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The Trio Cavatina PG 6 Jonas Gerard PG 11 Spring Festivals & Studio Tours PG 4 Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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What to Do Guide™

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spring festivals

Spring is a celebration of renewal and revitalization. Festivals & tours provide a great opportunity to reconnect with friends, relatives and neighbors.

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Spring Festivals & Studio Tours Greening Up the Mountains Festival Saturday, April 25 – Downtown Sylva. . . .PG 13

French Broad River Festival

May 1-3 – Outdoor family music festival. Hot Springs, NC.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG 13

Weaverville Art Safari

May 2 & 3 – Weaverville Barnardsville, and surrounding areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG 12

Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival

April 25, 2015 • 10am—4pm

Come Spend the day with us...

River Arts District Studio Stroll May 9 & 10 – Studio Stroll and Art Sale. .PG 13

☀ Food, Fun, Free Festival ☀ Over 100 vendors ☀ 2 Stages of Music • Kids Activities

Downtown Sylva, NC greeningupthemountains.com 828-586-2719

Saturday, May 9 – Waynesville. . . . . . . . . .PG 24

Faerie And Earth Festival (FAE)

May 16 & 17 – Explore magical realms! Highland Lake Cove, Flat Rock. . . . . . . . .PG 13

Toe River Arts Tour

June 5-7 – Arts and crafts in Mitchell and Yancey Counties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PG 13

#1 Music Festival #1 #1 Festival For Kids #1 #1 Festival For Camping

At beautiful Lake Eden

ASHEVILLE | BLACK MTN, NC

SAVE THE FALL DATES: OCT. 15-18

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CHILDREN 10 YRS UNDER - FREE! DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR 10-17 YRS


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Eight

APRIL 2015

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographer: Amber Combs Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Scott Bunn, Cortina Caldwell, Chris Chromey, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Sarah Jones Decker, Amy Downs, Steven Forbes-deSoule, Amy Ammons Garza, Lucia Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Katie Kasben, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Jake Lanier, Peter Loewer, Tina Masciarelli, Ashley Van Matre, Jane Molinelli, Michael J. Morel, Lauren Patton, Dennis Ray, Zan Rose, Shelley Schenker, Erin Scholze, John Springer, David Craig Starkey, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Dan Weiser, Robert Wiley, J. & R. Woods, Anna Lee Zanetti.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, April 2015, Vol. 18 No. 8

On the Cover:

Cathedral of Light, oil painting by Judith Rentner, a member of the Asheville Gallery of Art. PAGE 23

6 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

Asheville Chamber Music . . . . . . . . 6 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 7 ACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Magnetic Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

9 Fine Art

New stories are added each month!

ONLY ONLINE

Knee Deep – in the Stream Written by Ronya Banks

Eat That Okra; It’s Good For You Written by Tom Davis

Amos’s Wild Second Thought

John Mac Kah at Addison Farms . . . 9 Virginia Pendergrass . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Richard C. Baker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Zapow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Deborah Squier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Joyce Schlapkohl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 23

12 Festivals & Tours Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The Faery And Earth Festival . . . . 13 Greening Up the Mountains . . . . . 13 River Arts Studio Stroll . . . . . . . . . 13 Whole Bloomin’ Thing Festival. . . 24

14 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .14

18 Columns Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 18 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 18 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 30 Book Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 37 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 37

28 Music

Written by Anne Raustol

Eating Guinea Pig in Peru Written by Jonathan Look

Mother Theresa

Written by Michael Landolfi

Hiking the PCT - It’s Come Time to Talk the Big “E” (as in equipment) Written by John Swart

Have Peach, Will Churn Written by Ashley English

WELCOME ABOARD! This month we welcome another regular contributor to the Short Stories section. Ronya Banks is the founder of and lead Mindfulness Meditation teacher at the Asheville Insight Meditation Community.

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District . . . . . . . . PGS 10-11 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . PGS 19-21 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 24-26 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 41 Points North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 42

The Kissing Booth, print by April Murphy. Custom frame by BlackBird Frame & Art.

BlackBird Frame & Art was awarded First Place in the Professional Picture Framers Association’s Carolinas Chapter Print Competition. Reflexology has many benefits to enhance the body in various ways. Written by Linda Neff.

Book Reviews by Marcianne Miller Shroom: Mind Bendingly Good Recipes for Cultivated and Wild Mushrooms, written by Becky Selengut. The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt, written by Kara Cooney.

Sound Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 LEAF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

33 Dining Guide Modesto: Wood, Fire, Kitchen . . . 33 Dining Out For Life® . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

38 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 39 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 39 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 39 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 39 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 39

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 5


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chamber music concerts ASHEVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC PRESENTS

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The Trio Cavatina

The final concert of the 62nd Asheville Chamber Music Series will feature the Trio Cavatina. “This concert brings to an end a remarkable season for the Asheville Chamber Music Series,” says President, Polly Feitzinger. “We not only returned to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation our series home, we held a benefit concert for the UU’s Welcome Project, which will greatly enhance our performance opportunities in the coming years. “In addition, the Asheville Chamber Music Series continues to bring world-renowned artists to Asheville and had the honor to hold the opening musical event in the Asheville Amadeus Festival, the Brentano String Quartet with violist, Hsin-Yun Huang, presented in conjunction with the Asheville Symphony Orchestra in March. It has been quite a year!” Trio Cavatina has rapidly emerged as one of today’s outstanding chamber ensembles. As the winner of the 2009 Naumburg International Chamber Music Competition, Trio Cavatina made its Carnegie Hall debut in 2010 with scintillating performances of two monumental Beethoven Trios, Leon Kirchner’s second trio, and the world premier performance of Faces of Guernica written for them by Richard Danielpour.

mARiLyNNe heRBeRT

For more than a half a century the Asheville Chamber Music Series has taken it’s place as a valued cultural resource in Asheville, bringing world-renowned chamber artists to the city. As one of the nation’s oldest continuously performing chamber music organizations, it has been recognized for its outstanding programs and for its unique education component through a collaboration with the strings program of the Asheville Buncombe Schools and our other cultural partners in the community, including the Asheville Young Musicians Club.

They made their Philadelphia debut as one of the youngest ensembles to perform in the prestigious Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert series. Violinist Harumi Rhodes, pianist Ieva Jokubaviciute, and cellist Priscilla Lee formed Trio Cavatina in 2005 at the renowned Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont. Deeply rooted in Violinist Harumi Rhodes, pianist Ieva a strong sense of shared Jokubaviciute, and cellist Priscilla musical values, Trio CavaLee are Trio Cavatina. tina has rapidly emerged as one of today’s outstanding chamber ensembles whose committed music-making prompted Harris Goldsmith to describe the trio, in his IF YOU Trio Cavatina in concert, Friday, April 2008 Musical America article, as offering GO 10 at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist ‘potent, intense interpretations’. Congregation in Asheville at the corner

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES Schumann: Etuden in kanonischer Form, Op. 56 (selections) Schumann: Piano trio in D minor, Op. 63 Schubert: Piano Trio in B-flat, D. 898

of Edwin Place and Charlotte Street. Individual tickets are $38 and are available at the door, first come first served. Youth under 25 admitted free. For more information please visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org, call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427, or email support@ ashevillechambermusic.org.

AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

Czech Mates & Quintessence

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AmiciMusic is an award-winning chamber music organization dedicated to performing the highest quality music in intimate spaces and nontraditional venues.

CZECH MATES A program of great piano trios by the two master Czech composers, Bedrich Smetana and Anton Dvorak. The performers for “Czech Mates” are Mary Irwin, violin; Franklin Keel, cello; and Daniel Weiser, piano and Artistic Director. Saturday, April 4 at 11 a.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall. Concert is $15 and brunch is available for $7-11. (828) 575-2737. Saturday, April 4 at 7:30 p.m. House Concert in Hendersonville. Fabulous home with panoramic views, great acoustics, incredible food, and a beautiful nine-foot Knabe grand piano from 1892. Reservations required and seating is limited. To purchase seats, visit amicimusic. org or call Dan at 802-369-0856 Sunday, April 5 at 7:30 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 in advance

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By

DAN WeiSeR

and $20 at the door. (828) 669-0816 or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

QUINTESSENCE A program of great woodwind quintets and piano – great music by Mozart, Beethoven, and more. This program will feature members of the new Asheville Woodwind Quintet as well as pianist Daniel Weiser. Friday, April 24 at 7:30 p.m. at All Soul’s Cathedral in Biltmore Village, an historic church with great acoustics. Cost is $15 for Church members and $20 for general public – tickets available at the door. Advanced purchase discounts available at amicimusic.org. Saturday, April 25 at 11 a.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, part of the Saturday Classical Brunch series. Concert is $15 and brunch is available for $7-11. (828) 575-2737 Saturday, April 25 at 7:30 p.m. House Concert in Hendersonville. Reservations required; seating is limited. Purchase tickets at amicimusic. org or call Dan at 802-369-0856

The Asheville Woodwind Quintet

Sunday, April 26 at 3 p.m. at White Horse Black Mountain. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com or call (828) 669-0816 The Asheville Woodwind Quintet was formed in 2015. This show will include four of their members. Steve Loew, clarinet, is a former member of the U.S. Marine Band. He has also played with the New York Philarmonic. Carlton Alexander, Oboe, is the Principal Oboe with the Denver Pops Orchestra. Hobart Whitman, French Horn, is the Principal with the Blue Ridge Philharmonic. Leslie Reim Zarnowski, Bassoon, has taught music in Western North Carolina for more than 22 years.


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captivating performances

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Alexander’s Feast

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Asheville Symphony Chorus, WCU Concert Choir, and soloists join the ASO for Handel’s masterwork.

The Asheville Symphony Orchestra will take on a large-scale Handel choral work with the Asheville Symphony Chorus and Western Carolina University Concert Choir in Handel’s Alexander’s Feast on Saturday, April 18. The concert starts at 8 p.m. at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. ASO Music Director Daniel Meyer will lead almost 200 singers and musicians in Alexander’s Feast, Handel’s dramatic cantata. Soprano Kerri Caldwell, tenor William Ferguson and bass-baritone Adam Fry will join the performance as soloists. Alexander’s Feast, composed in 1736, is one of Handel’s lesser-known works but is comparable to his beloved and frequently performed Messiah. Alexander’s Feast was an experimental work based on a narrative poem by one of England’s greatest poets of the preceding century, John Dryden (16311700). The aim of Dryden’s poem, a dedicatory ode to Saint Cecilia, the patron saint of music and musicians, was to proclaim the power of music. The plot harks back to reconstructed and romanticized ancient history with the main characters Alexander the Great (during the Persian war); Thaïs, a courtesan and Alexander’s “partner,” credited in history as

having urged him to burn the Persian capital, Persepolis; and Timotheus, a musician whose art can manipulate the feelings of the king and his court. Although the poem is a third-person narrative, Handel uses the dramatic nature of the music to describe the actions of the characters. Music Director Daniel Meyer says of Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s Music Director, Daniel Meyer, the piece, “Alexander’s will lead almost 200 singers and musicians in Alexander’s Feast, Handel’s dramatic cantata. Feast is a musical party, as only Handel could imagine. A musical dramatist to his very core, where he also conducts the University ChoHandel creates music that comes alive with rus and Early Music Ensemble and teaches soldiers boasting of their conquests, drinkconducting and voice. ing and eating until they’ve had more than their fill, and of course, with the beautiIF ful Thais within arm’s reach, love and lust YOU Asheville Symphony performs Handel’s GO Alexander’s Feast, Saturday, April 18 reign supreme. I cannot wait to conduct the at 8 p.m. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Asheville premiere of this amazingly vivid and Daniel Meyer, Music Director. The concert is life-embracing work and to share it with our sponsored by TD Bank. audiences.” Tickets range from $22 to $62 for adults and Michael Lancaster directs both the $11 to $43 for youth, and are available through Asheville Symphony Chorus and Western the ASO office or the U.S. Cellular Center Carolina University’s Concert Choir. He is ticket office. For more information go to the director of choral activities in the School ashevillesymphony.org or call 828-254-7046. of Music at Western Carolina University,

Minneapolis Guitar Quartet Performs in Hendersonville

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Imagination, artistry, and musical mastery.

The MGQ has performed in recital throughout major Fresh from performing U.S. cities, and at at the Guitar Art Festival in Princeton UniverBelgrade, Serbia, the foursity, the National some will show off their Arts Center (Mexico amazing talent to close HenCity), Round Top dersonville Chamber Music’s International Guitar 2015 season Sunday, April 26 Festival, and at the at 3 p.m. Guitar Foundation One of the very few of America Festival. guitar ensembles performing Concerto appearthe majority of its repertoire ances include the from memory, the MinneapSt. Paul Chamber olis Guitar Quartet (MGQ) Orchestra, Minpresents original works and nesota Orchestra, commissions as well as its and the Austin and own brilliant arrangements of Columbus symphomusic by such composers as nies. For the April 26 Ginastera, Piazzolla, Debussy, The Minneapolis Guitar Quartet brings concert, the quartet and the Finnish folk-based its audiences distinctive and imaginative performs the music music of Maria Kalaniemi. experiences. of Joaquin Rodrigo, New arrangements Astor Piazzolla, Alberto Ginastera, David Critshowcase music by Jazz pianist Hiromi, tenden, Maria Kalaniemi, Ben Abrahamson, Prince’s Purple Rain, and The Easy Beats’ and J.S. Bach. Friday on My Mind. These ventures represent Hendersonville Chamber Music is the quartet’s intention to bring its audiences funded in part by a Grassroots Grant from distinctive and imaginative experiences.

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RoBeRT WiLey

The Minneapolis Guitar Quartet has made its case as “one of the major guitar ensembles in the world.” ~ Soundboard Magazine the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, which is administered by the Arts Council of Henderson County. IF YOU Hendersonville Chamber Music GO concert featuring The Minneapolis

Guitar Quartet, Sunday, April 26 at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. Tickets are $ 20 including tax and are available at the door on the date of performance. Students admitted free of charge. More information on Facebook and hendersonvillechambermusic.org.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 7


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captivating performances Asheville Community Theatre

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A Streetcar Named Desire

Blanche DuBois is an attractive but fading Southern belle who arrives at the New Orleans apartment of her sister Stella and her husband, the brutish and sensual Stanley. Conflicts build between the three in the small, steamy apartment, with Stanley becoming increasingly cruel and violent. As a result, Blanche’s already tenuous ability to separate reality from illusion becomes gossamer thin. This is the first production of A Streetcar Named Desire in Asheville Community Theatre’s 69 year history. Performances April 17 - May 3. Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m., Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are available online at www.ashevilletheatre.org, over the phone at (828) 254-1320, or at the theatre’s Box Office.

Seussical, Jr.

Horton the Elephant, the Cat in the Hat, and everyone’s favorite Dr. Seuss characters spring to life in this fantastical musical extravaganza performed by students ages 7 to 13. Performances are Friday, April 3 at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 4 and Sunday, April 5 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5.

Happily Ever After

On April 18, Bright Star Touring Theatre brings to life some of the Grimm Brothers’ greatest tales, including Rapunzel, Little Red Riding Hood, Rumpelstiltskin, and The Elves and the Shoemaker. Performance begins at 10 a.m. Tickets are $5, available online or at the door.

Humble Boy

The Autumn Players’ Readers Theatre presents this rich, quirky comedy. Playwright Charlotte Jones captures both the humor and the pathos of family life and the often convoluted, multi-textured, bittersweet relationships between parents and their adult children. Performances are Friday, April 24 and Saturday, April 25 in 35below, and Sunday, April 26 at UNCA’s Reuter Center. All performances begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $6, available online or at the door.

Listen to This

Stories and original songs from locals. April 30 at 7:30 p.m. in 35below. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $15. IF YOU Asheville Community Theatre, GO 35 E. Walnut St., downtown

Asheville. For more information, please call (828) 254-1320, or visit the website, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

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Brief Encounters 2015

Six short, original plays at the Magnetic Theatre’s new home.

The Magnetic Theatre, known for their local hits The Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular and Food and How to Eat it, will be opening a program of 6 short plays April 23rd at their new theatre, Magnetic 375, in the River Arts District. These six scripts were selected from more than 300 submissions from across the country and right here in Asheville. This production marks the return of the Magnetic’s Brief Encounters series, a semi-annual program of short work, which honors the Magnetic’s tradition of producing original plays. The show is co-produced by Katie Anne Towner, an Associate Artistic Director of the Magnetic Theatre, and Lucia Gray, Managing Director and also Associate Artistic Director. “Brief Encounters is theatre for those with short attention spans,” says Towner, “Each play is totally different, and just long enough to tell a quick story, make you laugh, or pack an emotional punch before it’s over.” Brief Encounters 2015 also serves as the soft opening for Magnetic 375, the Magnetic Theatre’s new venue at 375 Depot Street. This is the first time the Magnetic Theatre has had their own performance space since the Magnetic Field closed in 2013.

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The plays are primarily comedic, poking fun at driving school, office culture, family life, hipster talk, and more. The exception is The Tug of Love, a haunting study of love gone tragically wrong. Gray describes the plays that were selected this year as “quirky, hilarious, and a little edgy. This year was different from years prior because of the sheer amount of submissions, which was totally unexpected, but our community banded together and we worked through it to create a full evening of exciting new work for the stage.”

IF YOU Brief Encounters, Thursdays GO through Saturdays, April 25 - May

16. Low-priced previews are Thursday and Friday, April 23 and 24. All performances begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance, $18 at the door. Preview tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Tickets can be purchased online at www.themagnetictheatre.org or in person at Magnetic 375, 375 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District.

Jobs I Had For Only One Day

Last season, comic storyteller C.J. Deering brought her incredibly funny but all too true tall tales of life, recovery and survival to the HART Studio and packed the house.

manager for the Jethro Tull “Bungle in the Jungle Tour,” as well as working with the Eagles, the Doobie Brothers, Neil Young, and Jackson Brown. As a DJ spinning late night Rock and Roll she was ‘CJ the DJ.’ She also worked as an The hysterically funny airline stewardess, a profesCJ Deering. sional cheerleader, and She’s back by popular a dog walker. This show demand this time with Jobs continues a life story of ups, downs, sex, drugs I Had For Only One Day. and Rock ‘n Roll; of what happened, and what The former mega-rock group tour manit’s like now. There is possible, though not ager, Los Angeles major record label execuplanned, adult language. tive, popular Texas radio deejay, nationallyacclaimed motivational speaker, hysterically IF funny comic, all-around wonderful person, YOU Jobs I Had For Only One Day, Friday and experienced summer camper CJ Deering, GO and Saturday, April 3 & 4 at 7:30 p.m. in is not to be missed! The best comedy writers the Feichter Studio Theater at HART. in Hollywood have cried their eyes out with To make reservations call (828) 456-6322 or both laughter and inspiration. go online to www.harttheatre.org. HART Studio Theater, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, NC. CJ’s credits include working as the tour

8 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

West Side Story

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This emotional drama of forbidden love and feuding families on New York’s West Side will be brought to life by the Asheville Lyric Opera.

