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310 Art Celebrates its 10 Year Anniversary. pg 10 French Broad River Festival pg 39 19th Annual

Matt Tommey’s nature inspired baskets.

Local Dining Guide

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22-23 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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13-16 • What to Do Guide™

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Fine Jewelry & Design Studio pg. 21

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue - Downtown Asheville

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Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 3


BRAVE NEW WORLD

THE MUSICAL

book by BEN ANDRON music by Jonnie Rockwell and John

McDaniel

lyrics by Bill Russell choreographed by Ryan Kasprzak

directed by Thomas Caruso Based on the book by Aldous Huxley

May 11 - June 5, 2016 TICKETS/INFO: www.ncstage.org •

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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Eight

APRIL 2016

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Short Stories: Kathleen Colburn Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Hannah Barry, Mark Bettis, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Stefanie Darr, Tebbe Davis, Amy Downs, Amy Ammons Garza, Turner Goins, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Bob Hayward, Marilynne Herbert, Cindy Ireland, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Tina Masciarelli, Kay Miller, Virginia Pendergrass, Dennis Ray, Alice Sebrell, Lindsey Solomon, John Springer, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, David Whitehill, Allison Wilson, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, April 2016, Vol. 19 No. 8

On the Cover

Basket created by Matt Tommey. pg

16

SHORT STORIES

6 Performance

New stories are added each month!

NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Harlem Quartet . . . . . . . . . . . 21

9 Fine Art

The Benefits of Sociology For Understanding The World, written by João Cerqueira

Beyond the Window Pane,

Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Fleta Monaghan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 John Mac Kah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Matt Tommey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Southern Highland Craft Guild . . 17 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 18 Mary Decker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 An Artful Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 SVFAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Plottware Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Art Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

8 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 James Cassara – Spinning Discs. . . 27 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 26 Books & Authors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 33 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 25

13 Movie Reviews

written by Kira Yates

A Dissident’s Perspective, written by P.H. Fraser

Super Can Dance,

written by L.B. Sedlacek

That Awful German Language, written by Eddie LeShure

Working the Walk,

written by Dave Rowe

Hiking the PCT - Adios Oregon. Washington. 68 More Miles,

written by John Swart

Short Story Guidelines are available at www. rapidrivermagazine.com. Kathleen Colburn is editor and curator of the section. She is assisted by RF Wilson. rrshortstories@gmail.com

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-16

22 Local Food

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Dining Out for Life Day . . . . . . . . 22 Live at the Classic Wineseller. . . . . 23

24 Festivals Greening Up the Mountains . . . . . 24 Faerie & Earth Festival . . . . . . . . . . 38 French Broad River Festival. . . . . . 39

26 Music Eliza Gilkyson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

34 What to Do Guide

River Arts District . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . pgS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 20-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 30-31 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 32

ONLY ONLINE Asheville Orchid Festival

Learn about, purchase, and view hundreds of orchids on display at the 18th Annual Asheville Orchid Festival, April 15-17 at The North Carolina Arboretum.

Soundtrack for the City

The Asheville Symphony and leading musicians from Asheville’s music scene have collaborated on an innovative new album to be released in May 2016.

RockyFest

Head up to Alexander County’s Rocky Face Mountain Recreational Area on Saturday, April 23. The event Daisy On The Rocks, will feature trail Photo: Ted Sharpe races, live music, rock climbing and rappelling, children’s activities, food/arts/crafts vendors, Cherokee storytelling and demonstrations, and more.

The Curmudgeon

Get away from the daily grind by driving to Fayettenam. By Peter Loewer.

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

COPYEDITING &

PROOFREADING SERVICES

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 35 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 35 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 35 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 35 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 35

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

rrshortstories@gmail.com

828-581-9031

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 5


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performance Virginia Woolf Long-married George and Martha invite a young couple into their home for a night of so-called fun and games. Each couple gets brutally entangled in the others’ deepest secrets and fears. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? runs April 6 – May 1.

IF YOU GO: Pay-What-You-Wish ($6-$20) on Wednessday, April 6. Complimentary hors d’oeurves before curtain on Thursday, April 7 at 6:30 p.m. $1 Beer Night + Actor Q&A on Friday, April 8. Opening Night champagne and dessert with the cast and crew on Saturday, April 9. Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

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Brave New World

NC Stage premieres a compelling new musical based on the dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley. After playing a vital role in the development of Stalking the Bogeyman before its OffBroadway and West End runs, and Someone Else, currently slated for an off-Broadway run this spring, North Carolina Stage Company (NC Stage) announced the world premiere of the brand new musical Brave New World. This will consequently change the originally slated production of Bad Dates. NC Stage has the unique opportunity to present Brave New World for its Asheville audiences and play a key role in the journey of a musical being developed for future commercial productions. Brave New World has a book by Ben Andron (White’s Lies Off Broadway, Broken Snow, Breaking Bobby Stone); music by Jonnie Rockwell (The Anthem Off Broadway) and Grammy and Emmy Award winner John McDaniel (Broadway music director and supervisor credits include Bonnie & Clyde,

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aLLiSON wiLSON

Catch Me If You Can, Brooklyn); and lyrics by Tony nominee Bill Russell (Side Show; Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens, Pageant). Charlie Flynn-McIver, artistic director and co-founder of NC Stage stated, “We’re really lucky to have a local theatre scene that has created the kind of confidence that New York producers have now tapped into several times to help birth their creative projects. NC Stage is thrilled to help bring this musical to life for the first time on a stage!” Brave New World focuses on the World State, where the population is chemically engineered, technologies control emotions, and perpetual happiness is just a small pill away. There are reservations beyond these borders where savages still live according to the “old” ways, fenced-in with no knowledge of this perfect new world. One man is given special permission to leave and experience the wonders of civilization. Two worlds collide in Huxley’s provocative story about love, humanity, and loss, set against the backdrop of a place where the most dangerous offense is an original thought. The artistic team for Brave New World includes director Thomas Caruso (Southern

Comfort at NYC’s Public Theatre, Dynamo: Seeing Is Believing in the West End, national tours of Matilda and Ghost), and original choreography by Ryan Kasprzak (Southern Comfort, So You Think You Can Dance). Joining this creative team will be a crew of local designers, musicians, and actors. IF YOU Brave New World, May 11 – June GO 5, 2016. Performances Wednesday-

Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. Pay-What-You-Wish night, Wed., May 11 at 7:30 p.m. Suggested ticket price: $6-$20. Happy Hour and a Half: Complimentary hors ‘doeurves before curtain, Thurs., May 12 at 6:30 p.m. $1 Beer Night + Actor Q&A: $1 Beer at concessions bar + Q&A following the show, Fri., May 13 at 7:30 p.m. Opening Night Toast: Champagne and dessert with cast and crew following curtain, Sat., May 14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting us online at ncstage.org. NC Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

Chaotic Comedy The Man Who Came to Dinner

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“You have the touch of a love-starved cobra.”

So says Sheridan Whiteside, the worst guest in the history of guests. From referring to a room in the family’s home as a “drafty sewer,” to practically forcing his caregiver to leave the nursing profession and instead open a munitions factory, Mr. Whiteside is a tart-tongued crank who spares no one from his vitriol. And it’s hilarious! “The writing in The Man Who Came to Dinner is delicious,” said Susan Harper, Executive Director of Asheville Community Theatre. “Sheridan Whiteside wields a sharp tongue. His zingers are often beastly but always laugh out loud funny. I think we’re all glad to not be on the receiving end!” The Man Who Came to Dinner was written by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. Asheville Community Theatre’s production of The Man Who Came to Dinner is directed by Jeff Catanese and stars a cast of 19 community members. Christy Montesdeoca plays Maggie Cutler, Julianne Arnall plays Lorraine Sheldon, and Steven Turner plays Sheridan Whiteside in the ACT production.

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By JeNNy

BUNN

(L-R) Julianne Arnall, Christy Montesdeoca, and Steven Turner. Photo: Rodney Smith / Tempus Fugit Design

IF YOU The Man Who Came to Dinner, April GO 8-24, 2016. Performances on Friday

and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $22 Adults; $19 Seniors/Students; $12 Children. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www. ashevilletheatre.org.


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captivating performances Star Soprano Angela Brown Performs Verdi’s Requiem

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One of the stars of the opera world makes her Asheville Symphony debut Saturday, April 16 in a performance of Verdi’s Requiem, the highlight of the ASO’s sixth Masterworks concert of the season. Angela Brown, who has received rave reviews for her performances on the Metropolitan Opera stage, joins the ASO, Asheville Symphony Chorus, and Music Director Daniel Meyer for the concert, which begins at 8 p.m. in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Brown was originally scheduled to make her Asheville debut on the symphony’s opening night in September 2015, but was forced to cancel due to illness. In her stellar career Angela Brown has performed with dozens of opera companies, classical and pops orchestras, and in recitals around the world. While opera is the main catalyst for her career, Brown’s performance career includes everything from star hostess on stage, to producer and creator of the witty and inspired “Opera…from a Sistah’s Point of View,” a trailblazing educational show that dispels the common myths of opera from Brown’s own sassy perspective, and has

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gained international notoriety for bringing opera to the masses. Joining Brown in the monumental Verdi Requiem are rising opera stars Dawn Pierce, mezzo-soprano; Dinyar Vania, tenor; and Timothy Jones, bass-baritone. Celebrated soprano Angela Brown will join the Asheville “This program comSymphony and the Asheville Symphony Chorus for a memorates the ways in which performance of Verdi’s legendary Requiem. Photo: Roni Ely music, in the face of tragedy can soothe the soul and uplift “This touching piece will stand as an elegy the spirit,” says ASO Music Director Daniel to the souls who lost their lives in this brutal Meyer. “Verdi’s Requiem, based on the Latin event,” says Meyer. text from the Requiem Mass, is replete with the qualities you expect from Italy’s most IF celebrated composer—soaring, memorable YOU Verdi’s Requiem, Saturday, April melodies, powerful sonics, and an indelibly GO 16, 2016 at 8 p.m. Thomas Wolfe Romantic spirit.” Auditorium in Downtown Asheville. The concert will open with the heartbreakSingle tickets for all concerts are $22 – $62 ing Memorial to Lidice, by Czech composer depending on seating section; reduced youth Martinu. He wrote the piece upon hearing of pricing is available. Tickets may be purchased the massacre of every man in the tiny Czech by calling (828) 254-7046, in person at the U.S. town of Lidice at the hand of the Nazis in Cellular Center box office at 87 Haywood Street, and at www.ashevillesymphony.org,. World War II.

The ‘B’s in Spring

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AmiciMusic welcomes in the new season with a beautiful program of music by the famous “B” composers – Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Bernstein. Tim Schwarz is the featured guest artist, performing on both violin and viola, in collaboration with pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser. They will perform a beautiful Bach Partita, Beethoven’s epic C Minor Violin Sonata, Brahms’ passionate F Minor Viola Sonata , and a wonderful arrangement of Bernstein’s West Side Story, written specifically for Dr. Schwarz. Dr. Schwarz is an Assistant Professor and Head of Strings at Rowan University in New Jersey. He has won numerous awards and competitions as a performer and concertizes regularly in Europe, Asia, and throughout the U.S. AmiciMusic, founded by Daniel Weiser in 2011, continues to produce top notch intimate programs every month in the Asheville region. At each concert, Dr. Weiser relates interesting and fun stories about the composers and estab-

have ever programmed.” International newspapers called their music “a melodic revelation” and “an irresistible introduction to..American music.”

The B’s in Spring will be performed in four different venues: Friday, April 15 at 7:30 p.m. – House Concert in Hendersonville at the home of Daniel Angerstein and Jerry Schultz. $35pp includes food and drink. Reservations required and seats available online at www.amicimusic.org. Daniel Weiser, pianist, and Tim Schwarz who will perform on both violin and viola.

lishes a very relaxed and informal atmosphere for the program. Weiser has taught at Dartmouth College, UNCA, and Johns Hopkins University. He also attended Harvard Law School at the same time as President Obama. Schwarz and Weiser, who met as classmates at the Peabody Conservatory, were formerly known as the Upper Valley Duo, and won the 1996 U.S. Artistic Ambassadors of Music. With this honor, they were sent on a two month, eleven country tour of the Middle East and Southeast Asia, performing over 50 concerts and masterclasses in countries such as Egypt, Pakistan, Thailand, Syria, Israel, and Sri Lanka. U.S. officials called them “brilliant cultural ambassadors” and “one of the very best we

Saturday, April 16 at 3 p.m. – All Soul’s Cathedral in Biltmore Village. $15 for Church members, $20 for general, and free for children 18 and under. Tickets available at the door. Advance purchase discounts available online at www.amicimusic.org. Saturday, April 16 at 7 p.m. – Isis Restaurant and Music Hall in West Asheville. $15 for concert only. Dinner and drinks also available in intimate upstairs lounge. Reservations strongly recommended by calling Isis at (828) 575-2737. Sunday, April 17 at 12 noon – The Night-

ingale Loft at 52 Broadway in downtown Asheville. A great new space for music and art. $35pp includes brunch and drinks. Reservations required and seats available online at www.amicimusic.org.

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fine art Creative Food

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INSPIRATION IS A SMORGASBORD

I awoke recently to the oddly rhythmic sounds of Brooklyn, NY coming to life in a slowly-rising crescendo: the J Train rattling across the Williamsburg Bridge, cars whooshing below on the street, a nearby construction crew getting machines going, all intermingled with the twitter of Mockingbirds. It was so – peaceful sounding, in its own way. Surely more so because I was on vacation, where I was in that mode where everything seems really cool and fun. I get a lot out of Stay-cations, but getaways are great for reengaging with and feeding our creative sides, too. This nourishment can come in the form of a several-course dinner where one knows what to expect, or as a smallplate frenzy, with endless options all the time. On this trip to New York City I was pretty much in a salad spinner. Prompted by my friends to join them for festivities surrounding one of their milestone birthdays, I was about to more than double my previous time there. I was in NYC for one day in 1995 (with one of these very same friends), and again in 2000 for a couple days. My exposure was so limited and distant that I really had no idea what I was in for. Being the newbie, I was 110% reliant upon my friends for direction, which included lots of subway experiences, but this was also great for just living in the moment. I’m the one in the group who can’t tell north from south, or

Wedge Duos

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navigate the turnstiles upon entering or exiting the trains. Seemingly always moving against the steady blur of earphone-wearing, gray and black-clad sea of people, I was pretty often just in the wrong spot much of the time. Being somewhat the comedic dork, I even managed to get my suitcase stuck in the turnstile on the way back to the airport. Once I finally got through, I stopped, took a bow for my audience (there’s ALWAYS an audience), and moved along. The whole subway experience was inspiring not just due to pace and content, but also especially because of the art. The old stations have some of the most amazing tilework and mosaics, and many others have been refreshed with new art installations. And brand new stations are architectural wonders, like the whalebone-esque Oculus, now almost finished in Manhattan. And while I’m not condoning unpermitted spray painting, I can say I saw some breathtaking graffiti, too. The smorgasbord of cultural outings included the Met, MOMA, the Museum of Arts & Design, and the Whitney, a section of

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Twenty six Wedge artists were randomly paired to create 13 collaborative pieces of art. This will be The Wedge Studios first exhibit in a series of themed shows which opens Wednesday, April 20. In a building that turns 100 years old this year, The Wedge Studios have become one of the premier stops in the River Arts District. As the district grows, the artists of The Wedge continue to celebrate and showcase the talent of their building. The theme of the first show will be The Wedge as a concept, as an idea, as a shape, as a place. The wedge is one of humanity’s oldest tools. It is a simple means of focusing power and intention into a cutting edge. Artists have always pushed their way into places that have been ignored and neglected, lifting them up through the power of imagination. The Wedge Studio artists will celebrate the transformative power of its artists in this show and will continue its work by lifting the Asheville art community to even greater heights. Light hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will

8 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

The artists of The Wedge

be served. A percentage of proceeds collected from sales will go to the charity AHOPE. If you are unable to attend the opening, each of the 13 works will be available for viewing throughout The Wedge Artists Studios for 30 days after opening. IF YOU Wedge Duos opening reception, GO Wednesday, April 20, from 6-8 p.m.

Mark Bettis Studio & Gallery, 123 Roberts Street, Asheville.

Cultural Smattering, 2016. Photo by Greg Vineyard

the High-Line, a smidgen of Central Park, and a smattering of Broadway. A peek at a Library or two, and a breezy walk through Brooklyn’s parks and botanical gardens. Walking the Brooklyn Bridge. Enjoying food found in the moment, from diner to posh hotel. A somber WTC site. Kids on field trips, workers commuting, vendors hawking. This set of days included planes, trains, automobiles and boats, singing, dancing, joking, laughing, and a variety of wonderful meals. I got to sit in front of three JMW Turners, a lifelong favorite, at the Met. The walks to and from home base featured blocks of shops, cafes, bookstores and more amidst the endless residences. The days were full of art, architecture, people and sensory overload. It was, in a word, Awesome. My friend Jeff and I have reached the point where we can see our aging selves reflected in each other’s faces, and it doesn’t go unnoticed that getting a decent amount of sleep is definitely part of the plan. At some point one must turn off some lamps and stop the day. The 20,000-plus steps per day (according to his app) were hard-felt in our feet. I also noticed how we haven’t changed in so many other ways from the kids we were in Junior High. My dear friends were the catalyst for this trip, and while I saw many great things, without them the creative food wouldn’t have held much nourishment at all. We picked up right where we last left off, as we always do. For creative field-tripping, I say throw out the menu, order a little of everything, and eat on the run. Everybody grab a spoon, share the plates, and dash through town taking it all in. And help each other through those turnstiles! Greg Vineyard is a marketingcommunications professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com


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fine arts & crafts LOCAL ARTISTS OPEN STUDIOS TO GUESTS DURING

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Weaverville Art Safari, May 7-8

Spring brings a sense of renewal and vibrant natural beauty to the mountains of Western North Carolina. With an array of wildflowers, lush mountain landscapes, and blue skies, it’s a time of inspiration for the artists in and around Weaverville, NC. The community of artists celebrates with the Weaverville Art Safari. Held May 7-8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., this bi-annual event is a chance to experience the creativity that’s part of Asheville’s renowned art scene. “We’re so excited about this year’s event. We have 53 artists participating this spring, making it the biggest event we’ve had in our history! Our artists are pulling out all the stops for the biggest and best show ever,” says Cindy Cindy Ireland Ireland, 2016 Art Safari President. The free event is an immersive experience within the local art community, and has been rated one of the top studio art tours in Western North Carolina for numerous years. Using event maps, guests select routes to explore local studios. The event is self-guided with a relaxed pace that encourages guests to linger and talk with artists in a unique and personal way. “We truly enjoy having folks come to see our work. Most linger to visit, savor the view, and enjoy a refreshment while they are here,” says Ann Hord-Heatherly who credits the event and the community of artists with their decision to make Weaverville their home. In addition to meeting local artists, guests enjoy a sneak peek of Kathy Lightcap the work that goes into each piece. Guests learn about the creative process and can watch demonstrations at select studios. All artists sell pieces from their collections during the Art Safari, and many also give away door prizes. This year’s event boasts 53 artists who specialize in handmade pottery, glass, photography, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, painting, drawing, fiber art, and more. Guests looking to plan their visit can pick up Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information at greater Asheville-area galleries, the Asheville Visitors Center, restaurants, and shops beginning in April. Brochures will also be distributed from an Art Safari information ROB Helmkamp booth located on Main Street in Weaverville on May 7 and 8. A downloadable brochure with map and full details about participating artists is also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com. If you would like to be kept up to date on Art Safari activities be sure to register for e-mail updates.

