Page 1

Celebrate Spring during the April is National month! PG 24

poetry

Weaverville art Safari

PG

9

Jonas gerard Opens New Gallery at Riverview Station PG 19 Interview with Fine Artist teresa pennington PG 32

Divergent • The Grand Budapest Hotel • Veronica Mars • Asheville Jewish Film Festival

PGS

12-15


 April 2014 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8


pg. 20

RC

536.1&541&$5"$6-"3

'*3&803,4 April 12, 2014 • 8 PM

Thomas Wolfe Auditorium Handel Music to the Royal Fireworks Hummel Trumpet Concerto Hayato Tanaka, trumpet Haydn Lord Nelson Mass Asheville Symphony Chorus WCU Concert Choir Michael Lancaster, director

Daniel Meyer, Music Director

C o t t o n M i l l S t u d i o s F e at u r e d Art i s t

pg. 17

S

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — April 2014 


BILTMORE VILLAGE

26 lodge st., asheville, nc 828-277-6222 open mon.-sat.: 10am-7pm, sun.: 12-5pm

`ÂœÂ˜Â˝ĂŒĂŠvÂœĂ€}iĂŒĂŠÂœĂŒÂ…iĂ€Â˝ĂƒĂŠ >ĂžĂŠÂˆĂƒĂŠÂ?Ă•ĂƒĂŒĂŠ>Ă€ÂœĂ•Â˜`ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠVÂœĂ€Â˜iÀÊUĂŠ9ĂŠÂŁÂŁ

jewelry made just for you

www.cRAfTGuILd.ORG

For more fine crafts visit: Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | 828-298-7928

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO pg. 17

Guild Crafts 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

www.craftguild.org

pg. 36

MB

4 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

J

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

pg. 21

WH


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

we love this place Campfire Songs Sing together

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Eight

APRIL 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Rev. Chimyo Atkinson, Judy Ausley, Harry Brown, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Kelly Denson, Amy Downs, Rae Geoffrey, Ginger Graziano, Max Hammonds, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Marcianne Miller, Steve Plever, T.Oder & R.Woods, Dennis Ray, Melissa Reardon, Alice Sebrell, Chris Stack, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Robert Wiley, Truth Wingfield. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Advertising Sales Manager Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, April 2014, Vol. 17 No. 8

6 Performance

Sound Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 UNC Asheville Arts Fest . . . . . . . . . 7 Hendersonville Chamber Music . . 10 Asheville Chamber Music . . . . . . . 11 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0

7 Music

Robin Bullock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Joe Kendrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Daniel Iannucci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Hank West and the Smoking Hots 9 French Broad River Festival . . . . . 8 LEAF: Fun for the Entire Family. . 9

8 Fine Art

Andrew Charles Gallery . . . . . . . . . . 8 Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Art MoB Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 River of Art 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Jonas Gerard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Teresa Pennington . . . . . . . . . . . . .  John Nelson Exhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

8 Columns

The Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place presents Beth and Jim Magill Beth and Photo: Mozingo Photography Jim Magill on Friday, april 11 at 6:30 p.m. The Sing Together Series is designed for family and friends to celebrate the joy of music and singing in spirited sessions. All skill levels are welcome. Campfire Songs participants will learn easy and popular songs the entire family can sing around the campfire. Selections include folk favorites and a few interactive summer camp songs to get the crowd up and moving. The Sing Together takes place in The Forum, a large multi-purpose space adjacent to the Diana Wortham theatre and accessible from the theatre’s main lobby. $10 for adults, $8 for children 12 and under, and children 2 and under are free. For more details call the box office at (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

SpeCiaL SeCtiOnS

Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 16 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 17 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 4 Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . 5 Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . 6 Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . 7 James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . . 8

12 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan 1 Asheville’s Jewish Film Festival . . . . 1 William Fox, Forgotten Mogul . . . 15

16 Artful Living

Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 River Arts District. . . . . . . . pgS 18-19 Downtown Asheville . . . . . pgS 0-1 Dining Out For Life . . . . . . pgS - Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 0-

earthday afterparty The first annual Jam Invitational gets underway on Saturday, april 19, following the Earthday celebration in downtown Asheville. The show starts at 9 p.m. at The One Stop at Asheville Music Hall, just a couple minutes away from the park by foot. Produced by local musician Sean Mason and his company, Masonic Productions, the invitational features a monster lineup of national, regional and local artists, for one epic night of jam and improv. Confirmed artists include Grammy-winning percussionist Count M’Butu, impeccable guitarist Grant Green Jr., drummer Sean Mason, Craig Sorrells on trumpet, Justin Powell on keyboards, Greg Hollowell on saxophone, Taylor Lee on bass, and Hank Smith on banjo. $5 for this 21+ show at The One Stop, 55 College Street, Asheville. For more information, call (828) 255-7777 or visit www. AshevilleMusicHall.com

Local Love Returns! Mondays through Thursdays in April, up to 20 seats on each Lazoom Tour bus will be available to locals for just $10! Lazoom is Asheville’s wildest ride, providing hilarious and historic comedy bus tours. Lazoom is “Beer City’s” only BYOB bus tour! There’s a six ticket max per person, and every ticket holder must have a valid Asheville ID. You have to call the office at (828) 225-6932 to purchase the discounted tickets. Lazoom Tours, 1 ½ Battery Park Avenue, downtown Asheville. www.lazoomtours.com

Local & Responsible advertising Rapid River Magazine is an eco-friendly newsprint publication dedicated to helping the area grow responsibly through our use of soy based ink, purchasing only recycled post and pre-consumer paper, and donating thousands of adverting dollars to local environmental and non-profit organizations. We are local people working to support local businesses. Keep your advertising dollars here in WNC, call (828) 646-0071 today.

Great Tree Zen Temple . . . . . . . . . 16 {Re}HAPPENING 2014 . . . . . . . 6

22 Dining Out for Life 34 What to Do Guide

On the Cover:

Forest Realm by teresa pennington. PAGE 32

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

5 5 5 5 5

iF YOU gO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! distributed at more than 90 locations throughout eight counties in WnC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

captivating performances

O

Don Giovanni

On april 4 & 5 the asheville Lyric Opera (aLO) presents one of Mozart’s darkest operas, don giovanni. Written about the fabled character Don Juan, this story of insatiable lust will shock and satisfy audiences of all types. Baritone Galen Scott Bower, last seen as Baron Scarpia in ALO’s production of the opera Tosca, returns to play the title role of Don Giovanni. Conductor and artistic director of Union Avenue Opera, Scott Schoonover, conducts. Founded in 1999, the Asheville Lyric Opera (ALO) is Asheville’s first opera company. It is recognized for its excellent artistic productions of operatic repertoire that entertain and inspire audiences, featuring world-class operatic talent performing fresh, new productions.

Sound Effects

O

On thursday, april 10 isis Restaurant & Music Hall hosts Sound effects: a Benefit Concert for the asheville Music School. The event will showcase the best of Asheville’s rising talents, revered teachers, and professional musicians. The night includes performances by Asheville Music School (AMS) Sound Education student ensembles, AMS faculty, including

t

Photo: Steve Mann

Sacred and Profane:

tHe pOetRY OF tRaCeY SCHMidt and MaJO JOHn Madden

tracey Schmidt knew she had to write poetry eight years ago, when she heard the great Robert Bly perform.

ing from bipolar disorder, which he has. Tracey’s poetry is intimate and paradoxical and influenced by the mystical poetry of Rumi and Hafiz. Much of Majo’s poetry starts in darkness and moves out into the light – though She also decided that, not always fast enough for like him, she wanted to everybody – and some of the memorize and perform her rest is wildly funny. Tracey’s poetry – not read it – and other passions are cooking that she wanted to work and natural healing; Majo’s with musicians. Majo John are his new granddaughter Madden, now 67, started Tracey Schmidt and Majo John and ecstatic dancing. writing poetry in his Catholic Madden, poetry partners Musicians for this conelementary school. His writcert include Joshua Messick ing was considered either on hammer dulcimer, Matthew Cox on tablas, brilliant or outrageous, depending on whether Peter Levitov on drums, Michael Ivey on guihis nun for that grade got his sense of humor. tar, Robert Thomas on piano, Tony Godwin Tracey’s other art form is photography, on guitar and Daniel Barber on djimbe. which she practices professionally and which also challenges her to develop her capacity to visit www.traceyschmidt.com and see and to capture a moment in time. Majo www.somethingrises.com worked for 20 years as a clinical psychologist and 15 years as a management consultant, and now develops online training for healiF YOU Sunday, April 6 at 3 p.m. at Jubilee, gO 46 Wall St., downtown Asheville. Advance tickets are $12 at Malaprop’s Web Exclusive (cash or check only), or through Majo Read poems by Tracey Schmidt (heymajo@jubilee.com). $15 at the door. and Majo John Madden at Doors open at 2:30 p.m. Come for tasty, www.rapidrivermagazine.com healthy treats.

6 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

MELISSA REARDON

a SHOWCaSe OF MUSiC BY aSHeviLLe MUSiC SCHOOL StUdentS & teaCHeRS

iF YOU Don Giovanni, Friday & Saturday, gO April 4 & 5, at Diana Wortham

Theatre at 8 p.m. For tickets call (828) 257-4530, or visit www.dwtheatre. com. For more information contact the Asheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670 or visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

BY

Photo: Steve Mann

Amanda Horton and Steve Loew, and members of Asheville Tango Orchestra, Common Foundation, Josh Blake’s Jukebox, The Secret B-Sides, Vertigo Jazz Project, and Zansa, plus appearances by Josh Phillips and international performing artist Justin Ray. A percentage of dinner sales will go to AMS. Dinner reservations recommended, with limited concert seating available. Proceeds go toward providing music education scholarships and to cover operating costs for the school’s outreach ensembles. Through the Paul Thorpe Music Education Fund (PTMEF), the nonprofit Asheville Music School provides underserved students with scholarships for music lessons and instruments, and conducts outreach programs that benefit underserved and elderly members of the community. Since 2012, AMS and the PTMEF have awarded more than 60 music scholarships to local youth. The Sound Education outreach ensembles, comprised of students ages 10 to 16, have performed in area hospitals and assisted-living facilities, bridging generations by establishing on-going relationships between youth and elders. Through funding from the Paul Thorpe Music Education Fund, these ensembles are aiming to further develop their outreach performances in our community, with performances at Eliada Homes, the Veteran’s Hospital, and Chunns Cove Assisted Living Center. The Sound Effects benefit concert will also offer a raffle of items, including original artwork, LaZoom tickets, Asheville Symphony Tickets, LEAF tickets, and more. Money raised through an instrument drive will go toward the purchase of instruments for the school’s scholarship students to use. AMS always accepts gently used instrument donations.

iF YOU Sound Effects, Thursday, April gO 10 at 6:30 p.m. Student and faculty

performances at 7-8:45 p.m.; Asheville Tango Orchestra at 9-9:30 p.m., and Asheville All-Stars show is at 10 p.m. Tickets are $12; $6 for ages 3-10; free for ages 2 & younger. Purchase tickets at the door. Call the restaurant for dinner reservations. Isis Music Hall & Restaurant, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

performances UNC Asheville Arts Fest

C

Concerts by the Steep Canyon Rangers and david Holt will highlight the first-ever UnC asheville arts Fest, april 10-1.

BY

STEVE pLEVER

television program Great Scenic Railway Journeys. Other UNCA Arts Fest highlights include TheatreUNThis new four-day festival CA’s staging of will feature music, theater, art Shakespeare’s A and new media exhibitions, Midsummer Night’s interactive sculpture, prose and Dream, and perforpoetry. All UNC Asheville Arts mances by UNCA’s Fest events will be open to the The Steep Canyon Rangers Percussion Ensemble community and while some and the String Quartet. The UNCA Quad will events will be ticketed, many will be free. host interactive sculpture and other outdoor The Steep Canyon Rangers won the events and art exhibits on Saturday, April 12. Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album last year The variety of literary events will range from for Nobody Knows You. Their new album, a “College vs. High School” poetry slam, to Tell the Ones I Love, is at No. 8 and rising on readings by local prose writers, to a keynote by the Billboard sales list. state poet laureate, Joseph Bathanti. An exhibit of Holt’s photos of the late Doc Watson, Grandpa Jones, and many others iF will be on display in the Lipinsky Hall lobby YOU The Steep Canyon Rangers perform throughout the Arts Fest. Holt, who plays gO in Kimmel Arena at 8 p.m. on traditional music on ten acoustic instruments Thursday, April 10. Tickets range and often tells traditional tall tales during from $11.50 to $34.50, and are available his concerts, won online and at the Kimmel Arena box office. Grammy awards for David Holt and the Lightning Bolts perform his recordings with at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 12, in Lipinsky Watson. He apAuditorium. Tickets range from $5 for peared in the movie, UNCA students to $20 for the general public. O Brother Where Art Thou, and hosts For more information and to purchase tickets, David Holt the popular public visit http://arts.unca.edu/ARTSfest.

Robin Bullock’s Homecoming Celebrated at BMCA

B

Bullock is calling this special concert his “Homecoming” since relocating to Black Mountain after living in paris for 1 years. Robin Bullock, who has been called “the Celtic guitar god, has been commuting to the area twice a year to perform at the Swannanoa Gathering at Warren Wilson College, and Swannanoa Solstice at Diana Wortham Theater. The multi-instrumentalist will be returning to the Arts Center after a guest appearance held there last November. During that appearance he was so smitten with the “sound” of the room he asked to perform a concert, “in celebration of my new home.” Bullock is a prolific composer, whose virtuosity on guitar, cittern, and mandolin blends the ancient melodies of the Celtic lands and their vigorous Appalachian descendants into one powerful musical vision. A warm, friendly presence onstage, Robin effortlessly creates a magical world for the audience with his multi-instrumental wizardry, taking them on a journey to the heart and soul of Celtic and American traditions.