Using a full classical orchestra with no electrical amplification, local and national singers, dancers, actors and musicians will expertly tell the tale of West Side Story. All new set design and choreography preserving the musical genius of Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim will make this production an unparalleled live theatre experience. Bringing to life the central character of Maria is Kathryn Sandoval Taylor, an Asheville native. Fellow graduate of the New England Conservatory and North Carolina native, Joshua Collier, is playing the role of Tony, Maria’s forbidden lover. Director JJ Hudson will be making his Asheville Lyric Opera directorial debut. West Side Story faced much criticism from the public when it was first released. The idea of a musical based on current events scared many people away from working on the project. Leonard Bernstein heavily emphasized the sweeping operatic lines in the music, and the elegant dance numbers are heavily influenced by drama and ballet. Asheville Lyric Opera is prepared to produce this classic musical as Bernstein and Sondheim envisioned it. IF YOU West Side Story, April 24 & 25 at 8 GO p.m., and April 26 at 3 p.m. at the Diana

Wortham Theatre. Tickets are available at ashevillelyric.org/tickets, or at the Diana Wortham Theatre Box Office, (828) 257-4530.

Construction of New Theatre Underway

Photo by Christy Bishop

The roof trusses go up on the new Daniel and Belle Fangmeyer Theater at HART Theatre in Waynesville. The building is expected to be completed sometime this summer and will give HART a second main stage performance space.


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Addison Farms Vineyard Barrel Tasting

Addison Farms Vineyard, our local winery in Northwest Asheville, has a fun and varied 2015 event season lined up. They are working with local bands, artists and entertainers to create an exciting season at the vineyard, and Corner Kitchen Catering will be offering delicious picnic lunches at many of the events. April will begin with their first Barrel Tasting. In May, local artist John Mac Kah will be offering a three-day painting workshop at the vineyard. Get the season started with a Spring Bud Break Party on Saturday, May 16. Additional details and tickets are available at addisonfarms.net.

Addison Farms Vineyard is a family-owned vineyard and winery situated in Leicester, NC IF YOU Barrel Tasting at Addison Farms Vineyard, Saturday, GO April 11. A private tour, tastings of not yet released

wines and current releases, and your choice of picnic lunch. Reserve your tickets at addisonfarms.net

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Vineyard Plein Air with John Mac Kah

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Three days of plein air oil painting with eminent landscape painter and artist, John Mac Kah on location at Addison Farms Vineyard in Leicester.

John Mac Kah painting at Addison Farms Vineyard

Painting by John Mac Kah

Demo and painting instruction Friday through Sunday, May 1-3 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The day begins with an introduction and review of materials and methods. Detailed daily discussion; one-on-one instruction. Group critique at closing, followed by wine tasting. All levels welcome. We can outfit and provide beginners with easel and supplies for an additional fee. Experienced painters? We will send you a materials list once you register so you are ready to go. Workshop includes a catered lunch from Corner Kitchen Catering in Asheville. Workshop students will receive a special discount for purchases from Addison Vineyard. Addison Farms Vineyard is a family-owned vineyard and winery situated in Leicester, NC approximately 17 miles northwest of Asheville. The property has been in the family for four generations, purchased by Addison Farmer and his parents in 1937. To learn more about Addison Farms Vineyard accommodations and their wine, visit addisonfarms.net Workshop sponsored by: M.Graham Paints, West Lynn, OR; The Starving Artist, Hendersonville, NC; Blackbird Art & Frame, Asheville, NC.

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IF YOU Vineyard Plein Air workshop with John Mac Kah, GO Friday through Sunday, May 1-3 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Register online at www.JohnMacKah.com or call/text (828) 225-5000 to sign up by phone or mail.

SpruceStreetMarket.com Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 9


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RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

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Virginia Pendergrass, Fine Artist

Coastal Carolina, an oil painting by Brevard artist Virginia Pendergrass, has been selected for the 2015 juried exhibition of Women Painters of the Southeast.

344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

The 2015 Women Painters of the Southeast (WPSE) exhibition will open at the Blue Ridge Arts Association in Blue Ridge, GA on Friday, April 10 from 6- 8:30 p.m. “Coastal Carolina” is a view from the edge of a marsh in Mt. Pleasant, SC on a brilliant summer day. Pendergrass hoped to express the feel of the heat and the shimmer in the distance in the beautiful marshlands. According to Pendergrass, “I believe we naturally respond with pleaCoastal Carolina, oil painting by sure to beauty in our environment.” Virginia Pendergrass Her goal is to capture her pleasure in nature, outdoors or painting from life and plein air sketches in the studio, and pass it on through her paintings.

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Pendergrass is a previous WPSE award-winner. Over her 15 year painting career, her paintings have also been selected for show in national competitions of the Oil Painters of America, the American Impressionist Society, and Paint The Parks. Her paintings have won many local, regional and national awards. Her paintings can be seen locally at the Asheville Gallery of Art in Asheville, NC, and the Silver Fox Gallery in Hendersonville, NC.

SAHAR FAKHOURY SANDRA BRUGH MOORE VIRGINIA PENDERGRASS

Visit Virginia Pendergrass online at www.virginiapendergrass.com IF YOU The WPSE exhibition will GO continue through April 30,

2015. Blue Ridge Arts is located at 420 West Main St., Blue Ridge, GA. For further information, visit their website at www.blueridgearts.net.

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Goat Barns, 9x12 oil by Virginia Pendergrass www.virginiapendergrass.com

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Riverview Station #216 • Asheville, NC 191 Lyman St., South Entrance

BARBARA WADE

Mixed Media Artist 140d Roberts Street

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Open Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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Fearless Spontaneity

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“Trusting the intuition” ...a captivating experience.

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As Spring alights on the mountains of Western North Carolina, the energy is transforming at Jonas Gerard Fine Art Galleries. With the opening of the gallery at Riverview Station, Jonas’ work can now be seen in two beautiful galleries located in the heart of Asheville’s River Arts District. Both galleries are filled with conscious colorful expressions of a world filled with love, gratitude and fearless spontaneity. Come to Jonas’ next live painting performance on Saturday, April 11.

Free painting performances are held the second Saturday of every month. Live Painting Performance Saturday, April 11 at 2 p.m. in the Riverview Station Gallery at 191 Lyman St. River Arts District Studio Stroll, May 9 & 10. Jonas Gerard will be painting a large mural at the Riverview Station gallery all weekend. IF YOU GO

While rhythmic music plays in the background, Jonas becomes completely absorbed in expressing what is in his heart with a gestural painting style that appears almost as a sponMolto Allegro, 36x72 painting by Jonas Gerard taneously choreographed dance. To the viewer, universe to come through with enthralling it may seem that the painting is done by rhythms and patterns that connects us all.” the music itself while the artist is simply Another great opportunity to see the holding the brush. However, the years of art spontaneously evolve will be at the River dedication to this trust allows an artistic Arts District Studio Stroll on May 9 & 10. integrity to flow Throughout the weekend the public can watch through his work. Jonas paint a giant mural that will be perma“For me painting nently installed on the outside of the Riveris an intense compulview Station Building. sion motivated by the process itself, allowing me to become more comfortable with uncertainty and unpredictability. Painting fast and spontaneously has been extremely beneficial, allowing my mind to be quiet and relinquishing my attachment to any imagined result. This process welcomes the Jonas’ work can been seen in two beautiful galleries in the creative energy of the heart of Asheville’s River Arts District.

Jonas Gerard Fine Art Two galleries open seven days a week from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Asheville’s River Arts District 240 Clingman Ave. Riverview Station Building 191 Lyman St. #144, Asheville (828) 350-7711 jonas@jonasgerard.com www.jonasgerard.com

Richard C. Baker, Fine Artist

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Richard Baker’s landscapes depict, with radiant light, the mountains and waters of western North Carolina. He paints the southern Appalachians in the Hudson River School style. His paintings are successful, he says, when they “glow,” whether it’s a brilliant sunrise or sunlight playing on the surface of a river or the softness of moonlight A self-taught artist, painting had been a sideline to other endeavors in life until five years ago when a heart attack made him prioritize his time. He felt that it was time to devote himself fully to his art as had been his dream since childhood. Now he paints every day in his Pink Dog

Richard Baker in his studio at Pink Dog Creative.

Creative studio in the River Arts District of Asheville. He moved to N.C. from Florida in 2005, after a 30-year career with Tampa’s Busch Gardens where he was the zoo’s curator of mammals. His father was a U.S. Army major and the family traveled all over the world. Baker remembers, especially, adolescent years spent in Europe visiting museums and staying in places where fine continued on page 13

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Local Artists Welcome Spring

Experiencing Western North Carolina’s incredible artist community is easier than ever with the Weaverville Art Safari’s spring tour.

Held May 2 and 3 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the free event offers an incredible way to experience art on a personal level. While most traditional art tours only showcase collections, this unique event pro-

Steven Forbes deSoule

vides exclusive access into artists’ studios and a chance to see the creative process behind each piece. “I love opening up my studio to visitors, and in the spring the gardens are in bloom. People not only come to see art and what inspires me, they also enjoy the landscape. Their enthusiasm gives me energy to create,” says Cindy Ireland, the 2015 Art Safari Chair and a regular participating artist. Experiencing art on such a personal level often creates unique and lasting relationships between regular attendees and artists. For participating artist Marcia Kummerle, the event blossoms into a family tradition for some. “I love working with ladies who are new grandmothers as they choose yarn for a knitting project to welcome their new grand baby. The real joy is when they bring their toddlers back to the Weaverville Art Safari to visit my Angora goats,” she says. This year’s free event boasts 35 acclaimed artists and the opportunity to purchase pieces from their newest collections. Offerings showcased include handmade

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pottery, glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, paintings, drawings, fiber art, and more. A special preview party and fundraiser at the Weaverville Town Hall kicks off the event on Friday evening, May 1. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and includes live music, door prizes, hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, desserts, and more. The highlight of the evening is a silent auction featuring art works donated by each participating artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. Event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari tours, and promotes the arts and community in the Weaverville area. The goal is to expose locals and visitors alike to some of the most talented artists in the area. Guests looking to plan Top: Quilt by Susan Lee their visit can pick up WeaverLeft: Howard Atwood ville Art Safari brochures Above: Jewelry by Q Evon containing maps and artist information at greater AshevilleThe first area galleries, restaurants, and shops beginning Weaverville in April. Brochures will also be distributed Art Safari was from an Art Safari information booth located organized in on Main Street in Weaverville on May 2 and the spring of 3. A downloadable brochure with map and full 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this details about participating artists is also availvibrant art community on the northern outable at www.weavervilleartsafari.com. skirts of Asheville, NC. Since then thousands About The Weaverville Art Safari of people have returned over and over each The Weaverville Art Safari is a 501(c)3 spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunon-profit and is staged twice each year–the nities and the ambience. first full weekend in May and the last full weekend in October–by a group of Western IF North Carolina artists whose studios are YOU Weaverville Art Safari, Saturday & GO Sunday, May 2-3. For more details visit located in and around the communities of www.weavervilleartsafari.com. Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC.

FINE ART PRINTING

PHOTOGRAPHY OF 2D AND 3D ARTWORK

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Archival Pigment Prints Custom Framing & Stretchers

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Asheville’s Full Service Fine Art Studio

2004 RIVERSIDE DRIVE, UNIT W. ASHEVILLE, NC 28804 12 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

18th Annual French Broad River Festival

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18 years ago a couple of friends thought it would be fun to “race” down Section 9 of the French Broad River and then have a party on its banks in Hot Springs. That “party” has grown into a weekend outdoor and family music festival featuring national and local recording artists on multiple stages, a mountain bike race, Photo by Joshua Timmerman whitewater raft race, kids’ village, arts and craft vendors, outdoor vendors, and great food. Musical acts include Larry Keel Experience, Sol Driven Train, Zach Deputy, Big Daddy Love, PGrass, and many more! IF YOU The French Broad River Festival takes place May 1-3 at the Hot Springs Campground & Spa. GO Early Bird tickets are $80 available online at www.FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com.


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The Faery And Earth Festival

This Faerie And Earth Festival (FAE) has been designed to bring people together representing the two realms of Faerie and Earth. Discover new products, services, readings, performances, talents, presentations, and presence. This joyous celebration offers an amazing experience for all attending. Enjoy the Fairy Stories of Vixi Jil; see Wizar the Sorcerer, the Faerie Kin, Dr. Momento and his Dragon. Damira performs the Dances of Universal Peace, and Marta Martin enchants all with her Creative Fairy Dances. Walk with Joel Windfox Boyle, learning about herbs or Heume and her walk with the Fairies, or spend time with Roger Bass or Skye Taylor to learn more about the honey bees.

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Visit Earthshine Nature and his Critters; listen to the sounds of flutes and drums of David Serra; Freedom conducts a Drumming Workshop for Children; and check into Crystal Bowls with Laura Painter. There will be Crystals by Shaman’s Dream from VA; Fairy Houses by Very Fairy Fun from TX; Soaps, Potions and Lotions by Fairy Giggles. Buy soap from FL, and much more. Wear your fairy wings, earth hat, or sparkle up with glitter, then follow the rabbit and the spinning flowers to our entry gate in beautiful Flat Rock, at the Highland Lake Cove Retreat Center.

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Follow the Rabbit! IF YOU GO

Faery And Earth (FAE) Festival, Saturday & Sunday, May 16 & 17 at Highland Lake Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: $10 adult, $5 child (ages 5-15), under 5 free. For more details please contact John Springer, Enchanted Walkabouts, (407) 620-1493, www.enchantedwalkabouts.com. Follow us on www.facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

18th Annual Greening Up the Mountains Festival

Experience Spring in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Located in the Tuckasegee Valley, Sylva is surrounded by the Balsam Mountain range, the Cowee Mountain Range and the Cullowhee Mountain Range. In spring, the green leaves begin in the valley and go meandering up the mountainsides as they mature. The Town of Sylva celebrates this very visible sign of spring with the Greening Up the Mountains Festival. The free festival draws artisans from within its commuCaleb Turpin, age 9, from nity, spotlighting fine arts and Robbinsville, NC. crafts, unique small businesses, heritage demonstrations, and those who work with the natural environment, dance.

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sustainability and wellness. Now in it’s 18th year, the festival will host a 5-K run, two full music stages featuring the many music styles of the area, children’s talent contest, dance performances, storytelling, craft demonstrations, community outreach, youth activities and lots of food and fun! The festival also combines the past, present and future of mountain living by sponsoring the Heritage Alive! Mountain Youth Talent Contest. Youth from all over western North Carolina come to play music, sing, and

One of last year’s contestants was Caleb Turpin, age 9. He hails from Robbinsville, NC, plays guitar, and sings old gospel songs. Craft demonstrators will showcase their many skills: chair caning, quilting, doll making, jewelry making, loom beading, carving, and much more. Local authors will be on hand to autograph their books. Enjoy a day full of old songs passed down, and hear some new music too, all while eating barbecue, kettle corn, and boiled peanuts.

Ya’ll come now! IF YOU GO

Greening up the Mountains Festival will take place on Main and Mill Streets in downtown Sylva, NC, on Saturday, April 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, contact the Town of Sylva, (828) 586-2719.

River Arts District Artists Celebrate Mothers’ Day

Two-day Studio Stroll and Art Sale, Saturday & Sunday, May 9 & 10. The artists of Asheville’s River Arts District open their doors for a full weekend during the Spring Studio Stroll and Art Sale, welcoming the public to experience and collect amazing art in the studios and galleries in which the inspiration flows. Come be inspired, shop, meet the artists and watch live demonstrations. This stroll replaces the June studio stroll.

Thousands of visitors from nearby and abroad interacting with some 180+ artists working and selling art in their River Arts District studios. The River Arts District of Asheville is a mile long cluster of working studios, galleries and eateries housed in the former industrial section of town surrounding the railroad along the banks The weekend will be packed with artists demonstrating their craft.

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of the French Broad River. More than 180 working studio artists, many with showrooms and galleries, are open throughout the year. During Studio Stroll, visitors are able to comb the district riding the Grey Line Trolley for free. River Arts District Artists work in such mediums as paint, pencil, pottery, metal, fiber, glass, wax and paper. IF YOU GO

Asheville’s River Arts District Studio Stroll, Saturday and Sunday, May 9 and 10 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more details visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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Bi-annual premier open studio tour, June 5-7.

More than 100 artists, craftspeople, and galleries open their doors to visitors for an entire weekend of awe-inspiring art and craft in Mitchell and Yancey CounPitcher by Jon Ellebogen/Rebecca ties. Plummer, Barking Hosted by Spider Pottery the Toe River Arts Council this free studio tour takes place the first weekends in June and December. IF YOU The Toe River Arts Tour begins GO on Friday, June 5 at noon. It goes

until 4 p.m. when visitors return to the Spruce Pine Gallery for a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at 269 Oak Avenue. On Saturday and Sunday the tour continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Go to www. toeriverarts.org or call (828) 682-7215 for more information.

‘Richard C. Baker’ cont’d. from pg. 11

art hung on the walls. “That’s probably why I paint today,” he said. Born in Tennessee, Baker had been visiting this region’s mountains for many years. “This area is magical. Its views are magical. I couldn’t get over that beauty when I moved here. How could I not paint them?” “I used to spend hours,” he said, “studying the rocks, the trees, the light as it moved through the forest.” He still travels the regional countryside with his camera, searching for beautiful landscapes, returning to a scene again and again until he finds the perfect light. After that he uses photographs, memory and imagination to make a sketch of the planned painting. Baker paints in oils, acrylics or watercolors, and does commissioned work, including portraits.

Richard C. Baker Fine Art and Portraiture 344 Depot Street, Suite 102 in Asheville’s River Arts District (828) 234-1616

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Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

‘71  ½

Short Take: A historic action thriller about a young British soldier, separated from the rest of his unit, during ‘the troubles’ in 1971.

REEL TAKE: ’71 marks a powerful debut feature film for director Yann Demange. ’71 is a historical, fact-based action film that takes place over the course of a single night. A young British solider (Unbroken’s Jack O’Connell) is accidentally sepaJack O’Connell plays a soldier thrown into ‘the troubles’ in rated from his unit following Ireland in the fact-based historical action-thriller ’71. a riot on the streets of Belfast during ‘the troubles’ in 1971. doing what’s right, even when it’s playing both Unable to tell friend from foe or which sides of the fence. The result is distrust, utter side is which, Hook tries to get back to his confusion and wasted life. We feel Hook’s barracks but is thwarted at every turn. Whether confusion right along with him, thanks to it’s the Protestants, the Catholics, or members Demange’s boots-on-the-ground, realistic apof his own squadron, everyone thinks they are

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THE MONTHLY REEL

Many thanks to the good Professor Kaufmann for holding down the fort while I gallivanted off to Paris for a friend’s wedding last month.