By

CiNDy iReLaND

Corey McNabb

About The Weaverville Art Safari The Weaverville Art Safari is a 501(c)3 non-profit and is staged twice each year–the first full weekend in May and the last full weekend in October–by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art community on the northern outskirts of Asheville, NC. Since then thousands of people from all over the country have returned over and over each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience.

IF YOU For more information on the Weaverville Art Safari and GO participating artists, visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

530 N. MAIN STREET, HENDERSONVILLE pg. 36

HD

(828) 697-1300 • O PEN M ON-S AT 11AM-6PM

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 9


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Riverview Station

ERIN KEANE Encaustic + Journals RV

www.ErinKeane.com

Riverview Station, Studio 256 • BlueBirdDesigns.com

Contemporary Fine Art Gallery Featuring the Work of 25 Local Artists

AT RIVERVIEW STATION

Art Instruction for Adults Year Round All Levels Welcomed We are the oldest independent fine art school for adults in the region. Oasis, oil by Fleta Monaghan

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310 ART • 191 Lyman Street #310 Ground Floor North • Asheville, NC 28801 Open Mon-Sat • 828-776-2716

310art.com

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Fleta Monaghan

Rapid River Magazine: 310 Art is celebrating its 10-year anniversary. Talk about how this gallery first came to fruition? And how has it evolved over the past decade?

Represented by 310 ART Gallery and Southern Highland Craft Guild RV

INTERVIEW WITH 310 ART FOUNDER & DIRECTOR

Fleta Monaghan: In January 2006 I rented a one room studio which is now our dedicated classroom at 310 ART. At that time the room was used for classes, my own personal studio and a place to show my work. I remember it was a big risk to leave my job teaching to set out on my own. But I needed the freedom to do what I wanted, outside of the confines of an institution of learning. I wanted a place to show my work, to practice my art and to collaborate with other artists. In late 2005 I wrote my list of goals. All were fulfilled in 6 months, including getting a studio and starting a new place of education. Through my experiences teaching adults, I knew there were budding adult artists who could only go so far in the existing community programs available. Many aspiring artists had no interest in going back to formal college training, and other adult pro310 Art offers classes for grams were professional artists. limited in offerings. I thought that a new model of education could be developed to meet the needs of busy adults. Some of the aims were to have flexible scheduling for the active individuals, top quality classes where professional artists

LORELLE BACON Fine Art • Commissions • Classes • Workshops

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Represented by 310 Gallery & Arrowhead Gallery RV

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lorellebacon.com

828 595-6007

iNTeRVieweD By

DeNNiS Ray

Summation of Love by Fleta Monaghan

could teach their carefully developed methods, and a democratic philosophy of education where the needs and interests of the learners would drive the development of new curriculum. This curriculum would be always evolving as the art scene changed and our participants expressed new interests. Education would always be new and fresh. This is how real artists work, through experimentation and trial and exploration of new ideas and new materials, and the school could model this way of life. As my studio neighbors left, I slowly secured the adjoining studio spaces and with some paint and new lighting and a lot of hard work, we now have a beautiful gallery space, room for four full time resident artists to work and we exhibit the work of 25 local artists and crafts persons. We currently have seven local professional artists who teach a variety of classes, and this year four visiting guest artists from other states are teaching specialty workshops. It has been an amazing evolution. The growth of the school and the gallery could only have happened with the dedication, hard work and community efforts of all the artists teaching and exhibiting, and of course the participation of our valued class participants and art collectors who come to us for original artwork. continued on page 11


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Sahar Fakhoury Sandra Brugh Moore Virginia Pendergrass

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FINE ARTISTS AT TRACKSIDE STUDIOS RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

John Mac Kah Relocates Upriver to Riverview Station

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John Mac Kah, after 20 years on Riverside Drive, moved to Riverview Station at 191 Lyman Street. The 1902 factory, formerly known as the Candle Station, now houses a diverse selection of studios, small businesses and galleries. “With some interior work, new paint and floor, added storage and renovation, the studio was not ready until February. We had to move twice, all the easels, brushes, paintings, teaching gear - once into storage, then into the studio- but it was all worthwhile. It’s a great space with two ‘occuli’ —round windows. Fantastic north light!” Located off Old Lyman, and behind the main building, it is upstairs on the right, studio 236. Classes have resumed. For a complete schedule, visit www. JohnMacKah.com

New Location! John Mac Kah Studios 191 Lyman Street, Studio #236 Asheville’s River Arts District www.JohnMacKah.com

Black Grapes, 5x7 in. oil painting by Virginia Pendergrass www.virginiapendergrass.com

This month, Brevard, NC artists Virginia Pendergrass, Deborah Kidwell and Lee Abell begin painting and exhibiting at ART Works, 27 S. Broad Street in downtown Brevard, NC.

ELIZABETH HENDERSON

How to Find Mac Kah Studios

Trackside Studios • 375 Depot Street

Park in front of the main building. You can enter through the front of the building. Go upstairs to the second floor and look for signs. Or, take Old Lyman off of Lyman Street, pass Mt. Glassworks, and turn right. Look for our round windows. The studio is located upstairs, first door on the right. Parking is limited. There is more behind the building (don’t block loading docks). Studio Hours: Mon - Wed 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday nights, 6-9 p.m. Saturdays, weather permitting we paint on location. It’s best to call first.

Open Daily 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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Riverview Station, 191 Lyman

Studio #217 + 310 Art at Riverview Station

‘310 Art’ cont’d from page 10

Libets2@icloud.com

RRM: 10 years is a huge milestone for any business.

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How has the art scene in Asheville changed during the past decade? Where do you see the art scene 10 years from now?

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RICHARD C. BAKER

FM: 10 years ago I could not have predicted what

Fine Ar t and Por traiture

would have happened in our art scene as it is today. This has always been a center for art, Black Mountain College is an example of a place that literally shaped the art movements in America in the 20th century. Still today the influence of Black Mountain College resonates globally. In the River Arts District, the area has been transformed in the last 10 years from an urban industrial slum to an incredible community of artists. Building owners and artists have worked so hard transforming the spaces into elegant, eclectic and spiritually safe places. It is a center for beauty and creativity. Visitors tell us they do not see art like we have here in other regions, and our community is like nothing else in the country. It will be up to the art critics and historians to put names to emerging styles and to record the impact on the scene for the future. Our studios at 310 ART have developed and continued on page 37

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ElizabethHendersonArtist.com

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344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 11


FLOWER GARDEN

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fine arts & crafts INTERVIEW WITH

Matt Tommey

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Rapid River Magazine: How would you describe your work and where do you think it fits within the sphere of contemporary art? Matt Tommey: I describe

16x20 photograph on canvas – gallery wrap

To Order ~ tguidone@gmail.com

my work as nature inspired sculpture that uses basketry and a variety of unique surface and assemblage techniques as my language of expression. I’m not sure where that puts me within the contemporary art world. Quite honestly, I don’t give that a lot of thought. I try to make things that I love and that resonate with my clients that originate within the simple elegance of the natural world. That process has served me well over the last 23 years as a maker.

RRM: What initially captured your imagination about fiber art? MT: I grew up in middle Geor-

pg. 36

MB

12 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

Matt Tommey creates nature inspired sculptural baskets.

MT: When I first started

making baskets, I got a lot of inspiration from traditional Appalachian style basket makers. I love the simple elegance of the functional forms and made those kinds of baskets out of vines for years. As I transition into sculptural work, I’ve gotten a lot of inspiration from ceramic artists who create interesting vessel forms and nature inspired works that mimic pods and nests. In particular, the work of Dorothy Gill Barnes, Michael Sherrill, Alice Ballard and Polly Adams Sutton I have significantly influenced my current work.

gia and was a part of the Boy Scouts. I spent my days riding four wheelers, hiking through the woods and paying attention in great detail to the things around me in the natural world. But love for nature quickly evolved into what I call “a compulsion to make.” As a kid I was always making something and so when I serendipitously found a book on RRM: What was your route basket three as a college student to becoming an artist? at the University of Georgia in MT: My journey to becomthe mid 90s, baskets or he gave ing a full-time, vocational me a language to express my Tommey’s baskets express his artist began , Like many love for nature. It was a very love for nature. artists, by doing my work natural transition. as a hobby. As my interest I always loved the fact that and mastery a basketry continued to develop, I could walk in the woods, harvest some very I began selling my work a few times a year at rough materials and within a matter of hours community shows. great something a beauty that others would After moving to Asheville in 2009, my work enjoy. That’s simple pleasure is still at the began to receive more critical acclaim and be center of why I am an artist. collected and commissioned by clients around Natural fibers in particular have always the country. That metamorphosis allowed me interested me because of my easy access to to transition into creating art as my full-time them here in the mountains and my love for vocation. Now most of my work consists of processing and handling natural materials. You commissioned pieces for luxury mountain can take something very rough and refine it to homes here in western North Carolina and a form that is unrecognizable to the untrained the upstate. eye. I love having conversations with people as I tell them that my baskets are made out of RRM: How has your work developed since you things like kudzu and other invasive plant mabegan and how do you see it evolving in the terials. Their eyes widen, they gasp and always future? say “wow, I’m glad somebody finally found something to do with all that kudzu…” MT: When I began making baskets, I enjoyed replicating the traditional Appalachian rib RRM: Who were your early influences and how has their art influenced your work? continued on page 37


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

 - Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

10 Cloverfield Lane

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com



Short Take: A woman fleeing from a relationship suffers a car wreck and wakes up in a prepper’s underground bunker in an allegedly post-apocalyptic world.

REEL TAKE: Whether you saw 2008’s ‘found footage’ monster movie Cloverfield should hold no bearing on whether or not you choose to see 10 Cloverfield Lane. For that matter, if you did see Cloverfield, whether you liked it or hated it shouldn’t have any bearing on this film either. The two films share producer J.J. Abrams in common and very little else. My limited knowledge on the background of this film is that its working title was The Cellar when it came to Abrams’ Bad Robot Productions. When they started doing rewrites on it, they thought it shared a similar feel to Cloverfield and decided to manufacture a tie-in then. At the beginning 10 Cloverfield Lane we meet Michelle (Mary Elizabeth Winstead, The Spectacular Now). She’s hurriedly packing her bags. Just before she leaves we see that she’s left an engagement ring and house keys behind. As she drives through the night her phone rings. We see the name Ben on the display and hear a man’s voice pleading with

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Don’t mess with this prepper! John Gallagher, Jr., Mary Elizabeth Winstead and John Goodman star in 10 Cloverfield Lane.

her, telling her that “running away isn’t going to fix anything. Come back.” This is all the background we have on Michelle before she is sideswiped and sent rolling down an embankment. When Michelle comes to, she’s in an underground bunker belonging to a doomsday prepper named Howard (John Goodman), and apparently doomsday has come. Howard explains that there’s been an attack, “… a big one. Maybe chemical, maybe nuclear. It could be the Ruskies or maybe the Martians.”

THE MONTHLY REEL

To be or not to be [a sequel]? That is the question.

This month we give you a sequel, a pseudo, sequel, part one of a two-part finale in a trilogy, and the start of a new chapter for a DC Comics superhero franchise. I review 10 Cloverfield Lane and My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2. Meanwhile the good professor Kaufmann braved a crowd of Milennials and Generation Z’s to review Allegiant and didn’t quite leap over buildings in a single bound to see Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Chip also reviews Zootopia, Disney Animation’s latest sure-fire hit – which means the cash cow will be wrung for all its worth and Zootopia 2 will no doubt soon be in the works. Last but not least I also review Hello, My Name is Doris, a great little vehicle for Sally Field and, mercifully, an

Joining them in subterranean lair is Emmett (John Gallagher Jr., Short Term 12), a local handyman who helped Howard build the bunker, though he doesn’t seem to be quite as welcome as Michelle is. And so sets into motion a very confined game of cat and mouse. Did Howard save her, or is she his captive? Was there an apocalyptic event or is the prepper a delusional, paranoid wack-a-doodle? Is Howard a degenerate, conspiracy theorist, or actually a good guy? 10 Cloverfield Lane keeps you guessing throughout. First time director Dan Trachtenburg does a great job building tension and then easing off the intensity and infusing the story with dark humor. Likewise Bear McCreary’s atmospheric score builds to appropriate plot point crescendos and is then supplanted by oldies on Howard’s jukebox including a very tongue in cheek, “I Think We’re Alone Now.” Winstead is a solid lead. She’s accessible, likeable and very believable; she’s scared but possesses hidden strength. Gallagher, who I don’t think I’ve ever seen in anything prior to this, is very at ease in his role. He’s a good buffer for the film’s darker edges. Goodman gives his best performance in years, adding perhaps even more depth than the film demands,

By

MiCHeLLe KeeNaN

change in ownership of the Carolina Cinemas. Newly released and unlikely option for franchise. coming soon to a theatre April marks the 400th annear you are: Eye In The niversary of William ShakeSky, a contemporary speare’s death and the 452nd Sir Lawrence Olivier in Hamlet. war-room drama featuring anniversary of the great bard’s Helen Mirren and the late birth. Shakespeare’s contribugreat Alan Rickman in one of his last roles; tion to the written word remains as vital today I Saw The Light a biopic about Hank Wilas it was centuries ago. His stories have been liams, starring Tom Hiddleston that’s receivtold on film many, many times reaching back ing good early notices; Demolition, starring to as early as 1899. Professor Kaufmann pays Jake Gyllenhaal as a successful investment tribute with a special feature, Shakespeare on banker who struggles after the death of his Film and with a month-long celebration of wife; and lastly a live-action version of the Shakespeare with the Hendersonville Film Disney’s The Junglebook. We’ll tell you Society Sunday screenings (see schedule on what we think about it next month. page xx). The Asheville Film Society (AFS) is on Until then, enjoy the show. hiatus this month, pending the outcome of a

which is curious considering how little we really know about him. Ultimately 10 Cloverfield Lane is a tight thriller. The joy of this film is in simply watching it unfold. It’s not a great film by any stretch of the imagination, but it’s a lot of fun. If you liked the Twilight Zone or Night Gallery TV series you’ll likely enjoy 10 Cloverfield Lane. Rated PG-13 for thematic for material including frightening sequences of threat with some violence, and brief language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Allegiant – Part 1 1/2

Short Take: The beginning of the last installment of the Divergent series turns out to be more of the same which, unless you are a die-hard fan, is not good.

REEL TAKE: There once was a time, in my

younger days, when I simply devoured movies. Good, bad, or indifferent, it really didn’t matter. I don’t think I missed a single movie during the 1970s. At least it seemed that way. Now, things are different. Now there are many movies that I do not see even if I don’t have to review them. This would have been one of them but I wound up reviewing it anyway. Why? Read on. There was another time, not that long ago, that I read a number of Young Adult books in order to keep pace with my daughter (and to keep tabs on just what it was she was reading). Well, she’s moved on and so have I but since I’ve seen the earlier installments in this series, I may as well see this one through. For those of you who haven’t seen the earlier installments, The Divergent Series, like The Hunger Games, is set in a dystopian future focusing on the now walled city of Chicago. It revolves around Beatrice ‘Tris’ Prior (Shailene Woodley) and Tobias ‘Four’ Eaton (Theo James). In the first film, Divergent, Tris discovers that she cannot be fitted into one of four societal classes because of her DNA. She joins an underground group of people with similar backgrounds (Divergents). There she becomes attached to one of her underground instructors named Four (Theo James). In the sequel Insurgent a secret box that may contain the secret Movies continued on page 14

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 13


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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used too, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Later this month (April 23) the world will mark the 400th anniversary of the passing of William Shakespeare. HFS will commemorate the event with 4 celebrated Shakespeare film adaptations from different decades. All movies will be subtitled for better comprehension.

Movies continued from page 14

of the Divergents’ origin is found which only a Divergent can open. After much action and mayhem Tris opens the box and discovers that there’s a world outside the walled city of Chicago. She and Four plan to go out to explore it. The current film, Allegiant, like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the Twilight series, and the last Hunger Games installment, has been turned into a two part affair making a slow moving and seriously overplotted saga even more so. This time around Tris seeks to learn more about her genetic heritage while Four and his powerful mother (Naomi Watts) clash over starting a class war. After much action and mayhem…well, you get the picture.

Tris (Shailene Woodley) and Four (Theo James) keep searching for answers about their origins in Allegiant.

What would have been a great Outer Limits episode has been hyper-extended into a two hour plus movie marathon that only die hard

fans or reviewers seem destined to finish. The domestic box office returns for each successive installment have been getting smaller and smaller. Thank goodness (from Summit Entertainment’s viewpoint) for the overseas markets where the films have been doing better. Despite a strong supporting cast that features Jeff Daniels, Olivia Spencer, Janet McTeer, and Ashley Judd, Allegiant suffers from too much plot that is undeveloped, and poorly developed characters aside from the two leads (despite 4 screenwriters). There are extended action sequences but they just grow tiresome after awhile. I was already forgetting the film before it was over which is not a good thing. I’m really looking forward to the final Movies continued on page 15

April 3:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) Warner Brothers went all out to bring Shakespeare’s comedy of mismatched lovers to the screen. The cast includes James Cagney, Dick Powell, Mickey Rooney, and a young Olivia de Haviland in her screen debut. The celebrated Felix Mendelssohn music is prominently featured. Directed by Max Reinhardt / William Dieterle. April 10: Henry V (1944) Conceived and intended as WW II propaganda, Laurence Olivier’s Henry V is the first completely successful adaptation of Shakespeare in cinematic terms. The movie is cleverly staged, Olivier is in his prime and the Battle of Agincourt remains a remarkable spectacle. The memorable music is by William Walton. Directed by Laurence Olivier. April 17:

Romeo & Juliet (1968) Of the many different movie versions of Shakespeare’s star crossed lovers, Franco Zefferelli’s 1968 version remains the best known, the most loved, and the most highly regarded. Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey play the title roles with a distinguished British cast supporting them. Directed by Franco Zefferelli. April 24: The Tempest (2010) No collection of Shakespeare on film would be complete without one that tries to be different. This recent version of The Tempest will do nicely. Helen Mirren stars as a magician (usually played by a man) who shipwrecks her enemies then transports them to a magic isle where thoughts of revenge are transformed into acts of forgiveness. Directed by Julie Taymor.