Robin Bullock

For more insight into the musician, listen to Bullock’s interview on WCQS with Dick Kowal, Friday, April 11 at 2 p.m., then come to the concert the following night. iF YOU Robin Bullock in concert, Saturday gO April 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the Black

Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street in Black Mountain. Tickets are $20. There will be a reception with the musician following the concert. For more details visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

fine art Beauty in the Chaos

O

OBSeRving and aBSORBing

Our dramatically fluctuating weather can throw our local flora into a bit of a tizzy. Recently, the pink magnolia tree in my yard was suddenly in full bloom after a too-warm week, so I ran out into the increasing chill to photograph its sundappled flowers against the crisp, blue sky, knowing that we — and it — were about to be battered by a twenty degree night full of forty-five mile-per-hour winds. Overnight, the sadly deciduous limbs were transformed into a haunted southern gothic mansion specter. However, this type of transformative progression is interesting food for thought, from the sunny, bloomy side of things, to the post-freeze look. These extremes represent an intriguing sort of chaos. Chaos doesn’t sound like a fun topic, but, really, everything serves as inspiration. For some, disorder is merely about objects being in disarray. But those in art and culture circles tend to see a broad spectrum of opportunities. It’s all useful, even necessary at times. To me, this particular tree is about colors, shapes and patterns, whether pink and soft or crinkly and brown, reminding me of how I am moved by the magnificence of the natural world and its

BY

gREg VINEYARD

processes. As objects and circumstances and viewpoints change, layers of Before & After The Storm Photography by Greg Vineyard visual and tactile interest continue to stack up. Many artists around the world artists are exempt from this notion due specialize in recording the general to being process-driven rather than breakdown of things. An old friend of emotionally so, many others are empamine, photographer Martin Cox (www. thetically narrating personal outlooks and martincoxphotography.com), is known concepts, reacting to the world around for his evocative images of abandoned them, and conveying their own and othsouthern California desert settlements as ers’ stories. They are often constructing well as old steamships in various stages new works in response to what they visof deconstruction. The beauty of it is cerally feel, pouring-forth interpretations unexpectedly striking. of the happenings around us, via film, Here in Asheville, our city is a paint, clay, mixed-media, performance, ready-made set for artists to capture words, food and more. many decades of juxtaposed art deco Back to “my” tree. I’m sharing space and graffiti, marble and corrugated, old with this one at a time in my life when I brick and new concrete; it’s a fascinatam more prone to notice it. This sudden ing, aesthetic turmoil, disclosed through changeover in the yard teaches me lesart, serving as informer, revealer and a sons about timing, fragility and how to conduit for action. And art as daily comappreciate shifts in my own life. Rather merce is big here. According to oft-cited than merely Observe, remaining fixed reports, our arts and crafts activities as if a foot is nailed to the floorboards generate many millions of dollars in (which would also cause one to walk in local economic activity. Unruliness can a circle), one can Absorb even the most breed business. fleeting of lessons and move forward on Personal unrest can also provide new journeys, fully intending to cope motivation for our output. While some and share and communicate. My reaction to the magnolia represents just one interaction in a given week in a certain season. A small moment, yet it has inspired me quite a bit. Artist or otherwise, imagine how many factors each of us is processing all the time. Roll all our overlapping life encounters into the mix, and the volume of data is astounding! We’re gauging and assessing all the time, evaluating our pasts, our connections, our futures. Sorting all this out can be a bit, well, chaotic. Yet, this unbridled, unfiled mass of information gets stored, crunched, dreamed, used, brainstormed, regurgitated … and then we lob it back out into the world to share and recombine into new ideas yet again. It’s a never-ending cycle, and I hope you get to go out and create a bit of it today and magnify your senses. Perhaps there’s a tree near your place that deserves a look-see.

WNC’s New Art Destination at Reynolds Village

t

the andrew Charles gallery opened its doors for business at Reynolds village in north asheville in late February, 014, showcasing the paintings of local artist Joel Cole.

It will continue featuring the contemporary work of local and regional painters, sculptors, printmakers, photographers and mixed-media artists in individual exhibitions and invitational groupshows based on themes. The first of those, on display through April 22, is Echoes of Egypt, with Egyptian antiquities, archival prints, museum reproductions and contemporary art with an Egyptian inspiration. Scheduled subsequent themes will be Eastern Breezes (Asian influences) and False Faces (masks). continued on page 9

8 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

greg vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in asheville, nC. zapOW gallery in downtown asheville carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards (www.zapow.com). www.gregvineyardillustration.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

fine art Weaverville Art Safari Celebrates Spring with Free Studio Tours

i

in the spring, Western north Carolina comes alive with native wildflowers, blackberry blossoms, and lush green foliage. In Weaverville, the town’s celebrated enclave of artists greets spring with the semi-annual Weaverville Art Safari studio tour. Held on the weekend of April 2627, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the community event provides the unique opportunity to interact and visit with locally and nationally known artists. Forty artists are participating in this year’s event, which encompasses downtown Weaverville and extends into the surrounding areas around Weaverville and Barnardsville. Guests have the chance to meet artists in their studios, hear the stories behind their creations, and learn more about the creative process. Last year, the event broke previous attendance records as art enthusiasts embraced the opportunity to immerse themselves in a vibrant and living art celebration. “Weaverville is so fortunate to have so much talent,” said Cindy Ireland, Weaverville Art Safari Chairperson and owner of Roundhouse Studios. “Our hard-working artists not only thrive on the creative process, but we enjoy sharing how that magic happens with everyone who comes out searching for something new.” The free event is a self-guided driving tour that’s perfect for all ages. Guests can split their experiences into two short tours spanning the weekend or enjoy a leisurely daylong tour of the community. “The beauty of the Art Safari is it allows individuals to create a unique visit that caters to their interests and tastes,” said Steven Forbes-deSoule, Weaverville Art Safari founding member and a creator of raku vessels and sculpture. “There’s no agenda other than enjoying yourself.”

Continued from page 8

But what sets ACG apart from other fine art galleries in the area is the ongoing exhibition for sale of Tribal Art (sometimes called Ethnographic Art) and New World Antiquities (or Pre-Columbian art). The tribal art from Africa, New Guinea, the Philippines, etc., is comprised of wooden masks and figurative sculpture as well as ceramic sculpture and vessels. The Pre-Columbian pieces are ceramics from Colima, West Mexico;

Works of art showcased include handmade pottery, glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, paintings, drawings, fiber art, and more. Many studios provide art demonstrations and door prizes. A special preview party at the Weaverville Town Hall kicks off the event on Friday evening, April 25. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and includes live music, door prizes, hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, desserts, and more. The highlight of the evening is a silent auction featuring art works donated by each participating artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. All event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari events. Weaverville Art Safari brochures containing maps and artist information, are available at greater Asheville-area galleries, restaurants, and shops beginning in April. Brochures will also be distributed from an Art Safari information booth located on Main Street in Weaverville during the Safari weekend. A downloadable brochure with map and full details about participating artists are also available at www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

Above: Susan Webb Lee, Tapistry Right: Leo Monahan, paper sculpture

RAPID RIVER-1_Layout 1 3/20/14 12:04 AM Page 1

Saturday & Sunday, April 26-27

Western North Carolina’s NEW ART DESTINATION

about the Weaverville art Safari The Weaverville Art Safari is an event staged twice each year–the last full weekend in April and the first full weekend in November – by a group of Western North Carolina artists whose studios are located in and around the communities of Weaverville and Barnardsville, NC. The first Weaverville Art Safari was organized in the spring of 2001 with the goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art community on the northern outskirts of Asheville, NC. Since then thousands of people have returned over and over each spring and fall to enjoy the shopping opportunities and the ambience.

the Vicus culture of Peru, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica and the Maya civilization. Prices range from $100 for a Costa Rican ceramic whistle in the form of a fish to $8,500 for a published late 19th Century ceramic sculpture of a seated Akan queen (Ghana, Africa). The ACG welcomes consignments of ethnographic and Pre-Columbian art from private collectors. The owners of ACG, Dennis Forbes and Carl Kojis, are both residents of rural Weaverville and artists them-

Offering Modern Fine Art

Tom Hoxie, Step Chest

Plus Ethnographic Art & iF YOU The Weaverville Art Safari, gO April 26-27, from 10 a.m. to 6

p.m. For more information and a full list of participating artists, please visit www.weavervilleartsafari.com, or contact Steven Forbes-deSoule at (828) 645-9065 or forbes143@charter.net.

selves, whose works are also available at the Gallery. Forbes is the founder and editorial director of the 4-color glossy quarterly Kmt, A Modern Journal of Ancient Egypt, now in its 25th year of publication (www.kmtjournal.com). iF YOU The Andrew Charles Gallery gO is located in Suite 105, Building

60 at Reynolds Village (The Lofts). Gallery hours 10-5, Tue-Sat., or by appointment. Call (828) 989-0111.

GALLERY

New World Antiquities

Themed Show Multiple Artists & Antiquities

‘ ECHOES OF EGYPT ’

March 29 - April 22 Opening Reception Saturday, March 29, 5-9 pm

pg. 36

gC

Hours: 10 - 5 pm Tue - Sat or by appointment: 989-0111 At Reynolds Village, 60 North Merrimon, Suite 105, N. Asheville Exit 23 off I-26, cross Merrimon & up hill to 1st building on right

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

HendeRSOnviLLe & Flat Rock

Hendersonville Chamber Music Concerts

R

Rawlins Piano Trio – Sunday, April 6

BY

Founded in 1987, the Rawlins Piano Trio is a dynamic group of performers, teachers and scholars, distinguishing themselves in arts outreach, master classes and performances in a variety of venues. The Rawlins Piano Trio Recent trio appearances include the prestigious performance showcase at the national conference of Chamber Music America in New York City, the national conference of the College Music Society, plus international tours to Taiwan, Panama and Korea in addition to performing a rigorous concert schedule throughout the United States. All faculty members of the University of South Dakota Department of Music, the trio, Eunho Kim, violin, MarieElaine Gagnon, cello and Susan Keith Gray, piano are active as teachers and recording artists as well as performers. Their Hendersonville program will include Beethoven’s Trio in G Major “Kakadu Variations,” David Stock’s “From the Old World,” and Smetana’s Trio in G minor. Op.15.

Hen Society Flocks to Art MoB Studios

F

Feathers were flying last month at art MoB Studios & Marketplace.

J U S T IC E S T

ST

ST

ENT

HA

VE

HM

ELL ST

GR

OV

E

N V IL L

ST

ST

GREE

S P R IN G S T

T W H IT T E D S

K A N U GA R D

ST

ELL ST

HR

ST

E HW

W H IT E

Y

HS

G ROVE

BA R N W

CASEW

D AV IS

HEBRON RD

T K IN G S

H ST

N ST

T M A IN S

CHURC

IN G T O

ST

ST

D ST

VE

HB

ST ALLEN L IL LY PO ND

10 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

ST

HL

W ASH

NG

T IC E

TTE

Along with the feathers were paint, food, wine and laughter. The Hen Society of Henderson County chose to hold their monthly meeting creating The Hen Society of Henderson County portraits of their chickens. The Hen Society of Henderson County are a small group of women who are thrilled about their chickens and wanted to educate, inspire, and reassure each other. They gather monthly at each other’s homes to enjoy the many different coops and pens and a potluck meal. Barb Glassman, the founder of the Hen Society, came up with the idea to hold the meeting at Art MoB Studios. Most of the women had no previous art experience, yet everyone left with a painting that surprised and delighted them. The flock was guided by Canvas & Corks instructor Miriam Hughes, who never lets anyone leave the class without being very happy with their work and new found talent. Canvas & Corks, Art Mob’s unique way of bringing creativity to everyone, holds classes every Wednesday evening. All supplies and instruction are include for $35. Each week there is a different subject, and once a month Canvas & Corks holds a Pop Art Pets class, and a Pick Your Own Topic class. These BYOB and snacks classes are a great way to gather a group of friends and explore your creativity while laughing. Michele Sparks, owner of Art MoB studio’s and Marketplace, also offers the Canvas & Corks as private parties both at Art MoB Studio’s & Marketplace, or at your location. Call her today at (828) 693-4545 to book your event!

Hg

AV E

T H IR D AV E

MMI

JU S

WHI

FH

the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. Tickets are $20 tax included and will be available at the door on the day of the performance. More information can be found on Facebook and at www.hendersonvillechambermusic.org.



AV E

F IR S T A

CU

SEV

VE F IF T H A F O RT H

FLat ROCK - 876

LO

AV E

S IX T H

FLE

S

Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

iF YOU All Hendersonville Chamber Music performances gO are presented on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. at

ST

Y

MA

HW

F L E M M IN G S T

HM

aRtS & CULtURe in HendeRSOnviLLe

The next and final concert in the 2014 Hendersonville Chamber Music Series will be the acclaimed Carolina Brass on Sunday, April 27.

IN

ON

LE

N.

V IL

E IG H T H



Carolina Brass – Sunday, April 27

HendeRSOnviLLe - 879 HE

PA TT

AS



S PA R T

A N BU

RG HW Y

ROBERT WILEY



art MoB Studios & Marketplace 14 4th east avenue, Hendersonville, nC 879 visit www.artmobstudios.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

HendeRSOnviLLe & Flat Rock

A R T S

&

C U L T U R E

performance aSHeviLLe CHaMBeR MUSiC SeRieS pReSentS

The Minguet String Quartet and Andreas Klein in Concert

HR

t

Minguet Quartet

the asheville Chamber BY MARILYNNE HERBERT Music Series will present the Minguet String Quartet, and pianist andreas Klein, in concert, Friday april 4 at 8 p.m. at the Biltmore United Methodist Church.

FH

HB

HS

According to Asheville Chamber Music Series (ACMS) Board President, Polly Feitzinger, the Biltmore United Methodist Church is one of Asheville’s most beautiful venues for chamber music and is known for its superior acoustics. “The Asheville Chamber Music Series has become one of Asheville’s most-valued cultural resources. It has received national recognition for its outstanding programs,” she added. The Minguet Quartet has performed in Europe’s most prestigious concert halls, as well as participating in the Salzburg Festival and Bonn’s Beethoven Festival. Pianist Andreas Klein joins the German quartet on their American tour and has been hailed as “A fascinating artist with all the indispensable qualities: touch, tone, temperament,” by the New York Times. The program will include works by: J.S. Bach, The Andreas Klein Art of the Fugue: Contrapuncti 1, 3, 4 and 9; Glenn Gould, String Quartet Op. 1; Mendelssohn, Capriccio from Four Pieces for String Quartet op. 81; and, J.S. Bach, Piano Concerto BWV 1052. iF YOU The Minguet String Quartet and pianist, Andreas gO Klein in concert, Friday April 4 at 8 p.m. at the

Biltmore United Methodist Church. The church is located at the corner of Hendersonville Road and Yorkshire Street in Asheville. Admission is $35; free for those under 25 with student ID. Purchase tickets from the ACMS website, www.ashevillechambermusic.org or contact Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427, or support@ashevillechambermusic.org.

