMacKah.com

Sunday, May 29

Asheville Community Concert Band

Hands On! A Child’s Gallery

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Memorial weekend concert at the Folk Art Center at 3 p.m. An afternoon of patriotic music. Free admission. Contact (828) 254-2234.

The Rutherford Chamber Consort

Belle Perle di Primavera (Beautiful Pearls of Spring), music of Martinu, Gliere, Piazolla, John Williams, and Brahms. Free. 4 p.m. at Biltmore United Methodist Church, 376 Hendersonville Road, Asheville. (828) 274-2379

UNC Asheville’s Blowers Gallery

Classic Wineseller

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Winning photographs from UNC Asheville’s Study Abroad Program’s annual international photo contest will be on display. Free. For details visit library.unca.edu or call (828) 251-6436.

Affordable part-time and weekend classes in film production for all experience levels. Asheville School of Film, 45 S. French Broad Ave., Ste 120, Asheville. 1-844-AVL-FILM (285-3456), www. ashevilleschooloffilm.com.

Perceptions

The Black Male; Images of Dignity. Works by Joseph Pearson and Jesse Whitehead. Opening reception from 5-8 p.m. On display until July 9, 2016 at Pink Dog Creative Studios, 348 Depot Street, Asheville.

WNC QuickDraw

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Learn Filmmaking

Friday, June 3

Saturday, June 4

Tuesday, May 3 through Friday, May 6 – Celebrate Screen Free Week (May 2-8) by challenging kids to go off TV and video games for the whole week. Crafts, activities, and educational experiences that stimulate the imagination and motivate learning in a fun, safe environment. Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main Street, Hendersonville. www.handsonwnc.org, (828) 697-8333

Sunday, May 29

Now Until May 31

Tuesday, May 24 at 7 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church, Hendersonville.

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by Jessica and Russ Woods

Event and Auction, 4:30-9:30 p.m., 60 minute artist challenge, silent and live Multi-instrument acoustic duo Steve Goldman and Ed Kelley auction, hors perform during the event. d’oeuvres buffet. Laurel Ridge Country Club, 49 Cupp Lane, Waynesville. Tickets $50. wncquickdraw.com or call (828) 456-6495.

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CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 35


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Joseph A. Pearson josephart.net

AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

Art Xtravaganza www.artxtravaganza.org

K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com

Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Kenilworth Art Studio Tour www.kenilworthartists.org.

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

LEAF www.theleaf.org

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com Blue Dream Curry House www.bluedreamcurry.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burr Studio www.facebook.com/burrstudionc Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cindy Walton fine art www.cindywalton.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Dona Barnett www.donabarnett.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Elizabeth Henderson www.Elizabethhendersonartist.com Erin Keane www.ErinKeane.com Faerie And Earth Festival www.enchantedwalkabouts.com facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

Mark Bettis Gallery www.markbettisgallery.com Mary E. Decker www.chartreusemoose.com Matt Tommey www.matttommey.com Mellow Mushroom, (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden www.theOG.us On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Patricia Cotterill patcotterill@yahoo.com

Swannanoa Valley Fine Art League www.SVFALarts.org

G. Carol Bomer www.gracecarolbomer.com

t.e. siewert www.tesiewert.com

Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net

Trackside Studios tracksidestudios375.com

Grovewood Gallery www.grovewood.com

Trinity Art Show www.trinityasheville.org

Hearn’s Bike Shop (828) 253-4800 www.facebook.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

Johnnie Stanfield www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

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The “Whole Bloomin’ Thing”, which is Waynesville’s kickstart event into the upcoming season of Craft Shows. “The Whole Bloomin’ Thing” is a very significant event for that very reason. It offers a unique opportunity for the “Early Birds” to get a head start on shopping for flourishing flowers and various vegetable plants for any type of garden. The show also offers numerous crafts, such as bird houses, garden sculpture, wood working, pottery, mosaics and more. Since the show takes place in Waynesville’s Frog Level District, visitors can not only visit vendors, but also shop at the colorful galleries on the same street, such as The Mahogany House and Art on Depot. Other galleries close by include Metal Sculpture by Grace Cathy, as well as the numerous art studios on Main St., just above Frog Level. This year marks the 14th annual “Whole Bloomin’ Thing” event which is always held the Saturday of Mothers Day weekend each year. Festival hours are from 9 to 5, which is plenty of time to have a great time at this one of a kind annual spring event! IF YOU Whole Bloomin’ Thing spring festival, Saturday, May 7 GO from 9 to 5 p.m., Waynesville’s Frog Level.

