Page 1

Reel Takes • 13-16

Local Dining Guide • 34-36

Kenilworth Studio Tour • 10

TPennington Fine Art • 23


2 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9


htoN Briga H Bemc oirs

Me

PG. 20 PG. 25

20

WH

PG. 40

ML

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 3


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

performance THE ASHEVILLE AREA PIANO FORUM’S

10th Annual Spring Benefit Concert

T

The Asheville Area Piano Forum (AAPF) will present its 10th Annual Spring Benefit concert on Sunday, May 24. The program will feature piano solo works by Bach, Haydn, Brahms, Liszt, and Shirley, performed by five of AAPF’s pianists: Dr. Deborah Belcher, Dr. Elizabeth Child, Dr. Leslie Downs, Nathan Shirley, and Dr. Teresa Sumpter. Proceeds from this concert will benefit educational and charitable opportunities for WNC piano teachers, piano students, and their communities. The AAPF, a tax-exempt 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization of about 100 members, is committed to providing educational and musical opportunities for professional and amateur pianists, teachers, students, audiences, and lovers of classical and jazz piano music. The Forum invites anyone who supports the AAPF mission and shares an interest in piano music to join. The AAPF is open to new people, new ideas, and opportunities collabo-

By

MaRiLynne HeRBeRT

rating with other music organizations in the Asheville community. Want to be a part of the volunteer spirit of AAPF? Visit www.ashevillepiano.org to learn more. Events sponsored by AAPF during the 2014-2015 season have been a Fall Benefit Concert at Diana Wortham Theatre, five general meetings open to the public, featuring lectures by guest artists, three student recitals, two master classes, social networking opportunities, various performance groups including one for amateurs, teacher roundtable discussions, “Practice for Pets,” and a student competition at Mars Hill University. In addition, the AAPF sponsors an important community outreach program called Keys for Kidz, a weekly group piano class specifically designed for under-served children in WNC. Each year the AAPF also gifts education student assistance awards to students who need help with continuing piano lessons.

4 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

Nathan Shirley

Dr. Elizabeth Child

Dr. Leslie Downs

In recent years, the AAPF has given $50,000 in assistance to area students. Interested in supporting the Arts in WNC but don’t want to join? Consider donating to AAPF by visiting www.ashevillepiano.org or by mailing your tax deductible donation to the Asheville Area Piano Forum: AAPF, Karen Boyd, P.O. Box 1292, Montreat, NC 28757.

Dr. Deborah Belcher

Solo works by Bach, Haydn, Brahms, Liszt, and Shirley. Dr. Teresa Sumpter

IF YOU The Asheville Area Piano Forum 10th Annual Spring Benefit concert, Sunday, May 24 at 3 GO p.m. in the Blue Ridge Room of the Deerfield Retirement Community,1617 Hendersonville

Road. Patron Tickets $40; Adult $25; $3 for Students 13-21; Students 12 and under, free. Tickets may be purchased by emailing rlrodwell@bellsouth.net, or through www.ashevillepiano.org.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Nine

MAY 2015

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Amber Combs Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Quinn Asteak, Petras Barcas, Hannah Barry, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, LeeAnn Bubrowski, Rosalind Buda, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Jason Consoli, Kelly Denson, Amy Downs, Sue Green, Max Hammonds, MD, Merrill Hardy, Phil Hawkins, Kristina Headrick, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Robert Maddix, Tina Masciarelli, Kay Miller, Michael J. Morel, Betina Morgan, Cindy Norris, Pamela Norris, Onca O’Leary, Virginia Pendergrass, Dennis Ray, Jeannie Shuckstes, John Springer, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Dan Weiser, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, May 2015, Vol. 18 No. 9

On the Cover:

Detail from Into the Smokies, pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington. PAGE 23

4 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

Asheville Area Piano Forum . . . . . . 4 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 ACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Americana Burlesque Festival . . . . 17 Lazoom Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

9 Local Shops

New stories are added each month!

ONLY ONLINE

What is The Flow,

Field Experiment is a public action

written by Ronya Banks

Amos’s Wild Second Thought, written by Anne Raustol

Dog Days,

written by Dave Rowe

All Nations Trading . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Downtown Books and News. . . . . 21

10 Fine Art

Cambodian Rice Noodle Soup and a Surprise, written by Jonathan Look

Kenilworth Artists Studio Tour. . . 10 Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 21 Sandra Brugh Moore . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Teresa Pennington . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Quickdraw. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Stress Management to Self Mastery: From Doing to Being,

written by Larry Cammarata

Outgrown,

written by Christopher Van Dyke

Hiking the PCT - The Big Day,

12 Music

written by John Swart

Fireships / Hey Rosetta! . . . . . . . . . 12 The Celebration Singers! . . . . . . . 33 Asheville Young Musicians Club . 33 Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse . . . . 29 Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Snipe Hunt,

written by Michael Landolfi

She’s My Cherry Pie,

written by Ashley English

13 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .13

18 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 18 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 18 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 30 Book Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 37 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 37

SPECIAL SECTIONS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 9 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . PGS 19-21 River Arts District . . . . . . . . . . . PG 22 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 24-27 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 41

project in Atlanta that aims to uncover truths and ignite new thinking. From Asheville, Mel Chin and Severn Eaton’s proposal, Jam-D-Jam! was selected as one of the project’s five finalists. Their radio based interactive entertainment intervention will help ease tensions during rush-hour traffic. Visit www. fieldexperimentatl.com. Read the full article at rapidrivermagazine.com.

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design hosts In Song: Sing On, an evening songbook workshop and an afternoon adventure to a hidden Asheville David Wilson, Arrivals, 2013. site for Photo by Dominic Santos, courtesy of SFMOMA. a sing-along led by Oakland-based artist David Wilson. The participatory event takes place on Friday & Saturday, May 1 & 2. Asheville’s listener-supported, community radio station, WPVM 103.7 FM, has announced the addition of Asheville Theater Radio to their lineup of local artistic and cultural programming. The show will be hosted by local theater personality Jeff Catanese, and will be broadcast live every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. The show will also stream live on wpvmfm.org,

34 Dining Guide Oil & Vinegar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Green Room Cafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

38 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 39 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 39 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 39 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 39 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 39

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

chamber music concerts AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

By

Cello-Bration and the DeMasi Brothers

A

AmiciMusic continues its intimate, informative, and informal chamber music concerts with a program of great cello and piano music. Cellist Lawrence Stomberg and pianist/Artistic Director Daniel Weiser will be performing works by Shostakovich, Grieg, and Foss.

Cello-Bration “Cello-Bration” features two powerful folkinfluenced cello sonatas by Norwegian Edvard Grieg and Russian Dmitri Shostakovich, along with a fun cowboy-inspired work by American Lukas Foss. Grieg said there was always a little “Norwegian cod-fish” in his music and his distinctive harmonies and melodic drive definitely evoke the rugged Norwegian people and the sea around them. Shostakovich wrote his Sonata in 1934 as the rumbles of war were just beginning and depression was spreading all across the globe. As always, he infuses his work with a bleak directness, tender sweetness, and ironic humor that reflect the multi-faceted emotions of the Soviet people during Stalin’s time.

P

Friday, May 22 at 7:30 p.m. at a house concert in Lawrence Hendersonville. Seats are Stomberg $35pp and include great food and drink. Reservations are required and seating is limited. To reserve, visit www.amicimusic.org or call Dan at 802-369-0856. Saturday, May 23 at 11 a.m. at Isis Restaurant

in West Asheville. $15 for concert plus brunch available for $7-11. Reservations strongly recommended by calling Isis at (828) 575-2737

Saturday, May 23 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse

Black Mountain. $15 for advanced purchase or $20 at the door. Call (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sunday, May 24 at 3 p.m. at All Soul’s Cathedral

in Biltmore Village. $15 for Church members and $20 for general admission. Tickets available at the door. Additional 10% discount available for tickets purchased in advance at amicimusic.org.

The DeMasi Brothers On Memorial Day weekend, AmiciMusic will present two concerts with the DeMasi

Pan Harmonia

Pan Harmonia’s 15th season concludes with J.S. Bach’s beloved Brandenburg Concerto #4.

Pan Harmonia Musicians from last Pan Harseason’s Brandenburg finale concert. monia will Photo: S. Houseworth perform“Summer” from Antonio Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” and his “Tempeste di Mare” F Major flute concerto on May 17 and 21. Internationally-acclaimed Baroque artists and sisters, violinist Margaret Humphrey and cellist Rebecca Humphrey, will join Barbara Weiss on harpsichord and Kate Steinbeck on flute, together with chamber orchestra collaborators Dilshad Billimoria Posnock, flute, Ginger Kowal and Andrea Pettigrew, violins, Kara Poorbaugh, viola and Matthew Waid, bass. IF YOU Sunday, May 17, Masonic Temple, Downtown GO Asheville. Tickets from $10-$35. Students $10; limited

seating. Thursday, May 21 at 7:30 White Horse 105 Montreat Rd Black Mountain. Tickets: $16.50 advance, $22 at the door, $5 students. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.panharmonia.org

6 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

T

Dan WeiSeR

Brothers, awardwinning folk musicians who have toured nationally and have appeared regularly the DeMasi Brothers on NPR, Good Morning America, and Entertainment Tonight singing songs of tolerance, friendship, and peace. On Sunday, May 24 at 7:30 p.m. they will perform at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $10. Call White Horse at (828) 669-0816 or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. On Memorial Day, Monday May 25 at 3 p.m., they will perform a special “Picnic for Peace” house concert in the Beaverdam area of Asheville. Upscale barbecue will be served along with drinks. Cost is $25pp, with discounted $15 seats for members of any UU Congregation and all U.S. Veterans. Reservations at www.amicimusic.org or by calling Dan at 802-369-0856. Joseph and John, the DeMasi Brothers, joined forces with their lifelong friend Chris Burke, the award winning actor with Down syndrome best known for his starring role as “Corky” on the hit ABC-TV show “Life Goes On.” Their shows are uplifting, meaningful, and humorous.

Ruscelli di Primavera

The Rutherford Chamber Consort presents Chamber Music of Milhaud, Schubert, and Schoenberg. The Rutherford Chamber Consort is a professional arts organization. Our members come from the finest music schools. We have played with world-class artists and now choose to call Western North Carolina home.

Ruscelli di Primavera Program Darius Milhaud: Suite op. 157b for violin, clarinet, and The Rutherford Chamber Consort piano. Sharon Lawrence, violin; Matthew Hanna, clarinet; Christopher Tavernier, piano. Franz Schubert: Quintet in A major, “The Trout” for piano, violin, viola, cello, and double bass, D. 667. Christopher Tavernier, piano; Sharon Lawrence, violin; Kara Poorbaugh, viola; Kathy Foster, cello; Matthew Ward, double bass. Franz Schubert: Die Forelle. Gwenn Roberts, soprano/alto; John Cobb, piano. Arnold Schoenberg: Transfigured Night, op. 4 for String Sextet. Sharon Lawrence, violin I; Tara Fensom, violin II; Kara Poorbaugh, viola I; Jessica Ronnevik, viola II; Alan Black, cello I; Kathy Foster, cello II. IF YOU The Rutherford Chamber Consort present Ruscelli di Primavera, Sunday, GO May 24 at 4 p.m. Biltmore United Methodist Church, 376 Hendersonville

Road, Asheville. Free. (828) 274-2379.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

captivating performances

T

U

R

E

PG. 18

n

Asheville Symphony Celebrates Jazz and French Connections

T

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra will end its 54th season on Saturday, May 9, with a program that will explore the connections and contrasts between jazz and classical music, and Paris and New York in the 20th century. Saxophonist Joe Lulloff will join the ASO under Music Director Daniel Meyer for “Ravel and the Duke,” featuring the music of Duke Ellington, Ravel, Debussy and Milhaud, beginning at 8 p.m. at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The symphony will perform the legendary bandleader and pianist Ellington’s Black, Brown and Beige, a vibrant jazz symphony inspired by African American history. From people at work and prayer in the first movement to a tribute to the masterful artists that emerged from the Harlem Renaissance in the finale, it is a work that cast Ellington’s talent in a whole new light. Another highlight of the concert program will feature two suites from French composer Maurice Ravel’s ballet Daphnis et Chloe. “There are so many artistic intersections between Paris and New York, particularly in the early 20th century, with American composers living in Paris and Parisians coming to America to hear jazz and experience Harlem’s amazing night club scene,” Meyer said. “With

P

By

MiCHaeL J. MOReL

this season finale and saxophonist Joe Lulloff, I wanted to explore these cultural collisions and how the color of Ravel, Debussy, Milhaud, and Ellington’s music contrasts to create a really fascinating kaleidoscope of musical possibilities.” Lulloff will be the soloist as the ASO performs Claude Debussy’s Rhapsodie and Darius Milhaud’s Scaramouche, which both feature the saxophone. Acclaimed internationally for his innovative style and unparalleled virtuosity, Lulloff has been described by Branford Marsalis as “a marvelous musician” whose “knowledge of music, along with his ability to embrace music normally considered outside the sphere, makes him a joy to listen to.” Lulloff has performed as a member of the wind sections of the Cleveland Orchestra, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, and Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestras, and performs regularly with symphony orchestras throughout the United States and as soloist in many of the most prestigious concert venues in the Americas, Europe, Southeast Asia and Japan. He is a member of the summer artist faculty at the Brevard Music Center in Brevard, NC.

Saxophonist Joe Lulloff

Ravel and the Duke Program Debussy – Rhapsodie Ellington – Black, Brown and Beige Milhaud – Scaramouche Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé Suites 1 and 2 Concert sponsored by Don and Barbara Layden. IF YOU The Asheville Symphony Orchestra GO presents Ravel and the Duke, Saturday,

May 9 at 8 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in Asheville. Tickets start at $22 for adults and $11 for youth, and are available through the ASO office or the U.S. Cellular Center ticket office. For more information go to www.ashevillesymphony.org or call (828) 254-7046.

Christopher Tavernier Named “International Perzina Artist”

Perzina Pianos was founded in 1871 and is located in Amsterdam.

“I am very excited about becoming a Perzina Artist,” said Christopher. “I’ve been playing on Perzina Pianos for eight years, since the age of Ron Bol, President, CEO six and it is a big honor to be & Owner of Perzina Pianos in recognized by the company.” Amsterdam is extremely honored Christopher Tavernier and proud to announce the first just released two DVD’s. The International Perzina Artist in its Grand Tour is a musical 144 year company history. journey through the ClasBol said, “Christopher is a new sical world, demonstrating generation of concert pianists, how pianism developed from restoring the beauty and colors the Baroque Period through of classical music. I have never Christopher Tavernier Modernism at its most excitbeen so impressed after hearing ing and defiant time. the first note that Christopher The second DVD is 176 Keys - World played on our Flagship Perzina Grand Piano. Extravaganza from the World Masterwork Christopher was able to bring out all the beauSeries. This extravaganza for two pianos, two tiful tones and colors from the Baroque Period virtuosos and three of the most colorful comthrough the current works of Modernism.” posers of the romantic age was a spectacular “Christopher showed polish, elegance two-piano musical journey. and passion with great power and yet, he also For the last two seasons, Christopher Tavshowed the lightest touch — a graceful, caressernier and Dr. John Cobb have played massive ing tone of beauty and passion. Additionally, fundraising concerts to benefit Mission FounChristopher has two of our Flagship Grand dation “Ladies Night Out.” Ladies Night Out Pianos in his private studio in Hendersonville, provides free mammograms and health screenNorth Carolina.”

ings to uninsured and underinsured women in our community to fight against women’s breast cancer. Christopher Tavernier made his orchestral debut with the Tar River Philharmonic Orchestra at the age of thirteen, performing Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No.1 on the opening concert of the Orchestra’s Fall 2013 Season at the Dunn Center for the Performing Arts in Rocky Mount, NC. Christopher began his piano studies at the age of six, and now fourteen, has won several honors and awards for both solo and concerto competitions. Christopher is a dedicated chamber music player and is a member of the Rutherford Chamber Consort in WNC. He has been featured on ABC affiliate television station WLOS, and has performed on Carolina Live, NPR radio and WCQS in Asheville. He is also a member of the Asheville Area Piano Forum. IF YOU Christopher Tavernier performs GO Schubert’s Trout Quintet and a Suite

by Milhaud Sunday, May 24 at 4 p.m. at the Biltmore United Methodist Church in Asheville.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

captivating performances Asheville Community Theatre

A

A Streetcar Named Desire – May 1-3,

with performances Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are available online at www.ashevilletheatre.org, over the phone at (828) 254-1320, or in person at the Asheville Community Theatre Box Office.

James and the Giant Peach. Presented by the Youth Production class. Roald Dahl’s story comes hilariously to life in this delightful dramatization that reveals the wickedness of some and the goodness of others. Performed by students ranging in age from 9 to 15. Friday, May 8 at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5. Letters and Notes Found on the Windshield at the Piggly Wiggly Parking Lot. In a small town in the Florida

Panhandle, a series of correspondence has been found between two people: she works at Piggly Wiggly, he is a plumber. May 8-24 with performances in 35below Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $15.

Listen to This: In the vein

of “The Moth” or “This American Life,” Listen to This features stories and original songs from locals. May 28 at 7:30 p.m. in 35below. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $15.

American Tales and Tunes. On May 30 Bright Star Touring Theatre returns to headline Asheville Community Theatre’s Saturday family series. Folk songs and folktales from across America come to life in this music-filled adventure. From the Jack Tales of the Appalachian region to the fishing docks of New England, this vibrant and energetic show seamlessly blends fantastic regional stories with classic American folk songs! Performance begins at 10 a.m. All tickets are $5. Register for Summer Camp. Calling all students ages 5-17! Registration is now open for our Tanglewood Youth Theatre Summer Camp. Session One runs June 15-26 and Session Two will be held July 13-24. Some financial assistance is available. For more information, or to register, visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. IF YOU Asheville Community Theatre, GO 35 E. Walnut St., downtown

Asheville. For more information, please call (828) 254-1320, or visit the website, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

HART PRESENTS THE NEIL SIMON COMEDY SMASH

N

Auditions for Oklahoma

Brighton Beach Memoirs

Now through May 10 catch a comedy which many consider Neil Simon’s masterpiece. The autobiographical play is set in the 1930s and the action is seen through the eyes of young Eugene Morris Jerome. The play is one of the funniest and most touching of all of the Neil Simon works. Neil Simon is the most successful playwright in theater history. At one point he had three hit plays running on Broadway simultaneously and throughout the 60s, 70s The autobiographical play is set in the 1930’s. and 80s one hit followed another. He was part of a legendary group of writers who worked for Sid Caesar on Your Despite a truck load of awards and wealth Show of Shows in the 1950s that included Mel Simon was not given the kind of respect as Brooks, Carl Reiner and Selma Diamond. a writer that he deserved until he created Brighton Beach Memoirs in 1983. For the first time he drew from personal memories of the depression, and family life in the days leading up to World War II. Brighton Beach would be followed by Biloxi Blues which drew upon his memories of boot camp, and then Broadway Bound which recreated the Sid Caesar days of early television. In 1991 Simon wrote what would become his most celebrated play, Lost in Yonkers. The play has the same spirit and feel as the Brighton Beach trilogy, and it finally won him the Pulitzer Prize. Brighton Beach opened at the Alvin HART’s production stars Hogan McLamb, Theater on Broadway and ran for over 1200 Stephen Gonya, Jan Welch, Holly Cope, Dakota Mann, Anna Denson, and Lily Bowen. performances and launched the career of a

A

Newly Grown Tales

Attic Salt Theatre Company was formed in New York City in 1998 and has since concentrated on children’s theatre and art residencies in NYC schools. With the arrival in Asheville four years ago of Jeff Catanese, Artistic Director, and Marci Bernstein, Executive Director/ Education Coordinator, the company has been continuing its work to those ends in Western North Carolina. Newly Grown Tales, is the latest of several outings at Asheville Community Theatre and will be touring regionally to schools and libraries in the fall of 2015. Conceived of by local director Jeff Catanese, Newly Grown Tales is an improvisational look at several different types of

8 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

By Jenny

young Matthew Broderick, who would win a Tony Award and then go on to star in the film version of Biloxi Blues. HART produced Brighton Beach in the Strand Theatre in 1993 under the direction of Wanda Taylor. That production marked the kickoff of the fund drive to build the Performing Arts Center at the Shelton House. Jump forward twenty-two years, and Taylor is directing again, this time with Hogan McLamb, Stephen Gonya, Jan Welch, Holly Cope, Dakota Mann, Anna Denson and Lily Bowen. IF YOU Brighton Beach Memoirs, May 1, 2, GO 8, 9 at 7:30 and May 3 & 10 at 3 p.m.

Tickets are available by calling the HART Box Office at (828) 456-6322 TuesSat. from 1-5 p.m., or at www.harttheatre.org. Performances are at the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville.

Quality theatre for families and children.

IMPROVISED FOLKTALES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY

Attic Salt Theatre Company, the team who produced March’s family hit The Tale of the Pig is pleased to present the delightful Newly Grown Tales at Asheville Community Theatre.

Auditions for chorus, dance corps and supporting roles held on May 3 & 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the HART theater in Waynesville. The production runs from July 10 through August 2, 2015. Directed by Steve Lloyd, music directed by Sandi Boone, choreography by Cord Scott. Actors should come with sheet music. Rehearsals begin May 18. For more details contact HART at harttheater@ gmail.com.