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - the previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHip KaUFMann is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MiCHeLLe Keenan is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest RevieWS, tHeateR inFO and MOvie SHOW tiMeS, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRent BROWn is a graphic designer and illustrator. view more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

tHe MOntHLY ReeL

W

With the Oscars doled out and the red carpet rolled up until next year, things have been fairly status quo at the cinema, that is until the arrival of Wes anderson’s the grand Budapest Hotel. Chip and I were beguiled and completely smitten with the film, and it may be Anderson’s bet work yet. If you like Anderson’s off beat tales, you won’t be disappointed. The Grand Budapest Hotel is currently my favorite film of the year, which isn’t saying much, seeing as it’s only late March [as I write this], but I imagine it will still be one of my top films by year’s end. Not out yet at press time, but promised soon at the Fine Arts Theatre is the much anticipated Indian film, The Lunchbox. Also in April at the Fine Arts is The Asheville Jewish Film Festival.

You can find a listing and descriptions for the festival on page 9. The Asheville Film Society and the Hendersonville Film Society are offering up a wonderful variety of films, including Marlene Dietrich’s Shanghai Express, The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night and The Great Santini. And last but not least, the good Professor Kaufmann takes a look at William Fox, a movie mogul whose name still graces TV, sports, and cinema, but who himself is long forgotten.

Until next month, enjoy.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Divergent ∑∑∑1/2

Short Take: Overlong Hunger Games knockoff has its good points including a nice turn from Kate Winslet as the principal villainess.

ReeL taKe: Yet another

installment in the Young Adult book trilogy to film version saga has a few things going for it. It’s clearly designed as a clone of The Hunger Games series although it’s not as good. It is however several Shailene Woodley and Theo James must stop Kate Winslet notches above what the from implementing a “final solution” in Divergent. Twilight quartet has to offer. This they plan to accomplish by turning the I should mention up front that I haven’t warriors into mindless drones. Can Beatrice read the source material (which is only 2/3 and her friend stop the “final solution” before finished) which, more often than not, is a good it occurs? thing for no matter how hard Hollywood tries, Director Neil Burger who had previously a film is not a book and a book is not a film. If directed one of my favorite films The Illusionyou like one you generally don’t like the other ist, handles all this derivative material in pretty depending on which you encounter first. solid fashion but at 143 minutes, it’s just too For those of you who haven’t read long. I don’t know if the book had all the endVeronica Roth’s novel, it’s another one of less exposition (which would work better in those “not too distant future” settings where print) but a lot of it could have been trimmed everything has been destroyed by war except and the rest of the film tightened up. There’s a for the city of Chicago which is surrounded really good 100 minute movie here if properly by a massive, impenetrable fence. The society edited. Perhaps it could be called Derivative. there is divided into 5 factions representing 1) On the plus side the film is well cast and the selfless, 2) the peaceful, 3) the honest, 4) that helps to keep things interesting for the the brave, and 5) the intelligentsia. Those who most part. Shailene Woodley and Theo James don’t fall into any faction become homeless. are good as the romantic leads, Jai Courtney is All 16 year olds must take a test to an intense “drill sergeant” while Ashley Judd determine which faction they are best suited personifies the strong “mother” figure. Howfor (shades of Harry Potter) but then you ever I went to see the movie for Kate Winslet’s can choose outside the test results. Once you villainess and she does not disappoint. choose though there’s no going back. Beatrice If you’re a fan of the novel, I don’t know Prior is born to the selfless class but she wants what to tell you. You might like Divergent and to be a warrior (shades of Brave). Her test reyou might not. As for others not familiar with sults place her in three factions which classify the source material, there’s enough Harry Pother as “divergent” and therefore dangerous so ter, Hunger Games, and Mein Kampf here to she must keep this knowledge hidden. satisfy just about everybody except for fans of After choosing to be a warrior and going huge pyrotechnics and they won’t have to wait through some brutal training (shades of Hunvery long until the next Marvel installment. ger Games), she is allowed to join. Shortly after that she and her instructor uncover a Rated PG-13 for intense violence and action, conspiracy by the intelligentsia to eliminate thematic elements, and sensuality. the selfless class because they threaten the perREVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN fect societal order (shades of Nazi ideology).

1 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

The Grand Budapest Hotel

∑∑∑∑∑

Short Take: Quite possibly Wes Anderson’s best film yet.

ReeL taKe: After watching The Grand Bu-

dapest Hotel, I didn’t want to leave, I wanted to check in for an extended stay. Inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig, Wes Anderson’s latest film is a fanciful mash up of 30’s style caper comedy, whodunit and Anderson’s own brand of fractured fairy tale. The Grand Budapest Hotel may just be Anderson’s best film yet, or at the very least his most evolved film to date. The movie is narrated first by Tom Wilkinson, a novelist beloved by the people of the fictitious nation of Zubrowka. He looks back to the 1960’s when he first became familiar with The Grand Budapest Hotel. At this point the narrative is passed to Jude Law who plays a younger version of the writer. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a shadow of its former self, now inhabited by a handful of exotic hermits. One night our narrator meets the most intriguing of the occupants, one Mr. Mustapha (F. Murray Abraham). Mustapha is the aging proprietor. As he regales our narrator with the tale of how he came to own the hotel, we travel back to the 1930’s when the Grand Budapest was a posh mountain retreat for Europe’s wealthy. At that time Mr. Mustafa was a mere lobby boy, complete with penciled moustache. Known as ‘Zero,’ (Tony Revolori) he was quickly taken under the tutelage of Monsieur Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes), the hotel’s renowned concierge, a meticulously fussy and over perfumed perfectionist with zeal for service and servicing his clientele. When Madame D (Tilda Swinton), one of Gustave’s most devoted and aged patrons dies suddenly shortly after leaving the hotel, Gustave and Zero head to her funeral. When it is revealed that Gustave is to inherit a priceless painting, all hell breaks loose and Gustave is pinned for her murder. So begins a game of cat and mouse, filled with hilarious antics and outlandish characters. The film is peppered with Anderson’s usual stock players, including Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban, Owen Wilson, and Edward Norton, all of whom are delightful. Adrian Brody is sinister as the head of Madame D’s money grubbing children and Willem Dafoe is dastardly as Brody’s henchman. Movies continued on page 13


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews compliments the part. As always, Anderson’s setting is an integral part of the story. Anderson’s aesthetics and typical affectations are all on full display. It’s wonderfully whimsical, a confection of sorts. The story, while wonderfully funny, is laced with a sorrowful or mournful tone of sorts. For me, much of this comes from the fact that it takes place in the time between two world wars, the rise of fascism and the fall of certain aristocratic lifestyles; these characters are living on the fringes of a soon to be bygone era. To be a fly on that fanciful wall in that bygone day, if only for a brief 99 minutes, was a sheer pleasure.

Movies continued from page 12

There are too many in the ensemble to mention them each, but it is clear everyone is having a good time and the Andersonesque ensemble seems to be elevated to a new level. Yet make no mistake, it is Ralph Fiennes and Revolori who truly shine. Their chemistry is terrific and it’s terrific fun to watch. Fiennes is a complete delight as Gustave and moves brilliantly within the character. He possesses an almost light footed finesse, whether sporting his colorful hotel uniform or donning stripes and making friends in prison. It’s wonderful to see Fiennes in a lighter yet still weighty role. His dramatic prowess certainly

Tony Revolori, Tilda Swinton, Ralph Fiennes and elevator operator in The Grand Budapest Hotel.

Rated R for language, some sexual content and violence.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

The Asheville Jewish Film Festival the asheville Jewish Film Festival takes place thursday evenings and Friday afternoons in april at the Fine arts theatre.

t

Mahmoud Shalabi (right) in A Bottle in the Gaza Sea

SCHedULe Opening night Film & Reception, april  at 6 p.m. Reception at Blue Spiral 1; Screening at Fine arts. all tickets $ april 4, 1 p.m. all tickets $8.50 Renowned ballroom dancer, Pierre Dulaine takes his belief that dance can overcome political and cultural differences and puts it into action with one hundred and fifty 11 year old Jewish and Palestinian Israelis. What occurs is magical and transformative. Sukkah City april 10 at 7 p.m.; april 11 at 1 p.m. all tickets $8.50 When best-selling author Joshua Foer (Moonwalking With Einstein) began to build his first sukkah, a small hut that Jews build and dwell in every fall for the holiday

Short Take: This film version of the cult TV series about a young female private eye comes across as a combination of Mean Girls and The Maltese Falcon and that’s a good thing.

ReeL taKe: I was looking forward to seeing

Veronica Mars even though I was completely unfamiliar with the TV series and I must say that it’s the best movie version of a TV show that I never saw that I have ever seen. Creatorwriter-director Rob Thomas has made a film that combines elements of Mean Girls with The Maltese Falcon and it works beautifully. On the TV show which aired from 200407, Veronica was a high school sleuth in the fictional town of Neptune, California. Her father ran his own detective agency so Veronica knew all about being a private investigator and how to use the tricks of the trade. The show primarily consisted of her helping out her high school friends who had gotten into trouble. Like Star Trek, the series developed a cult following but was cancelled after 3 seasons. The movie takes place on the eve of Veronica’s high school’s 10th anniversary reunion. Veronica is now living in New York and hoping to join a prestigious law firm. Right after her final interview she’s contacted Movies continued on page 14

The festival shows the diversity of Jewish identity through film, exploring the dynamic environment of the history and culture of the modern Jewish experience. The festival strives to link newcomers with the vibrant Jewish community formed over Asheville’s history, bringing attention to a constantly evolving Jewish culture.

Dancing in Jaffa

Veronica Mars ∑∑∑∑

Sukkah-building designs on display in Union Square.

of Sukkot, he wanted to move beyond the generic plywood boxes and canvas tents that have become the unimaginative status quo. He discovered that while the bible outlines the basic parameters for what a sukkah should look like and how it should function, it leaves plenty of room for variation and interpretation. Foer thought, what if contemporary architects and designers were challenged to design and construct twelve radical sukkahs? What would they come up with? And so was born the design competition and exhibition known as “Sukkah City.” A Bottle in the Gaza Sea april 17 at 7 p.m.; april 18 at 1 p.m. all tickets $8.50 Tal is a 17-year-old French woman who has settled in Jerusalem with her family. She writes a letter expressing her refusal to accept that only hatred can reign between Israelis and Palestinians. She slips the letter into a bottle, and her brother throws it into the sea near Gaza, where he is carrying out his military service. A few weeks later, Tal receives an e-mail

response from a mysterious “Gazaman,” a young Palestinian named Naïm. And thus begins a turbulent but tender longdistance friendship between two young people that are separated by a history they are trying both to understand and change. Based on the award-winning novel by Valérie Zenatti.

theatre directory asheville pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Aftermath

Carmike 10 (asheville)

april 4 at 7 p.m.; april 5 at 1 p.m. all tickets $8.50

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

Franek and Jozek Kalina, sons of a poor farmer, are brothers from a small village in central Poland. Franek immigrated to the United States in the 80’s, and cut all ties with his family. Only when Jozek’s wife arrives in the US, without explanation, does Franek finally return to his homeland. Franek discovers that Jozek has been ostracized from the community, and constantly receives various threats. As Franek and Jozek struggle to rebuild their relationship, they are drawn into a gothic tale of intrigue. The two brothers eventually uncover a dark secret that forces them to confront the history of their family and their hometown.

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (asheville) www.cinebarre.com

the Falls theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine arts theatre (asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

the Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 1


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews aSHeviLLe FiLM SOCietY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. April 1:

the White Sheik (1952) The first two days of a marriage. Ivan, a punctilious clerk brings his virginal bride to Rome for a honeymoon, an audience with the Pope, and to present her to his uncle. Stars Alberto Sordi, Giulietta Masina, Brunella Bovo. Directed by Federico Fellini. April 8:

Shanghai express

(1932) Many passengers on the Shanghai Express are more concerned that the notorious Shanghai Lil is on board than the fact that a civil war is going on that may make the trip take more than three days. Stars Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong. Directed by Josef von Sternberg. April 15:

Monte Carlo

(1930) Minutes before her wedding to Duke Otto Von Seibenheim, Countess Helene Mara flees, on a whim, to Monte Carlo, where she hopes her luck will save her poor financial state. Stars Jeanette MacDonald, Jack Buchanan, Claude Allister. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. April 22:

the devils

(1971) In 17th-century France, Father Urbain Grandier seeks to protect the city of Loudun from the corrupt establishment of Cardinal Richelieu. Hysteria occurs within the city when he is accused of witchcraft by a sexually repressed nun. Stars Vanessa Redgrave, Oliver Reed, Dudley Sutton. Directed by Ken Russell. April 29:

a Hard day’s night (1964) A ‘typical’ day in the life of the Beatles, including many of their famous songs. Stars John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr. Directed by Richard Lester.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Movies continued from page 13

by an old boyfriend who’s been accused of murdering his current girlfriend. She goes back to California to offer legal advice but finds herself getting caught up in an ever expanding series of events. This is where the movie enters true film noir territory. We already have the first person narrative ala Raymond Chandler and Veronica has had as many ups and downs as Sam Spade or Phillip Marlowe so she’s a “seasoned veteran”. The more she investigates the more she uncovers but just can’t put it all together. Finally, after being forced to go to her high school reunion (the Mean Girls part), she comes face to face with her past (the other characters from the TV show) and finds the clues she needs to solve the case but at what cost? Kristen Bell gives a wonderful performance as Veronica, tough and caustic yet still vulnerable. Life has kicked her ass on more than one occasion but then she’s the one who put the “kick me” sign on her back. Yet underneath she’s still a romantic for without those feelings she couldn’t be a true noir detective. We want a figure that we can root for and Bell not only is able to make us root for

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Sunrise”

teresting and totally believable. Veronica Mars is exactly the kind of throw away movie that I long to see these days. It’s the right length, it has no aspirations other than to entertain, yet it manages to stay with me afterwards. A fascinating back story to Veronica Mars is that its initial funding came from a Kickstarter campaign by director Rob Thomas and fans of the show. There was enough to get the movie started and then Warner Brothers kicked in the rest. It has already done quite Kristen Bell as the titular character investigates the murder well in limited showings and of an old high school friend in Veronica Mars. is available for downloading or disc purchasing right now. Like all movies though it should be seen on her but to feel for her as well. the big screen first. If you enjoy film noir as Rob Thomas’s script has all the necessary a genre, then Veronica Mars is right up your noir complications and false leads but it also (dark) alley. has a lot of snappy dialogue and that’s something noir fans expect as well. The perforRated PG-13 for sexuality, drug content, violence, mances by the rest of the old TV regulars are and strong language. spot on as they should be but then I’ve never REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN seen the TV show and I still found them in-

april dvd picks

Sunrise (1927)

