Issuu on Google+

O’Charley’s

Sunday Brunch at – New, and Very, Very Good!

PG

32

Fiber Weekend at the

Folk art Center

PG

17

Bella Notte, an evening of Italian

art house gallery & Studio PG 30

Opera and Dining at the

Kenilworth’s Studio tour Cascades with new work PAGE 9

Interview with River Arts District Artist

JONAS GERARD 1th annual wnC Quickdraw PAGE

23

PG

11

whole Bloomin’ thing Spring Festival PAGE

21

Captain America • Joe • The Lunchbox • Oculus • The Quiet Ones • Transcendence

PGS

12-15


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v

ART TRAVAGANZA

F I N E A RT ABSTRACTS JEWELRY SCULPTURE

2 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9


Season finale

pg. 10

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$ " 3 /0$ 1*"

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May 10, 2014 • 8 PM

Thomas Wolfe Auditorium Daniel Meyer, music director Mariangela Vacatello, piano

Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Shostakovich Symphony No. 11 “The Year 1905�

C o t t o n M i l l S t u d i o s F e at u r e d Art i s t

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

pg. 17

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Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — May 2014 


U MO 14

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spring

U MA AY

DON’T FORGET

12 Y1 0

BILTMORE VILLAGE

26 lodge st., asheville, nc 828-277-6222 open mon.-sat.: 10am-7pm, sun.: 12-5pm

colors www.cRAfTGuILd.ORG

are in! pg. 17

For more fine crafts visit: Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | 828-298-7928 Guild Crafts 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

J

14 kt gemstone rings by

www.craftguild.org

pg. 36

Mb

4 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

pg. 21

wH


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we love this place international Festival of Magic

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Nine

MAY 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Nick Andrea, Judy Ausley, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, T. Oder & R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Bruce Sales, Ashley Van Matre, Greg Vineyard, Kelly Walker, Bill Walz, Mark Warwick. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Advertising Sales Manager Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, May 2014, Vol. 17 No. 9

6 Music

Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse . . . . . 6 Ben Bjorlie. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Paper Bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

6 Columns

Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. 16 James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . . 24 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 26 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 27 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 28 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 29 Bill Walz – Artful Living. . . . . . . . . 29

7 Performance

HART – To Kill a Mockingbird . . . 7 NC Stage Summer Camps. . . . . . . . 7 Bella Notte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

9 Fine Art

Kenilworth Studio Tour. . . . . . . . . . 9 Grovewood Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Gallery of the Mountains . . . . . . . . 19 Art on Depot Studio & Gallery . . . 20 Art After Dark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 WNC QuickDraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 New & Fun Art Materials. . . . . . . . 1

12 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan. . 12

18 Local Favorites

Ooh La La Curiosity Market . . . . . 18 O’Charley’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Akers, a bicoastal U.S. location photographer with bases in Atlanta, GA, Laguna Niguel, CA, and Asheville, NC. Specializing in people and luxury resort photography. www.charleyakersphoto.com. PAGE 11

iF YOU gO: Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 2541320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. Full schedule, tickets, and show times are available at www.WeekendofWonder.com.

the Spencers: theatre of illusion

The Weekend of Wonder takes place Friday, May 2 through Sunday, May 4. A dream team of master magicians will present a dazzling showcase of stage and street magic, close-up, one-man shows, lectures, workshops and all-star galas.

An amazing high-tech stage show full of comedy, drama and suspense, The Spencers: Theatre of Illusion enchants and astounds.

World renowned magicians, Jay Scott Berry and Maxwell Blade teamed up to produce this historic event. They will be joined by a host of international stars including, award-winning wizard, Jeff McBride, world champion close-up artist, Michael Ammar, and magical minstrel, Andrew Goldenhersh. Featured artists include Asheville magicians, “MagicBrad” and TJ Shimeld, Charlotte’s Chastain Criswell, and, from Dallas, the Serpentine Sorcerer, Daryl Sprout. Local celebrity and magic shop owner, Ricky Boone, the festival’s guest of honor, will also perform and lecture.

SpeCiaL SeCtiOnS River Arts District. . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 Downtown Asheville . . . . . pgS 18-19 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 20-23 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . pgS 30-31

See this stereotype-shattering duo of magicians Friday & Saturday, May 9 & 10. The Theatre of Illusion is a unique fusion of magic and illusion, humor and mystery, and persona and personality that inspires viewers with a sense of wonder, using magic like a storyteller uses words. Comprised of husband and wife duo Kevin and Cindy, The Spencers are actively keeping the art of illusion on the cutting edge.

iF YOU gO: Diana Wortham Theatre at

Pack Place. Friday & Saturday, May 9 & 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $35, Student $30, Child $15. Student rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

we’re a Local & Responsible publisher Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of advertising dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

17 Festivals

Art in Bloom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Whole Bloomin’ Thing Festival. . . . . 21 Faerie & Earth Festival . . . . . . . . . . 0

33 What to Do Guide On the Cover: Jonas gerard. Photo by Charley

For three wondrous days, downtown Asheville will come alive with magic, Master Magician Jay Scott Berry mystery and enchantment.

Tickets for the Weekend of Wonder start at $10, and many of the shows are free! Ticket packages are $150 for adults, and $100 for children under 17. Packages include reserved VIP seating to 10 of the major shows and events.

Classes & Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

 5 5 5 5 5

iF YOU gO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! distributed at more than 90 locations throughout eight counties in wnC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 5


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sound experience Celebrating a Decade of the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

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Behind the SCeneS with JaMeS CaSSaRa This month I’m continuing my series of semi-regular articles focusing on those dedicated individuals who might not make music, but are no less critical in furthering the entertainment scene in our area. These often unsung figures contribute greatly to the local landscape, and typically do so as a labor of pure love. It is a pleasure to be able to support their efforts via Rapid River Magazine!

this month i am thrilled to highlight don and Louise Baker, whose Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse series has been an enduring part of our local independent and (largely) acoustic music scene.

were more on the side of music fan but at some point you obviously felt the urge to move beyond that. So let’s talk about the genesis of the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse series. Was it in response to a perceived need you saw in the local music scene? There must have been a lot of learning by mistakes.

Nestled in the warm confines of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation on Edwin Place (just off of Charlotte St.) the series is now in its ninth year. During that time it has presented up and comers, established names and some of the most intimate and engaging performances around.

performer in the local Boston/Cambridge folk scene many years ago and played at church coffee houses. She always had a dream to start one somewhere when the time was right. We perceived that there was a need for an acoustic listening room in Asheville where people could enjoy music without extraneous bar noise. So back in 2005 we approached some of our local favorites; David LaMotte, Al Petteway and Amy White and Chuck Brodsky. They were willing to help kick off our series.

James Cassara: To my knowledge neither

you nor Don came from music backgrounds but feel free to correct me. I’ve gathered you

don & Louise Baker: Actually Louise was a

We started in the small fellowship hall at UUCA and after a standing room only show with Annie Lalley and Joe Ebel we were allowed to move into the more spacious sanctuary. We initially had a hand built stage and pole lamps for lighting and only a few volunteer helpers.

JC: Who were some of your first perform-

ers? Were you fortunate enough to host artists just before their careers caught fire? I know that early on you had Chuck Brodsky and he keeps coming back.

d&L: David La Motte was the first in Sept,

2005 and early on we had Al and Amy, Chuck Brodsky, Chris Rosser, Annie and Joe, Pierce Pettis and Michael Reno Harrell.

JC: How do you determine who to get? I’ve

wnC Jazz profiles: Ben Bjorlie

g

~ Rick Dilling, drummer Ben moved to Asheville in 1997 and started playing bass in bands and freelancing around the region. It is also when he got his first drum set. “In 2003, I went back to school at Appalachian State University to finish my music degree where I studied percussion with Dr. Robert Falvo and jazz drumming with Rick Dilling. I also took lessons with Charlotte area bassist Ron Brendle. Returning to Asheville, I began playing professionally on both bass and drums. “Currently I’m involved in many groups in the area including two weekly gigs: The Thursday Alien Music Club jazz jam at Barleys on drums (over 2 years), and bass on the Tuesday night funk jam at Asheville Music Hall (over 5 years). I’m lucky to be working with a wide variety of groups like The Asheville Horns, Bayou Diesel, David Zoll Trio, Montuno Salsa Band, The Rhythm Serenaders, Ram Madlekorn Trio, The Archrivals, Crybaby… as well as fronting groups under my own name.”

6 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

d&L: We get sev-

eral emails a week from musicians around the country and even Canada and Europe. Many of them have heard about our series from other performers who have enjoyed playing for us. By having only one show a month we have to be choosy about whom we select. We like to book performers that we have had the opportunity to see and hear in person and who have stage presence along with

Brooks Williams performs Sunday, May 18 at the Mtn. Spirit Coffeehouse.

continued on page 16

by

“Ben Bjorlie is one of those rare guys who is comfortable playing any style of music, be it funk, bop, Latin, swing, big band, you name it — always with great feel and sensitivity. But regardless of the genre, he always maintains his own “voice” on the instrument — the sign of a great player. and most important, he is a gentleman, balancing the demanding life of a musician, wonderful father and husband.”

Growing up in Charlotte, Ben Bjorlie was exposed to music early on with his parents part of the Charlotte Symphony for nearly 30 years — his mother Carol a cellist, and his father Leo a bassist. Ben started out on clarinet in the 5th grade and eventually moved on to the bass clarinet. He was selected to play in the Charlotte Youth Symphony, all-state bands, plus the National Honors Band in Chicago directed by Frederick Fennell. Then Ben received a scholarship to study clarinet at UNCGreensboro. “I got my introduction to drums by playing on the drum line in high school marching band, and at 13 started borrowing my dad’s early 70’s fender jazz bass and amp. I had no idea at the time how lucky I was! My dad had some great Stanley Clarke records that really put the bass in the forefront of the music and inspired me to search out other adventurous bassists like Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Bootsy Collins from Parliament Funkadelic, and eventually Victor Wooten. I started playing bass in clubs well before I was old enough to legally get in.”

gathered the shows have a great reputation in that artists want to play them, and often seek you out. But do you ever invite an unknown based solely on recommendation or availability? Is there anyone you’ve wanted to get but things haven’t yet worked out?

Ben Bjorlie Photo: Frank Zipperer

“Ben is an exceptionally gifted musician with the rare ability to drive a band equally well on two different instruments in any style you throw at him. It’s terrifying if you ask me!”

~ Michael Davis, drummer I asked about influences. “Philly Joe Jones was huge early on as I listened to those famous Miles Davis Quintet Prestige recordings. I got to see Elvin Jones and that was an eye opener, as his elasticity of time keeping and explosive approach to jazz contrasted Philly Joe’s elegance and understatement. Despite their differences, both of these guys swing like no other!

eddie LeSHURe

“Nowadays I keep coming back to Lewis Nash for his ability to support the group sound. He solos very musically and manages to display top notch technique without drawing too much attention away from his band mates. That’s the way I aspire to play.” While Ben was at Appalachian State University, Johnny Carson’s former drummer the late Ed Shaughnessy came and performed. “I hung out with Ed for a few days, picking his brain about technique and on the last tune of the concert, he called me up to the stage. Though we hadn’t rehearsed, I got to trade solos with him. He gave me some sincere compliments and advice I still draw from today.” “Ben’s the bomb! Just when you think you know how good he is he takes it up another notch. And he’s humble as can be. It’s always good news when Ben’s on the gig!”

~ Jonathan Pearlman, guitarist

eddie LeShure produces “asheville Jazz Unlimited” each wednesday 7-10 p.m. on Main-FM (10.7/mainfm.org), plus the monthly white horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.


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performances

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To Kill a Mockingbird

haRt theatre kicks off its 0th season with “to Kill a Mockingbird,” based on the beloved novel by harper Lee. There are few titles that are as cherished. Maybe it’s because it captures noble characters through the eyes of a child. Christopher Sergel adapted the novel in 1990 for the town of Monroeville, Alabama, where it is staged annually in the courthouse. Monroeville is Harper Lee’s home and the locations in the town match those in the novel. The story is so revered that people in the town treat the novel as Dave Evanoff as Atticus Finch and Jacob scripture, able to quote lines at the drop Shanken as Jem in HART’s production of To Kill A of a hat. Harper Lee never approved, Mockingbird running through May 11. however. She liked the film version with Gregory Peck but has never attended a performance of the play and sued to prohibit Winfield, Stan Smith, Bill Cannon, Terrence merchandizing connected with it. Littlejohn Jackie Simms, Larry Porter, Andrea Harper Lee only published one novel, Cody, and Kirby Gibson. but with it she became one of America’s most In addition to the large production celebrated authors, winning the Pulitzer Prize patrons will be greeted by the site of HART’s and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Her new theater under construction. The Daniel only other major contribution to literature was and Belle Fangmeyer Theater broke ground her collaboration with Truman Capote on the last fall but actual construction didn’t begin early research for his novel “In Cold Blood.” until early April. The anticipated completion is Capote and Lee were childhood friends near the end of the year so HART supporters and though Lee constantly downplayed any auwill be able to watch the progress at each show tobiographical comparisons of her novel with of the theatre’s anniversary season. her life, many characters and events parallel things she experienced and people she knew, iF including Capote. Her father, for example, was YOU “To Kill a Mockingbird” May 2, 3, a lawyer who defended black men in MonrogO 9, 10, at 7:30 p.m.; May 4 and 11 at 3 eville. She was a witness to the discrimination p.m. Tickets: $20 for Adults, $18 for she documented. Seniors, Student/Teachers $10. Special $6 HART’s production includes a huge cast discount tickets for Students and Teachers for and is under the direction of Wanda Taylor. Sundays. Box Office Hours Tuesday-Saturday The cast includes: Carolyn Pope, Lily Bates, 1-5 p.m. Call (828) 456-6322 for reservations. Jacob Shanken, Dave Evanoff, Leah Hampton, Tickets available on line at www.harttheatre. Susan Rudniak, Dane Peterson, Luke Wilson, com. Performing Arts Center at the Shelton Jack Ross, Phil Haire, Sarah Lipham, John House, 250 Pigeon Street in Waynesville.

Musical Theatre Summer Camps

n

deSigned FOR eLeMentaRY, MiddLe, and high SChOOL StUdentS

north Carolina Stage Company (nC Stage) helps students learn, grow, and have fun on stage! Students can participate in workshops in acting, voice, dance, and stage craft with groups their own age. There is a camp for students in elementary school, and a camp for students in middle and high school. Each camp will culminate in a showcase at NC Stage. • Each camp is two weeks long and runs from July 28 through August 8, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. • Camps include: two weeks of fun with trained NC Stage counselors; a camp t-shirt; and two tickets for any 2014/15 NC Stage Company Mainstage Production.

Space is limited so secure your spot now. A $100 non-refundable deposit is required to hold your space; the balance is due on or before the first day of camp. Payment plans are available. Register now by calling (828) 29-026 or email Kelly at Kelly@ncstage.org.

iF YOU NC Stage Summer Camps will gO be held at Jubilee in downtown

Asheville, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.- 3 p.m., July 28 through August 8. Before and after care available. Early bird price through May 9 is $375; register before June 12 and pay $400; Full Price: $425.

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 7


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fine art Get Rejected by the Best

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…and enJOY the pROCeSS!

Some of my acquaintances were amused by my extreme excitement recently when my portfolio was very promptly rejected by one of the most famous artist representatives in the country.

by

gReg vineyaRd

Some considerations when pursuing this type, or any type, of passionate venture:

1) Have inventory. What if

someone says “OK!” Do I have more than the nine images in that pretty little grid I sent?

2) Know your niche. Re-

search your target companies. Does your work fit the overall “look” of the company? Does your style step on the toes of anyone else on the roster?

I’m not intending to be disrespectful in my description here. Quite the opposite, actually. Reaction to Success, 2014, This one particular pastel by Greg Vineyard ) Hone your confidants agency has been on my list. Stick with folks who will short list since the early give you useful, on-strategy 90’s. When I first forayed critiques, and who will hold Don’t take it into a more formal atyou and your success in their tempt at illustration a personally. hearts, minds and souls at few years ago, I had an 110%. artist representative for a 4) Evaluate your portfolio. Are the images clean, bit and I liked it. So this time around, I find clear, organized, and thematically appropriate? myself once again knee-deep in the activity of Are they digital, and in whatever format and size outreach. that has been requested? Getting picked up by any particular rep is a long shot for many reasons, the most simple 5) Don’t take it personally. A “no” is not usually of which is numbers. Just hearing back from a rejection of us as people. Folks are just evaluatany cold call is a bit rare (imagine: a thousand ing what they need for their business at the time. artists, seeking approvals and acceptance, in And take any feedback under consideration. your voicemail or Inbox.) 6) Try, try again. Never give up. Anyway, this particular person answered my email promptly. He was professional One can apply these concepts to any busiand courteous. And for me, it was like I got ness where one works with a product or serthrough on the Red Phone. vice. All this is really about being prepared and The main reason I am enthused about aiming high. It helps to shoot for the moon. having taken this action is because it was sort Even if one doesn’t quite hit a mark of Bucket List-ish. You know. Things like: 238,900 miles away, one still ends up land“See Australia,” “Be an extra in a Star Trek ing above the horizon line, say, perhaps, in a reboot,” and “Actually put your portfolio out major city on the coast, rather than in a ditch. there to the highest authorities.” And it can feel really good to take action –any But wait! I’m not just getting rejected action – no matter what a target’s answer in New York, but also all across America. turns out to be. And there’s more! I’ve gone global! I’ve been Putting it out there is what matters most. rejected by agencies in England, Canada and And if you try it consistently enough, and in Australia, too! That’s right, the entire Coma conscientious way, something is bound to monwealth doesn’t want my art. stick. I urge you to go out and seek, don’t give OK, so far it’s just one company in each up, in whatever your main goals are in life. country. But I’m actually quite motivated At some point the answer will be “yes!”, and simply from having taken an easy risk. And you’ll be glad you valued the journey. about how, in several cases, someone on the other end of the communication has taken a moment to say … well, anything! It’s a reminder that there really are quality greg vineyard is an businesses out there, with real human beings artist, writer and creative checking their emails. And one can cheerily consultant in asheville, move along to the next target, and make notes nC. zapOw gallery in in one’s calendar about when next to reach out downtown asheville, (‘cause that really famous rep didn’t say to not (www.zapow.com), carries ever contact him again...) his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