MERRIMON AVE. MW

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FLAT ROCK

WAYNESVILLE

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TUNNEL ROAD

BRANNER AVENUE

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CLYDE

Waynesville Breakfast House #WaynesvilleBreakfastHouse

Zapow www.zapow.com

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com

Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com

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WNC OVERVIEW

Seven Sisters Gallery www.sevensistersgallery.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

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www.ashevillemeditation.com, (828) 808-4444.

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

IF YOU Asheville Insight Meditation, Saturday June 18 from 2-4 GO p.m. 175 Weaverville Road, Woodfin, NC. More details at

RAD Studio Stroll www.riverartsdistrict.com

Suzanne Gernandt www.suzannetextiles.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

It’s an exciting time for Asheville Insight Meditation. Because of increasingly larger crowds of visitors, this community non-profit meditation center has moved into a beautiful new and larger home just north of Asheville at 175 Weaverville Road, Woodfin, NC. The grand opening celebration takes place June 18 from 2-4 p.m. Tour the new meditation center, learn to meditate and enjoy snacks and participate in prize drawings. “There’s a huge demand for quality Mindfulness meditation instruction in the Asheville, NC area,” says Ronya Banks, Asheville Insight Meditation’s founder and guiding teacher. A 31-year veteran and trained instructor in meditation and Buddhism, Ms. Banks and other teaching staff at A.I.M. provide the public with a dogma-free environment and daily opportunities to practice; learn; and of course calm and develop their minds using various meditation strategies. As a non-profit, A.I.M. is committed to providing these services to everyone, regardless of their financial situation, because they feel all people should have access to these meditation practices – practices which are scientifically proven to reduce stress, and bring more happiness, peace and presence to people’s lives.

QuickDraw www.WNCQuickDraw.com

Firefly Craft Gallery fireflycraftgallery@gmail.com

Jane Molinelli www.jmolinelliart.com

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Learn about our individual and family Mindfulness Meditation offerings.

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

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Meditation Center Open House & Grand Opening

Plottware Pottery www.plottwarepottery.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps 310 ART at Riverview Station www.310art.com

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WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

WAYNESVILLE

HAZELWOOD AVE.

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Sourwood Festival

August 13 & 14

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Visit the artists of Studio 12 during their special painting presentation Saturday, May 21. Artists Martha Raines and Denise Geiger of Studio 12 in the Red House Studios and Gallery, will receive visitors during May with an exhibit of paintings from the mountains of North Carolina to the mountains of Switzerland. Great snacks and a personal demonstration will be provided by the artists. Denise Geiger is originally from Switzerland, where she painted since her youth. She has brought back many sketches — views of the Alps and the France’s Provence. An admirer of the great European impressionists and having been mentored by an impressionist from Zurich as well as a wellknown pastelist, Denise has specialized in pastels for many years and will demonstrate how to start and complete a pastel painting on Saturday, May 21 upstairs in studio 12.

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This all-ages four-day workshop/symposium celebrates the life and ideas of Black Mountain College artist/philosopher/ educator Mary Caroline (M.C.) Richards.

by

aLICe SebReLL

Martha Raines is a Black Mountain native and is a self-taught artist who has studied with various artists through the years. She has wandered over all of Alpine Scene, oil by Denise Geiger North Carolina with her sketch pad and camera and has discovered many lovely waterfalls and the ever changing mountain views. Her favorite subjects to paint are these local landscapes with many of her paintings including local barns. Her paintings reflect Valley View, 18 x 24 her interpretations of by Martha Raines some of these scenes. Visitors are invited to watch these two artists, Denise and Martha, paint one of their favorite scenes on Saturday, May 21. This demonstration and the current exhibits are free to attend.

M.C.Richards four-day workshop/ symposium, July 7-10. For information and to register, contact Alice Sebrell at alice@ blackmountaincollege.org or (828) 350-8484.