Is Sunrise the greatest silent movie ever made? Who can say? What is without question is that Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (to give the film its full title) IS one of the greatest films ever made, sound or silent. The fact that we still have it is something of a miracle as the original negative was destroyed in a fire in 1937. Fortunately there were copies in England and Europe which were recently discovered. What is basically a simple story of love, betrayal, and redemption is transformed and elevated into a work of art by legendary German director F. W. Murnau. There are just so many things to savor in this film, from the beautiful cinematography in the village scenes, which is reminiscent of Rembrandt or the Bauhaus influenced designs of the city, to the performances of George O’Brien and Janet Gaynor, who won the first Best Actress Oscar in 1928. The brand new Blu-Ray/DVD combo pack from 20th Century Fox is a cause for celebration as it provides us with the best surviving American version (94 min.) and a shorter European version (74 min.) that was found in the Czech Republic. The original 1927 Fox Movietone score has been digitally remastered and sounds fabulous (Sunrise was the first film to be released with a soundtrack) although there is also a recent recording of the score as well. In addition to the above there are outtakes, an excellent optional audio com-

14 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

mentary, a digital version of the original script, and copies of original promotional materials. If you are truly a lover of cinema then you need to see Sunrise and decide its status for yourself. Like all truly great films, it’s one that you can watch over and over again, and that is the highest compliment I can bestow.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

After raving this month about Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel, I had to pick my favorite Anderson film, Moonrise Kingdom. It was also my hands-down favorite film of 2012. Moonrise Kingdom takes place the summer of 1965 on an island off the coast of New England. Two twelve year olds fall in love, become pen pals, and hatch a plan to run away together. Sam (Jared Gilman) is an orphan and the least liked member of the ‘Khaki Scouts’. Suzy (Kara Hayward) is the brooding, troubled daughter of two lawyers (Frances McDormand

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Moonrise Kingdom” and Bill Murray). Both are misfits who identify with each other the moment they set eyes on each other. They run away armed with a camp set, his Khaki Scout wilderness skills, a suitcase full of fantasy books, a plastic portable record player (with Francoise Hardy 45’s and The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra), a kitten in a fishing creel and a pair of binoculars. In hot pursuit of our underage love birds are her parents, Scoutmaster Ward (Edward Norton), the local sheriff, Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis), a social services agent (Tilda Swinton) and a bunch of khaki scouts. We are aware of an approaching storm, so we know the storm will of course hit the island in the climatic moments of the story. Moonrise Kingdom is part offbeat kitsch and part fractured fairy tale, the combination of which is affected and precious but also somehow rather charming. Anderson’s attention to detail is brilliant and serves the story well. He has also created characters that we actually like; from Sam and Suzy to Scoutmaster Ward and Captain Sharp. In the end we are all misfits in one way or another looking for love. The narrative by Bob Balaban rounds out our fractured fairy tale and they all live happily ever after. The End. Rated PG-13 for sexual content and smoking.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews William Fox, Hollywood’s Forgotten Mogul the next time you watch a tv show on the Fox network, cheer or hiss a talking head on Fox news, see a movie produced by twentieth Century Fox (or any studio for that matter), or visit the Fox theater in atlanta, then spare a thought for the forgotten man who made it all possible, for, without William Fox, the history of american movies would be very different.

W

When we hear about the classic Hollywood studio heads, Louis B. Mayer is the first name that usually is mentioned William Fox in 1927 at the followed by height of his career. Jack Warner and then Adolph Zukor. That is only natural as they were the heads of the 3 most powerful and successful studios in Hollywood (MGM, Warner Brothers, and Paramount). Then there’s Darryl F. Zanuck who started at Warners, formed Twentieth Century Pictures in 1933, and merged it with Fox Film in 1935 to create 20th Century – Fox which he ran off and on for the next 30 years. But before Zanuck there was William Fox who not only founded Fox Film and made the movies the way we know them today but he almost changed the course of movie history. William Fox was born Wilhelm Fuchs in Hungary in 1879. After coming to New York City with his immigrant parents, he Americanized his name and worked a variety of jobs in the garment industry. In 1906 he opened his first nickelodeon and by 1912 he owned a number of movie theaters along the East coast. In order to exert quality control over what he showed and to ensure a steady product for his theaters he founded the Fox Film Company in 1915. That same year he cast a small time stage actress named Theda Bara in a movie called A Fool There Was based on a poem by Rudyard Kipling. It cost less than $100,000 to make and grossed well over a million. Bara, who was born Theodosia Goodman the daughter of a tailor in Cincinatti, became an overnight sensation and the word “vamp” (short for vampire

because she drained her victims of their reBY CHIp KAUFMANN sources) entered the national lexicon. She was a dark haired, dark-eyed angel of destruction, that proved to be Fox’s undoing. Seeing an opthe antithesis of Mary Pickford, who went portunity to acquire one of his biggest business unpunished for her misdeeds. competitors, Fox attempted to take control of Fox suffered no consequences either as Loews Inc. They had a national theater chain the success of Fool and other Bara pictures to rival his own and were the parent company like it enabled him to produce the more of MGM which was headed up by Louis B. artistic fare to which he was inclined such as Mayer. Mayer threw as many stumbling blocks adaptations of A Tale of Two Cities (1917) in Fox’s way as he could and then Fate interand Count of Monte Cristo (1922) without vened. In the summer of 1929, Fox was badly having to worry whether or not they made injured in a car accident and then right after money. The popular Westerns of cowboy star that the Stock Market crashed Tom Mix added to the coffers. and he lost all his money. The Fox was a hard-nosed busifollowing year he was ousted nessman who built up an empire as head of his own company by of movie houses (like the Fox the stockholders. Theater in Atlanta) which kept For the next several years the profits rolling in. But, unlike Fox fought bankruptcy but the others, Fox was also a visionan attempt to bribe a judge in ary who anticipated the coming 1941 landed him six months of sound long before it hapin jail. When he got out, he pened and invested heavily in was treated in Hollywood as a a sound on film process which pariah and never worked there became the soundtracks we again. Fortunately he owned know and still use today. Warner the rights to the patents of the Brothers beat him to the punch Fox Movietone system and he with The Jazz Singer and their and his family were able to live sound on disc Vitaphone system, Wlliam Fox in 1941 at his in relative comfort until he died but the Fox Movietone system bankruptcy hearing. in 1952 at the age of 73. No one became the industry standard. from Hollywood came to his funeral. He was In 1927 Fox invited the great German buried in a lesser known cemetery in Brooklyn. filmmaker F. W. Murnau to Hollywood and Although William Fox has been forgotten, gave him carte blanche to make any movie his legacy and name are everywhere. Not only of his choosing with full artistic control. The are there the various media outlets but several eventual result Sunrise (my DVD pick for of the movie palaces, whose construction this month) was the first movie to feature he oversaw, are still standing and operating. a soundtrack and was a huge artistic if not The same cannot be for MGM so in the end financial success. By the end of the decade, perhaps William Fox has the last laugh. It’s four legendary Hollywood directors, Murnau, interesting to speculate that had he been able John Ford, Raoul Walsh, Frank Borzage, were to take over MGM back in 1929, what would working at Fox and producing movies that Hollywood have been like? made money and were well received. However it was also the end of the 1920s

Music Video Asheville

M

Music video asheville (Mva) is an annual showcase highlighting the pairing of asheville musicians and filmmakers. To celebrate the 7th Anniversary of Asheville’s favorite music event, the MVA crew is once again rolling out the red carpet… literally. Music Video Asheville strongly suggests “Grammy style” attire (with Asheville flair, of course). Pre-show mingling takes place on Wednesday, April 16 at 6 o’clock. The video showcase promptly starts at 8 p.m.

BY

KELLY DENSON

Music Video Asheville, now coming into its 7th year, is an annual event featuring collaborations between filmmakers and local musicians. Area bands submit their music videos, the best 90 minutes of videos are selected for a viewing and awards ceremony at Diana Wortham Theater in downtown Asheville.

The red carpet event is a celebration of the creative, unique and diverse music community that exists here in the heart of Western North Carolina. iF YOU Music Video Asheville, Wednesday, gO April 16. Reception at 6 p.m.;

Screening from 8-9:30 p.m.; Awards presented at 9:30 p.m. $10 adv/ $12 at the door. $25 VIP tickets include unlimited popcorn and two drink tickets. Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 N. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. For more details visit www.musicvideoasheville.com.

HendeRSOnviLLe FiLM SOCietY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. This month HFS will feature an actor’s showcase as we offer three celebrated roles from three generations of performers. Remember there are only three Sundays this month (no show on Easter, April 20). April 6:

Capote

(2005) The tragic death earlier this year of Philip Seymour Hoffman robbed us of a truly great talent. Nominated several times, this is the role that won him his only Oscar. His portrayal of the celebrated writer Truman Capote is absolutely uncanny. Stars Philip Semour Hoffman, Clifton Collins Jr. and Catherine Keener. Directed by Bennett Miller (Moneyball). April 13:

High noon (1952) Gary Cooper won his second Oscar for his portrayal of a stoic lawman forced to go it alone against a gang of ruthless killers when he is abandoned by the townspeople who elected him. Stars Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly and Thomas Mitchell. Directed by Fred Zinnemann (From Here to Eternity). April 20:

no show – Happy easter! April 27:

the great Santini (1979) Robert Duvall should have won an Oscar for this, one of his best loved roles. He plays a fighter pilot in the early 1960s who dominates his family while trying to deal with his own personal problems. Stars Robert Duvall, Blythe Danner and Michael O’Keefe. Directed by Lewis John Carlino (The Sailor Who Fell from Grace).

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 15


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living Summer Zen Mindfulness, and Creativity Workshops

g

great tree zen temple, located in alexander, nC, 0 minutes north of downtown asheville, was established in 001. It’s founder Rev. Teijo Munnich is a dharma heir of the late teacher Dainin Katagiri Roshi of Minnesota Zen Center and has strived over the last 9 years to keep the spirit of his practice here in North Carolina. Rev. Munnich’s vision is to provide opportunities for everyone to experience the benefits of Zen meditation. The weekly, monthly and annual events at Great Tree include traditional Soto Zen practices, body awareness techniques and creative or artistic “free play” to develop mindfulness and compassion in our everyday lives. Throughout the year we feature many special creative workshops for adults, youth, and families. We are fortunate be able to present two writing workshops this year. Carolyn Wallace will lead her new workshop “Your Inner Life Story – A Writing Retreat,” May 9-11, exploring writing as a meditative practice. August 1-3, our good friend from Clarity Works, Peggy Millin returns with “Zen Mind, Writing Mind” a women’s writing circle. In October Norma

a

BY

REV. CHIMYO ATKINSON

Bradley and Anna Matheson will teach “Mindfulness and Ikebana,” combining the mindfulness practices of Thich Nhat Hanh with the art of Japanese flower arrangement. Upcoming in autumn, Rev. Great Tree will offer a writing retreat on May 9-11. Nancy Spence of Anattasati Magga Sesshins or traditional Zen meditation will lead her women’s retreat “Let the World retreats are held the first week of every month Take Care of Itself.” Rev. Munnich and and are open to the public. During these 2-5 Alexander Technique instructor Meredith day retreats we follow a modified monastic McIntosh will lead the “Beginner’s Mind Sesdaily schedule that includes several periods of shin,” applying body awareness techniques to meditation, work practice and a nightly lecture. meditation practice. These retreats are held in silence and include Family practice is an important part of traditional Soto Zen ceremonies each day. Great Tree’s Programs. The Family Meditation Group meets on the last Sunday of each month from 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon for youth meditation, dharma teachings and storytelling, For more information about great tree’s arts and crafts projects and fellowship led by programs visit www.greattreetemple.org Rev. Munnich. At our annual Mother & Child or call (88) 645-085. great tree is Retreats and Summer Children’s Retreats located at 679 Lower Flat Creek Road in parents and their children are given more alexander, nC. opportunieies to explore mindfulness meditaRev. Munnich also gives bi-weekly lectures tion together. Registration for the Summer at zen Center of asheville. See their Children’s Retreat held July 21-23, this year is schedule at www.zcasheville.org. now open.

Testosterone – the New Male Miracle Medicine?

a casual perusal of night time television, the sports channels, or the masculine adventure channels will reveal a plethora of ads for testosterone therapy for men who think they have low “t” (testosterone). While twenty-five percent of the males over age 45 have lower than normal testosterone levels, only a small segment of these males have any symptoms of low testosterone which include: decreased libido, depression, osteoporosis, decreased energy. In fact, most of the time these symptoms can be attributed to other poor health entities such as high blood pressure, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease,

Web Exclusive Find additional health and wellness articles online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

16 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

high cholesterol, poor peripheral circulation, overweight, or lack of exercise. Many men who have one or more of these situations also have lower than normal testosterone levels but there is no evidence that the low testosterone causes these problems. In fact, when lifestyle changes are made to bring some of these situations under control – like losing excess weight, bringing diabetes under control, increasing exercise, controlling hypertension, the low testosterone levels tend to self-correct. Medically, endocrinologists recommend that testosterone should be used only for men who have proven low “T” and also have symptoms – because testosterone treatment carries the risk of increased heart attacks and strokes, hypertension, increased PSA levels with the increased risk of breast cancer and prostate enlargement and/or cancer as well as a host of other side effects. Then why the big direct marketing push on television, in the publishing media, and on the internet? After the age of 25, men in general have decreased libido, decreasing body strength, and decreasing energy levels as they age. With these perceptions of weakness

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

a man’s male ego is at risk. Like any athlete, performance enhancing medications seem to be the answer for a quick reversal of these seeming signs of weakness and less maleness. Two facts should be considered. First, in males – who do not have low “T” and do not have specific symptoms – there is no evidence that there is any improvement in sexual performance, energy levels, or body strength. Second, those males who are taking testosterone should be followed closely for side effects by a medical person as the side effects can be deadly. Healthy lifestyle choices – maintaining ideal weight, regular exercise, lowering blood fats, regular sleep patterns, and lowering stress reactions is probably as effective as medication in maintaining testosterone levels, male prowess, and body strength commensurate with age – without the risk of side effects. Make the choice to set aside male ego and reach for good health instead.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living Freedom From Fear

C

“Freedom’s just another word for nothin’ left to lose.”