Life has been such a whirlwind for both of us lately that we’ve paid little notice to that post award season cinematic lull that is usually so dreary for us critics. And, while there haven’t been any titles that have had either of us beating a path to the movie theatre, we have been fortunate to have a decent blend of art house, off-beat, and main stream titles in local theatres. That has been enough to keep most movie goers content, including us. This month’s section is pretty representative of that mix of offerings. On the lighter side we review Disney’s blockbuster live-action version of Cinderella. On the heavy end we dive into the Russian depths of bleakness in Leviathan. The yin and yang of our cinematic sensibilities have been tested this month. Chip reviews the Ed Harris, Liam

Neeson crime thriller, Run All Night, the wildly entertaining ArgentineanSpanish anthology film Wild Tales, and the aforementioned bleak Russian drama Leviathan. I review the ‘controversial’ waist cinching Cinderella, the utterly unnecessary but aptly named Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, the uplifting familyfriendly story of the unlikely cross country team that could in McFarland USA, and the most apolitical film to date about ‘the troubles’ in Ireland in ’71. The Asheville Film Society (AFS) and Hendersonville Film Society (HFS) both offer an array of films this month. AFS kicks off with Norman Jewison’s film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Weber’s Jesus Christ Superstar from 1973. AFS also welcomes Lisi Russell back for a special presentation of Ken Russell’s Mahler. If you’ve never seen it, or have never seen it on the big screen,

14 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

proach. There are moments when the camera work makes Katherine Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker look like it was filmed with a steady cam. The film is dark and gritty. This also enhances the confusion, tension and suspense to great effect. We don’t get to know the characters, but you get an intuitive sense of each characters moral fiber. Jack O’Connell delivers a strong performance. (Although after this and Unbroken, I do hope he chooses something lighter for his next project.) Supporting cast members, including Richard Dormer, David Wilmot, Sean Harris and Velene Kane, all turn in strong performances. You can’t be in a project like this and turn in anything less. The script by Scottish playwright Gregory Burke is stark but strikingly effective and bursting with humanity. Demange and Burke have managed to take a highly polarizing and political subject and strip it of all politics, ergo creating an incredibly powerful story and statement. There are no sides. It’s one of the

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this is a rare treat. Because of the Easter holiday, HFS is hosting just three screenings this month, but they are enjoyable goodies: Ladies in Lavender with Judi Dench and Maggie Smith, Orson Wells in Black Magic, and Fred Zinnemann’s riveting The Day of the Jackal from 1973. In a sea of upcoming mainstream comedies, a handful of art house titles, and the next chapter in both The Avengers and the Fast and Furious franchises, there’s one documentary on the docket this month that may be of interest to some of our readers. It’s called Merchants of Doubt and is slated for a late April booking at The Carolina. Until next time, enjoy!

most thought provoking darkly raw films I’ve seen in a while. ’71 is incredibly worthwhile but certainly not for everyone. It is confusing. It’s brutal and it’s profoundly sad on a number of levels.’71 is playing at the Fine Arts Theatre. I don’t imagine it will last for long, so if it’s of interest see it while you can. Rated R for strong violence, disturbing images, and language throughout. Review by Michelle Keenan

Cinderella ½

Short Take: Disney’s live-action version of its animated classic, directed by Kenneth Brannagh.

REEL TAKE: Did we need a new live-action

version from Disney of its beloved animated classic tale of Cinderella? I think not. But with Kenneth Brannagh at the helm, Cate Blanchett as the wicked stepmother, Helena Bonham Carter as the fairy godmother, and Downton Abbey’s Lily James as the titular character, it held promise. That is, it did until I got to the theatre. Navigating a cinemuck-coated theatre, brimming with sticky, squirming, chatty children, I began having second thoughts about the whole thing. However, being armed with an adult beverage and a small bag of popcorn, I decided to settle into my seat and hope for the best. When the lights dimmed and a rashinducing Frozen short played before the main feature, said small, sticky children tittered with glee and I gave thanks for adult beverages. I tell you all of this because, with that prologue, this review was in jeopardy of being cruelly biased. However, sometimes you just have to ‘let it go’ and enjoy the show. Brannagh has created a Cinderella that is faithful to the 1950 animated classic (thankfully sans the singing) and given it new life. It’s a lively, colorful and enjoyable, albeit slightly forgettable affair. Our ‘once upon a time’ tale begins with Cinderella’s back story - a happy young couple, blissfully in love and their cherished daughter. Their story book existence is torn apart when the mother takes ill, but when she leaves her daughter with parting words, “Always have courage and be kind,” she sets the tone for the rest of the film. The story then Movies continued on page 15


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Bippety boppety boo! Cinderella (Lilly James) arrives at the ball.

shifts into entirely familiar territory and varies little from that well worn path. Brannagh wisely enlisted the talents of production designer Dante Ferretti and costume designer Sandy Powell to make that path as visually appealing as possible and the results are sumptuous. The film is well cast, including Ben Chaplin as Ella’s heartbroken father and Derek Jacobi as the King. Lily James is the perfect embodiment of the fair Cinderella and she has a good chemistry with Kit (aka Prince Charming), played by Richard Madden. Personally, I wish they’d given Cate Blanchett just a little more to chew on, though the addition of a scheming Duke (Stellan Skarsgard) is a nice balance for our wicked stepmother. Helena Bonham Carter’s narrative voice is pitch perfect for the telling of a fairy tale, but in her big scene as the fairy godmother she almost steals the show. There was quite a brouhaha when the film was released over the size of Lily James’ waist. Detractors claimed it was sending a bad message to young girls. Get a grip, people. She’s a slim young woman, her waist-line corseted and given the illusion of being even smaller by the voluminous blue dress she wears. If only people would spend as much time focused on the moral of the story – have courage and be kind. Brannagh touchingly reinforces that message throughout. Cinderella is a delightful trifle for the romantic and gentle at heart. Cynics and curmudgeons need not see it, nor ruin it for the rest of us.

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critical rating and an 82% audience approval on Rotten Tomatoes. It’s on occasions like this that I ask myself “Did they see the same movie I did?” Kolya (Aleksei Serebryakov) lives in a coastal town with his wife Lillia (Elena Lyadova) and his son (Sergey Pokhodaev) from a previous marriage. The local mayor Vadim (Roman Madyanov) desires Kolya’s property and tries to obtain it through devious legal means. Kolya enlists his old Army buddy Dmitri (Vladimir Vdovichenkov) now a successful Moscow lawyer to help him. In the beginning things go well but then Dmitri has an affair with Kolya’s wife and the Mayor brings in some local thugs to threaten Dmitri’s life. Kolya finds out about the affair but forgives his wife who is overcome with guilt. The mayor continues his manipulations with the aid of the local church and Kolya is sent to prison. The mayor and the church get the property, tear down Kolya’s house, and erect a small cathedral in its place. Take this grim scenario which has several Biblical overtones (most notably the Book of Job), add a healthy dose of contemporary cynicism then direct it at a snail’s pace and apparently you have a critical winner. It has also scored well at numerous international film festivals. The movie was nominated for Best Foreign Film at this year’s Oscar but fortunately lost out to the Polish film Ida. The director Andrey Zvyagintsev (The Return) has said that the film is based on an incident that took place in Colorado in 2004 when a mechanic named Marvin Heemeyer, enraged over a local zoning ordinance, built a modified bulldozer and then went on a rampage wrecking 13 buildings in his small city before committing suicide. Leviathan is not without merit. It is well acted and beautifully and simply photographed but what should be a powerful 100 minute film is dragged out to 141 minutes blunting much of its effectiveness as far as I was concerned. I couldn’t wait for it to be over. I’m reminded of what Ernest Hemingway reportedly said about Thomas Wolfe, “Why use 10 words when 100 will do?” Think of that in cinematic terms and you have Leviathan.

Rated PG for mild thematic elements. Review by Michelle Keenan

Leviathan ½

Short Take: Painfully long and drawn out Russian take on local politics and corruption with more than a few biblical references thrown in for good measure.

REEL TAKE: From its Koyaanisqatsi like opening through its parade of dismal characters to its ironically sanctimonious ending, Leviathan was, for me, an incredibly dreary experience. It would appear that I am in the distinct minority as it currently holds a 99%

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Aleksei Serebryakov as the put upon Job-like character at the heart of the Russian film Leviathan.

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While the overall plot is fairly predictable, what evolves is not the conventional teacherinspires-the-students story. Here White and the kids are on pretty equal footing. Say what you want about Costner, but he turns in a fine performance as do his young co-stars. A wonderful sub-story involving White’s wife (Maria Bello), daughters and various townspeople evolves perfectly in direct relationship to the main story. Director Nicki Caro Rated R for language, sexuality, and graphic (best known for Whale Rider) pulls the whole nudity. thing together organically and with such earnest Review by Chip Kaufmann warmth, it’s hard not to be moved. The honest humanity of the story is its greatest strength and it’s what gives the story staying power. While I very soon forgot about Cinderella or The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, this one stayed with me. McFarland USA is the kind of movie you root for. This is the kind of movie where the audience applauds at the end. (Speaking of the end, be sure to stay for the epilogue when they show the real Coach White and the real members of McFarland’s 1987 cross country team.) Keven Costner stars as a coach who leads an unlikely

I won’t be seeing it again anytime soon but you may feel differently especially if you appreciate the Russian literature of such 19th century writers as Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy. I admire those writers but you can take a break from Crime & Punishment or War & Peace anytime you want and then pick it back up again. Not so here. Incidentally the title comes from the skeleton of a whale found on the beach.

cross-country team in the likeable McFarland USA.

McFarland USA 

Short Take: Sports drama based on a true story about an unlikely cross country team and coach in need of a second chance.

REEL TAKE: McFarland USA may be finding

its way to the second-run theatres by the time this issue comes out. It was overshadowed by bigger releases and received little praise from some of the other local critics. Because it’s an inspirational, family-friendly, underdog sports drama one could, understandably, have reservations. Because it’s also a Disney production and Kevin Costner is the lead actor, the film is automatic fodder for some critics. I was curious and in need of a feel-good movie the night I went to see it, but still didn’t think it was going to be anything special. I was pleasantly surprised on both counts. Even more surprising was the audience applause at the end of the film. McFarland USA tells the true story about Jim White, a hot tempered coach in 1987 who, after losing a cushy job in Idaho, finds himself teaching life science and PE in one of the poorest towns in America. McFarland, California is largely Hispanic, agrarian town. He doesn’t want to be there. His family doesn’t want to be there and no one else seems to want him there either. While assigning laps around the track to mouthy students, White begins to notice something. Some of these kids are fast. Really fast. White decides to form a cross country team, a sport far more likely to be found in more affluent school districts and prep schools. Kids who work in the fields before school and after school are not exactly the target demographic for cross country. White is met with resistance from the kids and from some of their family members too, but he persists.

Rated PG for thematic material, some violence and language. Review by Michelle Keenan

Run All Night ½

Short Take: Despite some unnecessarily flashy camerawork, Run All Night is a solid crime thriller in the manner of The Drop with two strong performances from Liam Neeson and Ed Harris.

REEL TAKE: For the present, Liam Neeson seems perfectly content to play the aging action star following in the tradition of Clint Eastwood, Sly Stallone or even John Wayne. While the Taken franchise (which is apparently over) racks up impressive worldwide box office totals, it is the other films like A Walk Among the Tombstones and this one that give him a chance to flex some acting muscle. Jimmy Conlon (Neeson) is a broken down wreck who was once a top hit man but now survives only on the charity of his boss and former childhood friend Shawn Maguire (Harris). He has no friends and is especially despised by his son Michael (Joel Kinnaman) for abandoning the family years ago. When unexpected circumstances force him to kill Shawn’s son Danny (Boyd Holbrook) in order to save his son’s life, Shawn turns on Jimmy with a vengeance and orders Michael killed at any cost. Shawn hires a ruthless hit man (rap star Common) to take Michael down. Complicating matters is the police think Michael killed Danny and Conlon’s long time nemesis Detective Harding (Vincent D’Onofrio) is determined to get them both. As a result Jimmy and Michael have less than 12 hours to stay alive and sort things out. The movie is told in flashback so you know how it turns out but, as Movies continued on page 16

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. There are only three movies this month, a classic espionage thriller, an Orson Welles rarity (not directed by him), and a bittersweet romantic tale with Judi Dench and Maggie Smith. There is no show on Easter Sunday, April 5. April 12:

Ladies In Lavender

(2004) Set in 1936 Cornwall, Judi Dench and Maggie Smith portray spinster sisters Ursula and Janet Widdington whose lives are changed when a young Polish violinist is washed ashore disrupting their lives and the serenity of their small village. The movie also features Daniel Bruhl and David Warner. Directed by Charles Dance. April 19:

Black Magic

(1949) Orson Welles (at his absolute thinnest) dominates this Italian made film about the life of 18th century magician and adventurer Count Cagliostro who rose from humble origins to conceiving a plot to take over the French throne. Akim Tamiroff and Nancy Guild costar. Directed by Gregory Ratoff. April 26:

The Day of The Jackal (1973) From the director of High Noon comes this riveting account of an attempt to assassinate French President Charles de Gaulle in the early 1960s. The movie is based on Frederick Forsyth’s international best seller. Edward Fox plays the assassin while Michael Lonsdale is the French inspector pursuing him. Directed by Fred Zinnemann.

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is often the case in this genre, it’s how it gets there that keeps it interesting. Spanish director Jaume ColletSera (Orphan) had worked with Neeson once before on Unknown (2011) so the two knew what to expect from each other. Run All Night’s story is more traditional but the powerhouse performances of Neeson & Harris as well as D’Onofrio keep you engaged Ed Harris and Liam Neeon meet one last time at their old neighborhood restaurant in Run All Night.

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April DVD Picks

WUSA (1970)

Throughout cinema history there have been a number of movies that were ahead of their time. There are movies that flopped when they were first released and found an audience many years later. Then there are those movies that are waiting to be rediscovered. WUSA is such a film. When it first appeared in 1970, Paul Newman had just come off the biggest success of his career with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Fans who expected more of the same were shocked and disappointed, for WUSA is the complete opposite of Butch being more in keeping with movies like Hud and The Hustler. Newman plays a laconic drifter who winds up working for a patriotic radio station in New Orleans. He doesn’t believe in their right wing rhetoric but it keeps him in drinking money. He hooks up with fake preacher Laurence Harvey and then takes up with another drifter (Joanne Woodward). The other principal character is Peace Corps dropout Anthony Perkins who is unknowingly used by the Right Wing powers he despises. What made WUSA so disturbing then and so forward looking now is not just the rise of talk radio but the total apathy and amorality of Newman and most of the other characters. Coming 2 years after the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, Robert Stone’s screenplay (based on his novel A Hall of Mirrors) was too much of a downer. Unlike M*A*S*H, which was released at the same time, there isn’t an ounce of comedy to be found. The film is full of fine performances from up and coming performers like Cloris Leachman and Wayne Rogers to old pros Pat Hingle and Moses Gunn. The right wing rally which comes near the end of the film could have taken place yesterday not 45 years ago. As for the rhetoric, well certain radio

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despite the familiarity of the material. Rapper Common has been criticized in most reviews for his performance but I thought he was actually quite good. What I didn’t enjoy and what took me out of the movie on several occasions was the use of what I can only describe as a Google Earth approach of zooming in on a specific location from far away. Anything that cinematically interrupts the flow of the storytelling, earns a demerit in my book. Another critical observation concerns something which didn’t bother me and comes with the aging action star territory but there is no way any normal man much less one of

Movies continued from page 15

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “WUSA”

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personalities and a certain news network could be quoting it verbatim. WUSA is not without its faults. It occasionally loses its way and some of the writing is heavy handed but as a time capsule of the late 1960s that unfortunately looks forward to several aspects of the 21st century, it makes for compelling viewing and is ripe for rediscovery.

The Drop (2014)

In my humble opinion one of the most overlooked movies last year was The Drop. Based on the short story “Animal Rescue” by Dennis Lehane (and adapted for film by Dennis Lehane) The Drop is a highly satisfying crime drama with a slightly dented moral compass at its center. Bob Saginowski (Tom Hardy) is a quiet, seemingly dull-witted bartender at Cousin Marv’s, a Brooklyn watering hole and cash drop site for the Chechen mob. Marv (James Gandolfini) still runs the bar, but was muscled out of ownership by the Chechens. Together Bob and Marv run the place and navigate the tension in a neighborhood that seems to wax nostalgically for a bygone era. Bob is the narrative voice and the story’s rudder. He is soft-spoken and reserved. He attends mass daily and lives alone in the house that is obviously the home where he was raised. When he finds a badly abused pitt bull puppy in a neighbor’s trash can one night, it seems his

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Drop” loner routine is about to get sacked by man’s best friend and the pretty neighbor, Nadia (Noomi Rapace / Prometheus, Girl With The Dragon Tatoo). Soon however a local creep, and apparent psychopath, lays claim to the dog, to Nadia and to an unsolved murder from a few years back. Meanwhile the bar is robbed one night, leaving Marv on the hook with the Chechens for $5,000. With that, the wheels are in motion, building an intense, yet quietly simmering drama. The Drop marks Belgian director Michael R. Roskam’s US debut. Roscam, who most notably directed 2011’s Oscarnominated Bullhead, sets just the right tone to the film. Adding a wonderfully disturbing level of suspense to the proceedings is Bullhead’s lead actor Matthias Schoenaerts as Eric Deeds, the aforementioned psychopath. Naomi Rapace is another unusual but solid casting call. Tom Hardy as Bob will be a revelation to many. Hardy is a chameleon of an actor, best known to American audiences as Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, Fresh off his brilliant turn in Locke, he gives yet another performance that shows the depth and breadth of his talent. Sadly, The Drop marks Gandolfini’s swansong. On the surface Gandolfini seems like just another version of Tony Soprano, but as with everything else in The Drop, the story isn’t about what’s on the surface. Marv is deceptively layered and vulnerable and [as always] Gandolfini brings a deceptive nuance to the character. The Drop is a well crafted, ensemble effort. Unfortunately Roskam’s subtle directional reserve may have some thinking it’s not as great as it could have been, but it’s exactly that tone that made this movie work for me. It’s a moody, slow burn that draws the viewer in. Give it the time to let it unfold and it will quietly surprise you. Rated R for some strong violence and pervasive language.