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Bambi”

April DVD Picks

Bambi (1942)

Having just immensely enjoyed Zootopia, the latest offering from Disney Animation (the company’s animation unit is now separate from the feature film division) which I reviewed this month, I was thinking of what to choose for this month’s DVD pick and then, suddenly, it occurred to me…Bambi! Why Bambi? Several reasons actually.1) It was a time when Walt Disney was unafraid of showing the dark side of life in his animated movies (think Pinnochio). 2) It was one of his most accomplished cartoon features visually without calling lots of attention to itself the way Fantasia did or seeming too cartoonish like Dumbo. 3) It has animal characters that we can identify with and that we really care about. 4) If you have never seen it, then you and your children should. Most everyone knows that Bambi is a faun (the name comes from the Italian word bambino) who grows up in a forest and has several animal friends (most notably Thumper the rabbit), undergoes several trials including a heart wrenching trauma, and ultimately triumphs over adversity. I’m leaving out specifics for those who haven’t seen the film or read the book by Felix Salter. What many people may not know is that Bambi’s allegorical nature, which is plain to see once the film is over but which rarely occurs while you are watching, is due to Disney’s superb skill as an animated storyteller. We are so seduced by the visuals and so caught up in the characters’ plights that we don’t see the big picture until later, especially if we are children. When I was in college in the early 1970s, Bambi had become a symbol of everything that then contemporary critics hated about Disney. It was manipulative, it was reactionary, it was cute, it was a relic from another

14 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

time. It didn’t help that it had become a punchline thanks to Marv Newland’s one minute animated film Bambi Meets Godzilla. Fortunately we’ve moved way past that and now Bambi can be appreciated as one of Walt Disney’s (as opposed to Disney) finest achievements that still has the power to enchant and disturb. If you’ve never seen it than you should and if you have then you should revisit it especially if you’ve just seen Zootopia.

Brooklyn (2015)

With all this sequel, pseudo-sequel and megawatt franchise madness, I decided to ratchet it back this month for my DVD pick and highlight a film that’s perfect for romantic spring night. Brooklyn was a delightful little film released late last year that garnered critical praise and several Oscar nominations. It was recently released on DVD. To describe John Crowley’s Brooklyn as a masterpiece makes it sound very grandiose, when in fact it is this film’s smallness that makes it so utterly charming. That it doesn’t pretend to be anything more than it is also makes it classically so. The premise is as simple as it gets – a young Irish woman immigrates to America. Perhaps it’s the story’s simplicity that allows it to genuinely tug on the heartstrings and hit all the right notes.

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Brooklyn” With no prospects for meaningful work in her native land, Eilis (pronounced EE-lish; played by Saoirse (pronounced SER-sha) Ronan) is sent to America to build a better life for herself. There she suffers the crushing despair of loneliness and homesickness, but gets a job in a department store, starts taking night classes, and falls in love with good Italian-American boy named Tony (Emory Cohen). But just as Eilis is getting a foothold on life in the states, a family situation sends her back to Ireland. Before she leaves she secretly marries Tony, and expects to return to Brooklyn in several weeks, but back in Ireland she is presented with professional opportunities and a life with a well off local boy (Domhnall Gleeson) The prospective life in her native homeland seems much better suited for Eilis, but the life she’s built in New York is the life she has built. Sadly, no matter which life she chooses, there will be sadness and hearts will be broken. The major and the minor characters all have a substantive realness to them. Saoirse Ronan is all grown up and shines brilliantly as the Eilis. Emory Cohen brings a hearton-his-sleeve sweetness to Tony’s character, and to the film, that is undeniably appealing. Everything about Brooklyn rings true, its story, its actors, its locations, and its tone. It’s a period piece that is a time capsule, but that somehow manages to not feel like a period piece; it’s just feels tangible and timeless. There is something very dear about this film and it’s really quite magical in its own way. Whatever you want to call Brooklyn – a ‘classic,’ a ‘masterpiece,’ etc., it’s one of the best pictures of the year. And better yet. It stand on its own and there won’t be a sequel next year or fourteen years from now. If you missed it in the theatres, rent it.


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installment Ascendant (NOT!) RatedPG-13 for action violence, thematic material, and partial nudity. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Batman v. Superman

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Short Take: The good news is that this movie is better than its ponderous, pretentious predecessor Man of Steel. The bad news is…just barely.

REEL TAKE: Although I should have known better, I was hoping that for Batman v. Superman “visionary” director Zack Snyder would have abandoned the “shoot a gnat with an elephant gun” approach that absolutely ruined Man of Steel. How silly of me.

Batman, Wonder Woman, & Superman join forces to try and defeat a slow moving film with a pretentious script.

The updating of the death of Bruce Wayne’s parents (1981’s Excalibur is shown on a theatre marquee), shot in super serious slow motion, sets the tone right away. Cut to the present where Superman (Henry Cavill) is seen rescuing Lois Lane (Amy Adams) from African terrorists only to be condemned in the press and by Congress for doing it without official authorization. Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) is now an angry approaching middle age executive whose Batman brands criminals after he captures them. He holds Superman responsible for all of the people killed at the end of Man of Steel. He wants payback and is aided in his quest by a woefully underused Jeremy Irons as family retainer Alfred. Add to the mix Jesse Eisenberg’s Lex Luthor, played here as a demented Mark Zuckerberg. He’s clever but not at all campy the way previous incarnations Gene Hackman and Kevin Spacey were. He is actually far more frightening and disturbing than the Kryptonian monster released by him for the film’s finale. An additional wrinkle is added by Holly Hunter as a sincere but misguided senator who wants to put Superman under government control. Too late does she realize that she has been a tool of Lex Luthor who has his own plans for the Man of Steel as well as for Batman. Diane Lane is back as Ma Kent and she plays a key part in the proceedings. The same can be said for Kevin Costner and Michael Shannon although they only have small cameos. This way Snyder links this movie with the first one. There is a new mythology being created and

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Shakespeare on Film

By

CHip KaUFMaNN

This year (and in fact this month) marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare. It officially occurs on April 23rd (which also would have been Will’s 452nd birthday) and there will be worldwide observances. In accordance with that, this seems the ideal time to talk about some of the cinematic interpretations of Shakespeare. The oldest Shakespeare film adaptation goes all the way back to 1899! It’s a 5 minute clip of 19th century actor Herbert Beerbohm Tree (Oliver Reed’s grandfather) doing the death scene from King John. There were a surprising number of short, silent Shakespearean films from several different countries. These have been collected on a DVD called, appropriately, Silent Shakespeare. Move forward to the 1930s and you get the American versions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) and Romeo & Juliet (1936) with a hopelessly old Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer as R & J. England gave us As You Like It (1936) with a young Laurence Olivier. The failure of these at the box office kept Shakespeare off the screen until the 1940s. Fittingly it was Olivier who revived Shakespeare with a 1944 version of Henry V that was intended as WW II propaganda but it was a first class adaptation that Olivier also directed. Three years later came one of the most famous Shakespeare adaptations, Olivier’s version of Hamlet which remains essential viewing. 1953 gave us the famous Joseph L. Manciewicz Julius Caesar with Marlon Brando as Marc Antony and James Mason as Brutus. Not to be outdone, Olivier directed and played Richard III (1955) in another celebrated interpretation that was an essential in high school and college courses during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Also in 1955 Laurence Harvey and Susan Stendahl were Romeo & Juliet in a version shot on location in Verona. Olivier returned in 1965 with the now politically incorrect Othello (he plays it in dark make-up and kinky wig) which launched the career of Maggie Smith (as

that requires one more character. Gal Gadot is Diana Prince who fans know is Wonder Woman but she doesn’t get to be her until the last 30 minutes of the film which is a titanic battle between the 3 superheroes and an “unkillable” Kryptonian Goliath created by Luthor. She certainly makes her presence felt. No spoilers here, but I’ll bet you can guess the outcome. But don’t forget the title of the film is Batman v. Superman. Before the titanic final

Desdemona) and featuring my favorite on screen Iago, Frank Finlay. This version seemed to open the floodgates and there were a number of quality adaptations made in the late 60s and early 1970s. Before I get to those I don’t want to forget Orson Welles. Welles made a low budget version of Macbeth in German expressionist fashion but it was heavily altered by its studio and all but disappeared for many years. 1952 saw the release of Othello which was shot piecemeal over a period of three years in several different countries. Finally there was Chimes at Midnight (Falstaff) in 1965 which was a conflation of Henry IV and V that focused on the fat knight. None of these were successful. Back to the mainstream and 1967 when Franco Zefferelli directed a very successful version of The Taming of the Shrew with Richard Burton & Elizabeth Taylor (Douglas Fairbanks & Mary Pickford had done a forgotten version way back in 1929). However it was his Romeo & Juliet the following year that became a worldwide hit and made film adaptations of Shakespeare fashionable for awhile. In 1968 Peter Brook did a contemporary version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream with a dream cast consisting of Ian Richardson, Ian Holm, Judi Dench, David Warner, Diana Rigg, and Helen Mirren. Director Tony Richardson (Tom Jones) did a stripped down version of Hamlet shot in a railway roundhouse with a riveting performance from Nicol Williamson that was released in 1969. 1970 saw Paul Scofield as a towering King Lear while Roman Polanski made his controversial version of Macbeth with its bloody violence, filthy witches, and a nude, sleepwalking Lady Macbeth. While both of these were excellent movie adaptations, the depressing nature of the material and the intensity of the performances resulted in box office failures for both and Shakespeare on screen then disappeared for almost 20 years. It was Irish born actor Kenneth Branagh who brought Shakespeare back in a big way with his 1989 adaptation of Henry V that, like Olivier before him, he starred in and directed.

battle there is what should have been the final titanic battle between B & S. It is B.S. because realistically this should take all of 30 seconds but Batman uses tiny amounts of kryptonite to weaken Superman just enough to kill 20 minutes of running time. Then the monster arrives followed by a third and final ending which has to be seen to be disbelieved. At 2 ½ hours Batman v. Superman is just way... too... long... and so deadly serious despite Eisenberg’s best attempts to lighten

Lawrence Fishburne and Kenneth Branagh in 1996’s Othello.

The film was a critical and commercial success and was the first of six Branagh adaptations including a delightful Much Ado About Nothing (1993) and a four hour adaptation of Hamlet (1996) that proved to be too much of a good thing. The 1990s also saw radical reinterpretations of the Bard with Peter Greenaway’s incomprehensible Prospero’s Books (after The Tempest) starring John Gielgud (1991), a clever transfer of Richard III to the 1930s with a beguiling Ian McKellan (1995), Baz Luhrmann’s updated Romeo & Juliet with Leonardo DiCaprio and Clare Danes (1996) and Julie Taymor’s outrageous but highly effective Titus (after Titus Andronicus) with Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange (1999). So far the 21st century has brought us a classic version of The Merchant of Venice featuring Al Pacino and Jeremy Irons (2004), updated versions of Coriolanus (2011) with Ralph Fiennes and Gerard Butler, Josh Whedon’s minimalist Much Ado About Nothing (2012) and most recently a well intentioned but misguided Macbeth (2015) with Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard. These aren’t all of the Shakespearean adaptations out there but they are most of the major ones. To close out the article I would like to mention two films that I consider worthwhile that feature Shakespeare as a character. The first is the multiaward winning Shakespeare in Love from 1998 and 2011’s Anonymous. While both are historically rubbish (Love means to be), they both convey Elizabethan London perfectly and are superbly theatrical.

things up (villains are always the best part of these movies). Affleck & Cavill do their best early Katherine Hepburn impressions by running the gamut of emotions from A to B. It was good to see Holly Hunter on screen again but there wasn’t enough of her. The most troubling aspect of these superhero movies (the DCs in particular) is how deadly serious the actors, writers, and directors take them. This film in particular Movies continued on page 16

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film reviews Movies continued from page 15

has more in common with Dostoyevsky than DC Comics. Is it any wonder that with comic book material like this being treated with such solemnity that such serious considerations as a political primary have become a comic book affair? That’s a question that is increasingly going to be asked and I’m afraid we already know the answer. Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action throughout and for sensuality. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Hello, My Name Is Doris 1/2

Short Take: The kind-hearted but tonally inconsistent story of an eccentric 60-something spinster and her crush on a young co-worker.

REEL TAKE: At the start of Hello, My Name

is Doris, our titular character (Sally Field) finds herself relieved of her longtime care taker duties when her elderly mother dies. But years of putting her own life on hold have taken their toll. Doris is a lonely, socially awkward eccentric 60-something spinster with hoarding tendencies and touches of mental instability.

quite makes it as a comedy and it never delves deeply enough to be something else. There is a surprisingly poignant scene, during a hoarding intervention, where Doris lashes out at her brother (a terribly underutilized Stephen Root), his horrid wife and a psychologist. The scene speaks to so much more [about Doris and the story] that it made me wonder if perhaps the May December romance should be the sub story and this the primary focus. In spite of inconsistencies and underdeveloped elements of the story, what really keeps the movie going is its kind spirit. Director and co-writer Michael Showalter (The Baxter) handles the material with sweet humanity and somehow maintains tenderness even in the film’s most cringe-inducing moments. The film pokes a bit of fun at Millennial hipsters (who wouldn’t), but that’s as cruel as it gets. Sally Field clearly relished the opportunity to play such a unique role and I’m glad for her. Max Greenfield is sure to be doing more big screen gigs with this successful foray. Tyne Daly is a hoot as Doris’s best friend Roz, and I’d like to have seen more of her in the film. At the end of the day Hello, My Name Is Doris is an oddity, but its heart is in the right place, just like Doris. Rated R for language. Review by Michelle Keenan

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2  Short Take: The Portokalos family reunites for another Big Fat Greek Wedding.

REEL TAKE: Some stories are meant to be

Doris (Sally Field) and John (Max Greenfield) are unlikely friends in Hello, My Name Is Doris.

After a ‘meet cute’ moment in an elevator, she develops a mad crush on John Freemont (Max Greenfield from TV’s The New Girl), a handsome young co-worker half her age. Fueled by the encouragement of a self help guru (Peter Gallagher) and aided in the art of stalking on social media by her best friend’s 13 year old granddaughter, Doris decides to pursue the object of her affection. Against all odds John and Doris form an unlikely friendship which only jettisons Doris’s romantic fixation. Also against all odds, Doris becomes a hit with John’s hipster friends, even landing an album cover for John’s favorite electronic band. Field and Greenfeld share a wonderful chemistry and make the most of it. Unfortunately, I couldn’t quite make peace with the tonal inequities of the film. Quirkiness, vintage bag lady couture and retro cat eye glasses add colorful layers to Doris, but they can’t mask mental illness or amend for bad behavior. And while much of what happens is supposed to make us laugh, the film never

a multi-series franchise – Harry Potter, Star Wars, The Hunger Games. Others, not so much. I thought the best example of this was last year’s sequel to The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, but that was until I saw My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2. It is hands down one of the worst sequels of all time, and it’s completely unnecessary. In 2002 Nia Vardalos charmed audiences with her semi-autobiographical story of an ugly duckling in a big Greek family who turns into a beautiful swan and falls in love with handsome [but not Greek] Adonis. If memory serves, Vardalos tried to follow-up the meteoric success and popularity of the film with a short-lived sitcom on network television. That should have told her something. Media hype in the weeks leading up to the sequel’s release centered around why it took

The Portokalos family reunites for My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2.

16 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

so long. I had not realized this was something we had all been waiting for these last fourteen years. Still, fourteen years is a long time for a sequel, so there was a tiny part of me that thought maybe, just maybe, Vardalos had waited until she had some great, bright new material. This was not the case. According to the story, seventeen years have passed. Toula (Vardalos) is married to Ian (John Corbett). They have a teenage daughter named Paris (Elena Kampouris), who is [of course] mortified by her mother’s family. They live next door to Toula’s parents Maria (Lainie Kazan) and Gus (Michael Constantine). Gus is still spouting the exact same Greek drivel that he did in the first movie (when it was funny), “You need to meet Greek boy and make babies. Give me a word, any word and I’ll give you the Greek root,” and on and on. Even Maria is sick of it. So, when Gus accidentally finds out that the priest who married them never signed the marriage certificate, it turns out they’ve been living in sin for fifty years. Maria may actually have an out, but then of course the title of the movie is a big give away. Oh the plot twists and suspense! Vardalos was able to bring everyone back for the sequel including the hilarious Andrea Martin as Aunt Voula. The good hearted camaraderie is there, but the jokes are tired, the romance has fizzled and the baklava is stale. Waking Ned Divine director Kirk Jones does nothing to help and in fact may have made things worse. My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 is grounds for annulment. Rated PG-13 for some suggestive material. Review by Michelle Keenan

Zootopia 1/2

Short Take: Disney does it again with this surprisingly adult children’s film about animal life in the big city as a small country rabbit tries to become a metropolitan police officer.

REEL TAKE: Don’t let the adult adjective keep

you from taking your children from seeing Zootopia. Everyone of every age should this fascinating twist on the old “country boy makes good in the big city” saga. In this case it’s a rabbit and it’s not a guy but a female bunny trying to make the big time and surrounding her story is a much larger one of racial tolerance and a celebration of diversity. Judy Hopps dreams of leaving her country vegetable stand and her overprotective parents behind as she goes to the big city of Zootopia where beasts of all shapes and sizes live in harmony. Her goal is to become a police officer. After rigorous training which she passes (in fact she’s first in her class at the Academy), she is assigned traffic duty as a meter maid because everyone knows cute little bunnies can’t be real police officers. While writing traffic tickets she helps out a fox and his son only to discover that she has been conned. This actually works out to her advantage as it puts her on the case of a missing individual (an otter) despite being forbidden by the Chief

Officer Hopps and sly fox Nick Wilde try to solve a series of animal disappearances in Zootopia.

of Police (an ox) from doing anything about it. Determined to prove herself and enlisting the aid of the reluctant fox (she has something on him), they set out to find the otter and uncover a vast conspiracy where predators are suddenly reverting to savagery which creates antagonism, mistrust, and discord among the population (sound familiar?). The mayor of the city (a lion) is implicated and the vice mayor (a sheep) takes over and orders a crackdown on all predators in the city. Fear and anger are now the prevailing emotions and those seeking permanent power use the unrest to their political advantage. Can Officer Hopps and Nick Wilde (the fox) sort things out and restore balance to the city? It’s a Disney movie so you already know the answer but how the solution is arrived at and then achieved makes for a fascinating, surprisingly sophisticated ride. Although conceived and created before the current Primary season, it’s almost impossible not to see parallels between what is currently unfolding in that arena and to one candidate in particular although the animal that best fits the description of that candidate is the last one you would pick. But that’s the beauty of Zootopia. Things are not what they seem on the surface which teaches an inherent lesson on how we view things and the prejudices we unconsciously express concerning individual types and what they should be doing. Although I did not see the 3-D version, the visuals here are creative, colorful, and eye popping when the occasion calls for it and really don’t need the 3-D effect unless you just want to shell out the extra cash. The vocal performances are uniformly fine with Ginnifer Goodwin & Jason Bateman (as rabbit & fox) perfectly suited to their animated characters. Able support comes from Idris Elba as the ox police chief, J.K. Simmons as the lion mayor, and Octavia Spencer as the wife of the missing otter. As with the best Disney animated offerings from Snow White through Cinderella and The Little Mermaid to more recent non-traditional animated movies like Tangled, Zootopia can be viewed over and over again and will readily stand the test of time. Very few movies animated or otherwise can make that claim. Rated PG for thematic elements, rude humor, and action. Review by Chip Kaufmann


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Bringing the Heat!

GLASS & METAL DAY AT THE FOLK ART CENTER

Gearing up for the season’s educational series of events, the Southern Highland Craft Guild is excited to showcase two new media on their calendar.