Central to Buddhist teaching, and the teaching of all true non-duality spiritual masters, is the concept of liberation. Generally this is referring to liberation from suffering. However, the path to the liberation from suffering is in liberation from attachment to the forms of the world for our sense of self, our identity. So, in a sense, it is about having no absolute dependence on anything for our well-being. There’s nothing to lose — because the stability of our existence is not based on any thing. If the stability of our existence, our sense of well-being, is not dependent on any circumstance external to our Being, this then is most certainly freedom. Here, spiritual becomes psychological, because this freedom liberates us from the anxieties based in finding worth and identity in anything outside our core experience of existence within and as an expression of the Universe. With Buddhism and all non-duality spiritual systems, we’re always peeling the onion. This freedom, this liberation, is not only based on freedom from finding identity in material objects and worldly status. It is based in freedom from the need for any identity that is given by or dependent upon society and social approval at all, and this is a deeper and subtler thing (or no-thing) than we could conventionally imagine. Just how subtle can be captured in the contemporary spiritual master Eckhart Tolle’s teaching that enlightenment (which can be seen as a synonym for spiritual and psychological freedom) is in “renunciation of the need to get to the next moment.” Brilliant! Just consider how the underlying cause of our anxiety is in our sense of the need to control and be in the next moment. Our very sense of identity is wrapped up in a story of self in time. We live leaning into the next moment. We’re on our way to….. something –with some measure of unease about what lies there. This anticipation, this leaning forward in our lives, is very much a source of the neurotic tensions of mind and body that are experienced as anxiety, and act as distraction from the richness of the present moment.. Occasionally, we are not on our way to the next moment. Occasionally, we actually want to linger in the present moment because the present moment seems so perfect, so beautiful. It is meeting our sense of perfection just as it is. Pop culture borrowed the term Nirvana from Buddhism to describe this perfection where self and the moment are completely, harmoniously one. We have no need to get to the next moment. We don’t want the next moment unless it is more of this moment. There comes with this experience a sense of wholeness and vastness, free of all anxiety, all discontent. Then, anxiety about the perfect moment ending will creep in, we are back in time,

~ Kris Kristofferson, Janis Joplin and Nirvana, once again is lost. This is where the Zen Master asks, “Whose sense of perfection is the criteria?” And the answer is: the ego’s sense of perfection, and here’s a good place to introduce another central Buddhist concept called “Egoic Delusion.” What we think we want or fear, in fact, what we think the world is about, is, to a very great extent based in a delusion of the mind. We have ideas about what is good and bad provided for us by our cultural contexts and psychological experiences, and we live reactively to the unfolding of Life from within those ideas. We are prisoners of those ideas. As Tolle is telling us, one of those very powerful ideas is what he calls “psychological time.” Now, in casual reading, one might think that Tolle is saying that time is one of those delusions, that it doesn’t exist. Well, not so simple. We are in the paradoxical universe of human-beingness where things can be simultaneously true and not true. In the realm of Being, Tolle’s word for Nature, the Moon circles the Earth and the Earth circles the Sun. Morning comes with the rising of the Sun, and evening with the Sun’s setting. Days and years pass. Yes. This is natural time. All of Nature lives within this time, which is always experienced as “Now.” The bird doesn’t anticipate the sun’s setting, it doesn’t regret that it missed the worm yesterday. Only humans can suffer in this way, and we suffer because we live trapped within the delusion of “psychological time.” Humans, with our capacity for abstracting our experience out of the immediacy of Nature, create an idea of time, and we actually live mentally more in the past and the future than in the present where our life actually occurs. This anachronistic orientation to Life creates a kind of fear that likewise is psychological. In Nature, the rabbit experiences fear as the fox chases it, but when it eludes the fox, it doesn’t live in fearful memory of that brush with death, nor is the quality of its existence marred by fearful anticipation of the reappearance of the fox. It lives in the Now, and in the Now there is no suffering of this abstract type that humans suffer. So, we can begin to see how freedom ultimately has to do with freedom from psychological time and fear — fear that future moments will be unsatisfactory to our projected fantasies about what we need to be peaceful and OK. For humans, there are also the moments of real fear, real danger — when the earthquake happens, in war, in battle — these

BY

BILL WALZ

experiences are not abstractions and they happen in real time, not psychological time, and it is important to note that in such catastrophic moments, moments of possible or inevitable mortality, for many there is no anxiety, no psychological fear. It is what makes the Zen Koan, “This moment, what is lacking?” a pointer to the truth of our capacity in real presence to be free of psychological fear and anxiety even in the face of real threat to our person and circumstance. “Fear is the mindkiller... I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it is gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.” ~ Frank Herbert in the Sci-Fi novel, Dune

We live, mentally, more in the past and the future, than in the present where our life actually occurs. idea about the moment, no idea about our self — ready to experience what is — to run if the fox chases us, to sit in the warmth of the sun if this is what the moment offers; to manage our personal and financial affairs if this is what the moment calls for. Planning and memory are included. Fretting and worrying are not.

ADDENDUM – An Apology In last month’s column on the Eightfold Path of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths, the observant might have noticed I only wrote about seven Paths. I managed to leave out the path of Right Thinking. For a teacher of Mindfulness, this is an interesting and somewhat ironic oversight. It, synchronistically, is also a relevant topic to include in this month’s column. Right Thinking is about thought that does not bind us in fearful ways to anxieties about continued on page 36

“There is nothing to fear but fear itself.” ~ Franklin Roosevelt So to be free of imprisonment within false ideas, even ideas about freedom — which can perversely even include ideas that freedom is being free to take away others’ freedom — we must again come back to that Zen question, “Who is it that is afraid?” The Dalai Lama tells us, we must “investigate who is becoming afraid. Examine the nature of your self. Where is this I? Who is I? What is the nature of I? Is there an I besides my physical body and my consciousness?” For when we discover that our most basic fear is concerning who this “I” is, and whether this “I” is sufficient for the trials of life, real and imagined, we begin to get to the core of the issue of freedom. Freedom is about realizing the “I” that does not live in ideas — that sees the “I” that is constructed of ideas filled with insecurities — and realizes there are two “I’s.” There is the “I” of the ego, constructed in psychological time, bound by conventions, insecurities and expectations. And there is the “I” of Being, that which sees, that which is awareness, and has no boundary of time, no insecurities, reactivity or conventions. Freedom is in a relationship to existence that is direct and true, in living the “I” of Beingness that experiences the vast interconnectedness that is the truth of existence. And so, ideas and experience based in the “I” of egoic separateness that engender fear about the significance, the safety, the security of this egoic “I,” whose reference point is in the instability of human society and culture, are irrelevant. This is the living as “nobody” with “no idea” that Zen inspires us to. Freedom is in showing up fresh in each moment, with no

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 17


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

River of Art 2

n

national members show for the Women in the art Foundation features 50 original small works by 5 member artists. The exhibition will include works in a variety of media such as oil, acrylics, watercolors, pastel, drawings, monotypes, woodblock, collage, mixed media and sculpture. Women in the Arts focuses on career education, networking, support and camaraderie. Most members are based in the NYC area. Asheville has the second largest membership in the nation. New members are welcomed. Meetings are held in Asheville every 2-3 months.

Singapore 1 by Fleta Monaghan

Markings II by Sandee Johnson

iF YOU An artists’ receptions will be held Friday, April gO 11 from 5-8 p.m. On display through April 30,

2014 at 310 ART, Riverview Station, 191 Lyman Street in the River Arts disctrict. Open from 12-4 p.m. and by appointment. Visit www.310art.com, call (828) 776-2716, or email gallery@310art.com for more details.

RF

RS RB

RC

Rp

Rp Rg

aSHeviLLe’S RiveR aRtS diStiCt The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. One can also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

RJ RT

RB

RL

RV

RS

18 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

RD


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

❖ Fine Arts & Crafts ❖ Unique Restaurants & Breweries Warehouse Studio Spaces

Jonas Gerard Opens Additional Gallery at Riverview Station CeLeBRateS neW SpaCe WitH a gRand Opening ReCeptiOn and painting peRFORManCe

J

Jonas gerard’s new gallery at Riverview Station is the result of the powerful synergies possible when creative growth aligns with a thriving business. New explorations in flow painting techniques and a love for larger canvases, on top of an already vibrant and extensive body of work, has turned Gerard’s Clingman Avenue location into a cornucopia of color. When it became obvious that his artistic imagination was bigger than the walls of one gallery, the search began for an additional location. Large paintings are where Jonas’ creative spirit soars best. The new gallery was designed in accordance with Feng Shui concepts, allowing energies to flow and creating the perfect blank canvas for Jonas to explore the nature of creativity, light and color. Its large walls and performance space

are filled with everything from his new flow paintings to landscapes and sculptures. The grand opening for the 4,700 sq. ft. gallery kicks off on Saturday, April 12 with the 2nd Saturday Live Painting Performance at 2 p.m., followed by the Opening Reception from 4-8 p.m. Live music, hors d’oeuvres, wine, and refreshments paired perfectly with vibrant art, will make this a celebration not to be missed. Together, the Jonas Gerard at Riverview Station and Jonas Gerard on Clingman Avenue galleries will house the fresh new creative rewards of a lifetime spent in art.

Truman Medical Center, and in conjunction with his at Riverview Station gallery opening, Jonas continues to impress with his unique flow paintings. “A Tale of Two Cities” is meant to highlight and expand the creative energy that now links Kansas City and Asheville through this exceptional artist. Established in 2008, Weinberger Fine Art grew from a small art consultation business to a thriving art gallery in the heart of the Kansas City Crossroads Art District. Weinberger Fine Art specializes in bringing diverse and fresh art to Kansas City from both emerging and established artists. A Tale of Two Cities opens April 4, with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Artist talk and reception held April 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. Weinberger Fine Art, 1800 Baltimore, Kansas City, MO. For more information, visit www.jonasgerard.com

BY

CHRIS STACK

iF YOU Jonas Gerard Grand gO Opening, Saturday, April 12.

Live Painting Performance from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Opening Reception 4 to 8 p.m. Jonas Gerard at Riverview Station, 191 Lyman St., Studio #144. Look for the big red doors!

Jonas gerard Fine art is located at 40 Clingman avenue – in the heart of the River arts district. Studio and gallery are open every day from 10-6 p.m.

a taLe OF tWO CitieS This spring is a time of incredible growth for Jonas. “A Tale of Two Cities,” The Flow Paintings of Jonas Gerard opens April 4 at Weinberger Fine Art in Kansas City, MO. Fresh off his highly successful exhibition hosted by Kansas City’s

The New Odyssey Co-op Gallery

t

the new Odyssey Co-op gallery has replaced the Odyssey gallery at 8 Clingman avenue.

BY

gINgER gRAZIANO

Join us for demonstrations and live music as well as a brilliant showcase of new work by members of the collective.

This new, artist-run co-op includes 25 local clay Reiko Miyagi artists, working in a variety iF YOU gO: The Grand of styles to create functional and non Opening takes place Saturday, April 12, functional pottery and works of figurative and coincides with the River Art District’s and abstract sculpture. Look forward to monthly “Second Saturday” event. For exhibits that reflect the new energy, ideas, more details call (828) 285-9700, or visit expertise and vision of the artists. www.odysseyceramicarts.com.

RV

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 19


R ® Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

Fabulous Dow

JOHn neBRaSKa’S “viSUaL pROOF” Opening reception Friday, april 4 from 7 to 10 p.m. On display until May 4, 014 at the Satellite gallery, 77 Broadway, downtown asheville. phone (88) 505-5, or visit www.thesatellitegallery.com.

Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

S

P

More of What Makes Asheville Special

36 Haywood Street

pH

A

E

T

O L

C

B C

J t

M e

p

H g K

S a

pH

L

Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Link 0 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8


A

R T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

wntown Asheville The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants “My art? i want to make it beautiful. i want to make well-crafted art that has more to see each time one looks at it. that’s about it. i would love if my paintings find a spot where people would be happy to see them everyday.” ~ John Nebraska Call (718) 956-859 or visit www.jnebraskastudio.com

H

K

pg. 36

gF

ks. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071. Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 1


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

dining out for life Dining Out for Life: Thursday, April 24

t

the Western north Carolina aidS project (WnCap) is revved up for the premier dining event of the year, dining Out for Life®. “In a city like Asheville, where festivals and events are embedded in the culture, Dining Out for Life® is truly a “Festival for Life” states Chairman, Harry Brown. This largest fundraiser for WNCAP is now in its 12th year in this region and is part of a national initiative which has raised over 30 million dollars for AIDS service organizations across the country. Here in Western North Carolina you have 115 choices of restaurants to choose from in 8 different counties including,

pg. 36

BD

Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Mitchell, Transylvania, and Madison. WNCAP depends on the community’s support to make this a successful and profitable event. The participating restaurants will generously donate 20% of their daily sales to the agency. Volunteer Ambassadors will be assigned to each restaurant, whose primary role is to help fill the restaurant to capacity with their friends, families, colleagues and clients, making Dining Out for Life® a “win-win” situation for everyone! And you have a great opportunity to win round trip airline tickets and other exciting prizes as our thank you for dining out. Supporting a great cause has never been so easy and so much fun. No tickets or tuxedos required. Just simply dine out for breakfast, lunch or dinner and help current and future generations with much needed funding and AIDS awareness to prevent the further spread of HIV. “The latest statistics for North Carolina show that the rate of new infections in the 13 to 25 age groups are staggering, says Jeff Bachar, WNCAP’s Executive Director. In addition, we are seeing so many individuals coming to us fairly sick because they have not yet come to terms with their illness. It is so important that we get the message out to the general public about the many services that WNCAP provides to help them live healthy, pro-

pg. 36

TI

pg. 14

Hg

pg. 20

g

continued on page 23

pg. 36

BL

pg. 16

HL

 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8


R A P I D

R I V E R

dining out ‘DOFL’ cont’d from page 22

ductive lives and events like Dining Out for Life® help us spread the word”. WNCAP has a team of over 250 enthusiastic and excited volunteers ready to greet you and help you enjoy your dining experience on April 24th and it doesn’t stop with the last meal. There will be an After Party for volunteers, restaurant staff, and diners at the Grove House featuring musical performances by Asheville’s most exciting swing group, the Rhythm Serenaders, followed by a DJ Dance Party until 2 a.m. The Grove House has generously waived the entrance fee, and the party is free of charge with 20% of all sales being donated to WNCAP. Now is the time to make your reservations for the largest dinner party of the year. For more information, volunteer opportunities, and a list of participating restaurants visit www.wncap.org/dofl iF YOU Dining Out for Life, Thursday, gO April 24. Visit www.wncap.org/dofl

pg. 36

RT

for more details and a full list of particpating restaurants.

pg. 36

BC

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

authors ~ poetry ~ books

a

The Poet’s Voice

a COnFLUenCe: pOetRY and Jazz

april shares her great transformation with poetry and jazz.

tHe WRiteRS’ WORKSHOp Writing Historical Fiction with anne Barnhill, Saturday, april 19 from 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members. The class will learn vital aspects of writing historical fiction, including how to make historical figures ‘come alive’, how to use dialogue from another century, where to find research materials, and much more. We will be doing writing exercises geared to historical fiction, as well as taking a brief look at some historical novels to see how other writers work. Anne Barnhill is the award-winning author of numerous books, including At the Mercy of the Queen; Coal Baby; and What You Long For. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from UNC-Wilmington, and teaches workshops throughout the state. Classes, for any level writer, meet at 387 Beaucatcher Road in Asheville and include a lunch break. Registration is in advance only, by mail or online at www. twwoa.org. Financial aid in exchange for volunteering is available.