BUnn

folktales. Included are a fairy tale, a tall tale, a fool’s tale and an origin tale, all designed to use the suggestions of the children in the audience as plot points. Said Catanese, “Kids grow up hearing many folktales, but know very little about how they came about. Allowing them to aid in the creation of never-before-heard tales helps the idea of oral tradition sink in that much better. Newly Grown Tales has been in existence for over a decade and has played to thousands of children all over the country. Whereas most children’s theater companies typically retire shows after a few years, the longevity of this one lies in the fact that it’s never been the same show twice. Each new audience will come up with unique suggestions and combinations of suggestions so that every tale is truly one that has never been told before.

Producer and Attic Salt Theatre Company co-founder Marci Bernstein said, “Most of our touring shows revolve around folktales in one way or another. This show is very special to us because we get to involve the kids in a special way and create something right in front of their eyes. Many times the stories we’ve told and acted out have amazed even us!” The cast is made up of local favorites Carin Metzger and Jeff Catanese. Mr. Catanese estimates he’s performed this show well over one hundred times. “It never gets boring,” he said. “For our other shows we create while sitting at our computers. To create on the fly, with an audience watching it happen is a real joy.” IF YOU Newly Grown Tales, Saturday, May GO 23 at 10 a.m. Tickets are $5. Call (828)

254-1320, or visit ashevilletheatre.org. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock

E

M

A

G

A

ST

ST IN

ON HW

Y

N.

US

T

ST

AV E HENDERSONVILLE - 28792

F L E M M IN G S T

E IG H T H

S IX T H

SEV

ENT

HA

VE

64 HT

HG HT HD

AV E

514 N. Main Street, Hendersonville 828-698-4888 • anita@spiritfeather.com Facebook/AllNationsTrading • www.SpiritFeather.com

HC HI

VE F IF T H A F O RT H

E

Handmade Mother’s Day Gifts

MA

LE

N

Featuring world renown Navajo Jeweler Calvin Begay

LO Sandburg’s home. Enjoy a guided tour of Carl C

AV E

ELL ST

GR

OV

E

N V IL L

ST

ST

GREE

S P R IN G S T

T W H IT T E D S

K A N U GA R D

ST

ELL ST

CASEW

ST

S PA R T

E HW

W H IT E

A N BU

RG HW Y

176

Y

HS

G ROVE

BA R N W

HR

D AV IS

HEBRON RD

T K IN G S

T M A IN S

H ST

N ST

ST ALLEN L IL LY PO ND

CHURC

VE

IN G T O

ST

D ST

E ST

NG

T IC

TTE

F IR S T A

W ASH

T H IR D AV E

MMI

JU S

FLE

WHI

(Napa Valley) for 15 years. They carry quality Native American jewelry and art such as fetishes, artifacts, bows and quivers, pottery, music, books, talking feathers, Cherokee dream catchers, medicine wheels and much more. Most of their jewelry is hand made. Some of the bone carvings are from Bali and some jewelry is Peru, Guatemala and Mayan made. All Nations Trading has a large collection of Calvin Begay jewelry. Calvin Begay is a Navajo silversmith and one of their favorite artists. From his studio comes amazing work with help of the inlayers. You will always find a great selection of Calvin Begay’s creations. His jewelry is all handmade, like the most popular horse pendants, dragonfly pendants and turtle pendants. Our friends Lonny and Michelle make the finest jewelry from buffalo bone, which they hand cut and paint. You can find Cherokee dream catchers by Tony Cucumber, Full Blood Cherokee, and Winterhawk Pottery. Also available, the always popular “Homeland Security, Fighting Terrorism Since 1492” tee shirts.

V IL

J U S T IC E S T

They relocated to North Carolina’s beautiful mountains in 2008. They work with artists from all tribes and take great pride in every piece they 64 bring into the store. Many different tribes are represented and most artists are longtime friends. Their first store was located in Calistoga, California

HE

PA TT

J

Jim and Anita Earnest have been in business for 18 years.

I

All Nations Trading

All Nations Trading AS

Z

225

530 N. MAIN STREET, HENDERSONVILLE

HH

HD

(828) 697-1300 • O PEN M ON-S AT 11AM-6PM

HS

Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar

NEW Exotic Menu Items

$10

Gift Certificate With Purchase of $30 or more. With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/1/15.

All Nations Trading 514 North Main Street, Hendersonville, North Carolina 28792

PG. 20

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885

HC

Hendersonville, NC 828-696-9800

(828) 698-4888, anita@spiritfeather.com www.spiritfeather.com Open Mon-Sat 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m.

3 Biltmore Ave.

CH

437 N. Main St.

www.champanc.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 9


R

Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

A

O

P

I

D

R

I

E

R

A

R

T

S

fine art

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

Kenilworth’s Art Studio Tour Returns Memorial Day Weekend

On May 23 and 24, the eclectic and beautiful neighborhood of Kenilworth will welcome folks in search of inspiration and wondrous finds.

Milepost 382 - BlueRidge Parkway, Asheville, NC 828.298.7928

V

Explore the studios of artists and craftspeople who live along the streets and cul-de-sacs of this historic residential area near central Asheville. In this off-square, hill-and-gully neighborhood, where most roads head up or down, the fresh works of 24 artists showing in 15 locations mirror the same kind of curvilinear eccentricity, intrigue and sheer fun. Traveling from studio to studio, you will be able to admire highly original works of art, including paintings, sketches, ceramics, wood craft, hand shaped tiles, whimsical sculptures, casual wear, quirky dolls and artful jewelry, among other treasures.

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70, Asheville, NC 828.298.7903

Rooster, Lisa Murphy

By

ROBeRT MaDDiX

And the stories are as compelling as the pieces— just ask Suzanne and Argenis Spaziani who met in the Andes and now develop stunning silver jewelry; Mike Wurman who sketched his way up the Appalachian Trail; or Ursula Gullow, imaginative painter and assembler of fabulous landscapes. It will be an adventure in visual delight, running from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, with Iron and Silver Jewelry, Suzanne and Argenis Spaziani an “Art Café” on the lawn of Kenilworth Presbyterian Church, where you can drop by for a Van Gogh lunch box from Green Sage Cafe between the studio stops. A Kenilworth Art Studio Tour brochure containing a listing of each artist and a map Ann and Sandy Batton, From the Woodland of studio locations will Batton Clayworks Animals series by be available throughout Rhiana Wurman May at the Chamber of Commerce and in stores and inns IF across Asheville. OU Kenilworth Art Studio Tour, You can find this year’s tour map and helpful information at www.kenilworthartists.org

Y GO

Saturday and Sunday, May 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For a map and more information, please visit www.kenilworthartists.org.

Mac Kah Studio Painting Ideas

26 Lodge Street, Asheville, NC 828.277.6222

P

Painting in weather has some challenges and one thing I have learned is to anchor my easel. I carry tent stakes and some cord so I can, if need be, secure my easel long enough to finish up. A box easel is less likely to blow, but a big canvas can act like a kite. The minute you turn away, off it sails into the bushes. Be prepared for sudden gusts, especially if using a light weight portable easel.

Upcoming Events WWW.CRAFTGUILD.ORG The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

Saturday & Sunday, May 9 & 10 –

RAD Studio Stroll.

Thursday, May 14 – Art for Justice. Ben-

efit for Pisgah Legal Services.

10 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

By JOHn

MaC KaH

Saturday, May 16 – Toe River

Paint-Out.

Friday, May 22 – Alchemy Art,

Miniature Show.

Friday, May 29 – Grand Bohemian Gallery opens Essential Nature: John Mac Kah. On display through June 25, 2015.

Essential Nature: works by John Mac Kah opens May 29 at the Grand Bohemian Gallery.

Ongoing Studio Classes Painter’s Choice, Mondays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Mac Kah Art Studio

Open Studio, Thursdays, 7 to 10 p.m.

122 Riverside Dr., Ste. H Cotton Mill Bldg., Asheville

Plein Air, Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

(828) 225-5000, www.jmkah.com


P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

fine arts & crafts

T

S

Fiber Weekend at the Folk Art Center

The Folk Art Center’s celebration of textile arts takes place Saturday & Sunday, May 9 & 10. Throughout the weekend, craftspeople will be sharing their inspiration and expertise as the Southern Highland Craft Guild hosts Fiber Weekend 2015. Educational craft demonstrations on Saturday will include natural dyeing, sheep shearing, weaving on a loom, tapestry weaving, knitting, crochet, batik, and surface design. Southern Highland Craft Guild member Sandra Rowland will host activities designed for all ages.

Lorraine Cathey

Bright Ideas for

By

Mother’s Day

HannaH BaRRy

Fiber Weekend to bring their own handwork, whether it be knitting, embroidery or hand sewing. Weather permitting we would like to fill the hill behind the Folk Art Center auditorium with people engaged in fiber arts. Bring a blanket and enjoy a spring afternoon of craft. On Sunday, the Folk Art Center’s auditorium will be transformed into a runway for the Sixteenth Annual Fashion Show of Wearable Art. Fiber artist Liz Spear will emcee the event. Styles showcased will range from contemporary to traditional, from funky to classic, made by members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and other regional artists. Throughout the fashion show, Liz will explore many fiber art processes, and focus on the various schools and studios in the area which offer classes in textiles to everyone from the beginner to the experienced fiber artist.

100 Cherry Street ~ Black Mountain PG. 41

MV

828.669.0065 | www.VisionsofCreation.com

original woodblock prints on handmade paper

April 1 (detail) • 10” x 6.5” • $80

There will be two separate showings of the Fashion Show, at 1 and 3 p.m. In between these shows, at 2 p.m., guest speaker and weaver Norma Smayda Staley will discuss The Weaving Roses of Rhode Island. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization established in 1930 to bring Spinning yarn. Activities for all ages. together the crafts and craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, One new demonstration this year is pulp education, marketing and conservation. painting by member Chery Cratty. Using tools The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an such as a South African porcupine quill, she authorized concessioner of the National Park will show how to create realistic paintings by Service, Department of the Interior. manipulating and molding wet pulp. “Paper begins as wet, gooey pulp – and I get to paint with it!” Cratty says. Also, current members IF Elynn Bernstein, Lorraine Cathey and Lisa YOU Fiber Weekend is free and takes place Klakulak will demonstrate different approachGO from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May es to felting. 9, and 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 10. Textile arts have always created a wonderTwo fashion shows will be held on Sunday, ful sense of community from spinning groups May 10 at 1 and 3 p.m. and quilting bees, to yarn circles. To celebrate The Folk Art Center is located on the Blue Ridge this community, combined with a love of Parkway in east Asheville. For more information, craft and crafting, the Guild invites visitors to call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

Designer/Goldsmith

Tulip Magnolia (detail) • 4” x 11” • $120

Bring a blanket and enjoy a spring afternoon of craft.

ROBERTO VENGOECHEA

Trees No. 5 (detail) • 4” x 8.5” • $80

T

A

Trees No. 28 (detail) • 10” x 13.5” • $95

R

Inset: Homage No. 1 • 2.5” x 10” • $60 (framing additional) PG. 40

MB 365 Merrimon Ave • Asheville 828.225.3117 • blackbirdframe.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

noteworthy

M

A

Hey Rosetta!

H

Hey Rosetta! is celebrating the release of their new record, Second Sight, with a spring tour.

Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local & Super Social! Discount Coupons ✿ Contests www.facebook.com/rapidrivermagazine

Invigorating new sounds from Hey Rosetta!

F

Hey Rosetta!’s short film, shot entirely on picturesque Fogo Island, was directed by Mark Bennett. Fogo Island lies off the Northeast coast of Newfoundland, the band’s home. The band was selected by Fogo Island Arts for their Artist in Residency Program to create the film, which features three new songs from Second Sight, as well as exclusive candid footage of their time spent on the island. Fogo Island’s artist residencies, unique

Fireships at the Bywater

Fireships is the new band from Honey Brothers founder and indie veteran Andrew Vladeck.

By JaSOn

COnSOLi

York City, from the USS Intrepid (where they were able to sneak inside an actual Mercury The band released Era space capsule), to the their self-titled debut Coney Island Mermaid in April via End Up Parade. Records. The 13-song “I realized that songs album melds indie-folk are fireships; cast against and Americana with darkness to brighten the Fireships plays guitar-driven alt-folk. some West African influway,” says Vladeck. The ences into an elegant affair that evokes shades Village Voice has called Fireships “bold and of Lou Reed, Paul Simon’s Graceland, and brassy, nothing but fun.“ Deer Tick. IF Fireships makes guitar-driven alt-folk that’s Fireships, Sunday, May 17 at the YOU dreamy and fiery, spontaneous and well-craftGO Bywater Brewery, 796 Riverside Dr., ed. Their whimsical video for “Countdown Asheville. Call (828) 232-6967 or visit Time” was shot guerrilla style all over New www.bywaterbar.com.

B

G

A

Z

I

By

N

E

KRiSTina HeaDRiCK

architecture and landscape serve as a backdrop for the music. Tim Baker (vocals, keyboards, guitars, percussion) explains how the backdrop of the island influenced the final, sprawling product, “We’d been hearing about the magical buildings being constructed on Fogo Island – offthe-grid Scandinavian-inspired artist studios, and this huge, floating, luxury eco-inn. We wanted to record and videotape some of our new songs in inspiring spaces, spaces that suited them, spaces that heightened them.” The band was recently featured on NPR’s “Weekend Edition” on line stream. In addition, their video for “What Arrows” premiered at USA Today. Of the video, which is part of the final Fogo footage, USA Today says, “The presentation itself is simple—the group and their instruments, awash in projections of crashing waves as the song crescendos—but the song is equal parts anthemic, dreamy and meditative...” Hey Rosetta! is comprised of Baker, Adam Hogan (guitars, vocals), Josh Ward (bass, keyboards, vocals), Phil Maloney (drums, percussion, vocals), Romesh Thavanathan (keyboards, guitars, cello, vocals), Kinley Dowling (violin, vocals) and Mara Pellerin (vocals, French horn, trumpet). The band’s last two albums, Into Your Lungs and Seeds, were short-listed for the prestigious Polaris Music Prize. In 2012 they received a Juno nomination for New Group of the Year. Visit www.heyrosetta.com

IF YOU GO

Catch Hey Rosetta! live on Tuesday, May 12 at The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com

Area Musicians Perform Paul Simon’s Graceland

Benefit held at Isis to support Helpmate.

The following artists are confirmed, with additional cameos to be announced: Josh Blake, Debrissa McKinney, Derrick Lee Johnson, Jamar A. Woods, Aaron Woody Wood, Phil Bronson, Jeff Knorr, Ryan G Reardon, Alex Bradley, Kyle Snuffer, Tyler Housholder, and Kellin Watson.

More than fifteen local musicians will gather in a collaborative effort to support local non-profit Helpmate at Isis Music Hall on Wednesday, May 6. The event is orchestrated by local musician, producer, and IamAVL.com co-founder Josh Blake. Presented by Safe and Sound, the Retrospective Collective will include a very special Prix Fixe dinner prepared by Chef Mike Mahoney, with instrumental music played during Josh Blake and others perform dinner. in support of Helpmate.

12 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

Retrospective Collective 6 p.m. Dinner begins. Reservations must be made in advance by calling Isis at (828) 575-2737. 7 p.m. Live Dinner Music begins. 8 p.m. Local musicians perform Paul Simon’s Album “Graceland” in its entirety.

By

KeLLy DenSOn

Tickets: $20 general admission. $65 VIP admission includes Prix Fixe Dinner by Isis Restaurant and VIP seating. $500 to sponsor a table of six. Includes a drink upon arrival and your business name featured at the event. You will be greeted with a complimentary cocktail, beer or wine. Proceeds will benefit Helpmate, Buncombe County’s non-profit agency providing safety, shelter and support for victims of domestic violence. IF YOU GO

Retrospective Collective, Wednesday, May 6 beginning at 6 p.m. at Isis Music Hall. Purchase tickets at www. safeandsoundavl.com.


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Child 44 

Short Take: Based on the first book in Tom Rob Smith’s trilogy, Child 44 tells the story of a disillusioned MGB agent in Stalinist Russia who stumbles onto the path of a serial child killer.

REEL TAKE: At press time Child 44 is still

in theatres in Asheville, but by the time this issue comes out it may be gone. If, on the off chance it is still out come May 1 and you have any interest in it, see it quickly. The film has a staggeringly low 25% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. So why even bother to include it? If you’ve read Reel Takes for a while you know that the Good Professor Kaufmann and I like to champion films that either don’t get a fair shake or the PR that they deserve. For me Child 44 is one of those films. Directed by Daniel Espinosa (Safe House and Easy Money) and based on the novel by Tom Rob Smith, Child 44 is a historical thriller based in 1950s Russia in the brutal days of Stalinism. Leo Demidov (Tom Hardy) is a war hero and MGB agent. On the surface he is the picture perfect exactor of Stalinistic Russia.

Noomi Rapace and Tom Hardy in the Soviet 1950’s drama-thriller Child 44.

Below the surface hides a Ukrainian orphan, a man who upholds the tenants of Stalinism as a means of survival only. Leo is terribly in love with his wife Raisa (Noomi Rapace), a school teacher who seems to only thinly veil her contempt of Stalinism and her husband. When his best friend’s son (his own godson) is found dead near a train track, hushed rumors of murder swirl. When his wife is accused of being a traitor, he refuses

THE MONTHLY REEL Celebrating Orson Welles, the Asheville Jewish Film Festival, and Avenging the Box Office!

T

This month we’re celebrating the 100th birthday of Orson Welles.

blockbuster Furious 7. I on the other hand stumbled on to a theme in my reviews of three To mark the milestone The films that all grapple with Asheville Film Society will the concept of truth in be showing The Lady From some way, shape or form Shanghai on May 20 and the – Child 44, True Story, and Hendersonville Film Society While We’re Young. will be hosting a presentation By the time this issue comes of Citizen Kane on May 3. Orson Welles in the out Furious 7 may be knocked The good Professor Kaufmann infamous 1938 War off its red hot #1 streak at ponders whatever happened to of the Worlds radio the box office by the latest Orson Welles on page 15. And broadcast. installment of the Avengers as if that wasn’t enough, there series. Also coming soon to a theatre near are DVD picks to boot! you is Russell Crowe’s directorial debut This month Chip reviews three very The Water Diviner, remakes of Far From different movies, Ex Machina, Woman in the Madding Crowd and Mad Max, as well Gold, and the record breaking box office

to denounce her. Leo’s carefully crafted and curated world is turned upside down and they are exiled to a bleak industrial outpost run by General Mikhail Nesterov (Gary Oldman). There Leo discovers a series of deaths, all matching his godson’s. What ensues is the hunt for a serial killer, the desperate attempt to prove corruption among MGB officer ranks and the opportunity to win his wife’s love. Sounds pretty good – so what’s wrong with it? It’s a hot mess. As I watched the multifaceted story unfold I thought this must have been an amazing book. The difficult task of adapting a book for big screen is streamlining a book for feature film. Here Espinosa and his screenwriters tried to include way, way, way too much of the book in the film. It’s too long, there are way too many things going on, the pacing is off, and the accents are all over the map. But here’s the kicker... the fact that any of it worked, in spite of everything it had going against it, means it’s really quite good. It also had more staying power than the average film. The grim portrait it paints of that era in Russian history is fascinating to those of us that can’t imagine

By

MiCHeLLe Keenan

as Tomorrowland with George Clooney and Aloha with Bradley Cooper. The Asheville Jewish Film Festival will have screenings each week in May at the Fine Arts Theatre. The Asheville Jewish Film Festival promotes the diversity of Jewish identity to its community through film, exploring the dynamic environment of history and culture on the modern Jewish experience to a rich and varied community. Titles to be screened are Deli Man, Above and Beyond, Once in a Lifetime, and what looks to be a delightful little film, Dough. For more information go to www. AshevilleJewishFilmFestival.com. Until next month, enjoy the show.

living in such a society. Hardy has worked with several of the other cast members in previous films and this works well for the film, especially the re-teaming of him with Noomi Rapace (they starred in The Drop together – one of my favorite films of 2014). Their relationship is one of the many elements of the story that makes Child 44 worthwhile and actually quite good. Rated R for violence, some disturbing images, language and a scene of sexuality Review by Michelle Keenan

Domhnall Gleeson, Alicia Vikander and Oscar Isaac in the absorbing sci-fi thriller Ex Machina.

Ex Machina  ½

Short Take: Essentially a 21st century reworking of Frankenstein, Ex Machina is my kind of sci-fi movie with thoughtful subject matter trumping endless action sequences.

REEL TAKE: Ex Machina is an engrossing, intelligent sci-fi flick that shows what you can do with a little money, a good screenplay, and committed performances. It tells the story of a brilliant but unbalanced creator (Oscar Isaac), his beautiful robot creation (Alicia Vikander), and the innocent young programmer (Domhnall Gleeson) brought in to evaluate her intelligence. Ex Machina marks the directorial debut of screenwriter Alex Garland who wrote the 2 fascinating sci-fi features 28 Days Later and Sunshine for Irish director Danny Boyle. While he lacks Boyle’s directorial panache, his low key, matter-of-fact approach enhances the feel of this three character drama which takes place in a claustrophobic, ultramodern setting. Movies continued on page 14

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 13


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. May 5: The Moon’s Our Home (1936) A New York novelist meets up with an actress and they marry, though neither knows of the other’s fame. The real adventure begins on the honeymoon, when this screwball comedy really heats up. Stars Henry Fonda, Margaret Sullivan and Charles Butterworth. Directed by William Seiter. May 12: You Can’t

Cheat an Honest Man

(1939) W. C. Fields plays circus manager Larson E. Whipsnade. When he’s not trying to fleece the customers or elude the sheriff, Whipsnade busies himself trying to break up the romance between his daughter and the circus ventriloquist. Also stars Edgar Bergen and Constance Moore. Directed by Edward Cline and George Marshall. May 19: The Tailor of Panama (2001) A Cockney ex-con who has reinvented himself as a popular tailor to the rich and powerful of Panama, is famous for his storytelling as well as his suits, some tales carry lethal repercussions. Stars Pierce Brosnan, Geoffrey Rush and Jamie Lee Curtis. Directed by John Boorman. May 26: Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) A middle-aged couple suspects foul play when their neighbor’s wife suddenly drops dead. Woody Allen and Diane Keaton lead an all-star cast, including Alan Alda, Jerry Adler and Angelica Huston. Directed by Woody Allen.