8 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9


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fine art

Western North Carolina’s NEW ART DESTINATION

Kenilworth’s Studio Tour Cascades with New Work

a

a virtual waterfall of talent has given rise to the largest, most diverse artist participation to date in this spring’s studio tour in Kenilworth, one of asheville’s historic neighborhoods. The Kenilworth Art Studio Tour is scheduled for Saturday & Sunday over Memorial Day Weekend, May 24 and 25, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. In its ninth appearance on Asheville’s cultural map, this year’s tour will feature 17 Kenilworth residents and 8 visiting artists all exhibiting at 15 Diana Gillispie – Handmade, Sam Stark – Blown glass, sculpture, studios in the neighborhood, along with nine addidecorative tiles. lighting, and functional glass. tional artists showing their work at Harvest House on Kenilworth Road. ratives of Lynn Bregman Blass; and the large “abstract” paintings The total outpouring of 34 artists represents the highof artist Irving Greene, among many, many others. est-ever participation by more than fifty percent. And, unique “The Kenilworth show is basically an adventure in exhilaraamong area art tours, the Kenilworth show drapes across a tion,” says Diana Gillispie, an exhibiting artist (tile and maiolica tightly drawn space, under a blanket of two miles square, so it’s pottery maker) who has taken a leadership role in the tour this easy to get around to all the studios, including serious browseyear. “It’s a lot of fun to jump from artist to artist, but within time at each one, in a short day or less. each artist’s work there are many layers that reflect the risks Signs for individual studios will be visually well-positioned taken. It’s just a lot of fun to explore.” along the route with easy and accessible parking indicated on Patrons for this year’s tour include: Adams & Adams Contour maps available at information posts throughout Asheville struction, Ambiance Interiors, City Mac & City Mug, Katuah and at Kenilworth Presbyterian Church. “Van Gogh” lunches Market, Longview Builders and the Kenilworth Residents’ Aswill be for sale at the church from 12 to 3 p.m. both days. sociation. Kenilworth, a largely arts and crafts ridge-and-hollow Again this year, each artist will donate 5% of his or her sales neighborhood known for its off-square, roly poly streets and to Loving Food Resources, a Kenilworth-based non-profit that intersections, has traditionally been the home of dozens upon provides basic necessities for people living with HIV/Aids. dozens of artists of immense range and a greatly varied genre. This year will be no exception. “We are crazy excited,” says Teddy Jordan, recent president iF of the Kenilworth Residents’ YOU The Kenilworth Art Studio Tour, Saturday & Sunday, Association. “This show is so gO May 24 and 25, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Visit www.kenilworthartists.org for more details. interesting because we get such a creative mix of aspiring artists with beautiful fresh work alongside established, ever-evolving professionals working in clay and glass and wood, with encaustics, photography, ink and oils and other media. It’s a privilege to grovewood gallery presents contemporary realist paintcoordinate the event.” ings by local artist Brad Stroman, and fine art wood This year’s brochure (availsculptures by indianapolis-based artist Clay Foster. able at the Chamber and around Brad Stroman combines his passion for making art with his town) along with a web site Ann and Sandy Batton concerns for our environment by incorporating a Japanese Zen for the tour (kenilworthartists. – Handmade pottery. philosophy known as wabi-sabi. His award-winning work has org) lists all the participants, garnered acclaim from environmentalists and art lovers alike. features images of their work, Brad’s paintings are included in nearly 100 private and corporate shows where they will be on the collections both nationally and internationally. route map and cross-references Brad additional artist information via Stroman: individual web sites. “My paintings All in all, it’s an enormous reflect the intirange of cascading talent that, as mate and fragan example, includes: the funcile relationship tional and sculptural blown glass between man work of Sam Stark; the hand-dyed and nature. and hand-printed clothing of Jude Moonlight Bittersweet by Brad Stroman, The aesthetic Stuecker; the off-center, whimsiacrylic on wood panel. of wabi-sabi cal, brush-stroke art of Vanessa encourages a contemplative look at our lives through a meditaBell; the charmed and charming tive and disciplined search for humility and an understanding of teapots of Ann and Sandy Batton; Lynn Bregman Blass our place in the physical world.” the encaustic, mixed media nar– Mixed media.

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Ancient Voices

Offering Modern Fine Art Plus Ethnographic Art &

GALLERY

New World Antiquities

Themed Show Multiple Artists & Antiquities

‘ ECHOES OF EGYPT ’

March 29 - April 22 Opening Reception Saturday, March 29, 5-9 pm

pg. 36

nC

Hours: 10 - 5 pm Tue - Sat or by appointment: 989-0111 At Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville Exit 23 off I-26, cross Merrimon & up hill to 1st building on right

by

aSHLey van MatRe

Clay Foster is a highly accomplished wood artist whose work is represented in many prestigious private and public collections. Clay is being honored with the Merit Award at the American Association of Woodturners 28th Annual International Symposium this June. Clay Foster: “Mystery is essential to art. Rather than explain what each element means, I prefer to let the viewer find their own meaning. My art combines elements and sources to capture the essence of things that endure, things that last, ancient voices that speak to our hearts in modern times.”

Temple Bowl by Clay Foster.

iF YOU Opening Reception, gO Saturday, May 31 from 3-6 p.m. On display May 31

through September 7, 2014. Grovewood Gallery,111 Grovewood Road next to the Omni Grove Park Inn. For more details, visit www.grovewood.com, or call (828) 253-7651.

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 9


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new inspirations, new art, in a new space.

Your Heart Feelin’ Happy, painting by Diane English.

River Arts District artist Diane English is celebrating her latest inspirational changing realities in her paintings, as well as her new studio and gallery at 375 Depot, with an open house on Saturday, May 10, from 1-4 p.m. English now occupies the front studio; her reception coincides with the RAD’s “Second Saturday” monthly open house weekend. Diane English, The Great Cosmic Happy-Ass, at work in her River Arts District studio.

iF YOU Opening reception, Saturday, May 10 from gO 1-4 p.m. 375 Depot St., front studio, River Arts

District. (828) 645-0188. For more details, visit www.greatcosmichappyass.com.

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aSheviLLe’S RiveR aRtS diStiCt The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. One can also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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10 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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v Fine Arts & Crafts v Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

Interview with Fine Artist

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Jonas Gerard

Rapid River Magazine: Jonas, what led

you to open a second River Arts District gallery?

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

For quite a while, I’ve been entertaining still. I’m always looking for a new creative the idea of opening an challenge. Usually the challenge takes place additional gallery to on the canvas, but not always. Things get Live music is paired with Gerard's vibrant art. Audiences enjoy Gerard’s live painting performances. display my larger works. exciting when inspiration spills out into When I found this wonother aspects of your life. we called in a fantastic Feng Shui consultant eye-view”. With modern camera and derful space so close-by at Riverview Station named Kelly Jones, who helped us make sure display technology it was fairly easy I was immediately drawn everything flowed energetically. to do. People really seem to enjoy this to the creative possibilities, The feedback we’ve received from visitors new angle on art. and really did view it as a so far has been full of warm, glowing encanvas for artistic experiRRM: What’s next for you? couragement. The new space is a big hit. Our mentation. JG: Our Riverview Station gallery is Clingman Ave. gallery is going full blast as It was amazing how still a work in progress. Keep on the well. It’s going to be a busy, creative and colormany creative design decilookout for new and exciting develful summer! sions were needed to bring opments there. Along with the new it all together. Wall color RRM: We’ve noticed a new video display gallery, we have acquired an additional and location, lighting, mulsystem at your painting performances recently. large delivery van. I’ll be painting it timedia, floor and ceiling Can you tell us about it? sometime this summer. Look for an treatments… everything JG: As I shifted deeper into the flow style of even bigger splash of color driving was an opportunity for painting I explored in my recent Confluence around town soon. expression. and Fluid Poetry shows, it became obvious RRM: How did you go that I had to change the way I did the painting Jonas Gerard Fine Art about planning the new performances. gallery? 240 Clingman Avenue When I paint “flows,” the canvas is not Studio and Gallery are open up on my painting wall, but lays flat on a table. JG: We started by buildevery day from 10-6 p.m. No matter how we arranged the seating, I was ing a scale model of the the only one who had a good view. We needed space. That let us do a lot Riverview Station, to come up with a better way… to let the of “what if” work to easily 191 Lyman Street, in the heart audience see what I see, to give them a “Jonas’Explore Jonas Gerard’s new gallery at Riverview Station. explore possibilities. Then of the River Arts District.

Jonas Gerard: I’ve never been one to sit

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — May 2014 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - has some good points ∑∑ - the previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

Chip KaUFMann is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on wCQSFM radio. MiCheLLe Keenan is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest ReviewS, theateR inFO and MOvie ShOw tiMeS, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRent BROwn is a graphic designer and illustrator. view more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Captain America: The Winter Soldier ∑∑∑∑

Short Take: A surprisingly serious minded action flick that recalls the paranoid political thrillers of the 1970s.

ReeL taKe: I was not looking forward to

seeing Captain America: The Winter Soldier based on the previews but, having seen the first film in the series and having liked it, I was the obvious choice to review it. Early reviews praising if for not having the elements that I liked in the first film also made me somewhat wary. My worst fears were realized when the film opened with an extended, overstaged and overshot prologue involving the hijacking of a secret military vessel. “Here we go again” I said to myself but to my surprise,

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S.H.I.E.L.D. official Alexander Pierce (Robert Redford) has a big surprise in store for Captain America (Chris Evans) in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

once the required fanboy rubbish was out of the way, Winter Soldier settled down into quite a good movie where ideas rather than action set pieces were the order of the day. After another action sequence involving Samuel L. Jackson, Winter Soldier becomes a 21st century update of such 1970s paranoid political thrillers as The Parallax View and 3 Days of the Condor. In fact the casting of Robert Redford as a central figure is no accident and, as if aware of the importance of his presence in the proceedings, he is absolutely brilliant. The rest of the cast almost rise to Redford’s level which is no mean feat. Samuel L. Jackson’s one-eyed Nick Fury, head of S.H.I.E.L.D. (the organization that all the Marvel superheroes work for in case you don’t know), makes his presence felt early on and then disappears for most of the

the MOnthLY ReeL – get thee tO a theatRe!

wonderful art house titles can be found on local screens, including Le Weekend and The Lunchbox (review on page 13). I implore you to see The Lunchbox. This film will no doubt be on my top ten list for the year come December. Le Weekend is a wonWe were actually wondering what derful film, but is at times painfully difficult to we were going to force ourselves to see in watch. I wager anyone who has been married order to cobble a section together. When for more than 30 years and folks who fancy the a superhero movie and a mainstream Before Sunrise films will especially appreciate faith-based film are the best things left Le Weekend. to review, it’s slim pickins’. (We even Ironically the film that stayed with me wondered if anyone would notice if we long after I left the theatre is one that I won’t re-ran the review actually recommend for Grand Budapest to many people. Joe Hotel.) is the latest film from Fortunately David Gordon Green for us, everything (Pineapple Express, changed and we All the Real Girls). couldn’t get to Joe is the blood rare, everything we dark underbelly of wanted to include contemporary southin the May issue ern gothic cinema. by deadline. There The performances are is literally somewonderful, but it’s not thing for everyone easily palatable. at theatres right Last and Jim Broadbent and Lindsey Duncan star as a now. For indie and definitely least in my long-married couple looking to rekindle their artsy a number of relationship in Le Weekend. reviews for the month

Just a couple of weeks ago the good professor Kaufmann and i were lamenting the offerings at the cinema.

12 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

is Transcendence (review on page 15). Essentially a hi-tech monster movie, gussied up with a monster-sized sci-fi budget, Transcendence is built on a great concept and has a solid cast. Unfortunately it gets too caught up in blurring the lines, and repeatedly tabling one contradiction for another, to make any kind of worthwhile statement or sense in the end. Meanwhile the good Professor Kaufmann made some interesting observations about filmmaking and the marketing of the film industry after seeing Oculus and Captain America. He was also eagerly anticipating the latest film from the new incarnation of Hammer Films, The Quiet Ones. Any of you who have read Chip’s columns for a while, or have taken any classes with him, know that he’s a big fan of Hammer Films. Unfortunately The Quiet Ones was a bit of a disappointment, but still an effective piece of filmmaking. Be sure to also check out the many and varied screenings for the Asheville Film Society and Hendersonville Film Society for May.

Until next month, enjoy!

movie. Chris Evans as Captain America aka Steve Rogers is now completely comfortable in the role and it is his underplaying compared to everyone else (except Redford) that give the movie its heart and soul. The plot focuses on the creation of a trio of “super drones” which, thanks to direct access to loads of personal and private data, can locate anyone on Earth and eliminate them at the touch of a button. The idea is to profile and then stop potential terrorists before they become terrorists. One character, however, decides to take things to an extreme and overly logical conclusion. “What if you could kill 20 million people in order to ultimately benefit the remaining 7 billion? Would you do it?” Captain America’s answer is a resounding NO but attempting to stop the drones is a Herculean task. Complicating matters is the fact that he must fight the title character, a man who has been genetically modified like himself and has a powerful metal arm to boot. It also turns out that the assassin is his old childhood friend Bucky (Sebastian Shaw) who has been brainwashed and reprogrammed to kill. After leaving the theater in a much better mood then when I arrived, I had an epiphany. Since this movie and all others like it are available in 2D and 3D versions, why not put the extended action sequences into the 3d/IMAX versions only so that older people like myself who value character and story over “Biff!”, “Bop!” & “Bam!” can have a movie that they will enjoy and can relate to. It would also make the movie shorter. Just a thought! Rated PG-13 for sequences of violence, gunplay, and action throughout.

Review by CHip KaUFMann

Joe ∑∑∑∑

Short Take: The gritty and disturbing story of an ex-con with a hot temper and a good heart who becomes a father figure to an abused teenage boy.

ReeL taKe: I think I may have been the

only local critic at a recent screening of Joe that genuinely liked the film. Well, it’s not a film one really likes. What struck me about the film was how long it stayed with me after I left the theatre. Ironically it’s a hard film to recommend to many people, and it will have a very limited audience. Be forewarned Joe Movies continued on page 13


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film reviews The Lunchbox is playing at the Fine Arts Theatre. See it while you can.

Movies continued from page 12

is a gritty, bloody, dog-fighting, unholy mess of a story. Joe is a hard drinking, chain smoking ex-con with a hot temper for injustice and a soft spot for the down trodden and abused. He tries to keep his short fuse at bay, living quietly, working hard. He lives in a rural, seemingly forgotten, southern town. It’s a hard scrapple place; ugliness is pervasive in every corner of it, figuratively and physically. Strangely enough Joe seems like one of the town’s success stories. He has a successful [by this story’s standards] business killing trees (so that the lumber companies can come in and plant better trees for milling). He’s good to his workers, he’s good to his [guard] dog, and he’s good to the local hicks. He’s even good to the local hookers. When a 15 year old boy approaches Joe’s crew in the woods one day to ask for a job, Joe takes the kid under his wing. Unbeknownst to Joe and young Gary (Tye Sheridan, Mud), he and young Gary will forge an important friendship. Several sub stories threaten to collide with our reluctant hero and his young charge, testing Joes’s mettle and determining his fate through ruin or redemption. One of these sub-stories deals with a long-standing feud between Joe and a southern fried psycho (Ronnie Gene Blevins). The other [incredibly disturbing] sub-plot involves Gary’s abusive, alcoholic, good-for-nothing, thieving and murderous father (played by Gary Poulter, a homeless man who died after the filming completed).

Tye Sheridan and Nicolas Cage star in the gritty Southern gothic drama Joe.

Based on the novel by Larry Brown and adapted for the screen by Gary Hawkins, Joe is directed by David Gordon Green. Green directed the popular mainstream comedy Pineapple Express a few years back, but seems to be returning to his indie and rural southern roots with Joe (Some readers may recall a little movie called All the Real Girls being a bit of a big deal in these parts about ten years ago.). Green makes the most of the story’s strengths, creating an atmosphere that is almost a character in and of itself, but it may ultimately be a story that fares better on the page than on the screen. Once you sink your teeth into it, and chew through the grizzly aesthetics, Joe is fairly predictable, but the performances by Sheridan and particularly Cage are not. Rated R for violence, disturbing material, language and some strong sexual content.

Review by MiCHeLLe Keenan

Rated PG for thematic material and smoking.

Review by MiCHeLLe Keenan

Oculus ∑∑∑1/2

Short Take: Quality low budget horror film is generally creepy but an overreliance on self mutilation kept me from enjoying it as much as I should have.

ReeL taKe: Whenever I see that a new

A mistake delivers savory delights and a pen pal to Saajan (Irfan Kahn) in The Lunchbox.

The Lunchbox ∑∑∑∑∑

Short Take: A quietly perceptive and incredibly satisfying story of a friendship forged through notes when a lonely young housewife’s lunchboxes are mistakenly delivered to a reserved widower on the verge of retirement instead of her husband.

ReeL taKe: The Lunchbox will no doubt

be on my Top Ten list come award season. I implore you to see this delightful little gem of a film. It’s a simple story, but its execution is flawless and its depth surprising. Ila (Nimrat Kaur) is a lonely young, middleclass housewife and mother in Mumbai. She’s hoping to put a little pizzazz back in her marriage by creating a special lunch for her husband. Ila quickly deduces that her food was not delivered to her indifferent husband and sends a note and another meal the next day for whoever is receiving her husband’s lunchbox. The recipient of the lunchbox is Saajan (Irfan Kahn) a quiet, lonely widower on the verge of retirement. They quickly begin a correspondence and Ila sends him wonderful meals each day. Their notes become more intimate, not of the romantic kind (at least not at first), but of life’s tribulations and worries; each needs someone to talk to. She confides in him about the state of her marriage. She confides in him when she realizes her husband is cheating on her. He confides in her about missing his wife and becoming old. While all of this is going on Ila is also dealing with her mother and dying father. Meanwhile Saajan is training his over-eager replacement Shaikh (Nawazuddin Siddiqui). The latter story is utterly delightful as an unlikely friendship forms between the two men. Every step of the story unfolds with an elegant grace, a quiet reserve, with compassion and a very natural humor. Ila, Saajan and Shaikh all have their worries, and each of them trying to find their place in the world and in life. The mark each leaves on the other is indelible. The Lunchbox is a kind hearted and heartbreakingly beautiful film. It brings new meaning to the love letter. It’s the first feature film from Hindi director Ritesh Batra. If this is what he delivers out of the gate, I can’t wait to see what’s next.

horror release has an R rating I usually have some qualms about seeing it. That rating generally (but not always) guarantees that it will be an over the top gore-fest and that the use of the F-word will be ubiquitous. It also means that you will usually not be spared from that most tiresome of recent conventions – the “found footage” horror film. Luckily Oculus avoided the former and had none of the latter, although it cleverly works video footage into its storyline. With all of this going for it, I wish I could say that I liked Oculus better than I did. I really wanted to but one element throughout kept me from doing so. I’ll explain a little later on but first…a digression.