800-669-2301 www.sourwoodfestival.com Presented by the Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

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Dueling Mountain Demonstration, Saturday, May 21 from 11 to 7 p.m. with Denise Geiger and Martha Raines. Studio 12 Artists at the Red House Studios and Gallery, 310 West State Street, Black Mountain. Open from 11 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sundays. Free parking.

in the Mountains

601 W. State Street in Black Mountain

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✿ Arts & Crafts ✿ Children’s Area ✿ Specialty Items ✿ Great Food ✿ Carnival Rides ✿ Wonderful Music ✿ Dancing ✿ Honey Bee Demonstrations

Sourwood Idol Contest Friday, August 12 ★ 7-10PM Sourwood5K.com Saturday, August 13 ★ 8AM

IF YOU GO

The workshop will take place from July 7-10, 2016 in multiple Jonathan Williams, M.C. Richards, Skywinding locations in Asheville, Farm, Scaly Mountain, Swannanoa, and Black NC, ca. 1970s. Mountain. Participants will enjoy hands-on experiences connected to M.C. Richards’ multilayered interests: pottery, painting, poetry, archival research, and agriculture. Advanced registration is required. There is a sliding scale fee of $150-250 and the workshop is limited to 25 persons. Two lunches and one dinner are included. Striving to mirror M.C. Richards’ dynamic nature, the workshop/symposium will consist of multiple activities at multiple sites across the area. IF YOU GO

FREE ADMISSION About 200 vendors • No Alcohol

Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

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Just Follow The Rabbit!

Just Follow The Rabbit! is the theme for the 2016 Faerie And Earth (F.A.E.) Festival. The Rabbit is your guide to a magical and enchanting experience awaiting you during the weekend of May 21 & 22 at the Highland Lake Cove Retreat & Learning Center on 217 Rhett Drive in Flat Rock, NC. The Rabbit will be posted on trees and as our directional signs to lead you to our event. Excess proceeds from the F.A.E. Festival will benefit The Center for Honey Bee Research located in Asheville. On Friday, May 20, we are offering four two-hour workshops involving Paneurnythmy Sacred Dance with June Sananda Hughes; Annie Martin sharing Mosses of the Mountains; Lady Cerelli teaching about our relationship with the honey bees; and Diomiro D’Agostina providing insights about the ever changing Fairy and Human Relationships. The cost of each workshop will be $20 per session, payable upon arrival. These programs will be taking place in the Sanctuary in the Pines, located on the corner of the festival grounds. Reservations can be made through our Facebook page. We are honored to have Rev. Faerie Elaine Silver providing a Faerie Concert on Friday, May 20 in the Sanctuary in the Pines, located at 34 Lake Cove Road (off Rhett Drive) in Flat Rock at 7:30 p.m. A 7 p.m. artist’s reception will take place in the lower level of the Sanctuary. The cost for this musical performance is the same as the entry cost to the Faerie And Earth Festival: $15/adult; $10/seniors (55+); $5/child (5-15). All adults and seniors will receive a free CD from the Faerie Elaine Silver Music collection, and a special $5 off discount ticket for entry into the F.A.E. Festival for either or both days. Throughout the F.A.E. weekend we will experience and see stilt walkers, mermaids, dinosaurs (Dakota & Friends), mother nature, dryads, fairies, Bubble Masters, 44 vendors, readers, musicians, magicians, storytell-

Trinity Artists

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Trinity Episcopal Church will host a public art show & sale featuring a wide variety of original art work by Trinity artists, May 20-22.

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“We are a community that celebrates our God-given strengths, and Trinity is filled with talented persons gifted in the arts,” Trinity Rector Scott White said. “The Trinity Sheep by Bee Sieburg Art Show is a

by JOHn

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Come and play with us!

ers, presenters, Fairy Tour Guides, dragons, puppeteers, fairy houses, Faerie Folk School, Girl Scouts (Magical Fairy Adventure Patch), snakes and critters (Earthshine Nature), healthy foods, dancers, plays, and our Silent Auction which will benefit The Center for Honey Bee Research. Come and play with us! This Faerie And Earth Festival has been designed to bring people together representing the many realms of Faerie and Earth in their services, readings, products, crafts, energy, performances, talents, presentations, and presence in providing a joyous and fun celebration for the families and children of Western North Carolina and beyond. This will be an amazing immersion experience for all.

IF YOU The 2016 Faerie And Earth Festival will GO be held May 20-22 at the Highland Lake

Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock, NC. Ticekts are $15/adult; $10/seniors (55+); $5/ child (5-15). For more details, please visit www. facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival.

demonstration of how we put our gifts to use outside our walls.” Located in downtown Asheville, Trinity will open its first Art Show & Sale Friday and Saturday, May 20-21, from 10am-4pm, and on Sunday, May 22, from 10am-1pm. “Art is a community endeavor and seeks to build up not merely an individual, but even a society,” Trinity’s Reverend Dr. White added. “What a joy that Trinitarians seek to build our community through art.” All proceeds from this Trinity Art Show & Sale will go to support the church’s youth programs and youth scholarships.