BUDGET BIG SCREEN FEATURE Tickets $8; $6 for AFS members. May 20:

The Lady From Shanghai (1947) In this stylish film noir, after joining a bizarre yachting cruise, a sailor becomes involved in a scam with a beautiful woman and her lawyer husband and finds himself at the center of a nefarious murder plot. Stars Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth and Everett Sloane. Directed (uncredited) by Orson Welles. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Rated PG-13 for frenetic sequences of violence, action, and mayhem, suggestive content and strong language.

Movies continued from page 13

Brilliant but eccentric tech CEO Nathan (Oscar Issac) invites talented young programmer Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) to his private retreat which is completely cut off from the outside world. The reason for the invitation is so that Caleb, a tech geek himself, can evaluate Nathan’s latest attempt at artificial intelligence, a beautiful but obviously robotic android named Ava. Over the course of a series of interviews with Ava, Caleb finds himself falling in love. He also becomes extremely wary of Nathan who is brilliant but erratic and a borderline alcoholic. He is also warned about Nathan’s duplicity by Ava who dreams of being outside the compound and interacting with other humans. As the story unfolds it becomes apparent that all is not what it seems and writer-director Alex Garland has a few aces up his sleeve. It’s not what happens but how it happens that is the movie’s raison d’etre. He utilizes elements of Frankenstein as well as aspects of the Greek myth of Prometheus. Throw in the occasional biblical reference and you have an absorbing movie experience. Greatly aiding the movie’s sense of unease is the music score by Geoff Barrow and Ben Salisbury, the crisp, no-nonsense photography of Rob Hardy, and Nathan’s isolated retreat which is actually a landscape hotel in Norway although after seeing Ex Machina, I definitely won’t be going there anytime soon. Seeing the film took me back to the late 1950s and 1960s where stories in Galaxy magazine and episodes of The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits focused on science-fiction scenarios dominated by ideas and not by special effects. Stanley Kubrick unintentionally changed that with 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). He gave us ideas AND special effects but it was only the latter that took hold. Ex Machina has a cinematic pedigree going all the way back to Metropolis in 1927. Only time will tell if Ex Machina will become a sci-fi classic. I’m still debating it but if you want to see it to decide for yourself you’d better hurry. This movie is sadly no longer mainstream fare and one that is, the next Avengers movie, is just around the corner. Rated R for graphic nudity, language, sexual references, and violence. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Furious 7 

Short Take: This latest installment of the venerable franchise may not be the best of the series but it’s certainly the biggest, which will send fans into orbit while others will go along for the ride.

REEL TAKE: The saga of the Fast & Furious series shows that try as you might, you just cannot predict pop culture. You can try

14 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

Review by Chip Kaufmann

True Story

 ½

Short Take: Based on a – wait for it – true story, a disgraced journalist forms a strange alliance with a man accused of murdering his family. The late Paul Walker and Vin Diesel go for one last ride in the billion dollar megahit Furious 7.

and influence it and many people frequently succeed but sometimes the least likely candidate can become a cultural phenomenon. Right now I’m thinking of Star Wars which started out in 1977 as a one shot, modestly budgeted homage to the 1930s serial Flash Gordon. Now look at it. The same is true of F&F. What started in 2001 as another one shot film about fast cars, hot women, and really macho guys, made back its cost on opening weekend and went on to gross over 3 times that much. The inevitable sequels followed with diminishing returns as the budgets got larger and larger and the total box office got smaller and smaller. The films still made money and had their devoted fans but they were running out of steam. Then in 2013 Furious 6 appeared and the once bad boy street guys were transformed into bad good guys with families who helped various government agencies go after extreme criminal elements in other countries. Sort of a Mission Impossible on non-stop wheels. This proved to be the most successful outing yet earning $800 million worldwide as now F&F had gone global in a big way. Plans for Furious 7 were immediately drawn up and shooting got underway when tragedy struck. On November 30, 2013 co-star Paul Walker was ironically killed in a fiery car crash with only half of his scenes completed. At first the movie was going to be scrapped but Universal and the cast decided to go ahead and finish it to give Walker a proper send off. Body doubles including two of Walker’s brothers were used and the end result is seamless. For what it’s worth, the plot is as follows. The principal villain of Furious 6 was left comatose and now his older brother (a perfectly cast Jason Statham) wants revenge. He begins to stalk the members of the F&F gang vowing to get them all. Throw in a super weapon that both the government and a group of terrorists are trying to get their hands on and you have 140 minutes of mostly non-stop action with eye popping stunts. It’s long, it’s loud, and it’s beyond belief but if you go in for this sort of thing, you’ll more than get your money’s worth. I was expecting popcorn entertainment in the megawatt range and that is exactly what I got. So many films promise more than they deliver. That is definitely not the case with Furious 7.

REEL TAKE: For something that’s sup-

posed to be so black and white, the truth can be awfully grey sometimes. This is certainly the case with True Story. The film is adapted from Mike Finkel’s book Murder, Memoir, Mea Culpa. Finkel was an award-winning journalist with the New York Times until he was unceremoniously sacked for fabricating a story for impact. The facts were true, but he manipulated the framework of the story.

Jonah Hill as Michael Finkel and James Franco as Christian Longo in True Story.

After the Times sends him packing, he flees to his girlfriend’s log cabin in rural Montana. There he learns that a man accused of murdering his wife and three children has been posing as Mike Finkel. Curious, he confronts Christian Longo (the accused killer’s real name) and the two begin a correspondence. Fascinated by Longo, Finkel sees him as his ticket to journalistic redemption. As he and Longo get to know each other, Finkel grapples with not only the truth (is he or isn’t he guilty?) but also how to tell the truth. This is one of the films greatest strengths. The last time Franco and Hill shared the screen together it was for the hilarious, albeit not-for-everybody, apocalyptic comedy This is the End. While both have proved their dramatic acting chops previously, True Story places Hill in leading man territory. Franco draws the audience in with his lazy lidded, creepy stares and enigmatic air, but it’s ultimately Hill’s picture. With this under their belts, I’m curious to see what they’ll both do next. True Story also marks the directorial debut for British theatre director Rupert Goold. His theatre background lends itself nicely here, deftly crafting the Movies continued on page 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Movies continued from page 14

scenes between Hill and Franco. Goold also collaborated on the screenplay with Finkel and David Kajganich. The results here are a little more mixed. Most of the scenes are strong, but it struck me that some of the dialogue may have played out better on a stage. The weakest element of the film and story (at least as it is here; I have not read Finkel’s source material) is the development, or rather lack thereof with Mike’s girlfriend Jill, played by Felicity Jones (who most recently earned an Oscar nomination for playing Jane Hawking in The Theory of Everything). Her character is used so ineffectually throughout the entire film, save for one scene, where she delivers a deliciously verbal walloping to Longo. Jones and Hill also seemed to have a complete lack of chemistry which made them seem implausible as a unit. When the murderer has better chemistry with his dead wife, a character shown only in flashbacks, something’s not quite right. Whether the film truly cuts it as a suspense thriller is debatable, or is at least a matter of opinion. For me True Story excels as a character study; a disgraced journalist seeking redemption and a brutal murderer seeking a verdict of innocence. It seems both are seeking justification and perhaps vindication in the other. Hill and Franco engage in a battle of hubris and ego. The result is an unlikely friendship that is strangely fascinating. The next time we see Hill and Franco together onscreen they’ll likely be up to their more familiar antics, but funny or serious and contrary to many a critic, I like them. True story. Rated R for language and some disturbing material. Review by Michelle Keenan

While We’re Young  ½

Short Take: Life as they know it is reinvigorated and turned on its ear when a 40-something couple befriends a bohemian 20-something couple.

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

film reviews

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

Whatever Happened to Orson Welles?

M

A

Z

By

I

N

E

CHiP KaUFMann

May 6, 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of filmmaker, and larger than life personality, Orson Welles. While there have been and will continue to be a number of tributes throughout the year, including a recent retrospective at NYC’s Film Forum, it is interesting to note what has happened to Welles’ reputation as filmmaker and actor since his death Welles as Citizen Kane. 30 years ago. It has been in decline. It is not unusual Unfortunately, the screenplay, which was for an artist’s reputation to take a dip, written primarily by Herman J. Manciewicz, especially if they haven’t done anything was a very thinly disguised attack on newspain years, or were as self-aggrandizing as per tycoon William Randolph Hearst, whose Welles was when he was alive. After being papers refused to promote the film. Hollynumber one in Sight & Sound’ s list of top wood even offered to reimburse RKO all the films published every 10 years since 1952, money spent on the film if they would destroy Citizen Kane was finally toppled in 2012 the negative. Contrary to popular myth the by Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo. film did not lose money, but it really didn’t This is not only an indication of changmake any either. ing tastes among Sight & Sound voters, but Welles had completed his second film, The of recognition of a film that many more Magnificent Ambersons (see my DVD pick), people are familiar with. Outside of cinema and had gone to Brazil to make a documentary enthusiasts, Citizen Kane, along with the for Nelson Rockefeller when his string of sucrest of Welles’ movies, are films that are cesses ended. Backed by Hearst and pressure generally unknown to the public at large. from stockholders, RKO fired the studio head, No one back in 1941 would have precancelled Welles’ contract, and cut Ambersons dicted that. At 25 Orson Welles was on from 131 minutes to 88. It naturally tanked, top of the world. Three years earlier he and from then on Welles was labeled box ofhad caused a nationwide panic with his fice poison as a director. War of the Worlds radio broadcast, which Between 1944 and 1958 he would direct was so real, many people believed an only four more films in Hollywood. They were alien invasion was actually taking place. The Stranger (1946), The Lady Before that he formed the from Shanghai (1947), MacMercury Theatre to create beth (1948), and Touch of Evil low-budget, stylized produc(1958). None were released in tions of classic plays for the the versions Welles wanted, and WPA. only The Stranger made money. After conquering the Welles was always in demand theatre, and then radio while as an actor and used money still in his early 20s, movies from those appearances to try were the next logical step for and finance several independent Welles. Citizen Kane, which projects in Europe. Some, like was shot for a modest amount Othello (1952) and Falstaff of money, revolutionized 1940s (1965), succeeded critically, Hollywood by reminding them while others like Mr. Arkadin of many of the silent film techWelles with (1955) and The Trial (1962) did niques they had forgotten, such Loretta Young in not. None of these films ever as deep focus photography and The Stranger, 1946. got major releases. montage editing.

Welles in Touch of Evil.

By the 1960s Welles was an expatriate whose size had grown to biblical proportion along with his reputation as the artist ruined by Philistines. This was greatly aided by Welles himself, a natural raconteur, who inflated his contributions to such films as Jane Eyre (1944) and The Third Man (1949), movies that he did not direct. He continued to appear in movies throughout the 1960s and 70s. Notable appearances included A Man for All Seasons (1965), I’ll Never Forget What’s ’is Name (1967), and Catch 22 (1970). To people of my generation, he was the overweight spokesman for Paul Masson wine (“We will sell no wine before it’s time”), along with many other products. He was the man in black with the big cigar who made numerous appearances doing magic tricks on The Tonight Show – a man who always seemed short of breath. Although occasionally honored by outfits like the American Film Institute, his cinematic achievements were largely neglected except on college campuses. Welles died of a heart attack, brought on by a crash diet, at the age of 70 on October 10, 1985. His ashes now rest in an abandoned well in Spain. He left behind a number of incomplete projects which some of his friends and colleagues are still trying to finish. Welles loved to say that he started at the top and worked his way down. Now that a restored version of Falstaff just premiered, and a new documentary called Magician is due to be released later this year, his movies may finally receive the attention that they deserve.

Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts star in Noah Baumbach’s While We’re Young.

REEL TAKE: I recently noticed a pattern

in my opinions of Noah Baumbach’s work. When he collaborates with his friend Wes Anderson on a writing project, I love it. However, when he serves as captain, cook and chief bottle washer, it’s a different story. As writer, director, and producer, Baumbach has made some critically acclaimed films, The Squid

and the Whale among them. While I appreciate them, his DIY projects tend to hold little warmth for me. They are interesting character pieces, but rather unlikable and a tad too pretentious for my taste. That all changed with While We’re Young. In fact I think it’s one of the best pictures of the year so far. It’s early yet, but I expect that it will have a place on my top ten list at year end.

While We’re Young tells the story of a documentary filmmaker (Ben Stiller) in his mid-forties who’s at an impasse in his life. Josh is suffering a creative roadblock professionally and personally. He and his wife Cornelia (Naomi Watts) are adrift and slightly deadened as they enter midlife. Their friends have morphed into parental/family units, while they remain childless, which of course creates

distance between them and their friends. Josh and Cornelia are the kind of couple that talk about doing great things but never actually do them. So when they meet a young 20-something couple that embodies the people they used to be and the people they aspire to be, their life together is reinvigorated and Movies continued on page 16

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. May 3:

Citizen Kane (1941) Orson Welles made Citizen Kane at the age of only 25. The story of the rise and fall of a newspaper magnate was based on the life of William Randolph Hearst. It remains as remarkable today as it was over 70 years ago. In addition to Welles, the movie also features Joseph Cotten and Dorothy Comingore. Directed by Orson Welles.

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

film reviews

Movies continued from page 15

simultaneously turned on its ear. Jamie (Adam Driver) is an aspiring documentary filmmaker who admires Josh’s earlier work. His wife Darby (Amanda Seyfried) makes boutique ice cream. They are consummate hipsters. The contrasts between the Millennial couple and the Gen-X couple are stark, noteworthy and even comical and ironic. As can be expected, all is not what it seems. But it’s through the whole journey with Darby and Jamie that Josh and Cornelia find their own truth. Interestingly, however, Baumbach doesn’t leave it at just a personal coming-of-middle-age story. Because Josh and Cornelia inhabit the world of documentary filmmaking, that forum allows Baumbach to debate editorial and ethical integrity of documentary filmmaking in today’s on-demand, always streaming, and constantly connected world. The exploration of that truth and that dialogue seems like an entirely different concept better saved for another story altogether, but instead serves and enhances the primary story beautifully.

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

I like Ben Stiller, always have. But for many, his performance in While We’re Young will be a revelation. He and Baumbach previously collaborated on Greenburg, a good but cynical work (a little age is working to everyone’s advantage here). Naomi Watts and Amanda Seyfried both turn in terrific performances. It was also great to see Charles Grodin back on the big screen as Cornelia’s father. The Beastie Boys’ Adam Horowitz has a plum little role as one of Josh and Cornelia’s friends who has recently had children. For me the real Helen Mirren & Ryan Reynolds have great chemistry revelation was Adam Driver, who worked together in the stolen art docudrama Woman in Gold. with Baumbach on Frances Ha and has gained notoriety on the HBO show Girls. Woman in Gold  My only real issue with the film comes at the Short Take: True story of a woman very end of the story, but fortunately the final attempting to recover a painting stolen from shot throws even that plot point into question her family by the Nazis benefits from the and, in doing so, quelled my aggravation at a warm chemistry between leads Helen Mirren possibly contrived ending and instead left a and Ryan Reynolds. smile on my face. Rated R for language. Review by Michelle Keenan

REEL TAKE: The majority of critics have not been kind to Woman in Gold and, as is now Movies continued on page 17

May 10: Mother’s Day – No Show May 17: Chef (2014) One of the surprise hits of last year, this heartwarming comedy-drama follows the exploits of a gourmet chef who is reduced to operating a food truck while trying to maintain a relationship with his estranged young son. The film stars Jon Favreau and features Scarlett Johansson, Robert Downey, Jr., and Dustin Hoffman. Directed by Jon Favreau. May 24:

Now, Voyager (1942) A repressed spinster (Bette Davis), dominated by her mother, is transformed into a sophisticated, confident woman after a stay in a sanatorium. She meets a married man (Paul Henreid) while on a cruise and begins an affair which ends when the ship docks. After returning home she must confront her family and her innermost feelings. Directed by Irving Rapper. May 31: Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) Spencer Tracy has one of his best roles as a wounded World War II veteran who visits a small Western town to make a special delivery only to encounter intense hostility from the locals. Why are they so angry and what are they hiding? The all-star cast includes Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, and Lee Marvin. Directed by John Sturges.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Magnificent Ambersons”

May DVD Picks

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

While Citizen Kane always grabs the top slot as Orson Welles’ greatest cinematic achievement, I cast my vote for The Magnificent Ambersons. Welles’ follow-up to Kane is the antithesis of that film. While Kane loudly proclaims its brilliance from every frame, Ambersons is a much quieter film. This is probably due to the fact that the source material is an actual novel as opposed to an original, acerbic screenplay. Another major difference is that this time around Welles is content to stay behind the camera as director and let others share the limelight. The signature chiaroscuro lighting is there along with the dazzling camerawork but now they are in the service of the narrative rather than the reason for it. Booth Tarkington’s 1918 Pulitzer Prize winning novel concerns the rise and fall of a prosperous Midwestern family. Tied in with their decline is the development of the automobile and the disappearance of a simpler, more relaxed way of life. It’s one of the very few movies I can think of that by the end, makes you nostalgic for the beginning. Joseph Cotten, Delores Costello, Anne Baxter, and Agnes Moorehead lead a repertory company of Welles performers from his Mercury Theater days in radio. The real star of the film however is Tim Holt who portrays the spoiled rich kid George Minafer. Holt, primarily an actor in B Westerns, is best known for being one of the prospectors

16 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. The film was taken out of Welles’ hands after an unfavorable preview and cut from over 2 hours to only 88 minutes. It was fitted out with a happier ending which, ironically, is taken straight from the book. Despite the cuts and changes, The Magnificent Ambersons remains one of the greatest American films ever made. It is currently available in a newly released version for streaming as well as on DVD so that now everyone can have a chance to see it.

Jane Eyre (1944)

Of the umpteen television and film versions of Jane Eyre one of my favorites is the 1944 version starring our Joan Fontaine and our resident birthday boy, Orson Welles. Fans of Charlotte Bronte’s Gothic romance will not be disappointed. While it is very much a piece from Hollywood’s Golden Era, it is also one of the finest

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Jane Eyre” adaptations to be found. Directed by writerdirector Robert Stevenson and adapted for film by Aldous Huxley and John Houseman, it’s got an automatic pedigree few films possess. Orson Welles turns in a tour de force performance as a charismatically brooding Mr. Rochester and Joan Fontaine is the picture of raw believability and loveliness as the titular Jane. Add in the talents of a young Margaret O’Brien, Agnes Moorehead, Elizabeth Taylor and Henry Daniell and you have a winner. Stevenson’s adaptation is faithful to the Bronte classic but is also a wonderful example of filmmaking from the 1940s. The lighting and photography is wonderfully atmospheric. It is black and white photography in some of its best form. The photography evokes everything every young girl feels as she reads Ms. Bronte’s page turner for the first time. For those unfamiliar with the source material, Jane Eyre is the tale of a lonely, young governess sent to work for the enigmatic and difficult Mr. Rochester. Jane’s gentle influence and utter honesty cracks Mr. Rochester’s hard façade and they fall in love. But before they are married, Rochester’s dark secret is revealed, threatening any chance of happiness together. It’s a classic story that never goes out of style. Likewise this version of Jane Eyre is timeless. When film buffs are celebrating Welles’ bi-centennial, Jane Eyre will still be worth the watch.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Movies continued from page 16

often the case, I fail to see why. The film is well directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn), the real life story is fascinating and compelling, there is great chemistry between the two leads Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds, and it is solidly acted by everyone else. Woman in Gold tells the true story of Maria Altmann (Mirren) who, as an old woman, attempts to recover a priceless painting from the Austrian government that was stolen from her family by the Nazis before World War II even started. She wants it not for its value but because it is a portrait of her aunt. Since the painting is by renowned artist Gustav Klimt and is inextricably linked to pre-War Vienna, the Austrian government is determined to keep it. Maria’s first step in attempting to get it back is to hire a young lawyer, RanPortrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, painting dol Schoenberg by Gustav Klimt. (Reynolds) who just happens to be the grandson of celebrated 20th century composer Arnold Schoenberg. At first he is attracted by the value of the painting (over $1 million) but then it becomes more personal as the Austrian government keeps throwing obstacles in their way. Assisting them is an Austrian lawyer (Daniel Bruhl) who is trying to make amends as his father was once a member of the Nazi party. Providing moral support is Randol’s wife Pam, well played by Katie Holmes in a part that is smaller than you would expect. In fact the movie has two other well known actors making very brief appearances. Elizabeth McGovern portrays a sympathetic judge and Jonathan Pryce portrays Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist. Although engaging, Woman in Gold is not without its flaws. The principal drawback is in the pacing. As my colleague Michelle Keenan astutely pointed out, the movie seems longer than it actually is. That being said, there is still so much to recommend including Curtis’ deft handling of the flashback sequences and the period recreations of 1930s Vienna. The ending could not have been better handled. Fans of Helen Mirren and period dramas of this type will find it right up their alley while some people will learn something about stolen art and what has become of it. The film was made on a modest budget and, so far, has been a modest success. Its greatest asset is that, like the art that it is about, it will age gracefully and be just as enjoyable years from now as it is today. Rated PG-13 for strong language and thematic materials. Review by Chip Kaufmann

V

E

R

A

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

noteworthy

T

U

R

E

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Americana Burlesque & Sideshow Festival

ABSfest is now in its ninth year in Asheville, and Burlesque is only getting bigger worldwide. ABSfest attracts burlesque artists from around the world, and with three days of inspiration, performance, workshops, professional development, it’s a juggernaut of awesomeness that has spawned the glorious birth of a successful sister festival, the Virginia Burlesque & Sideshow Festival, in Richmond, VA. Also, we are happy to be working again in 2015 with local organizations to speak to issues of consent, gender rights, and empowerment. Our ABSfest Artist of the Year award for 2015 goes to the one and only Kitty Love of the Asheville Area Arts Council.