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film reviews having their own internal crises. All of this, combined with a farcical case of mistaken identity, serves as the foundation for The Neeson’s age could take the kind of physical Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. punishment he receives and still keep going. Ol Parker’s script is ok, but uneven. If A Walk Among the Tombstones was Our who’s who of British pension-aged too dark for you then you’ll find Run All actors do their best with the material, but Night a lot easier to take. It’s worth seeing for even Bill Nighy, who can do uncomfortone scene alone where Ed Harris confronts able like nobody’s business, looks strained Liam Neeson in their old childhood restauat times. Director John Madden is clearly rant. No action, no violence, just two old pros relying on the talents of his players and reminding us that in the end, acting is what it’s A flat tire leads to a most unusual case of likeability of their characters to carry the all about. road rage in one of the stories that make up story, and by and large they do. Richard the Argentine anthoogy film Wild Tales. Gere is a good addition to the cast. David Rated R for strong violence, strong language, Strathairn, as the potential investor, is and drug use. takes place in a diner and focuses on a under utilized. The film is still very much Review by Chip Kaufmann roundabout form of revenge. The third an ensemble piece, but in this chapter of their story showcases the most unusual case journey it’s ultimately Maggie Smith’s show. The Second Best Exotic Marigold of road rage you will ever see, taking Madden smartly embellishes the film Hotel ½ the concept of Steven Spielberg’s Duel with some distractions, including a terrific Short Take: The aptly titled, entirely (1971) to unheard of levels. Bollywood-style dance number. The vibrancy unnecessary but ultimately affable, next The last three stories aren’t up to of India’s streets and its rich culture are on chapter in the lives of our favorite British the level of the first three but they are full display. The colors and production values ex-pat pensioners. still more than able to keep your interest. make The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel The fourth story involves a workaholic a wonderful feast for the eyes. REEL TAKE: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel engineer who ignores his family. He In the final analysis, sequels have been was the surprise hit of 2012. It was utterly becomes obsessed with justice when his made for much lesser films. It’s refreshing charming and perfectly self-contained. To my car is mistakenly towed and enacts an apthat a little film starring an ensemble of 60 and knowledge there is not a sequel to its source propriate revenge. The penultimate tale 70-something year old actors was beguiling material These Foolish Things. There was involves a rich man trying to persuade a enough to make a second. It’s certainly a pleasabsolutely no need for a sequel. If the stellar, poor neighbor to take the blame for his ant enough way to spend a couple of hours. late-career ensemble of The Best Exotic Marison’s hit-and-run accident. gold Hotel was willing to come back for round Rated PG for some language and suggestive The final segment is the longest of two, then by gum, it must be really good. comments. the set or at least it seemed that way. It Critically, it’s – meh – at best. The storylines Review by Michelle Keenan is also the most conventional, as it deals aren’t nearly as poignant as in the first film. with a couple at their wedding party, the Its mediocrity is made tolerable by the merits Wild Tales  secrets that are revealed, and the conseof its actors. That said, it’s certainly pleasant quences that ensue. It is also a modern Short Take: Argentine-Spanish anthology enough, and the sea of grey haired fans at the domestic variation on the old Laurel & film runs out of steam before the end but showing I attended certainly enjoyed it. Hardy formula of “tit for tat,” where is still wildly creative, with one sequence In the aptly titled Second Best Exotic things start small and then escalate outthat has to be seen t be believed. Marigold Hotel, we find our pensioners a few of-control. months down the road from where we last saw REEL TAKE: I have always loved anthology Two of the many producers on them. Sonny (Dev Patel) is seeking investors in films, from classics like Tales of Manhattan this film are Pedro Almodovar and his order to expand his retiree-hotel concept with (1942) and The Yellow Rolls Royce (1964), younger brother Augustin. Due to how the help of Muriel (Maggie Smith). But while to more recent offerings like New York some of the stories play out, it’s hard on a business trip to the United States with Stories (1989) and Paris je t’aime (2006). not to believe that they didn’t have more Muriel, Sonny becomes convinced that one of I also enjoy old school horror anthologies than just financial input into the film, his best friends is trying to steal Sunaina from like Tales from the Crypt (1972) and From which has already become Argentina’s him. This internal personal crisis turns him Beyond the Grave (1974). most successful movie export. into an even crazier, hotter mess than he already Wild Tales is an Argentine-Spanish coThe cinematography by Javier Julia is. In the meanwhile our pensioners are each production of six stories that is very creative, which can be a drawborrow from both of the back in some films (it was for me in above genres. The stories are Birdman), but here it perfectly compleessentially comic in tone (alments the material. The musical score beit black comedy) although by Gustavo Santaolalla is also a winner there are some horrific as it highlights each segment and keeps overtones. It features an enthe viewer interested. semble cast of international If you’re looking for something actors (but no big names) off the beaten track then Wild Tales and a host of producers certainly qualifies. At two hours it paces including one internationitself well and gives you your money’s ally recognized name. worth, unlike the other foreign film reThe first story, which viewed here. If you don’t like one story serves as a prologue, then another one immediately follows. involves an airplane flight This is one film that I will definitely be where the passengers revisiting especially for the third story. discover that they all knew Rated R for violence, language, and brief Our favorite British ex-pat pensioners are back a particular individual who sexuality. in the wholely unecessary but aptly titled The Second just happens to be flying Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Review by Chip Kaufmann the plane. The next one Movies continued from page 16

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. April 7: Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) Full blown, highly creative version of the once controversial Andrew Lloyd Webber musical is now an interesting time capsule of the early 1970s. Ted Neely stars as Jesus, with Carl Anderson as Judas and Yvonne Elliman as Mary Magdalene. Directed by Norman Jewison. April 14: Excalibur (1981) This dazzling version of the King Arthur legend remains the template that others must aspire to. Beautifully photographed, sumptuously scored, and with a powerhouse cast that includes Nigel Terry, Nicol Williamson, and younger versions of Helen Mirren and Liam Neeson. Directed by John Boorman. April 21: Love Letters (1945) Interesting modern variation on the Cyrano de Bergerac story. Joseph Cotton writes love letters for a fellow soldier only to fall in love with the woman he’s writing to. Revelations and tragedy ensue. The screenplay was co-written by Ayn Rand. The film also stars Jennifer Jones and Gladys Cooper. Directed by William Dieterle.

SPECIAL SHOWING! Wednesday, April 22: Mahler (1974) The life of Gustav Mahler is given the Ken Russell treatment in one of the filmmaker’s best movies. A marvelous use of Mahler’s music with stunning visuals and certain scenes that can only be described as pure Russell. Directed by Ken Russell. The film will be introduced by Lisi Russell, the filmmaker’s widow. Tickets $8; $6 for AFS members. April 28:

For The Defense

(1930) Rarely seen early talkie has William Powell as a smooth talking lawyer whose specialty is keeping high profile criminals out of jail. His life is on a roll until he becomes romantically involved with a dancer (Kay Francis) who is two-timing him. Directed by John Cromwell. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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Musings on Worthiness FIGHTING THE TROLL WITHIN

Trolls in the movies are fun, with their attack-you-from-under-thebridge lifestyle, keeping it interesting for characters like Willow and Madmartigan. But in real life, there is a reason we’ve nicknamed those who constantly tear others down: it’s because Trolls are mean! The modern version of that bridge is social media; however, we also encounter some form of these monsters deep down within ourselves, too. In a recent on-line discussion about how artists are potentially being edged-out of gentrifying areas, a stranger who appeared to be part of a successful gallery scene in another state commented something like: “just because someone puts paint to canvas, it doesn’t make them an artist.” More than tinged with bias, this dismissal of huge swaths of people who contribute in large ways to their local economies with his simplistic comment demeaning their skills is all too common. Not only do statements like this miss the mark, they contribute to the fostering of our own Internal Trolls. While there are of course distinctions between professional and amateur artists (and crafters, and hobbyists, and on and on – that’s another column for another day!), harshly indicating that artists or art groups are only worthy of taking up space under high-end commercially viable conditions is short-sighted, both on a personal level as

Creatives Sketched ARTISTS & WRITERS, PROMOTE YOURSELF Artists and writers are invited to contribute to our new web exclusive section – “Creatives Sketched.” With a rapidly growing readership, the Rapid River Magazine website is a great way to promote yourself, and a great way for potential buyers and readers to learn about you. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com.

WWW.RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

By

well as in the sphere of business. I’m reminded of my journey back into the ceramic arts as a “Non-Traditional Age” student in the schools and clay centers of Southern California in the 1990’s. The Trolls of Times Gone By can rear their ugly heads, gurgling up simple but powerful phrases like: “You can’t do this.” Many remember exactly when and where they were, what they were working on, and who said it, when they were told by a Troll casting its shadow across their little work table: “You’re not good at art.” It happens in other skill areas, too, but in the arts, it becomes a life-long battle about worthiness. For many, it can take years to work up the nerve to give something another shot. I remember this woman in a ceramics class at a clay center in Monrovia, CA, where, after the weekly kiln unloading, she looked a bit forlorn. Both her colorful work and her sad expression caught my eye, and I walked over and asked her how she felt about her results. Her Inner Ogre had taken over, and she replied that her work was just no good compared to everyone else. She recalled exactly when she was told she couldn’t do this – FORTY YEARS EARLIER. Believing she wasn’t good enough, becoming timid and self-effacingly comparative as she moved through life, she waited. Many of us that day conveyed how much we liked her work, and the studio became her oasis. We saw ourselves in her. We often take turns help-

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ing each other through these battles, changing our psyches one incident at a time, reminding ourselves that it’s not just the skills we value, but also the activities themselves. In many regions with vital arts and crafts scenes, many commercially successful artists and non-artists alike connect with and support the community, regardless of how people label themselves regarding professional status. Wouldn’t it be amazing if everyone’s first instinct was to do that, nurturing the dreams of their colleagues, knowing that the rewards of an activity are sometimes measurable on a spreadsheet, sometimes not; yet all are valuable, nonetheless. No one deserves Trolling; but it can happen, and we must remain vigilant. I say let’s counteract the snobby, broad brush-bearing goblins that spring forth to dismiss the collective lot through their pens and keyboards – and internally through our memories. Some of the best ways to stave them off are to keep showing up every day for one’s art or craft or job, and to continually strive to grow in one’s chosen area of focus. Sometimes we can’t fight the whole army, but we can slap back a Troll Within or two by simply saying: “This is who I am. This is what I do.”

The Troll Within, 2015. Illustration by Greg Vineyard

Greg Vineyard is a marketing professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards, www.zapow.com. www.gregvineyardillustration.com

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Your Target Market

When an artist wants to sell more work, the first conversation we have is about identifying their target market. By answering a few questions, they begin to hone in on how to direct their energies. Does your work appeal more to women or men? What age group? What income level? What type of occupation? What geographic locations? These and several other factors can help an artist focus on the sector that is most profitable. Of course, to some extent, success depends on how and where you market your work. Here in Western North Carolina, artists have several options. There are many commercial galleries, as well as co-op galleries and retail rental establishments that offer a wide array of artwork. In addition, there are a number of arts organizations that have ongoing exhibit programs that keep the artists’ work in the public eye. If you are fortunate enough to have

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a working space in the River Arts District, chances are your work is on display most of the time to those that visit your building. But many of the creative folks working there learn that is not enough; you must also be seeking exposure throughout the downtown area and other places as well, if you are serious about increasing your exposure. Perhaps you’ve already come to some conclusions about your target market. If not, here is my challenge. Talk with people as they are looking at what you’ve produced. Allow them a few moments to take it all in, and then mention that you are doing some market research and would be interested to know what

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WeNDy h. oUTLAND

their first thoughts were when they saw your work. Then ask if there is anything in particular that drew their eye or held their interest. Often the responses are surprising. Once the conversation heads in that direction, you can comfortably inquire about their occupation with a remark such as, “That was an interesting comment…it makes me wonder what kind of work you do.” By making a few notes after each chat, you will begin to gain a better understanding of what types of folks respond most favorably to your work. The next step is getting your art in places that they frequent.

The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz


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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

Wonderland

DRUGS, SYMBOLIC LOGIC AND VICTORIAN SEX

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Wonderland is the title of the next ZaPow Artist group show. This unique exhibit will present viewers with the opportunity to walk through the complete text of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass as retold via the illustrations created by ZaPow Artists. The opening reception will be held Saturday, April 4 from 7-9 p.m.

Jce Schlapkohl

“French Cuisine“

Works by Cheryl Keefer at: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (often shortened to Alice in Wonderland,) was originally published in 1865 and written by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Dodgson was an intensely private academic who published scholarly articles on advanced mathematics and Symbolic Logic. To understand the world of Wonderland and what inspired Dodgson’s nonsensical whimsy one must first consider the culture of Victorian England. According to his journals, Dodgson believed that “having sex was against God’s wishes for him.” Many scholars believe that Dodgson’s imposed sexual repression contributed to his preference for the company of children. Children during the Victorian era were seen as pure creatures free from sex. Dodgson became a sort of uncle to the children of the Liddel family. One July afternoon in 1862 Dodgson told the children the story that would become Alice. The Mad Hatter, Chesire Cat, Caterpillar, Do Do and many other characters were born as allegory for figures in the real life of Alice Liddel. Beginning in the 1960s artists drew similarities between the tales of Alice and their own experiences with illicit substances. Jefferson Airplane’s song Go Ask Alice and Mark McCloud’s blotter artwork of Alice Goes Through The Looking Glass are two of the most famous instances of drug inspired Alice art in contemporary American culture. It is Dodgson’s use of creative allegory for universal concepts such as frustration, alienation, and abandonment that lend the Alice stories to vivid artistic interpretation. In ZaPow artist Rebecca Rouse’s words “The ZaPow group show will be an evolved Wonderland where things you’ve never imagined may appear right before your eyes!” IF YOU Wonderland, opening reception Saturday, April 4 GO from 7-9 p.m. Wonderland will run until the end

of May 2015. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Suite 101, Downtown, Asheville. Visit zapow.com.

Wedge Studios 129 Roberts St. River Arts District By appt. Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Downtown Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

Works on Display at:

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Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

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Cedar Hill Studios, . 25 Waynesville PG

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828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

“After the Storm” Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

PG. 20

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1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade PG. 20

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Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

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Shops, Galleries & Restaurants Pack Square Park, Downtown Asheville The sculptural railing on Reuter Terrace was designed and built by Black Mountain artist Julia Burr.

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Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

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First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

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For as long as I can remember, I have loved nature, music and art as fundamental expressions of the human experience which expand our awareness and connect us to something larger than ourselves.

it was the sense of mystery and atmosphere or the ephemeral faces of landscape that excited and stimulated my imagination. These were poetic landscapes subtle yet powerful. Nature is fleeting. Tones are subtle and the light crossing the landscape illuminates and transforms what could easily be overlooked into a dazzling symphony of color notes and sublime atmospheric effects. Tonalism seemed to capture the mystery of the subject at hand. They were elegant landscapes, rich in mood and feeling.

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Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

Web Exclusive

A CONNECTION TO THE LAND

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Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Deborah Squier

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36 Haywood Street Downtown Asheville

Read Deborah Squier’s full article at www.RapidRiverMagazine.com

www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

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Deborah Squier Fine Art Regional Landscapes in Oil and Pastel

DEBORAH SQUIER AT BLUE SPIRAL 1 The pastels at Blue Spiral 1 are shown in conjunction with works by Will Henry Stevens (1881-1949). The eight pastel paintings included in the show are painted at locations in and around Asheville, including Beaver Lake, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Warren Wilson Turning Point, 18x34 pastel by Deborah Squier. College farmland. My works are always in support of conservation and preservation I am moved and influenced by of habitat and the disappearing landscape. many artists past and present but early It is my belief that as artists we have a on it was the impressionists and the responsibility to truth and authenticity lesser known tonalist painters who whatever our subject matter. seemed to resonate with the poetry in my own perceptions. IF The early tonalist painters who inYOU Panel discussion with Deborah fluenced my work and style are George GO Squier, Friday, April 10 at 3 p.m. Inness, James McNeill Whistler, and “Water” is on display through April John Henry Twachtman, along with 24, 2015. Blue Spiral 1, 38 Biltmore Ave., others. They were named tonalists in Downtown Asheville. Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6; the late 1800’s and early 1900’s for their Sunday 12-6. For more details, call (828) 251-0202 or visit www.BlueSpiral1.com particular soft style of painting. Perhaps

www.DeborahSquier.com 828.216.8806

PG. 20

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Squierd@bellsouth.net

love is alive

The Other Place We Live

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Explorations in Dreams and Hypnagogia.

New works, most created specifically for this show, by Asheville artists Dona Barnet, Alisa Carswell, Hannah Dansie, Nicole McConville, Meg Reilley, and René Treece Roberts, explore the infinite landscape of dreams, dreaming, and the space between waking and dreaming. Mediums including photography, encaustics, collage, illustration, and drawing will be featured.

Asheville style gold and diamond rings

Opening Reception Friday, May 1, from 7 to 9 p.m. The Satellite Gallery, 55 Broadway, Asheville. (828) 505-2225, www.thesatellitegallery.com

v Local Arts & Crafts v Jewelry Repair

29 Biltmore Ave.

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO PG. 20

IF YOU GO

v Custom Designed Jewelry

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Parking access from S. Lexington Ave. Look for signs to your left at back of building.

www.jewelsthatdance.com

63 Haywood Street • Downtown Asheville 828-254-5088 • Hours: Mon - Sat 10:30 - 6

(828) 281-4044 PG. 20

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www.vandykejewelry.com

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fine art

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Here comes spring and color!

We love the subdued neutral hues of winter and the tranquility of watching snow fall and sitting by an open fire. However, with Spring around the corner, everything in nature seems to awaken. There is excitement in the air as the daffodils, tulips, and other blossoms start appearing and coloring our landscape. I’ll be painting the flowers from our garden as they appear, including peonies, hollyhocks, dahlias, hydrangeas, and some wild flowers. I strive to capture their beauty with light and shadow showing their form. Joyce Schlapkohl has works on display at: Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Seven Sisters, Black Mountain Cedar Hill Studios, Waynesville (828) 456-4600, www.joycepaints.com

22 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

Painting by Joyce Schlapkohl

I hope you will visit the Asheville Gallery of Art soon and see our new and exciting paintings. IF YOU Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College GO Street, across from Pritchard Park in

downtown Asheville. Call (828) 2515796, or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.