My toxic Backyard Documentary by Katie Damien about the community living around the old CTS Superfund site in South Asheville and their ongoing struggle to get clean, safe drinking water.

Photo: Katie Damien

This is the first comprehensive documentary of its kind ever to be released about the residents living near this site. Visit www.mytoxicbackyard.com

iF YOU gO: My Toxic Backyard,

premiere May 8 at 7 p.m. May 9, 10 and 11 at 1 p.m. $9.75 Adults; $7 Seniors; $7.50 Matinees before 6 p.m. The Fine Arts Theater, 36 Biltmore Avenue, Asheville. Call (828) 232-1536, or visit www.fineartstheatre.com.

theatre directory asheville pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Karen Gillan and Brenton Thwaites as brother and sister join forces to try and redeem their parents’ death and destroy an evil mirror in Oculus.

Oculus revolves around a haunted mirror and the effect it has on people who have owned it. I first fell in love with haunted mirror stories at the age of 10 after watching an episode of Boris Karloff’s 1960s television series Thriller. The episode was The Hungry Glass starring a then unknown William Shatner. That was quickly followed by another episode called The Prisoner in the Mirror. A few years later I read The Black Mirror by Belgian fantasy writer Jean Ray. When I got to college, I got to see the most celebrated haunted mirror story of all time (and it is worthy of its reputation) which is to be found in the 1945 British omnibus film Dead of Night. In 1973 another multistory Brit film, From Beyond the Grave, opened with an outstanding haunted mirror sequence starring David Warner. That and The Hungry Glass remain my templates. Now back to the present and the main reason I had an issue with Oculus. Although Movies continued on page 14

Biltmore grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (asheville) www.cinebarre.com

the Falls theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine arts theatre (asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

the Strand (waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 1


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film reviews aSheviLLe FiLM SOCietY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. May 6:

noah’s ark

(1928) The Biblical story of Noah and the Great Flood, with a parallel story of soldiers in the First World War. Stars Delores Costello, George O’Brien and Noah Beery. Directed by Michael Curtiz. May 13:

not overly grisly in content, much of the unease factor involves bodily horror in the style of David Cronenberg (remember Jeff Goldblum in The Fly?). Mutilated fingernails, shattered teeth, and in one scene the principal character imagines that she eats a light bulb, give the film a very high cringe factor from my P.O.V. In other words I don’t enjoy bodily horror especially when it’s self-inflicted. Cringe inducing is not the same as being scared. Setting aside the cringe factor, Oculus is a solid, well made thriller that shows once again that in terms of budget, less is more. The script by director Mike Flanagan is engaging and adds a new twist to the proceedings (the mirror doesn’t just show you things, it alters

your perceptions of them). The performances by the entire cast are uniformly fine especially Karen Gillan (of Doctor Who fame) as the central character trying to destroy the mirror through scientific means and Rory Cochrane as the father who becomes possessed by it. Oculus deserves credit for doing what it does with its limited resources (the design for the haunted mirror is particularly effective) but, unlike the other examples that I mentioned which I have revisited on a number of occasions, I have no desire to ever see Oculus again. It’s not a bad movie, it’s just not my cup of tea. Rated R for terror, violence, disturbing images, and brief languages.

Review by CHip KaUFMann

The Quiet Ones ∑∑∑

Short Take: Disappointing but still an effective psychological thriller of a paranormal experiment gone awry.

ReeL taKe: This is the fifth release from

the newly reconstituted Hammer Studios and it loses some of its predecessor’s fighting trim. Let Me In (2010), The Resident (2011), Wake Wood (2011), and The Woman in Black (2012) were all medium budget productions characterized by strong storylines, interesting characters, and solid performances from the actors involved. The Quiet Ones has some of each of these elements but not enough to make it a complete success. Movies continued on page 15

parachute Jumper

(1933) A gangster victimizes three friends who are trying to get legitimate employment. Stars Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Bette Davis and Frank McHugh. Directed by Alfred E. Green. May 20:

Miller’s Crossing (1990) Tom Regan, an advisor to a Prohibition-era crime boss, tries to keep the peace between warring mobs but gets caught in divided loyalties. Stars Gabriel Byrne, Albert Finney and John Turturro. Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. May 27:

Movies continued from page 13

the Beauty of the devil

(1950) The Faust story retold, with an aged alchemist accepting the gift of renewed youth from the devilish Mephistopheles. Stars Michel Simon, Gerard Philipe and Nicole Besnard. Directed by Rene Clair.

Big SCReen BUdget FiLM 7:30 p.m. $7 general; $5 for members. Wednesday, May 14:

a Clockwork Orange (1971) In future Britain, charismatic delinquent Alex DeLarge is jailed and volunteers for an experimental aversion therapy developed by the government in an effort to solve society’s crime problem – but not all goes according to plan. Stars Malcolm McDowell, Patrick Magee and Michael Bates. Directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Wake Wood”

May dvd picks

Wake Wood (2011)

Well now that the new Hammer’s latest opus The Quiet Ones is in the theaters and is not as good as its predecessors (see my review this issue), you should check out the least known of their previous four movies and that is Wake Wood. Everything that is missing in The Quiet Ones atmosphere, effective soundtrack, empathy with the characters, can be found here. Wake Wood is a curious combination of The Wicker Man and The Bad Seed. A young veterinarian and his wife lose their 9 year-old daughter on her birthday when she is mauled to death by a dog. One year later they move to a small Irish village to try and rebuild their lives. A few days later the wife witnesses a pagan ritual that brings back the dead…but only for three days. Desperate to have their daughter back they take part in the ritual but withhold a vital piece of information. Their daughter is resurrected and everything is fine at first but the older villagers are afraid of her and strange deaths begin to happen. It turns out that the withheld piece of information (she has been dead for over a year) results in her being demonic instead of angelic. She does not wish to be dead again and will stop anyone who tries to make her go back. Can her parents succeed in sending her back or will they be among her victims? Shot on location in Donegal, Wake Wood is loaded with Irish atmosphere and, like the original Wicker Man, is a perfect combination of ordinary modern day life and ancient Celtic ritual. The strong cast is headed up by Timothy Spall as the town mayor who conducts the ritual of reviving the dead. Although released later, Wake Wood was the first Hammer film to be made in 30 years. It won’t appeal to everyone but if you enjoy an unsettling foray into the

14 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

supernatural as opposed to an outright horror film then you should give it a try. It falls into the category of once seen, not soon forgotten.

Mud (2013)

Tye Sheridan who plays Gary in Joe also starred in last year’s sleeper hit Mud. Now available on DVD, I thought Mud would make for an interesting contrast with Joe. Both films are contemporary southern gothic tales. Both depict a culture of people and a way of life fairly unknown to our own. But where Joe will play to a very limited audience, Mud appeals to a very broad audience, without being any less of a film. Mud takes place in the sleepy backwoods Arkansas tributaries of the Mississippi River, part of a culture relatively untouched by the rest of the world and a way of life not long for this world. Best friends Ellis (Tye Sheridan) and Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) are fourteen year old boys who explore the river, looking for adolescent fun and adventure. When they discover a boat amazingly suspended in a tree on a nearby island, they get the adventure of a lifetime. The story is a coming-of-age story of sorts and is centered around Ellis. Ellis sells fish door-to-door with his father and he’s struggling with the apparent disintegration of his parent’s marriage. He is a romantic and an idealist. Neckbone is a little rougher around the

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Mud” edges, never having known his parents and being precariously raised by a well meaning and loving uncle (Michael Shannon). When they discover the boat, they decide to claim it as their own – a perfect, secret tree fort. Soon however, they discover the boat is occupied by a mysterious squatter with an odd moniker. ‘Mud’ (Matthew McConaughey) is a fugitive hiding out on the island and waiting from the law waiting for his lady love, Juniper (Reese Witherspoon). Mud is his own ‘beast of the southern wild’ (a love child of Boo Radley and Max Cady if you will). He’s superstitious, but very capable of surviving in the woods and under the radar. He’s done bad things, but has a code of honor. He, like Neckbone has never known his parents, but like Ellis is a true romantic. He’s an oddball to be sure, and while we don’t quite know how much of his story is true, he earns the boys’ trust. The three then set about the task of getting the boat out of the tree and patching it up so that Mud can sail into the sunset with his lady love. Directed and written by Jeff Nichols (Take Shelter), Mud takes it time unfolding but never dawdles. It feels like a literary piece adapted for the screen, but it’s not. Mud is told with patience, nuance and a salty underbelly, but at its core is a sweet soul. Youthful naiveté counters harsh realities yet never diminishes them. Rather, an almost childlike romanticism and idealism, and a general faith in the innate goodness of [most] people, gives the story a wonderful spirit without falling prey to sappiness. There are very few missteps (if any) in this film, and even a rather conventional, crowd pleasing ending actually works here without feeling false. Bottom line – see it.


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The biggest problem is the screenplay which was adapted from a previous one that had been accepted and then rejected. The adaptation is credited to three writers including the film’s director John Pogue. There are a number of elements that, while interesting by themselves, never seem to jell as a whole. The film was originally advertised as being about an attempt to create a poltergeist under laboratory conditions. That’s not quite the case here.

quences, holds his own but the film belongs to Harris and Cooke. In addition to the muddled storyline, the other thing that bothered me was the lack of an effective soundtrack for around 75% of the movie. Sound effects and the occasional use of Gregorian chant do not a soundtrack make and when there were sound effects they were way too LOUD! While the lack of music was probably intended to increase tension it wound up having the effect of distancing me from the proceedings. In the end The Quiet Ones was a disappointment compared to the previous Hammer releases mentioned earlier but it still has its moments. Although I was unhappy with it after I first left the theater, thinking about it later I discovered that a lot of it has managed to stay with me and any movie that accomplishes that can’t be all bad. Cool poster too. Now all I need to do is find out why they called it The Quiet Ones. Rated PG-13 for sequences of violence and terror, sexual content, thematic material, and language.

Review by CHip KaUFMann An Oxford professor (Jared Harris) and his patient (Olivia Cooke) try to combat evil in a new and startling way in The Quiet Ones.

I got the feeling that early on during the production someone at Hammer noticed the success of the Paranormal films and altered the original screenplay in the hopes of cashing in on that success. What emerges is a scenario that is thoroughly confused with lots of loose ends and bits of dialogue that just don’t make sense. However the film is not a total loss thanks to two wonderful performances from Jared Harris and Olivia Cooke. Oxford professor Joseph Coupland (Harris) and two students conduct an experiment involving Jane Harper, a mentally disturbed young woman (Cooke). Another student (Sam Claflin) is recruited to videotape the experiment from beginning to end. Coupland’s theory is that any kind of psychic disturbance is simply a form of physical energy that can ultimately be dispersed under scientific conditions. Jane believes she is possessed by an evil spirit which Coupland dismisses as “supernatural nonsense”. The experiment involves trying to force Jane to materialize her “evil spirit” so that it can be categorized and then eliminated. Forced to leave the University, they continue privately and things spiral out of control as Coupland is determined to prove his theory at any cost. Sessions become more and more intense until a final revelation leaves the two students dead and the girl, the professor, and the cameraman locked in a life and death struggle. Jared Harris shines in a role that Peter Cushing would have played 50 years earlier, the well meaning scientist blinded by his inability to accept failure. Olivia Cooke is heartbreaking as Jane, wanting to be cured but essentially tortured by those supposedly helping her in the attempt to achieve that cure. Sam Claflin, as the cameraman who falls in love with Jane with disastrous conse-

Transcendence ∑∑∑

Short Take: A well intended, well acted convoluted sci-fi thriller that seems more like a high tech monster movie of sorts.

ReeL taKe: At the start of Transcendence

we see a post apocalyptic world (at least technologically speaking), so we know that what we are about see doesn’t end well. Max Walters (Paul Bettany) bore witness to the events leading up the end of the world as we knew it, and serves as the film’s narrative voice. He takes us back five years; Dr. Will Caster (Johnny Depp) is the leading researcher in artificial intelligence and is working on his greatest project – a sentient machine equipped with full knowledge and full range and understanding of human emotions. When Will is gunned down with a radioactive-laced bullet by anti-technology extremists and is facing inevitable death, his wife, and fellow scientist, Evelyn (Rebecca Hall) has the brainchild to give Will’s machine life by integrating his brain and being with the machine. Evelyn and Will are the type of scientists that only think about the good that their advancements will bring. Max on the other hand grapples with moral dilemmas posed in the wake of technological advancement. When the machine springs to life with Will’s voice, face, memories and his love for Evelyn, she sees it as Will. Max on the other hand sees it as a machine, not the man they knew, not a human being with a soul. Max’s intimate knowledge of Evelyn’s experiment and his previously published contemplations make him a desirable ally for the same anti-technology terrorists who killed Will. As the story escalates, electronic Will uses his power and access to everything to make Evelyn a ridiculously wealthy woman, enabling her to buy a town in the middle of nowhere and build an underground research facility

hendeRSOnviLLe FiLM SOCietY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310.

Even its fine cast can’t transcend Transcendence.

to continue their work. As A.I. Frankenstein becomes more and more powerful, our mad scientist becomes a little less enamored with their work. Soon it’s the ‘monster’ versus the good (?) guys. Transcendence marks the directional debut for Christopher Nolan’s go-to cinematographer Wally Pfister. The visuals are perfect for a sci-fi thriller, and they should be for the price tag on this film. Unfortunately we’re supposed to think it’s cleverer than it actually is, which is ironic because at its core it felt more like a B-movie to me (not that there’s anything wrong with that). The cast is solid, but it’s not enough to elevate the picture. Depp appropriately reigns himself in and delivers an earnest performance. Hall is very good. Bettany is good but under utilized and tasked with keeping some of the weakest points of the movie afloat. Transcendence poses interesting questions, but gets so bogged down by tabling one contradiction with another and another, the whole scenario becomes an answerable conundrum and ultimately delivers a wholly unsatisfactory ending. Maybe that was the point?? Rated PG-13 for sci-fi action and violence, bloody images, brief strong language and sensuality.

Review by MiCHeLLe Keenan

the 48 hour Film project On Friday, June 20, participating teams will gather at Asheville Brewing Company where they will be given a genre, a character, a prop, and a line of dialogue they must work into a film. Submitted films will be judged by a panel of experts. The Best Film from Asheville will be awarded a trophy and screened at the 48 Hour Film Project, in Hollywood, CA, at Filmapalooza. Public screenings take place June 24, 25, 26. For more details visit www.48hourfilm.com.

Once again there are only three movies this month (no show on Mother’s Day, May 11). They are a classic silent World War 1 drama, a popular adaptation of a Gilbert & Sullivan operetta, and finally a drama about Edward R. Murrow & the Senator McCarthy hearings. May 4:

the Big parade (1925) This August marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I. This silent classic about the romance between an American soldier and a French farm girl has been fully restored in honor of the occasion. Stars John Gilbert and Rene Adoree. Directed by King Vidor (Duel in the Sun). May 11: No Show – happy Mother’s day! May 18:

the pirates of penzance (1983) Rollicking film adaptation of the Broadway version of Gilbert & Sullivan’s popular operetta with standout performances from Kevin Kline, Linda Ronstadt, and Angela Lansbury. George Rose also stars as the Major General. Directed by Wilford Leach (The Wedding Party). May 25:

good night and good Luck (2006) This riveting docudrama was nominated for six Academy Awards back in 2006. It relives the confrontation between CBS newsman Edward R. Murrow and Senator Joseph McCarthy back in 1953. The film stars David Strathairn, Patricia Clarkson and George Clooney, Directed by George Clooney (The Monuments Men).

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artful living the CURMUdgeOn BY peteR LOeweR

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Monikers

it took forever for spring to arrive in western north Carolina. Day after day all the cars in the area—not to mention the trucks—had ice-covered windshields every morning; it wasn’t until 10:30 or even 11:00 before the ice began to melt, and the sun warmed the car’s interior, so that getting in to start the engine had a modicum of civility to it. Once inside, all the folks who drove up to the General Store began any salutation with general complaints about the winter just past and the distinct possibility that spring might never arrive, and even the early wildflowers would refuse to appear and just stay bound in the frozen earth and await a hot day in July for their entrance into the world. Like many mornings before, when Cityfella walked into the store the first sound he heard was the 60-cycle hum of the florescent lights that hung on short wires from the newly painted tin ceiling. In addition there was the morning report from the AM station out of Asheville that gave a limited review of the weather because such reports actually came from an underground bunker not far from Omaha, Nebraska, entirely programmed and

‘Mtn. Spirit’ cont’d from page 6

top notch musical ability. We have also met and booked performers visiting The Swannanoa Gathering, SERFA, New Bedford Folk Festival in Massachusetts, the South Florida Folk Festival and Folks Fest in Lyons, Colorado. We have tried to engage David Holt, Ellis Paul and Jim Lauderdale but due to tight schedules we have not been successful in placing them in our line up yet.

day and soon Breadman was punching up stacks of familysized loaves and replacing stale hot dog rolls with a new batch. operated by a company that sent “Funny,” he said, “I always out such reports throughout the thought the name was procountry, accompanied by descripnounced Mo-og that is a ‘mo’ tions of the area involved, so that followed by an ‘og’.” if it was sunny outside of the “Nice day,” said Storekeep. General Store, the radio reported “Could be worse,” said clouds and potential rain. Breadman. “Is anybody here?” asked Illustration by Peter Loewer “How about Mog as the Cityfella. “Yoo, hoo! Anybody?” correct pronunciation?” asked Storekeep. “I’m here,” answered Mr. Storekeep, “I “I don’t think it makes a whit of differwas just down in the basement looking for that ence,” continued Breadman, “and I do rememstack of new tourist maps just in case we get ber that back in 1970, Moog received some any business from passers-by who are in the kind of a special Grammy Award for lifetime area for the Moog Festival.” achievements in the world of music and in At the moment Curmudgeon came into 2002, he was honored with Honorary Doctorthe store and having heard Storekeep mention ate from Berkley.” Moog, hastened to correct the pronunciation “Then,” said Cityfella, “we are going with of the man’s name who invented the process Mog as the pronunciation?” that changed music from being live folks in “We could ask the NC Guv,” said Breadconcert to imaginary folks made of electrons man. and digital harmonics. “I think,” said Curmudgeon, “we should “The name,” he said, “is pronounced let well enough alone with the music side of Moog as in the average cow cry ending with a the day, and instead start planning on that bal‘g’.” loon we were going to build for our flight to “Funny,” said Cityfella, “I always thought Raleigh. Up in the clouds as we sail to Governit was pronounced Mog, with a long ‘o’, but I ment House and make our demands for the could be wrong.” governmental turnaround of things in the Tar “You are,” said Curmudgeon, “it is Moog.” Heel State.” With that the door opened and the new air that rushed in was warming up and it continued on page 28 looked like it might be a better than average

might not mesh well with the typical Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse regular. Is there a formula for figuring these things out or is it more gut instinct?