FOR MORe detaiLS or to register:

(828) 254-8111, writersw@gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org.

Your Book advertised Here $49/Month in print & Online!

Call (88) 646-0071 today www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Some committee somewhere designated April National Poetry AND National Jazz month. April has to share her pink spears of peonies, plum blossoms and crinkled rhubarb with Carl Sandburg and Oscar Peterson! I like the idea of spring, words, and music caught up in a torrent of streams merging. Writer, and teacher, Kenneth Koch, in his book, Making Your Own Days, devotes an entire chapter to music. The chapter begins with two quotes: “Music can make us do what it wants.” (Pythagoras) “Poetry searches for music amidst the tumult of the dictionary.” (Boris Pasternak) Koch begins his chapter with this sentence. It’s hard to say if the music of poetry creates the emotion in a poem, or if it is the poet’s emotion that creates the music. Poets find their own music in the words they write. This music is an essential part of the “translation” a poet makes from ordinary to poetic language. Poets and musicians use the same tool box. In it we find rhythm, meter, line, form, lyricism, energy, sound and silence. Robert Wrigley wrote about poetry and music for the Writer’s Chronicle in 2000. He wrote “I envy the musician’s utter abandon to sound. It’s a kind of ache I feel. I wish. I wish. I want to be able to bring forth the very kind of exquisite sadness music proffers.” He says he wishes he could “be a pair of vocal cords scatting across a bandstand somewhere. I want to la-la a capella across the page and move them to tears.”

BY

CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

I listen with a pen in my hand. I could be at a symphony concert, string quartet, or jazz club. I will be found with my tiny journal, and ball point pen. (Pencils make too much noise. Remember to click your pen before the music begins. You don’t want to incur nasty looks.) I can’t not write in the presence of live music, except when I’m playing. I must respond. “Red” Mitchell is one of my heros. He was a jazz bass player extraordinaire, performing with a large number of top-rank bands in a variety of styles. He was a poet, too, “The Poet Behind the Bass.” Here are three short poems of Red’s.

Jazz Something less than perfect will do but it must be perfectly you.

Morningtime There is something nice with the morningtime For music and also for verse The first soft feelings of flowing forward This mind coming out of reverse.

My Only Home is My Suitcase My only home is my suitcase All the hotels are the same My oldest love is my old bass Everything else is a game.

~ “Red” Mitchell Poets who write in response to jazz are multitude. Consider, Kate Green, Sylvia Plath, Phillip Dacey, Ann Sexton, Ray Gonzalez, Bill Holm, Ralph Ellison, Quincey Troupe, Billy Collins, Keith Flynn, and you probably know twenty more.

Winners of Rapid River Magazine’s 17th Annual Poetry Contest 1st place: “Taking Issue with Kahlil Gibran” by Lenore Coberly nd place: “Olympic Peninsula” by James Davis rd place: “Warm Afternoon at Jeff’s” by Connor Vine Honorable Mention: “A Wink to Byron Katie” by Janice Sutton Honorable Mention: “Trip Taking” by William W. Cobbs II Read the winning poems online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

JOin a BOOKCLUB! Women in Lively discussion (Wild) - Tuesday,

Bridging differences Bookclub - Monday, April 7 at 7 p.m. Host Patti Digh leads a discussion on Growing Up Amish by Ira Wagler.

April 1 at 7 p.m. Host Susan Blexrud leads a discussion on Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple, at the Battery Park Book Exchange.

Comix Club - Tuesday, April 15 at 7 p.m. Lauren

Malaprop’s Bookclub - Wednesday, April 2 at

Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

7 p.m. Host Jay Jacoby will lead a discussion of Dear Life by Alice Munro.

4 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

Napoli leads a discussion on Blue by Pat Grant.

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55

One of my favorite lines is from Kate Green’s “Saturday Night at the Emporium of Jazz.” She opens the poem this way: God, if there be a heaven, let it be Saturday night at the Emporium of Jazz in Mendota, Jay McShann in a shimmering brown suit, his hands blurred reflections in perfectly sheened ebony of the piano. Smoke in air dusky like half rain outside November night.

~ Kate Green

Oh, Kate sets the scene! Take me there. Resources Kenneth Koch, Making Your Own Days, Scribner, 1998 Keith “Red” Mitchell, Selected Poems, Red Inc. Music Company, 1999 Mixed Voices, Contemporary Poems about Music, edited by Emilie Buchwald, Milkweed Editions, 1991 i want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

pOetRiO

Sunday, april 6 at  p.m. A special

Poetrio event featuring four poets. Elaine Bleakney will read from her collection, For Another Writing Back, and three of the contributing poets will read from the anthology What Matters: Sue Lefler, Leila Wheless, and Pat Riviere-Seel. Poet Richard Krawiec, editor of the anthology, will join us for this event.

nC pOetRY SOCietY ReadingS Sunday, april 7,  to 4:15 p.m.

North Carolina Poetry Society (NCPS) poet Pat Riviere-Seel, whose book Nothing Below But Air, will host a reading featuring four NCPS poets: Anthony S. Abbott (The Angel Dialogues), Peg Bresnahan (In a Country None of Us Called Home), Marilyn McVicker (Some Shimmer of You, forthcoming), and David Radavich (The Countries We Live In).

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore &

Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

authors ~ books ~ readings Stepping Into Ourselves: An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses

i

i was an extremely religious child. i knew exactly what i wanted to be when i grew up — a priest. I would wear lacy vestments in seasonmatched colors and convert entire villages of pagans, whatever they were. I knew Jesus would certainly hear my prayers and change the rules of the Catholic Church in time for my ordination. Guess what? No luck. Here we are in the 21st century and the Catholic Church, even with its populist new leader, Pope Francs, still doesn’t allow women to be priests. It’s not an exaggeration to say that my realization that I would never get to be a priest inspired my lifelong feminism. I didn’t know about being a priestess. Heck, I’d barely heard the word until I changed careers from TV production to archaeology, where I discovered the work of LithuanianAmerican archaeologist Marija Gimbutas (1921-1994). Her controversial theories (The Civilization of the Goddess and others) about a woman-centric culture in “Old Europe” revolutionized the study of ancient history and helped to inspire the modern Goddess movement. Not until I moved from Los Angeles to Asheville did I meet a real-live priestess. Now I am happy to say that I know quite a few. In fact, Asheville is a haven for priestesses. I just read a wonderful book that I wish had been available to me decades ago. I want to cheer about it in the hopes that all other women with a calling to priestess might also read it. Stepping Into Ourselves: An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses (www.goddess-ink. com), includes 80 beautifully written poems

REVIEW BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

and prose pieces, ranging from personal memoirs to academic treatises to practical tips (such as rituals and spiritual tools) on how to be a priestess. The scope of the book is truly astounding. I had no idea how many priestesses there are in the U.S., nor how many different types of priestess roles women have chosen to follow. You can be a ritualist, or a guardian, a healer, a teacher, a spell-maker, a fire tender and more. You can even be a tree priestess. There’s no strict definition of what a priestess is, or can be. One thing for sure, it seems, that if you are a priestess, you’ll end up doing a lot of the work in any group activity. There are ancient priestess lineages, of course, and the pieces on Neolithic and Mesoamerica priestesses are some of the best explanations I’ve ever read. The spiritualities in the book are mostly eclectic or pagan or Goddess-honoring (Dianic). But some of the most interesting articles are about how priestessing has been revived in Judaism. For me personally, as for many women in Asheville (descendants of the ancient Celts), the essays on Celtic priestessing are something to put into daily use. The anthology was edited by two scholarly women, Anne Key and Candace Kant, who also happened to be priestesses at The Temple of Goddess Spirituality Dedicated to Sekhmet, in the Nevada desert (www.sekhmetttemple. com). The substantial volume (592 pages) includes the work of over 50 writers, some of whom are my favorites. There are several poems by Patricia Monaghan (1946-2012), ac-

Amazon Warriors Alive and Well Today?

d

diane Morgan ph.d. is an Oxford professor of philology, the study of written texts. When she is lured by a large fee and the promise of seeing a heretofore unknown language, she throws off her Ivory Tower inhibitions and heads off to a recently discovered ancient temple in the sands of Algeria. What follows is a non-stop adventure (think DaVinci Code) filled with danger, derring-do, nasty villains, family secrets, a tall, dark, handsome son of a billionaire — and lots of super-athletic women, who appear without warning, seemingly bent on sending Dr. Morgan to Hades, if not back to Oxford. While Dr. Morgan is traveling the globe in the digital age, author Susan Fortier tells a parallel story — back in the Bronze Age, fearless Amazon Queen Myrina escapes the ruins of Troy and rides on horseback with her

sisterhood for safety in the far north. Oh, this is terrific storytelling — and hearing it on audio (Random House, 19 CDs, 24 hours) with talented narrator Cassandra Campbell, makes the exciting twists and turns in the complex tale absolutely spellbinding. In addition to entertaining you, The Lost Sisterhood will make you so enamored of the feats of physically fit women you’ll want to join their ranks. The Lost Sisterhood, written by Anne Fortier, Ballantine Books (2014), 585 pages.

tivist, mentor, scholar, who wrote more than 20 books on Goddess and Celtic spirituality, including the must-have Encyclopedia of Goddesses and Heroines Heroines. One author I know personally is Kim Duckett, Ph.D., priestess/teacher in Asheville. She’s a moving force behind the Land and Sky Chapter of RCGI (Reformed Congregation of the Goddess), whose motherhouse is in Madison, WI. (www.rcgi.org). Trained in both women’s psychology and Goddess spirituality, Duckett has had more than 20 years experience working with women in group settings, including her popular courses on The Wheel of the Year, the annual cycle of the seasons. Her anthology article, “As Within, So Without: Some Psychological Aspects to Priestessing,” is a wise woman’s look at the joys and the conflicts that can happen in women’s groups – meaning, simply, women’s groups can have the same kinds of personal dynamics other groups have, and like all relationships, including one-on-ones, groups with priestesses can change over time. Her advice to women who feel a call to priestess? “Find a teacher,” she says. “Someone you trust and value and who mentors women. She will have access to a community so that you can be trained. It’s very hard to have a call and feel you have nowhere to go… “And I believe in getting an education in women’s or Goddess spirituality. Women need to know about things like racism and classism to be good priestesses.” The working title of Duckett’s first book, out next year with Goddess Ink, is The Wheel of the Year as an Earth-Based Psychology for Women. For more information, send an email to followheartkd@hotmail.com And, let’s not forget our former Rapid River Magazine book columnist, Byron Ballard. She and other priestesses are members of the Mother Grove Goddess Temple in Asheville. They hold public rituals and private classes of interest to women wanting to know more about priestessing. More information at www.mothergroveavl.org.

apRiL

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING visit www.malaprops.com

ReadingS & BOOKSigningS tuesday, april 1 at 5 p.m. aLeXandRa dUnCan, Salvage, Sci Fi & Fantasy. thursday, april  at 7 p.m. LaURen ROSenFeLd, Breathing Room: Open Your Heart by decluttering Your Home. Friday, april 4 at 7 p.m. period novel by BeatRiz WiLLiaMS, a Hundred Summers. Wednesday, april 9 at 7 p.m. dR. JUditH ORLOFF, the ecstasy of Surrender. Friday, april 11 at 7 p.m. SHeiLa tURnage, the ghosts of tupelo Landing. Saturday, april 1 at 7 p.m. aSHLeY engLiSH, Handmade gatherings: Recipes & Crafts for Seasonal Celebrations. tuesday, april 15 at 7:0 p.m. anne CLinaRd BaRnHiLL, Queen elizabeth’s daughter; JaSOn SMitH, magic. Wednesday, april 16 at 7 p.m. patti digH streamed, the geography of Loss. thursday, april 17 at 7 p.m. ROBin O’BRYant, Ketchup is a vegetable and Other Lies Moms tell themselves. Friday, april 18 at 7 p.m. Under Magnolia: a Southern Memoir, by FRanCeS MaYeS. Saturday, april 19 at 7 p.m. Spring Fling Queer Ladies Speed dating. Bring your favorite book. $10 includes refreshments. email Robin@malaprops.com to register. tuesday, april  at 7 p.m. eLLen StiMSOn, Mud Season, funny memoir. Wednesday, april  at 7 p.m. SaLLie BiSSeLL, the deadliest of Sins, mystery. thursday, april 4 at 7 p.m. the time traveler’s almanac by ann vandeRMeeR. Friday, april 5 at 7 p.m. tupelo Honey Cookbook, reading, signing & tasting. Wednesday, april 0 at 7 p.m. KiM CHURCH debut of Byrd, an adoption story.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM pg. 36 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Stepping Into Ourselves: An Anthology of Writings on Priestesses; edited by Anne Key and Candace Kant; Goddess Ink (2014); 592 pages.

Marcianne Miler is a local writer and critic. She can be reached at marci@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

artful living

t

{Re}HAPPENING 2014

the fifth annual {Re}Happening takes place Saturday, april 5, from 6 p.m. to midnight, in the original dining hall of the former Black Mountain College at Lake eden in Black Mountain, nC.

BY

ALICE SEBRELL

The evening re-imagines Black Mountain College’s tradition of Saturday night parties and performances, and pays homage to the innovative artists of the legendary Black Mountain College. The event launches a contemporary platform for artists and patrons to experience adventurous art and creativity in the Timber Pavillion, 2013, an architectural and textile present day. installation by Brandon Pass and Libby O’Bryan. More than 80 artists will come Photo: P.L. Anderson together to create and share art on the grounds of the original campus and in the Additionally, a $50 “fund-an-artist” spirit of Black Mountain College. Vinnie’s purchase may be added to any ticket as a way Neighborhood Italian will provide the main to make a tax-deductible contribution to a course for dinner, with dozens of local restau{Re}HAPPENING artist. The buyer of this rants contributing. ticket can choose which project/artist he or she Two ticket levels are available; a dinwould like to fund. ner ticket for $100 ($85 for members of With more than 80 artists participating, BMCM+AC); and an after-dinner ticket for this year’s event promises to be as eclectic as $30 ($25 for BMCM+AC members), which ever. The lineup includes dancers, sound and includes two drink tickets and access to all art visual artists from WNC, along with several installations and performances taking place artists from the midwest and northeast. Perafter 7:30 p.m. The Gray Line Trolley will formances are slated to take place throughout be providing roundtrip trolley service from the campus — including a performance on the downtown Asheville for $8. tennis courts by members of the local art collective, Apothecary.

event HigHLigHtS

BLaCK MOUntain CenteR FOR tHe aRtS Upper gallery – The Annual BMCA

Emerging Artists Exhibit is on display through april 11. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday 10-5 p.m.

auditions – The Front Porch Commu-

nity Theatre is holding open auditions for its upcoming shows Our Town (August) and Turn of the Screw (October). Auditions will be held on Saturday, april 5 from 1-3 p.m. Be prepared to read from the scripts. We are also interested in learning about those with talents behind the scenes. Call (828) 669-0930 to schedule a time slot.