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Asheville Gallery of Art Showcases Local Artists

Asheville Gallery of Art in downtown Asheville, provides a unique gallery experience to all who visit. Walk in and you are greeted by one of the 28 member artists who will answer any questions you might have about the pieces you see. This friendly, hands-on approach to viewing and purchasing art connects visitors to working artists and offers a glimpse into Asheville’s thriving artistic community. As you stroll through the gallery you will notice a remarkable diversity of styles and vision, all made by local artists. Traditional landscapes hang side-by-side with expressive abstracts, whimsical mixed-media paintings, figurative works, and still lifes. Along with original paintings in oil, pastel, watercolor, and acrylic, AGA also features artists’ reproductions and a colorful array of note cards. Founded as a co-operative in 1988, AGA is Asheville’s longest-established downtown gallery. The artists represented are co-owners who not only display their work throughout the gallery, but also take care of all responsibilities and duties of running the business. Members serve on committees that handle the day-to-day jobs of finance, advertising, housekeeping, and selecting new members. Admission into the gallery is through a rigorous jury process. When AGA has openings in membership, the gallery calls for 2-D artists to apply and submit paintings for review. AGA’s jury committee selects members based on refined craftsmanship, diversity in styles, and professionalism. There are no limits to style or paint medium, as long as the body of work meets the gallery’s high standards, and the artist has a contribution to make to AGA. The gallery currently has a waiting list of juried artists from this region. Sahar Fakhoury, AGA’s current president, believes the gallery has been an important art destination in downtown Asheville since its inception and strives to continue that tradition.

Asheville Gallery of Art Seeks New Home After 27 years in the same location, Asheville Gallery of Art will lose their lease at 16 College Street by the end of the year. Parsec Financial, who owns the building, is expanding their office space. AGA is currently looking for a new location in downtown Asheville. President Sahar Fakhoury states, “We see this as both an opportunity and challenge for the gallery. All our members are working toward finding a new home as we look forward to continuing to be a prominent presence in the Asheville art community.”

By JANe

moLiNeLLi

Mt. Mitchell Morning, oil by Peggy Horne Taylor

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100 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

Fragments of Time and Space, oil painting by Sahar Fakhoury

“We are very proud of our artists. We expect them to grow professionally by staying current and fresh. The gallery offers opportunities for monthly featured solo and group shows which allow artists to present new work. Many of our artists participate in workshops or conferences with well-known artists or join artist organizations related to their medium. Some teach, and many travel nationally and internationally looking for new inspiration.” Asheville Gallery of Art will feature the work of Bill Cole during the month of April. His show, titled “Art of the Angle,” celebrates the art hidden away in everyday buildings and structures. “I’ve tried to capture my feelings when I glance at scenes and realize that there are pieces of art in plain sight all around me. Most often, what catches my eye is a small part of a much larger scene,” says Cole.

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street, in the heart of downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. Hours: Mon-Sat 10-5; Sun 1-4 (828) 251-5796 www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

PG. 25

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Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 23


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Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival

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This year’s Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival will be held Saturday, May 9 in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level.

free; held rain or shine. Don’t forget to visit our one-of-a-kind shops in the Historic Frog Level District, open year ”round.

Local growers will furnish plenty of herbs, flowers, and trees, while artisans will provide a plethora of nature-related items. From birdhouses to baskets, and pottery to plants, this festival is the best way to jump-start the growing season. The Haywood County Master Gardeners will be on hand to help you with any gardening questions. Musical groups will perform all day and include the Frog Level Philharmonic, Bohemian Jean, and more. There will also be wonderful food vendors to keep you in sustenance while you enjoy your day. Parking is available at the nearby public garage on Branner Ave., at Haywood Builders, and all public parking areas. Bring your family and friends; enjoy the day with us. Admission is

In 1884, the railroad came to Waynesville. The tracks were laid in a low-lying area alongside Richland Creek. Up til then, the area had little development, being mostly swampland with only a few scattered buildings. All that

HISTORY OF FROG LEVEL

Waynesville Depot circa 1890.

ended with the advent of tourism brought in by the new railway. Liveries lined up and down Commerce St. to take the visitors to their destinations as boarding houses and inns grew. Since the creek occasionally flooded when the heavy rains came, townsfolk started calling the area “Frog Level.” The first train depot burned in 1900, but was soon replaced with another that remained standing until 1987. Up til the early ’40s, Frog Level remained the commercial center of town. Folks walked up the hill to what was then called Pleasant Hill, now downtown Waynesville. The focus changed to Main Street when automobiles became popular and the train was no longer the main source of transportation. The last passenger train arrived in Waynesville in 1949, however, freight trains pass through Frog Level twice daily, with most trains continuing on to Sylva.

Even though the waterways were rerouted and Richland Creek no longer flooded the area, Frog Level declined for several decades as businesses came and went. However, there is one store at 244 Depot St. that has been in continuous business since it was built in 1900. Known as “The Waynesville Candy Company,” the business has been owned by the Stovall family since 1925. It served as the main distributor for the Stovalls’ 5 and 10 stores in western NC and northern Georgia in the prosperous ’30s and ’40s. It is still run by descendant Dewey Stovall today. continued on page 27

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2015 “Whole Bloomin’ Thing” Spring Festival FREE • Frog Level • Waynesville, NC

Haywood County’s Official Kick-off to Spring Local growers and crafters offer a bevy of garden starts and unique, nature-related treasures. This outdoor festival features food, music, and much more! Sponsored by Haywood Tourism Authority www.VisitNCsmokies.com 800-334-9036

Facebook.com/wholebloominfestival

Visit our one-of-a-kind shops in Frog Level, open year ’round.

24 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8


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“Old Homeplace” Candler NC. Colored pencil drawing.

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WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY.

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Twigs & Leaves Gallery is WV

Carryout + Catering

Bursting with Spring

Fresh Southern Homemade Meals & Desserts

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828-550-2265

Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

1092 N. Main Street • Waynesville, NC Mon-Sat 6am-2:30pm

Sun 7am - 2:30pm

PG. 40

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FEET HURT? All Types of Major Appliances Bonded & Insured

Walk-In Foot and Ankle Clinic Monday - Thursday 1-4pm

828-456-4989 Fax: 828-456-7021 Mark1462@Att.net

WAYNESVILLE 289 Access Road 452-4343 ASHEVILLE 573 Merrimon Avenue 254-7716 www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

Mountain Top Appliance Service Mark Atkinson • Reputable Repairs

91 Smokies Ridge, Waynesville, NC 24 Hour Emergency Service 828-646-7422

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature Mark your calendar to join us as we kick off the season’s first Art After Dark on May 1st featuring jewelry artist Becky Burnette and clay artist Crystal Allen.

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville PG. 40

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etching by Andrea Wilson

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828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 25


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Certified Course Designed by Runners for Runners

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Blue Ridge Books

Messages to the Heart, with Elise and Phil Okrend Saturday, April 4 at 3 p.m. – Elise, a pastel painter and Phil, a writer and professional life coach have incorporated the art and words from their book, Messages to the Heart, Reflections of Beauty and Truth, into a one hour program.

Saturday May 2

Where All Light Tends to Go, with David Joy

B&C Winery Locally Crafted Wines

Fresh Air, Mountain Vistas & Local Swag! The inaugural event begins on Main Street in beautiful downtown Waynesville and winds through neighborhoods & scenic farmlands to finish in Frog Level, a revitalized railroad district listed on the National Re Register of Historic Places.

828.550.3610

145 Wall Street PG. 25

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Downtown Waynesville

Ad sponsored by Haywood Tourism Authority VisitNCSmokies.com

26 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

(828) 456-6000, www. blueridgebooksnc.com

You need to know if your advertising is paying off. When it came to publicizing our meet the artist tours, concerts, or storytelling in the park, the overwhelming response was “We read about it in Rapid River Magazine.”

SmokiesHalfMarathon.com

Presented by the Haywood Chamber of Commerce

IF YOU Held at Blue Ridge Books, GO 152 S. Main St. Waynesville.

~ FROG LEVEL ~

Registration Open!

Presenting Sponsor:

Saturday, April 11 at 3 p.m. – In David Joy’s “Appalachian noir” coming of age story, Where All Light Tends to Go, blood is thicker than water and Jacob McNeely is drowning in it. This debut novel has already garnered praise from authors Daniel Woodrell, Ron Rash, Tawni O’Dell and Ace Atkins.

PG. 25

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Thank you for supporting the arts and entertainment community. ~ Ruth Planey


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artful living April Madness

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We all know what March Madness is — it involves a heated tournament, brackets and that pool of money you don’t mind losing if your inner sports guru is off the mark.

April Madness is a phenomenon that regularly occurs every spring among local food lovers. Everything that was canned, preserved or frozen from last season is nearly gone and the promise of the season ahead is still weeks away. Essentially, we find ourselves so hungry for the bold flavors of a bountiful growing season that a sort of madness sets in. Just when you think you are ready to breakdown and buy produce grown thousands of miles away, spring wakes up in Haywood County. Luckily, we have the luxury of enjoying four beautifully balanced seasons— each with something unique to offer. Early spring

By

TiNA mASCiAReLLi

is no exception. Enter cool weather crops like garden fresh kale! Some varieties of kale winter-over better than others. If you have some growing in your garden, this is the time to enjoy the small tender leaves raw. Hearty kale is easily elevated to dinner status by adding grilled farm-raised chicken. For a twist on local, try infusing your salad with Asian flavors by adding honey, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil and toasted sesame seeds to your vinaigrette. Throw in spring onions or green garlic, dried cranberries, crunchy Asian noodles and top with local grilled chicken (optional). With each bite, you will feel your spring madness slowly transform into spring delight! Haywood County is home to a vibrant community of agripreneurs, offering farm fresh ingredients year round. Visit our online directory at www.BuyHaywood.com

Spring Hike in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

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Hike through history in Great Smoky Mountains National Park’s Cataloochee Valley.

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ANNA Lee ZANeTTi

on the second Tuesday of each month. Guided Classic Hikes are $35 and include a complimentary membership to Friends of the Smokies. Current Friends members hike for $10. Members who bring a friend hike for free.

Hikers will enjoy scenic views, wildflowers, rushing creeks, a gravesite and a historic home along Caldwell Enjoy scenic views, wildflowers, Fork Loop on Tuesday, April and rushing creeks. 14. This hike is led by hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein. Caldwell Fork Loop is 9.4 miles in length IF with a total elevation gain of 1,650 feet, and YOU To register contact AnnaLee@ GO friendsofthesmokies.org. For more is moderately difficult. Hikers will visit the information, please visit www. historic Woody House and a union gravesite. friendsofthesmokies.org. Friends of the Smokies hikes are offered

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Healthy, Good Thoughts

I’ve been thinking about the challenge of caregiving.

Many of us in our fifties and into our sixties are caring for aging parents. Fortunately there’s a lot written about being a caregiver. Just in our area, many compassionate people share their experiences and offer insights and suggestions. I could write a book just about the gifted professionals that devote their days to elder care. Perhaps some of them will read this and hear once again, how thankful I am. Here are my “Good Thoughts” about self-care for the caregiver. When even reaching out and asking for help seems like another thing on a long to-do list, I encourage you to simply acknowledge the little things you man-

By

KAThLeeN CoLBURN

age to do for yourself. A phone conversation with a friend. A load of laundry done. Sitting still for a few minutes. A good night’s sleep. Strive to be easy with yourself as you continue to do whatever you can for yourself. Strive to be honest and real with yourself and others. Realize that unless someone has done what you’re doing, they may not fully know the extent of what’s needed for an aging parent. Have compassion for them as they try to understand. Know that what you’re doing for this person is beautiful, even if they don’t always want your help. You accomplish a lot. Sit down with a few bites of chocolate and breath!

Organic kale grown by King Harvest Farm and sold at Haywood's Historic Farmers Market in downtown Waynesville.

‘Whole Bloomin’ Thing’ cont’d. from pg. 24

In 2003, Frog Level was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its contribution to the history of Haywood County and the architectural features of its buildings. It is now known for being home to Panacea, a popular coffeehouse/roaster, and Frog Level Brewing Company, noted for its “Frog Pee” brew. The area has attracted many art and antique businesses in the past few years. The Historic Frog Level Merchant’s Association began the local annual tradition called The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival in 2002. More than 8,000 people attend the festival which marks the beginning of the season for many locals. Frog Level business owner and artist at the mahogany house art gallery and studios (which opened in October of 2013), t.e. siewert says, “It will be the first time many people will see what Frog Level has to offer them, and with so many art and antique businesses added, I believe they will want to return many times. There’s a nostalgic feel to the buildings and an ambiance you can’t find everywhere – it definitely leaves an impression.” Make plans to attend The Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival and see for yourself what is so special about Frog Level! Sponsored by the Haywood Tourism Authority, 800-334-9036, www.VisitNCsmokies.com.

IF YOU GO

Whole Bloomin’ Thing Spring Festival, Saturday, May 9 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Waynesville’s Historic Frog Level. Visit us at Facebook.com/ wholebloominfestival

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 27


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sound experience

Sound Waves

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Andrew Combs

Andrew Combs’ new album, All These Dreams, is out now on Coin Records/ Thirty Tigers (iTunes).

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A benefit concert for the Asheville Music School.

There’s no shortage of musical talent at the Asheville Music School. Some 35 professional musicians and teaching artists train more than 600 students of all ages in using an array of instruments Rock band performing at Sound Waves 2014. each year. The sessions are primarily one-on-one, yet what you might not know will also be a special performance by guest about AMS is that since late 2012 the school artists acclaimed percussionist River Guerhas operated as a nonprofit. It has provided guerian and multi-instrumentalist Chris hundreds of music scholarships to underRosser of Free Planet Radio, plus a raffle served youth and adults through the Paul of gift certificates, artworks, event tickets, Thorpe Music Education Fund, and operates and more. A portion of the night’s dinner the Sound Education Outreach Program, sales also goes back to the school. comprised of six ensembles that perform free Sound Effects brings good tunes to of charge for youth, seniors and people living the stage for a good cause. Sponsored in with disabilities at community sites throughpart by Mark Fields Real Estate and 98.1 out Buncombe County. The River. “It’s all an effort to further the school’s mission of strengthening our communities through music education and outreach,” says IF YOU Sound Effects: A Benefit Concert Director Amy Rae Stupka. GO for the Asheville Music School, On Thursday, April 9, AMS presents the Thursday, April 9 from 6-9 p.m. Sound Effects benefit concert at Isis Restau$12 advance at isisasheville.com or AMS; rant & Music Hall in West Asheville. The $15 door. Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, concert is a showcase of the school’s talented 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. For more students and faculty, and a fundraiser for its information, call (828) 252-6244 or visit ashevillemusicschool.org scholarship and outreach programs. There

Released to widespread acclaim, NPR Music’s Ann Powers praises, “The arrangements on All These Dreams have a retro quality, evoking 1970s Laurel Canyon and 1980s Austin as well as 1960s Music Row. With the singer’s sagebrush-rough but always carefully calibrated vocals at the center, the album works on one level as a history of the troubadour figure from the classic-rock era onward, with Combs as charming antihero.” IF YOU Andrew Combs with Nicki Bluhm, GO Saturday, April 18 at New Mountain,

38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 785-1701, www.newmountainavl.com.

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Band of Lovers

Band of Lovers is an indie/folk duo from Upstate NY with guitar, ukulele, and vocal harmonies

The band is currently on a national tour celebrating the February 2015 release of their debut full-length album, the Coast.

The Honeycutters Release New CD

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The Asheville-based American Country Roots Band releases Me Oh My this month through Organic Records.

The Honeycutters include Tal Taylor on mandolin, Rick Cooper on bass, Josh Milligan on drums, and Matt Smith on pedal steel, electric guitar, and dobro. Fueled by the powerful songwriting and vocals of founder Amanda Platt, Me Oh My moves her into the spotlight as producer, band leader, and principal creative force behind the band. With songs that are honest and relatable, part chagrin and part hope, Platt’s voice carries a timeless appeal. Me Oh My is threaded with themes of love, loss, acceptance and regrowth. It kicks off with “Jukebox,” an engaging southern swingin’ song. The up-tempo, beerraising, danceable “Ain’t It The Truth” will fuel audiences at live shows, while melancholy ballads like “Texas ‘81” balance the album both in meter and mood. “Little Bird” gained Platt notoriety at MerleFest’s prestigious Chris Austin Songwriting Contest in 2011. For more information about the Honeycutters, please visit www.thehoneycutters.com.

28 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

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eRiN SChoLZe

The Honeycutters are Rick Cooper, Tal Taylor, Amanda Anne Platt, Josh Milligan, and Matt Smith. Photo by Sandlin Gaither IF YOU GO

The Honeycutters, Friday, April 17. Doors open at 5 p.m.; show at 9 p.m. All ages. General admission $15; standing room, some balcony seating. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road, Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737, or visit www.isisasheville.com

With a folk heart full of harmonies, Band of Lovers are modern day troubadours. Hailing from Upstate New York, Dave Strumfeld (guitar and vocals) and Sabina Beachdell (ukulele and vocals) formed the band in California in the fall of 2013. They recorded the Coast, near Woodstock, NY last summer. Learn more at www.bandoflovers.net IF YOU GO

Band of Lovers: Tuesday, April 21 at 9 p.m. at Jack of the Wood; and Thursday, April 23 from 6-8 p.m. at French Broad Brewery.

James Cassara’s “Spinning Discs” will return next month.


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sound experience Spring LEAF 2015 Performing Artists • Xavier Rudd & The United Nations • Bombino • Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires • R. Carlos Nakai • Karsh Kale • The Duhks • Ganga Giri
 • Lágbája • Martha R. Carlos Nakai Redbone Roots Project • Donna The Buffalo
 • Natalia Clavier (vocalist of Thievery Corporation) • Secret Agent 23 Skido • Kinobe & The Wamu Spirit • Diali Cissokho & Kaira Ba • Sierra Hull • Proyecto Jirondai • Masankho Banda • Free Planet Radio • Chief Shaka Zulu
 Sierra Hull • Poetry Slams • Preston Frank Zydeco • Grandfather Mazatzin Aztekayolokalli • Bailey Spiritual Sounds FKA Madisson Elites • Contra w/ Free Raisins • Buddy System • Clayfoot Strutters • Adina Gordon • Charlotte Crittenden •T 
 he Warriors of Anikituhwa • Unifire Theater • Kickin It’ Jelly Dome • Toy Boat Circus
 • Fox & Beggar Theater • Numatik • Travers Brothership • Sirius B • Juan Benevides Group

LEAF Celebrates its 40th Festival by Spreading Global Gratitude

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The Spring 2015 LEAF Festival takes place May 7-10 at the majestic Lake Eden in Black Mountain. Spread “Global Gratitude” at LEAF Festival and experience tribal tribute artists from 30 different countries. The stellar lineup of performing artists includes Xavier Rudd & The United Nations making their 2015 debut, Rolling Stones Top 100 Guitarist Bombino, and Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires known as “The Screaming Eagle of Soul.” “Moving into our 40th Festival this Spring, LEAF is embracing 20 years of momentum to give our amazing community a truly unique experience,” states Ehren Cruz, LEAF Performing Arts Director. “Over the past two decades we have established time honored traditions that now rest at the heart of our community – from contra to Bombino poetry, family adventure to late night drum circles, roots music to world music – this Spring LEAF aims to bring the very best of all we have created these many years into a celebration of epic proportions!” The 40th LEAF features Arizona Music & Entertainment Hall of Famer R. Carlos Nakai (Native American flautist), Donna the Buffalo (Americana Roots Rock) returning since playing the inaugral LEAF Festival in 1995, and Sierra Hull (Bluegrass), who performed at the Grand Ole Opry and Carnigie Hall by the age of 12. The LEAF experience is rounded out with showcases from the 2nd Annual Newsong: LEAF Singer Songwriter Competition,

By

CoRTiNA CALDWeLL

Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local & Super Social! Discount Coupons ✿ Contests www.facebook.com/rapidrivermagazine Xavier Rudd & The United Nations

the Pisgah 10th Year Anniversary Happy Hour Jams, the Global Gratitude Mural Project, and much more. In addition to music from three stages and various art displays, the LEAF Festival also features healing artists, local craft brews, a kids village, a poetry slam, lakeside activities, camping, cabins, dance parties and food from local independent restaurants and vendors. IF YOU GO

The Spring 2015 LEAF Festival, May 7-10 at Lake Eden in Black Mountain. Purchase adult tickets, starting at $40 for the day or $147 for the weekend, online at www.theLEAF.org or by phone at (828) 686-8742. Additional discounts available for local, commuting residents, and youth 10-17 years of age. Children under 10 years of age admitted free with parent/guardian.