By

HaNNaH BaRRy

Representing 11 media within the nearly 900-member organization, the Guild will introduce the public to elements of Metal and Glass on April 2. A range of techniques will be demonstrated in both of the media, as the artists each have their distinct touch and style. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., these master craftspeople Michael Hatch working on a parison on the punty. will be blacksmithing, Photo: Sarah Carballo glass blowing, piercing and soldering metals, knife making, bezeling, repoussé, copper etching, assembling stained glass, forging and many other Saturday, April 2 manipulation processes. Member Rachelle Davis will be working with fine sterling silver, showcasing her wellknown talent in piercing. “All the designs on the back of my pendants are [sawed] by hand,” Davis says. Her pieces contain intricate designs and messages that often tell a story. “I have always loved hidden symbols and meaning.” Visitors will have the opportunity to watch and learn more about two of the five original craft media. Glassblower Michael Hatch of Crucible Glassworks is currently assembling a small kiln to exhibit the quick thought process of blown glass, alongside member Hayden Wilson. For a complete list of artists participating in Jewelry and metalwork by Erica Bailey. Glass & Metal Day, and to learn more about Southern Highland Craft Guild programs at the Folk Art Center call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org. Admission to Glass & Metal Day and the Folk Art Center is free. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 on the Blue Ridge Parkway in east Asheville. Headquarters to the Southern Highland Craft Guild, the Center also houses three galleries, a library, Allanstand Craft Shop and a Blue Ridge Parkway information desk and bookstore. The Southern Highland Craft Guild is a non-profit, educational organization estabRachelle Davis at work on her bench, lished in 1930 to bring together the crafts and piercing the metal. Photo: Hannah Barry craftspeople of the Southern Highlands for the benefit of shared resources, education, marketing and conservation. IF The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an YOU Glass & Metal Day, Saturday, April GO 2, From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Folk authorized concessioner of the National Park Art Center is located at Milepost 382 Service, Department of the Interior.

of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Highway 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC.

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Asheville

Jce Schlapkohl

PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

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Gallery of Art

On display at the Asheville Gallery of Art and Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

The Nature of Things

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Asheville Gallery of Art’s April show, “The Nature of Things,” will feature the work of new member artists, Tebbé Davis, Mark Harmon, t.e. siewert, and Kate Thayer.

joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600 www.joycepaints.com

pg. 21

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Composition in Blue, Yellow and Red, (Detail) 24”x30”

Mary E. Decker

Works by Cheryl Keefer Available at:

This will be the second show in AGA’s new gallery space at 82 Patton Avenue. The artists will present works that highlight their diverse styles as they each interpret their view of the natural world. continued on page 19

Jane Molinelli

expressive contemporary painter

pg. 11

NorthLight Studios, RN 357 Depot Street in the River Arts District

pg. 21

Asheville Gallery 6 of Art, 82 Patton Avenue, Asheville Seven Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry Street, . 25 MS Black Mountain pg

Mahogan House Mahogany Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville Up Against the Wall Gallery, 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

Asheville Gallery of Art • 82 Patton Avenue, Downtown pg. 21

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Chartreuse Moose Fine Art • chartreusemoose.com

t.e. siewert encaustic landscapes

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT: 310 Art, River Arts District pg. 21

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Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Asheville jmolinelliart.com

ELINOR BOWMAN ASHEVILLE, NC

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT:

pg. 21

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pg. 21

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Asheville Gallery of Art • 16 College St. tesiewert.com

18 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District

www.elinorbowman.com

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Asheville Gallery of Art 82 Patton Avenue • Downtown Asheville

INTERVIEW WITH

Mary Decker

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Rapid River Magazine: How did you get involved with art?

Mary Decker: I have been drawing and

painting my entire life. My earliest commissioned art was for classmates in 1st grade who asked me to do their assigned drawings for them. I wonder how many of my drawings graced the refrigerators of unsuspecting parents. I didn’t paint continuously throughout my life, but the need to express myself through painting was always inside me. At times ‘something’ inside me just had to come out and the only way to express it was through painting. Years might go by without me ever lifting a brush, but then, suddenly, something needed expression and I would work around the clock painting until I captured that feeling.

RRM: Where do

you derive your inspiration from? Purple Daylilies by Mary Decker

MD: Growing up in the

interviewed by

Dennis Ray

“It is the beauty of the flower, its perfection – even in its imperfection – that Mary attempts to convey in her paintings.”

Pocono mountains, surrounded by the wonders of Nature, I was enthralled by the intricacies of plants, with their form and structure, down to the tiniest detail. The variety astounded and intrigued me then, as it does now.

RRM: We would love to hear about

your emphasis on the beauty of flowers and nature and why you have primarily chosen this subject.

MD: As a gardener, growing and tend-

ing plants, my fascination with nature “blossomed.” I was so captivated by its beauty and so intrigued with it that I wanted to study it in depth. Painting granted me entry into an even deeper level of beauty. Structure. How the petals or leaves curved. Color variations. The closer I looked, the more intrigued I got. Walking through botanical gardens, I watch people all taking photos of the flowers—gorgeous flowers. But lately what catches my attention is the foliage—the colors, shapes, textures, and how the sunlight plays

that made life on land possible. Of his paintings, Harmon says, “These works Tebbé Davis paints speak of the frailty and landscapes and abstract resilience of life in paintings that focus the form of beautiful primarily on the textures compositions that capand colors of the southture the very nature of ern Appalachians and things often ignored.” the Carolina seashore. t.e. siewert claims He uses color, texture, it’s never too late to be and composition in each what you might have scene to convey the inbeen. “In my fifth detense beauty he perceives cade of life that saying as an artist. “I invite has never been so true the viewer to explore Water Sky by Kate Thayer as I become the artist a world far removed I was meant to be,” she states. Siewert from their everyday existence to an inner works in encaustic, a hot wax techjourney of the soul,” he states. nique. The depth of the colored wax Mark Hamon says the very texture of layers and sheen achievable using that the Smoky Mountains, the weathered medium allows her to create nature rock faces covered by lichens and mosses, scenes that are characteristically full of inspire his work. He states that lichens light and poetry. Her work reflects her were the first organisms to colonize dry land some 700 million years ago, which continued on page 20 began the slow process of creating soils

off the leaves. It fascinates me. I want my art to draw the viewer closer into Nature. To look beyond the obvious. To take a close-up look and experience my fascination with the natural world.

RRM: How does the area’s growth impact your artistic expression?

MD: This area is known for art. People

coming here appreciate the creative expression of artists. There will be a segment of the public with whom my art resonates—regardless of the direction my art takes. If I take a detour from painting flowers and focus on foliage, perhaps I may lose one portion of the audience but there will be another segment to which the foliage paintings appeal. We, as artists, paint for ourselves, because painting/creating is something we have to do. But there is still some part of us deep within that wants acceptance, and getting that acceptance is liberating for the creative spirit.

Dazzle by Mary Decker

Pink Ruffles by Mary Decker

Mary Decker’s art is available at: Asheville Gallery of Art, 82 Patton Avenue, Downtown Asheville Cedar Hill Studio, 196 N. Main Street, Waynesville Visit Mary online at www.chartreusemoose.com

‘AGA’ cont’d from page 18

pg. 21

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Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 19


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville More of What Makes Asheville Special – The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Honoring, recognizing and showcasing some of our area’s lifelong master level artists.

A

An Artful Life

AN EXHIBITION OF MASTER ARTISTS AT THE AAAC

An exhibition at the Asheville Area Arts Council’s art gallery features seven master artists.

An Artful Life April 8 - May 14, 2016

Featuring Art by: Nadine Charlsen Diane LaRose Bob Martin Fleta Monaghan Jean Wall Penland Bernie Segal Monika Teal

RECEPTION Friday, April 15, 2016 5-8 PM

Curated by Fleta Monaghan Nadine Charlsen Hosted by the Asheville Area Arts Council. Points of View: Artists Curate Artists. pg. 21

4

Asheville Area Arts Council Gallery in the Grove Arcade 1 Page Avenue, Asheville, NC 28801 • Monday–Saturday 10–6pm

WNC’s Largest Selection of Pre-Owned Bikes and Accessories.

Probably the Oldest Bike Shop in the U.S.

FREE Downtown Parking

pg. 21

pH

(828) 253-4800

28 Ashland Ave • Downtown Asheville

Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine!

at the Council on Aging of Buncombe County, is producing this exhibition of local master artists. The program provides a free 10-week creative arts program to low income older adults This exhibition is part of the and creates opportunities for area senior Asheville Area Arts Council’s program artists to exhibit and sell their work. This “Point of View: Artists Curate Artists,” show marks the program’s first annual which was founded in 2013. The show exhibition of Master Level visual artists. will run from Friday April 8 through Dr. Turner Goins, the Program DiSaturday May 14. The public is invited rector, stated, “We live in an amazing arts to a free reception on Friday evening community; our program takes advantage April 15 from 5 to 8 p.m. At the recepof this, honors lifelong artists and brings tion, you’ll see selections from each creative arts to more older adults. When of the artists’ collections, be provided we first approached the Arts Council a refreshments, and enjoy live swing little over a music. year ago, they The expressed a theme of strong interest the show is in supporting “An Artful this project. Life,” which We could focuses on not be more honoring, pleased about recognizing, this partnerand showship with the casing some Asheville Area of our area’s Franny’s Flying Circus by Diane LaRose Arts Council lifelong and to have these exceptional artists artists. The seven contributing highly exhibiting. It is thrilling to sponsor this accomplished master level artists in show, and be a part of the joining of this show are Diane LaRose, Bob Marmissions between our two Buncombe tin, Jean Wall Penland, Bernie Segal, County nonprofits.” and Monika Teal with the co-curators Painter Diane LaRose commented, Nadine Charlsen and Fleta Monaghan. “New and unique, everything today is The Geezer Gallery, a new program

20 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

about young and new. So it’s a constant struggle for an older artist to appear old and relevant. The Geezer Gallery is providing an opportunity to show my work, that’s why I paint, to share my vision, and the Geezer Galley is giving me the venue to share my work.” Bernie Segal, an accomplished sculptor commented, “...it means that I’m getting the recognition that I deserve and you can do anything you want. …it’s always good to be chosen.” www.geezergallery.com IF YOU An Artful Life, opening GO reception, Friday, April

15 from 5 to 8 p.m. On display at the Asheville Area Arts Council’s art gallery, 1 Page Ave., #144, in the historic Grove Arcade. Visit ashevillearts.com for more information.

nature,” she states. “The Nature of Things” runs from April 1-30. The public is cordially invited to meet the artists at a reception on Friday, April 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. Their work and that of the other 26 gallery members will be on display and for sale through the month during regular hours, Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 4 p.m.

‘AGA’ cont’d from page 19

love of the Western North Carolina mountains where she says, “The air is fresh, the streams are clear, and the people are down-to-earth.” Kate Thayer states, “As a painter, my aim has always been that of attempting to kindle in the viewer the same kind of emotional exhilaration that I experience when I am seduced by a scene that asks to be brought to life in pastel or oils.” She says she thinks of her paintings as poems, those wordless encounters with the often stunning voices of nature whose colors and forms we rarely notice. “I want to bring to you, the viewer, what you may not have noticed in this busy world of ours: a time to stop and breathe in through our eyes the sweet and compelling voices of

Running by Monika Teal

IF YOU The Nature of Things, GO opening reception, Friday,

Rock Face by Mark Harmon

April 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 82 Patton Avenue in Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. For more information, please visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville More of What Makes Asheville Special – The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

ASHEVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES PRESENTS

The Harlem Quartet

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The Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) will present the Harlem Quartet in concert on Sunday afternoon May 1 at 4 p.m.

By

MaRiLyNNe HeRBeRT

Pops and the Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland, Detroit, National, The concert will be held at the UnitarUtah, Puerto Rico, ian Universalist Congregation of Asheville, Julliard, New World located at the corner of Edwin Place and and Pittsburgh symCharlotte Street. The New York-based Harlem Quartet. phony orchestras. Since its public debut at Carnegie Hall “We look forward in 2006, the New York-based ensemble has The program will include: to welcoming the fine musicians of the performed throughout the United States, Harlem Quartet to Asheville,” says Polly as well as in France, the U.K., Belgium, Mendelssohn: String Quartet No. Feitzinger, President of the ACMS. “We Panama, Canada and South Africa. Each 4, Op. 44 No. 2 have had an outstanding season this year and member of the quartet is a seasoned solo Buena Vista Social Club Medley: we will be ending it on a high note with this artist, having appeared with such orchestras Chan Chan wonderful ensemble,” she added. as the New York Philharmonic, the Boston Dizzy Gillespie: A Night in Tunisia Billy Strayhorn: Take the A Train Beethoven: String Quartet No. 9, Op. 59 No. 3 First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m. For more than half a century the ACMS has taken it’s place as a valued cultural resource in Asheville, O L bringing world-renowned chamber artists to the city. As one of the naC tion’s oldest continuous performing M B A chamber music organizations, it has been recognized for its outstanding programs and for its unique educaE tion component through a collaboration with the strings program W of the Asheville Buncombe Schools and our other cultural partners in the community, including the Asheville Young Musicians Club.

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Tickets are $38 each. To purchase tickets or for more information please contact Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427, support@ ashevillechambermusic.org, or visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org

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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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The acclaimed national fundraiser has raised more than 30 million dollars for AIDS service organizations across the country and in Canada since it began. Locally, more than 100 restaurants will generously donate 20% of their gross sales that day for breakfast, lunch, dinner, drinks, and takeout. In return, there will be an intense marketing campaign to increase diner traffic in each restaurant though social media, numerous print ads and our friends at WLOS-TV, iHeartMedia, the Asheville Radio Group, and Public Radio. “Dining Out For Life® is an opportunity for everyone in the community to come out and support the cause,” says Jesse Oates Vest, Special Events Coordinator for WNCAP. “From the diners, to the restaurants, to the amazing volunteers, there are so many people involved to make the event a success.” The funds raised during Dining Out for Life directly support WNCAP’s work of HIV/AIDS education, prevention, pg. 26

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food

advocacy, and case management care to those living with the disease. WNCAP provides services to 18 counties across the region, and this year you can enjoy your meals at restaurants in 6 of those counties; Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, and Transylvania counties. Last year’s event raised the bar to a new record high, thanks to the generosity of our sponsors, our amazing restaurants and extra donations from over 12,000 diners in WNC. The Asheville fundraiser ranks 5th in the nation in actual dollars raised out of 55 cities producing the event, across the country and in Canada. It was also voted Best Fundraising Event in the “WNC Best Of” 2014 and 2015, another testament to our local support. WNCAP has been busy putting together a team of over 250 enthusiastic volunteers needed to support this great event. “We have a person at each restaurant for each meal called Ambassadors” explains Chris Winebrenner, WNCAP’s Volunteer Coordinator. They have attended a training party for volunteers and been assigned to one of their favorite restaurants. It’s a fun day for volunteers as they encourage their friends, clients, family and co-workers to eat at their restaurant that day. Simply by donating a few hours of their time, they are making a difference in the life of people living with HIV/AIDS.” If you would like more information

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3 Biltmore Ave.

Downtown Asheville 828-225-8885 pg. 21

Open Daily 8am-3pm pg. 36

828-252-8333 ◆ www.cafe-64.com

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THURSDAY, APRIL 28

The Western North Carolina AIDS Project’s (WNCAP) 14th annual Dining Out for Life® benefit takes place Thursday, April 28 in Asheville and the surrounding communities.

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Dining Out for Life Day

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

pg. 21

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www.champanc.com

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437 N. Main St.

Hendersonville, NC 828-696-9800

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about being an ambassador, please contact Chris at (828) 2527489 or www.wncap.org/dofl. Mark your calendars, check out this year’s Participating Restaurants and make your reservations today for Dining Out for Life® 2016 and you just might help save a life. DOFL raises much needed AIDS awareness and serves as reminder that our community is still being affected by HIV. IF YOU Dining Out for Life® GO takes place Thursday,

April 28. A celebration of the day will be held at O.Henry’s in downtown Asheville. The official DOFL “After Party” will begin at 7 p.m. and feature top live entertainment and a live DJ – dance the night away until 2 a.m. For more information, and alist of participating resaturants, please visit www.wncap.org/dofl.

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Presenting Sponsor

Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Live at the Classic Wineseller

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The Classic Wineseller is Waynesville’s premier wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue.

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On Thursday, April 28, dine at any of over 100 restaurants in Western North Carolina and 20% of your bill will be donated to the

Multi-instrumentalist Jay Brown (guitar, piano, harmonica, vocals) performs on Friday, April 8. Brown performs various styles of music including blues, bluegrass, and American roots music. On Saturday, April 9, 16 & 30, piano man Joe Cruz performs music of the Beatles, Jay Brown Elton John, James Taylor, and Simon & Garfunkel. Guitarist Kevin Lorenz performs pop, jazz, Bossa nova, and Latin tunes on Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m. On Friday, April Sheila Gordon 22, Tina & Her Pony bring a unique sound to the American folk tradition. Waynesville-based singer and piano player, Sheila Gordon will perform a musical tribute to Janis Joplin, Annie Lennox, Bonnie Rait, and Stevie Nicks on Saturday, April 23. An evening of hot swing, Gypsy jazz, and Bossa nova with Michael Pilgrim (mandolin) and Don Mercz (guitar) is scheduled for Friday, April 29.

Western North Carolina AIDS Project for more info

wncap.org

pg. 30

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Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 23


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fine arts & crafts Spring Breaks Out at The Red House Studios and Gallery

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The Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League (SVFAL) announces the opening of Springtime.

“The show will consist of artwork in various media from our SVFAL artists will reflect the observations, impressions and delight with the arrival of spring,” stated Donna Davis, curator for the show. “The artists who make up the SVFAL are talented individuals who are inspired by the beauty of the western mountains. This show will prove to be worth the trip to Black Mountain.” The SVFAL is the oldest fine art league in the area. There were originally 82 members; the organization currently has 140 members. In operation since 1967, the SVFAL attracts new artists, as well as keeping long-term members. One new member is Bob Falanga, a photo collage artist. His artwork entitled, “Orchidia” is his entry into the show. Judy Barron Williams has been a member since the League’s move to the Studios and Galleries at the Red House, and she submitted her watercolor “Plum Blossom.” Jack Williams, Judy’s husband who is also an artist, is SFVAL president. Denise Geiger, a long-time member, submitted a pastel work entitled, “Mount Mitchel Awakens.” Denise has been a member of

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Painting by Sue Swetzler

Painting by Jack Williams

SVFAL since 2002. Cathy and Stan Skeen are co-treasurers of SVFAL. Cathy’s mother was an original member of the group and recruited them. Both use their talents as organizers and love of the organization to keep it on good financial footing. An all-volunteer group, the SVFAL members are the backbone of this active organization, which attracts talented artists working in a variety of media. Take the short trip from Asheville and see what SVFAL and Black Mountain have to offer! Free admission and parking.

The SVFAL is the oldest fine art league in the area.

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Studios and Gallery, 310 W. State Street, Black Mountain. The show will conclude on Sunday May 1, 2016. Hours for The Red House are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 1-4 p.m.