IF YOU Trinity Art Show, May 20-22 at Trinity GO Church, at 60 Church Street. (828) 253-

9361 or visit www.trinityasheville.org.


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5th Annual Mad Mountain Mud Run

The fifth annual Mad Mountain Mud Run is a muddy obstacle course adventure race held in Hendersonville benefiting the nonprofit children’s museum Hands On. Registration is open until May 20 – or until the field of racers is filled. Teams of four can register and choose to compete in one of three categories: competitive, somewhat competitive, or “in it for fun.” The three-plus mile course welcomes racers with more than thirty obstacles and challenges, ranging from mud pits, rolls and crawls to swings, climbing challenges and swamp slush mush. And back this year, for the most amazing athletes (or mathletes), there’s a challenging math equation with clues at various obstacles throughout the course. If you’ve got the brain agility, your team could win a great prize if you solve the equation correctly. “The Mad Mountain Mud Run is

an incredible for our community and important fundraising event for our organization,” said Heather Boeke, executive director of Hands On! – A Child’s Gallery in Hendersonville. “We expect tons of mud, new obstacles, and we’re excited to host a great festival for racers and spectators. And, of course, this event is made possible in large part by a great community partner, Hunter Subaru.” “We are certainly pleased to be a part of the Western North Carolina region, and this event has become one of our signature outreach events in the region each year,” said Randy Hunter, Owner of Hunter Subaru. “We care about our community, and the children’s museum has a huge, positive impact on the lives and education of so many children in our area. This community has provided so much support to our family and business since 1940, and we could not be prouder to have Hunter Subaru support Hands On! through the Mad Mountain Mud Run – it’s a great match for us! We are all about rugged, outdoorsy Subarus that look pretty good in the mud!” For spectators and Finish Line Festival-goers, the venue for the event is a free festival in full swing from noon to 7pm. Live music

by

HeatHeR bOeKe

from The Stipe Brothers, food, beer and hard cider from Henderson Countybased Sierra Nevada and Naked Apple Hard Cider are offered. Food and beverages are available for sale. And while organizers love pets of all kinds, the festival is a pet-free zone. Teams should register soon for the June 4 event and volunteer registration is also open for those that want to lend a hand while enjoying the muddy entertainment. For more information about Hands On! – A Child’s Gallery, please call (828) 551-0247 and visit www.handsonwnc.org IF YOU Mad Mountain Mud Run, GO obstacle course adventure race

held in Hendersonville on June 4. More information available at madmountainmudrun.com. pg. 36

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‘Trackside’ cont’d from page 10

are always thrilled when they get to participate, so I like to let them hold the brushes and feel the rice paper,” she says. Lynn was one of the original artists in the space before remodeling, and she is delighted at the changes that have been made. “There’s a new collaborative energy that flows among the artists with the opening up of the walls,” she said. Trackside’s themed group show reflects this collaborative spirit in the studio’s gallery space. In May the exhibition will be the artists’ choice of work that best defines their current artistic emphasis.

‘Mark Bettis’ cont’d from page 11

Portrait, pastel, Chon Vinson

IF YOU Trackside artists will be present during the Spring Studio GO Stroll on Saturday, May 21 and Sunday, May 22 from 10

a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. “The Best of Trackside” will hang through June 15. Open during regular studio hours, daily from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Trackside Studios, 375 Depot Street, River Arts District.

ling School of Art and Design, Mark moved to the mountains of Asheville, where he paints in his open studio/gallery at Wedge Studios (123 Roberts Street in the River Arts District). Mark is also an award-winning artist and has works displayed at multiple galleries throughout the United States, including the reknown Ella Walton Richardson Gallery in Charleston, SC.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed

Mark Bettis is an award-winning artist.

Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery Wedge Studios, 123 Roberts St. in the River Arts District www.markbettisart.com, www.markbettisgallery.com

Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 19, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2016 39


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On the cover: Sarah Sneeden..p24. Inside: RADical Daze in the River Arts District..pgs 10-12; Kenilworth Art Studio Tour..p9; QuickDraw Live...

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