Moon Hooch

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Brooklyn sax-and-drums dance music trio Moon Hooch released their second album, This Is Cave Music.

While Moon Hooch’s debut album was almost entirely instrumental, the new album features Mike Wilbur singing on four of the album’s ten tracks. And while the core of their sound still revolves around the saxes and drums, the band supplemented their sound with live digital effects, resulting in a more lush and progressive sound. The looping, maniacal sax melodies and James Muschler’s furious drumming are fierce and trance-like. Sometimes McGowen switches over to a contrabass clarinet or inserts objects into the bell of his sax to create the deep, throbbing womp of a dubstep bassline.

Mike Wilbur (saxophone), Wenzl McGowen (saxophone), James Muschler (drums). IF YOU GO

Moon Hooch, Saturday, April 4 at 9 p.m. $15; 21+. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 785-1701, www.newmountainavl.com.

Learn more at www.moonhooch.com

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COPYEDITING &

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SHORT STORY WRITERS WANTED

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Rapid River Magazine Web Exclusive

Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. Visit her website, www.aptitudeforwords.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

18th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops. Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline May 31, 2015. Winning poems will be published online. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071.

Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest 85 N. Main Street Canton, NC 28716

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authors ~ poetry ~ books

The Poet’s Voice

FINGERPRINTS

When we write poetry, we leave verbal fingerprints behind.

Kathleen Colburn www.aptitudeforwords.com

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The Voice of the poem identifies us. When Robert Frost wrote, “Sound is the gold in the ore,” he was writing about voice. Voice identifies, etches indelibly, stamps, and inscribes. Our words make us present for readers today, and the future. In an essay from Poets and Writers (March/April), publisher, Jennifer Noel remarks, “Publication is a means to an end. And the end is being read.” I agree. Nothing pleases me more than to know someone has read my work. : ) Poems are the “glue” that cement me to the past, and connect me to the future. (I give Tracey K. Smith credit for this idea – again from Poet’s and Writers magazine.) “The sound of the author’s voice resurrects the poet. The force of a poem is empowered by the voice behind the poem.” These are two thoughts from Poetry Speaks, a volume containing poems – you can listen to the poets reading on an accompanying CD. I lost my voice for eight years. My first mother-in-law, a Yankee (bless her heart) decided I sounded ignorant. (I was born in Richmond, Virginia.) She insisted that her son, my new husband, rid me of my “awful accent.” Husband managed an opera company, taught diction, considered himself “a singer,” (at least he wasn’t a tenor). With his guidance, I learned to speak “correctly.” You’ll be glad to know that when I decided to figure out where Carol had gone, my voice found me. I declare, my Southern accent hasn’t deserted me since. I wallow in it. I received my MFA from Hamline University, in St. Paul, Minnesota. When the professor or another student read my poetry, the class would nod and say, “That’s Carol’s.” At first I thought they could hear my Southern accent, but it wasn’t my accent. It was word choice, syntax, details – “voice.” I consider poets I can’t do without – they contain multitudes. Here’s a short list: Gerard Manley Hopkins, Walt Whitman, T.S. Eliot, lucille clifton, Basho, Stanley Kunitz, Mary Oliver, William Shakespeare, Bill Holm, Jane Hirshfield, William Butler Yeats, both Brownings, Seamus Heaney, Gwendolyn Brooks, Em-

POETRIO

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“Writers need to understand the distinction between wanting to be published and what they really want. Publication is a means to an end. And the end is being read.” ~ Jennifer Noel, from Poets and Writers magazine, March/April 2015

ily Dickinson, H.D., William Stafford, and Bill Holm… for starters. Voice distinguishes them. This quote opens Mary Oliver’s, A Poetry Handbook. It is by Basho (1644 - 94), translated by Robert Bly (the one who kisses books). The temple bell stops – but the sound keeps coming out of the flowers. In a chapter on Sound, Mary writes, “To make a poem, we must make sounds. Not random sounds but chosen sounds.” She continues with a selection from a textbook of grammar published in 1860 which divides the alphabet into categories: vowels, consonants, semivowels and mutes – poet’s tools. She writes that poets select words for sound as well as meaning. (We knew this, right?) Mary continues with devices of sound: alliteration, assonance, and onomatopoeia. I am dazzled by details. Not only do they identify poets, they place them on the map. Mary Oliver has left New England, and moved to Florida! How will this change her words? She will continue to pay attention, be astonished, and tell about it. In A Poetry Handbook, she writes, “Poems are not language, but the content of the language.” And for advice: “Good poems are the best teachers.” I taught music history at the University of Wisconsin in River Falls. Most of my students grew up on farms. I played Bach for them. I played Mozart, Handel, and the hinge in music history, Beethoven. Every class listened to the last movement of Beethoven’s ninth symphony. One of my students returned from a weekend and told me he’d played the fourth movement of the Ninth Symphony for his parents. His mother said, “I’m going to listen to this every day for the rest of my life.” I admit to quoting poets in class, good stuff, the Beethoven and Brahms of the poetry world. For children, grandchildren, and friends, memorize a favorite poem. Say it aloud for yourself. Share it. You never know whose life you will change.

Write on!

Sunday, April 12 at 3 p.m.

References

Readings by poets Katherine Soniat (The Goodbye Animals), Grace Ocasio (The Speed of Our Lives), and Megan Sexton (Swift Hour).

Poetry Speaks, edited by Elise Paschen and Rebekah P. Mosby Singing School: Learning to Write (and read) Poetry by Studying the Masters, Robert Pinsky

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

A Poetry Handbook, Mary Oliver

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Poets and Writer’s magazine, March/April 2015

In this dream the typewriter is a piano and I play with unplanned accuracy and such fluency you would think I was a Southerner whose tradition recommended continues telling. from “In This Dream” by Grace Paley

Advice Someone dancing inside us has learned only a few steps: the “Do-Your-Work” in 4/4/ time, the “What-Do-You-Expect” Waltz. He hasn’t noticed yet the woman standing away from the lamp, the one with black eyes who knows the rumba and strange steps in jumpy rhythms from the mountains of Bulgaria. If they dance together, something unexpected will happen; if they don’t the next world will be a lot like this one. by Bill Holm

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

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April is National Poetry Month

The Southern Poetry Anthology, VII Friday, April 24 at 7 p.m. A projected twelveto-sixteen volume project celebrating established and emerging poets of the American South. Hosted by William Wright, with readings by contributors Hannah Bonner, Keith Flynn, Luke Hankins, Katherine Soniat, and Matthew Wimberley.

Thomas Rain Crowe Discussion & Signing Wednesday, April 29 at 7 p.m. Local author, publisher, and environmental activist Thomas Rain Crowe is the author and editor of many books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. His latest is Living Legacy: In Their Own Words, a collection of interviews with dozens of poets from the 60s generation including Beat poets, performance poets, eco-poets, and many more. IF YOU GO

Readings held at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings

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On the Trail of a Famous Writer’s Journey – Part One

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When I first came to town, a friend told me about the famous novelist and short story writer Gail Godwin, who grew up in Asheville and often used local characters and settings in her work. I was curious to read her, since we were both educated by Catholic nuns, a fact that differentiated us from most other American writers, but also made us spiritual sisters. Alas, upon learning that Ms. Godwin had moved to Woodstock, New York, and thus was no longer a “local,” I put her on my literary back burner. Flash forward a decade and a half. Attracted by its lovely cover, I “accidentally” discovered one of Godwin’s non-fiction books, Heart: A Personal Journey Through Its Myths and Meanings (William Morrow, 2001, 328 pp.) It was an extraordinary look at the body’s blood-pumping organ and its symbology through the ages. The audacity of the book’s scope, its depth, and the sheer beauty of its language was mind-blowing. Gail Godwin was again on my radar. This year Godwin, at age 77, came out with Publishing: A Writer’s Memoir. (B&W illustrations by Frances Halsbrand, Bloomsbury, 2015, 209 pp.) In her words, it is about “wanting for a long time to be a published writer and about the condition of living as a writer for a long time after you are published.” She was referring, not to the millions of published words of non-fiction someone like I had accomplished, but to the publication of fiction, of novels, the highest goal of a writer. The slim volume was interesting to me as a history of what the publishing industry used to be like (writer advances, close relationships with agents and editors, book tours, marketing strategies). That world is long gone, but Godwin’s experiences are relevant to today’s writers. I arrived at the third and fourth stops in my Godwin odyssey because I’m a big fan of Rob Neufeld, who, among his other accomplishments, is the book reviewer and local

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history writer for the Asheville Citizen-Times. It turns out that Godwin, long before Julia Cameron had made Morning Pages de rigueur for Asheville’s creative enclave, had been keeping a journal since her years at Chapel Hill in Raleigh. Urged by her friend Joyce Carol Oates (certainly no slouch in the publication department), Godwin decided to publish these journals. Volume 1 (out in 2007, Random House, 333 pp.) covered years 1961 to 1963 (college, journalism, working in Europe and more). Volume 2 (published four years later in 2011, Random House, 319 pp.) included years 1963 to 1969, ending with the acceptance for publication of her Ph.D. thesis, The Perfectionists, when she was age 31. Neufeld served as editor of the journals, which means he was “The Great Explainer,”

Among her many awards and accomplishments, Gail Godwin is the author of fourteen novels. Three were National Book Award finalists, five were New York Times bestsellers. Her most popular novel is A Mother and Two Daughters (1982) which sold millions of copies. Her latest novel is Flora (2013). Check out her excellent website, www.gailgodwin.com

Book Discussions & Signings

Small Press & Self Published Author Event Monday, April 6 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join us for a wine reception, discussion, and signing with several local authors. This is a great opportunity to meet and mingle with writers, discuss writing and publishing. Support our local creative community, and purchase signed copies of some terrific books.

Writers at Home Reading Series Sunday, April 19 at 3 p.m. Join host Tommy Hays for this monthly reading series from the folks at the Great Smokies Writing Program and The Great Smokies Review.

IF YOU GO: Held at Malaprop’s Bookstore & Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.

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APRIL

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, April 6 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Small Press reception and signing. Wed., April 8 at 7 p.m. NINA MACLAUGHLIN, Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter. Thursday, April 9 at 7 p.m. WENDY WAX, While We Were Watching Downton Abbey.

Gail Godwin, author

the compiler Photo by Dave Hermon of numerous footnotes that made the connections from Godwin’s journals to what would become her published work. Without Neufeld’s contribution, the journals would have remained merely the ruminations of a youthful person, albeit one who was more literary than most. “True, time is the villain and we are trapped in him. True, love is sometimes not returned. True, friends are sometimes false. But to be aware of this—all of it—and still want to go on living, that is the triumph. It is the reward.” The most touching aspect of these journals is Godwin’s relationship with her mother, Kathleen Krahenbuhl Godwin Cole, who always wanted to write more than romance novels, but whose ambitions were thwarted by family responsibilities. The young woman who emerges from Godwin’s journals is someone I wanted to throttle many times, commiserate with at other times, and mostly admired for her passionate insistence to grab life and keep writing. With the help of mentors, such as writer Kurt Vonnegut, and keeping body and soul thanks to an education, Godwin survived personal and professional disappointments that would have squelched a less ambitious writer. “I want to be everybody who is great; I want to create everything that has ever been created.” By now I’m dying with curiosity about Godwin’s life after 1969, especially how she recovered from the many early Mr. Wrongs and found long happiness with composer Robert Starer, who died in 2001. And the time is right, at long last, to seek out Godwin’s fiction. The stack of her novels and short story collections in my living room is over two feet high. In the following months I’ll be sharing with you more steps on my journey to discover Gail Godwin.

Friday, April 10 at 7 p.m. DADA VEDAPRAJINANANDA, From Brooklyn to Benares and Back, spiritual memoir. Saturday, April 11 at 7 p.m. CAT WARREN, What the Dog Knows, search and rescue. Monday, April 13 at 7 p.m. PETER VAN BUREN, We Meant Well, Iraqi war. Wed., April 15 at 7 p.m. JOSEPH BATHANTI, Half of What I Say is Meaningless. Thursday, April 16 at 7 p.m. STEVEN SHERRILL, Joy, southern perspective. Sunday, April 19 at 5 p.m. ABIGAIL THOMAS, What Comes Next and How to Like It. Monday, April 20 at 7 p.m. CHRISTIAN HAGESETH & JOSEPH D’AGNESE, Big Weed: Adventures in the Legal Marijuana Business. Tuesday, April 21 at 7 p.m. CHRIS HOKE, Wanted: A Spiritual Pursuit; BRYAN BLISS, No Parking at the End Times, YA novel. Thursday, April 23 at 7 p.m. AMY GREENE, Long Man, 1936 clash between traditions. Saturday, April 25 at 7 p.m. TIM SPIRA, Waterfalls and Wildflowers in the Southern Appalachians: Thirty Great Hikes. Tuesday, April 28 at 7 p.m. AMY REED, ROBIN CONSTANTINE, DELILAH DAWSON & JAYE ROBIN BROWN, YA novels. Thursday, April 30 at 7 p.m. CHRIS McDOUGALL, Natural Born Heroes.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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Marcianne Miler is a local writer and critic. She hails from Junction City, Ohio and came to Asheville via Los Angeles. You can reach her at marci@ rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 31


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noteworthy

Excellent Entertainment, Fine Food, and Spectacular Views

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Crest Mountain Dinner Show announces two April preview events!

Enjoy the elevated experience of a buffet dinner provided by M7, one of the premiere catering firms in the region (full bar available), and live music by local and regional performers, while surrounded by panoramic views of the mountains and valleys of the Blue Ridge, in our 300-seat windowed pavilion.

Friday, April 10 - The Legacy Motown Revue

Paying tribute to legendary icons of Motown, four talented performers dance and sing, with an amazing six-piece horn band, transporting you back to one of the most influential periods of American musical history with R&B, Beach, and Soul music that will have you dancing in the aisles.

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Wednesday, April 15 - Crest Mountain Canteen USO Tribute

Step back in time and enjoy the big band sounds of the ’40s with Betty Grable, The Andrews Sisters, and more! Featuring live music, song and dance by professional local performers and, of course, your host, Bob Hope (local favorite, Mondy Carter). IF YOU GO

Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for cocktails, 6 p.m. buffet, and 7 p.m. showtime. Visit www. crestmountaindinnershow.com or Crest Mountain Dinner Show on Facebook for upcoming events. Contact the office at (828) 252-2637, for any questions regarding the reservation process.

Tailgate Tents Going Up

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Area farmers markets begin opening outdoors this April.

Spring is here and the growing season is upon us! Tailgate tents are going up, and area farmers markets are opening outdoors for the season. Celebrate spring by getting a taste of what is growing in your community. At early spring markets, expect fresh greens, spring onions and asparagus; meats, cheeses, baked goods, value-added farm products like preserves, and a wide selection of plant starts. Produce offerings will differ from market to market based on the location of vendor farms—microclimates vary greatly in

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the region. But the season changes quickly, with new offerings sprouting up each week.

WNC Farmers Markets Opening Dates Asheville City Market April 4, Saturdays 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Asheville City Market South April 1, Wednesdays 12-4 p.m. Bakersville Farmers Market April 4, Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Black Mountain Tailgate Market May 2, Saturdays 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. East Asheville Tailgate Market May 1, Fridays 3-6 p.m. Flat Rock Farmers Market May 7, Thursdays 3-6 p.m.

Plenty of Parking!

Let Asheville Brewers show you how affordable, enjoyable and delicious homebrewing can be!

Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 11-4

712-B Merrimon Ave • Asheville, NC • (828) 285-0515 .AB. • S’ F • S 

PG. 40

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32 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

French Broad Food Co-op Wednesday Tailgate Market April 15, Wednesdays, 2-6 p.m. Haywood’s Historic Farmers Market April 25. Wednesdays and Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Henderson County Tailgate Market March 14, Saturdays 7 a.m. - 12 p.m. Historic Marion Tailgate Market May 5, Tuesdays 3-6 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

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Enjoy a 100% organic meal on Root Bottom Farm.

Madison County farmers, Morgan & Sarah Decker, are teaming up with local Asheville business owner, Dava Melton of Blessed to Cook, to present a Farm to Table Dinner Series at Root Bottom Farm. Dinners will be held Saturday, July 11, August 8, and September 5 at 6 p.m. in beautiful Marshall, about 3o minutes north of Asheville. Guests will enjoy a 100% local, organic Madison County meal that is gluten free (bread served separately) and vegetarian friendly. Produce is organic and harvested the same day as the dinner. If we didn’t grow, raise or make it; a fellow Madison County farmer did. Seats are limited. Tickets are $50 a plate and include a farm tour. Farm stand produce and cook books will be available for purchase. Please visit Rootbottomfarm.com for more information.

Jackson County Farmers Market April 4, Saturdays 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Leicester Farmers Market April 4, Saturdays 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Madison County Farmers & Artisans Market April 4, Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Mills River Farmers Market May 2, Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. North Asheville Tailgate Market April 11, Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Oakley Farmers Market May 7, Thursdays 3:30-6:30 p.m. River Arts District Farmers Market May 6, Wednesdays 2-6 p.m. Spruce Pine Farmers Market May 6, Wednesdays 2-5 p.m. Transylvania Farmers Market April 18, Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Original Waynesville Tailgate Market May 13, Wednesdays and Saturdays 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Weaverville Tailgate Market April 8, Wednesdays 2:30-6:30 p.m. West Asheville Tailgate Market April 7, Tuesdays 3:30-6:30 p.m. Yancey County Farmers Market April 18, Saturdays 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. For a complete list of the 90+ tailgate markets in the region visit appalachiangrown.org.