Greening Up the Mountains Festival

crafts, demonstrators, local schools, busi ness, community, environmental, health, safety, children’s activities, and more. The 19th annual Greening Up the The festival will also provide many tasty Mountains festival will fill the streets of food options and a plethora of regional downtown Sylva on Saturday, April 23 musical acts performing on two stages. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This historic JackGreening up the Mountains began as son County town’s largest festival of the an Earth Day celebration, and continues year typically draws thousands of visitors to keep its focus on environmental proto this free family-friendly event in the tection, sustainability, and promotion of mountains of western N.C. local businesses and civic groups. Organized by the Town of Sylva, Before the festival officially begins Greening Up the Mountains features at 10 a.m., there is a 5K Run and Walk more than 180 vendors, representing arts, starting at 9 a.m., at Mark Watson Park, this Jackson County Parks & Recreation event has a $15 pre-registration fee through April 16. Register online at www.imathlete. com or stop by the Recreation Center in Cullowhee. Race day registration begins at 8 a.m., and the cost will be $20. Music will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the Mountain Youth Talent Contest at the Sun Trust Lot on Main Street. Music will be held throughout the day at both the Main Greening Up the Mountains features more than Street stage and at the 180 vendors. Bridge Park gazebo on

Free event features music, arts, crafts, food, and more!

pg. 25

IF YOU Springtime, opening reception Friday, GO April 1 from 5-7 p.m. at The Red House

24 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

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Railroad Avenue. For more information about this 19-year-old talent contest now lead by the Jackson County 4-H, contact: heather_gordon@ncsu.edu More than 30 arts and crafts booths and displays will be on Railroad Avenue as well, plus a full Farmer’s Market. Families can visit the “Kid’s Zone” where children can enjoy an inflatable slide, with many kid-friendly booths featuring fun games, arts & crafts and much more. Law Enforcement of Jackson County will be out to meet the public, and share some shaved ice, the “DARE” car display, and more in the “Safety Zone.” “In this global community, Greening Up the Mountains focuses on local community connections, face-to-face,” said Festival Coordinator Amy Ammons Garza. IF YOU Greening Up the Mountains GO Festival, Saturday, April 23

from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sylva, NC. For more information, call (828) 631-4587, e-mail greeningupthemountains@gmail.com, visit www.greeningupthemountains.com, like the event on Facebook, or call the Town of Sylva at (828) 586-2719.


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artful living Belief and Faith “Belief, as I use the word here, is the insistence that the truth is what one would “lief” or wish it to be. The believer will open his mind to the truth on condition that it fits in with his preconceived ideas and wishes. Faith, on the other hand, is an unreserved opening of the mind to the truth, whatever it may turn out to be. Faith has no preconceptions; it is a plunge into the unknown. Belief clings, but faith lets go.”

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~ Alan Watts, The Wisdom of Insecurity

There are many, many beliefs and believers, but faith, as Watts uses the word here, is rare indeed, as are those who live in faith. The word “faith” is used promiscuously in our culture and misapplied to all kinds of what are more accurately defined as beliefs, or even hopes. People say they have faith in God – generally as represented by their particular religion – or that their prayers will be answered if they are sufficiently “faithful.” Perhaps they have faith in a political figure or that their baseball team will win the World Series. This generally speaks to people seeking something they can hold on to, something to which they can attach their identity, that can help them find some specialness and meaning for their lives. They want to believe in something that makes their lives a little less a cipher. They want to be able to pray, chant, sing, dance, follow rigid precepts, burn candles, fast, do penance, laying-on-hands, diksha, participate in rituals that allows them to transcend their frightened sense of vulnerable separateness and merge into something larger.

People misapply the word “faith” onto belief systems that are imperfect projections of their own egos. The issue is whether they are merging their individual ego into a larger collective ego or into the no-ego of life and the universe, of God in the universal sense of the word. This is the difference between belief and faith. People misapply the word “faith” onto belief systems that are imperfect projections of their own egos, looking for specialness and security for their personal identity and those with whom they identify. They pit those of their “faith” and “beliefs” against those of differing “faith” and “beliefs.” This interchangeable use of these words can be applied to religion, but also political/economic ideologies, even dependent interpersonal relationships. These words ought not be considered interchangeable. This misapplication has made religion too often a scourge to human history rather than a refuge and balm. It has allowed deeply flawed political/economic systems to be followed blindly, and become sources of much

human strife and misery. It can, as well, create deeply dysfunctional relationships. This application of the word faith actually reveals a lack of faith. It simply means blind belief, and often a good clue to what is belief rather than faith is the suffix “ism” and just so there is no confusion, this can be applied to Buddhism as well. Buddhism practiced as a belief in the achievement of Nirvana, or for blessings in life if certain practices and teachings are followed by rote, is just as much a flawed belief system as any other “ism.” The word “Buddhism” is a convenience of language. The saving grace of the teachings associated with this word is the warning said to be given by the Buddha to not “believe” what he teaches – rather to let his words and example be pointers to what is real and true – that which can only be experienced in one’s own deep silent faith - that one is in fact seeking that which is already in them – a truth that is silent and is one’s own deepest nature. The teachings, the “ism” of Buddhism, are sometimes described as a boat that can take you to the further shore of awakened truth, Buddha-nature, and that having arrived, the boat must be left behind in order to explore the shore and the vast realm beyond. Clinging to the vessel of the journey is not the point of the journey. “It is a plunge into the unknown. Belief clings, but faith lets go.” Faith is saying “yes” in the face of life’s uncertainty and confusion. It is saying “yes” I know there is meaning and purpose deeper than events, that events are only servants of a deeper purpose. What is far too rare is faith in basic goodness and kindness and in our common humanity. Rarer still is faith in the perfection and sacredness of nature and the universe - that we, in fact, are expressions of that perfection and sacredness and that within us and through us that wisdom and perfection is expressed and manifested. We only need to quiet our insecure, seeking minds to find that which is already in us, in fact, is who we are. This is the essence of faith. It may not be able to be articulated, it may be a silent sense of “the peace that surpasseth understanding.” There may be any of the

By

BiLL waLZ

myriad names of God, or no God as a personification at all, attached to this felt sense that those who possess it have difficulty articulating. That this sense of faith may leave those who experience it speechless is perhaps its best indicator of authenticity. The great Zen teacher, Dainin Katagiri, wrote two books, the first entitled Returning to Silence. The second was You Have to Say Something. This catches the conundrum of seeking truth through words or belief systems. So “Buddhism” is a word that points to what a person can only find by letting go of beliefs and words, words in the Dharma, its teachings that are pointers to silent truths behind the words. Yet, you have to say something. The something can only rise from the silent certainty of faith, the felt sense of oneness with the great Source. You can be of any or none of the religious “isms” and have this certainty. You can call it God, Jesus, Allah, Brahma, Buddha. You can call it Life, Nature, the Universe, the Moment, the Mystery, Being. You can call it “I am.” But when any of those names expresses a belief rather than a silent knowing and faith, it is more likely a projection of our ego. Many would call faith as described by Watts foolish, but it is only through this kind of faith that we can truly find ourselves and our balance and place within life. This sort of faith opens us to truth precisely because it emerges with the realization that we are an expression of life and the universe and therefore, the true nature of life and the universe is like a resonant wave in our consciousness. This is the silent intelligence and capacity for discerning truth that is awareness. When someone says they are a “person of faith” and you ask them to describe what they mean, and they begin describing the teachings of some “ism” by rote rather than hesitating and offering a disclaimer about how hard it is to describe, then you know you are in the presence of a believer who has not yet found the silent strength within that is “an unreserved opening of the mind to the truth, whatever it may turn out to be.” But if they speak of some silent “knowing” that strengthens and fortifies them, that takes them beyond the feeling of separateness from life, that allows then to say “yes” to life in all its occurrences and manifestations, that is “a plunge into the unknown,” they have left all boats of belief behind and found the further shore of faith. Remarkably then, it is discovered the further shore is this very life

Plunge into the unknown... we live, in its ordinary and mundane tasks and challenges, only now, released from preconceptions and clinging, it is experienced with, as the Jewish mystic Abraham Heschel spoke, “sublime wonder,” and with the peace and compassion that naturally arises in the oneness with life that is faith. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz. com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs at www.billwalz.com

The Big Book of Kombucha

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Brewing, Flavoring, and Enjoying the Health Benefits of Fermented Tea. The comprehensive guide, written by Hannah Crum and Alex LaGory, has been recognized by James Beard Award-winning author and TV show host Andrew Zimmern as “the one go-to resource for all things kombucha.” Crum and LaGory are also the creators of Kombucha Kamp, which provides brewing supplies, products, and information. IF YOU Discussion and signing with the GO authors on Monday, April 11 at 7 p.m.

at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 25


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sound experience A Moment in Time with Eliza Gilkyson

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Born into a music family, growing up surrounded with well known friends of her father — the successful folk singer Terry Gilkyson — Eliza Gilkyson has always sensed what her path in life would be. While her father was performing with The Weavers; scoring top-10 hits such as 1951’s “On Top Of Old Smokey” (and writing hit songs for performers such as Doris Day and Frankie Laine), Eliza and her siblings would sing together and “make up songs as we went along.” One sibling is her brother Tony, a successful session guitarist and long standing member of the seminal rock band X as well as Lone Justice. She grew up in Hollywood, where her father would also contribute songs to a number of Disney films, among the rarified air of artistry that few of us can even imagine. Though uncredited, she can be heard singing with her father in the Disney TV movies The Secret of Romney Marsh (1964) and The Legend of Young Dick Turpin (1965). Sister Nancy, herself a vocalist, would go on to become a top executive at Warner Bros. Records, one of the first women to do so. But the family affair doesn’t stop there: Her son Cisco is a touring musician and the producer of her latest album, 2014’s The Nocturne Diaries, while daughter Delia has also forged a career in music. Cleary there is much to say about the DNA running through the Gilkyson clan. As for Eliza’s career, it formally stretched back to 1977, with the release of her first album, and steadily gained traction. While she’s never had that elusive commercial “breakthrough moment” her records rightfully receive consistent critical acclaim and her songs are steadily recorded by others. In the course of her career she’s released an impressive body of work adding up to 15 studio recordings, as well as a pair of live albums

iNTeRVieweD By JaMeS

RRM: Were you going through a period of sleeplessness? Musicians lead hours that are very different from the rest of us.

and accompanying DVDs. Along the EG: That was part of it. I’ve had way she’s shared a lot on my mind lately, not restages and collaboally morose things, or thoughts rated in the studio of my mortality, but more with some of the concerns for the world at large. best known names World events, the environin the world of folk/ ment, just a feeling of “what pop/rock. kind of planet are we leaving When I spoke for the next generation?” The with Eliza via ways in which we are abusing phone I was fightthe earth really scare me. I look ing a sore throat at my grandchildren and those and barely able to are the weights I find myself speak above a whiscarrying. I want to be clear per. She patiently Singer/songwriter Eliza Gilkyson that I am a happy person; I’m fielded my quesPhoto: Scott Newton married, I have a great family, tions and gave every no major worries. Yet I still assurance that I was found myself lying awake with those feelings on the right track, understanding her intent so at some point it made sense to begin putting with the writing and recording of the record. them to song. Upon casually mentioning my unfamiliarity with much of her catalog she generously gave RRM: As I’ve gotten older I know I spend a lot me a contact at Red House Records and told of night’s trying to quiet down my mind. It me to give them a call and have them “send gets harder and harder to not think about all whatever of my records they have” in my the stuff we think we have to do. direction. That in itself speaks to the inherent kindness that is reflected in her music. EG: It really does. I’m a musician; I’ve trained myself to rarely go to bed before midnight. I Rapid River Magazine: Talk about the genesis might get a few hours sleep but I find myself of The Nocturne Diaries. I’m intrigued by the waking up after a while. Fortunately I can notion of a set of songs inspired-directly or sleep in later into the morning and be okay. not-by the wee hours. It’s an idea that might Most people don’t have that luxury. seem obvious but I cannot think of another album so thoroughly immersed in that mood. RRM: I’d like to highlight a few individual Eliza Gilkyson: The strange thing is that songs and bounce some ideas around. I love wasn’t my intent, I didn’t go in thinking I’d the imagery found in “No Tomorrow” of a write a bunch of songs in what you’ve nicely blue light coming from the flat screen. Anyone described as “the wee hours.” But as I started who has ever lain awake at night can relate. to look at the new songs I came to realize that I find there’s a temptation to be drawn into they’d all come from that space, where I’d be turning on the computer, phone or whatever lying awake at night for hours with all these device is nearby that is hard to resist. thoughts rolling through my mind. There was EG: Yeah, we’ve become so wired to the world a certain restless nature to them that came out at large. That was the point I wanted to get of that. across. It seems we’ve become so connected and not always for our good. I force myself to just lie there and see what happens; either I drift back to sleep or find a song in there somewhere.

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pg. 36

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~ S  ~ 26 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

CaSSaRa

.AB.

--

RRM: That universe of social networking is further explored in “An American Boy” with the stakes being much higher. It’s also one of the few songs on the album that you wrote in a different persona. Is that a challenge to do? EG: I was thinking about the isolation that person (in the song) must feel, and how too many of your youth act out that isolation in horrible ways. We read about these kids that feel so desperate, that there’s no place they can turn. And when they commit these crimes they often leave a trail on the internet. Three of my grandchildren are now in their teens, and they tell me how hopeless it sometimes continued on page 27


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

‘Eliza Gilkyson’ cont’d from pg. 26

feels to them. And these are kids who have very good lives, kids who are really smart, but at some level they feel powerless.

RRM: I think the kids of today are far smarter and more world wise than we were. I think by and large they’re pretty great but their world is so much more complex. EG: That’s right, and they’re more aware of the problems in the world than we were. As to the second part of your question, about my writing songs not from the first person, I did challenge myself to try and break my routine. I tend to write a lot of songs about “me” and it’s good to get outside that. The other song written in second person was “Not My Home,” which is about a teenage girl wanting to get away from an unhappy situation. I gave it a happier ending in the finale verse in which she realizes she can walk away and live the life that’s meant for her. RRM: I guess I completely misinterpreted the song, or at least gave it my own interpretation. I gather you and I are about the same age and it spoke directly to some of the middle aged concerns I feel: How we’d like to imagine we’re in control of our lives— but the truth is we rarely are. EG: That’s wonderful, I love that you were able to see that song in an entirely different way than I intended. I find that so thrilling, when the listener is able to discover their own meaning in a song. It speaks so much to the power of the arts, to the ways in which we define community. Thank you James, I really appreciate that you heard it that way. RRM: “Eliza Jane” is a remarkably upbeat song on an album that tends towards a somber, more reflective vibe. I assume it’s an older Eliza Gilkyson talking to a younger one. There’s a lot of emotional weight there. EG: (Laughs a bit) It’s the idea of one side of

me warning the other, what to watch out for in life, how to navigate things. That was also a fun song to record. All the musicians were having a great time, and it shows.

RRM: That seems like a good time to switch gears a bit. Can you talk about the role that Cisco played? Many of the songs have only three or four players and some pretty sparse instrumentation, but the sound of The Nocturne Diaries is amazing rich and varied. EG: He did an amazing job. He’s been playing

drums with me since he was about 16, and really knows how to make a song work. Not so much in a “we’ve had three slow songs so now we need a fast one” way but in digging out the vibe of a song.

RRM: Were there ever times you disagreed over a song, you wanting it to go one way and he wanting it to go another? I mean you’re his mother. Did you ever have to pull rank? EG: Never. That might have been the case 20

years ago but he’s 43, a grown man and he holds his own. It really comes down to making the right decisions about the song. If we disagreed we’d both talk it out and do what was best in musical terms. He knows so much about music and about how to make records, things I was never that concerned with (at his age). We’ve started making plans for a new record and I again find myself listening to his ideas. His perspective is much broader than mine and I rely on that.

RRM: You grew up in the sort of artistic household that many of us can only dream about. Did you feel preordained towards music? Was there ever a time you didn’t want to do this? EG: I might have rebelled against the kind of music my dad listened to and wrote but never against the idea of being a musician. Part of that was timing. When I was old enough to start making my own music the type of folk stuff he did was on the wane. This was the late 1960’s and I was into psychedelics, both the music and all that it implies. I went through various phases of music, exploring different styles, and eventually found my voice. RRM: And now Cisco has followed in those footsteps. I’m curious as to whether or not you nudged him in that direction or perhaps away from it. EG: It never really came up. As I said he was making music from a really young age, touring by his mid teens. He makes music that is way outside what I do; he plays in a cowboy punk band and does these other things. He listens to music I might not ever hear but that’s cool. Sometimes he shares it with me. What matters to Cisco is that the music is authentic, that it’s free of pretense. He brings a great deal of authenticity to everything he does. RRM: Talk a bit about the show at Altamonte.

If you’re not familiar with the theatre it’s very intimate, with really great acoustics. Will you be playing solo?

EG: I’m bringing along a great guitarist and

multi-instrumentalist named Jim Henry. I find it works so much better to have someone to bounce ideas off of. It’s a lot more fun. Strangely I’ve never played Asheville before, I’ve always wanted to but it’s never quite worked out. I’ve lived in Santa Fe and now live in Austin. From everything I’ve read and heard Asheville has a similar artistic vibe as those places. I look forward to seeing it.

RRM: One last question. You have an amazingly rich body of songs and I must admit that I’ve a lot of catching up to do. I hadn’t realized you’d written “Rosie Strike Back” which Roseanne Cash recorded. How did that song fall into her hands? EG: We had the same publisher. That was a really brave thing for her to do. At the time I wrote it (1987) she was riding pretty high with some hit songs. But no one was writing songs about abusive relationships and she was willing to give that song a vehicle. She fought continued on page 39

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I’m back again, focusing on newer under the radar releases and, in an effort to catch up, keeping each review as brief as possible. If it gets a mention here it’s worth your time. Life’s too short to spend on meaningless music!