Ronny Cox Trio shows you’ve hosted.

d&L: We do have a large mailing list which

how about a plug for those that are upcoming?

role the Unitarian Universalist Congregation plays in all this. You depend a lot on volunteers, and I want to give a special shout out to Charlie Van Buskirk.

brings in our core of regular attendees. They will often come just based on our recommendation. Occasionally we host a Celtic show and that usually brings us a different crowd from those that like singer songwriters, but it’s always a large crowd attending the Celtic shows which is great too. We are also grateful to local publications like this one that help provide exposure for our artists. As we are entirely volunteer based and non-profit, we have no budget to promote our shows. We rely on our mailing list, Facebook and posters.

d&L: We have been fortunate to partner

JC: Okay, now I am going to put you on the

JC: Hopefully some day! Talk a bit about the

with UUCA in using the space and we have a small group of dedicated volunteers both from UUCA and just from our local circle of friends. We hope to see better attendance from UUCA members in the future. We get great support from the staff and the sexton there. Charlie has been invaluable to our series by running the sound and offering the use of his equipment too.

JC: How about the audience? Is it a fairly

steady set of regulars, or does it vary from show to show? I would think trying to match the performers to your clientele would be quite the juggling act. Suppose there’s an act you really want to bring on board but they

16 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

spot. Could you name your favorite five or six shows? That’s not intended to slight anyone but I’m curious who really blew you away; either someone you were relatively unfamiliar with or someone who ended up being even better then you’d hoped.

d&L: Thanks! JC: How far ahead are the shows booked? And d&L: We book out about a year ahead. Up-

coming shows include: Brooks Williams, May 18; Neptune’s Car and Flagship Romance, June 8; Pat Donohue on August 3; and Robin Bullock, September 14. We will close out 2014 with the amazing John Gorka on December 7.

JC: Any closing thoughts? d&L: We need people to come out to the

shows and consider volunteering to keep our series going. There are many venues in Asheville that showcase music, but we like to think ours is a treasure of talent in a cozy, quiet atmosphere, easy to park, great desserts and a nice place to make new friends.

JC: Obviously I couldn’t agree more, and

thanks for your comments and support of local music!

d&L: Wow that is tough to answer but here

For a complete listing of events for the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse, go to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of asheville website, www.uuasheville.org, and click on the “Our programs” tab.

JC: I’ll second The Kennedys. I had several of

Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse, 1 edwin place, downtown asheville. Call (828) 254-6001 for more details.

goes: Al Petteway and Amy White, Brother Sun, John Mc Cutcheon, Chuck Brodsky, Pat Donohue ( NPR-Prairie Home Companion) Robin Bullock and The Kennedys. their albums but seeing them on stage took it to a whole different level. I also loved the two


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fine art Fiber Weekend, May 10-11, at the Folk Art Center

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Join us May 10 and 11 for the Folk art Center’s celebration of textile arts.

by

apRiL nanCe

she applies wax resist painting on cloth. Also, a local group of Throughout the weekend, craftstextile artists called Operation people will be sharing their inspiration Colorstorm are collaborating to and expertise as the Southern Highland create a temporary fiber installaCraft Guild hosts Fiber Weekend 2014. tion at the entrance to the Folk During Fiber Weekend the Guild hosts craft Educational craft demonstrations on SatArt Center which will be on demonstrations and hands on activities. urday will include natural dyeing, sheep display during Fiber Weekend. shearing, weaving on a loom, tapestry On Saturday they will be arts. Bring a blanket and enjoy a spring weaving, knitting, crochet, and surface working on the world’s longest scarf, afternoon of craft. design. Southern Highland Craft Guild and inviting attendees to add onto the On Sunday, the Folk Art Center’s members Sandra Rowland and Jan Morproject. They will be offering imprompauditorium will be transformed into a ris will host activities designed especially tu knitting lessons for anyone who runway for the Fifteenth Annual Fashion for children. wants to give it a try. Show of Wearable Art. Fiber artist Liz Two new demonstrations this year Textile arts have always created a Spear will emcee the event. Styles showare batik printing and yarn bombing. wonderful sense of community whether cased will range from contemporary to New Southern Highland Craft Guild it be spinning groups, quilting bees, or traditional, from funky to classic, made member Robin Ford will show how yarn circles. To celebrate this commuby members of the Southern Highland nity, combined Craft Guild and other regional artists. with a love of Throughout the fashion show, Liz craft and craftwill explore many fiber art processes, and ing, the Guild focus on the various schools and studios invites visitors to in the area which offer classes in textiles Fiber Weekend to everyone from the beginner to the exto bring their perienced fiber artist. There will be two own handwork, separate showings of the Fashion Show, whether it be at 1 and 3 p.m. knitting, embroidery or hand sewing. iF Weather YOU Fiber Weekend is a free event permitting we gO held on May 10 (10 a.m. to 4 would like to fill p.m.) and May 11 (two fashion the hill behind shows, 1 and 3 p.m.) at the Folk Art the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Center auditorieast Asheville. For more information, Robin Ford will demonstrate Patte Vanden Berg models um with people visit www.craftguild.org or call (828) the art of batik printing on her own design during a fabric on Saturday, May 10. recent Fashion Show. engaged in fiber 298-7928.

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8th Annual Art in Bloom

the Black Mountain Center for the arts presents a three-day flower-centric event, June 12, 1, 14. Art in Bloom features: a Gala Preview Party (Thursday, June 12 at 6 p.m.) with seated catered dinner; a gallery display of 22 Ikebana and Western floral designer’s interpretations of regional art work; a two-day Cottage Garden Tour (Friday and Saturday, June 13 and 14 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.); and plein air painting in the gardens followed by a display of their works. In April, various regional galleries loaned work for the floral designers to interpret. This year the designers have been tasked with including edible plants in their designs to fit the Garden to Gallery theme. This year’s Art in Bloom honorary chairperson is artist and musician Akira

Satake. Satake, along with the floral designers and those who purchase tickets to the gala, will enjoy a seated dinner catered by local restaurants. Each year Ultimate Ice Cream creates a signature flavor for Art in Bloom. Tickets for the Gala Preview Party are $40. The Cottage Garden Tour features gardens located in the heart of Black Mountain and up Hwy 9. Each garden will have a guide and a plein air painter creating artwork. The result of the plein air artist’s efforts will be displayed for sale from June 16-18 on the main floor of the Arts Center. Tickets for the garden tour are $20 and include admission to the floral designs in the Upper Gallery. For just $5 you can visit the Gallery with the floral designs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 13 and 14.

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Rapid River Magazine Seeks advertising Sales Representatives

Plein air painting in the Gardens.

iF YOU Art in Bloom, June 12, 13, 14 gO at the Black Mountain Center

for the Arts, 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. For more information call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses in these areas: Black Mountain, North Asheville, and Weaverville. Great for retirees needing extra income. Set your own hours – potential earnings are up to you! Some experience necessary. Seniors are encouraged to apply. inteReSted? Call (828) 646-0071,

or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 17


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Mak Asheville Spial

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Ooh La La Curiosity Market

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throughout the summer you can come to pritchard park and find a beautiful inviting canopy of market umbrellas sheltering local artists and musicians. Not only is the market a fantastic outlet for very talented local artists and musicians to share their work, it is also a fundraiser for Animal Haven, a no kill shelter located in East Asheville. Each market features a raffle basket

filled with donated items from the participating artists with all the proceeds benefiting Animal Haven. The market opens on Saturday, May 24 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. You will find a wide variety of arts and crafts, with new vendors participating each Saturday. Local artists will be showing everything from pottery, jewelry, temporary tattoos, natural skin care, fabric art, up-cycled crafters and so much more. The market is free of charge and family friendly.

For more details on the market iF YOU visit www.facebook.com/ gO OohLaLaCuriosityMarket.

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Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Links. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071.

18 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9


A R T S   &   C U L T U R E

Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Gallery of the Mountains d R

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gallery of the Mountains, a local american handmade gallery here in asheville, is celebrating their 0th anniversary this year. Rapid River Magazine recently contacted them to chat about their blueprint for success.

Rapid River Magazine: Gallery of the Mountains has

been promoting the Buy Local mantra since 1984, right?

gOM: Absolutely! 2014 marks the gallery’s 30th year

of selling American made and handmade. We continually seek out and support some of the region’s finest craftspeople. Currently, we carry about 100 artists. We offer jewelry, art-to-wear clothing, women’s and men’s accessories, wood, glass, paper, and more.

RRM: Besides being a

mainstay of the local galleries that support the Buy Local movement, what else sets you apart from the many craft galleries in town?

gOM: We have an in-

credibly well informed Handmade accessories. staff. Many of them have pursued their own artistic endeavors, and because of their experience in the arts they can talk knowledgeably about glazes, or jewelry making, or prints, fiber, paintings. Our eight employees have a combined total of seventy years of gallery experience.

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RRM: Tell us more about the artists that you feature. gOM: Much of what we carry is exclusive to Gallery

of the Mountains and can’t be found anywhere else in Asheville. Also, we work very closely with many of our artists to develop and create collections based on continued customer requests. Working closely with our local artists is greatly beneficial to the gallery, the artist, and the customer.

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RRM: I imagine some folks don’t even know where the gallery is located?

gOM: We’ve been fortunate enough to have been

located inside the Omni Grove Park Inn since 1984, just off the lobby on the Sammons Wing. Our clientele is usually staying at the Inn while they travel through our region, so it’s a great opportunity to promote and sell what’s local and wonderful. Being open 80 hours a week makes it super convenient for customers, too.

RRM: Any final words on the gallery and its success? gOM: We’re looking forward to 30 more wonderful years!

gallery of the Mountains 290 Macon avenue, asheville nC 28804 www.galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com 1-800-692-2204 or (828) 254-2068

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Art on Depot Studio & Gallery

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a colorful, working pottery studio. Artist and owner Cathey Bolton creates unique and colorful pottery. Stop in to watch her work and shop the gallery, which features works by more than 20+ artists. Art on Depot offers a wide range of fine arts and crafts, including jewelry, paintings, wood, fiber, and sculptures from both local and regional artists. art on depot is located just down the hill from Main St., in waynesville’s historic Frog Level, 250 depot Street. For more information phone (828) 246-0218 or email artondepot@live.com. hours: Monday-Saturday 10-5. wp

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Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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waYneSviLLe Frog Level Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival

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the whole Bloomin’ thing Spring Festival will be held Saturday, May 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in waynesville’s historic Frog Level. Local growers will furnish plenty of herbs, flowers, and trees, while artisans will provide a plethora of nature-related items. Birdhouses to baskets, pottery to plants, this is the best way to jump-start the growing season. The Haywood County Master Gardeners will be there to answer your gardening questions. Musical groups including the Frog Level Philharmonic, Tarnished Rose, Round the Fire, and Bohemian Jean will perform all day. Wonderful food vendors will provide a variety of dishes. Parking is available at the nearby public garage on Branner Ave, the VFW, and Haywood Builders. Here’s a little history to add to your appreciation of the festival. In 1884, the railroad came to Waynesville. The tracks were laid in a low-lying area alongside Richland Creek. Up until then the area had little development, being mostly swampland with only a few scattered buildings. All that changed with the advent of tourism brought in by the new railway. Liveries lined up and down Commerce Waynesville Depot circa 1890 St. to take the visitors to their destinations as boarding houses and inns grew. Since the creek occasionally flooded when the heavy rains came, townsfolk started calling the area “Frog Level.” The first train depot burned in 1900, but was soon replaced with another that remained standing until 1987. Up until the early 40s, Frog Level remained the commercial center of town, and folks walked up the hill to what was then called Pleasant Hill, now downtown Waynesville. The focus changed to Main Street when automobiles became popular and the train was no longer the main source of transportation. The last passenger train arrived in Waynesville in 1949; however, freight trains pass through Frog Level twice daily, with most trains continuing on to Sylva. Even though the waterways were rerouted and Richland Creek no longer flooded the area, Frog Level declined for several decades as businesses came and went. However, there is one store at 244 Depot St. that has been in business since it was built in 1900. The Waynesville Candy Company has been owned by the Stovall family since 1925. It served as the main distributor for the Stovalls’ 5 and 10 stores in western NC and northern Georgia in the prosperous 30s and 40s. It is still run by descendant, Dewey Stovall today. In 2003, Frog Level was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its contribution to the history of Haywood County and the architectural features of its buildings. It is now known for being home to Panacea, a popular

coffeehouse/roaster, Frog Level Brewing Company, and many art and antique businesses. The Historic Frog Level Merchant’s Association began the annual tradition of The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival in 2002. More than 8,000 people attend the festival which marks the beginning of the season for many locals. Frog Level business owner and artist at the mahogany house art gallery & studios, t.e. siewert says, “It will be the first time many people will see what Frog Level has continued on page 36

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wander through working studios and galleries on Main Street, depot Street, and Frog Level. Festive Art After Dark Dancing Hens and other flags denote participating works by Sarah Sneeden at galleries. With more than 12 Twigs & Leaves Gallery. galleries participating, everyone is sure to find inspiration through the beauty of art!

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~ waynesville has it aLL ~ pg. 20

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Home Furnishings, Great Food, plus Live Music, and Fine Arts & Crafts.

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Live Music

Every Friday & Saturday at 7pm

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Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

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20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000


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Can you imagine watching an artist create a piece of artwork in one hour? That is exactly what happens at the annual WNC QuickDraw benefit happening on Saturday, May 17 at Laurel Ridge Juan Pablo Pena Karen WhiteCountry Club in Waynesville. There will Mejia, jewelry. Chambers, pastels. be dozens of brave, talented artists who will partake in this exciting event. You will be able to participate as a spectator while the artists buffet with the artists after the auction. design a special piece out of pottery, glass, metal “QuickDraw has been the prisculpture, fiber art, basketry, pastels, woodworkmary funding source for our local Art ing and more. Education program for the past several Witness art in the making as forty artists years. This event has provided over challenge the clock and attempt to finish a piece $85,000 in the last ten years for grants in sixty minutes. Spectators will be caught up in and scholarships. Haywood County the excitement of watching artwork in a variety of Schools are very grateful for the hard mediums come to life before their eyes, and will work of this committee and this suchave the chance to ask the artists about their work cessful event,” Jenny Wood, Cultural and inspiration. You can chat with them before Arts Education Director. the starting bell and stroll around their working WNC Quick Draw is a unique stations as they create original art. partnership of artists, organizers, and At the end of the hour these completed teachers who are committed to enrichpieces plus other completed works are offered in ing the art experiences of children a silent auction. Proceeds from the auction fund college scholarships and innovative art teacher grants. Bid on your favorite works of art produced at the event and take home a beautiful memory. Attendees will also enjoy a heavy hors d’oeuvres

they prepare for the challenge. Also, sign up for your auction number.

5 p.m. Quickdraw Challenge Begins + Silent auction Begins. Don’t be late! The challenge begins promptly at 5 and ends at 6 p.m. You don’t want to miss strolling around the ministudios observing highly motivated live-auction artists paint to beat the clock. Other artists demonstrate their techniques on work in progress while offering a completed piece for sale during the silent auction.

6 p.m. Quickdraw Challenge ends – Preview the framed fine art for the live auction.

6:0 p.m. Live auction – Grab a seat for a

lively auction. Original, ready-to-hang art is sold to the highest bidder. Lucky winners take home a piece they can describe with enthusiasm and pride and provide inspiration and support for the art teachers and students in the Haywood County Schools.

7:0 p.m. hors d’oeuvres Buffet – Meet the

artists and enjoy delicious food in a spectacular setting.

9 p.m. Silent auction ends

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Dominick DePaolo creates a painting of Waynesville’s Strand Theatre.

in our public schools. The fundraiser provides funds for art education in the public schools and awards scholarships for graduating seniors to pursue art-related studies. Since 2002 QuickDraw has funded over 18,000 art experiences in the elementary population alone not including elective courses in middle and high schools. This year’s event features many outstanding artists from across the region. Artists find the event as intriguing as attendees: “I fly into color and design mode when I get the first QuickDraw letter of the year… exciting… edgy…!” Vickie Beck, volunteer artist.

6YkZgi^h^c\I]ViLdg`h

4:0 p.m. Cocktail Social – Watch the artists as

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Painter Joyce Schlapkohl shares, “I’ve been involved (with Quick Draw) from the first year that Gretchen Clasby started it. It’s one of the most rewarding and exciting events that I’ve ever been involved with. It is so well organized and fun for everyone. Plus there are some very nice paintings on display and for the live auction. Quick Draw has

1th annUaL BeneFit FOR the aRtS in haYwOOd COUntY

Saturday, May 17 • 4:0-9:0 p.m.

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We were eager to advertise our new ownership of Bogart’s Restaurant in Waynesville. While we kept all the original menu items, we were excited about trying out new, homemade original dishes as well. Rapid River Magazine has been a great value for getting our message out to their readers. After running a coupon, we were pleasantly surprised at how well it was received. A big THANK YOU to all our awesome Bogart’s customers and to Rapid River Magazine!