Worldwide pinhole photography day

On Sunday, april 7 from 1-4 p.m., photographer and artist Lynette Miller will lead participants in the experience of lens-less photography. Anyone, anywhere in the world, who makes a pinhole photograph on the last Sunday in April can be part of the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day online gallery. No experience necessary. Pinhole cameras will be available for participants to borrow.

the Black Mountain Center for the arts 5 W. State Street. (88) 669-090 or visit www.BlackMountainarts.org

The Asheville Darkroom will set up a camera obscura in the bed of a 40 ft. trailer; local composer Elisa Faires will create an immersive sound experience in the campus’ theatre, and the gymnasium will be home to a variety of dance performances. Additionally, this year four “Chance Operations” teams are participating. Severn Eaton – Cooperative Instrument. Costuming created with electrical pickups and strings allow players to interact and manipulate each other as instruments in an embrace. Kehren Barbour and Michael Luchtan – Post Piano Project. Four piano harps in the campus roundhouse allow group interaction and the experience of creating music. Grayson Morris – Narrative shadow puppetry in a dome on the front lawn. Jeff Marley – Gaming and the Booger. Interactive performance explores race and identity. (www.jeffmarley.com) You Nakai – Artist collective will stage a contemporary dance/music performance (www.nocollective.com). iF YOU {Re}HAPPENING, Saturday, gO April 5 from 6 p.m. to midnight.

Purchase your tickets today at www.rehappening.com, or in person at the Black Mountain College Museum, or Harvest Records (for after-dinner and shuttle tickets only).

6 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Southern Comfort COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

A Paradise for Gays is Out There Someplace

W

While reading the monthly magazine Columbia Journalism Review, i turned the page and a story caught my eye. When photographer Claire Martin heard about Faerieland she was more than a little curious about the stories she would find there. Faerieland is a sanctuary close to eastern Australia’s coast for gay men seeking a simpler and quieter lifestyle. A place where they can live an open way of life away from some of the hatred, and often physical attacks, found in this country and others. They play their drums, grow their own food, and dance around in costumes if they choose. No one bothers them or threatens to harm them. The place is located on 134 acres of rainforest. Several nationalities of gay men reside there, while others visit. They seek to reconnect with what’s natural within themselves. Many of these men come from oppressive pasts. Not many outsiders enter Faerieland (only by invitation), and no women are allowed unless they receive permission. Martin writes, “these good people are following their dreams and finding the peace they yearn for.” Gosh, I thought, that is what I have been doing all these years, just following my dreams no matter what. Many of us have this need in our own lives in the U.S. We live through the twists and turns, and the disappointments of our lives, and accept it for what it is. But, there are many of us who will never stop searching for a place to live away from hatred. Lesbian women have the same feelings. We also yearn for peace and contentment in our lives.

a

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

This is not a new way, because many of us did these very same things, searching for something real in the ‘60s. Many of us, even today, have not found it, we may never. But, I am very proud to be a part of other creative lesbians and girlfriends who have never stopped. And, age has not stopped us cold in our tracks. We are still searching for real contentment. I am also smart enough to know, at age 73, that we may never realize this in our lifetimes. But, we must continue the search, for if we stop we may die. Perhaps the gay men in this story have found their paradise. I think it is about time that we lesbians find our own sanctuary of peace and paradise someplace. It may just be in some wonderful rainforest in another land. If we dream long enough it just may happen.

Writer Judy ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in nC for 40 years. She retired in 005 and continues to freelance at her home in asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. if you know of a character in asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

neW MYSteRY BY SaLLie BiSSeLL

Sallie Bissell

among our many noted local authors is one of the best mystery writers in the country, Sallie Bissell.

Her masterfully written stories about prosecuting attorney Mary Crow, set in the North Carolina mountains, are not for the lily-livered — they’re headline-inspired, tense, hard-edged, often violent, and Mary always ends up in really big trouble. Bissell’s newest Mary Crow novel, Deadliest of Sins (Midnight Ink, 2014),

is a riveting mystery involving murder, homophobia, conspiracy and the strange history of Highway 74. Bissell is also the host of Malaprop’s Mystery Book Club, which meets the second Monday of the month at 7 p.m.

iF YOU gO: Sallie Bissell reading and

booksigning, Wednesday, April 23 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience Joe Kendrick’s Lingua Musica Series

a

as an on the air voice for WnCW radio, Joe Kendrick is a familiar figure to music listeners in WnC. He’s worked for the station for over 20 years, manning the microphone and promoting the sounds he enjoys and believes others will likewise. As such he’s as much an educator as announcer, eager to share his knowledge and equally eager to add to it. Kendrick is a model of southern congeniality and enthusiasm; any conversation will likely turn to music both old and new, crossing stylistic lines with the fervor of an acolyte who cannot wait to share the good news. In this case that news might be a new or newly discovered band or some obscure stratum of world beat sound.

BeHind tHe SCeneS WitH JaMeS CaSSaRa This month I’m introducing a series of semi-regular articles focusing on those industrious individuals who might not make music, but are no less critical in furthering the entertainment scene in our area. These often unsung figures contribute greatly to the local landscape, and typically do so as a labor of pure love. Nowhere is this devotion more apparent than in Kendrick’s Lingua Musica series, a semiformal succession of interviews and performances by local and national performers. The series, now in its fifth year, has undergone a reincarnation of sorts, as Kendrick guides it towards continued and (hopefully) profitable success. My thanks go to Kendrick for not only supporting the music, but for answering a few questions about this endeavor.

James Cassara: Talk a bit about the history of Lingua Musica, how it came to be and its earliest incarnation.

Joe Kendrick: I coined the name Lingua

Musica as a riff on Lingua Franca, which was a common language consisting of Italian mixed with French, Spanish, Greek, and Arabic that was formerly spoken in Mediterranean ports,

and made its motto “where music is the universal language.” Lingua Musica is a forum that brings people together through conversation about their own musical ports of call. It’s about discovering each other and ourselves. The show grew out of my music talk show series on WNCW called What It Is which was a weekday feature for four and a half years. Journalists, music professionals and artists would talk about a topic relating to music news, history or culture for about five minutes per episode; we would then take listener comments and air those in a Friday recap of the week’s shows, which were also podcast on the What It Is blog. I wanted to take the music talk show concept to another level, and envisioned a video webcast of the same kind of music round table,

WnC Jazz profiles: Daniel Iannucci

O

“Danny is such an enjoyable bassist for two strong reasons. First, he

EDDIE LESHURE

Colorado, and played many music festivals. I’ve only been gigging on my own for just four years now. It’s been a blast and I hope it’s only the beginning!” I asked him what gets his juices flowing and his response was, “Playing live music with anyone who is open to uncertainty and the unknown… when I hear everything going on around me and there’s no judgment or negativity coming from anyone - only love. In my day-to-day life, it’s my wife Natalie, cooking, climbing, soccer, hiking or anything else that leads to the production of adrenalin!”

~ Jason DeCristofaro, percussionist does his work, which includes good technique and musicianship. Plus, his character seems highly suited to being a bassist – he’s supportive and works to make those he plays with sound good. I’ve really enjoyed watching (and hearing) him develop in the few years that I’ve known him. We’re lucky to have Danny as a part of the Asheville music community.”

~ Mark Guest, guitarist “Growing up, I listened to a lot of metal, plus whatever other random bands my friends were into. I didn’t really discover jazz until I was about eighteen and met Pavel Wlosok at WCU. There I fell in love with Monk, Mingus, as well as classical music. I’d gotten started musically when I was about eight-years-old when my parents got my little brother a guitar. “The logical thing to do was have a bass player in the band so I picked up on it. My brother quit a year later, but I never put the bass down. At WCU, I was the only bassist in the program for a while and super saturated myself in playing. I got into every ensemble I could fit into my schedule and learned to read music, which has proven to be one of my most

continued on page 39

BY

“danny is one of the most intuitive musicians i have ever known and a phenomenal bassist. He captures the essence of the music, knowing when to support the ensemble and when to step out as a soloist. the bassist has the hardest role in a jazz group. they have to be the pulse and harmonic foundation of the ensemble, plus be prepared to take a riveting solo. danny is a master at all of these things!”

Originally from Raleigh, Daniel Iannucci has been living and performing in Western North Carolina for the past nine years. After receiving his Bachelor of Music from Western Carolina University in the spring of 2010 where he studied with Asheville bassist Eliot Wadopian, Danny relocated to Ashville. “I’d already made a few connections in the area, so I stuck around to see if I could make some money. Plus I love climbing, hiking, sports….this area has all of that!” Danny is currently involved in several local jazz, bluegrass and fusion projects including Brushfire Stankgrass as their full-time bassist, Shane Perlowin and Century Seconds, Steve Alford and Rational Discourse every Tuesday night at the Mothlight, Dave Zoll Trio out of Black Mountain, the Jason DeCristofaro Trio, and many other random jazz gigs. Plus he performs regularly with the Spartanburg Philharmonic, Hendersonville Philharmonic, Brevard Symphony and members of the Asheville Symphony.

complete with interactivity through social media and music performance in front of a live studio audience. This was the first iteration of the Lingua Musica show, and I produced three episodes in 2010. In 2011 I came up with the idea of making videos of short interviews Joe Kendrick with artists, and started the next incarnation of the show with myself and fellow music professionals talking with everyone from regional artists and bands to international stars like Rosanne Cash and Lloyd Cole. Last year I started using Google Hangouts to interview artists and professionals as well. All of these videos are accessible through the Lingua Musica YouTube page and website, which contain a great number of

Daniel Iannucci Photo: Frank Zipperer

valuable abilities when it comes to money gigs. “I’ve been influenced by Cliff Burton, James Jamerson, Jaco Pastorius, Stanley Clark, Flea, Edgar Myers and Niels-Henning Ørsted Pederson. Locally, I look up to Zack Page, Mike Holstein and Cody Wright. I’ve opened for Jimmy Herring twice and played with Kofi Burbridge several times — that was something else! “I have been all over the East Coast and

“Danny is that rare breed of young musician who encompasses great talent, a big heart and an incredibly positive attitude towards life. It’s always a great pleasure to perform with Danny and I look forward to watching his limitless talent emerge. One can only imagine what wondrous music he will share with us as he continues to grow!”

~ Michael Jefry Stevens, composer/pianist

eddie produces “asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on Main-FM (10.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 7


R

A

P

I

spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

D

R

I

A Day In Nashville Relativity Music

Having made his mark as a jazz/rock guitarist extraordinaire Robben Ford has lately turned his attention to Nashville, recording a pair of albums reflecting his latent country music obsessions. 2013’s Bringing It Back Home was a sturdy collection of cover tunes featuring an all-star cast and showcasing Ford’s skill as arranger and interpreter. A Day in Nashville serves as its logical counterpart, written largely by Ford and recorded in a single herculean day at the famed Kitchen Sounds Studio. It’s a deliberately loose affair convening a sublime band consisting of guitarist Audley Freed, bassist Brian Allen, keyboardist Ricky Peterson, drummer Wes Little, and trombonist Barry Green. As such it relies more on groove than precision-quite a risk for the classically trained Ford-and rewards in ways that might surprise his fans. The sound is forceful, at times ragged, and consistently filled with shuffling, Southern rhythm and blues addled performances. “Ain’t Drinking Beer No More” swirls with the sound of Booker T. like Hammond B-3 organ while “Top Down Blues” is a bass anchored bit of instrumental funk. Only “Just Another Country Road” gives any hint of Ford’s fabled jazz roots. Peppered with minimal overdubs, A Day in Nashville isn’t quite “live in the studio” but it’s the sort of understated delight that I’d love to see Ford further explore. It’s the sound of first class musicians spending a day having all the fun in the world, and in its own unassuming way packs greater punch than many of his far more calculated albums. ***

Reagan Boggs

Given the generally insipid state of present-day radio friendly country music, it’s pretty tempting to write off the genre as a Nashville wasteland, an incestuous assemblage of mediocrity dressed up in a jewel lined cowboy hat. There are certainly exceptions to the rule but for every Miranda Lambert there are a dozen Carrie Underwood wannabees who have somehow made the charts singing insincere material with innocuous voices. And while there was a time when “commercial country music” still had some serious gravitas, those days seem largely lost: Which is why the emergence of a force such as Reagan Boggs is

8 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

As is more commonly the case there’s far too much music this month than to allow for lengthy reviews. But with brevity being the soul of wit (and I love the challenge of saying more with less) it’s away we go!