The Westies

Six on The Out PAUPER SKY MUSIC

In the world of the Westies front man, Michael McDermott, no one gets out of here intact; his songs are populated with the down and out, victims of circumstance and their own bad choices. The lead protagonist of “Parolee” — the strongest track here — wishes he could “start all over again,” a lament shared by many, while the sprightly Celtic underpinnings of “The Gang’s All Here” cloaks the desperation of those who find themselves “scattered, unmasked and shattered” by what life has thrown at them. His best songs are ripe with such sentiment, and if McDermott’s voice doesn’t always provide the best vehicle — it’s a bit too smooth for its own good — that’s a relatively minor quibble. Producer Will Kimbrough provides his trademark sublime guitar work; Heather Horton adds some fiddle and welcome vocal accompaniment, which helps propel Six on the Out forward in reasonably fine fashion. I’m still not sold on his vocal approach for such dark material and find myself wishing he’d market these powerful entries for others to sing. That’s clearly a matter of taste and I encourage you to sample a few You Tube clips before deciding if this album is for you. ***

Jody Search Seasons

WHEN I RUN MUSIC

This five-song EP could best be filed under White Soul (a bit too white) or contemporary Christian. Not a thing wrong with either of those but while Search brings a pleasant voice and clever instrumentation (piano, beat boxing, synths, bass loops, and guitar) to the mix, the songs suffer from a sameness of pace and overly sentimental lyrics. Designed as a seasonal cycle, Seasons has some fine glimpses but could have used a producer to tighten things up and insist upon a few rewrites. **1/2

Chuck Johnson and Charlyhorse Barb Wire LITTLE KING RECORDS

This five-piece Charlotte NC based band delivers a nice bit of throwback (in the best sense of the word) country rock, nimbly written and played songs of lost love, hard times and the eternal hope that

redemption is just around the corner. Propelled by lead singer Chuck Johnson’s earthy singing and Dennis Johnson’s nimble piano work the songs glide quickly with an honesty that isn’t always found in today’s music. Standout tracks include “Elaina,” a fine remembrance of better times and “Eight Feet of Water,” which manages to add nicely to the list of songs inspired by the tragedy that was hurricane Katrina. I’m less enamored by the bluegrass tinged “Shine” but taken in its entirety Barb Wire is an impressive effort. ***1/2

Jason Paulson Crow River Ramble CAMPER VAN RECORDS

For his third album Minneapolis based Paulson “turns down the amplifiers and picks up the acoustic guitar” but the results are no less electrifying and engaging. “Crow River Ramble” focuses more on Paulson’s strength of songwriting, and while he’s often likened to Jason Isbell and such sprightly gems as the hard rocking “Cold in California” and “Long Way to Run,” the sound is uniquely his. By using the same core line up, producer Jason Swensen gives the album a nice sense of unity, balancing the laid back with the up tempo; but its Paulson’s own mid-range voice and acute knack for imagery that elevates “Crow River Ramble” above the crowded field of Americana efforts. ****

Lizanne Knott

Excellent Day

PROPER RECORDS

Badass rocker meets wounded bird, with a heavy dose of unapologetic lust thrown into the mix. Supported by a hugely talented and simpatico band Knott pretty much knocks every track out of the ballpark, and while her own songs carry the day the standout here is her ethereal cover of Bruce Springsteen’s “Stolen Car,” which might just be the best reworking ever of a song from The Boss. Credit also goes to producer and support musician Glenn Barratt for adding just the right touches — muted trumpet, banjo, and guitar loops among them — as needed. The result is an adventurous and multi-layered delight which lives up to its name and bears repeated spins. ****

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 27


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authors ~ poetry ~ books

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The Poet’s Voice APRIL

This is National Poetry Month! (About time.) Poetry is a genre Latinos have excelled in. Think Lorca, Neruda, Paz, Gabriela Mistral, William Carlos Williams, Carmen Tafolla, Juan Felipe Herrera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Victor Hernandez Cruz. Claribel Alegria, a major voice in Latin American letters, published fifteen collections of poetry. She won the Casa de las Americana poetry prize. She keeps a “seed book” – a collection of ideas, quotes, fragments – which compost and grow into poems. Her poem, Ars Poetica was written during a war in El Salvador. In spite of the horror, something else came.

Ars Poetica by Claribel Alegria I, poet by trade, condemned so many times to be a crow, would never change places with the Venus de Milo: while she reigns in the Louvre and dies of boredom and collects dust I discover the sun each morning and amid valleys volcanos and debris of war I catch sight of the promised land.

Daisy Zamora, Vice Minister of Culture in Nicaragua, wrote, “Writing poetry is my life. I could not live if I did not write poetry. Poetry is my way of living, a way of feeling life.”

Hand Mirror by Daisy Zamora

Want to be a part of our publication each month? Rapid River Magazine is seeking a proofreader. About 3-4 hours each month. A great opportunity to build your resume. For more details, email info@rapidrivermagazine.com.

After so many years my grandmother Ilse returns with her astonished dark and melancholy eyes, and glances - slender Narcissus at her small silver pool, her magic oval, her moon of cut glass, occupying this face more and more hers and less mine. Octavio Paz wrote, “To make life a marvel that is the role of poetry.”

28 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

By

CaROL peaRCe BJORLie – THe pOeT BeHiND THe CeLLO

Between what I see and what I say, by Octavio Paz between what I say and what I keep silent, between what I keep silent and what I dream, between what I dream and what I forget: poetry.

Its nourishment, how beautiful it is To need. The song is ending now, because I cannot bear to hear it any longer. I call this song of needful love my voice. Gracias Amigos - Carol Bjorlie

August by Frederico Garcia Lorca The opposing of peach and sugar, and the sun inside the afternoon like the stone in the fruit. The ear of corn keeps its laughter intact, yellow and firm. August. The little boys eat brown bread and delicious moon. Raphael Campo, Cuban American physician teaches and practices general internal medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He is on the faculty of Lesley University in their MFA program in Creative Writing. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, Pushcart Prize for starters. I interviewed Dr. Campo for Water~Stone, a collection of essays and poems produced by Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota. In his remarks Campo said, “Poetry conveys a sense of connectedness. I like the idea of a universal message from poetry, from the rhythm which is visceral and deeply ingrained.” I asked Dr. Campo if listening to the body’s rhythm inform your poetry? His answer: “Absolutely. The attention of listening is one aspect of poetry that is critically important for me. As in Whitman’s great phrase, I try to sing “the body electric.” Poetry makes it possible to listen with our whole heart.”

My Voice by Raphael Campo To cure myself of wanting Cuban songs, I wrote a Cuban song about the need For people to suppress their fantasies, Especially unhealthy ones. The song Began by making reference to the sea, Because the sea is like a need so great And deep it never can be swallowed. Then The song explores some common myths About the Cuban people and their folklore: The story of a little Carib boy Mistakenly abandoned to the sea; The legend of a bird who wanted song So desperately he gave up flight; a queen Whose strength was greater than a rival king’s. The song goes on about morality, And then there is a line about the sea, How deep it is, how many creatures need

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

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Celebrate Poetry

National Poetry Month at Malaprop’s.

Ron Rash will read from his Poems: New & Selected on Sunday, April 17 while introducing Robert Morgan. Local author and teacher Katherine Soniat reads on Thursday, April 28 with fellow poet Peter Cooley. IF YOU Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 GO Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-

6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

26th Annual Poetry Contest

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Deadline: April 30, 2016 The Writers’ Workshop is sponsoring its 26th Annual Poetry Contest, open to any writer regardless of residence. All work must be unpublished. Each poem should not exceed two pages. The entry fee is $25 ($20 for Workshop members) for up to three entries. Make check or money order payable to The Writers’ Workshop, and mail to: Annual Poetry Contest, 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville, NC 28805. Entry fee is also payable online at www.twwoa.org.

POETRIO Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: John Blackard (A Book of Meditations), Lola Haskins (how small, confronting morning), and another poet TBA.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings Malaprop’s Recommended Reading

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EMOKE Spring is springing and I am feverishly purchasing new books for the coming summer and fall. Our children’s books are going to be in the able hands of Amy. Erin can also help out since she loves children’s books. These recommendations don’t mean you can’t ask anyone else, but these two are more focused on literature for the young people. Or you could be in a bookstore (like the one in the photo that my brother Denes sent) where browsing is discouraged and you can only rely on the knowledge of the staff. This bookstore is in Tokyo, Japan. I have seen places like that in the US in my lifetime but it is not my way of being with books and their readers.

A bookstore in Tokyo

I just read two amazing books. Hang on because these two will only be available in the fall. Jot them down now or reserve your copy with us. Local author Monika Schroder, who wrote Saraswati’s Way, has a new novel that I really enjoyed. Yes, it is a young adult title, but reading the book Be Light Like a Bird is something for all readers to enjoy and learn from—about love and loss, trust and family, and of course BIRDS. It’s like David Van’s book Aquarium, which is about fish as well as all of the above... love, loss, family and healing. My second recommendation is Wonder, by Emma Donoghue. Her book The Room is

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Short Stories, a Web Exclusive Contribute to Rapid River Magazine’s online short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works in more than 20 genres. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. For submission guidelines and special editing rates, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Please contact Kathleen Colburn with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

making its way around the world on celluloid and in book format also. The new book is about the room in our heads and how strong and unbelievable it is that belief—and heart—are much greater than what we understand rationally.

ALI MCGHEE I’m starting this spring with an international trip to South America to fully break the chains of winter and make room for the new possibilities sprouting up in my life. Travel is a priority in my life, whether it’s to some place far away or somewhere closer to home. This spring, embrace possibility and take a trip. You don’t have to go very far to see something in a new way. Here are my favorite books that highlight travel and adventures, whether they’re internal or external. The Heart of the World by Ian Baker. I have probably given this book as a gift more than any other. Buddhist scholar and worldclass climber and adventurist Ian Baker’s breathtaking true story of his multi-year journey into Tibet’s hidden lands is perfect and shimmering. His search for a mystical 108 foot high waterfall was a game-changer for me—when I picked it up I’d read very little nonfiction, and I was hooked. It’s a beautiful meditation on Tibetan Buddhism, environmentalism, and the breakneck speed at which the world transforms. Wayfaring Strangers: The Musical Voyage from Scotland and Ulster to Appalachia by

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Fiona Ritchie and Doug Orr. Fiona Ritchie and Doug Orr have written a carefully researched history of Appalachian music’s roots in Scotland and Ulster. Starting with the Age of the Troubadours during the 12th and 13th centuries and eventually moving into contemporary takes on old songs from beloved musicians, it’s not just academic; rather, it’s a joyful exploration of the subject complete with personal letters, pictures, anecdotes, and a CD with 20 songs from artists featured in the book. Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love by Simran Sethi. I loved Simran Sethi’s luscious descriptions of food— breaking bread, sipping wine, swooning over a plate of pulpo (octopus). This book is a transportive food memoir, but it’s also a compelling and deeply important examination of how we eat and why we need to shift our attitudes toward the foods that are the most deeply important to us. Sethi argues that our food is becoming more and more homogenized through our agricultural and eating practices, when in fact we should be concentrating on diversifying our farms and foods. Sethi reminds us that food is what sustains us, but also what deeply connects us. M.F.K. Fisher’s Provence, with photos by Aileen Ah-Tye. M.F.K. Fisher is one of my favorite travel and food writers, and Provence brings these two strains together with Aileen Ah-Tye’s gorgeous photographs. Ah-Tye met continued on page 33

Sci-Fi Novel Armada May Be the Must-Read-Book of 2016

In 2011 Ernest Cline published Ready Player One which went on to win numerous awards, including an Alex Award from the Young Adult Library Services Association, and millions of diehard fans. In March 2015 Steven Spielberg announced he would direct Ready Player One and the film is set to hit theaters in 2018. Now Cline has published his follow-up Armada a sci-fi novel about a teenager Zack Lightman who happens to see a flying saucer and is forced to save humanity. But like Ready Player One the story deals with as much introspective thoughts and questions (if not perhaps more so) than the physical ones. Told with wit and charm and a splash of humanity Armada is perhaps the best sci-fi book of the year for all readers. Cline’s characters in Armada are better drawn, more for a better word, real er than in Ready. They pop from the page and grab you by the collar,

ReView By

aSa pORTMaN

tantalizing you to join them. His protagonist has a charming way of being fun while still being annoying. Lightman snatches the reader into his chaotic life in a way perhaps only John Kennedy Toole successfully managed. Lightman isn’t as unforgettable nor as original as Kennedy’s Ignatius J. Reilly, but a close second and perhaps the rightful heir for readers in the 21st century.

APRIL

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, April 5 at 7 p.m. LEE SMITH, memoir, Dimestore: A Writer’s Life. Thursday, April 7 at 7 p.m. ASHLEY WARLICK, The Arrangement, M.F.K. Fisher. Friday, April 8 at 7 p.m. DANNY BERNSTEIN, Forests, Alligators, Battlefields. Saturday, April 9 at 7 p.m. JEFF ZENTNER, The Serpent King, YA author. Monday, April 11 at 7 p.m. Hannah Crum, Alex LaGory, The Big Book of Kombucha. Wednesday, April 13 at 7 p.m. QUINCY WHITNEY, American Luthier, violin. Thursday, April 14 at 7 p.m. PAUL LISICKY, memoir, The Narrow Door. Friday, April 15 at 7 p.m. FRED CHAPPELL, fantasy, A Shadow All of Light. Saturday, April 16 at 7 p.m. DOMNICA RADULESCU, Country of Red Azaleas. Sunday, April 17 at 5 p.m. ROBERT MORGAN, Chasing the North Star, slavery in 1850s SC. Saturday, April 23 at 7 p.m. JULIA FRANKS, Over the Plain Houses; MARK BEAVER, Suburban Gospel. Monday, April 25 at 7 p.m. KEN ILGUNAS, travel, Trespassing Across America. Tuesday, April 26 at 7 p.m. NELDA HOLDER, The Thirteenth Juror. Thursday, April 28 at 7 p.m. KATHERINE SONIAT, poetry, Night Bus to the Afterlife. Friday, April 29 at 7 p.m. TRACEY RIZZO, Intimate Empires: Body, Race, and Gender in the Modern World. Saturday, April 30 at 7 p.m. M.J. PULLEN READING, novel, Regrets Only.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

pg. 21

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IF YOU Ernest Cline reading and booksigning GO takes place on Wednesday, April 20 at 7

p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 29


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Art Exhibits at HART and The Strand

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The Haywood County Arts Council (HCAC) recently solidified partnerships with Haywood Arts Regional Theatre (HART) and The Strand at 38 Main to show work in the lobby of each facility.

Featuring Local Sunburst Trout

Shows at HART will open in conjunction with shows on the Performing Arts Center Main Stage. Exhibits at The Strand will change Work from Soft and Stitched: approximately Textile Artists from Haywood twice a year. Community College. “HART and The Strand have given us an incredible opportunity to expand the reach of our gallery,” said HCAC Executive Director Lindsey Solomon, “We are thrilled to partner with great community organizations and to expose our artists’ work to more people.” The first show in HART’s Rodwell Gallery, Soft and Stitched: Textile Artists from HCC, opens April 8 and closes May 9. This show from the Haywood Community College Continuing Education Creative Arts Department will feature local fiber artists. Works of art from the

WA WF

828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

Burr Studio

10 Reasons to Buy Local 6. Help the environment. 7. Buying local supports community groups. 8. Invest in the community. 9. Your taxes are put to good use. 10. Show the country we believe in WNC.

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Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

1. Keep money in the neighborhood 2. Embrace what makes us different. 3. Get better service. 4. Enjoy a more diverse range of product choices. 5. Create more good jobs.

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FROG LEVEL

Waynesville, NC 28786

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continued on page 36

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128 N. Main Street

pg. 26

Creative Arts Quilting and Upholstery classes as well as pieces from instructors who are fiber artists will be on display during HART’s Red Velvet Cake War play. Haywood Community College’s Creative Arts programming offers innovative, affordable, and groundbreaking craft education. More information on classes can be found at creativearts.haywood.edu. Works by Jared Schwartz, an emerging artist, will be featured at The Strand. Fascinated by the human face,

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Gallery of American Art & Craft pg. 26

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828-456-7400

30 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

136 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC

WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


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Wild About

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WAYNESVILLE

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My name is Cory Houston Plott, and I have been creating pottery as a full time career since 2012. Plottware Pottery is located in Clyde, NC, and is a small, but International business serving several clients in Geneva, Switzerland, as well as across the Eastern United States. All of my wares and sculptures are made from High Fired Stoneware which is dish washer safe, microwavable, and also oven safe. The clay is purchased by the ton and turned only on foot-powered treadle wheels without electricity. I incorporate Wood Ashes into the mixture, which is a technique that was used by the Folk Potters of North Carolina. My glazes are

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Breakfast Buffet Thurs - Sat Lunch and Dinner Mon - Sat Sunday Brunch 10am - 4pm

828-246-9881

Open 7am, 6 days • Open Sunday 9am

pg. 36

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67 Branner Ave. • Waynesville, NC Like us on Facebook/WaynesvilleBreakfastHouse

E L E G A N T & U T I L I TA R I A N , H I G H F I R E D S T O N E W A R E

Plottware Pottery

TiNa MaSCiaReLLi

Local plant nurseries, garden flavoring and an entire plant may centers and Haywood’s Hisbe used for medicinal purposes. toric Farmers Market return this Culinary herbs can be grown month with a wonderful selection in a container or planted right in of culinary herbs to delight any your garden space. We recomcook’s palate. mend preparing Herbs have the soil with long been organic matter revered for both to provide plenty their medicinal of drainage. and culinary Keep in mind value. Fortunatethat most herbs ly for home garare native to deners, growing the Mediterraherbs is relatively nean, recreateasy. They thrive ing conditions Basil seedlings sold at in just about similar to that Haywood’s Historic Farmers any type of soil, region will help Market. do not require them flourish. much in the way Think plenty of of added fertilizer, and are rarely sunlight, moderate temperatures bothered by insect or disease and amended soil or potting mix pests. that drains well. Defined as a plant without a In early April, look for herb woody stem that dies back at the plants like rosemary, French end of each growing season, herbs tarragon, cilantro and basil. were once considered a gift of the Mid-month, you will find veggie gods. Elaborate ceremonies and starts like lettuces, kale, chard rituals celebrated their growth, and beets. harvest and use. Today, herbs are For a complete list of Uniquely popular in many home gardens, Local – Farm Fresh partners, visit where their leaves are utilized for BuyHaywood.com.

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HOUSE

rich in color, glossy, and easy to clean. Plottware Pottery is fired in an oxidizing atmosphere which helps create the brightest and richest colors possible. I create pottery in such a way that it is truly an ode to the past, while maintaining a fresh and artful product. Cory’s stoneware is turned on a foot-powered treadle. The foot powered wheels turn back the hands of time, and my inspiration is strictly derived from historical European Art Plottware Pottery Pottery and Sculpture. My misClyde, NC sion is to offer elegant utilitarCall for appointment (828) 550-2516. ian décor into your home, and enrich your daily life through plottwarepottery@gmail.com Plottware Pottery. www.plottwarepottery.com

By

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BREAKFAST

Plant an Herb Garden

April is the perfect time to start an herb garden.

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Waynesville

Plottware Pottery

Elegant and utilitarian, high fired stoneware.

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Cory Houston Plott A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

Clyde, NC (828) 550-2516 plottwarepottery@gmail.com

PlottwarePottery.com

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721 Melissa Owen

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville 828.456.1940 | twigsandleaves.com wT

Find us on Facebook!

pg. 36

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Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 31


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T h e L i t t l e To w n T h a t R o c k s

16th

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Wednesday, April 6 – “Biscuit and Business Breakfast” will feature Murphy Funkhouser Capps, CEO of Kudzu Brands Stand by Your Brand. He will present the Three Keys to Success in Growing a Small Business Brand. Get your reservation in by Monday April 4. Red Rocker Inn, 7:45- 8:45. Full Buffet, $10.

Thursday, May 11 5:30-7pm Sample a Variety of Local Food, Brews, and Wines. Tickets Available May 1st

Saturday, April 2 - Spring Clean Up & Litter Sweep. Sponsored by Black Mountain Beautification Committee and Kiwanis Club of Black Mountain. 9 a.m. - 12 noon. Meet at Town Square. Call 419-9300 Ext. 602 for more details.