~ Shelly Sneed, Co-Owner of Bogart’s Restaurant

Bogart’s Restaurant, 303 S. Main St., Waynesville, NC (828) 452-1313, www.bogartswaynesville.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 2


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Flesh & Blood Vanguard Records

The first album in four years from this roots based Australian trio finds bandleader John Butler in a distinctly introspective space, taking stock both of the band’s future and the world it helps occupy. Butler has long leaned towards the cerebral side—sometimes unintentionally sacrificing groove in the process—but Flesh & Blood does an admirable job of balancing both the head and the rousing anthem sing along aspects of his music. Having said that, it’s also considerably steadier, suggesting a maturation that can only come with experience. It’s an ages old conundrum—moving from heated young man to cooler thirty something—but one that Butler handles well. The lovely opening “Spring to Come,” with its hopeful declaration of flowering love, sets a good tone. It’s reflective of the seasonal passages so beautifully chronicled by fellow Australian Paul Kelly while exhibiting a newly discovered contemplative vibe. Such is the sea of change that marks this surprisingly concise (under 52 minutes) gem. While the John Butler Trio are typically tagged as a “jam band” Flesh & Blood shows a very different side. Thoughtful meditations such as “Only One” and the somber “Bullet Girl” will likely segregate their fan base, and those who prefer the more head banging aspects of the John Butler Trio are going to feel left out. And while most of Flesh & Blood works well, the band still has a tendency towards toss away ditties (“Devil Woman”) and missteps (the reggae gone wrong “Blame It On Me”) that keeps this from being the epic step forward it might have been. It’s certainly a move in the right direction but one that might best be considered as two steps forward but one half-step in reverse. ***

Wyatt Easterling

Born and raised in the musically rich environs of Chapel Hill, Wyatt Easterling is one of the unknown gems of the music world. While he’s never been the most prolific of artists—his last record is now four years gone—he’s kept plenty busy as a successful Nashville songwriter and occasional music label executive. Not the well-tailored “I’d just as soon be selling commodities” type, but the all too rare insider who genuinely loves music and does his best to promote it. It’s that broad exposure to a variety of

24 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

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I’m back again with an assortment of “musical biscuits” that reflect the amazing variety of music out there. There’s again far more than I could ever cover so I’ll keep my comments short, with a reminder to support Asheville’s many fine independent record stores. And a belated happy Record Store Day to one and all.

John Butler Trio

Goodbye Hello Phoenix Rising Records

artists and sounds that Easterling draws from, one which provides him a sensibility that has guided his career. The upshot is an album that is marvelously thought out, diverse yet cohesive, and relentlessly engaging. Its gospel influences might infiltrate (best heard in “Help Me Find My Way” and “Somebody Prayed”) some songs while others, most notably “My Brand New Love” and “Right Before My Eyes”, showcase a country tinged indie pop mix that is a pure joy to hear. There’s not a weak link to be found, and while the effervescence of new found love—a sentiment which dominates the lyrical content of the album—might lean itself toward potential syrupiness, Easterling pulls it off with nary a stumble. As a former A&R man at Atlantic Records, Wyatt Easterling knows a thing or three about what makes a good song better. With Goodbye Hello he’s taken the essence of that knowledge, mixed it with his own surplus of talent, and come up with an album worth playing again and again. ****

Nashville Jazz Orchestra It Ain’t Necessarily So Jazz City Music

While Nashville is the undisputed epicenter of country music, its geographic location, serving as one corner of a triangulation that includes St. Louis and New Orleans, has helped foster its long association with jazz. That association is further enhanced by the debut release of the Nashville Jazz Orchestra, an old school ensemble dedicated to the preservation and furthering of this great American art form. Subtitled New Twists on Gershwin Classics, the album is a throwback in all the right ways, part education and all enjoyment. Opening with the charming “Cuban Overture” originally recorded in 1932, the disc includes three tracks from Porgy and Bess (which I should confess to being my favorite all time piece of music) as well as such standards as “Someone to Watch Over Me“ and the rarely played and even more rarely successfully translated “Prelude No. 2”. That piece, perfectly arranged by Jamie Simmons and featuring a delightful clarinet solo by Don Aliquo is a pure show stopper. Trombonist Barry Greene solos through a sinuous “But Not for Me” while “Summertime” is highlighted by the piercing work of tenor saxophonist Doug Moffet. Unfortunately the liner notes lack much detail as to who plays what, an omission that I hope is corrected in future releases. Recasting American classics, songs that have long since permeated our communal subconscious, is a tricky business. Note by note replications are often tedious while straying too far from the source

material can be blasphemous. With It Ain’t Necessarily So the Nashville Jazz Orchestra has managed to deliver an effort that should please neophytes and aficionados alike. ****

Dead Rider

Chills on Glass Drag City Records

This explosive mix of screeching guitars, drumbeats, synthesized mayhem, and distorted vocals might at first sound like a sonic train wreck but once you get through the gruff (and at times tricky to assimilate) surface, there’s an entire other level underneath. Led by guitarist Todd Rittman, the Chicago based band, which includes Andrea Faught, Matt Esby, Thymme Jones, and Noah Tabakin, seem to delight in life on the edge; they careen from one moment to the next with such wild abandon that I kept expecting the entire effort to unravel. But it never does, which only adds to the stupefaction of this explosive 35 minute excursion into the darker corners of cerebral rock. The most immediate influence would be Tin Machine era David Bowie or Captain Beefheart but there are also abundant strands of punk, wildly skewed electronica, and bass heavy funk. The music is so chameleon like that distinguishing one track from another seems pointless, as this is the sort of project that begs to be heard as an inclusive entity. Replete with all manner of weirdness Chills on Glass is one challenging listen, but it’s one that offers ample reward and will likely stay with you in surprising ways. It’s a take no prisoners bit of wonderment that is simultaneously perplexing, threatening, evocative, and altogether fascinating. ****

Various Artists

Looking Into You: A Tribute to Jackson Browne Music Road Records

Roughly split between those contemporaries who are fortunate to call him friend and a few of the many (relative) newcomers he has influenced, Looking Into You: A Tribute to Jackson Browne is a long overdue testament to one of the truly great songwriters of our generation. At 23 songs, and covering a wide swath of artists and styles, it’s a naturally mixed bag but one that never ceases to enforce how devoted Browne is to song craft. Not surprisingly it’s tilted towards the first half of the 1970s—a period in which Browne released a breathtaking number of brilliant songs—which gives me hope that a second volume might loom in the ‘CD’s’ continued on page 25


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future. Jimmie LaFave gives a stunning rendition of “For Everyman”, perfectly capturing that odd mix of hope and resignation that marked the original, while Lyle Lovett imbues “Rosie” with a sardonic wit that’s worthy of such a delicate subject matter while also delivering a fine rendition of “Our Lady of The Well.” Longtime Browne cohorts Bonnie Raitt and David Lindley team for a fine reworking of “Everywhere I Go” (surpassing the original) and Sean & Sara Watkins, who in recent years have toured with Browne, nail “Your Bright Baby Blues.” Of course not everything works. Bob Schneider inexplicably slows “Running on Empty” down to a stilted dirge which robs the song of all its world weary desperation. But that’s the only real misstep, and while Looking Into You might best be heard as a reminder of how golden the first four Jackson Browne albums were that’s more than reason enough to justify its being. ***1/2

Charlie Parr Hollandale Chaperone Records

Charlie Parr might initially be described as an artistic recluse, an eccentric in the purist sense. He only occasionally travels outside his native Minnesota (typically playing dance halls and American Legion Posts), lives a solitary life ensconced in the harsh north woods outside Duluth, and remains an adherent to a style of music making that only a few hard core enthusiasts seem to care about; which goes a long way towards explaining why he is so little known; a lack of talent sure isn’t the reason. Like many of his records Hollandale, a brilliant collection of five exquisitely imagined and performed instrumentals, defies description. For those who assume instrumentals an insufficient vehicle for delivering passion, joy, loss, doubt, or any other range of human emotions, Hollandale is powerful evidence to the contrary. Playing his trademark resonator guitar—and improvised around five unique open tunings I cannot begin to fully understand—Parr paints an affecting sonic landscape of color, texture, and depth. Following less than a year after Barnswallow—itself an assuming masterpiece—Hollandale is an example of primitive Americana at its best. The song titles (“Clear Lake”, the two part “I Dreamed I Saw Paul Bunyan Last Night”) are reflective of the somber environment in which they were recorded, and while Hollandale was specifically mixed for vinyl, my CD version sounds as rich and warm as an old 78. It’s a 40 minute musical expedition, a decisive example of one man’s vision and as fine an album as I’ve recently experienced. Pay a visit to CharlieParr.com and prepare to be amazed. *****

Paper Bird Glides Back to Town

by JaMeS

CaSSaRa

while many, me included, first became aware of paper Bird via their stunning 2012 release Rooms and the subsequent You tube clips that trickled out in support of it, the band’s roots actually go back to Colorado in late 2006 when Sarah anderson and sisters esme and genevieve patterson began singing together.

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Built around gorgeous three part harmonies that immediately drew favorable comparisons to The Roches, the band, augmented by a collective membership that included a broad range of instruments, quickly gathered a strong reputation for the eclectic nature of their performances and the innate good time vibe they radiate. Their self-released first album, 2007’s Anything Nameless and Joymaking, became one of the Evergreen State’s top sellers. By the summer of 2008 Paper Bird had grown confidant enough to embark on their first national tour-as part of New Belgium Brewery sponsored “Tour de Fat”-and have been touring nationally since, including sold out marquee shows in Philadelphia and New York City. In June of 2009 Paper Bird released their first EP; the well-reviewed A Sky Underground, and followed that with an extensive summer tour including stops at the High Sierra Music Festival, Oregon Country Fair, Mile High Music Festival and 10,000 Lakes Festival. During that time they shared the stage with such heavy hitters as Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Neko Case, Big Head Todd and the Monsters, Glen Campbell, and The Lumineers. A Sky Underground was re-released in April of 2010, followed immediately by the live EP, Live at Twist & Shout. Culminating their intense summer was the band’s second full length album, When the River Took Flight. Reflective of their productive nature, Paper Bird subsequently released several more EPs of newly recorded and leftover material. Barely taking a break, Paper Bird upped the ante in the fall of that year as they began collaborating with Ballet

Marshall Crenshaw Driving and Dreaming Red River/Relativity Records

Now this is a genuine oddity, a three song vinyl EP by one of the most idiosyncratic and continually engaging musicians out there. And at times I mean *really* out there. While Crenshaw’s career dates back more

Nouveau Colorado. The group composed the music for the ballet Carry On, with their contribution attached to the choreography of acclaimed artistic director Garrett Ammon. The multi-media performance debuted at the Lakewood Cultural Center in early 2011 to Paper Bird, a seven-piece outfit of bass, trombone, sell out houses. trumpet, and vocal harmonies. Carry On was released as a fullWe chose the latter, now having Caleb length, two-act live album in June of that year. primarily play bass. It’s really opened up the Percussionist Mark Anderson, who worked sound, resulting in a fresh and lively new on the project, was added to the band shortly approach. Our pockets keep getting deeper. thereafter, solidifying Paper Bird’s personnel as Sarah and Mark Anderson, Esme and JC: Having a trio of female voices brings Genevieve Patterson, guitarist Paul DeHaven , to mind easy comparisons to The Roches, and multi-instrumentalist Caleb Summeril. In and I am certainly guilty of that. What are true collective fashion all members contribute some of the other bands you draw upon for to the songwriting and there is, by design, no inspiration? Yours is a sound that is both group leader. contemporary and steeped in a certain era Paper Bird has previously played Asheville of classic pop music. and will be doing so again at The Isis Theatre in West Asheville on Friday, May 9. In anticipaMa: We get this question a lot and never tion of that evening drummer Mark Anderson really know how to answer. All of us have was gracious enough to answer a few questions. very different musical back grounds, spanning from punk to rhythm and blues, James Cassara: While the core of Paper Bird reggae to rap. Our influences are all over has remained constant since the release of the place. Rooms, I understand there have been some We’ve been particularly influenced changes in the group dynamics. Can you catch by soul and R & B, and old western music us up to date? these days, but at the same time pulling influences from contemporary music. We Mark anderson: Our bass player Macon are stepping away from being a throwback decided to leave the band a few months ago. It band though. Our sound isn’t so steeped in was a very amicable departure, but with his absence we had to decide whether to replace him, ‘Paper Birds’ continued on page 28 or try and alter the band to work as a six piece.

than three decades (his five stars self-titled debut came out in 1982) he’s managed to be both wildly revered and largely ignored. With his career being what it is—it’s hard to imagine too many folks just now discovering his music—Crenshaw has been dribbling out new material even as his older albums get the deluxe reissue treatment they deserve. Driving and Dreaming is the third in a series of EP releases following a formula set forth by its predecessors; a new song (in this case the mid tempo pop title track) a cover tune (Bobby Fuller‘s “Never to be Forgot-

ten”) and a reworking of one of his best known songs (“Someday, Someway”) from days gone by. It’s an interesting snapshot of where Crenshaw’s head is these days, and while his inherent knack for catchy hooks and quirky phrasing is as strong as ever I cannot help but think Crenshaw’s mostly treading water. Three songs is hardly a definitive statement and insufficient to make much in the way of judgment. But as one who has long been fascinated by the artistry of Marshall Crenshaw I’m holding out for more. ***

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 25


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authors ~ poetry ~ books

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The Poet’s Voice

greetings word Lovers, what are you working on today?

the wRiteRS’ wORKShOp hard times writing Contest Deadline: Postmarked by May 31, 2014 1st Place: Your choice of a 3 night stay at our Mountain Muse B&B, 3 free workshops, or 100 pages line-edited and revised by our editorial staff. 2nd Place: 2 night stay at our B&B; or 2 free workshops; or 50 pages line-edited. 3rd Place: One free workshop; or 25 pages line-edited. 10 Honorable Mentions. Write about a difficult experience in your life, how you overcame this obstacle, and how you were changed by it. Winning stories will be chosen for originality and creative writing style. Stories should be previously unpublished, and should not exceed 5,000 words. Your name, address, email and title of work should appear on a separate cover sheet. The entry fee per submission is $25 ($20 for Workshop members).Multiple entries are accepted. Enclose legal size self-sealing SASE for critique and list of winners. Make check or money order payable to The Writers’ Workshop, and mail to: Hard Times Contest, 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville, NC 28805. Emailed submissions may be sent to writersw@gmail.com, with “Hard Times Contest” in the subject.

FOR MORe detaiLS call (828) 254-

8111, email writersw@gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org.

my job is yard work – I take this inchworm, for instance, and move it from here to there Has Mother Nature left seeds of poems scattered in your notebook? My husband has four green thumbs (just kidding). Our garden is sanctuary for him. He planted dahlia bulbs today. I threw myself on the grass and recited to the sky, “i thank you god, for most this amazing day,” a perfect Spring poem by e.e. cummings. I let it rip at all occasions, weddings, Baptisms, funerals, walks, and during garden chores.

Illustration by Michael O'Brien

Spring in Carolina Verses by Henry Timrod (1829-1867) Spring, with that nameless pathos in the air Which dwells with all things fair, Spring with her golden suns and silver rain Is with us once again. In the deep heart of every forest tree The blood is all aglee, And there’s a look about the leafless bowers As if they dreamed of flowers. In gardens you may note amid the dearth, The crocus breaking earth; And near the snowdrop’s tender white and green, The violet in its screen. Still there’s a sense of blossoms yet unborn In the sweet airs of morn; One almost looks to see the very street Grow purple at his feet. Some wondrous pageant; and you scarce would start, If from a beech’s heart, A blue-eyed Dryad, stepping forth, should say, “Behold me! I am May!”

BOOKCLUBS & SaLOnS at MaLapROp’S Bridging differences Bookclub – Monday,

May 5 at 7 p.m. Host Patti Digh leads a discussion of Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo.

women in Lively discussion Bookclub

Tuesday, May 6 at 7 p.m. Join host Linda Barrett for the WILD bookclub, which meets at the Battery Park Book Exchange. The May pick is Caravaggio by Francine Prose.

Your Book advertised here $49/Month in print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

CaROL peaRCe bJORLie – tHe pOet beHind tHe CeLLO

I sat down at my dining room table to write May’s column intending the subject to be grief. There have been two family deaths in Minnesota;

“BehOLd Me! i aM MaY!” Has Spring inspired a Villanelle, Sonnet, a greening blank verse, or a rap to Spring (zing! Pop! Plush! Sting!)? I imagine Wendell Berry is in his field running soil through his hands. I imagine Stanley Kunitz loved the feel of dirt and searched for signs of life in his Provincetown garden. I know Mary Oliver is out in the woods touching trees, watching for the fox, snake, owl, present in “the ecstacy of paying attention.” (Annie Dillard) Charles Wright’s poem, “Yard Work”, which appears in Negative Blue, ends with these lines:

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autism Bookclub – Wednesday, May 7 at 12 p.m. Hosts Catherine Faherty and Carolyn Ogburn lead a discussion of The Reason I Jump: The Inner Voice of a Thirteen-YearOld Boy with Autism by Naoki Higashida.

Malaprop’s Bookclub – Wednesday, May 7

at 7 p.m. Host Jay Jacoby leads a discussion of The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera.

Mystery Bookclub – Monday, May 12 at 7

p.m. Mystery writer Sallie Bissell leads a discussion of The Lock Artist by Steve Hamilton.

new! women who Run with the wolves Salon – Wednesday, May 14 & May 28 at

26 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

7 p.m. Join host Andrea Olson for this series discussing Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estés’ seminal work, Women Who Run With the Wolves. The series begins with Singing Over the Bones, and Chapter 1, The Howl: Resurrection of the Wild Woman.

February 2, and March 18. (The temperature in February was 35 below zero.) I had my resources at hand. I taught a class in Minnesota, titled, Healing Words. It was all there. Then my muse let me know I am not in charge. (I was certain I was.) Outside the door, a blue bird did a quick splash in the blue bird bath. A bully robin scared her off. Then a graytufted tit mouse appeared and stamped his feet in the grass. When I walk out the front door, I dodge black bumble bees, butterflies and wasps, each intent on sucking every last drop of nectar from the plum and peach tree blossoms. What am I working on? I’m learning to let the muse have her way. I’m learning to get out of the way and let words work. Writer, get out of the way. Read other poet’s words on Spring. Walk a forest trail. Visit the Arboretum. Bring your notebook, a pencil. Let words have their say. I was certain I was going to write about my Father-in-Law, fellow poet, and pen-pal. I was certain I wanted to tell you about Lois, my Mother-In-Law, who wore turquoise. Instead, those damn birds showed up, singing and stamping their feet. The sun came out, we mowed the grass, ran the sprinkler; ate asparagus in the yard. It’s Spring’s fault.

i want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. we need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

politics of Food Bookclub – Monday,

May 26 at 7 p.m. Join host Dan Rosener for a discussion of Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto.

Ya Bookclub – Tuesday, May 27 at 5 p.m.

Join host Robin Criscuolo for a discussion of Scar Boys by Len Vlahos.

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

pOetRiO

The salons will meet twice monthly and not only involve discussion of the assigned chapters, but integrate and experience the materials in the cantadora’s way. The May 28 salon will discuss chapter 2, Stalking the Intruder: The Beginning Initiation. Andrea Olson, MA, Min., has produced and directed performance pieces on the woman’s story and teaches movement-based expressive arts and shadow work here in Asheville.

Sunday, May 4 at  p.m.