By

OnCa O’LeaRy

Mab Just Mab, DC’s Own Sideshow Girl. Brother Ben Wisdom of the New Orleans Snake Oil Festival. The Judy Chops, Virginia Mountain Swing. And so many more! Festival Producer Lauren ‘Madame Onça’ O’Leary travels internationally teaching and performing dance, music and stagecraft.

Friday, May 22 The Annual Live Music & Burlesque Speakeasy, with music by the Judy Chops, 8 p.m. GlitterDome! Last Pasties Standing Comedy Improv, hosted by Sadie Hawkins, 10:30 p.m. $15 each show; $25 for both. Grey Eagle Music Hall, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville.

Saturday, May 23

Sidetracked Theatre

Saturday Spectacular Show – Starring award-winning Mr. Gorgeous, Sidetracked, and many more. Enjoy the phenomenal talent of the burlesque world in a full immersion experience! This is the show to never, ever miss in Asheville.

Mr. Gorgeous, King of Burlesque from the West Coast.

VIP are always assured a chair near the action. Doors open at 7 p.m. $25 general admission, $45 VIP seating with goody bags. Orange Peel Social Aid & Pleasure Club, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville.

Sidetracked Theatre, two-woman storytelling comedy duo from Philly.

Tickets available at the box office, or visit www.theorangepeel.net.

Festival Headliners

C

M

Cardboard Poncho

Sunday, May 24 Burlesque Brunch Cabaret – Hosted by New Orleans very own Reverend Pastor Father Brother Ben Wisdom, it’s an idyllic ‘spiritual’ cure for the end-of-ABSfest blues. This show sold out last year! 12:30-2 p.m. $12. Grey Eagle Music Hall, 185 Clingman Ave Asheville.

Friday through Sunday Workshops Burlesque, Circus and Business Workshops – Train with artists from around the country in the ABSfest Sexy Seminary in stagecraft, circus arts, fire performance, burlesque and more. Open to all levels. Dive on in! M & L Center, French Broad Food Co-op, 90 Biltmore Ave.

IF YOU GO

Americana Burlesque & Sideshow Festival, May 22-24 at locations around Asheville. For tickets, reservations or more information, please visit www.absfest.com

The Great American Trailer Park Musical

Charlotte Street Computers continues its Power On Community fundraising opportunity for local non-profits. The local business is sponsoring a private performance of The Great American Trailer Park Musical at The Asheville Community Theatre on Thursday, June 18 at 7:30 p.m. Participating organizations will be provided with a block of tickets at no cost, and can retain 100% of the money realized from sales to their donor base. Applicants are encouraged to check the Asheville Community Theatre website (www.ashevilletheatre.org) to ensure that the content of the play is appropriate for their organization’s target audience prior to submitting an application, then email

marketing@charlottestreetcomputers.com for more details. Charlotte Street Computers is an independent computer repair company founded in 2002. Today the company has grown to a staff of 18 team members, including 10 of the top service technicians in the area. CEO Jennifer Mayer operates the company with a continued focus on customer satisfaction and philanthropic marketing. Charlotte Street Computers provides upgrades, networking, troubleshooting, and repairs for home computers and small business systems for both Macs and PCs. The company also provides daily computer classes, oneon-one tutoring, On-site service, and rental computers for customers who are having their systems repaired. Charlotte Street Computers is a one-stop shop for exceptional repair and retail, and sells

By

Lee ann BUBROWSKi

the full line of Apple computers. Charlotte Street Computers is located at 252 Charlotte Street in Asheville, and is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 am to 5 p.m. on Saturday. For more information or to register for classes, visit www.charlottestreetcomputers.com or call (828) 225-6600. To find out about contests, giveaways, and the latest computer trends and products, become their fan on Facebook. IF YOU GO

The Great American Trailer Park Musical, Thursday, June 18 at 7:30 p.m. at The Asheville Community Theatre. Visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 17


R

I

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

fine art

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

The Value of Color A KEY PART OF ART IDENTITY

It’s clear that color is a key factor in all art. In the design fields, colors and various combinations of them – and even areas lacking color – become even more strategic. And when it comes to establishing one’s identity, along with all the other aspects of creating a brand, how one chooses and uses color is critical. Over the decades, I have worked with folks who take this task seriously, and with beautiful results. Others have made less than strategic choices, resulting in a visual randomness that didn’t necessarily support their business goals. I’ve seen identity programs turn out to be unattractive, unreadable and un-reproducible in all applications, sometimes due to efforts to be “unique,” or out of simple loyalty to an old, favorite hue. The most difficult experiences for designers are when clients insist on using color schemes that don’t relate to their product, environment or market, which then leads to poor marketing, visual inconsistency, confusion and complex PR. I recommend people stay strategic, keep the consumer top of mind, and trust the experts. Something to consider with color is whether one’s selections are right for the long-term. This goes for everything from business identity to packaging to what color one has decided to paint the house. A friend of mine just shared excellent choices for her exterior and front door, reflecting not only the

Creatives Sketched ARTISTS & WRITERS, PROMOTE YOURSELF Artists and writers are invited to contribute to our new web exclusive section – “Creatives Sketched.” With a rapidly growing readership, the Rapid River Magazine website is a great way to promote yourself, and a great way for potential buyers and readers to learn about you. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com.

WWW.RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

By

Stay strategic, keep the consumer top of mind, and trust the experts. aesthetics she is known for, but also the period of the home, and increased curb appeal (and, therefore, home value). In art, craft, design, interiors, and all sorts of retail, we are surrounded by inspiring examples of successful uses of color. In grocery stores, observe how package design systems convey their products, how signage leads shoppers to another zone, and even the way that different colors on the shelves draw the eye. At home, look in your cabinets – there are schemes for medical supplies, personal products, foods, home items, and more. Industries like automotive, and institutions like hospitals also have hues we readily associate. Color can be quite trendy, too. Many artists and designers look forward to annual trend reports from companies like Pantone, and Benjamin Moore Paints. It’s important to sift through these carefully, adopting tones that won’t feel dated in just a year or two. I recall a couple zingers from way back, a particular aqua and a particular mauve, which I simply call “80’s Mall Colors,” that are never to return. On the flip side, I have a Member’s Only jacket from the same period that is the most

M

GReG VineyaRD

exquisite shade of blue-gray. The jacket is of course too retro to wear (so I’m told), but the color is amazing. It’s the perfect pigment for a suit, a house, a car… any of which would stand the test of time. Keep in mind when evaluating one’s color choices: What are my most and least favorites? Why do I react to them the way that I do? Are the colors I’m choosing appropriate for my area of business? Do my choices have reasonable online equivalents? Will these colors print well in magazines and newspapers? Will these colors translate to a black and white version? For how many years do I need this palette to work?

i love hue, 2015 by Greg Vineyard

of the best in trends, to heavily researched science, as well as to best practices, from mixing to reproduction in the digital age. It’s a cornucopia of hues, and it’s all here for us.

Have I engaged a professional to help me? Color is part of identification, recognition and awareness in any marketplace, and great resources are available to each of us as we think about the role colors play in our identity development process, and how well they represent our product or service. The colors we’re surrounded by are a testament to history, to cultivation of the best

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Getting Your Work Seen

Most artists start out working from a home studio - and many prefer to keep it that way. However, you can’t expect the world to beat a path to your door! So here are some ways to get your work in front of new audiences. Even if there is not one in your area, you may be able to participate in an established neighborhood art tour. Some artists are happy to host a guest artist – especially if your work does not compete with what they have to offer! Such an arrangement may include a fee, percentage of sales, and/or volunteering to help publicize, set up, clean-up, etc. Try to make arrangements many months in advance, so details about your participation can be included in the event’s publicity. Two local happenings this month are the Weaverville Art Safari, May 2-3; and the Kenilworth Studio Stroll, May 23-24. Research which art museums and art centers sponsor artist talks, demonstrations or

18 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

art festivals. Volunteer to help a participating artist at an event before deciding to jump in the deep end of the pool. This is a great way to learn about the event schedule, the physical aspects of setup and breakdown, and get a preview of the audience. Connect with your local arts council and find out about any exhibit opportunities offered there. Discuss the possibility of add-on events or incentives to draw attention and increase attendance. Routinely explore existing opportunities to show in your area and beyond, including retail stores, restaurants, service-based businesses, libraries, educational facilities and other public

By

WenDy H. OUTLanD

buildings. Check out opportunities on the Asheville Artists listserv, which is a free Yahoo Group. Also, from the main page of the North Carolina Arts Council website, you can scroll to the bottom and click on NC Arts Everyday; then scroll down the page to click on Artist Opportunities. Consider joining artist organizations that have an ongoing roster of exhibits, programs and other opportunities. And finally, it’s always a good idea to ask others about their experience with various arts organizations, events, etc. Artists are generally very willing to share information and encourage others. So, don’t be shy!

The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

Downtown

Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

AL JUNEK Fine Art

Don’t Forget Mom!

F

For anyone looking for the perfect gift for mom this Mother’s Day weekend (the kind she’ll never forget), look no further! The team at LaZoom Bus Tours created a special 75 minute Mom’s Day Ride that is sure to make her day! Only four shows: Saturday, May 9 at 5 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 10 at 1 and 3 p.m. See Earlene Hooch and Augusta Wind together! They will be giving moms more than they ever expected as they explore what being a “real mother” is all about. They’ll talk about the dangers that mom’s face on a daily basis... running with scissors, dealing with skid marks, and what to do when your kids have too much whine.

707 Victory Lane • Hendersonville 828 890-5777     Cell:  828 606-4127 junekal60@yahoo.com www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

5 Important Tips from Earlene and Augusta:

“French Cuisine“

1. Don’t buy your mother tweezers for her chin hair.

Works by Cheryl Keefer at:

2. It ain’t polite to stare (no matter how weird someone looks).

Wedge Studios 129 Roberts St. River Arts District By appt.

3. Don’t touch that, you don’t know where it’s been!

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Downtown

4. Don’t look at me like that... Your face is gonna freeze that way! 5. You don’t want to know what your father is really thinking!

Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

IF YOU LaZoom Mother’s Day Tours. Tickets are $23. GO Must be 13 years or older. LaZoom Bus Tours, 1

½ Battery Park Avenue, Asheville. Call (828) 2256932, or visit www.lazoomtours.com.

PG. 10

5

PG. 20

7

PG. 25

MS

828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

Jce Schlapkohl Works on Display at: Asheville Gallery of . 20 Art, Downtown 7

“After the Storm”

PG

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

PG. 41

MS

Cedar Hill Studios, . 25 Waynesville PG

WC

1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade PG. 20

18

Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

PG. 20

PH

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 19


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Downtown

MAY 2015

Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

My Wonky World

Pack Square Park, Downtown Asheville The sculptural railing on Reuter Terrace was designed and built by Black Mountain artist Julia Burr.

Works by

Sandi Anton Opening Reception

Friday, May 1 5-8 pm 23

Show runs May 1-31, 2015

“Night’s End” by Sandi Anton

Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

20

Wonky, funky, never-perfect buildings are Anton’s obsession. “I find life much more interesting in the imperfections.”

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m. “My Wonky World” by Sandi Anton

ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 16 College Street, Downtown Asheville Hours: Monday-Saturday 10-5pm; Sundays 1-4pm 828.251.5796

www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

7

20 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery

9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

N. Lexington Ave.

A

College St.

. St

2

N. Spruce St.

W

Broadway St.

19

N. Market St.

Walnut St.

PACK SQUARE

Patton Ave.

10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

8

14

CH

3

6 20

21

S. Market St.

1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery

K

ge

B

Eagle St.

10 13

Sycamore

16

1

Hilliard Ave.

11

S. Spruce St.

“Untitled,” acrylic Christine Siegfried

Coxe

PH

C

le ol

St.

9

17

Wilson

4

Patton Ave.

7

22

L

Biltmore Ave.

t. Wall S N

23

S. Lexington Ave.

Battery Park

E

Rankin Ave.

18 5

M Haywood St.

GROVE ARCADE

Page Ave.

P

“Back of Theatre,” oil Bill Cole

15

C

Church

The Asheville Gallery of Art features a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

Woodfi n

12

O


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Mother’s Day

May 10

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART PRESENTS

A

My Wonky World

Asheville Gallery of Art will feature the work of Sandi Anton during the month of May. Her show, titled “My Wonky World,” is filled with wonky, funky, never-perfect buildings, which Anton claims are her obsession. “I find life much more interesting in the imperfections,” she says. Anton first held a brush in her hand in May of 2009, and fell in love with the world in color. “Suddenly, all objects and subjects became potential paintings,” she says. She claims that experimentation and practice were key to her process without sacrificing her spontaneity. “I began using a very limited palette of only primary colors. This exercise taught me color, light, and composition, while inspiring creativity and supporting my individual technique and style.”

P

Having lived in the French Quarter in New Orleans for 12 years, much of what she paints and the subjects she’s most drawn to are architectural in nature, though she continues to experiment with other themes and techniques. Anton now lives in the Asheville area, where she and her husband, Tom, write and produce movies, as well as spearhead the Asheville Cinema Festival. IF YOU The public is invited to the opening GO reception on Friday, May 1 from 5 to 8

p.m., where they can view Sandi Anton’s work as well as the works of the 27 other gallery artists. My Wonky World will run May 1-31, 2015.

add family birthstones to create

My Wonky World by Sandi Anton.

Mom’s Family Tree

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street, downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

Hours: Mon-Sat 10-5:30; Sun 1-4 PG. 20

(828) 251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

15

www.jewelsthatdance.com

63 Haywood Street • Downtown Asheville 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon - Sat 10:30 - 6

RARE FIRST EDITIONS, KISSY VAMPIRES, AND MORE AT

Downtown Books and News

Pictures of customers, a cat that hung around for 18 years, and staff Christmas parties, adorn the walls.

own Malaprop’s. Both stores are owned by Emöke B’Racz. Despite his extensive experience in the book selling business, Vorus said he’s constantly surprised by what comes through the An antique dentist’s work station door of the shop. “Without fail, every week serves as a planter in the corner. And the here I’ve seen books I’ve never seen before in wonderful smell of old books fills every my life,” he said. nook and cranny. Rare first editions, musty Downtown Books old leather-bound books and News has operated on intellectual subjects, and in Asheville for 28 years, newspapers from around the and it’s just as eclectic world may conjure images as ever. The inventory of a stuffy old bookstore, but hovers around 28,000 that’s not the case. used books, all bought “There’s a few things we from people who come try to steer away from,” said into the store, and the Vorus with a smile. “We don’t material keeps regulars really have a romance section, coming back weekly. but there’s stupid fun stuff “There’s a real here as well.” randomness here bePerched under a sign cause we don’t control indicating the “kissy vampire our inventory,” said books” section is a cardboard Julian Vorus, the store’s cutout of Mark Hamill as manager for the last Luke Skywalker, grinning on ten years. Vorus ran a the end of a row of paperbookstore in Manhattan, backs. But not fifty feet away and worked at Downis a rare first edition of the town News and Books’ Downtown Books and News Lewis and Clark expedition is as eclectic as ever. bigger sister, Asheville’s from 1814 that walked in the

By

PeTRaS BaRCaS

door one day late last year. Vorus said some customers know the value of what they have when they go to sell, some don’t know what they have. “He didn’t,” said Vorus of the $4,500 book’s seller. “We did the right thing and continued on page 32

® Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

v Custom Designed Jewelry v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

36 Haywood Street

Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

29 Biltmore Ave.

Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

(828) 281-4044 PG. 20

e

PG. 20

21

www.vandykejewelry.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 21


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

Sandra Brugh Moore’s “Santangles”

S

Sandra Brugh Moore has been well-known in the Asheville area for years for her beautiful plein air landscape watercolors.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

Virginia Pendergrass

by

Now for Moore, “Patterns are everywhere. I am always searching for patterns, and letting them flow and emerge In April of 2014 however, freely into designs on paper.” her life forever changed with Using the Zentangle the sudden death of her dear philosophy of letting your husband. Moore says, “I realmistakes become a part of ized in the subsequent months the artwork, she injected the that my art had to change, too. fluidity and vibrant color of I am not the same person after brushed watercolor into her Within, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. pen/ink watercolor losing my best friend.” pen and ink works, creating by Sandra Brugh Moore. During a period of reflecher own new art form. tion over the past year, she “In the reverse process,” discovered a new way of creating visual patterns through added Moore, “I turn watercolor sketches into my new art Zentangle- a creative meditation process using pen and by adding ink patterns to an existing watercolor study. I am ink. The new art of visual patterns, and the meditative led by the shapes within the painting. This makes someaspects of this, became therapeutic for her grief. Accordthing that was old new again.” ing to Moore, “Over time, I was able to reawaken from With the addition of color, and creating her own patthe shock of my loss through the support of family and terns, Moore now call her designs “Santangles.” friends--and the meaningful focus Zentangles brought to Her search for patterns to use in her Santangles continmy art.”

continued on page 43

French Broad Artists

RG

SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS

RF

RS

NEW STUDIO IN THE RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

RC

RP RG RJ RT

RB

RL

Sanctuary Tree, 7x10 in. pen/ink watercolor by Sandra Brugh Moore

Visit us during the River Arts District Studio Stroll May 9 & 10 from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. RG

Riverview Station #216 • Asheville, NC 191 Lyman St., South Entrance

BARBARA WADE

Mixed Media Artist 140d Roberts Street

RV

Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

22 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

RV

RD


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

M

Little did my parents know that when they took me to Oconoluftee River for a Sunday afternoon picnic or camping among the bears in Cades Cove they were establishing my career path. I grew up under the shade of great oak, hemlock and maple trees and looking for pink Lady’s Slippers, my mother’s favorite, among the pines. At 22, I was carrying my only child, Jacob, when I began to paint with watercolor. Being self-taught, I really didn’t know what medium would be my favorite until a friend gave me a set of Prismacolor Pencils. I was mesmerized by all the rich colors and the textures you could achieve by applying layers, blending and burnishing to create new colors. I was able to draw with meticulous detail, rendering the fur of bear cubs and rabbits and the smooth finish of Magnolia leaves. As I gained confidence I found that colored pencils were the perfect medium for illustrating the adornments of the Biltmore House and Gardens. I am very fortunate and blessed to be celebrating 30 years in business. In 1985 I rented a small space for my gallery on Church Street in Waynesville.

By

C

fine art

Celebrating 30 Years of Fine Art

My journey began in the ancient, forested mountains of western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

&

TeReSa PenninGTOn

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Songs & Comedy Skits Celebrating Life’s Special Events

“I found that the things and places that made me happy as a child are the ones that make me happy now.”

Birthday Valentine’s Day Anniversary Get Well Retirement Heartfelt & Memorable Same Day Service

www.thesingingtelegram.com

828.290.5715

Once Upon a Forest, illustration by Teresa Pennington

DOT EDITIONS FINE ART PRINTING

PHOTOGRAPHY OF 2D AND 3D ARTWORK

The Old Homeplace, illustration by Teresa Pennington

Twenty one years ago I purchased a building at 15 North Main Street and now I have three wonderful employees who are my behind the scenes support team. The drawing “Into the Smokies,” reprinted here, is my 30th Anniversary Commemorative print. I have also completed a new series of four drawings of Cades Cove in the Smokies titled “Something Red.” Pictured is “The Old Homeplace,” my grandparent’s farm in Candler where I spent a lot of time as a child. I have gone back to my roots during this 30th year and I found that the things and places that made me happy as a child are the ones that make me happy now. In my 30 year career, I have been commissioned by the U.S. Forest service, the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation and the magnificent Biltmore Estate. My desire is to, through my work, honor God who has blessed me with a gift. I wish I had written this quote by Mother Teresa, that resonates with me, “I’m just a little pencil in God’s hand.”

Into the Smokies, 30th Anniversary Commemorative print. Colored pencil illustration by Teresa Pennington.

828.275.7028 PG. 40

RB

Archival Pigment Prints Custom Framing & Stretchers

828-575-5534

www.doteditions.com

Asheville’s Full Service Fine Art Studio

2004 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, UNIT W. ASHEVILLE, NC 28804 Weddings, Graduations, Family Portraits, Nature and Scenic Photos

TPennington Art Gallery 15 North Main Street, Waynesville (828) 452-9284, www.tpennington.com

940-783-2027

AMBER COMBS PHOTOGRAPHY

Marion, NC amber_combs@aol.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 23


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

Watch and Marvel as Artists Create Original Works in One Hour!

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

T

The Waynesville Gallery Association is excited to present a new season of Art After Dark, beginning Friday, May 1.