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Modesto: Wood, Fire, Kitchen

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Arriving at Modesto Wood Fire Kitchen, we chose the corner window table, enjoying the fresh air from the open door.

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Our server was knowledgeable about the vast menu and was helpful in giving suggestions along the way. She presented the wide array of menu items offering a slant on traditional Italian food. We Modesto has a cozy yet classic atmosphere. took our time ordering and decided to try some of the with a caramelized sauce. most unique dishes. The mouthwatering meat We could see the was highlighted with orentire restaurant from ange and dark fruit notes. our seats, including the The polenta evoked just small bar where a couple as much richness as the pleasantly engaged with lamb, crisp on the outside, the bartender. Soon, more creamy in the middle with tables filled in and the a crumbling of chevre on hush became a cozy stir of top. Succulent wood-fired conversation and liveliness. vegetables rounded out The sun was setting and the meal. cast a warm hue through After such a spread, the windows before the we had to try dessert, even wire-framed chandeliers though we could have left took over for the passing jubilant at that moment. Fried duck confit ravioli with daylight. We went with the tiramisu lemon aioli. Our cocktails arbecause it was our server’s rived quickly. The North favorite. The lightness and Carolina Martini was crisp and refreshing, decadence of the tiramisu paired well with with subtle ice thins floating on top. My the decaf Americano, the best I’ve had in partner’s Mountbatten gin cocktail was town. The dessert and ambience reminded a fruity bubbly infusion of Chambord me that in addition to a wonderful dinner and house-made Assam tea syrup and spot, Modesto is a great place to go simply Prosecco. These were soon followed by a for dessert and coffee. wood-fired romaine salad from Modesto’s I enjoyed going for dinner on the Mugnaini oven, a respected Italian vessel, early side of a weeknight to enjoy the quiet and fried duck confit ravioli served with bustle of the restaurant and take advantage lemon aioli. The crisp, slightly tart salad of the excellent service. This place has a was the perfect counterbalance to the fried cozy yet classic atmosphere with a bend shell of the ravioli and the rich filling. towards intimate – a great date spot. A few currants in the filling introduced a trace of sweetness and the lemon aioli added creaminess and acidity. The two dishes together hit the spot. For our entrees, I ordered the herb garlic grouper and my partner, the braised lamb. The grouper was plated with creamcolored corona beans in a satisfying tomato sauce, wood-fired vegetables – winter squash, zucchini, creamy eggplant – and squid ink risotto, along with a confetti of colorful vegetable strips and orange relish. The shiny black finish of the risotto stood out beautifully next to the white grouper, and offered a meaty bite. The vegetables Herb garlic barrel grouper with corona were succulent and perfectly roasted. beans, wood-fired vegetables, and squid ink risotto. The lamb shank, braised until it pulled away from the bone, glimmered

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Modesto's tiramisu and Americano for dessert.

Modesto 1 Page Avenue, #138 Asheville, NC 28801 (828) 225-4133 Weekdays 11:30-4 p.m. & 5-9 p.m. Fridays ’til 10 p.m. Saturdays Noon-4 p.m. & 5-10 p.m. Sundays Noon-4 p.m. & 5-9 p.m.

GREAT FOOD! GREAT BEER! GREAT SERVICE! ANYWAY YOU LIKE IT! PG. 40

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33 Town Square Boulevard, Asheville • 828.651.8481 Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800 Open 7 Days a Week

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC PG. 20

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Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Delicious Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 33


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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food Dining Out For LifeTM Rapid River Magazine, along with our generous advertisers, are committed to helping the Western North Carolina Aids Project (WNCAP) raise awareness and find a cure for HIV/AIDS. You can help by making a donation and dining at a participating restaurant on Thursday, April 30, 2015. By dining out, 20% of your dining total will be donated to WNCAP.

Please go to www.wncap.org for a list of participating restaurants.

RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE

Arts&Culture

Caffeinated Art WOOD

Grandee Revival Thursday, April 2

FIRE

KITCHEN

Reception 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Art Show & Maundy Thursday Dinner 6:30-8:30 p.m. Reservations only Art exhibit runs month of April

PG. 40

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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

NEW MENU

PG. 20

P Yummy Wood Fired Pizza Creative Salads • House Made Pastas Fresh Seafood • Fine Meats

New Wine, Beer & Coffee Bar Introducing Chef Nicolas DeSorbo 828.692.6335

1 Page Ave. TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

Breakfast: Tues-Sat 8:30-10:30 am • Lunch: Everyday 11 am - 3 pm Dinner: Friday & Saturday 5:30 - 8:30 pm

536 N. Main Street • Hendersonville

in the Grove Arcade Downtown Asheville

Sun-Thur 11:30- 9:30 • Fri and Sat 11:30-10 Closed Daily from 4-5 • 828-225-4133

PG. 40

BX

34 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Dine Out, Fight AIDS!

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Whether you’re new to Dining Out For Life® or have dined with us for years, I challenge you to think of a better way to spend a Thursday dining out for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

On Thursday, April 30 thousands of caring individuals in WNC will join with the Western North Carolina AIDS Dine out on Thursday, April 30 and you just might Project (WNCAP) for the 13th help save a life! annual fundraiser. Participating restaurants all over the region will be generously donating 20% of their win for you as you enjoy a great meal out, proceeds for the day to the organization a win for the restaurant of your choice, and just by picking up a fork, you can and a win for the clients of WNCAP and help save a life. future generations who will continue Dining Out For Life® (DOFL), to benefit from their many prevention voted #1 Fundraising event in the Best programs. of WNC 2014, will take place in seven This year, Subaru of America, counties of WNC with restaurants in DOFL national sponsor, has partnered Asheville, Arden, Black Mountain, with celebrity designer Mondo Guerra, of Brevard, Candler, Hendersonville, MagProject Runway, for their Love Respongie Valley, Saluda, Spruce Pine, Sylva, sibly social action campaign. Together Waynesville, Weaverville, and Woodfin. they are working to encourage patrons in You can join over 55 cities in the US cities all over the country to get involved, and Canada to help support their local support Dining Out For Life®, and “Love AIDS organizations. Responsibly.” You can see more about the campaign at www.takepart.com/ love-responsibly. “Volunteers and sponsors are key to the success of any event of this magnitude” says Harry Brown, veteran volunteer chairperson for Dining Out for Life. “This year the community has really stepped up in support of WNCAP thanks to over 250 Ambassador/Volunteers, our generous sponsors and the best restaurants in Western North Carolina.” Call your friends, clients Make plans now to enjoy a meal with a group of and neighbors and put together friends at your favorite restaurant. a gathering at your favorite Since 1986, WNCAP has provided restaurant, or use this opportunity to try HIV/AIDS Outreach Education & a new restaurant. As an added bonus this Prevention programs across 18 counties year, you will have an opportunity to win in WNC, and case management services several great prizes including roundtrip to those affected by the disease. Dining airfare tickets for two, plus other exciting Out for Life® is a vital fundraiser necesprizes just for dining out. sary for WNCAP to carry on their critiMake your plans now to dine out cal services throughout our region. on Thursday, April 30 and you just might Last year, DOFL raised more than help save a life! $176,000 in a challenged economy to help with the shortfall of funding at the federal and state levels, while expanding IF much needed services to other counties. YOU For a complete list of sponsors GO and other participating restaurants, Consider your participation as a winplease visit www.wncap.org/dofl win-win situation for everybody — a

Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

777 Haywood Road, Asheville

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

PG. 40

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(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

Oil & Vinegar Asheville 8 Town Square Blvd., Suite #150, Asheville, NC 28803 www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com (828) 676-1678

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 35


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Live Music at the Classic Wineseller

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Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premier small plate restaurant, retail shop, and intimate live music venue, will feature jazz, pop, rock, and original music this month.

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person, call (828) 452-6000 for tickets

Friday, April 24 - Dan Shearin vocals, guitar. Folk, pop, originals.

Wednesday, April 1 - 65th Birthday Party

for Classic Wineseller owner Richard Miller. Live music by Jay Brown; guitar, piano, harmonica, vocals. Blues, bluegrass, American roots, pop, originals.

Friday, April 3 - Sean Bendula; piano, vocals. Folk-Americana, pop, originals.

KAy STeGALL miLLeR

EVERY SATURDAY Joe Cruz – Piano, vocals. Cruz performs

Sean Bendula

Friday, April 10 - ‘Round the Fire; guitar, bass, drums, vocals. Rock n’ roll, blues, originals.

Friday, April 17 - The 9th Street Stompers;

the music of the Beatles, Elton John, and James Taylor every Saturday this month. As a child he began singing and playing piano in church. By the time he reached his early twenties he was a regular on the New York City club circuit. He has toured internationally and opened for Chicago, Bonnie Raitt, Santana, and the Average White Band.

guitar, bass, vocals. Swing, gypsy jazz, blues, The Wineseller’s retail shop and rockabilly, tango. The 9th Street Stompers are wine bar opens at 11 a.m., Tuesday well-dressed “no-counts,” playing acoustic inthrough Saturday. The kitchen opens at struments and singing about life, death, love, 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday serving small and liquor. Hailing from Chattanooga, Tenplate and tapas-style cuisine. Dinner and nessee, the group brings to mind the music of music reservations are taken anytime an era when the lines between swing, gypsy by calling (828) 452-6000. Seating is jazz, blues, guaranteed until 7 p.m. on non-ticketed rockabilly, and evenings. After 7 p.m. seating is on a first tango weren’t Dan Shearin come, first served basis. nearly as hard and fast as the drinking Visit www.classicwineseller.com for additional information and dancing. about wine dinners, tastings, and weekly live music events.

PG. 40

Dalton Chapman of the 9th Street Stompers.

Features Skip Frontz Jr. (string bass), Lon Eldridge (blues fingerstyle resonator guitar, ukulele, kazoo), and Dalton Chapman (guitar). Tickets: $10 per

The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street in Waynesville 828-452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com

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a Culinary Gi Shop 8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

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“This moment is a perfect moment, this moment is my refuge.” – Thich Nhat Hanh

“This moment” seems like a simple concept. A snap of the fingers. A blink of an eye. How then could “this moment” be a refuge? It seems hardly sufficiently substantial to provide a refuge from the vicissitudes of life. The mind of thought can’t quite grasp it, yet these words echo some truth we hold deep inside. Why does this seemingly inscrutable Asian utterance both puzzle and reassure us? This little declaration by the great Vietnamese Zen Master is a koan, a verbal device intended to take us beyond the world of thought and into intuitive understanding of an experience that is mystical, unfathomable, yet right here, right in front of and all around us. And yes, when fully realized, its promise is not empty. What is this moment? It is, first of all, conventionally ungraspable. We all know the bitter-sweet desire to grasp and hold a moment when we are in the midst of a “perfect” experience, knowing it will pass. Our idea of a perfect experience, however, is a concept of the mind, a concept of the ego. It is based in judgment, an ordering of our experiences by subjective criteria from worst to best to “perfect.” Yet, that we experience perfection implies there is something happening that is even deeper than judgment, deeper than our capacity to categorize. It is perfect, yet, whether a moment with a loved one, or a moment in a sublime setting in Nature, the stimulus

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for the experience has always been there, yet not seen, hidden within the routines of ordinary life. The person who is loved is usually around us quite a bit, beautiful settings in Nature are not that hard to find. It is we who are seeing, hearing, feeling in a manner profoundly different from our ordinary way, our usual self-centered, egoic way. Our usual manner of perception has been suspended in a moment of connected transcendence, of love. It is not the person or the natural setting that becomes perfect, it is we who realize qualities of inherent perfection that are always there, usually lost in a blur of projected ordinariness in the hurry of time. Perfection is realized in this moment when in this moment there is no longer a separate self experiencing the person or the natural setting “out there.” We and they and it are all folded into a seamless entity that is this moment, a unity of experience, and it is this unity that is perfect. When we think about it, it is gone, lost again in the blur of time, for thought is structured in time. No, “perfect” cannot be an intellectual experience. It is, as Zen calls it, a “felt sense.” It is the felt sense of non-duality, of oneness, of completeness, of “thusness” or “isness.” It is

Isn’t There a Pill for That?

“I’m having a hard time getting to sleep.” Isn’t there a pill for that?

“My cholesterol is higher than it should be.” Isn’t there a pill for that? “I have a headache every Monday morning.” Isn’t there a pill for that? “I have type II diabetes that is not well controlled.” Isn’t there a new pill for that? For every human ailment, every bodily discomfort we turn to the medicine chest, or the pharmacist, or the nutritionist, or the medical practitioner and say, “Isn’t there a pill for that?” But it doesn’t have to come in pill form. We eat tomatoes because we are sure that they contain substances that will prevent cancer. We drink wine because we are sure the wine contains substances that will protect our heart. We take male hormones because we are sure that they will increase our male functions. We examine the labels on our food and drink to make sure it is fortified with 100% of whatever it is we think we need to perform

the day’s activities. Most Americans are sure that the answer to what ails them is available as a pill, as a supplement, or as special substance eaten or applied that has special powers to cure and correct the problem. As a society, including our doctors, we have come to believe in the myth of the “pill.” A good example of this phenomenon is the belief that consuming some alcohol each day is protective for the heart. Scientific studies have shown this to be true, yes? Yes, alcoholic beverages are made from grains, fruits, and vegetables. Many of the anti-oxidents and micro-nutrients that were in the original plants are still in the spirits made from them. And yes, these nutrients still do what they do for the heart. But for what kinds of people is this true? In those people who have such a poor diet that they are deficient in good nutrition (fruits, nuts, vegetables, and whole grains), these people do derive some small benefit from their alcohol consumption. But people who

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“just this,” meaning, as a poet might write: the Universe in a flower, a moment, a breath. It is often said in these “perfect moments” it is as if time has stopped, yet, we have the problem that we cannot sustain stopped time. Often, the perfection begins disappearing the moment we remember time, when we anticipate the ending of the “perfect” experience. We re-introduce the thought of our separate self into the moment, and like a magic spell being broken, the perfection begins to dissolve. We are back in our separate self, back in time, the moment lost, now only memory, a part of the story of me. So what is Thich Nhat Hanh saying to us? It would seem that our usual perspective is rather the opposite of what he is saying. Our usual perspective is that there sometimes occur moments that have the quality of perfection if conditions are perfect. Thich Nhat Hanh is telling us this moment is perfect, this moment has the capacity to be refuge. There are no qualifiers as to the quality of content of the moment. He is even implying that moments in which the content of the moment may be very challenging can be experienced as perfect and can constitute a refuge. How can that be? This sounds bizarre to our rational minds, yet we all know there is truth to this. We have

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even experienced it - sometimes exactly in the midst of personally shattering moments – moments that shatter our personal story in time. Perhaps the key to the puzzle is in the concept of time. Let us return to the question: what is this moment? An analogous question is: what is the here and now? – that ubiquitous New Age, consciousness community phrase, another koan, so to speak, that has become clichéd. Just what is the “here and now”? And what mystical power does it possess to merit its clichéd standing? Does it not, like “this moment,” have an ungraspable yet transcendent quality? “Just where,” I sometimes like to ask, “is the boundary of here and now?” Where does it begin, where does it end? The same question can be asked of “this moment.” Is it really a snap of the fingers, a blink of an eye? This is the small egoic experience of this moment. Thich Nhat Hanh and mystics of all spiritual traditions are calling us to a greater, vaster experience of this moment. They are calling us to this moment in the realm of eternal Beingness. Here, the experience of the timeless space of perfection is certainly not the blink of an eye. It is far more like being on raft, flowing on a river and we have no sense of its continued on page 40

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Most of the diseases that afflict us do not need a pill or a supplement or a special food. eat a well-balanced diet of those named items derive absolutely no benefit whatsoever from alcohol consumption. This also is confirmed by the scientific studies. In fact, most of the diseases that afflict us in Western society do not need a pill or a supplement or a special food. Most of the diseases, including heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, and stroke, can be prevented or severely curtailed by adopting a healthy life style: regular adequate sleep, sufficient exercise, a well-balanced diet to maintain ideal weight, regular significant social contacts, no smoking, no alcohol, and wearing seatbelts. We don’t need a “pill.” We need common sense and the willingness to use it.

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Now through April 18

Downton Abbey Afternoon High Tea

Full Tea Service with live classical and romantic music. Enjoy English teas, savory tea sandwiches, scones, cakes, tea cookies, fresh fruits, and champagne or sherry served in the vintage style of Downton Abbey. Fridays 1 p.m - 3:30 p.m.; Saturdays 1 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Lex 18, 18 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. (828) 575-9494, www.lex18avl.com

Wednesday, April 1

Museum Opening Day

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Back to the Drawing Board Artists “take-over” the Benchspace Gallery & Workshop for a 24-hour period. Each project begins with a public reception from 6-9 p.m. Friday evening and continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday. April 3-4 – Hand in Hand, Tanya Aguiñiga, Community Felt-In.

A collection of yarns about life in the Blue Ridge. Features traditional marionette variety acts and music ranging from bluegrass to classical. Show begins

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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Asheville Art Museum Spring Workshops Friday, April 10 - Drawing Faces Saturday, April 11 - Collage Friday, April 17 - Altered Books Taught by San Francisco artist Pamela Lanza. For details, contact the Museum at (828) 253-3227 or email lalanza@earthlink.net.

Saturday, April 11: Science Fiction writing with Norris Orbach. Saturday, April 25: Screenplay writing with Bob Hardison.

Easter on the Green

Mountain Marionettes

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The Writers’ Workshop

Saturday, April 4

Saturday, April 4

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David Wilson, Arrivals, 2013.

Photo by Dominic Santos, courtesy of SFMOMA.

Saturday, May 2: Short Fiction workshop with Richard Krawiec.

May 1-2 – In Song Sing On: The Songbook Project, David Wilson

Each workshop is $75; $70 members. Classes meet from 10-4 p.m.

The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design 67 Broadway Street, Asheville (828) 785-1357 www.craftcreativitydesign.org

The Writers’ Workshop 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville (828) 254-8111, www.twwoa.org

at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8, available at www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. White Horse, 105C Montreat Road, Black Mountain.

Saturday, April 4

Crimson Laurel Gallery

“New Work” by featured artist Patrick Crabb, and two person exhibition Lindsay Rogers “American West” by Jason Bohnert and Steven Schaeffer – through April 28. “Close Quarters” exhibition with Mark Errol and Lindsay Rogers, through June 3. Bakersville, NC. (828) 688-3599. www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com

Monday, April 6

Take Two Jazz

Pianist Bill Bares and Vibraphonist Matthew Richmond. Show begins at 7:30 p.m. $12. White Horse, 105C Montreat Road, Black Mountain. www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Tuesday, April 7

Gallery Opening

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The Swannanoa Valley Museum opens for the season. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free. 223 West State Street, Black Mountain. www.swannanoavalleymuseum.org, (828) 669-9566.