Comix Club – Tuesday, May 20 at 7 p.m.

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Malaprop’s bookseller Lauren Napoli leads a discussion of Battling Boy by Paul Pope.

Join us for our monthly series of readings and signings by 3 poets at 3 p.m.! This month will feature Thomas Rain Crowe (Postcards from Peru), L. Lamar Wilson (Sacrilegion), and Landon Godfrey (Spaceship).

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &


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authors ~ books ~ readings Love & War

twentY YeaRS, thRee pReSidentS, twO daUghteRS and One LOUiSiana hOMe after more than a quarter century of living together, my ex-husband decided he wanted a divorce because my vote for Barack Obama proved that i was “un-american.” people invariably laugh when i relate this story. i can assure you it was not funny.

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X’s development into a Rush Limbaugh clone took years. Like the frog in the gradually boiling pot of water, I didn’t realize what was happening until it was too late. I write today in the vein of sharing “The Lesson Learned,” a caveat to others in a similar situation. On the theory that the only thing more boring than a knee-jerk conservative is a kneejerk liberal, I have long balanced my political reading with conservative authors and histories (including Mr. Lumbaugh’s books and those of Glen Beck, Anne Coulter, Bill O’Reilly, Sarah Palin, and George Will, among others). I often reviewed these books in this column. (See Bush and Cheney in the White House by Peter Baker and other past reviews at www.rapidrivermagazine.com, and my current review of Charles Krauthammer’s collection of essays below.) I learned a lot, increased my understanding of the conservative view and broadened my perspective on the world in general, but no one writer made enough sense to me to change my political beliefs, honed by years of social activism and spiritual principles. each of these audio books, or their hardback versions, can be found at Malaprop’s and other local bookstores.

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MaRCianne MiLLeR

As luck would have it, now I’m single and dating – a Republican! Am I doomed? Is it possible for a Tea Party supporter to be happy with a woman who thinks they are idiots? I needed advice. So I turned to the most political odd couple in the country – Republican Mary Matalin and Democrat James Carville. Married for 20 years – happily, it seems, to everyone who’s observed them – these two ought to have some advice about “mixed marriages.” Matalin and Carver weren’t just political opposites, they were high-ranking professional political operatives whose opinions helped affect national policy. Republican Mary Matalin was the very loyal assistant to Vice President Dick Cheney in the George W. Bush White House. Democrat James Carville was “The Ragin’ Cajun,” President Bill Clinton’s campaign manager and apologist. I figured their new book – Love & War: Twenty Years, Three Presidents, Two Daughters and One Louisiana Home – would help me out. I really enjoyed reading this book on audio where you could clearly differentiate the two wildly different and opinionated person-

Things That Matter

thRee deCadeS OF paSSiOnS, paStiMeS and pOLitiCS

if i could write one essay as brilliantly as conservative pundit and pulitzer prize-winning syndicated columnist (and Fox news contributor) Charles Krauthammer does, i could die happy. His latest collection of essays covers his 30-some year writing career and runs the gamut of both personal and political topics. The book starts out with a remarkable memoir… born in Canada, educated at Harvard, liberal in politics, paralyzed from a diving accident, practiced as a psychiatrist, served as Vice President Walter Mondale’s speech writer,

then became a conservative and full-time writer for conservative (some say libertarian) issues. In 2006, the Financial Times named him “the most influential commentator in America.” The irony, for me, an unrepentant liberal, of Krauthammer’s work is that I agree with him often. He’s against assisted suicide and the death penalty (so am I). He’s also against the use of Spanish on an equal footing with English because the policy is creating bi-lingual separatist regions in the U.S. rather than polyglot societies of old. (I agree). On other things, we’re galaxies apart – global warming, the war in Iraq, Republican fiscal policy and the value of President Obama.

“…only thing more boring than a kneejerk conservative is a knee-jerk liberal.”

MaY

we host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING visit www.malaprops.com

alites: Mary (a big-hearted Earth Mother) alternated writing and reading her chapters with James, a hyperactive, acerbic, rat-a-tat comedian. (Not sure the book would have been as effective without their voices.) But Love & War is not really about politics, which was disappointing. To me, the lack of more politics (a choice made maybe to broaden the book’s appeal?) instead reduced the story to an interesting, but basically generic celebrity marriage memoir. James offered one secret on how the couple has been able to live together without killing one another, a piece of wisdom that did indeed make the book worth reading. “It takes two to fight,” James says, “I won’t fight.” Doesn’t mean Mary’s politics, and her intense involvement with Dick Cheney at the highest levels didn’t make things difficult – it just means James refused to fight about politics. At first I felt cheated to read an entire book and get only one piece of advice. But upon reflection, I realized Carville had given me a gem. To keep the peace, couples in a politically combustible relationship have to remember just one simple rule: “I won’t fight.”

Love & war: twenty Years, three presidents, two daughters and One Louisiana home; written by and narrated by Mary Matalin and James Carville; Random house audio; 9 Cds; 10.5 hours.

ReadingS & BOOKSigningS Saturday, May  at 7 p.m. aLLan gURganUS, Local Souls. Monday, May 5 at 5 p.m. SidneY pOweLL, Licensed to Lie: exposing Corruption in the department of Justice. Monday, May 5 at 7 p.m. JeSSiCa wapneR, the philadelphia Chromosome: the Quest to Cure Cancer. thursday, May 8 at 7 p.m. FRanCine pROSe, Lovers at the Chameleon Club, paris 192. ticketed reception 5:0-6:0. email alsace@malaprops.com for info. Saturday, May 10 at 10 a.m. three tellers from the Smoky Mountain Storytellers. Saturday, May 10 at 7 p.m. zaCh LazaR, i pity the poor immigrant. Monday, May 12 at 7 p.m. One way Out: the inside history of the allman Brothers Band by alan paul. tuesday, May 1 at 7 p.m. tiM & LYnne MaRtin, home Sweet anywhere. wednesday, May 14 at 7 p.m. ChaRLeS veSS, illustrator of Seven wild Sisters: a Modern Fairy tale. vess’s work is on display at downtown Books and news. thursday, May 15 at 7 p.m. geORge SingLetOn, Between wrecks. Friday, May 16 at 7 p.m. JOn SeaLY, the whiskey Baron. wednesday, May 21 at 7 p.m. taMaSin nOYeS, vegan Finger Foods, cookbook. Friday, May 2 at 7 p.m. danieL e. LieBeRMan, the Story of the human Body: evolution, health, and disease.

“…rational, non-strident, thoughtful language…” I highly recommend Things that Matter for anyone who’s curious about the conservative view stated in rational, non-strident, thoughtful language. Caveat here – you may not agree with Krauthammer but he’s such an elegant writer that you’ll want to listen to every word.

thursday, May 29 at 7 p.m. CORBan addiSOn, the garden of Burning Sand. Saturday, May 1 at 7 p.m. Ben MOntgOMeRY, grandma gatewood’s walk, appalachian trail thru-hiker.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM pg. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

things that Matter: three decades of passions, pastimes and politics; selections read by Charles Krauthammer with george newbern; Random house audio; 10 Cds; 12 hours. Marcianne Miller, a local writer and critic, is taking a few months off from Rapid River Magazine’s book column to concentrate on her novel. She can be reached at marci@rapidrivermagazine.com.

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 27


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artful living SOUtheRn COMFORt BY JUdY aUSLeY

from classes at Duke. When she is back on campus she attempts to blend in with other students. She is into women’s studies and sociology. She may study pre law at Duke. I would wholeheartedly rechas their share of rednecks, just as ommend that this young woman Asheville has. In some ways, she do just that because she needs to may have had a safer time in Chaprotect herself in her career. She is pel Hill at arch rival, Carolina. I too young now to think of the wisunderstand from other reporters I dom given from me that, “Honey, know in Durham that she has had by JUdy aUSLey the longer you live, something is a hard time with some students at going to come back and bite you.” Duke so far. Be prepared to defend yourself. Duke’s “iffy” reputation goes back to If Duke’s economically privileged stuthe 70s. Everyone knows Duke has reports dents are okay with this, and the ever-remainof dorm rapes never charged or prosecuted. ing conservative Bible Belt culture of North Do not forget the debacle of a case with the Carolina do not get wind of it, she may survive stripper/dancer and the soccer stars. That at Duke. young woman trying to make a buck who was I do not condemn any woman who is tryinvolved and humiliated is in NC’s women’s ing to make a living, no matter how she does it. prison in Raleigh now, after being found guilty It is the culture now, folks! Love it or ignore it! of other charges in a different case not related to the university. Can someone please explain to me why so writer Judy ausley has many nerdy women get into porn? I don’t get been a reporter with it! Weeks took Amanda Knox’s last name after newspapers in nC for she was found not guilty in an Italian court last 40 years. She retired year. So, Belle Knox was born into her prein 2005 and continues porn movie career. to freelance at her How does she do it? While at Duke she home in asheville. She flies off to Atlantic City or California on breaks can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com.

It’s the Culture We’re In, Folks!

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When I picked up Rolling Stone this weekend, I was in shock to see something a little more than risqué happening at the state’s most prestigious university and the most expensive, Duke. Word is out, but so is beautiful Duke Freshman, Miriam Weeks, who is a rising star in the adult entertainment field. Her screen name since November is Belle Knox and she is becoming a big name on the alternative screen production. She is getting wealthy while starring in the sex trade and porn industry. She admits she watched porn movies at age 12. Not only is she savvy, she is well on her way to making millions if she stays in the profession. She has made enough money acting in “f---“ films, as we called porn in the 1960’s, to pay her own tuition at Duke (over $4,000 a month.) She did not have to consult or borrow money from her dear old daddy who was a military doctor in Afghanistan. Yea hahaaaaa, I say. Go Duke! LOL Pardon me, but I lived and was a news reporter in Durham in the 1980s. Durham

‘Paper Birds’ cont’d from page 25

nostalgia anymore. It definitely has its place in contemporary culture.

JC: One of the things that immediately drew

me to the band was what I heard as a deliberate emphasis on songs as standalone entities. While Rooms holds together beautifully as a whole, it seems a bit of a throwback to a time when albums were made up of potential single releases. In these days of You Tube and digital purchases it seems we’ve seen a return to standard four minute pop songs. And I welcome that!

Ma: We hope every one of our songs can stand as its own, but we are very much in the business of making cohesive records. We want the listening experience to flow together as much as possible.

JC: From the start Paper Bird seemed in-

tended as a cooperative; everyone contributes material and there is no clearly defined band leader. I love that approach but, when push comes to shove, how is it decided which songs make the cut and which don’t? Does the collective nature of the band present some unique challenges?

Ma: It really has never been hard for us to

decide which songs make the cut and which don’t. In a lot of ways we’ve all learned how to write specifically for Paper Bird. We all have side projects where we can have more control, but the cooperative nature of our band truly works for us. Also, when

28 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

someone presents a song to Paper Bird, it generally changes a lot when the band gets their hands on it. In a lot of ways a song becomes the band’s, instead of the individuals.

if you know of a character in asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

JC: You Tube, Facebook, and other arenas

widely defined as social media have been a big part of the band’s growth, and I assume that to some degree your core audience is reflective of that. Can you expand a bit on what strategies you’ve used to reach new listeners? A decade ago touring like crazy seemed to be enough, but I’m not sure that’s any longer the case.

Ma: Social media has been great for us, but

honestly touring is how we’ve gained most of our fans. We use social media to connect with our audience and keep them updated on what we’re up to, but I think the core of our audience discovered us on the road. It’s after that discovery that they follow us on Facebook or Twitter or Instagram. Although, we have had some gracious write ups on various blogs or magazines, which definitely boosts our following, but I think gaining a dedicated listenership requires a real experience. iF YOU Paper Moon at the Isis Restaurant gO and Music Hall in West Asheville

on Friday, May 9 at 9 p.m.. Tickets are priced at $8 in advance and $10 for day of show: Standing room with some balcony seating available. Go to www. isisasheville.com for more details.

‘Curmudgeon’ cont’d from page 16

“Tar Heel State?” asked Cityfella. “Yep,” answered Curmudgeon. “That special moniker is traced back to the state’s early history, and was suggested by the production of tar, pitch, and turpentine, all manufactured from the great pine forests of North Carolina. The production of such materials became so important that the members of the English Parliament were so impressed by the output that eventually we became a great source for the English navy. I’ve heard tell that thousands of barrels of pitch and tar were annually shipped to London for their navy’s use.” “So we go from Moog to Tar Heel in five minutes of the meeting of some of the greatest minds in WNC?” “Well,” said Storekeep, “it kept you all in a good frame of mind while we waited for winter to leave and spring to arrive.” “I forgot what I came in for,” said Cityfella. peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.


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artful living Bringing Your Whole Mind “the (Chinese) term ‘hsin’… is used in a way… synonymous with the tao. hsin means the totality of our psychic functioning…. to both taoism and zen, the center of the mind’s activity is not in the conscious thinking process, not in the ego.”

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~ Alan Watts, The Way of Zen

In Buddhism, the concept of bringing your whole mind to life-experience is very important. As Watts indicated, in Zen, the point is to transcend finding the center of mind and our sense of self in thinking and emotions (the ego), and find them in the integrated totality of our Being-in-the-world. When Buddhism speaks of “little mind” it is indicating that what we usually associate as “mind” is really only the dimension of mind built around the egoic experience of “me” with “my” thoughts and emotions, while we ignore that which is called “big-mind” that transcends separateness, form and conditioning, which this “little mind” arises within. The purpose of Buddhism with its emphasis on meditation and Koanic riddles is to point the student toward and open them into the realization of “big mind,” the consciousness of non-dualistic intuitive experience that is aware awareness. The typical person, identifying mind with the thought and emotive structures of the ego, approaches life in a manner that is superficial and programmed. We exist largely within conditioned sets of observation and response, paying just enough attention to notice a situation falling into some recognizable mental set and scenario and go into a stimulus-response, thought-emotion-behavior pattern. We bring only enough of our mind to the situation to engage our thoughts which then activate our emotions and behavior. We play out these pre-set patterns over and over again as we go

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through our lives with very little awareness of their limitation, or of the many alternative and probably better, wiser, more skillful possibilities available. These patterns constitute our personality, our habitual interactive manner. They might be effective and they might not be. We mistakenly confuse these patterns for who we are, and they are often significantly neurotic, that is, not optimally appropriate, healthy or helpful. They cause our perceptions and responses to be significantly distorted regarding the what-is of the moment, and they most certainly cannot access genuine spiritual experience. From a Buddhist perspective, we are asleep and to awaken within us a deeper, totally sane and truly spiritual mind is the entire purpose of meditation and Buddhist teaching. Upon occasion, we are caused, by the context, novelty, intensity or importance of a situation, to bring full attention to what we are experiencing and to engage and respond with the full spectrum of our faculties. In such moments, we become insightful, nuanced, artful, creative, appropriate and skillful in ways that are exceptional. Such moments would be our most psychologically and spiritually healthy, in

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which we flow effortlessly with the moment, when there is, in fact, no separation between us and the moment. These are moments in which we fulfill the requirements for “hsin.” Importantly, Buddhism teaches that such moments are reflective of our true, enlightened Self, our true and “big” mind and do not have to be accidents, but rather can be cultivated. Meditation, and its life-interactive correlate, mindfulness, are exercises in the development of this capacity leading to an integrated, skillful, wise and spontaneous sense of Self-in-the-world. Likewise, koanic challenge, those riddles that force a person out of habitual dualistic thought-response patterns into fresh non-dualistic insight, are meant to open the underdeveloped intuitive dimension of mind that serves to create experiences of “felt” understanding and integration. Such insights, skill, nuance and originality are precisely the goals of Zen training. For a Westerner, it can be helpful in understanding what is meant by whole-mind to look at a concept borrowed from Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (d. 1961) who noted that the mind has four “functions”: thinking, feeling (emotions), sensation and intuition. He noted that thinking and feeling are egoic functions, creating the sense of the personal separate self, the “me” that has thoughts and emotions, while sensation and intuition are trans-egoic functions, direct realizations of

connection with the physical and consciousness dimensions in which the sense of a separate self can be transcended into a flowing unity with existence. Dr. Jung further noted that a psychologically balanced and healthy person operates with relatively equal distribution and facility in all four functions. He also noted two directions of mental energy: introversion – the taking into and consideration of experience, and extraversion – the projection of personal consciousness into the world. Here too he described a healthy person as equally and fully capable in both directions. He finally noted that it is with applied awareness that these psychic functions integrate and harmonize. Finally, in a nod to the Eastern philosophical systems that affected the development of his reasoning, he used the image of the Hindu/ Buddhist mandala, the perfect circle made of harmonized individual parts, to symbolize this process he termed “individuation.” This term begins to approach what Buddhism means by enlightenment, the integration and awakening of a fully natural person into profound insight and presence with no tension between personal duality and the non-dualistic true nature of existence. Such a person in daycontinued on page 36

How Much Colon Cancer Can We Prevent?

a recent report revealed that colon cancer rates have decreased 0% in people over 50 years old. Interestingly, this good news came in March – Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. The researchers attribute this large decline in cancer occurrence to the increased rate of colonoscopy – a visual examination of the inside of the colon by a physician, looking for and removing polyps (small growths) which can become colon cancer at some time over the next ten years. Why the decline in colon cancer? Because the rate of colonoscopy in 50 year olds has increased from 15% to 55% in the last three years. Because colon cancer is the third most common cancer and is the third deadliest cancer, this is good news. The bad news hiding behind the wonderful headlines is that 1) 45% of the people over 50 have not had a colonoscopy, 2) in people under 50 the rate of colon cancer has increased slightly, and 3) in people

who have a family history of colon cancer or have other significant risk factors for colon cancer, they should be screened (have colonoscopy) by age 40. What are those other risk factors, besides a family history? The next three most significant risk factors for colon cancer are: being overweight, lacking regular exercise, and eating red meat, especially salted, spiced, and packaged meat – that is, bologna, hot dogs, cold cuts, etc. Further risk factors include smoking, eating fast food, and alcohol use – as well as eating a diet low in fiber but high in salt, fat, and calories. What’s the common factor in all of these risk factors – inflammation and irritation of the colon lining. The high cholesterol, high fat and spices irritate the colon from the inside. Smoking and alcohol irritate the colon from the outside. Being overweight and eating a diet high in protein and fat slows the transit time that food material passes through the colon, exposing the lining of the colon to the irritants.