Saturday, May 16 4:30 p.m. Tickets: $60

Live Art Hour & Auction

Laurel Ridge Country Club, Waynesville

www.WNCQuickDraw.com

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

Emerging Artists Becky Burnette, Jewelry Metalsmith Crystal Allen, Clay Artist Demonstrations by the artists during

Art After Dark, Friday, May 1 • 6-9PM

B&C Winery Locally Crafted Wines PG. 25

828.550.3610

WT

98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com

145 Wall Street PG. 25

WW

Downtown Waynesville

24 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

WAYNESVILLE Art After Dark

Art You Watch + 1-Hour Sprint + Artists on the Block = Philanthropy x FUN!

E

By Jeannie

SHUCKSTeS

Her triple strand necklaces are her signature, although she makes necklaces from single to five strands. Earrings, bracelets and necklace extenders are also part of her seasonal collections. Also available are custom made pieces for weddings, birthdays and Mother’s Day. Mama Necklaces are one of a kind creations using the mom and children’s birthstones. Beautiful. The Village Framer will be featuring the beautiful pottery of Cory Houston Plott. A potter native to the Appalachians, Cory’s “plottware” is affordable and durable, yet also artistic and sculptural works of art. Stop by and watch Cory in action as he demonstrates on a manual wheel. We will be kicking off the new season of Art After Dark with jazz guitarist and vocalist, James Hammel. His unique arrangements of songs from the Great American Songbook (jazz standards) will take you to another time and place. Stop by and welcome spring with us with art and music, and peruse hundreds of new framing samples. Light refreshments will be served. The Waynesville Gallery Association was formed in 1996, and together represent a multitude of local and national artists. As you visit the art galleries and studios of Downtown Waynesville, we hope you will gain a sense of the uniqueness and diversity represented. Paintings, sculpture, furniture, metal, pottery, graphics, weaving, glass and jewelry are but a few of the surprises waiting for you to discover.

Enjoy a stroll through working studios and galleries on beautiful Main Street, Waynesville. Festive Art After Dark flags denote participating galleries, such Five strand necklace as Haywood County Arts by Suzy Johnson, at Council’s Gallery 86, EarthEarthworks Gallery. works, Jeweler’s Workbench, Burr Studio, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, TPennington Art Gallery, Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery, Cedar Hill Studios and the Village Framer. “Emerging Artists” Becky Burnette, jewelry metalsmith, and Crystal Allen, clay artist, will be kicking off the Art After Dark season at Twigs and Leaves Gallery Friday evening, May 1, 6-9 p.m. Both are recent graduates of Haywood Community ColFind pottery by lege’s Creative Arts Program Cory Houston Plott at and have evolved into amazThe Village Framer. ingly talented artisans. Friday evening, as you stroll through the gallery’s 145+ primarily regional artists, enjoy piano music by Waynesville’s Diane Wolfe and delight in the savory hors d’eurves. If you are participating in the Chamber’s Half Marathon on Saturday, May 2, come by AAD for a good luck treat. Twigs and Leaves Gallery, 98 North Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786 Open Enjoy live music by Monday through Saturday James Hammel at 10-5:30; (828) 456-1940 The Village Framer. www.twigsandleaves.com The creator of FourElements BeadWorks, Suzy Johnson, will be in house at Earthworks Gallery as the featured artist. Meet and greet her and shop her newest collection for late spring and summer, fresh from her Find works by Crystal studio. Using semi-precious Allen, clay artist, at Twigs stones, precious stones, and Leaves Gallery. For more details on these and other events, visit the pearls, coral and mother of Waynesville Gallery Association online at pearl, Suzy creates jewelry that represents WaynesvilleGalleryAssociation.com. the four elements of Earth, Sky, Water and Fire.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

WAYNESVILLE ARTIST

BLUE RIDGE

OF THE

WC

WS WT

WP

“Old Homeplace” Candler NC. Colored pencil drawing. WM

WW

WP

WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY.

WA

Twigs & Leaves Gallery is WV

Carryout + Catering

Bursting with Spring

Fresh Southern Homemade Meals & Desserts

WH

828-550-2265

Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

1092 N. Main Street • Waynesville, NC Mon-Sat 6am-2:30pm

Sun 7am - 2:30pm

PG. 40

WK

FEET HURT? All Types of Major Appliances Bonded & Insured

Walk-In Foot and Ankle Clinic Monday - Thursday 1-4pm

828-456-4989 Fax: 828-456-7021 Mark1462@Att.net

WAYNESVILLE 289 Access Road 452-4343 ASHEVILLE 573 Merrimon Avenue 254-7716 www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

Mountain Top Appliance Service Mark Atkinson • Reputable Repairs

91 Smokies Ridge, Waynesville, NC 24 Hour Emergency Service 828-646-7422

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature Mark your calendar to join us as we kick off the season’s first Art After Dark on May 1st featuring jewelry artist Becky Burnette and clay artist Crystal Allen.

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville PG. 40

WV

etching by Andrea Wilson

Wa

WT

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 25


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

WILD ABOUT

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

WAYNESVILLE

A Room with a Hue

A

QuickDraw Participating Artists

Artists Transform Laurel Ridge Country Club Into Atelier. The idea of creating art in the public eye is familiar in the American South West. Patrons flock to outdoor quickdraws to watch plein-air and cowboy painters and snap up their works. In western North Carolina, artists tweaked the concept to craft an original, memorable Mark Menendez delineates a heron before onlookers Photographer Ed Cassidy Russell and art event that directly supports during QuickDraw 2014. Photo Lori Johnson Kelley provided Tanan Webb create art teaching in schools. entertainment. coiled baskets. Photo Jo Kelley Photo Annelle Woggon Enter QuickDraw 2015, where artists upend the tion that education matters. fund innovative art teacher grants. Now in its traditional studio setting and work in Besides working live, painters up the ante 14th year, QuickDraw patrons are the lifeblood the inspired indoor/outdoor venue of and embrace risk during the event’s quickto invigorating teachers and inspiring students. Waynesville’s Laurel Ridge Country draw portion: to start and finish an original QuickDraw founder Gretchen Clasby Club. Artists create in front of the work in sixty minutes. Artists plan for months notes: “It is probably true that most artists bystander, stepping out of their comfort choosing a subject and color palette, and doing think about what they are going to paint for zones to stand up for art teachers in practice studies. Notes Clasby: “the first time months, and break down the process. I know public schools. On Saturday, May 16, I tried the painting with a stopwatch, it took I cannot complete a painting in the hour, guests join to see forty artists create origseven hours. My second attempt took five. I never have been able to.” Clasby works from inal works, and then buy them at aucnever could get it past three at home.” During her gut. “I never have the luxury of months tion to put supplies on art shelves and the one-hour challenge, there’s no time to of thought and planning. If I have two days second-guess a brushstroke. Asheville’s Ann ahead to think about it and do a practice piece, I am blessed indeed.” Guests gain a birds-eye view of the creative process, and report it inspiring and informing. Artists gain a venue to show new work, a chance to push the comfort envelope while they draw upon inner steel and ignore inner voices to work live. Art buyers and collectors More photos, details, and articles at have a chance to rub elbows with their favorite Clay artist Cathey Bolton incises and www.RapidRiverMagazine.com artists, as well as watch their technique. Art stamps her botanical-themed works. Photo Bob Ludlow teachers and students gain a very real affirma-

Web Exclusive

• Jenny Buckner • Gretchen Clasby • Bete Coningsby • Anne DerGara • Dominick DePaolo • Guido Frick • Jon Houglum • Cheryl Keefer • Jo Ridge Kelley • Susan Lingg • Mark Menendez • Teresa Pennington • Kelly Phipps • Joyce Schlapkohl • Bee Sieburg • Teri Siewert • Sarah Sneeden • Ann Vasilik • Melissa Enloe Walter • Cindy Walton • Cathey Bolton • Rebecca Hellman • Keri Anna Kelley Hollifield • Juan Peña Mejia • Tracey McCracken Palmer • Mike McKinney • Margaret Roberts • Karen Zimmerman

Vasilik treats the clock challenge as “an exercise in reductionism, which creates a very fresh result.” The event includes the sixty-minute quickdraw challenge and silent auction, auction preview, an entertaining live auction, and concludes with a meetand-greet buffet social with patrons and artists. IF YOU GO

QuickDraw, Saturday, May 16 from 4:30-9:30; shotgun start 5-6 p.m. Laurel Ridge Country Club, Cupp Lane, Waynesville. Tickets are $60 per person and include admission, auction registration, live quickdraw, and meet-the-artists buffet. For the complete schedule and to purchase tickets visit www. WNCQuickDraw.com.

Massie Furniture Company 45 North Main Street, Waynesville 828-456-3311 • Hours: M-Sat 8:30am - 5:30pm Massie Furniture is proud to support the Waynesville Art Association’s presentation of the most recent acrylic paintings by local artist

Take Advantage of Our

SUMMER SPECIALS 25% OFF

Rick Hills

Suggested Sugges Retail Price

PG. 25

WM

Delivery in WNC is Always FREE!

E

On display June 1 - July 30 at Gallery 86 on Main Street. We Offer Expert Decorating Services Serving WNC Since 1920

26 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

Additional paintings by Rick Hills are available across Main Street. Please stop by.

PG. 25

WS

121 North Main Street, Waynesville (828) 452-3611 • www.shopatstyle.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

WILD ABOUT

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

WAYNESVILLE

U

L

T

U

R

E

Buy Haywood for Mother’s Day

M

Mother’s Day is just around the corner.

Peony photo courtesy of Ricardo Fernandez of Wildcat Ridge Farm.

If you are looking for a uniquely local present, visit one of our plant nursery and landscaping partners for an unforgettable gift that keeps giving season after season! From mixed containers and spectacular hanging baskets, to perennials, shrubs, trees, and mixed herb pots for the culinary lover — even locally made pottery and gift certificates. Haywood County nurseries have an array of possibilities to remind mom just how special she is! For gift giving inspiration, visit our Farm Fresh Blog at www.buyhaywood. com to read about a love affair with peonies. “Subscribe” to Buy Haywood to receive notifications of new blog posts, local events, recipes and updates. For the foodie in your life, Sunday, May 10 typically marks the last spring frost date in Haywood County. This is a great time to plant your herb, vegetable and flower gardens. Vegetable and herb starts can be purchased at local nurseries,

Haywood County Arts & Culture

T

The Honey Hollar Band –

Performing Saturday and Sunday, May 16 & 17 as part of the Saturday and Sunday Concert Series sponsored by the Friends of the Library of Haywood County and facilitated by the Haywood County Arts Council. The Honey Hollar ladies pick a fiddle and guitar to provide a lot of good old fashioned ‘hootin and hollarin’ fun! Come on out to your local library and join in the great old time country music of the Honey Hollar band! Concerts take place Saturday, May 16 at 3 p.m. at the Waynesville library, and Sunday, May 17 at 3 p.m. at the Canton library.

By

BeTina MORGan

within the next six months to a year.

Art of Wood and Metal – Fine art exhibit

at Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery and Gifts. The show will officially open to the public The Honey Hollar band at the on Wednesday, June 3 Waynesville library. with an artist reception held Friday, June 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. during Art After Dark in downtown Waynesville. The show will feature the beautiful paintings of Rick Hills of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine; the personally designed and crafted wooden furniture of Stephen Metzger Wine Tasting Event – The of Burl Wood Gallery in Haywood County Arts Jewelry by Becky Burnette at Twigs downtown Waynesville; Council and Bosu’s Wine and Leaves Gallery. and the alluring and Shop are collaborating to attractive contemporary host a wine tasting event wood and metal sculptures of Michael Dodson on Friday, May 29 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Bosu’s. of Lifespan Abilities Illuminated. Tickets can be purchased at both establishThe show will also feature guest artist ments for $25 a ticket. Come and enjoy the Becky Burnette, of Twigs and Leaves Gallery distinctive wines and delicious food! in downtown Waynesville. The show will Gallery 86 Becomes Gallery and Gifts – Be run through June and July of 2015. Twigs & on the lookout for the changes coming to the Leaves is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86 as it transitions into the Haywood County Art IF Council’s Gallery and Gifts. YOU For more details on these events, The Arts Council’s gallery has featured GO contact the Haywood County Arts consignment items for sale during the last Council, 86 North Main Street, several years and is now adding to its selecWaynesville. Call (828) 452-0593 or visit tion. Changes to the gallery will take place www.haywoodarts.org.

By

Tina MaSCiaReLLi

farmer and tailgate markets along with shrubs, flowers and perennials. A listing of Buy Haywood partners can be found on our online directory under Plant Nurseries & Landscaping, or by picking up a printed “Find your Adventure! 2015 Agritourism Guide,” available at area visitor centers and other locations. Buy Haywood is a project of the Haywood Advancement Foundation. 28 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Waynesville, NC 28786. For more information contact Tina Masciarelli, Buy Haywood Project Coordinator, (828) 7349574, ttmascia@alumni.unca.edu

Whole Bloomin’ Thing Festival

T

The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival takes place Saturday, May 9 in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level. Local growers will furnish plenty of herbs, flowers, and trees, while artisans will provide a plethora of nature-related items. From birdhouses to baskets, and pottery to plants, this festival is the best way to jump-start the growing season. Admission is free; held rain or shine. The Haywood County Master Gardeners will be on hand to help you with any gardening questions. Musical groups will perform all day and include the Frog Level Philharmonic, Bohemian Jean, and more. There will also be wonderful food vendors to keep you in sustenance while you enjoy your day.

Birdhouse Bash

Daydreamz project and Open Door Community Gardeners are celebrating spring by asking local youth and adults to create or decorate birdhouses for a silent auction to benefit local community gardens and community-art projects. Birdhouses may be delivered to the Second Blessing Thrift Store on Commerce Street from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, until May 7. The Birdhouses will be auctioned at the Daydreamz booth during the festival. Winning bidders will be notified at 3 p.m., and birdhouses may be taken to their new home or garden by 4 p.m. IF YOU GO

Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival, Saturday, May 9 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level. Visit us at Facebook.com/ wholebloominfestival

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 27


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

S

&

Wake

BLUE PIG MUSIC

If 2013’s Carnival was Nora Jane Struthers’ awakening to an understanding of her own talents and the possibilities therein, the appropriately titled Wake is that promise fulfilled. Bristling with energy and unbridled joy (and an ideal effort for a spring release) the central theme of its 12 songs can best be summarized as “grab the goodness of life while you can.” Musically it moves Struthers further away from her bluegrass traditions and towards a more encompassing alternative country sound with undertones of honky tonk, roadhouse blues, and early Wilco styled roots rock. For someone born and raised in New Jersey, Struthers sure sings with a lovely twang. “When I Wake” is hopelessly (in a good way) romantic while the remaining tracks celebrate her recent success, and her gratitude for such. Producer Chris Strayhorn seems the ideal complement for Struthers and her lively band, sequencing the album with a keen sense of dynamics (a bit of a lost art these days) while Struthers delivers her songs in a narrative arc, telling a story in chapters that add one to the other but stand independently. It adds up to an effort that yet again asserts her as an artist to watch, a still relatively under the radar screen voice ready to take on the world. ***1/2

James McMurtry

Complicated Game

COMPLICATED GAME RECORDS

Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

As ridiculously talented as he is — few musicians so consistently write songs as lyrically demanding and musically confident, James McMurtry’s indifference to the making of records makes him his own worst enemy. Every one of his ten studio efforts abounds in great songs (or great moments within average ones) but none seem to match their own promise. It’s almost as if once he decides what he wishes to say he loses interest in saying it, like an artist whose best drawings never see print. But there’s no denying the casual brilliance of his writing (no surprise given his literary DNA) or the honesty and irreverent humor he brings to the table. Complicated Game is more fully thought out and constructed than any McMurtry album since his still unmatched 1989 debut, and there’s not a song writer in Nashville who wouldn’t kill to tell such a perfectly detailed story as “Copper Canteen” or to

28 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

With so much new music to explore I’ll again try to “clear the deck” by keeping my comments as brief as possible. More reviews can always be found at rapidrivermagazine. com. And if like me, you still prefer physical product to download and streaming be sure to again thank your lucky stars we live in a town with a number of fine independently owned record stores. Long may they thrive!

Nora Jane Struthers

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine

C

write a lyric as wild as “woman don’t you be yelling at me when I’m cleaning my gun.” The addition of such instrumental risks as Uilleann pipes and low whistles, (even if they don’t always work) as well as doo wop vocals, speak well of his desire to craft records that are as great as his songs and, as such, Complicated Game is certainly a step in the right direction. But somewhere out there must surely be the producer (Rick Rubin? Jeff Tweedy?) who will push James McMurtry hard enough to make the record as good as his well deserved reputation. For the meanwhile, this collection of terrific songs, even as the overall album lags behind, will have to do. ***

Iron & Wine

Archive Series, Vol. 1 BLACK CRICKET RECORDING

This wonderful collection of demos and living room recordings, made while band founder Sam Beam was still working as a film instructor at the University of Miami, strikes to the heart of what makes Iron and Wine so fascinating. Sixteen paeans to the joy of cerebral pop — most of which formed the nucleus of the band’s 2002 breakthrough release The Creek Drank the Cradle — provide an intimate glimpse into Beam’s thought process. Be it the haunting majesty of “Eden” or the extending rovers “Beyond the Fence” and “Judgment” Archive Series Vol. 1 (with a promise of more to come) is a holy grail for fans of Iron and Wine or melodically engaged and meticulously constructed pop. ****

Beth Hart

Better Than Home PROVOGUE MUSIC PRODUCTIONS

While her previous trio of albums have been first rate, Beth Hart’s bold decision to replace long time producer Kevin Shirley with the more contemporary steeped team of Rob Mathes and Michael Stevens seems to have paid off in spades. Better Than Home veers a bit away from the blues rocker image she’s cultivated over the past decade (no doubt a result of her extensive work with guitarist Joe Bonamassa) while again exploring her singer/ songwriter roots. Opening with the Memphis styled groove of “Might As Well Smile” Hart navigates her way through a landscape that is every bit as cinematic as it is arresting. The balance between her assertive blues laden piano (eerily reminiscent of early Elton John) and her gut bucket vocals are spot on, as is her emotion-

ally raw delivery. The songs themselves are surprisingly roundabout, offering a more complex side of Hart than you might expect, but in the end they are far more satisfying and measured: majestic ballads mix ideally with more direct blues numbers to form an album that is idiosyncratic, ambitious, and certain to stay with you well after the last spin. ****

Liz Longley Self-titled SUGAR HILL RECORDS

By now it’s a safe bet that you’ve at least heard of Liz Longley, via either her steady airplay on WNCW or one of her several late night television appearances. Not to mention the overflowing (and deservedly so) rave reviews her self-titled debut has received. If like me you’re a bit skeptical of such, wondering how much of the praise is warranted and how much is the product of the hype machine that is the music industry and self promotion on Longley’s part, I’m here to set the evidence straight. This album is as good as you’ve read or heard, and if anything, the admiration it’s received may be understated. Recorded in Nashville (where she now lives) with producer Gus Berry – whose admirable track record is only getting better – this 11 song set is a rare gem. Given free rein in the studio and with many of Nashville’s most in-demand session musicians at her disposal (unheard of for a debut album, but proof of Sugar Hill’s confidence in her talents) Longley delivers the goods, a cascading chorus of ringing guitars, impeccable singing, hooks to die for, and songs that deserve no less. There are plenty of more detailed examinations of this album, and I regret the limitations of space prevent my going on and on. So I’ll instead just add my voice to the many singing its accolades, and declaring Liz Longley the artist as one of my new favorites and Liz Longley the album as one of the best of the year. ****1/2

Van Morrison

Duets: Reworking The Catalog RCA

While all too often a collection of duets signals an artist’s last ditch attempt to rekindle some sort of creative spark, looking back and resting on their laurels, Van Morrison is of course not just any other artist. While picking and choosing the songs to reinvent he not only dug deeply into his enormous repertoire of songs (matched by few and surpassed by even fewer) but deliberately avoided those more continued on page 29


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

sound experience

R

E

M

A

G

A

Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

Z

I

N

By JaMeS

E

CaSSaRa

CELEBRATING A DECADE OF MUSIC AND COMMUNITY

F

For nearly a decade Louise and Don Baker have been building community with their Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse series, all the while showcasing music by performers they know and genuinely admire. The list of such is impressive: Al Petteway and Amy White (there at the beginning), Pat Donohue, John Gorka, The Kennedys, Ronny Cox, and Michael Reno Harrell are among the many artists who have graced the stage and shared their talents. While the performers might vary in style and genre they are share a unique ability to connect with their audience. That connection speaks to the heart of the series’ success and longevity. Don and Louise have built, nurtured, and no doubt sweated out the details but ten years later the shows go on, stronger than ever. To celebrate this milestone Don and Louise are bringing back a number of past performers for a special show, one that marks the anniversary while making a strong declaration that the best is yet to come. Reflecting on their history while hinting towards what the future may hold, they have graciously sat down and answered a few questions.

James Cassara: Ten years is an amazing run.

When you first began formulating a plan for what would become the Mountain Spirit Cof-

‘CDs’ cont’d from pg. 28

well known. No “Moondance” or “Brown Eyed Girl” but rather deep cuts, gems that exist profoundly within his well of creativity, given new life. With a list of collaborators including those with whom he’s worked before (Georgie Fame, Bobby Womack, daughter Shana) and others among those he’s influenced (Mick Hucknall, Natalie Cole, Michael Buble) Morrison seems at his most relaxed in years, having a blast and actually once again enjoying the act of making records. Mavis Staples turns “If I Ever Needed Someone” from a contemplative prayer to a Sunday morning blowout while the lesser know Clare Teal ignites “Carrying A Torch” with passion and desire. Even former 1960s star P.J. Proby gets into the act, playing along on the track (“Whatever Happened To P.J. Proby?”) examining his own career misfortunes. I approached this album with plenty of reservation. Van Morrison is among my most beloved musicians and the prospect of his revisiting his past — something he’s always been loath to do — was a troubling one. Instead he’s given us a solid and sincere effort from a great who is not even close to calling it a day. ****

feehouse series did you envision it might last this long?

