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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

Wonderland

DRUGS, SYMBOLIC LOGIC AND VICTORIAN SEX

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Wonderland is the title of the next ZaPow Artist group show. This unique exhibit will present viewers with the opportunity to walk through the complete text of Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass as retold via the illustrations created by ZaPow Artists. The opening reception will be held Saturday, April 4 from 7-9 p.m.

Jce Schlapkohl

“French Cuisine“

Works by Cheryl Keefer at: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (often shortened to Alice in Wonderland,) was originally published in 1865 and written by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Dodgson was an intensely private academic who published scholarly articles on advanced mathematics and Symbolic Logic. To understand the world of Wonderland and what inspired Dodgson’s nonsensical whimsy one must first consider the culture of Victorian England. According to his journals, Dodgson believed that “having sex was against God’s wishes for him.” Many scholars believe that Dodgson’s imposed sexual repression contributed to his preference for the company of children. Children during the Victorian era were seen as pure creatures free from sex. Dodgson became a sort of uncle to the children of the Liddel family. One July afternoon in 1862 Dodgson told the children the story that would become Alice. The Mad Hatter, Chesire Cat, Caterpillar, Do Do and many other characters were born as allegory for figures in the real life of Alice Liddel. Beginning in the 1960s artists drew similarities between the tales of Alice and their own experiences with illicit substances. Jefferson Airplane’s song Go Ask Alice and Mark McCloud’s blotter artwork of Alice Goes Through The Looking Glass are two of the most famous instances of drug inspired Alice art in contemporary American culture. It is Dodgson’s use of creative allegory for universal concepts such as frustration, alienation, and abandonment that lend the Alice stories to vivid artistic interpretation. In ZaPow artist Rebecca Rouse’s words “The ZaPow group show will be an evolved Wonderland where things you’ve never imagined may appear right before your eyes!” IF YOU Wonderland, opening reception Saturday, April 4 GO from 7-9 p.m. Wonderland will run until the end

of May 2015. ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Suite 101, Downtown, Asheville. Visit zapow.com.

Wedge Studios 129 Roberts St. River Arts District By appt. Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College St. Downtown Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

Works on Display at:

PG. 10

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Asheville Gallery of . 20 Art, Downtown 7 PG

Seven Sisters, Black Mountain

PG. 20

7

PG. 41

mS

Cedar Hill Studios, . 25 Waynesville PG

WC

PG. 25

mS

828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

www.joycepaints.com joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600

“After the Storm” Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

PG. 20

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1 Page Avenue ~ Historic Grove Arcade PG. 20

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Suite 123 ~ 828.350.0307

MtnMade807@aol.com

www.MtnMade.com

Vol. 18, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2015 19

Profile for Rapid River Magazine

April 2015 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by Judith Rentner..p3; Inside: The Trio Cavatina..p6; Weaverville Art Safari..p12; Jonas Gerard..p11; Asheville Galle...

April 2015 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Painting by Judith Rentner..p3; Inside: The Trio Cavatina..p6; Weaverville Art Safari..p12; Jonas Gerard..p11; Asheville Galle...

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