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The fiber in the diet holds water, making passage time quicker. And the microbes that live in the gut digest the fiber to make butyrate, a chemical that decreases irritation and decreases the formation of polyps. A diet low in fiber negates these good effects. How many of these risk factors are under the control of choice by the individual? All of them except family history. By how much can maintaining ideal weight, exercising, and eating a healthy diet decrease the incidence of colon cancer? By about 50%. (See www.aicr. org for details) Imagine how much we could improve on the good news if we could get people to make lifestyle choices that reduce colon cancer by 50 % and get their colonoscopy in a timely fashion to reduce colon cancer by 30%. Since Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month just passed, we thought you ought to be aware.

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 29


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Bella Notte

A beautiful evening of Italian opera and dining.

Bella notte, a beautiful evening of italian Opera selections and dining will be held Saturday, May 10.

Michigan, her home state. She has presented recitals in Italy at the Conservatoria di Firenze, the Villa Corsi-Salviati and at the Spoleto Vocal The event is being held at The Art House Arts Symposium. She also played the role of Gallery and Studio, a building beautifully restored Nerina in the bicentennial revival of Domenico by owners Susan and Mark Olivari. It is located at 5 Cimarosa’s L’infedelta fedele. She has also been Katie Cilluffo, Highland Park Road in East Flat Rock. Soprano involved in several local community theaters. Nancy Pew is the hostess for this event which Katie is so excited about this event that she she has been planning since attending a similar is having her piano shipped from her parent’s function last summer at Historic Thompson’s home in Traverse City, Michigan to ensure Store. Nancy says “I love opera and I savored the renowned pianist George Wilkins can provide special looks of ‘a time remembered’ on the faces of superior sound accompaniment. many patrons. Since a lot of the attendees had come Tenor Eric Martinez has studied in several from Hendersonville I knew we needed an opera opera apprenticeship programs in the West, event here. We have so many opera lovers, espeincluding the Santa Fe Opera. He is a native cially those who lived in the New York area where of Albuquerque, New Mexico. His opera roles they frequented the Met.” include Don Ottavio in Don Giovanni for Nancy credits friend and new owner of Jonga the Rome Festival Opera, Nanki-Poo in The Java, Paul Schiro with putting her in touch with the Mikado, El Remendado in Carmen, and Dog in Eric Martinez, Tenor right people to help her make this happen. Nancy Henry Mollicone’s Starbird. He has been very had just finished preservation of the historic Mcactive in regional theater. Clintock Clock, spearheaded by her partner Mark Ray and Some of the songs Katie and Eric will sing include selecwas ready for a new challenge. tions from La Traviata, Rigoletto, La boheme, Don Giovanni, Soprano Katie Cilluffo studied music at Interlochen L’Elisir d’Amore and Le Nozze di Figaro. Arts Academy, Indiana University and the University of The menu will consist of appetizers, Caesar style salad, chicken with romano cheese sauce, spinach lasagna, orzo with broccoli and Italian cheesecake with berries. There will be tea and coffee service. A selection of wines can be purchased.

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from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at The Art House Gallery and Studio, 5 Highland Park Road in East Flat Rock. Tickets are $45 and can be reserved by calling Nancy at (828) 6742003 or Susan at (828) 808-3594.

Faerie & Earth Festival

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put on your Fairy wings, your earth hat, or Sparkle Up to enjoy the magical experiences awaiting you. Vendors, music, puppeteer, fae troupe, storytelling, workshops, face painting and more will be featured throughout the day. Proceeds to benefit: the Center for Honey Bee Research in Asheville; www.HoneyBeeResearch.org. For more details visit www.facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival.

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Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

iF YOU Bella Notte, a beautiful evening of Italian opera gO selections and dining takes place Saturday, May 10



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iF YOU gO: The Faerie and

Earth Festival takes place Saturday, May 17 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Purchase tickets at the gates: Adult $10; Children ages 5-15 $5. Festival held at the Highland Lake Cove Retreat, 215 Rhett  Drive (look for signs) in Flat Rock. For directions visit www.highlandlakecove.com


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Hands-On Demonstration of New & Fun Art Materials

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the staff of the Starving artist will demonstrate materials that are either new to the art world or at least somewhat out of the main stream. Come as a guest of The Starving Artist, but leave your Sunday best at home and wear your studio clothes to this demo. Stations will be set up for you to try new materials and get your own hands-on experience. The Starving Artist staff will be available to give product demos and answer any questions. This demo is about you getting a chance to play. Samples and door prizes will be available too! Some of the materials that will be demonstrated include: the new QoR (pronounced ‘core’) Watercolors by Golden; Watercolor, Pastel and Oil Papers from Canson/ Arches; High Flow Golden Acrylics; Pebeo enamels and resins; Solar Fast light activated dye; Akua printmaking inks; various water soluble drawing mediums; oil bars, alcohol inks, and more.

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iF YOU New art materials demonstration, Sunday, May gO 18 from 1:30 to 4 p.m. during the Art League

of Henderson County monthly meeting, held at the Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Hwy, Hendersonville.

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there’s a new bark in town. The inaugural Barq In The Parq event for dog lovers takes place May 17 at the Mountain Lodge and Conference Center in Flat Rock. Barq In The Parq is a wag-filled community event for dog lovers and their best friends. The entry fee is only $5 – proceeds will benefit the non-profit organizations Blue Ridge Humane Society, Charlies Angels, Brother Wolf and Horse About. More than 40 vendors from Asheville to Greenville will be participating, with you and your dogs health in mind. The day will be filled with contests, music, food, art, agility training and more.

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iF YOU gO: Barq In

The Parq, Saturday, May 17, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on the Green at Mountain Lodge and Conference Center, just off I26 and Upward Road in Flat Rock. Rain or Shine. For more information please call WTZQ at (828) 692-1600 or visit www.WTZQ.com.

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local favorites O’Charley’s Sunday Brunch – New, and Very, Very Good

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the restaurant known for being a “perfect place to relax with family and friends” has recently completed a full exterior renovation with future plans to remodel the inside. O’Charley’s has just redone their by denniS Ray entire Sunday Brunch Menu. The amazing part is just how good it is. As Chef Paul Prudhomme is famous for saying, “you don’t need a silver fork to eat good food.” It can also be said you don’t need to spend a lot of cash to have a great meal. Sunday brunch (10-3 p.m.), which now offers lavish fares like the Overloaded Brunch Platter and the New Ultimate Omelet, has already become favorites among their guests. There are five waffle plates including the new Bacon-inthe-waffle combo — hand-chopped bacon mixed in their signature waffle batter, topped with powdered sugar, butter and real whipped cream. This is served with two eggs any style and your choice of bacon or ham steak. I picked their new Classic Eggs Benedict — two poached eggs on a slice of grilled tomato, Canadian bacon and a toasted

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Above: Overloaded Brunch Platter — 6 oz. USDA Choice sirloin, two eggs any style, three slices of applewood-smoked bacon, and half a waffle. Served with parmesan potatoes and fresh fruit. Clockwise from top left: Steve Harder, General Manager, Assistant Dining Room Managers, Kyle Waggoner, Amanda Blankenship, and Sarah Cutshall. Photo: Keli Keach Photography

English muffin with traditional Hollandaise sauce. The side dish of Parmesan brunch potatoes, an intoxicating mix of cheese, green onion and garlic, stole my heart. The food tasted wonderful, the service was outstanding and the casual no-rush atmosphere felt perfect. I must add, there is a certain art to quality service. Too fast and the customer feels like they just experienced a Jane Fonda workout; too slow and they feel as if they just spent a long week dining out. Here in Asheville I’d say the latter is more common than the prior and the Goldilock’s zone is practically non-existent. O’Charley’s manages to simply get it right. General Manager Steve Harder, who has, during his two short years at this location, turned this restaurant from being practically dead last in sales, quality and customer satisfaction among the companies many restaurants, to number one. This news has his staff beaming and eager to be even better. He says it’s his mission to not only make “tasty food” but to

give each customer a well-rounded dining experience through passion, creativity and integrity. “We buy local. We listen to our customers. We work to give them our very best 100% of the time.” The new menu features additional Brunch Classics that include the tempting Country (L-R) Luis Frommer, assistant kitchen Sausage Scramble, manager, and James Thompson, kitchen Chicken Fried manager. Photo by Keli Keach Photography Steak and Eggs, and the slowroasted Prime Rib Try the new Ultimate that, as my dining Omelet, made with companion says, “Practically melts in ham, onions, peppers, your mouth.” and chedder cheese. O’Charley’s offers a host of four flavorful versions of the Bloody Mary drink including their Southern Bacon Bloody Mary, a thick and hearty secret recipe garnished with candied bacon. They also serve Mimosas and Proseccos (a sparkling Italian wine). It wouldn’t be much of a stretch to say that they have some of the best sweetened and unsweetened tea around. For a hot late spring afternoon try their made-from-scratch lemonade.

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O’Charley’s general Manager Steve harder 2 Kenilworth Knolls, asheville, nC 28805 (828) 281-0540, www.ocharleys.com

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classes ~ workshops ~ lectures FiRSt FRidaY aRt waLKS Hendersonville’s Arts District, May-December in downtown Hendersonville and Flat Rock. Stroll galleries, meet the artists and enjoy refreshments. Beginning May 2, 5-8 p.m.

aRt in the paRK...ing LOt Second Saturdays, May-September. See local artists and jewelers in the parking lot of Art MoB. Beginning May 3, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Applications are now being accepted for artists, jewelers & craftsmen. Booth fee is $35.

CLaSSeS Canvas & Corks – Share a bottle of wine

and paint with friends. Many different fun classes. May 7, 14, 21 or 28, 6-8 p.m., or Tuesday afternoons, $35, supplies included.

Basket weaving – Weave a small eco market

basket. May 19 & 21, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., $48, supplies included. Instructor: Teresa Jordon.

Rug hooking – Learn the basics. June 26,

July 3 & 10, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond.

Bob Ross painting – Instruction on painting landscapes. May 17, 21 or 26, 12-4 p.m., $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry.

Silk painting – Learn different methods to paint on silk. May 6 or June 17, 12-3 p.m., $45, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display.

zendoodle Mini workshop – Lines, designs

and doodles! Create a small abstract piece. May 19, 5:30-8 p.m., $30, supplies included. Instructor: Catherine Langsdorf.

gourd art – Different techniques taught

in each class. June 8, painting, or June 30, TBD, 1:30-4:30 p.m., $42, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display.

watercolor gouache Resist painting – Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. May 27, 1-4 p.m., $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display.

Mosaic Mirrors – Create a small mirror

using fun items. May 31, 1-5 p.m., $75, supplies included. Instructor: Linda Pannullo. Work on display.

JOhn MaC Kah StUdiO – LandSCape OiL painting wORKShOpS

O May 11-15

Paint one view in morning light, another in the afternoon or sunset if we are lucky. Pack your lunch and bring your portable easel. $200. Enroll by June 1, 2014.

Oil Painting in the Studio and Plein Air at J.C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC

Join me at this wonderful residential location in the south mountains, near Murphy, NC to paint historic buildings, grounds and gardens in order to take advantage of oil paints’ luminosity and rich color. We will make our own supports and grounds, as well as oil-varnish mediums. Painting will be in the studio and on location. Demos, discussion, and lots of painting time, along with the Folk School’s great food, music and dance events. Visit the J.C. Campbell Folk School website at www. folkschool.org.

June 1-15 Painting a Mountain, Cold Mountain Expedition

Painting the mountains has special challenges and pleasures. Join me for an adventure and expedition to paint an icon! We will start from the studio and then travel via the Blue Ridge Parkway where there is a grand view of Cold Mountain and Shining Rock Wilderness.

June 29-July 12 Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts, Gatlinburg, NC

A rare opportunity to paint on location in the Great Smokies. We will start in the studio and get theory before practice, then take a safari into the mountains to experience the wonder and challenge of true color in nature. Color mixing and color relationships are covered in tandem with the expressive use of drying oils and varnish mediums. Students can deepen and develop painting skills while working from life on site to become adept at handling the principles of painting with oils. Designed for all levels, this class offers foundation information in the use of materials and craft of oil painting. Visit the Arrowmont website to find out more and register: www.arrowmont.org. John Mac Kah Studio 122 Riverside drive, asheville (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

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Sesshin - Zen Meditation

Great Tree is a residential women’s zen retreat center in the Soto Zen tradition in Alexander, NC. We offer meditation programs and practice for everyone. Check our schedule for Dharma teachings, zazen instruction, family meditation, youth and childrens’ programs and opportunities for community service. Sesshins consist of zanzen (sitting meditation), kinhin (walking meditation), workservice periods, and oryoki meals. Menus are vegan.

We offer sesshins of varying lengths throughout the year, the first weekend of month. Call (828) 645-2085 and leave message or visit www. greattreetemple.org.

May 9-11 Your Inner Life Story: a Writing Retereat with Carolyn Wallace

This workshop will take participants deeply into reflection on their life as a spiritual journey, in both the past and present, as they write the story of their inner life journey. They will also

explore ways to use writing as a meditative practice for spiritual reflection and opening to awareness of one’s true nature. Carolyn Wallace has lived in WNC since 1977. Through her business, Life Story Catcher, in addition to writing workshops, Carolyn digitally records life stories for folks who want to tell rather than write their life stories, creating CD’s and legacy books with family photos and other memorabilia. For more information, or to register, call (828) 685-2085 or visit www.greattreetemple.org

everything Old is new again – Learn basic

book art principles. June 23, 24 & 25, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., one class/$45, three/$40 each. Instructor: Kate Stockman. From Childhood Stories to Adult Reflections: altered Board Books. Create your own story from a child’s board book. July 26, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., $45. Instructor: Kate Stockman.

home Sweet home – box. Create mixed

media pages and cigar box wooden covers. June 14, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $45. Instructor: Kate Stockman.

art MoB Studios & Marketplace

124 4th avenue east in hendersonville (828) 69-4545, www.artmobstudios.com

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Friday, May 9 at  p.m. Daniel Meyer, Asheville Symphony Orchestra Music Director, will talk about Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2. Free and open to the public. Held in UNC’s Reuter Center. More information by calling (828) 251-6140 or visit www.olliasheville.com.

attentiOn: ShORt StORY wRiteRS wanted!

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Rapidrivermagazine.com is expanding! Rapid River Magazine is expanding its online edition with a short story section. We’re looking for a variety of “shorts,” including flash fiction, articles, travel journals, and short stories in more than 20 categories.

every Saturday – Beginning Art classes from 2-4 p.m. with art instructor Chris Baschon.

every thursday – Mandalas workshops from 6-8 p.m. with Chris Baschon.

For more information, or to register, call (828) 699-0240.

the art house gallery and Studio 5 highland park Road east Flat Rock, nC 28726 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

arrowhead artists and artisan League every Sunday, 2-4 p.m.

gReat tRee zen teMpLe MeditatiOn RetReatS, MindFULneSS wORKShOpS

May 2-7

adult art Classes at the art house

All work will be reviewed for appropriateness and once chosen will be subject to a collaborative editing process. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, will be managing the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to shortstories@ rapidrivermagazine.com

For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave, in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net for details.

Brown Bag Lunch Seminar Friday, May 2 – Bootlegging, Love and

Kicking Mule: Local Folk Ballads. Participants will read poems and folk ballads on love and the realities of rural life. Led by poet Tina Barr. Free; bring lunch. From noon to 1 p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For more details call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

Classes & workshops Listings with Rapid River Magazine List your class or workshop in print and online for just $14.95 for 35 words. Add 20 cents for each additional word. 60 word limit per event. Longer listings can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email info@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number submissions we get, we can not accept entries that do not follow our publication’s format. You must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description, contact details, and location. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 


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what to do guide May 1-17

Stop Kiss Different Strokes Performing Arts Collective presents a moving drama about vulnerability and risk. BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. $15-18. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Details at www.differentstrokesavl.com.

May 1-0

decorative papers, paint, and pastels. On display May 1-31, 2014. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College St., downtown Asheville. (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Saturday, May 

national day of puppetry

X-ray like images formed by the heat and smoke. On display at The Mothlight at Mr. Fred’s, 701 Haywood Road, West Asheville. www.themothlight.com

Asheville Puppetry Alliance presents a free day of events from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the Reuter Terrace at Pack Place in downtown Asheville. There will also be a puppet parade, so bring a puppet and join in. Details at www.ashevillepuppetry.org

Friday, May 2

Sunday, May 4

Ron Killian exhibit

the american Chamber players Presented by the Asheville Chamber Music Series, 8 p.m. at Biltmore United Methodist Church, corner of Hendersonville Road and Yorkshire Street. $35; students under 25 admitted free. To purchase tickets or for more information visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org or call (828) 575-7427.

Friday, May 2

pat perkerson exhibit Opening reception 5 to 8 p.m. Figurative drawings, digital photography,

Quattro de Mayo Restaurant opens at 11 a.m. with music from 12:30-11:30 p.m. Side stage taco stand, margarita and beer bar. Free to all. If it rains there will be a huge tent to keep everyone dry. Zia Taqueria, 521 Haywood Road in West Asheville. (828) 377-9393, www.ziatacom.com

Sunday, May 4

all Kinds of Quilts Exhibit by the Asheville Modern Quilt Guild. Opening reception 2-4 p.m. On view through August 19, 2014 at Handmade in America, 125 S Lexington Ave., Asheville.

Sunday & Monday, May 4 & 5

how to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

auditions for “hello dolly” The HART Theatre will hold auditions at 6:30 p.m. at the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St. in Waynesville. The production opens July 11. Come with sheet music prepared to sing. Rehearsals begin after May 19.

wednesday, May 7

Spring handbell Concert The Blue Ridge Ringers, community handbell ensemble of Henderson County, NC. First United Methodist Church, Hendersonville. $7 Dinner at 5:15 p.m. RSVP by May 5 to (828) 693-4275, or www.fumchvlnc.org. For more information call (828) 692-4910.

Friday, May 9

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Jamaica people Photography exhibition by Jessica Rehfield explores the residents of Kingston, Jamaica. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. at the West Asheville Library, 942 Haywood Rd., Asheville. Open daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Friday, May 9

asheville playback theatre No scripts. No elaborate sets or

appalachian pastel Society Saturday, May 10 – Meeting

from 10 a.m. - noon, with a free demonstration by Regina Burchett on how to paint sky. Workshop ($45 members/$55 non-members) from 1-4 p.m. Materials needed: easel, pastel paper, pastels, photo, and a tarp.