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

ExploreBlackMountain.com 800.669.2301

Saturday, April 2 -

Swannanoa Valley Museum hosts the Old Mt. Mitchell Toll Road Caravan. $75 members; $100 nonmembers. Popular 4-wheel drive up to Camp Alice Old Mt. Mitchell Toll Road Caravan with stops for historical presentations. Snacks and lunch provided. Reservations required. Contact: Swannanoa Valley Museum, (828) 669-9566, info@swannanoavalleymuseum.org.

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Breakfast

Thursday, April 7 - Soup Night. 6-7:30 p.m. Black Moun-

tain Primary School. $5 for soup in a pottery bowl made by second grade students.

in the Mountains

Saturday, April 9 - The Black Mountain 9th Annual Green-

601 W. State Street

way Challenge, 5K/10. Start time 2 p.m. at Pisgah Brewery. for more details, please visit www.runsignup.com/BlackMountainGreenwayChallenge.

in Black Mountain

MB

Explore Black Mountain

Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

MV MS MC MR

craft gallery 117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107 32 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8

Greenways Discovery Days

4th Saturday of each month April - August. The Black Mountain Greenways will give five guided tours. Learn about plants, animals, history, and more, while enjoying a walk on the beautiful Greenway Trails. Fun for all ages! No dogs please. Call (828) 989-3269 for more details. Saturday, April 23 - Lake Tomahawk Loop Saturday, May 28 - Flat Creek Greenway Saturday, June 25 - Garden Greenway Saturday, July 23 - River Loop Trail /Oaks rail Saturday, August 27- Riverwalk Trail IF YOU GO

For more details and additional events, please visit Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce, 201 E. State Street, Black Mountain, NC. (828) 669-2300, 1-800-669-2301.

8th Annual ReVIEWING Black Mountain College

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Call for papers and proposals.

By

aLiCe SeBReLL

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center (BMCM+AC) is seeking papers and proposals for the 8th Annual ReVIEWING Black Mountain College conference, hosted and sponsored by BMCM+AC and UNC Asheville on September 23-25, 2016. The call welcomes any theme related to Black Mountain College, with optional special topics: “The Painters of Black Mountain College” and “Democracy and the Liberal Arts.” All disciplines are welcomed, including papers, performances, panels, and workshops. ReVIEWING Black Mountain College is an annual conference that preserves the legacy of Black Mountain College and explores the work of contemporary scholars who bring new insights into the college’s short life. Last year, ReVIEWING Black Mountain College featured more than 50 crossdisciplinary presenters from around the country as well as Ireland, Switzerland, Lithuania, Germany, and Austria. ReVIEWING Black Mountain College invites scholars and artists to build upon the conference’s strong and diverse foundation. The deadline for submissions is June 30, 2016. For information about submitting a proposal, contact Alice Sebrell at (828) 350-8484, or email alice@ blackmountaincollege.org.


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artful living Are You Nuts?

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What’s with the nuts? Why are they so popular? Aren’t they high in fat – which isn’t good for you, right? In 1993, a landmark study demonstrated that the “frequent consumption of nuts in the diet was associated with a reduced risk of ischemic heart disease,” specifically lowering total cholesterol by 12.5% and LDL cholesterol by more than 16% (two markers for cardiovascular risk.) Since then, the judicious use of nuts along with a healthful lifestyle of a plant-based diet, regular exercise, stop smoking, and maintenance of ideal body weight has resulted in a healthy, extended longevity in both men and women. Okay, what’s the trick? Nuts are still high in calories. Correct. Nuts vary from 160 to 185 calories per ounce. Half of those calories are evenly split between protein (with all the essential amino acids) and low-glycemic-index carbohydrate which makes nuts ideal for improving insulin resistance and Type II diabetes control. The other half of the calories in nuts is fat. But 80% of these fats are mono- or poly-unsaturated fats (plant-based omega-3’s), the kind that lower LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and

‘Malaprop’s Reccomendations’ cont’d from pg. 27

M.F.K. Fisher in Provence and the two began a deep friendship, one result of which was this book. The photographs show us one manifestation of Provence that complements Fisher’s words: “I was [a] brash newcomer to [Provence], and yet when I first felt the rhythm of its streets and smelled its ancient smells, and listened at night to the music of its many fountains, I said, ‘Of course,’ for I was once more in my own place, an invader of what was already mine.” Blue Ridge Parkway Vistas by Tim Barnwell. Whether you’re just visiting Asheville or you’ve been here all your life, Blue Ridge Parkway Vistas will show you a familiar place in an entirely new way. Now that the Parkway has reopened and the weather is perfect for long drives along windy roads, take Tim Barnwell’s book to help you situate yourself in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The remarkably easy to use guide gives you the names of the mountains, valleys, rivers, gaps, and towns that you can see along the way. The Stargazer’s Handbook: The Definitive Field Guide to the Night Sky by Giles Sparrow. Once you’ve mapped your surroundings on planet Earth, expand your view to take in a bit of the cosmos with Giles Sparrow’s gorgeous guide to the celestial realms. The book includes breathtaking images of major constellations and heavenly bodies and clear, detailed star charts that will help you find your place in the cosmos. Each entry also includes a bit of science and history, giving contextual information about related mythology, key features, and recommendations for telescopes.

HANNAH RICHARDSON I have a confession: I am decidedly un-self-sufficient when it comes to food. I don’t currently have a vegetable garden or raise chickens or bees. I can’t make my own kombucha and I’ve haven’t canned anything, ever. It might be time to forfeit my Asheville card. That said, before this happens I’m hoping the spring will grant me a new agricultural beginning. While I might not be ready for my rooftop urban farm, here are a few books that make me feel like I can take one step closer to foodie freedom this year. One-Hour Cheese (Claudia Lucero) – Not only does this book include a wide variety of cheeses (rated on an easiest –easy scale), pairings, and fun facts, but it reads as a photographic

Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

By

MaX HaMMONDS, MD

triglycerides. Yes, the fat calories can cause accelerated weight gain if too many nuts are eaten. But a handful of nuts as a snack instead of a high-glycemic-index carbohydrate snack actually results in weight loss and less belly fat. Why? Because nuts are also high in fiber which gives prolonged feelings of fullness and controls further craving. Hmmm. Nuts sound good. What else do they have? Nuts are high in vitamins (B2 and E) and minerals (copper, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and selenium). Not only do they enhance nerve and muscle function, they act in concert with their plant sterols and phytochemicals (antioxidants) to control oxidation and help protect against blood vessel damage and prevent cancer and nerve damage, as well as fight autoimmune diseases. Isn’t there anything bad about nuts? What about added salt? Generally nuts are only lightly salted, less than 140 mg per serving. And yes, there is a down side. Some of the fats in nuts can go rancid if left out at room temperature or in the sun. They should be kept cool after being opened. And remember, eat them with care. Even if its good fat, they are 50% fat and the calories can build up quickly.

step-by-step process for each cheese. Basically, you can’t mess it up. The Backyard Homestead (Carleen Madigan) – This is a great overview of everything you can raise or grow in your backyard and then what the heck to do with it! There are even beautiful step-by-step drawings of everything from brewing your own beer to milking your goat…if you are so brave. Vinegar Socks (Karin Berndl & Nici Hofer) – While I might not run to this book in the throes of a severe migraine, this is a good look at some traditional home remedies for everyday ailments and why they work. Preserving Everything – This book makes me want to build more shelves in my kitchen and move somewhere with long winters. Forget fresh foods, I’m ready for fermented chard and candied grapefruit peels. Finally, for those of you who are leaps and bounds beyond me, I challenge you to this: The Rooftop Growing Guide (Annie Novak). This book has the ins and outs, ups and downs of urban gardening, something Asheville could use a little more of.

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09 One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

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LAUREN HARR Last night, in a breathless hush, my 7-year-old, my husband, and I finished Peter Brown’s debut middle grade book, Robot. The story of Roz, a The Wild Robot robot shipwrecked and accidentally activated on a remote island, it explores themes of nature vs. technology, fear, community, and the nature of love. This didn’t feel like a radically different story; rather, it felt familiar, and its characters—including a bear family, a chatty squirrel, and an orphaned gosling—kept us reading chapter after chapter, pushing the boundaries of bed time. All three of us loved it from beginning to end and were sad to say goodbye to Roz and her island. Brown is also the author of kids’ favorites like Mr. Tiger Goes Wild and Creepy Carrots— one of my 7-year-old’s other favorite books. The Wild Robot comes out on April 5.

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Tuesday, April 5

Saturday, April 9

April 15-17

April 22-24

Arroyo & Levy: April Fools!

Thao Nguyen

Charming Disaster

Asheville Orchid Festival

Benefit for The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design

Fantasy, pop-surrealism, and skate art by Fian Arroyo. Skate decks, wild blotter art collages, original drawings and screen prints by Joshua Marc Levy. Opening at Push Skate Shop & Gallery at 7 p.m. 25 Patton Avenue, Asheville. (828) 225-5509, pushtoyproject.com

Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, and Merrill Garbus (tUnE-yArDs). Parody of The New York Times’ recent Justin Bieber/Diplo/Skrillex video piece. With Saintseneca. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com

Friday, April 1

April 5-8

Feet Don’t Fail Me Now!

Spring Flower Festival

Genre-hopping music and percussive dance highlighted by taps, shuffles and a human beat-box. 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Regular $42; Student $37; Child $20; Student Rush day-of-the-show $10. (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Sunday, April 3

La Terza Classe

Italian bluegrass. 7:30 p.m. $10 advance; $12 door. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Monday, April 4

Take Two Jazz

With Dr. Bill Bares and Richard Schulman. $12; $6 students with ID. 7:30 p.m. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Create flowers using recycled materials. $5 admission; free for members. Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main Street, Hendersonville. (828) 697-8333, www.handsonwnc.org.

April 5, 12 & 19

Get Growing

Classes cover all aspects of organic gardening: planning, planting, production, and pests. Held at Fifth Season Asheville Market, 4 South Tunnel Road, in Asheville. $20 per class. (828) 772-5846, organicgrowersschool.org.

Murder ballads and more. 6-8 p.m. at Asheville’s French Broad Brewing Co. Free. 101 Fairview Rd., Asheville. (828) 277-0222, frenchbroadbrewery.com.

Saturday, April 9

Tesla Quartet

7 p.m. at The Asheville Masonic Temple. $12 adv; $15 door; $10 students. Purchase at freerangeavltq.eventbrite. com. Part of Free Range Asheville. Visit www.freerangeavl.org

Saturday, April 9

Odyssey Co-op Gallery

Celebrating the ceramic art of Mary Jimenez, Melanie Dyel, and Libba Tracy and other gallery members. Food, music, and artists’ demonstrations. Odyssey Co-op Gallery, 238 Clingman Ave. (828) 285-9700, www. odysseyceramicarts.com

Sunday, April 10

The Blue Ridge Brass

April 7-10 Special guest artist, Yumiko Yoshioka. Dance workshops and performances. Be Be Theatre, 20 Commerce St., downtown Asheville. (828) 254-2621.

Benefit concert for the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games. Bagpipe corps and other musical guests. $20. 4-7 p.m. Highland Brewing Company 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Asheville. (828) 299-3370, highlandbrewing.com,

Friday, April 8

Thursday, April 14

Harpeth Rising

Adult Spelling Bee

Asheville Butoh Festival

Excitingly unique folk music by Allfemale group. 9 p.m. $15 adv; $18 at the door. ISIS Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road. (828) 5752737, www.isisasheville.com.

David Ostergaard is the emcee. Silly and fun! Drag queen entertainment during intermission. The Millroom, 66 Ashland Ave. in downtown Asheville. Visit www.ashevillemillroom.com

Friday, April 8

Thursday April 14

The Cactus Blossoms

Iain Matthews

Roots music duo. 8 p.m. $12 adv; $15 door. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. (828) 270-7747, www.TheAltamont.com.

April 8 -May 14

WNC Design Guide Show

Wood, ceramics, glass, painting, basketry and textiles. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special events include an Artists’ Talk on Saturday April 30 at 3 p.m. Closing reception with the artists on May 12 from 6-8 p.m. The Studios at Flat Rock, 2702A Greenville Highway. (828) 698-7000, studiosflatrock.com

Saturday, April 9

Saturday, April 16

Secret B-Sides

One of Asheville’s favorite soul bands. Slo_Gold, vinyl release party from 7-7:45 p.m. Secret B-Sides 7:45-9 p.m. Free. All ages. Highland Brewing Company, 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Asheville. Call (828) 299-3370, or visit www.highlandbrewing.com.

Wednesday April 20

Tea & Flowers & Costumes

Piper Jones Band

Celtic music. 9 p.m. Jack of the Wood, 95 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 252-5445, jackofthewood.com.

April 15 & 16

Dopapod

Boston-born progressive quartet. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 785-1701, newmountainavl.com

Featuring beautiful, affordable works in many media. 4-7 p.m. on Friday, April 22 and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 23 in S. Tucker Cooke Gallery, in UNC Asheville’s Owen Hall. Info: art.unca.edu or (828) 251-6559.

Saturday, April 23

The Thirteenth Juror

Golden Threads

Shindig on the Green Mural, created by Doreyl Ammons Cain, to be unveiled at 6 p.m. at Pack’s Tavern. The mural will be installed on an outside wall of Packs Tavern in downtown Asheville, within yards of Shindig’s Bascom Lamar Lunsford Stage.

Thursday, April 21

Sound Effects

April 21-23

Friday, April 15

Spring Student Art Sale

Thursday, April 21

The Elegant Statement

Exhibition features 27 book artists and letterpress printers. Asheville BookWorks, 428 1/2 Haywood Road, Asheville. For details, call (828) 255-8444, or visit ashevillebookworks.com

April 22-23

Sidney Lanier Poetry Competition Award Ceremony and Reception

through April 15

Renowned folkie. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets and show times call (828) 2707747 or visit www.TheAltamont.com

Save 10% on all ceramic art at Grovewood Gallery. Free raffle. Artist demonstration by Brent Skidmore. April 22 & 23 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 24 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Adjacent to The Omni Grove Park Inn in North Asheville. (828) 253-7651, grovewood.com.

Author and wedding folklorist Cornelia Powell hosts a celebration of the beauty and romance of weddings. Start the day with a delicious English-inspired Morning Tea then tour Biltmore’s two costume exhibitions. For more information or to register, contact Cornelia Powell at cornelia@corneliapowell. com, and visit CorneliaPowell.com.

4th annual concert to benefit Asheville Music School. 6-9 p.m. Teachers and students cover The Beatles’ Abbey Road album. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. (828) 575-2737, isisasheville.com.

Asheville Music School Summer Camps

Audition day for all ages and skill levels. Pop, rock, jazz. 126 College St., Asheville. More details at www.ashevillemusicschool.org

Hundreds of orchids on display. Repotting clinic, guided tours and a variety of lectures, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. $5 per person at the door. Held at The North Carolina Arboretum. Full schedule and list of speakers at www.wncos.org.

Yes Fest the Second!

Reasonably Priced Babies, No Regets, Blacklist Improv, and The OxyMorons! At Magnetic 375 (375 Depot Street in the River Arts District). Thursday-Saturday, at 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $15 online; $18 at the door. Info: (828) 239-9250. Tickets: www.themagnetictheatre.org.

Friday, April 22

Jazz is Chamber Music

Byron Hedgepeth, vibes; Mike Holstein, bass; Justin Watt, percussion. 7:30 p.m. $15 in advance; $20 day of; $5 student. Purchase tickets at www. panharmonia.org/shop. Concert held at All Souls Parish Hall, 9 Swan Street, Asheville. Call (828) 254-7123.

Keith Flynn, founder and editor of Asheville Poetry Review, will host the event. Reception held at the Lanier Library. Free. For details, visit www. lanierlib.org, or call (828) 859-9535.

Tuesday, April 26 West Asheville-based journalist Nelda Holder analyzes the grand jury hearing for the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. 7 p.m. Malaprop’s, 55 Haywood Street.

Friday, April 29

The Risograph Museum

Opening reception from 5-7:30 p.m.

A celebration of the Risograph, a stencil-based digital press. On display

through June 30, 2016. Asheville BookWorks, 428 1/2 Haywood Road, Asheville. ashevillebookworks.com

Saturday, April 30

Writing The Novel

Brenda McClain leads this class, for any level writer. Learn characterization, dialogue, plot, and sense of place. 10-4 p.m. $75. The Writers’ Workshop, 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville. (828) 254-8111, www.twwoa.org.

Sunday, May 1

Appalachian Pastel Society

Member Show opening reception, 10 a.m. On display through May 13, 2016. Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Rd., Mills River, NC. Visit appalachianpastelsociety.org.

Sunday, May 1

Two Sisters Farmstead School

Open House. Designed to teach natural sciences, homesteading, life skills, sustainability, and agriculture to children and families. Summer camps,

APRIL EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 34 April 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 8


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Workshops at 310 ART

Classes, Workshops, Private Instruction Oils & Acrylics.

April 2 & 3 – Encaustic 2-Day Comprehensive. Team-taught class.

New! Portrait Drawing with Nicholas Raynolds. Wednesdays, starting April 1.

April 7 – Golden Effects with Beer and Watercolor, Wine and More. A unique Approach!

Drawing & Painting. Monday & Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

April 9 – Experimental Watercolor with Nadine Charlsen.

Children’s Art with Alisa. Tuesday & Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

April 16 & 17 – Bind Your Beeswax with Erin Keane.

Studio Painting, Thursdays 6-9 p.m. Landscape, Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Addison Farms Vineyard Plein-Air Painting, May 13-15, 2016. Includes catered lunch, wine tasting. Leceister, NC.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

JMK Studio 236, Riverview Station 191 Lyman, Asheville (828) 225-5000, JohnMacKah.com

Hendersonville Chamber Music April 10 – The Poinsett Piano Trio

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

www.hendersonvillechambermusic.org

Classic Wineseller

Dragin

by Michael Cole

4th Annual Birdhouse Bash

Weaverville Art Safari

Affordable part-time and weekend classes in film production for all experience levels. Asheville School of Film, 45 S. French Broad Ave., Ste 120, Asheville. 1-844-AVL-FILM (285-3456), www. ashevilleschooloffilm.com.

Safe Step Walk-In Tub

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Explore Weaverville’s eclectic art scene with a self-guided tour of 53 local artists’ studios. Art sales, demonstrations, and door prizes offered. Visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com for details and map.

Alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by the Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than 4 inch step-in. Wide door. Antislip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 800-886-8956 for $750 Off.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258.

Advertising That Works!

You need to know if your advertising is paying off. Learn all about branding. Discover how to position yourself to succeed. Call Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 or email rick@rapidrivermagazine.com.

Live music Friday and Saturday nights from 7-10 p.m. Retail: Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 p.m. Restaurant: Wednesday-Saturday 4-9 p.m. serving small plates, charcuterie, tapas, desserts. Classic Wineseller, 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Learn Filmmaking

Deadline: Thursday, May 5 Use your imagination to make or decorate a birdhouse! Bring completed birdhouses to 2nd Blessing Thrift Store, 39 Conley St., Waynesville between 10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Birdhouses will be part of a Silent Auction at the Whole Bloomin” Thing Festival. Call (828) 476-4231 or Open Door Garden Manager (828) 734-1570 for questions or more information.