Louise & Don: At first we really did not know and thought we would give it a try for a year. We were uncertain about the success of our venue and how well it would be received. As time went on we kept going due to good response from the audience.

JC: How has the series evolved during this

time? Is it what you thought it might be or did you go in without any sort of expectations?

L & D: At first we hoped to book mostly local

talent but through various connections such as the Swannanoa Gathering and Southeast Regional Folk Alliance, we were able to attract national touring musicians. As word spread throughout the music community we had an overwhelming response from musicians wanting to play for us.

JC: Which I see as a testament to all the hard work you’ve put in. Talk about the structure of the Sunday, May 17 show. Do you expect the artists to each perform a few of their own songs or can we look forward to some on stage collaborations? L & D: Each artist will perform for about

fifteen minutes and we will also set up equipment so that the performers can join each other on stage in a possible jam. We hope to have a nice closing song with all the musicians participating.

JC: Looking back at the past ten years what has

S

surprised you? Is there one aspect of the series that gives you the greatest satisfaction?

Amy White and Al Petteway.

L & D: We

have been surprised by the far reach our reputation has grown in the acoustic Friction Farm music community across the country. We get the greatest satisfaction from the repeat audience attendees who support us and always compliment us on great shows. We also are very pleased to have formed relationships with talented musicians from many places.

JC: After you take a well deserved breather, what can we expect for the next ten years? L & D: That is a tough question. We are taking the summer off but we’ll be hosting some acoustic nights in partnership with the Isis Restaurant and Music Hall in West Asheville. We’ll start the MSCH series back up in September and at this point we are booked well into 2016. Beyond that we can’t say for sure but we’ll do the best we can to keep the series running.

Dana and Susan Robinson

JC: For which we’re grateful. Thanks for all your hard work and for ten years of bringing music to Asheville! IF YOU Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse GO Celebrates Ten Years of Music on

Sunday, May 17 at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1 Edwin Place. Confirmed performers include Ray Chesna, Chris Rosser, Al Petteway and Amy White, Dana and Susan Robinson, Todd Hoke, Michael Reno Harrell, Annie Lalley and Joe Ebel, Friction Farm, Tim Grimm, and Zoe and Cloyd. Tickets are $20/$18 plus tax and are available at www.uuasheville.org/mountain-spiritcoffeehouse. Seating is at 6 and the show begins at 6:30 p.m.

Live Jazz + Dinner

Singer Dallas Wesley kick’s off the Classic Wineseller’s May line up. The Classic Wineseller is Waynesville’s premier small plate restaurant, retail shop, and intimate live music venue.

Friday, May 1 – Dallas Wesley, guitar, vocals. Americana, originals.

Saturday, May 2 & 23 – Joe Cruz, piano,

vocals. Beatles, Elton John, James Taylor.

Friday, May 8 – Jay Brown, guitar, harmonica, vocals. Blues, bluegrass, American roots music, originals. Saturday, May 9 – Dana and Susan Robinson,

guitar, banjo, fiddle, vocals. New-time/oldtime music.

Friday, May 15 – Bob Zullo, guitar, vocals.

Jazz & pop standards from James Taylor and the Beatles to Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana.

By

Kay MiLLeR

Saturday, May 16 – Russ Wilson Quartet:

Russ Wilson vocals, Russ Wilson Quartet Hank Bones guitar, Photo Dave Welch Mike Filippone bass, Tony Creasman drums. Jazz standards, swing, doo wop. Dinner and music tickets are $34.99 per person; reserve at (828) 452-6000.

Friday, May 22 – The Moon & You, cello,

guitar, vocals. Americana, folk, pop, originals.

Friday, May 29 – Arvie Bennett, vocals, guitar. Americana, rock, originals.

Saturday, May 30 – Jacob Johnson, guitar,

The Moon & You

Arvie Bennett

at 11 a.m., Tuesday through Saturday. The kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday serving tapas, small plate entrees, appetizers and desserts. Reservations are taken at (828) 452-6000. Seating is guaranteed until 7 p.m. on non-ticketed evenings. After 7 p.m. seating is on a first come, first served basis.

vocals. Neo-acoustic Folk-Funk. Tickets $10.

The Classic Wineseller

The Classic Wineseller presents local, regional, or national talent each week on Friday and Saturday night. The retail shop opens

20 Church Street in Waynesville (828) 452-6000 www.classicwineseller.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 29


COPYEDITING &

R

PROOFREADING SERVICES A sharp eye for the big picture and the small details. Books • Websites Short Stories • Cookbooks Assistance with Self Publishing

Kathleen Colburn www.aptitudeforwords.com

828-581-9031

SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

R

Rapid River Magazine Web Exclusive

Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. Visit her website, www.aptitudeforwords.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

18th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops. Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline May 31, 2015. Winning poems will be published online. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071.

Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest 85 N. Main Street Canton, NC 28716

T

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

By

Another favorite is John Updike’s, The Great Scarf of Birds:

The Great Scarf of Birds

Playing golf on Cape Ann in October I saw something to remember. Ripe apples were caught like red fish in the nets of their branches. The maples were colored like apples, part orange and red, part green. The elms, already transparent trees, seemed swaying in vases full of sky. The sky was dramatic with great straggling V’s of geese streaming south, mare’s-tails above them. Their trumpeting made us look up and around. The course sloped into salt marshes, and this seemed to cause the abundance of birds. As if out of the Bible or science fiction, a cloud appeared, a cloud of dots like iron filings which a magnet underneath the paper undulates. It dartingly darkened in spots, paled, pulsed compressed, distended, yet held an identity firm: a flock of starlings, as much one this as a rock. One will moved about the trees the liquid and hesitant drift. Come nearer, it became less marvelous, more legible, and merely huge. “I never saw so many birds!” my friend exclaimed. We returned our eyes to the game. Later, as Lot’s wife must have done, in a pause of walking, not thinking of calling down a consequence, blake I lazily looked around. saw them glittering in the trees, The rise of the fairway above us was tinted, their quills erect among the leaves, so evenly tinted I might not have noticed angels everywhere. we need new words but that at the rim of the delicate shadow for what this is, this hunger entering our the starlings were thicker loneliness like birds, stunning our eyes into rays and outlined the flock of hope. we need the flutter that can save as an inkstain in drying pronounces its edges. us, something that will swirl across the face The gradual rise of green was vastly covered; of what we have become and bring us grace. I had thought nothing but nature could be back north, i sit again in my own home so broad but grass. dreaming of blake, searching the trances And as I watched, one bird, for just one poem. prompted by accident or will to lead, ~ lucille clifton ceased resting; and, lifting in a casual billow, the flock ascended as a lady’s scarf, transparent, or gray, might be twitched by one corner, drawn upward and then, decided against, negligently tossed toward a chair: the southward cloud withdrew into the air. Long had it been since my heart Sunday, May 3 at 3 p.m. had been lifted as it was by the lifting Readings by poets R. Flowers Rivera of that great scarf. (Heathen), Mark Smith-Soto (Time ~ John Updike Pieces), and Sandra Ann Winters (The Place Where I Left You).

POETRIO

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

30 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

U

R

E

CaROL PeaRCe BJORLie – THe POeT BeHinD THe CeLLO

TRA-LA! I’M A WORD PROCESSOR!

The first verse from Kenneth Goldsmith’s poem, I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered (yes, that’s the title) begins: “I used to be an artist; then I became a poet; then a writer. Now when asked, I simply refer to myself as a word processor.” (Poetry Magazine, April 2015.) Kenneth’s poem is over twelve pages. I stopped at the identity of “word processor.” Is that I? Is it all right to be a “word processor?” You know something, I AM a word processor. I savor alliterations, internal rhyme, onomatopoeia, meter in poetry and prose. Yes. Prose. When I read Annie Dillard, Esther De Waal, Eudora Welty, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, or Thomas Rain Crowe, I’m reading poetic prose. This is as good as it gets. Here’s Annie from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek: “Today is one of those excellent January partly cloudies in which light chooses an unexpected part of the landscape to trick out in gilt, and then shadow sweeps it away. You know you’re alive. You take huge steps, trying to feel the planet’s roundness arc between your feet.” This paragraph is one of those Prose = Poetry delights that set me off! Off to where? Glad you asked. Off into the wild blue yonder, one without air craft or drones, only clouds, moon rise, sunrise, red-tailed hawks or eagles catching wind currents. Here are two of my favorite bird poems.

T

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

“TRA-LA! It’s May,” the lusty month of May, the vigorous, dynamic, vivacious, impetuous month of May. Stop. Look. Look up! Listen. Write. Read. Mother’s Day is May 10th. Write a poem about yours. If she’s here, send it. If she’s elsewhere, read it aloud on a day of sun and wind. She’ll hear.

Resources Poetry USA: 105 American poems, edited by Paul Molloy, Scholastic Book Services. Nov. 1972 the terrible stories, lucille clifton, BOA Editions Limited, 1996 The Annie Dillard Reader, Annie Dillard, Harper Perennial, 1995.

BLUE RIDGE BOOKS

T

Thursday, May 7 at 7 p.m. Friends of the

Library Event at First United Methodist Church. Featuring Wiley Cash, author of A Land More Kind than Home. Tickets available.

Saturday, May 9 at 11 a.m. Fritz Fombie

Have No Fear. Reading and book signing with local children’s author and illustrator Tony Antonino Jr. Antonino will also be teaching the kids how to draw manga, Japanese comic art.

Saturday, May 9 at 3 p.m. Beneath the Chatter: The Wise Self Awaits with Tina Firewolf. Wise and whimsical, with gentle and yet raw honesty. Tuesday, May 12 – Book Buddies, ages 0-3. Share a book and explore reading through song, 9:30-10:15 a.m. Page Pals, ages 3-5. Learn skills in early literacy and school readiness, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Tuesday, May 12 at 1 p.m. Reading and book signing with Mary Kraft, author of Watch Where You Walk: New and Selected Poems. Saturday, May 23 at 3 p.m. The Mending

Time reading and book signing with Meta Commmerse. Overcoming violence and separation in the legacy of slavery.

Thursday, May 28 at 6:30 p.m. The Lowcountry Summer Trilogy with Mary Alice Monroe. Everything Thursday 1-4 p.m. Smoky

Mountain Chess Club. Players of all levels are welcome. Events held at Blue Ridge Books, unless otherwise noted, 152 S. Main Street, Waynesville. Call (828) 456-6000 for more information, or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com IF YOU GO


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

U

L

T

authors ~ books ~ readings

How to Talk to Rockstars

T

C

ReVieW By

U

R

E

MaRCianne MiLLeR

WRITTEN BY ALLI MARSHALL

This month the long-awaited first novel from Asheville arts writer Alli Marshall will be celebrated with a rockin’ good launch at Malaprop’s. How to Talk to Rockstars is not an autobiographic tale, but it does uncover the soul of someone, like Alli, who passionately loves music. “In my personal life music plays a lot of different roles,” she says, “motivation, inspiration, mood enhancer. I have different play lists for whatever I’m doing.” She sees her novel as “a love letter to music and the power of music. In some ways, it’s my ‘thank you’ to all the musicians I’ve met over the years.” Rockstars is a “quiet” novel, meaning there’s not much action, no murders or kidnappings, in fact, no one even falls off stage. It is, however, an exciting, can’t-put-down read, thanks to its raw look at the inner workings of a creative person. Bryn is a rare heroine, a female music writer in an industry populated mostly by men. With no friends, female or male, Bryn spends most of her days, and nights, very much alone. Why did Alli make Bryn so solitary? “The really wonderful thing about music and why so many of us gravitate to it,” says Alli, “is because it creates community. Going to a show, even just listening to music, you’re with other people. I wanted Bryn to be alone to underscore the role of music.” Born in western New York, Alli came to Asheville to attend Woodrow Wilson College, where she received a B.A. in Human Studies. Then off to Goddard College in Vermont for her MFA in Creative Writing in 2000. Back in Asheville, she was a barista at Malaprop’s when one of her essays was found by Melanie McGee-Bianchi, then the arts editor at Mountain Xpress. Alli was invited to join the newspaper’s arts team and she’s been there ever since. Now she is the arts editor, still writing, but also giving assignments to other writers. In Rockstar, Bryn fills her time with intense conversations she imagines having with people she barely talks to. This internal dialogue is so emotional it makes the novel seem crowded. I identify with Bryn because I do the same thing. And so does Alli. As a child, when she told her father she was always talking to people in her head, he said, “Well, seems like you’re meant to be a writer.” “I wondered if people would relate to Bryn and how internal much of her life is,” says Alli. “Her voice kept speaking to me through all the

months of writing.” The book began as a novella and went through four drafts before taking final form. “Bryn was telling me it was a story that needed to be told — it was like she was sending me letters about what happened to the people she interviewed.” In real life, being interviewed by Alli Marshall is an absolute must for any musician who wants to make an impact in Asheville. Alli usually interviews by phone, for a half hour. But even after doing almost 500 (!) interviews, Alli doesn’t find it easy. “It still causes me a lot of anxiety,” she admits. “Sometimes I’m hyperventilating right before an interview.” When I asked Alli for her definition of a rockstar, she gave me such an extraordinary answer that it changed my whole conception of what music means to people “A rockstar is an archetype,” she says, “a persona and image, a kind of performance art created to remind audiences of our own inner wildness, the life of the soul that is greater than day-today mundaneness.” To follow that idea even farther, she adds, “I’d say a rockstar is almost shamanic, connecting to the creative source and channeling that energy to the audience… there is a sense of ritual around concerts and festivals. These are the places we go to escape our ordinary lives and participate in a dream of something more magnificent. It’s where we recharge, find community, feel free. And rockstars are the conductors of those ceremonies.” Her favorite rockstars of all time? Mark Bolan (1947-1977), the front man of English glam rock group T. Rex, was “the ultimate rock star,” a singer-songwriter, a guitarist and a brilliant poet. “Then there’s Alabama-born blues legend Wille Mae “Big Mama” Thornton (1926-1984),” who made “Hound Dog” a hit in 1953, three years before Elvis Presley came out with his version. “And, of course, Janis Joplin,” (1943-1970), the American singersongwriter “Queen of Psychedelic Soul.”

The novel is “a love letter to music and the power of music. In some ways, it’s my ‘thank you’ to all the musicians I’ve met over the years.” ~ Alli Marshall

MAY

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Saturday, May 2 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Literary Trivia Challenge with ALLAN WOLF. Tuesday, May 5 at 7 p.m. MARK ESSIG, Lesser Beasts: History of the Humble Pig. Friday, May 8 at 7 p.m. DAVE BARRY, The Worst Class Trip Ever. Tuesday, May 12 at 7 p.m. BETSY POLK & MAGGIE ELLIS CHOTAS, How Women Lead Better Together. Wednesday, May 13 at 7 p.m. MARGARET McMULLAN, Every Father’s Daughter. Thursday, May 14 at 7 p.m. SY SAFRANSKY, Many Alarm Clocks, entries from The Sun. Saturday, May 16 at 7 p.m. JONI TEVIS, The World is On Fire, life and death. Novelist Alli Marshall, who’s also arts editor at the Mountain Xpress. Photo Carrie Eidson

Her favorite current rockstars? “Britt Daniel of Spoon, out of Austin, Texas, is really incredible,” Alli says. “And Joseph Arthur (from Akron, Ohio) who performed here in the fall, is the most underrated musician currently, so talented, but never became famous and deserves more acclaim.” Local rock stars? “Oh, Seth Kauffman of Floating Action in Black Mountain. His whole persona, how he appreciates creativity and the type of music he puts out — he’s just terrific. I’m a big fan.” Who do you want to interview but haven’t yet? “That would be Beck,” she says the American singer-songwriter, musician, and producer. “Our careers have taken similar turns — he started music when I started writing. And he doesn’t do a lot of interviews. We’d have a great conversation!” How to Talk to Rockstars, written by Alli Marshall, Logosophia Books (2015), soft cover, 201 pp. Visit www.alli-marshall.com

Monday, May 18 at 7 p.m. ELISE & PHIL OKREND, Messages to the Heart. Wednesday, May 20 at 7 p.m. MARIE BRENNAN, Voyage of the Basilisk & MARY ROBINETTE KOWAL, Of Noble Family. Thursday, May 21 at 7 p.m. BEATRIZ WILLIAMS, The Secret Life of Violet Grant. Friday, May 22 at 7 p.m. CHRISTIAN HAGESETH & JOE D’AGNESE, Big Weed. Saturday, May 23 at 7 p.m. Lesbian Novelists. Sunday, May 24 at 5 p.m. SEAMUS McGRAW, Betting the Farm on a Drought. Tuesday, May 26 at 7:30 p.m. MARY ALICE MONROE, The Summer’s End. Wednesday, May 27 at 7 p.m. DEBORAH HARKNESS, The Book of Life. Tickets are $10 and include a $10 coupon. Thursday, May 28 at 7 p.m. NICKOLE BROWN, Fanny Says, and JESSICA JACOBS, Pelvis with Distance.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

PG. 20

M

IF YOU How to Talk to Rockstars with author GO Alli Marshall. Friday, May 15 at 7

p.m. Malaprop’s Café and Books, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.Malaprops.com

Marcianne Miller is a local writer/ critic. You can reach her at marci@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 31


R

J

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

authors ~ books ~ readings

U

R

E

Celebrate Independent Bookstore Day – May 2

Join Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe and independent bookstores across the country for parties, author readings, in-store events, and exclusive day-of merchandise.

things bookish, win fabulous prizes donated by generous local businesses, and raise a glass of champagne to indie bookstores everywhere! “Independence is an integral part of our democracy, and we love practicing it here at Malaprop’s with our unique selection of books and unsurpassed customer service,” said MalaFollowing the runaway success of last year’s prop’s owner and founder, Emoke B’Racz. California Bookstore Day, bookstores across The 16 exclusive books and art pieces for the nation are now preparing for Independent Independent Book store Day 2015 will be Bookstore Day, a country-wide celebration of available only at participating IBD bookstores, books and independent bookstores on Saturonly on May 2. day, May 2. From L.A. to Brooklyn, book lovItems include a signed, original Chris Ware ers should mark their calendars for this special print; a signed chapbook of original essays by day of literary parties. the bestselling author of Bad Feminist, Roxane Malaprop’s has asked our wonderful WNC Gay; a Margaret Atwood stencil, a literary map authors to name a book that was life-changing of the seas; a color broadside from Stephen and tell us why. We’re planKing’s forthcoming novel Finders Keepning a great display of the ers; an original, signed, Captain Unbooks with author photos derpants print and much more. More and each author’s words than 65 authors have demonstrated their that describe what made the support for independent bookstores by book a life-changer! donating work for IBD. At 5 p.m. we’re hosting a Said Jaci Updike, President, Sales of champagne reception with Penguin Random House U.S., “Calihors d’oeuvres and cake. fornia Bookstore Day was a tremendous We’ll have exclusive limited success for our booksellers, their cusedition books and art pieces tomers, and for us last year, and we’re for sale, as well as a literary looking forward to working with booktrivia contest hosted by sellers all across the country to grow this the hilarious Allan Wolf terrific event in their communities.” (The Watch That Ends the “The entire purpose of Bookstore Night). Come show off Allan Wolf will host a Day is to celebrate our collective success your knowledge about all literary trivia contest.

By

CinDy nORRiS

and thank our customers and the community of readers,” says IBD Program Director, Samantha Schoech. “For so long, the message about indie bookstores was all doom and gloom, but the truth is, there are more indie bookstores this year than last, and more last year than the year before that. Independent bookstores are actually opening around the country. We want people to know that.” Independent Bookstore Day (IBD) is produced by the Northern California Independent Bookstore Association in partnership with the American Booksellers Association. Pete Mulvihill, co-owner of Green Apple Books in San Francisco, spearheaded the launch of the event after noting the success of Record Store Day. Independent Bookstore Day is produced by writer and former bookseller Samantha Schoech. You can follow IBD at facebook.com/ BookstoreDay, twitter.com/bookstoreday, and instagram.com/indiebookstoreday. IF YOU Independent Bookstore Day, Saturday, GO May 2 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Toast at

5 p.m. Trivia contest hosted by Allan Wolf. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville, (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com

‘Downtown Books & News’ cont’d from pg. 21

bread and butter inexpensive books that drive the store’s profit. gave him a fair price. If it were a two volume “We don’t have to depend on selling $500 set, the price tag would be $35,000.” books to pay the rent,” he said. “However, The staff pools their knowledge and uses with used books, we have to be aware of how online resources to price rare books, some inexpensively things can be found online.” of which are listed on the internet for sales Selling such intimate goods such as books through a brokerage company. About 300 high means the customer base is both tenacious and end or strange, unusual books are listed online warm, coming back often to check on new to reach a broader audience. items. It’s the community of locals that allows Vorus said the online aspect hasn’t the store to buck the Asheville trend of having changed the way Downtown Books and a slow season. News operates very much, since they work “Tourist season helps, but the difference beunder such a niche. While high end and rare tween seasons is not that huge in sales,” reports books are impressive, exciting, and fun to see Vorus. “We definitely have regular customers. and sell, he says the average price of books in It’s a very faithful, motivated regular customer the store is about seven dollars, and it’s the base that comes in to see what they missed week after week. They’ve been supporting the store for decades.” It’s the customers, their rabid curiosity, and not knowing what’s coming through the door next that has kept Dianne Tinman working at the bookseller for 18 years. “I’m lucky to live in a literate area where people are hungry for books,” she said. “All of these books are from the community, they support the bookstore, and it’s wonderful.” The store also is open every day The wonderful smell of old books fills every of the year, even Christmas day, the nook and cranny.