Sunday, May 18 – Non-Jur-

ied Exhibition. Opening reception from 10-11 Sari Martin a.m. On display May 15 through July 7, 2014. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday 9-5; Sunday 9-12 noon. Meeting and exhibit held at Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River, NC 28759. For more information call Suzy Hart, (845) 986-3653. www.appalachianpastelsociety.org

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Sunday, May 11

greek Luncheon & Bake Sale Cafeteria style with a variety of Greek gourmet dishes. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 227 Cumberland Ave. Greek folk dance troop. Tours of the renovated Byzantine Style Sanctuary. Carry out from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call the church at (828) 253-3754 between 9 a.m & 1 p.m.; call (828) 254-7424 the day of the luncheon.

Monday, May 12

Sierra Leone’s Refugee all Stars An Educational “Informance.” Doors open at 10:30 a.m.; show at 11 a.m. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. $3 students; $5 adults. Tickets: www.theorangepeel.net, or call (828) 68-MUSIC [686-8742]. visit www.theLEAF.org

tuesday, May 1

waterfall hike Join hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein for a hike to Ramsey Cascades, the tallest waterfall in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Strenuous 8-mile hike. Carpool details given upon registration. Fee: $35; $10 for Friends of the Smokies members.Contact outreach. nc@friendsofthesmokies.org or (828) 452-0720.

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CtRL+p Works by several contemporary artists who use open-source programs and 3D printers to conceptualize and create in revolutionary ways. Benchspace Gallery & Workshop. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. On view through August 23, 2014. For more information, call (828) 785-1357 or visit www.craftcreativitydesign.org

thursday, May 15

Menopause the Musical Four women form a unique bond with the audience as they rejoice in celebrating menopause. At the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Purchase tickets by calling 1-800-7453000 or at www.ticketmaster.com. Group discounts for 10+ available by calling 1-888-686-8587 ext. 2.

May 15-17 & 22-24 Mondy Carter and Tom Chalmers star in this hilarious comedy about Texas’ third smallest town. 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For tickets or more details call (828) 669-0930 or visit www. BlackMountainArts.org.

Friday, May 16

downtown after 5 St. Paul & The Broken Bones headlining with The Broadcast. 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on North Lexington Ave. between Hiawassee and the I-240 overpass. www.AshevilleDowntown.org

Friday & Saturday, May 16 & 17

Celtic dreams Irish tunes and Scottish ballads featuring the Asheville Choral Society performing with The Magills. Tickets are $20; $10 for students. Available at www.ashevillechoralsociety.org or call (828) 232-2060. Friday at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday at 4 p.m. Central United Methodist Church, 27 Church Street, downtown Asheville.

Friday & Saturday, May 16 & 17

Southeastern Fly Fishing Festival Programs, presenters and exhibitors. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Ramsey Center at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee. Admission is $5 for adults, $10 for families. Scouts in uniform and disabled veterans free of charge. Visit www.southeastfff.org.

Saturday, May 17

Black Mtn. garden Show & Sale From 9-4 on the grounds of the historic Monte Vista Hotel, 308 W. State

Street, in Black Mountain. Perennials, annuals, herbs, vegetable plants, native trees, shrubs and garden accessories. Silent auction from 9-2. Great food. www.blackmountainbeautification.org

Saturday, May 17

Musical Mentors Opening reception of David Holt’s photography show from 6 p.m. until. Live music by Ralph Stanley; local fiddlers. Refreshments. At the Madison County Arts Council, 90 S. Main Street, downtown Marshall. Visit www.madisoncountyarts.com

Sunday, May 18

pastyme Concert 5 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 60 Church St., Asheville. Cost: $10. Visit www.trinityasheville.org

Sunday, May 18

Sunday Concert Series Free concert by Jess Cook, professional guitarist. An eclectic mix of folk, rock, blues, country and swing music. 3 p.m. in the meeting room at the Waynesville Public Library.

Friday, May 2

Cabaret Jazz Series James Hammel, Dr. Bill Bares, Zack Page and Rick Dilling: “Celebrating a Collage of Life - a Journey Through Some of Life’s More Poignant Moments.” Tickets $15. 8 p.m. show; optional buffet dinner 6:30-7:30 by Black Mountain Bistro. White Horse Black Mountain, (828) 669-0816.

May 2-1

asheville Beer week Tastings, dinners, beer education, pint nights and a full slate of beer-related fun and festivities. Highlights: Homebrew Festival, Saturday, May 24 at Wedge Brewing; Beer City Festival, Saturday, May 31, Roger McGuire Green downtown Asheville. Visit www.ashevillebeerweek.com

May 2 - June 1

alice in wonderland Dance Theatre for all ages. May 23, 24, 30, and 31 at 7:30 p.m.; May 25 and June 1 at 3 p.m. $10-$12 student and seniors, $15-$17 general admission. Details and tickets at (828) 2542621 or www.acdt.org. BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., Asheville.

May 0-1 & June 1

ghosts When a society prescribes what is allowable in our behavior, what is really achieved by following the rules? Produced by The Autumn Players.

MAY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 4 May 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 9

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greater tuna costumes. Stories are provided, on the spot, by the audience. $10 adults; $5 youth. 8 p.m. at Jubilee!, Patton Ave., next to Jack of the Wood. For details call Robert, (828) 273-0995, or visit www.ashevilleplayback.org

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what to do guide 35below at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 254-1320. Sunday, June 1, in the Manheimer Room at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. All shows at 2:30 p.m. $5.

Saturday, May 1

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Live Music at the Classic wineseller Waynesville’s premier small plate restaurant, retail shop, and intimate live music venue offers a wide range of performances every Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare from 5:30-9 p.m.

Director, Anita Chapman. Photo: Roger Bargainnier

the Braided path

Friday, May 2

Donna Glee Williams reads from and discusses her new novel at 3 p.m. Three characters set out to discover their limits. Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. (828) 456-6000, www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Sunday, June 1

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- James Hammel, guitar and vocals, Jazz and pop.

Saturday, May 

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

asheville Young Musicians Club

- Bohemian Jean with Jessi Stone, vocals, and Matt Welborn, guitar, harmonica, vocals. Originals, pop, soul, country.

James Hammel

Eleven young musicians from area high schools who enjoy playing classical music. Concert at 3 p.m. at Bent Creek Baptist Church, 1554 Brevard Road in Asheville. $20 adults; $10 students. Tickets and details: (828) 681-9732 or aymc2011@gmail.com.

Friday, May 9 - Daniel Shearin, guitar and

Sunday, June 1

- New! Love, Lies, Liaisons. A cabaret show featuring Wendy Jones, vocals; Steve Davidowski, piano; Zack Page, bass; Rick Dilling, Wendy Jones drums. Ticket price of $34.99 per person includes four-course dinner. Reservations at (828) 452-6000.

zipping for autism Team up for this fundraising event hosted by Asheville Zipline Canopy Adventures and Treetops Adventure Park. Held at One Resort Drive (behind Crowne Plaza Hotel), the event features an urban canopy tour for teams of 10 who raise $800 or more. Register online at www.zippingforautism.com by May 23.

vocals. Pop, originals.

Saturday, May 10 & Friday, May 2 - Joe Cruz, piano, vocals. Beatles & Elton John.

Friday, May 16 - Jay Brown, guitar,

harmonica, vocals. Folk, blues, Americana roots.

Saturday, May 17

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Saturday, May 24 - Live

zoom in to the appalachian trail deadline: tuesday, June , 2014 Photo Contest featuring close-up shots of the details that make up the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). For submission guidelines or to enter, visit www.appalachiantrail.org/ 2014photocontest.

Michael Jefry Stevens

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Jazz + Dinner. Michael Jefry Stevens Trio, featuring Michael Jefry Stevens, piano, Zack Page, bass, Rick Dilling percussion.

Friday, May 0 - Ben Wilson, guitar, vocals. Music of 60s, 70s, 80s. Saturday, May 1 - Mike Pilgrim, mandolin, Don Mercz, guitar. Gypsy jazz.

Fine artists and Crafters wanted

the Classic wineseller 20 Church St., waynesville (828) 452-6000 www.classicwineseller.com

applications due by July 1, 2014 Colorfest, Dillsboro Fine Arts & Crafts Fair, is looking for artists to participate in the 6th annual fine art festival held October 4 in Dillsboro, NC. Visit www.visitdillsboro.org or call (828) 506-8331 for more information.

new downtown Outdoor Market

are you in Big trouble with the iRS?

Vending opportunity in the center of downtown on Spruce Street. Held each Saturday. Apply at www.sprucestreetmarket.com. All work must be locally or regionally handcrafted. $40 per Saturday for the full season. Fees waived for Asheville Art in the Park members.

Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, and resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800867-6028.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

asheville arts alive Free events and artist directory featuring unique portfolios. The Asheville Arts Alive web portal is for you and it’s free! Entries/profiles are being collected now and the launch will be in June. Sign up at www.AshevilleArtsAlive.org to see a list of criteria and to request an account. visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com for more events!

Medical guardian

the tax doctor

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 9 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — May 2014 5


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Jonas gerard Fine art www.jonasgerard.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

ariel gallery www.arielcraftgallery.com the art house www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com art on depot (828) 246-0218 art Xtravaganza www.artxtravaganza.org

Just ducky www.justduckyoriginals.com Kathmandu Cafe www.cafekathmanduasheville.com Ken wilson Ford www.kwford.com LeaF www.theleaf.org Kenilworth artists association www.kenilworthartists.org

BlackBird Frame & art www.blackbirdframe.com

Kirk’s Collectables (770) 757-6814 Lenny’s Subs, www.lennys.com Lime Leaf thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com

the Mahogany house www.themahoganyhouse.com

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Massie Furniture (828) 456-3311 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Spirit wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com

asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

grace C. Bomer art www.gracecarolbomer.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com the Cantina www.cantinabiltmore.com Champa asian Cuisine www.champanc.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com double exposure giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Frog Level Brewery www.froglevelbrewing.com Frog pond downsizing (828) 734-3874

tpennington art gallery www.tpennington.com

gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

to offer. I believe they will want to return many times. There’s a nostalgic feel to the buildings and an ambiance you can’t find everywhere – it definitely leaves an impression.” Her gallery, which opened in October 2013, is located in a building built in 1925, with Art Deco window glass trim, fallaway brick walls, original tin ceilings, and wood plank floors. It is the perfect backdrop for the art that graces its walls. Make plans to attend The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival and see for yourself what makes Frog Level so special! iF YOU The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival takes gO place Saturday, May 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level. For more information, visit www.visitncsmokies.com.

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hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800 Jewels that dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

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BiLtMORe viLLage

thai Spice www.ThaiSpiceWaynesville.com town hardware & general Store www.townhardware.com

haRt theater www.harttheatre.com

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twigs and Leaves gallery www.twigsandleaves.com wnC Quickdraw www.wncquickdraw.com the writers’ workshop www.twwoa.org

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to-day life is notable by their stability, non-reactiveness, non-defensiveness, peacefulness and kindness while being well-boundaried, holding themselves and others responsible for their actions without judgmentalism. To bring the whole-mind into the world begins with the senses, with a heightened, focused and subtle experience of the physical world we experience as outside brought to our internal world through introversion. We, of course, have, through conditioning, egoic thoughts and emotions concerning our experience, but the person trained in Buddhist mindfulness, rather than letting this egoic conditioning automatically interpret our understanding and determine our actions, notes and suspends them so as to hold the experience in spacious awareness, without thought. This allows intuition, the wisdom-bearing ego-transcendent connection to the unconscious, both personal and collective, that is Life itself, to guide us in then bringing the experience into its own unique mental form and expression through thought and resonant emotion. In this transcendent state, outside and inside dissolve. There is only the moment in awareness. This is “big mind” employing “little mind” to give form and communication of pure Life-experience, which is in truth ineffable, into the world of form and society. As is written in the Tao Te Ching: “The Tao that can be named is not the Tao,” while at the same time, as the great Zen master, Dainin Katagiri reminds us: “You have to say something.” This process trains the unruly and opinionated human mind into the wisdom and discretion of whole mind in the world. With all four mental capacities and both mental energy directions present and interacting, we can bring our experience of the moment into wiser, intelligent, feeling, skillful understanding and action. We can extravert this whole-mind into the world as applied mindfulness, and likewise, the whole-mind’s individual functions can be held in the field of awareness for purposes of deep clarity, integration and understanding of mind itself in meditation. So, we arrive at the Chinese concept of “Hsin,” the harmonization that leads to the experience in which the sense of self, of “me,” becomes the experience of self and the moment integrated. The sense of an absolute separate self dissolves into the totality of direct experience. Whole-mind is the “totality of our psychic functioning” non-dualistically experiencing and expressing the moment. It could be said that rather than being a person having experience, experience is happening, within which a person occurs. (This last sentence has the quality of koan – so sit quietly with it allowing intuitive insight to arise.) This points to the Zen instruction to “be nobody,” or to “emptiness,” for it is only when we are empty of the sense of a separate self that we can be filled completely by the direct experience of the moment. This cultivation of “hsin” is “The Way” that Taoism and Zen refer to that brings liberation from the clumsiness and craziness of ego, restoring our natural true self-in-the-world with whole mind. We enter “the gateless gate” of Zen previously barred by ego. We can “Break through the impassable barrier and get to know the opening beyond.” (Fo-hsing T’ai)

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Susan Marie designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

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‘Whole Mind’ cont’d from page 29

River arts district artists www.riverartsdistrict.com Soapy dog www.thesoapydog.com Southern highland Craft guild www.craftguild.org

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‘Bloomin’’ cont’d from page 21

Starving artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

north Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com Octopus garden www.theOG.us On demand printing www.ondemandink.com

the Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Mountain top appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

12 Bones (828) 253-4499 andrew Charles gallery (828) 989-0111

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Bill walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. he holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:0-7:0 p.m., at the Friends Meeting house, 227 edgewood in asheville. By donation. information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


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artful living Business in a More Beautiful World

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do we remember the context of our existence when we do business? Below is a poem I wrote atop a mountain:

the Context

Do we see the boundaryless Earth beneath our feet, That as we walk in Asheville, we walk also in Texas, in China, in the Congo? Do we see the cosmos as we look across the land, That we ride on a spaceship, hurling through the universe at speeds untold? Do we see our human bodies as stardust, That we are the universe, dancing? Do we see the Context, as we stand in line at the checkout counter after work?

Rapid River Magazine Our Monthly Magazine is iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly!

This poem is about the cosmic significance of every moment we inhabit, a significance that is simultaneously larger than this body and intellect, and inclusive of it; writing email, driving to work, eating dinner, etc., happening in unseen synchronicity with all the other parts, like a grand orchestra playing a universal tune. This, for me, is not just a beautiful way to look at the world, it is a theory backed up by evidence. For example, I have observed and noted serendipity throughout my adult life – thinking about someone and then they show up at acupuncture; texting lyrics of a song to a friend and finding out they

just happened to be listening to it; three by niCK andRea independent psychics who don’t know me saying the same thing about my health, etc. These occurrences have become so commonplace that I conclude we are undeniably interconnected. I now believe the universe is a giant synchronicity happening all the time, and it’s changing how I view business. My decisions about how to meet my needs become less ego-centric and more considerate of others, because I am them and they are me. Now, imagine what will happen when individuals, corporations, and even governments start thinking this way…Business In A More Beautiful World will emerge, naturally. So, do you see the Context of existence right now as you read the words on this page? And, how is it speaking to you?

Find out more about the people behind the column and the live events that we host both locally and online by visiting www.businessinamorebeautifulworld.com iF YOU “Business in a More Beautiful World,” a monthly gO networking & education event for those interested in

a collaborative, heart-centered, purpose-driven model of doing business. Every 4th Thursday, 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Next event is May 22 at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville. Free to the public.

www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine pg. 36

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‘Art After Dark’ cont’d from page 22

The Haywood County Arts Council’s Gallery 86 will be featuring a show in conjunction with the Haywood County Master Gardeners Volunteer Association to celebrate gardens. The show’s theme, “Artists and Gardens – A Partnership,” will feature gardens, flowers, and crafts suitable for homes, decks, or patios. The Garden Tour itself takes place on June 21, 2014. NC resident, Sarah Sneeden will be showing at Twigs and Leaves Gallery in May. “Paints that Dance” perfectly describes Sarah’s work and her love of painting out of doors, on location, where she can “study first-hand the play of light.” Sneeden will be demonstrating her distinctive style and versatility at Twigs and Leaves Gallery during Art After Dark, Friday evening, May 2, from 6-9 p.m. While in Waynesville, stroll down to Frog Level, to see Grace Cathey’s sculpture garden. Her show, “Metamorphosis of the Butterfly in Steel,” is a perfect blend of nature and art. While in Frog Level, visit our newest members, The Mahogany House and Art on Depot. The Mahogany House represents over fifty artists and has working studios. A must see for all art enthusiasts!

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iF YOU Art After Dark, May 2, June 6, July gO 11, August 1, September 5, October

3, November 7, and December 5 in Waynesville. For more information visit the Waynesville Gallery Association website at www.waynesvillegalleryassociation.com or contact Twigs and Leaves Gallery at (828) 456-1940.


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fine art ‘WNC QuickDraw’ cont’d from page 23

benefitted so many art students and is great for our community.” For artist Jon Houglum, QuickDraw is one of his favorite events of the year, “With the fellowship with other artists, food, auction and the lovely location, it has been a delight for my wife and I each year and shall remain on our calendar of annual events. The community support continues to blow me away, and I hope that the economic conditions nationwide do not have a negative impact on the Quick Draw and the purpose for which it is presented.” Tara O’Loughlin, art teacher at Waynesville Middle School shares “QuickDraw has an understanding as to what art means to a culture and to our mountains. The funding QuickDraw provides my art program allows me to introduce mediums and materials that otherwise would not be monetarily possible. I cannot stress enough how integral QuickDraw is to sustaining a long history of arts in Haywood County.” Tickets are $50 in advance. Purchase tickets online at www.wncquickdraw.com or at one of these fine area galleries: In Asheville – 310 ART Gallery/River’s Edge Studio. Waynesville area – Cedar Hill Studio*, Ma-

Susan Lingg, fine artist.

hogany House, Hazelwood Soap Co., Gallery 86, Great Smokies Creations, Polly’s Florist, Robin Blu*, Teresa Pennington*. (Galleries marked with * can accept credit cards). if you cannot attend but would like to make a donation to support art in the schools, make check payable to Quickdraw and mail to: Quickdraw, 6 Kims Court, Clyde, nC 28721.

iF YOU WNC QuickDraw, Saturday, gO May 17, from 4:30-9:30 p.m. For

more details please visit www. wncquickdraw.com or call (828) 456-6495 or (828) 734-8068.

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May 2014 Rapid River Magazine