May 7-8

April 24 – The Rutherford Chamber Consort Concerts begin at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. $20 tickets at the door on the day of performance.

Call for Artists Deadline: May 2, 2016 Applications are available for the 57th annual Art on Main fine art and fine craft festival in downtown Hendersonville. Festival will be held Saturday and Sunday, October 1 and 2 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $3,000 in cash prizes will be awarded. For details, email the Arts Council of Henderson County at acofhc@bellsouth.net, call (828) 693-8504, or visit www.acofhc.org.

April 30 – Block Printing Small Work on Paper and Fabric with Dona Barnett. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio 191 Lyman St., Asheville. (828) 776-2716, gallery@310art.com www.310art.com

Fusion Painting, May 22-28. Crossover techniques, acrylics & oils. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC. folkschool.org

a half-day pre-K program, science classes for homeschoolers, large group tours and lessons, scouting merit badges and drop-in childcare. Two Sisters Farmstead School, 218 Morgan Cove Rd. Candler. Call (828) 707-4236, or visit www. twosistersfarmstead.org

April 23 – Faux Finishes for Painters.

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain?

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-408-9017.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2016 35


Find It Here

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AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Greening Up the Mountains www.greeningupthemountains.com

Anthony Guidone tguidone@gmail.com

Hearn’s Bike Shop (828) 253-4800 www.facebook.com

ArtFields® www.ArtFieldsSC.org Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Jane Molinelli www.jmolinelliart.com Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com Johnnie Stanfield www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com LEAF www.theleaf.org

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com

Blue Bird Designs www.bluebirddesigns.com

Lorelle Bacon www.lorellebacon.com

Blue Dream Curry House www.bluedreamcurry.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Burr Studio www.facebook.com/burrstudionc Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Mary E. Decker www.chartreusemoose.com Matt Tommey www.matttommey.com Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Case Garden Designs (828) 697-1300

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Champa Asian Cuisine and Sushi Bar www.champanc.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Elizabeth Henderson www.Elizabethhendersonartist.com Erin Keane www.ErinKeane.com Faerie And Earth Festival www.enchantedwalkabouts.com facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com French Broad River Fest www.FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Geezer Gallery www.ashevillearts.com

Connect to Arts & Culture! RapidRiverMagazine.com

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The Value of Arts Education to Workforce Development and the Economy. The 6th Annual Creative Sector Summit, takes place: Friday, April 8 at the Diana Wortham Theater from 9 a.m. to 12 noon; at the Asheville Area Arts Museum from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. (registration required); and Saturday, April 9 from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Asheville Area Arts Museum (Free). While there are many great programs that serve the needs of small arts based businesses and artists, there is not yet a comprehensive, collaborative response in our community that provides dedicated, tailored, and strategically delivered workforce development to ensure the future success of Buncombe County’s cultural workers. For more information, the full schedule, and to register, please visit www.ashevillearts.com.

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

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Jared presents viewers with interpretations of Native Americans, celebrities and others. Movies and comic books are influential to his art, and he utilizes light, shadow and the manipulation of color to make powerful images. Jared Schwartz was born in Columbus, OH. Though untrained, he grew up in a family of artTextiles and other works by ists and poets who loved Haywood county artists are on and appreciated the visual display at HART and The Strand. arts. Schwartz moved to Maggie Valley, North Carolina over two years ago and found the peace and beauty of the mountains to be an ideal creative environment. For more information about these and other exhibits, visit HaywoodArts.org.

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Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com

Zapow www.zapow.com

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Waynesville Breakfast House #WaynesvilleBreakfastHouse

WNCAP www.wncapgala.org

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‘Haywood Arts’ cont’d from pg. 30

Jane Molinelli, T.E. Siewert, Johnnie Stanfield, Mary E. Decker, Waynesville Breakfast House, Blue Dream Curry House, Cory Plott, and Case Garden Supply.

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

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WNCAP and Rapid River Magazine wish to thank the following advertisers for their generous support of Dining Out For Life®, and their continuing efforts to find a cure for AIDS.

Plottware Pottery www.plottwarepottery.com

Seven Sisters Gallery www.sevensistersgallery.com

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On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

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Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps 310 ART at Riverview Station www.310art.com

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Artists at Work in Brevard, NC

ART Works, a new working studio/ gallery of fine art at 27 S. Broad Street in Brevard, is in a beautiful light-filled space in the restored historic Aethelwold Hotel building.

health facility; her pencil drawings of patients each day fostered an expressive use of line. She was captivated by pastels through classes and workshops with Aline Ordman and Margaret Dyer. Kidwell says, “For me pastel is the perfect dance between painting and drawing… Deborah Kidwell, originator of the idea color and line” She began teaching pastels in of the working studio/gallery in Brevard, 2007. Since coming to Brevard, she volungrew up in Boston in a family of artists. As a teered teaching introductory pastel classes at child, she was greatly influenced by American Silvermont Senior Opportunity Center, where Impressionism of the Boston School Tradition she met a new friend, artist Lee Abell. through visits to art museums and galleries Co-Owner M. Lee Abell, a Florida native, in the area. Her exposure to Impressionism, pursued a successful career as a residential real coupled with love of the outdoors gained in estate appraiser for the firm she co-owned her mother’s gardens and there. When her career no childhood summers in Maine, longer challenged her, she inspire her pastel paintings and her husband, David, notable for tender renderleft Florida in an antique ings of birds and strong quiet Airstream to discover the mountain scenes. back roads and park lands of Kidwell took classes at DeAmerica. During her travels, Cordova Museum School and Abell studied watercolor with travelled to Europe as an art a resident artist in Yosemite student, then completed her National Park, and studio BFA in painting at University and plein air pastel at the of New Hampshire in 1977. A Whidbey Island Fine Art pivotal experience after college Studio in Washington State, was as a yearlong Artist in where she learned to capture Vireo, pastel painting by Residence at a geriatric mental natural beauty on canvas. Deborah Kidwell.

‘310 Art’ cont’d from pg. 11

evolved just like the rest of the district, step by step and with community effort, dedication and enthusiasm of all the participants. We always welcome new aspiring artists, and just this year have welcomed many new learners to our program. We are always changing the art out and bringing in new work. This April we introduce a new exhibition, “Approach with Perception”. We invite our visitors to enter the doors with eyes wide open to see new things and experience what we see.

RRM: Tell us a little about some of the various types of art that can be found at 310 Art. FM: Almost all commercial galleries are intent

on sales, and often that overriding focus can cramp the styles of dedicated artists who exhibit. So, while we definitely want to sell our art, the primary intention is to have “A Place for Artists.” This means the artists are encouraged to follow their own hearts and inspiration, to experiment and let their inner voices take them on a journey of expression without the concern of whether something will sell to a particular market. We are primarily a contemporary gallery, with very new and fresh abstract work, new methods with detailed realism, landscapes created in cutting edge experimental new ways and explorations in new materials such as encaustic. I can attest to the fact when artists are given free rein, they create their best and most authentic work, so relieving them of the pressure to pro-

duce for a market allows this to happen. We also are involved in community art projects all the time. Two of us, 310 resident artists Nadine Charlsen and I are co-curators for a show this April at the Asheville Area Arts Council. “An Artful Life” is part of the council’s Point of View – Artists Curate Artists Program. Sponsored by an arts program of the Council on Aging, this show features lifelong master level artists. The reception is Friday, April 15 from 5-8 p.m. We are celebrating our own 10th anniversary with events during April. On Saturday, April 9 we are having a “Demo Day.” Many of our artists will be in the studios demonstrating their methods. On Friday, April 29 we will have a 310th Anniversary party from 4-7 p.m. Fleta Monaghan is founder and director of 310 ART. The gallery is open Monday Saturday 11-5, and classes are held at times scheduled. For more details, visit 310art. com, fletamonaghan.com

After this inspiring trip, the Abells chose Brevard, NC to call home. Abell has continued her art education with nationally awarded artists, added oil painting to her repertoire, and has shown her art in regional galleries and exhibitions. She still travels and is inspired by the Wintergreen Afternoon, pastel Back Alley - Brevard, oil painting by outdoors. Most painting by Lee Abell. Virginia Pendergrass. recently, she backpacked 500 miles from the south of France to Southeast and Paint the Parks national shows, northwest Spain through varied landscapes. as well as regional shows; her paintings have She looks forward to sharing with other talbeen recognized by many awards. ented and enthusiastic artists in ART Works. As well as offering gallery sales, Kidwell Virginia Pendergrass, a Brevard resident and Abell look forward to ART Works being a for 14 years, shares their vision for this space working studio. Kidwell, Abell or Pendergrass in downtown Brevard, where her art will also will be making art in the studio/gallery on a be featured. Pendergrass is a contemporary regular basis. Part of the decor of the studio/ oil painter whose works have been exhibited gallery is all the paraphernalia needed by the in the American Impressionist Society, Oil continued on page 39 Painters of America, Women Painters of the

‘Matt Tommey’ cont’d from page 16

baskets. As I begin to master those forms, my I is begin to look deeper into nature for inspiration, no longer simply as a source for my weaving materials. I’ve always said that for me, every basket begins with a walk in the woods. Initially that walk was centered around sourcing locally available materials for my baskets. As my artistic voice matured, I began to use those walks as sources of inspiration for new sculptural forms. Every time I would see a nest, a pod or a river rock nestled in the woods I would see baskets. I just took all the limits off of what baskets were traditionally supposed to be — functional containers — and began to see it as a language for expression through which anything was possible.

RRM: Tell us a bit about your process and what environment you like to work in. MT: Although much of my in-

Web Exclusive Read the full length version of the interview with Fleta Monaghan at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

parts of my creative process has been my interaction with my clients. Nowadays, I have the opportunity to visit with my clients in their homes, discuss our collaborative vision for their space and even Harvest materials from their property. This connection between the land, my clients and my work is particularly meaningful for everyone involved as it allows me the privilege of creating work that is unique to the client and they are home. It really is a privilege to be trusted by interior designers, architects and clients to create pieces that reinforce I rustic yet elegant aesthetic in the home.

Tommey’s baskets all begin with a walk in the woods.

spiration comes from the natural world. I create my work in my studio located in Asheville is River Arts District. I am really blessed to have a large studio space and gallery where I can create, display my work and interact with my clients in a meaningful way. Over the years, one of the most special

Matt Tommey matttommey@gmail.com (404) 538-5173 www.MattTommey.com

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Just Follow The Rabbit!

Just Follow The Rabbit! is the theme for the 2016 Faerie And Earth (F.A.E.) Festival. The Rabbit is your guide to a magical and enchanting experience awaiting you during the weekend of May 21 & 22 at the Highland Lake Cove Retreat & Learning Center on 217 Rhett Drive in Flat Rock, NC. The Rabbit will be posted on trees and as our directional signs to lead you to our event. Excess proceeds from the F.A.E. Festival will benefit The Center for Honey Bee Research located in Asheville. On Friday, May 20, we are offering four two-hour workshops involving Paneurnythmy Sacred Dance with June Sananda Hughes; Annie Martin sharing Mosses of the Mountains; Lady Cerelli teaching about our relationship with the honey bees; and Diomiro D’Agostina providing insights about the ever changing Fairy and Human Relationships. The cost of each workshop will be $20 per session, payable upon arrival. These programs will be taking place in the Sanctuary in the Pines, located on the corner of the festival grounds. Reservations can be made through our Facebook page. We are honored to have Rev. Faerie Elaine Silver providing a Faerie Concert on Friday, May 20 in the Sanctuary in the Pines, located at 34 Lake Cove Road (off Rhett Drive) in Flat Rock at 7:30 p.m. A 7 p.m. artist’s reception will take place in the lower level of the Sanctuary. The cost for this musical performance is the same as the entry cost to the Faerie And Earth Festival: $15/adult; $10/seniors (55+); $5/child (5-15). All adults and seniors will receive a free CD from the Faerie Elaine Silver Music collection, and a special $5 off discount ticket for entry into the F.A.E. Festival for either or both days. Throughout the F.A.E. weekend we will experience and see stilt walkers, mermaids, dinosaurs (Dakota & Friends), mother nature, dryads, fairies, Bubble Masters, 44 vendors, readers, musicians, magicians, storytell-

By JOHN

SpRiNgeR

Come and play with us!

ers, presenters, Fairy Tour Guides, dragons, puppeteers, fairy houses, Faerie Folk School, Girl Scouts (Magical Fairy Adventure Patch), snakes and critters (Earthshine Nature), healthy foods, dancers, plays, and our Silent Auction which will benefit The Center for Honey Bee Research. Come and play with us! This Faerie And Earth Festival has been designed to bring people together representing the many realms of Faerie and Earth in their services, readings, products, crafts, energy, performances, talents, presentations, and presence in providing a joyous and fun celebration for the families and children of Western North Carolina and beyond. This will be an amazing immersion experience for all.

IF YOU The 2016 Faerie And Earth Festival will GO be held May 20-22 at the Highland Lake

Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock, NC. Ticekts are $15/adult; $10/seniors (55+); $5/ child (5-15). For more details, please visit www. facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival.

Enchanted Living Forest School

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Are you ready to see and feel the world of nature through a new set of eyes and heart?

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The E.L.F. (Enchanted Living Forest) Schools have been designed to bring people together who seek to understand and to communicate with the many realms of earth including Nature Spirits, Faeries, Devas, Elementals. Connect with Nature through hands-on exercises with flowers, trees, wind, water, weather, soil, animals, and other natural beings. Awaken your sacred heart to hear the voices, feel the energy and approach everything in nature with love. Enchanted Living Forest School takes place April 29, 30 & May 1, 2016 at Terra Nova. Limited to 15 attendees. Program Options

range from $88 to $166. Repeat attendees, please contact John directly to receive a reduced rate ($77) for attending the 2016 ELF School Program. Program will provide hands-on exercises, insights, walkabouts, arts, creative activities, sensory exercises, photographic sharings, day & night time meditations, stories, bubble blowing, energy movements, wing fluffing, crafts and much more. Full program schedule is available upon request. IF YOU For more information, please go to GO www.enchantedwalkabouts.com.

Terra Nova Center, Cedar Mountain, NC, near Brevard & Flat Rock, NC. Visit www. terranovacenter.com.


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fun and adventure 19th Annual French Broad River Festival

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Did you know that The French Broad River is the third oldest river in the world? Have you ever floated down Section 9? In my experience there are not many better ways to get away from the fast pace of modern life and to see this beautiful part of the world that we live in the way the Cherokees saw it, who actually called this section of the river Tahkeyostee (“where they race”). After several hours on the river, you arrive in the little town of Hot Springs, where throughout the 19th century a stream of wealthy visitors came via railroad to “take the waters” and enjoy the luxury hotels built adjacent to the thermal springs, along the banks of the French Broad. Today the Appalachian Trail runs right down Main St., and the surrounding area offers abundant recreational opportunities including whitewater rafting, kayaking, hiking, fishing and mountain biking.

‘Eliza Gilkyson’ cont’d from page 27

hard to have it released as a single but the record company wouldn’t go for it. I think it could have been a hit. The album it’s on, Kings Record Shop, is so great, and (guitarist) Steuart Smith did some amazing work on that record. I’ve played it live with her a few times. Roseanne is a dear friend and I owe her a lot.

RRM: Anything else you’d like to add? I

really appreciate your time.

EG: I think that about does it. It’s been great. Take care of that sore throat and please do come up at the show and say hello! IF YOU Eliza Gilkyson, Wednesday April GO 13. Doors 7 p.m.; Show 7:30 p.m.

All ages. $17 adv.; $20 d.o.s.; $30 VIP (guaranteed seating in 1st three rows!). The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets call (828) 2707747 or visit www.TheAltamont.com

19 years ago Chris Donochod and Mark Mickey, while paddling down Section 9, thought it would be fun to “race” down with friends and then have a party at the takeout in Hot Springs with any proceeds from the party going to the non-profit American Whitewater. Chris and Mark came from different backgrounds, but these guys had become fast friends exploring all the whitewater this area has to offer. With the help of a few friends, the 1st French Broad River Festival took place on a beautiful Saturday in May of 1998. Fast forward to 2016 and as spring approaches you’re liable to see these same guys squeezing time from their busy schedules to get together and iron out the details of the “River Festival,” which has grown to a weekend outdoor music festival encompassing the entire Hot Springs Campground. In addition to a weekend of music on multiple stages and the whitewater raft race, there is now a mountain bike race, a kid’s village (with inflatables), kid’s bike race, parade, yoga sessions, trapeze artists, fire jugglers, and multiple arts, outdoor and food vendors, and a river cleanup with NOC, Riverlink and Sierra Nevada. In addition, more than $200,000 has been donated to charities including American Whitewater, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of WNC, Caring for Chil-

The Lyrid Meteors

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The Lyrids are predicted to reach a peak of about twenty meteors per hour on Friday, April 22. Lyrids are likely to be spotted on the mornings of April 21, 22 and 23, and are best observed between midnight and dawn from a clear, dark location with a good horizon. Look to the northeast to find the meteors appearing to radiate out of the constellation of Lyra the harp. A full moon occurs at almost the same time. So, the light of the moon will interfere with observations of these meteors in the predawn hours of the night.

dren, Homeward Bound, Hope for Holt, Manna Food Bank, Hot Springs Community Learning Center, and others. In an area of multiple outdoor music festivals, there are many reasons the French Broad River Festival have thrived while retaining their “grassroots” feel: Relative to other weekend music festivals this festival is affordable, and isn’t organized by full-time promoters with a goal of big profits. The festival takes place at the Hot Springs Campground & Spa in historic Hot Springs, NC. It is in an incredible setting by the French Broad River, in fact right where it intersects with the Appalachian Trail. Where else could you have the choice to go whitewater rafting, mountain biking, hiking on the AT, swimming, fishing, or spending quality time with your family and then enjoy a relaxing soak by the river and see great music? Follow #FBRF IF YOU French Broad River Festival, GO Friday, April 29. Gates open at

8 a.m. Tickets include camping, music, registration fees for whitewater and biking events (you must have your own boat/bike). Ticket prices: $100 before 4/20/16; $110 at the gate (if available). Children under 12 get in free. Parking $50 inside festival, or park free just outside. Reserve a camp site by calling the Hot Springs Campground & Resort at (828) 622-7676. For more details, email frenchbroadfest@gmail. com, call (828) 230-4054, or visit www. FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com.

‘Brevard’ cont’d from page 37

working artist. They welcome residents and visitors in our local community who are curious about how an artist goes about creating a work of art. Brew-yourown coffee will be available, so grab a tasty pastry from the Bracken Bakery across the street and enjoy both completed gallery art and works in progress. Kidwell and Abell also plan to support other regional artists by offering them month-long guest exhibits and demonstration opportunities. Both aspiring and working artists are invited to participate in classes in various mediums offered throughout the year. IF YOU ART Works Brevard Ribbon GO cutting and reception takes place

Friday, April 8 from 4-6 p.m. For more information, call (828) 553-1063, email artworksbrevardnc@gmail.com, or visit www.artworksbrevardnc.com.

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April 2016 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
April 2016 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Matt Tommey..p16. Inside: 310 Art Anniversary..p10; Weaverville Art Safari..p9; Dining Out for Life..p22; French Broad River F...

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