Share the beauty of spring and listen to the squeals of sheer joy as the little ones play in the bounce house or run to gather eggs in the Easter Egg Hunt. From 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Roger McGuire Green at Pack Square Park in downtown Asheville.

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The Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery opens a new show celebrating the ceramic art of Mary Jimenez and Ed Rivera and other gallery members. 2238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville.

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UNC Asheville 2nd Annual Arts Fest Musical and theatrical performances, exhibits, creative workshops and more. Free and ticketed events. More details at arts.unca.edu/arts-fest.

April 8, 10, 12

Almost, Maine

A whimsical romantic comedy, performed by UNC Asheville students. 7:30 p.m. April 8; 10 a.m. April 10; 1 p.m. April 12. Free and open to the public. UNC Asheville’s Carol Belk Theatre. Visit arts.unca.edu/arts-fest

Friday, April 10

Trio Cavatina

Concert at 8 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Asheville. Tickets are $38. Under 25 admitted free. For more information please visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org.

Saturday, April 11

Fiddlin’ 5K

“Run for the Music” race in Mars Hill begins at 9 a.m. Local musicians perform at locations along the course. More details at lunsfordfestival.com/ home/fiddlin-5k, or contact Hannah Furguiele at hfurguiele@mhu.edu.

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Barrel Tasting

A private tour, tastings of not yet released wines and current releases, and your choice of picnic lunch. Held at Addison Farms Vineyard, 4005 New Leicester Hwy., Leicester, NC. (828) 581-WINE (9463). For more details, or to reserve your tickets, please visit addisonfarms.net

Saturday, April 11

5K/10K Road Race

Begins at 2 p.m. Benefits the Blk Mtn Greenways trails and paths. The race starts and finishes at Pisgah Brewery. Awards to winners after the race. This Grand Prix event is hosted by the Black Mountain Greenways Commission. Go to IMAthlete.com to register.

Saturday, April 11

Second Saturday Event

The Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery joins the River Art District’s Second Saturday Event. Demonstrations, refreshments, music, and art. 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville.

Sunday, April 12 Fundraising event from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. Raffle, live music, vendors, food and more. All ages. $5 donation. Bywater, 796 Riverside Dr., Asheville. (828) 232-6967, www.bywaterbar.com

Friday, April 17

Echoes in Rhythm

Band plays live swing dance, 8-11 p.m. at the Twisted Laurel, 10-A S. Main Street in Weaverville.

April 24 & 25

Creative Sector Summit

The 5th Annual Summit will look at ways to incorporate the arts into community and economic development in significant ways. Anne Gadwa Nicodemus is the keynote speaker. Email kitty@ashevillearts.com. Hosted by the Asheville Area Arts Council. (828) 2580710, www.ashevillearts.com

Wednesday, April 29

Music Video Asheville

Annual event showcases collaborations between filmmakers and local musicians. Reception at 5 p.m. Panel at 6 p.m. Film screening 8-9:30 p.m. Awards ceremony 9:30 p.m. $15; $12 adv. $25 VIP tickets. Purchase at www. musicvideoasheville.com

Saturday & Sunday, May 2-3

Weaverville Art Safari

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free tour of galleries and art studios. Details, maps, and more at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

Pan Harmonia’s Sonata Series Renowned harpist Jacquelyn Bartlett joins flutist Kate Steinbeck Kate Steinbeck, and to perform Jacquelyn Bartlett works by Photo: Lisa Ringelspaugh-Irvine Lowell Liebermann, opera master Gaetano Donizetti, and Roumanian harpist Carmen Petra-Basacopol. Thursday, May 1 at 7:30 p.m. White Horse, 105 Montreat Rd., Black Mountain. Sunday, May 3 at 3 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, Asheville. Tickets: $16.50 advance; $22 at the door; $5 students. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.pan-harmonia.org

Saturday and Sunday, May 9 & 10

River Arts District Studio Stroll

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more details visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Saturday & Sunday, May 16 & 17

Faery And Earth (FAE) Festival

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Highland Lake Cove Retreat Center in Flat Rock. $10 adult, $5 child (ages 5-15), under 5 free. Facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

through May 26

New Artists, Old Friends

Suzy Shultz and Grant Penny share the showcase with gallery luminary Karen Titus Smith. An Example of How Simple it Must be to First Friday Art Build a Bridge, collage Walk, openby Grant Penny. ing reception April 3, from 5-8 p.m. Artetude Gallery, 89 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville. (828) 2521466 www.artetudegallery.com

Call for Artists 56th Annual Art on Main Fine Art / Fine Craft Festival

Juried and judged show produced by the Arts Council of Henderson County. Festival takes place Saturday and Sunday, October 3 and 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Download an application from www.acofhc.org. email acofhc@ bellsouth.net, or call (828) 693-8504.

APRIL EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

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Harmonia by The Water April 8-11

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Best in Show

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Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

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The Strand Theater 38 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786 www.38main.com

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

Participate in a weekly artist vending area located in Downtown Asheville! It takes place every Saturday in July, August, and September from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information please visit www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

at the Classic Wineseller

Restaurant serves small plate and tapas starting at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Live music at 7 p.m. 20 Church Street, Waynesville. Details (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Art Classes

2nd Tuesday Ukelele Jam Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Diana Wortham Theatre

Meets 2nd Tuesday of each month at Lourey’s Catering on Biltmore Ave. from 5:30 to 7 pm. Beginners and stringed instruments welcome.

Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net.

Tuesday and Wednesday, April 7 & 8 – Pilobolus, 8 p.m. Saturday, April 11 – Mainstage Series presents New York Voices at 8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, April 14 & 15 – Theatreworks USA’s Curious George, 10 a.m. and 12 p.m.

Vendors Wanted Dragin

by Michael Cole

Thursday, April 30 –The Barra MacNeils at 8 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre 2 South Pack Square, downtown Asheville (828) 210-9837, www.dwtheatre.com

For the third annual Art in the Park…ing Lot. Monthly art and jewelry show held the second Saturday of each month, May through September, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is a juried show. Cost to participate is $40 per show. For more information, call Michele Sparks, (828) 693-4545. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Ave. East, Hendersonville. www.artmobstudios.com

Call for Artists

10th Annual Come to Leicester Art Tour to be held in August. We are looking for new artists to join the tour. Write to cometoleicesterstudiotour@gmail.com for more information.

Opening at HART Brighton Beach Memoirs – Opens April 24. Director Wanda Taylor.

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Friday, April 17 – The Hillbenders, diverse bluegrass with 3- and 4-part harmonies. 8 p.m. $20; $18 adv.

Spruce Street Market

Friday, April 17 – Carl Sandburg’s American Songbag. 6:30 p.m. in the Forum. Led by Beth & Jim Magill.

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Thursday, April 16 – Pat Donahue, old blues, swing, R&B, and original tunes. 7:30 p.m. $20; $18 adv.

Tuesday, April 21 – Square-Foot Gardening, 5:30 p.m. Get a great yield from a small amount of space. With Master Gardener Hughes Roberts.

Classes in painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

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Thursday, April 9 – Planting with the Seasons, 5:30 p.m. with Master Gardener Hughes Roberts.

Canton Public Library, 11 Pennsylvania Ave. (828) 648-2924, www.haywoodlibrary.org

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Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Nunsense – Opens May 22. Directed by Suzanne Tinsley. The 39 Steps - Opens June 19. Directed by Julie Kinter. Oklahoma! – Opens July 10. Directed by Steve Lloyd. Chorus and dance auditions May 3 & 4 at 6:30 p.m.

Get Paid to Drive Around with Our Custom Vehicle Wraps

Paid to Drive, Inc. seeks people – regular citizens, not professional drivers – to go about their normal routine as they usually do, only with a big advert on their vehicle. If interested please contact Luiswayne077@gmail.com for details.

Medical Guardian

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

HART, 250 Pigeon Street, Wayensville (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.com www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 39


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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps Addison Farms Vineyard www.addisonfarms.net AmiciMusic, www.amicimusic.org Art on Depot, (828) 246-0218 Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com Asheville Chamber Music www.AshevilleChamberMusic.org Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610 Barbara Wade 140d Roberts Street BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Brixx Pizza, www.brixxpizza.com BT’s Burgerjoint www.btsburgerjoint.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com LEAF (Lake Eden Arts Festival) www.theleaf.org Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com Modesto Trattoria, (828) 225-4133 Norbury Books www.facebook.com/norburybooks O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com The Pink House, www.facebook.com/ ThePinkHouseAsheville Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616 Ron Maffett (828) 450-2177

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com

Spruce Street Market www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

Deborah Squier Fine Art www.DeborahSquier.com

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Faerie And Earth Festival www.enchantedwalkabouts.com Facebook.com/fairyandearthfestival

Teresa Pennington www.tpennington.com

Greening Up the Mountains www.greeningupthemountains.com HART Theater, www.harttheatre.com Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Heart & Soul www.thesingingtelegram.com Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com Jonas Gerard Fine Art www.jonasgerard.com Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

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‘This Moment’ cont’d from pg. 37

beginning or end. The river flows and we flow with it. River, raft, person – all flowing. The “this moment” that Thich Nhat Hanh is directing us to flows not down a river, but through eternity, and the “perfection” he offers is a glimpse of eternity. It is non-duality, unity, and in non-duality there is no edge of beginning or ending, for it is without an opposing other, out there. There is only the awareness of the moment, flowing. It is “thusness, isness.” It cannot be grasped with the intellect, for the intellect is the mental faculty that divides the Universe into this and that, and the “this moment” that Thich Nhat Hanh calls us to is this moment as the Universe, perfect. Perfect because it is the Universe. It is a refuge from the up and down, the pain of the this and the that in time that comes and goes. It is the perfect mystical, spiritual realization of union with a flower, with all flowers, with a person, with all persons, with all Life, with the Universe. It is this moment as the raft of our personal life flowing on the eternal river of here and now, a river without beginning or end.

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MERRIMON AVE.

NORTH ASHEVILLE

Seven Sisters Gallery sevensistersgallery.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness.

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Smoky Mountain Foot Clinic, PA www.smokymountainfootclinic.com

Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

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The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

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Mellow Mushroom, (828) 236-9800

Smokies Half Marathon www.SmokiesHalfMarathon.com

French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com

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Kornerstone Kafe, (828) 550-2265

Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com

Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com

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He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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Weaverville Art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com

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Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com Western North Carolina Aids Project www.wncap.org

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RIVERSIDE DRIVE

Whole Bloomin’ Thing Festival Facebook.com/wholebloominfestival Zapow www.zapow.com

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Kirk’s Collectables, (770) 757-6814

40 April 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 8

GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071 WB


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Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Black Mountain Events – April 2015

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CREATIVE MOUNTAIN FOOD TOURS

April 4 - Ultimate Foodie Tour April 10 - Pub & Grub Crawl April 11 - Ultimate Foodie Tour April 17 - Pub & Grub Crawl April 18 - Ultimate Foodie Tour April 19 - Dessert Tour

Tours begin at 2 p.m. Advance reservations required. Call (828) 419-0590, or visit www. creativemountainfoodtours.com

April 24 & 25 - Mary Poppins. Performed by students. The Learning Community School at Owen High School auditorium. $13 adults; $7 children 5 and under. Purchase tickets at www. thelearningcommunity.org

List provided by the Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce, 201 E. State Street, Black Mountain. (828) 669-2300, 1-800-669-2301, or visit www.blackmountain.org.

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

April 4 - Easter Egg Hunt. All ages. Free. 1 p.m. at Marjorie McCune Memorial Center, 101 Lion’s Way.

in Black Mountain

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Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

A Destination in Black Mountain Since 1981

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Contact: Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 669-0930, www.blackmountainarts.org

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April 11 - Black Mountain Greenway Challenge 10K & 5K. Run, walk, or volunteer for the 8th

craft gallery

annual event. Presented by The Blk Mtn Greenway Commission and Pisgah Brewery. (828) 775-9251, greenwaychallenge@gmail.com, www.imathlete.com

April 12 - Art exhibit by residents at the Black Mountain NeuroMedical Treatment Center.

601 W. State Street

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April 9 to April 10 - Plien Air Painting Workshop with Cheryl Keefer. $150. 9 a.m - 4 p.m.

strations include draft horse work and logging competition. Kids activities throughout the day. BBQ lunch w/vegetarian option. For more details contact R. Truitt, (304) 268-6252, rtruitt@ warren-wilson.edu.

in the Mountains

April 26 - Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. 1-4 p.m. at Black Mountain Center for the Arts. For more details call (828) 6690930, www.blackmountainarts.org

April 2 - Annual Bake Sale. Wide range of baked goods, preserves and candy. Proceeds benefit local nonprofits. Hosted by Givens Highland Farms Resident Corporation. 7 a.m. 5 p.m. in back of dining room.

April 11 - 2nd Annual Spring Plow. Demon-

Breakfast

117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5 MB

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107

T h e L i t t l e To w n T h a t R o c k s

Opening reception 3-4 p.m. On display through May 1, 2015. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, Upper Gallery. (828) 669-0930, www. blackmountainarts.org

FAISON O’NEIL Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

April 18 - Robin Bullock Concert, 7:30 p.m. $20; reserve tickets online. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 669-0930, www. blackmountainarts.org April 24-26 - Owen High Spring Comedy Production, The Foreigner. Award-winning

comedy by Larry Shue. 7 p.m. Reserved seating $7 (online). General seating, pay at door: $10 adults; $5 Students. www.cdowenhs.ticketleap. com/foreigner

April 24 - Brown Bag Pinhole Photography presentation with Lynette Miller. Free. Noon.

Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 6690930, www.blackmountainarts.org

Thursday, May 7 Night in the Mountains by Linda Johnson

5:30-7pm Sample a Variety of Local Food, Brews, and Wines. Tickets Available May 1st

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce

ExploreBlackMountain.com 800.669.2301

128 Cherry Street Black Mountain, NC info@faisononeilgallery.com Winter Hours: Wed-Sat. 11-4; Closed Sun-Tues 828.357.5350 Queen’s Guard by Dan Reiser

www.faisononeil.com

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New Books • Lenox Gifts

French Press Coffee Loose Leaf Teas Taza Chocolates

CAFÉ

Hot Soups, Sandwiches & Salads

62c North Main St.

Songs & Comedy Skits Celebrating Life’s Special Events

Weaverville, 28787

Birthday Valentine’s Day Anniversary Get Well Retirement

Mon-Thur 10-6 • Fri & Sat 10-7 • Closed Sunday

828-484-1542

Find us on Facebook

Heartfelt & Memorable Same Day Service

www.thesingingtelegram.com

828.290.5715

THE PINK HOUSE A Repurposed Design Studio

178 Weaverville Rd. ReLove Your Furniture with Chalk Paint®

Asheville, NC 28804 828-645-7310

❖ Vintage Furnishings ❖ Workshops PG. 20

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puppies, cats, and kittens each day. For more information Grovewood Gallery’s about Brother Wolf Animal annual charity sale kicks off on Rescue visit www.bwar.org. Friday, April 17. During the Grovewood Gallery is sale, customers will be able to a family owned, fine crafts save 10% on all regular priced destination that showcases items, including studio furnitraditional and contempoture and outdoor sculptures, rary crafts, all handmade by and up to 50% on sale items. American artisans. GroveEverything in the gallery will wood Gallery is located in be marked down! Thanks to the “Help Me Heal a beautiful, historic setting, 10% of all proceeds Fund” Annie was treated for adjacent to the Omni Grove from this two-day event will heartworm disease. Park Inn in North Asheville. go directly to Brother Wolf Free parking for gallery paAnimal Rescue’s “Help Me trons is available on the Grovewood grounds. Heal Fund” for animals with special needs. Grovewood will also be hosting an adoption drive during the sale from 12 to 4 p.m. on IF Friday and Saturday YOU Grovewood Gallery’s annual charity Brother Wolf Animal Rescue (BWAR) is GO sale, April 17 & 18 from 10 a.m. to 6 a No Kill organization offering free spay/neup.m. For more information, contact ter assistance and a pet food pantry. The Joyce Grovewood Gallery at (828) 253-7651 or visit B. Cambron Adoption Center, located at 31 www.grovewood.com. Glendale Avenue, is home to up to 100 dogs,

Art Galleries & Antiques Galore

Large Selection of Used Books

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Support our fuzzy friends by buying American made craft!

Infinite Shopping

BOOKS

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Grovewood Gallery’s Charity Sale

WEAVERVILLE

Comfortable Inns and Unique Cabins

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Discover New Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

EXPERIENCE POINTS NORTH OF ASHEVILLE

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Located inside Omni Grove Park Inn

Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

Local and Regional Handmade Crafts Now in our 30th year of supporting American handmade PG. 40

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Pendant by Niki Fisk

Gallery of the Mountains

290 Macon Avenue TOLL - FREE

(800) 692-2204

Asheville, NC

Milepost 382 - BlueRidge Parkway, Asheville, NC 828.298.7928

(828) 254-2068

www.galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

Reflexology ~ Reiki ~ Reiki Drumming Bowen Training Instructor ~ Reiki Master / Teacher

One Hour Session: $40 FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the frame that surrounds it may be worth a thousand more.

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70, Asheville, NC 828.298.7903

Health & Healing are Just 2 Feet Away

Linda Neff, NCBTMB #582633-09 68 Sugar Grove Ct., Clyde, NC 28721 513-675-2819 • 828-565-0061

Preserve Your Memories with a Custom Frame

26 Lodge Street, Asheville, NC 828.277.6222

For Mothers Day, Give a Gift Mom Will Always Cherish We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC 1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway PG. 40

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1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6

WWW.CRAFTGUILD.ORG The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 43


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®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com pg. 40

36 Haywood Street

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Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

Ongoing Plein Air & Studio Classes Enroll Now!

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive, Studio H

Vineyard Plein Air May 1-3 Addison Farms Vineyard

John Mac Kah

www.JohnMacKah.com (828) 225-5000

pg. 10

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Great Chamber Music

in Intimate Venues and Non-Traditional Spaces Contact Daniel Weiser, AmiciMusic Artistic Director, (802) 369-0856, or e-mail daniel@amicimusic.org for performance details.

www.amicimusic.org

ASHEVILLE LOCKSMITH NOW

Auto, Residential & Commercial

Emergency Service 24/7 Advertise with Rapid River Magazine pg. 40

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Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

828-236-1901

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www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

April 2015 Rapid River Magazine  
April 2015 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by Judith Rentner..p3; Inside: The Trio Cavatina..p6; Weaverville Art Safari..p12; Jonas Gerard..p11; Asheville Galle...

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