32 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

Downtown Books and News carries rare first editions.

origin being that people needed to get their newspapers. After that, a tradition was born. “There was a spontaneous potluck on Christmas one year. People come, they like it,” said Vorus. “Books are a direct representation of different people’s tastes, it’s a mirror of the community. Something is working. We’re still here, and things are going well.”

Downtown Books & News 67 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville Sun-Thurs 9AM-7PM; Fri-Sat 9AM-9PM (828) 253-8654 www.downtownbooksandnews.com


R

A

F

P

I

D

R

I

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

sound experience

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Asheville Young Musicians Club FOURTH ANNUAL BENEFIT CONCERT

Founded in 2011, the Asheville Young Musicians Club will present its fourth annual benefit concert Sunday, May 31 at 3 p.m. at Bent Creek Baptist Church in Asheville. The program is co-sponsored by the Asheville Chamber Music Series and the Asheville Area Piano Forum. AYMC founders are local student musicians, sisters Grace, now a freshman at Vanderbilt University, and Kristie Kim, a junior at Asheville High School. “The Asheville Young Musicians Club is composed of highly talented, classically trained student musicians who come together for weekly rehearsals and present concerts to benefit children’s education in Nicaragua, and to support music education in the Asheville area,” says Dr. Hwa-Jin Kim, the advisor of AYMC and member of the music faculty (piano) at UNC-Asheville. “The group has enjoyed performing at WCQS and with Pan Harmonia, among others. Overall, the group has raised more than $7,700, which has been donated to children’s education in Nicaragua through Vision Nicaragua and music education around the city of Asheville through the Asheville Area Piano

Fairy House Building

O

On May 16 & 17 the second WNC Faerie And Earth (FAE) Festival takes place at the Highland Lake Cove Retreat & Learning Center. An area will be set-up to teach people of all ages how to make fairy houses, toad houses, and gnome homes using different natural materials, including acorns, sea shells, pine cones, moss, dried grasses, and other natural materials found or gathered. This will be an entertaining and fun experience for everyone. Wear your fairy wings, earth hat, or sparkle up with glitter, then follow the rabbit to our entry gate in beautiful Flat Rock. IF YOU GO

V

Faery And Earth Festival, Saturday & Sunday, May 16 & 17 at Highland Lake Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: $10 adult, $5 child (ages 5-15), under 5 free. For more details contact John Springer, (407) 620-1493. Visit www.enchantedwalkabouts.com, and www.facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

Forum and the Asheville Chamber Music Series,” she added. All of the proceeds from the benefit concert will be shared equally with the ACMS, AAPF and the Education Fund for the children of Bethel, a small village outside the city of Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. The children of Bethel suffer from poverty and related serious health issues resulting from chemicals used in the nearby sugar fields.

PARTICIPATING STUDENTS

By

MaRiLynne HeRBeRT

Ryan Zhang, piano, 10th grade Guest: Grace Kim, flute, (cofounder and former member)

THE PROGRAM Vivaldi: Double Cello Concerto Piazzolla: Piano Trio

Aaron Chen, cello, 7th grade

Mozart: String Quartet

Alyes Chen, piano, 11th grade

Mozart: Oboe Quartet

Mischa Dzubay, violin, 6th grade

Haydn: Piano Trio “Gypsy”

Ann Gerhardt, cello, 12th grade

Rimsky-Korsakov: The Flight of The Bumblebee

Katelyn Hammel, violin, 11th grade Kristie Kim, violin, 11th grade Kiffen Loomis, piano, 11th grade Madison Neill, cello, 12th grade Christopher Tavenier, piano, 8th grade Abby Weirich, viola, 11th grade Grayson Wickel, violin

The Asheville Young Musicians Club performances help raise funds for children’s education in Nicaragua, and music education around the city of Asheville.

Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 “It has been a wonderful experience collaborating with, and making music with other talented young musicians,” says Kristie Kim. “It is awesome to have the opportunity to share our talents as a group and reach out to the local community and raise funds to help others,” she added.

Maggie Williams, oboe, 10th grade

T

IF YOU GO

Asheville Young Musicians Club presents its fourth annual benefit concert Sunday, May 31 at 3 p.m. at Bent Creek Baptist Church, 1554 Brevard Road in Asheville. Tickets are $20 each; $10 for students. For tickets and more information please contact (828) 6819732 or email aymc2011@gmail.com or kristieskimnc@gmail.com. Visit the AYMC Facebook page at aymc2011.

The Celebration Singers!

The Celebration Singers of Asheville will present selections from I Never Saw Another Butterfly by Charles Davidson on Sunday, May 17.

talent, dedication, and hard work of kids ages 8-14. Comprised of young musicians from area public, private, and home schools, this community youth chorus is a true labor of love for Haselden, whose passion for sharing great works of opera with children knows no Founded by longtime area musician and limit. teacher Ginger Haselden, the group will also Now completing its 8th year as a not-forperform the children’s opera Bundibár by profit 501 (c) 3 educational charity, CelHans Krása. The performance showcases the ebration Singers has grown steadily, attracting youth from a wide circle of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. “We are proud to present a poignant and historically important concert in this the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II,” adds Haselden. “The lyrics for Butterfly, from the poetry of the children of Terezín, are full of hope and are set to the beautiful score. The singers will perform selections from this major work written as a musical memorial to the 15,000 children who passed The Celebration Singers of Asheville is comprised of young through Theresienstadt on musicians from area public, private, and home schools.

By JaMeS

CaSSaRa

their journey to Auschwitz. The delightful opera Bundibár (sung in English) was performed for and by the children to lighten their anxiety and for the entertainment of the officials. It’s the story of a town bully who learned his lesson when the children were victorious, and is appropriate for all ages.” The performance will be dedicated to Alice Herz-Sommer, the last known survivor of Terezín and a virtuoso pianist who died last year at age 110, and her son Raphael who performed in Bundibár. IF YOU GO

The Celebration Singers of Asheville present selections from I Never Saw Another Butterfly, and Bundibár. Friday, May 15 at 7 p.m. at Unity of the Blue Ridge Center, 2041 Old Fanning Bridge Rd, Mills River. Saturday, May 16 at 3:30 p.m. Brooks-Howell Home, 266 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Sunday, May 17, at 4 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 20 Oak St., downtown Asheville. Admission is free; donations requested at the door. For more information call (828) 2305778 or visit www.singasheville.org

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 33


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

At Oil & Vinegar It’s All About Passion

O

Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

Oil & Vinegar’s story is one of passion: a passion for taste, presentation, and perfection. In 1999, the first Oil & Vinegar shop was opened in the Netherlands. It’s unique collection of oils and vinegars drew interest from cooking aficionados and everyday home chefs alike. The company rapidly expanded and opened additional locations across

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885 W

WOOD

FIRE

KITCHEN

e BEST Hot Dogs, Sizzling, Juicy Burgers, Fresh, Crispy Seafood, Hand-Cut Fries, and Homemade Onion Rings. Our food is FRESH, delicious, and cooked to order.

Mon-Sat 10am-8pm • Sun 11am-3pm

www.greatamericandog.net

QUinn aSTeaK

S

Katz will lead lectures and hands-on fermentation classes demystifying the microbial process. Participants will learn: how to make sauerkraut, kimchi, kvass, wine, mead, kombucha, kefir, idli, dosa, sourdough, farm cheese, and the basics of fermenting meat, beans and fish. Afternoons include excursions with five top wild food experts: Alan Muskat, Marc Williams, Asia Suler, Luke Cannon, and Natalie Bogwalker. Participants will go on a wild mushroom hunt and create a harvest feast, concoct mineral rich bone broths, make digestive bitters, forage and make cleansing salad & pesto, and partake in a wild woodland tea party. Fermento virgins and kraut connoisseurs alike will gain in-depth knowledge

Learn how to make wine and mead.

on culturing, home-brewing, natural healing, preserving food, identifying wild edibles, crafting herbal medicines. Ashevillage is a one acre, eco-urban sanctuary, living-learning laboratory, and homesteading hub located in Asheville. IF YOU Wild Food & Fermentation GO Workshop, May 24-30 in

Asheville. Visit www.ashevillage. org/wild-food-fermentation-workshop

BX

P Yummy Wood Fired Pizza Creative Salads • House Made Pastas Fresh Seafood • Fine Meats

PG

By

PG. 40

PG. 20

808 Greenville Highway .9 Hendersonville HH

Oil & Vinegar 8 Town Square Blvd., Biltmore Park asheville@oilandvinegarusa.com www.oilandvinegarusa.com

Sandor Katz will give participants the tools to naturally heal their bodies with fermented foods and wild edibles.

www.WasabiAsheville.com

PG. 20

Wild Food & Fermentation Workshop

Europe and the US. Now, Dana Hunter has brought this very unique boutique of international Oil & Vinegar products to Asheville for all to enjoy.

1 Page Ave. in the Grove Arcade Downtown Asheville

Sun-Thur 11:30- 9:30 • Fri and Sat 11:30-10 Closed Daily from 4-5 • 828-225-4133

34 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

GREAT FOOD! GREAT BEER! GREAT SERVICE! ANYWAY YOU LIKE IT! PG. 40

BT

Indian ~ Nepali ~ Tibetan Himalayan Cuisine

33 Town Square Boulevard, Asheville • 828.651.8481

PG. 34

Wa

Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

PG. 20

K

777 Haywood Road, Asheville

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

PG. 40

HW

(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

Open 7 Days a Week

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC

8 Town Square Blvd., Suite #150, Asheville, NC 28803 www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com (828) 676-1678

PG. 20

B

Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Delicious Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 35


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Green is the Color of Their Values and Their Name

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

T

The Green Room refers to a special room for people who are waiting to make a public appearance; a place to relax and receive VIP treatment, good food and beverages in a cozy atmosphere. The owners and staff of The Green Room strive to make your visit with them an enjoyable and memorable

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

Celebrate Mom

Saturday, May 10 Mother’s Day Brunch Specials

828.692.6335

PG. 40

HG

Bill & Sue Green, owners of The Green Room Cafe.

experience. The Green Room offers Farm to Table fare, using fresh ingredients for their made to order signature entrees, sandwiches, homemade soups, sauces, dressings and infused oils. The owners buy from local farmers as much as possible and supplement the harvest of local farmers with their own home grown herbs and produce. The Green Room serves Fair Trade locally roasted primo coffee and locally baked gluten-free breads. The owners are supportive of the Café Femenio Program purchasing their Colombian coffee beans that are grown by women coffee farmers. Café Femenio is a social program with the goal to empower female farmers using the production and sale of their own product as a vehicle to create social change. The owners are eco-conscious and practice it by using to-go containers made from recycled disposable product and they recycle disposable containers. Coincidentally, The owners’ last name is Green. Ben & Sue Green welcome you to experience The Green Room Café!

The Green Room Café & Coffeehouse

TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

536 North Main St. in Hendersonville (828) 692-6335, www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Friday & Saturday 5:30 - 8:30 pm PG. 40

WB

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

PG. 40

BC

a Culinary Gi Shop 8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com 36 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

PG. 20

C

E


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

artful living

T

Come to Your Senses “The contours of your neurosis are the same as the contours of your awareness.”

H

- Fritz Perls

Have you ever heard it said to a very distraught person, “you need to come to your senses”? Taken literally, this may seem a strange bit of advice, but like many common phrases, there is deep wisdom hidden in this riddle-like expression. Indeed, this particular suggestion is just about the best advice any person can give to another under any circumstance, but especially in times of distress. The creator of Gestalt Therapy, Fritz Perls, used to incorporate this exhortation as a centerpiece of his psychotherapeutic technique. He would instruct his patients to, “Get out of your head and come to your senses!” and he meant this literally. To say it another way, to be free of the endless commenting, reviewing, anticipating, and frequent chaos in the mind, a remarkably effective strategy is to shift the focus of awareness from thoughts and emotions into the immediate sensory experience of what is seen, heard and felt in the immediate here-and-now. Bring attention to your body and the physical world around you. Include in this special attention to the sensations of breathing. Do this for fifteen to thirty seconds and see if you don’t experience a sense of calm and clarity

H

that might be described as a taste of sanity. Perls had realized that to develop this here-and-now awareness as one’s predominant state of consciousness is a remarkable antidote to neurosis. In another of Perls’s famous aphorisms, he stated, “the contours of your neurosis are the same as the contours of your awareness.” He had realized a simple equation for regaining one’s balance in a seemingly chaotic world. It’s not the world that is chaotic - the world is what it is; it is our minds that are chaotic. It is that we typically live with a very narrow focus of awareness dominated by the contents of our mind, while we pay just enough attention to the world to reinforce what we believe about the world. We project our own chaos onto the world, causing Perls to comment, “Thou art projection.” We are generally unable to have the spaciousness of awareness that allows us to have a clear, integrated sense of the present moment utilizing our full capacities for consciousness that sense, feel, think and intuit the moment in a

The Bacteria in Your Body

Humans harbor trillions of bacteria in their bodies. Collectively they are called the microbiome, a collection of mainly a half dozen categories of bacteria that serve a multitude of useful functions. They assist the body in the digestion of hard-to-digest carbohydrates, creating short chain fatty acids that in appropriate amounts assist the growth and development of many body systems and work together with the body to create and regulate gut hormones, prevent cancers of the gut, and stimulate the production of some neurotransmitters. These bacteria help create vitamins that the human body cannot produce and assist in the absorption of minerals and other vitamins. Their presence in the gut suppresses the growth of disease-causing bacteria. And finally these bacteria, especially in early life, help train the immune system to recognize and destroy bad bacteria and harmful molecules and to ignore (not react to) good bacteria and innocuous molecules. But there needs to be a balance and a diversity of the major kinds of bacteria in the mi-

crobiome. Citing one example of many, if the percentage of Firmicutes is high, the diversity of the microbiome decreases and the metabolism and especially absorption of carbohydrate and short chain fatty acids increase leading to obesity, diabetes, colon inflammatory diseases, and some cancers of the bowel and elsewhere. If the microbiome tips too far in this direction, the function of the immune system decreases. If the percentage of Bacteroides is high, the diversity of the microbiome increases (a good thing at first) and the production of short chain fatty acids increases, and the incidence of obesity, diabetes, and colon disease decreases. If the microbiome tips too far in this direction, cancer cell growth is stimulated and autoimmune disease increases. While much about the management of the microbiome is yet to be learned, there are some logical steps to help optimize the microbiome. 1) Avoid foods that tip the microbiome to less diversity, like animal protein, high fat foods, and high glycemic index foods. Fruits, vegetables and plant proteins correct this imbalance.

U

R

By

E

BiLL WaLZ

balanced and nuanced manner. Present moment awareness focused into the purely physical here-and-now is always a good place to start as it slows and quiets the runaway mind and grounds our experience into the what-is of the moment in the immediate environment. Doing this with very stable and relaxed concentration so that the entire field of awareness is filled with these sensations causes something very remarkable to happen: the experience of who you are shifts from a very contracted experience of you being located inside your physical body and the activity of your mind into that which is experienced. Sensations and perceptions that seemed to be “out there” become integrated into the experience of yourself. Actually, the experience of yourself sort of dissolves into what is being experienced. Your body is still there, and your mind is still there; they, however, are no longer separate from what is being experienced. There is some sense of an “out there” and an “in here” but they actually are all experienced within the larger field of awareness. “You” exist every bit as much in the heard song of the bird, the seen clouds and sky, the felt touch of the wind, as

By

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

The ego plots to get what it wants and to avoid what it doesn’t want. you do in this body and mind. This is what is called non-duality or unity of experience, and focusing into your senses in this way is a sort of gateway into this remarkable realm, notable for its sense of calm and clarity. It is the experience of total presence that feels like whatever might be described as sanity. The author of the books The Power of Now and A New Earth, Eckhart Tolle, teaching what amounts to a contemporized Buddhist psychology, has identified the culprit for humanity’s individual and collective distress as the human ego and its incessant thinking and resonant emotions. It chatters and nags, trying to find ways to make sense of our experience in a way that gives us some illusion of control. It tells us that we must be right and that we must be significant (even if it is significantly afflicted). It plots to get what it wants and to avoid what it doesn’t want. The ego talks to continued on page 40

MaX HaMMOnDS, MD

2) Avoid artificial sweeteners that tip the microbiome to less diversity and toward obesity. Also avoid simple carbohydrates which increase fat production and obesity. 3) With diet and exercise, avoid obesity which unbalances the microbiome and increases several diseases. 4) Avoid animal products produced with lowlevel antibiotics which distort and destroy the normal microbiome, allowing the overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria. 5) Over the age of 40, in consultation with your health care provider, use probiotics or prebiotics to rebalance the microbiome which can assist in improving or eliminating several disease processes. Adjusting and maintaining the microbiome does not guarantee good health. But encouraging the proper balance of the microbiome with good health habits is one more step toward a healthier you.

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 37


R

A

P

I

D

Friday & Saturday, May 1 & 2

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

Blue Ridge Ringers

Comedy at the Altamont

Friday & Saturday, May 1 & 2

Community handbell ensemble presents two hour-long concerts. A free will offering is requested. Sunday, May 3 at Holy Cross Episcopal Church in Tryon, 4 p.m.

Thursday, May 7 – Comedian Eric Hunter. Doors 8 p.m. Show 9 p.m. Comedy. Ages 18+. $7 adv.; $10 day of show. Thursday, May 14 – Reasonably Priced Babies. Asheville improv comedy troupe. Doors 7 p.m. Show 8 p.m. All ages. $10 Thursday, May 21 – Comedian Mcqueen. Doors 8 p.m. Show 9 p.m. Ages 18+. $10 adv.; $15 day of show.

In Song: Sing On

Sing-a-long led by Oakland-based artist David Wilson. Friday, May 1 from 6-9 p.m. Bring a song or join along. Saturday, May 2 at 2 p.m. Explore where art can take you. CCCD’s Benchspace Gallery & Workshop, 67 Broadway St., Asheville. Call (828) 785-1357 or visit www.craftcreativitydesign.org.

Sunday, May 16 at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Brevard, 4 p.m. Call (828) 692-4910 or email blueridgeringers@gmail.com

May 1-3

in Waynesville. The Folkmoot Festival is set for July 16-26. Tickets are available at www.FolkmootUSA.org.

French Broad River Festival

Saturday, May 2

Outdoor family music festival featuring multiple stages, a mountain bike race, whitewater raft race, kids’ village, vendors, and food. At the Hot Springs Campground & Spa. Purchase tickets at www.FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com.

Saturday, May 2

Folkmoot Spring Sale & May Day Celebration

Music, dancing, kids activities and special foods from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Friendship Center. Cash in on our spring-cleaning fundraiser from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Old Hazelwood School

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

T

U

what to do guide

Asheville Wordfest 2015

“The City Narrative / The Narrative City.” A celebration of the many voices that make up a place. At Lenoir-Rhyne University’s Asheville campus downtown. $25. asheville.lr.edu

L

Once Upon a Time… A Whimsical Art Show

Altamont 18 Church Street, Asheville (828) 270-7747 www.thealtamont.com

R

E

M

A

Appalachian Pastel Society

A

Z

I

N

E

Sunday, May 10

Tennis

Concert by Denver couple Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley. Dreamy tracks, throwback beats with Moore’s eloquent lyrics. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 2325800, www.thegreyeagle.com.

Wednesday, May 13

Appalachian Women Entrepreneurs Conference

Micro-Business in the 21st Century. 8:15 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center, 227 Cumberland Ave., Asheville. Keynote speaker is Dorothy Clark. HandMade in America, (828) 252-0121. Visit www. handmadeinamerica.org.

May 13-17 Saturday, May 9

G

Conference for Folk Music Professionals

$5 child (ages 5-15), under 5 free. Facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

Sunday, May 17

Pizza Pan-Demonium!

Fun food competition featuring gourmet pizza. Celebrity judges, jammin’ local bands, and a Biker Babe Fashion Show! $20 adv.; $25 door. Includes pizza, beer, and entertainment. Kids under 12 are $5; teens $10 at the door. VIP packages available. 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Highland Brewery. Tickets and more details at bioflyer.wordpress.com.

Saturday, May 23

Just Brew It Homebrew Festival

The Wedge, 2-5 p.m. Homebrew competition and tasting festival benefit. Open to Just Economics members. Membership starts at $25. Reserve your spot today at JustEconomicsWNC.org

Saturday & Sunday, May 23 & 24

Free meeting and demonstration featuring Barbara Jaenicke. 10 a.m. to noon at Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River. Workshop from 1-4 p.m. Registration required. $55; APS members $45. www.Appalachianpastelsociety.org.

Eigth annual conference held at the Montreat Conference Center. Panels, mentorships, keynote speakers, awards, performances and networking opportunities. Details at www.serfa.org

Saturday, May 9

Two films will be screened, Knowing You, Knowing You, and The Hearing Voices Network, 25 Years On, Volume 2: From Psychiatry to Society. Free. 12 noon to 3 p.m., Haywood County Public Library, Waynesville, 678 South Haywood Street. www.intervoiceonline.org, www.hearing-voices.org

Saturday & Sunday, May 2-3

“Storytellers,” features paintings by Arden Cone, Margaret Curtis, Dawn Hunter, and Anna Jensen. Opening reception 5 to 8 p.m. On display through June 19, 2015. 49 South Trade Street, Tryon. Call (828) 859-3408, or visit www.upstairsartspace.org

Prizes totaling $1,000. Held rain or shine in downtown Burnsville. Open to artists of all ages and skill levels working in all painting and drawing mediums. To enter, visit www.toeriverarts.org. $30 entry fee; no fee for students ages 5 to 18, or register the day of the event. Exhibit at the Burnsville TRAC Gallery May 16 - June 20, 2015.

Weaverville Art Safari

Saturday, May 9

Saturday, May 16

Live Art Demonstrations

Opening reception for Marcy Jackson’s exhibit of fantastical art, greeting cards and more. 5 p.m. at Fountainhead Bookstore, 408 N. Main St., Hendersonville. On display May 1 through July 10, 2015. Hours 10-6 p.m.

Saturday, May 2

Songwriter Frankie Leo’s “Farewell Montreat”

With special guest Nathan Stitely. 8 p.m. Folk, pop, rock. $8; $5 students. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free tour of galleries and art studios. Details, maps, and more at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

Monday, May 4

“Take Two” Jazz Series

Pianist Bill Bares with special guest Rick Simerly, trombonist. 7:30 p.m. $12. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Tuesday, May 5

Gallery Opening

Ceramic art of Melanie Dyel and Blue Fire and other gallery members. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville. Tuesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thursday, May 7

Rock The Taste

Restaurant competition in Black Mountain. Sample local food, brews, and wines. 5:30-7 p.m. Tickets and more details at www.exploreblackmountain.com, or call 800-669-2301.

The Upstairs Artspace

Second Saturday Event

Demonstrations, refreshments, music, and a showcase of ceramic arts. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville. Tuesday through Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, May 9 & 10

River Arts District Studio Stroll

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more details visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Sunday, May 10

Greek Mother’s Day Luncheon

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cafeteria style with a variety of Greek gourmet dishes: Lamb Shank, pastichio, Spanakopita, Chicken Riganato, Dolmathes, and pastries. Greek folk dancing and tours. Carry out from 10:30 a.m to 2 p.m. Call the church at (828) 253-3754 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., or the Hellenic Center at (828) 254-7424 the day of the luncheon for more details or to place an order. At the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center of the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 227 Cumberland Ave.

Saturday, May 16

Toe River Paint-Out

Bud Break and Live Music

12-5 p.m. at Addison Farms Vineyard. Featuring the Vince Junior Band. Bring your friends and join us for a beautiful day in the vineyard with friends, music and wine. Wine tastings and Corner Kitchen catered picnic lunches available. For more details and to preorder a picnic lunch, go to www.addisonfarms. net/budbreak.

Saturday, May 16

Hike the Mountains-to-Sea Trail

Hike from Bee Tree Gap Road to Rattlesnake Lodge and then down to the Parkway, about six miles. Good views, wildflowers, history, ruins dating back to 1903. Moderate level of difficulty. Meet at 10 a.m. in Asheville and return around 3 p.m. Contact outings leader at Jane Laping at janelaping@sbcglobal. net or call (828) 772-0379.

Saturday & Sunday, May 16 & 17

Faery And Earth (FAE) Festival

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Highland Lake Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock. $10 adult,

Kenilworth Art Studio Tour

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For a map and more information, please visit www. kenilworthartists.org.

Saturday, May 30

Hearing Voices, Seeing Visions?

Every Saturday in May Artists will showcase the hammer dulcimer, ceramics, and fiber vessels. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.. Free, at Mountain Made Art Gallery, 1 Page Ave., Grove Arcade, Asheville.(828) 350-0307

Fine Artists and Crafters Wanted Applications due by July 1, 2015 Colorfest, Dillsboro’s Fine Arts & Crafts Fair, is looking for artists of all mediums. Festival to be held on October 3, 2015. Prizes awarded. To apply, go to www.visitdillsboro.org, email Connie Hogan, chogan4196@ gmail.com, or call David Marker at (828) 631-0900.

Call for Artists 56th Annual Art on Main Fine Art / Fine Craft Festival Juried and judged show produced by the Arts Council of Henderson County. Festival takes place Saturday and Sunday, October 3 and 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Download an application from www.acofhc.org. email acofhc@ bellsouth.net, or call (828) 693-8504.

MAY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

Spruce Street Market

Participate in a weekly artist vending area located in Downtown Asheville! It takes place every Saturday in July, August, and September from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information please visit www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide

Best in Show

R

E

by Phil Juliano

Classes in painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Saturday, May 2 – The Annie Moses Band. Universally acclaimed for their electrifying instrumental virtuosity and shimmering, layered vocals, the Annie Moses Band blends fiddle, jazz, and classical influences with soaring, folk inspired vocals, creating a sound that is both refreshing and familiar. 8 p.m. Friday, May 15 – Karan Casey. As a member of Solas for four and a half years and now six albums into her solo career, Karan Casey has garnered awards and Grammy recognition while wooing audiences around the world with her pristine voice.

A

Z

I

N

E

The Strand Theater May 7 – The Delta Billies, 7:30 p.m. $8 adv.; $10 at door. Rockabilly, Western Swing, Blues. May 14 – Open Mic. Signup at 6 p.m., performance at 7 p.m. May 21 – The Josh Daniel/Mark Schimick Project, 7:45 p.m. $10 adv.; $12 door. Bluegrass, soul, reggae, and rock n’ roll. May 24 – Lee Roy Parnell, 7:30 p.m. $35. Delta blues, road house rock, southern boogie, Texas swing, and gospel. May 30 – Shana Tucker, $30 adult; $25 student; $15 child. Singer-songwriter and cellist performs ChamberSoul™.

MOVIES

The Strand Theater 38 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786 www.38main.com

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller

Restaurant serves small plate and tapas starting at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Live music at 7 p.m. 20 Church Street, Waynesville. Details (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Diana Wortham Theatre 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

2nd Tuesday Ukelele Jam

Meets 2nd Tuesday of each month at Lourey’s Catering on Biltmore Ave. from 5:30 to 7 pm. Beginners and stringed instruments welcome.

Plein-Air Painting Workshops

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net.

Adorable Puppies

Two AKC registered male and female Yorkie puppies for adoption. Trying to find a good home for them. Good with kids and other pets. Health guarantee and current on shots. For pictures and details contact Collindelaney@live.com.

Opening at HART

G

May 8 - May 20 – Selma May 22 - June 3 – Still Alice

Tickets: Regular $30, Student $25, Children 12 and under $15; Student Rush day-ofshow (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Trail & Palette will host two plein-air painting workshops near Asheville in June. NYC-trained artists and Montana geologist offer a Hudson River School approach to landscape painting. Details, registration at www.trailpalette.com.

A

Art Classes

Diana Wortham Theatre

M

Art in the Park…ing Lot

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Nunsense – Opens May 22. Directed by Suzanne Tinsley.

Monthly art and jewelry show held the second Saturday of each month, May through September, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call Michele Sparks, (828) 693-4545. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Ave. East, Hendersonville. www.artmobstudios.com

Call for Artists

10th Annual Come to Leicester Art Tour to be held in August. We are looking for new artists to join the tour. For more information write to cometoleicesterstudiotour@gmail.com.

The 39 Steps - Opens June 19. Directed by Julie Kinter. Oklahoma! – Opens July 10. Directed by Steve Lloyd. Chorus and dance auditions May 3 & 4 at 6:30 p.m.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

HART, 250 Pigeon Street, Wayensville (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.com

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258. www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 39


Find It Here

R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps Addison Farms Vineyard www.addisonfarms.net

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Al Junek (828) 890-5777 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Jonas Gerard Fine Art www.jonasgerard.com

All Nations Trading www.SpiritFeather.com Amber Combs Photography (940) 783-2027 Art Extravaganza www.artxtravaganza.org Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com Kenilworth Arts District www.kenilworthartists.org Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814 Kornerstone Kafe (828) 550-2265 Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Massie Furniture Co. (828) 456-3311

B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Barbara Wade 140d Roberts Street

Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com

Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com Modesto Trattoria (828) 225-4133 O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Brixx Pizza, www.brixxpizza.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

BT’s Burgerjoint www.btsburgerjoint.com Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300 Champa www.champanc.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Faerie And Earth Festival www.enchantedwalkabouts.com Facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Great American Hotdog www.greatamericandog.net The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz HART Theater, www.harttheatre.com Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Heart & Soul www.thesingingtelegram.com High Country Style www.shopatstyle.com Ichiban (828) 252-7885 Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

MERRIMON AVE.

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

NORTH ASHEVILLE

U

L T

U

R

PATTON AVE.

timately fall silent. To whatever degree (percentage, if you will) the energy of mind can shift from thinking to sensing, there is a proportional quieting of the mind’s emotional talking. So, when you are feeling overwhelmed, distressed, even a little crazy, remember Perls’s exhortation to “get out of your head, and come to your senses!” Look, listen, feel the world around you. Experience the calming effect of your own breath and the subtle sensory orientation of your body. As you practice this sensory-focused awareness, becoming more skillful in it, you will discover that your life is becoming calmer, clearer and saner. You will be opening the door to a deep well of wisdom and security that exists within the quiet recesses of every person. You will find yourself living pleasantly and effectively in the now, not crazily in the then and when. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

LA

BG

V

M

RC A

PA

BX

BD BT

HENDERSONVILLE RD.

HF

WA H

RIVERSIDE DRIVE

WAYNESVILLE - NORTH

RB HK

WK

WM

TUNNEL ROAD

WEST ASHEVILLE WA

TC

40 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

E

When anxious, we are reliving past fears and caught in dread and uncertainty about what has not yet taken place.

Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com Zapow www.zapow.com

C

WNC OVERVIEW

Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com

&

BILTMORE VILLAGE

Tom Roberts (336) 577-5711

Van Dyke Jewelry www.vandykejewelry.com

S

MB

Teresa Pennington www.tpennington.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

T

ML

Spruce Street Market www.SpruceStreetMarket.com Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

R

artful living

NF

Seven Sisters Gallery sevensistersgallery.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

A

us constantly trying to interpret our experience consistent with our conditioned interpretation of the world and our place in it. All the misunderstanding we have about the world, others and ourselves is brought about by what our insecure egoic mind is saying to us. Tolle points out what Perls noticed and what Buddhism has taught for several thousand years. They all teach that we are only truly sane when we are grounded in the reality of the present moment and not lost in the chaotic time traveling and projected judgments of the egoic mind. They also teach that our senses provide a portal to a wise, intuitive dimension of mind that exists in every person, while the ego and its distorted perceptions exist in a fictional timeline story of “me.” This observation caused Fritz Perls to also say, “neurotic thinking is anachronistic thinking, it is out of place in time.” When depressed, we usually are thinking about past events that thwarted ego’s desires and we are projecting more of the same into the future. When anxious, we are reliving past fears and caught in dread and uncertainty about what has not yet taken place. Often when we are upset, our minds are shuttling between past and future, and we are lost in a mounting blur of regret, anger and anxiety, playing and replaying in our minds scenarios fraught with drama, fears of diminishment, harm and defeat. There is a phenomenon concerning mind that is similar to the law in physics that says no two objects can occupy the same space. By focusing awareness totally into the here-and-now of the senses, the talking mind of the ego begins to quiet, and ul-

Ron Maffett (828) 450-2177

Smoky Mountain Foot Clinic, PA www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

R

‘Come to Your Senses’ cont’d from pg. 37

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net Quickdraw www.WNCQuickDraw.com

E

HW

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071 WB


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Art in Bloom at the BMCA

A

Art in Bloom is held every June as a fundraiser for the Black Mountain Center for the Arts. Executive Director Gale Jackson and her selection committee visit regional galleries from Asheville to Old Fort and select artwork that they believe will spur the imaginations of the floral designers who will descend in June to create flower arrangements inspired by the artwork. This will be the ninth year the Center has organized this multi-day immersion in art and flowers. The art gallery show is May 12 – June 20. Gallery hours are from 10-5 Monday through Friday and admission is free. The diverse collection is on display for nearly a month before the three day fundraising event to give the floral designers time to gather the materials necessary to complete their floral designs. Art in Bloom weekend, which includes a Gala Preview party, floral designs in the gallery, two-day cottage garden tour and a reading by

honorary chair former NC poet laureate Fred Chappell, will take place June 18, 19 and 20, 2015.

in the Mountains

IF YOU GO: The Black

Mountain Center for the Photo: Jessica Klarp Arts is located in the Old City Hall at 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. For more information call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.BlackMuntainArts.org.

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

601 W. State Street in Black Mountain

MB

Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

MA MV MS MG MC

BLACK MOUNTAIN GARDEN SHOW & SALE

T

Breakfast

MR

craft gallery

The Tenth Annual Black Mountain Garden Show and Sale takes place Saturday, May 16.

117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5 MB

MS

SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107

T h e L i t t l e To w n T h a t R o c k s

FAISON O’NEIL Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

Vendors will sell perennials, annuals, herbs, vegetables, native trees, shrubs, iris, day lilies and garden accessories. Great food and a quilt raffle. Free. This event is hosted by a non profit group of volunteers to help keep Black Mountain beautiful by planting and maintaining public garden sites. IF Tenth Annual Black Mountain Garden YOU GO Show and Sale, Saturday, May 16 from 9

to 4 p.m. at the Monte Vista Hotel, 308 W. State Street in Black Mountain. Contact Susan Chabot for details, (828) 301-4347.

Thursday, May 7 Night in the Mountains by Linda Johnson

5:30-7pm Sample a Variety of Local Food, Brews, and Wines.

128 Cherry Street

Tickets available on line or at the Chamber. Go to www.exploreblackmountain and click on The Little Town That Rocks icon.

Black Mountain, NC

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

ExploreBlackMountain.com

800.669.2301

info@faisononeilgallery.com Winter Hours: Wed-Sat. 11-4; Closed Sun-Tues 828.357.5350 Queen’s Guard by Dan Reiser

www.faisononeil.com

MG

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 41


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

artful living

S

Steel Magnolias at BMCA

The Front Porch Theater at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts presents a production of Steel Magnolias. Written by Robert Harling and directed by Stuart Williams, DDS, the performance is scheduled to coincide with Mother’s Day weekend. “This is the perfect show to round out our second season and celebrate all things beautiful!” said BMCA Executive Director Gale Jackson.

PG. 40

La

Steel Magnolia’s cast (L-R): Julie Harrison, Cristy Brunner, Michelle Hamilton, Carol Cole, Susan Yeatman, and Regina Webster (leaning in). Photo: Murphy Capps

M

IF YOU Steel Magnolias at BMCA. Shows: 7:30 GO p.m. May 8, 9, 15 & 16; 3 p.m. May 10

& 17. Tickets are $15 plus tax. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. Call (828) 669-0930 for more details.

Unconditonal Love

Mothers, you deserve to receive the love that you have given to replenish your energy. In honor of Mother’s Day Linda is providing treatments this month at half price ($33). Please mention that you have read this article and you will receive your discount. As you receive your treatment know Linda Neff, that behind the hands NCBTMB relaxing your muscles, releasing your tension, and rebalancing your body there is a unique and subtle transformation happening. Properties of unconditional love, respect, and compassion are being transferred through the reflexology, reiki and bodywork that Linda provides. You may schedule your treatment by calling, texting or emailing. Gift certificates are also available.

I

Performances of Steel Magnolias take place May 8, 9, and 10. The following weekend, shows will be held May 15, 16 and 17.

Love is made up of three unconditional properties in equal measure: 1. Acceptance 2. Understanding 3. Appreciation Remove any one of the three and the triangle falls apart. Which, by the way, is something highly inadvisable. Think about it – do you really want to live in a world of only two dimensions? So, for the love of a triangle, please keep love whole. ~ Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

Linda Neff offers free sample treatments the first Thursday of each month at Mountain Spirit Wellness in Waynesville. Call 513675-2819, or email LANFF68@gmail.com www.Soul2SoulHeals.com

Healthy, Good Thoughts

I’ve been thinking about authenticity. “You find peace not by rearranging the circumstances of your life, but by realizing who you are at the deepest level.”

PG. 20

O

42 May 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 9

~ Eckhart Tolle

To live an authentic life I believe, as many do, that we need to identify less with the ego and more with the heart. Living truthfully and honestly allows us to also live with ease. Living with ease allows us a less stressful, more healthful life, yes? From this place we can explore different aspects of ourselves and choose to make changes that please our hearts rather than changing to conform to others. Taking the time to feel what’s right and

By

KaTHLeen COLBURn

what’s real is a practice. We practice meditation in part as a tool to discovering what feels right to us. We are drawn to those who look at life in similar ways and practicing and exploring together helps us to discover more of what is real to us. Today, right where you are, right now, you have the opportunity to practice being who you really are. Kathleen Colburn is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email: rrshortstories@gmail.com. Visit her website: www.aptitudeforwords.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

artful living

C

U

L T

U

R

E

FOR SALE

Mountain Home w/Guest House, and Artist Studio/Workshop

Mountain Home For Sale

W

With guest house, and artist studio/workshop; south of Black Mountain, NC.

2 Bdrm, 1817 sq. ft. House • 489 sq. ft. Guest house • 937 sq. ft. Studio

Asking $219,000; no owner financing. The house The house and its auxiliary buildings sit on a .87 acre lot. and its auxiliary buildings sit on a .87 acre lot, which is part of the Rosy Branch Farm Community, itself composed of seven lots dispersed through a heavily wooded Contact Tom Roberts, 336-577-5711 and hilly 50 acre tract. The lots are individually owned and the or email troberts44@gmail.com balance of the acreage of approximately 44 acres is owned jointly by the For more information and pictures, go to seven lot https://asheville.craigslist.org/reo/4959788539.html owners as members of a homeowner’s association. Reflexology ~ Reiki ~ Reiki Drumming House: Bowen Training Instructor ~ Reiki Master / Teacher 1817 sq. ft., 2 bedOne Hour Session: $40 rooms (also sleeping FREE Session the First loft in one Thursday of the month. bedroom 1817 sq. ft. House and sleeping platform on balcony in sun room), full bath, kitchen, dining nook, great room, sun room with wood-fired hot tub, and deck (approx. 800 sq. ft., part of which is screened). We have a gas furnace and a wood-burning stove. Guest house: 489 sq. ft., bath, combination kitchen, living and sleeping area, wood burning stove, covered porch/patio. Artist Studio: 937 sq. ft., w/ covered front and side porches, Health & Healing car port. The studio is well-lit with natural and artificial light. are Just 2 Feet Away It has a wood burning stove and an auxiliary propane wall unit, and hot water heater. The building was used by the original owner (and builder) as a woodworking shop and was rented for a period of years to a local herbal business. It’s a great space for a painter, artisan, or woodworker. 68 Sugar Grove Ct., Clyde, NC 28721

$219,000 – South of Black Mountain, NC. Contact Tom Roberts, 336-577-5711 or troberts44@gmail.com For more information and pictures, go to

asheville.craigslist.org/reo/4959788539.html

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the frame that surrounds it may be worth a thousand more.

Linda Neff, NCBTMB #582633-09 513-675-2819 • 828-565-0061

‘Sandra Brugh Moore’ cont’d. from pg. 22

ues every day, even when she paints watercolors in the woods in her old, comfortable way. “Living in the woods was always a source of peace for my husband and me. As I try to communicate through my current works, making my art has become fundamentally linked to his influence on my life. It feels right to be creating something different, but the balance between old and new styles is instrumental in my growth as an artist.” Moore believes in her new art, as well as her traditional paintings. In April of 2015, she established a studio in Asheville’s River Arts District with two other artists, collectively known as the French Broad Artists. “I see this as a step towards opening myself up to whatever is ahead in my life- looking forward instead of dwelling on the past. I will always paint the beautiful landscapes of North Carolina in watercolor, but Santangles are now also an important part of my art and life,” says Moore.

Preserve Your Memories with a Custom Frame

For Mothers Day, Give a Gift Mom Will Always Cherish We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC Sandra Brugh Moore’s Santangles are currently on display in her new French Broad Artists studio at 191 Lyman St., Riverview Station, South Entrance. Open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway PG. 40

Pa

1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6

Vol. 18, No. 9 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — May 2015 43


pg. 20

E

®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com pg. 40

36 Haywood Street

HF

Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

Ongoing Plein Air & Studio Classes Enroll Now!

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive, Studio H

Vineyard Plein Air May 1-3 Addison Farms Vineyard

John Mac Kah Health | EXCLUSIVE Introducing Kyrobak, the only home-use device using professional Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) and Oscillation Therapy technology, recommended by doctors worldwide, that’s clinically proven* to bring you...

LASTING RELIEF from

BACK PAIN

www.JohnMacKah.com (828) 225-5000

pg. 10

RC

Saving a Life from a potential catastrophe EVERY 10 MINUTES

but I’m never alone. I have Life Alert.®

*Data on file.

Try it now!

AS SEEN ON

TV

RISK-FREE FOR 60 DAYS

You have nothing to lose but the agony of lower back pain!

CALL NOW 1-800-792-4541

For a FREE brochure call:

1-800-396-4903

ASHEVILLE LOCKSMITH NOW

Auto, Residential & Commercial

Emergency Service 24/7 Advertise with Rapid River Magazine pg. 40

TC

Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

828-236-1901

AshevilleLocksmithNow@gmail.com

www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

May 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
May 2015 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Detail from Into the Smokies, pencil drawing by Teresa Pennington..p23; Inside: Kenilworth Artists Studio Tour..p10; Quickdraw...

Advertisement