Robben Ford

Quicksand Reckless Bess Records

V

a much needed breath of fresh air. She’s not retro; she’s the real deal, building on precedent while adding to it on her own terms, telling honest stories of hardworking people who might be down on their luck but are still fighting their way through life. “Saving Grace” could only come from the guitar and pen of someone who’s been there, who knows what it’s like to be on the outside looking in. The disinclined lover in “When It Mattered” could be anyone but I get the sense Boggs has someone in mind, and that someone had better make their amends. The most clearly defined moment, “You Deserve Better”, is a love song for grownups, the aftermath of an affair in which the fervor might be gone but the friendship remains. It’s a space we’ve all been in, but one that rarely gets written about. Quicksand is not without its flaws; at times Boggs’ lyrics slip into predictability and there’s more than a few lines that are downright awkward. But there’s no denying the power of her singing-equal parts vulnerable and self-assured-and the band is clearly in empathy with the material. Which adds up to an album that, while not perfect, might be the ideal antidote for what ails the once proud field of contemporary country. ***1/2

Ozomatli

place in the sun Vanguard Music

For their sixth studio album, this Los Angeles based ensemble, which deftly employs rock, reggae, hip hop, and world beat Latino music into a sound that is both intimate and far reaching, Ozomatli has placed all its bets on producer Robert Carranza who, while collaborating with the band since its earliest days, has never been the go to guy. Given that Carranza has a sterling track record-having helmed successful records for Jack Johnson, Los Lobos, and Karl Denson’s Tiny Universeit’s a fairly safe move. The band has come a long way since their 1998 debut with a more fully developed sound that speaks of confidence and comfort in the studio; they’ve never let go of their Latino roots but they have ventured more deeply in world fusion, rap, and high octane rock and roll. The resultant pairing is a lively mix of everything that makes Ozomatli so interesting, peppered with a tension and synergy that keeps things fresh and vibrant. From the dynamic reggae groove of “Brighter” to the Latin Dance vibe of “Prendida” place in the sun is a confluence of styles that bursts with ideas and brims with texture. The explosive heavy rock blast of “Burn It Down” literally jumps out from the speakers; it’s the sort of dance floor hybrid that few bands pull off with such audacity. That said, place in the sun still relies heavily, perhaps a bit too much, on forcing together styles that don’t

always work side by side. The electronica aspects can be distracting and it would be nice to see the band play more to their strengths. But there’s no denying the enormously engaging sound of this album, one that should please their fans while helping to expand their audience. And that should only work to their advantage. ****

The War On Drugs

Lost in the Dream Secretly Canadian Music

Having only become stronger as a band, Philadelphia’s The War on Drugs continue to refine their sounds while expanding their repertoire. Since the departure of cofounder Kurt Vile, who has gone on to a wildly successful solo career, bassist Dave Hartley has stepped towards the forefront, becoming an equal partner with original member Adam Granduciel. Hartley’s own experimental solo work (under the name Nightlands) has clearly infused the direction War on Drugs has taken. There’s a greater reliance on tape loops and ambient directives, while the lyrics, which early on reflected the Dylan like poetic leanings of Vile, have become a bit less vital to their sound. The current lineup of Hartley, Granduciel, Robbie Bennett, and Patrick Berkery are a formidable unit, able to propel the songs forward with a heavy dash of bass, drums, and synthesizer. Imagine the broken dreams romanticism of Springsteen matched to the mid-1970s Berlin trilogy mechanics of Bowie/Eno and you might have some notion of what Lost in the Dream sounds like. Powerful songs such as “Red Eyes” and “The Haunting Idle” are melancholic masterpieces, repetitive grooves that draw you in with a combination of pain and passion. When the band slows things down-as in the mournful “Suffering”- the results are no less spectacular, with guitars taking an uncharacteristic lead and piano/strings following closely behind. The more lengthy celestial passages, such as the beautifully captivating “Disappearing” bring to mind the best work of Tangerine Dream. With this album The War on Drugs have set a seemingly impossible bar, a standard that might be hard to match. The warmth and depth of Lost in the Dream is at times astonishing, a creative alchemy that is at once observational, introspective, and gorgeously executed. I could go on and on but the truth is the best and only way to experience this album is to listen with intent. I’ve spun it a half dozen times and remain both mesmerized and intrigued. Now it’s your turn. ***** ‘CD’s’ continued on page 29


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 28

John Sebastian

Faithful Virtue: The Reprise Recordings

Originally released in 2004 on Rhino Records-limited to 3000 copies, beautifully packaged, and ultra rare-this fabulous and far more affordable set collects all five of Sebastian’s early ‘70s recordings for Reprise. John B. Sebastian, Cheapo-Cheapo Productions Presents Real Live John Sebastian, The Four of Us, Tarzana Kid, and Welcome Back were all unique entities, showcasing Sebastian’s uncanny “aw shucks” charm and untiring knack for pop masterpieces with a folkie underpinning. The founder of the Lovin’ Spoonful may have retreated from the spotlight of rock stardom but the six years represented here were amongst his most fertile period. The major hits-and there were dozens-are included but so too are such rarities as the up tempo rocker ““Baby, Don’t Ya Get Crazy” (with Stephen Stills on guitar) and a lively cover of Lowell George’s “Dixie Chicken.” There’s an additional thirty minutes of live material not featured on the Rhino set-which largely compensates for the lack of deluxe packaging-making this one heck of a great listen and a tremendous opportunity to discover the magic of John Sebastian’s post Spoonful phase. *****

The Allman Brothers Band

Play All Night, Live at the Beacon Theatre 1992 Epic/Legacy Records

With the announced departures of Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks, and the probability that the Allman Brothers Band are no more, Play All Night is likely the first of many releases to plumb the depths of the band’s vast history. In fact since its release, other sets have been placed on the schedule, assuring us of years of ABB music to come. The question might then be “how much is too much?” Based on the superb quality of this collection I don’t think we need to worry. 1992 was a pivotal year for the band; with Warren Haynes fully in the fold, and Dicky Betts not yet trapped in the twin addictions of drugs and arrogance, the band sounds great. Gregg’s voice is vital and alive while the standard two drummer configuration supported by percussionist Marc Quiñones and the thunderous bass lines of the late Allen Woody, fires up such standards as “Statesboro Blues”

Hank West and the Smoking Hots

BY JAMES

CASSARA

One of the greatest pleasures of writing about music is discovering bands i might not have encountered.

S

Such is the case with Hank West and the Smoking Hots, an energetic and immensely listenable five piece band that seem like men out of time: Which is part of their persona, and one that gives the band a distinctive flavor. I first met the Smoking Hots at one of Joe Kendrick’s Lingua Musica shows. I had no idea who they were but, knowing Kendrick’s discriminating taste in music I took the chance. The band, consisting of members: Andrew Fletcher (keyboard), Jon Corbin (guitar), Leo Johnson (bass), Mike Gray (drums), and trumpeter and vocalist Hank West, play a high octave blend of swing and space jazz, mingling 40s big band with 70s experimental fusion in ways that expand both without discrediting either. In a pre-show interview Jelly Roll Morton and Sun Ra came up as influences, but when I later mentioned Herb Albert and the Tijuana Brass they enthusiastically embraced the notion. Starship Nighthawk, their debut EP, is a brisk combination of ethno beat, ragtime, hard bop and whatever strange and wonderful notion creeps its way in. On such numbers as “Space Love Song” and the delightful “Hachi Mani” (the highlight of the live show) one gets the sense that the band members are more conduits than originators, and I mean that as high praise. Ideas flow in and out in ways that redefine the idea of write and record. I’ll let band member Hank West more fully explain the band’s unusual guise, and how it works into the magic that is Hank West and the Smoking Hots.

James Cassara: To those listeners new to

the band how about giving us Hank West and the Smoking Hots 101. How did the band get together, and what were the previous artists they’d performed with?

Hank West: The band started coming out

and “Whipping Post” with new energy. You’d think they were playing these treasures for the 20th, not 2000th time. There’s a polish and grit to these performances that make them essential for any hardcore Allman Brothers Band fan. The Brothers are gone but the road does go on forever. ****

Will Kimbrough

Sideshow Love Daphne Records One of music’s most respected side-

of a Sunday brunch gig at Jack of the Wood Pub. We all knew each other from previous projects such as the Firecracker Jazz Band, to name one. So it seems our roots are in traditional Jazz.

JC: Yours is a chal-

lenging sound to characterize and I mean that in a very good way. I gather that Hank West and the Smoking Hots much of the writing process takes place in the studio. Starship JC: I’ll make it a point to do so. You menNighthawk certainly doesn’t sound like a tioned getting set to record soon. What can collection of songs that were fully defined in you tell us about that? advance. HW: We just finished up recording at the HW: [laughs] That’s partially true. When that wonderful Collapsable Studios. This is album came to be, at that point we had so what you would call an Electronic Release, many different songs with unique feels and 3 songs, all original material once again, genres, we just cherry picked the most fun only to be released to iTunes. ones. I feel as though each song could probably JC: Anything else to add? be expanded into its own album.

JC: Okay, what’s with the men from the future shtick? My initial reaction was that it might be a clever way of engaging the listener but there seems to be more than that.

HW: We are, in fact, from the future.

HW: Well sure. Since we were sent back in time, with no way back, we try to replicate the technologies, sentiments, and feelings that prevail in the future. It is important that y’all know that the future really is a peaceful place. Thanks for having us!

JC: Okay… I guess I’ll have to play along! My

first reaction as an audience member was how much fun the band was having. The interaction between members was neither forced nor contrived. Do you guys tend to shake things up from night to night?

HW: Yes, every night we like to channel differ-

ent influences. Plus, we are practically family which can mean all sorts of emotions brew on stage. You should come to a show where we all finish the third set in a fist fight.

men, plying his trade with such high profile artists as Emmylou Harris, Todd Snider, and Jimmy Buffett, Will Kimbrough has finally released the solo album that should move him from glorious second tier and into the big leagues. Sideshow Love is a sprightly collection of songs, short stories set to melody that remind me of the two post-Derek and The Dominoes albums by Bobby Whitlock. It follows the progression of a relationship (although not in direct sequence) from newfound love to aching loss, chronicling the joys and hurts we accumulate along the way. That’s hardly new terrain, but what Kimbrough so smartly does is pepper the songs

iF YOU Hank West and the Red Hots, gO Thursday, April 24 at 9 p.m.,

opening for Jimbo Mathus of Squirrel Nut Zippers. Tickets are priced at $8 in advance and $10 day of show, ages 21 and over only. The Mothlight, 701 Haywood Road in West Asheville. Visit www.themothlight.com

with mordant wit (“Home Economics”) and playful amusement (the title track). As best heard on “I Want Too Much” Kimbrough’s voice is surprisingly supple; he may not be gifted with the range of other artists but he knows precisely how to work his singing to its fullest. If you’ve followed his career you know that Will Kimbrough is largely employed for his guitar prowess, which is in solid evidence here. But he’s also a clever lyricist, smart arranger, and jack of many trades; which makes Sideshow Love the most compelling and fully realized of his solo efforts, as well as a top notch slice of Americana. ****

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

WaYneSviLLe FROg LeveL

C

HART Studio Theatre presents Most Improved Camper

Comic storyteller C.J. deering brings her incredibly funny, but all too true, tall tales of life, recovery, and survival to the HaRt Studio by popular demand. This performance by former mega-rock group tour manager, Los Angeles major record label executive, popular Texas radio deejay, nationally-acclaimed motivational speaker, hysterically funny comic, all-around wonderful person, and experienced summer camper, C.J. Deering, is not to be missed! The best comedy writers in Hollywood have cried their eyes out with both laughter and inspiration.

CJ’s credits include working as the tour manager for Jethro Tull, as well as working with the Eagles, the Doobie Brothers, Neil Young, and Jackson Brown. She also worked as an airline stewardess, a professional cheerleader, and a dog walker. There is possible, though not planned, adult language. iF YOU Most Improved Camper, April 4 & 5 at 7:30. gO To make reservations call the HART Box Office

any time at (828) 456-6322, or go online to www. harttheatrecom. All performances are in the HART Studio Theater, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville, NC 28786.

WD

WaYneSviLLe

gReat SMOKY Mtn eXpY. Wv

WH

WS WM

Wd

Wt

WF Wp Wa

WH

WB WS WM

0 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

WiLd aBOUt

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

WaYneSviLLe

Classic Wineseller’s Live Music Series opens with Fleetwood Mac Tribute

t

the Classic Wineseller opens its april music series with a Fleetwood Mac tribute by Sheila gordon (piano, vocals) on Friday, april 4 at 7 p.m. Ms. Gordon will perform many of Fleetwood Mac’s greatest hits like, Rhiannon, Go Your Own Way, Dreams, and Don’t Stop. Gordon has been playing piano and singing her way into the hearts of thousands since she was a Sheila Gordon young girl. Her beautiful voice moves effortlessly between musical genres such as blues, jazz, gospel, and popular music. On Saturday, April 5, 12, 26, & May 3, enjoy the best of the Beatles and Elton John with Joe Cruz (piano, vocals). Cruz was raised in New York Rockell Scott City and began performing in church as a child. As a young man he performed regularly on the New York nightclub scene. He has opened for such notable groups as Chicago, Santana, Bonnie Raitt, and Average White Band. Beginning Thursday, April 10 through Sunday, April 13, the Classic Wineseller will present four consecutive days of live music and dining specials as part of the Haywood County Chamber’s Melange of the Mountains Culinary Weekend. On Thursday, April 10 at 7 p.m., the DuPont Brothers (guitars, vocals) perform. Ben Wilson

WB

~ Waynesville Has it aLL ~ Home Furnishings, Great Food, plus Live Music, and Fine Arts & Crafts.

continued on page 32

Wp

Live Music

Every Friday & Saturday at 7pm

WV

WF

Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

WA

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 1


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

WiLd aBOUt

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Pennington has been commissioned by the Biltmore Estate and has completed four series of drawings capturing the grandeur of the house and gardens. Other scenes she has captured include Grandfather Mountain, Cold Mountain, and Mabry Mill, one of the most photographed features on the Blue Ridge Parkway (mile marker 176). She records the large and small, with a tender regard for the details of chickadees and hummingbirds, as well as orchids and fruit. Pennington has forged a formidable reputation working in colored pencil. Renowned for her luminous color and sensitive line, Pennington’s mastery of the colored pencil has made her a household name in Western North Carolina.

pg. 24

WT

G

A

Z

I

INTERVIEWED BY

Teresa Pennington

t

A

N

E

WaYneSviLLe

inteRvieW WitH Fine aRtiSt

teresa pennington is a selftaught colored pencil artist who often spends as much as four months on one drawing.

M

tp: That is a tough question to answer because the sizes of my pieces vary so much. In general, I spend anywhere from several days to four months. The drawings of Biltmore are the most time consuming. I was commissioned to do a series of overlook drawings of the Blue Ridge Parkway to celebrate the 75th anniversary. There were four of them and each one took four months to complete not counting the time I spent on the parkway photographing.

Rapid River Magazine:

Thank you for taking the time for this interview. When did you discover your love of colored pencils, and are they your preferred medium to work with?

teresa pennington:

Being self-taught, I tried other mediums, but fell in love with colored pencils after receiving a Forest Realm, 6x9 by Teresa Pennington set of Prismacolors for Christmas. That was 30 at the tiny veins and reproductive parts in the years ago. It is my perfect medium and suits Pink Lady’s Slippers and observing the bees my personality and style. Everything I do is and butterflies as they pollinate the myriad colored pencil only. There are no solvents or species we have in this area inspires me to ilwater used. lustrate every tiny detail. But I am also inspired RR: Many artists have a message, a deeper by the majestic grandeur of the Biltmore meaning they wish to express - what is your House and Estate. That same attention to message to us all? detail is also expressed through the drawings I have done for them of the intricate architectp: I believe this is what I was born to do. tural designs of the house and gardens. God has blessed me in so many ways and I try to honor Him with my work. Rendering the RR: How has your style developed and natural beauty of our region is my first love. changed over time? When I am looking out at a sweeping vista tp: My work started out small. As I gained of the Blue Ridge Mountains I feel like I am confidence my drawings became larger, bolder standing on God’s shoulders. It is a glimpse of and warmer in color. I spend more time in reeternity. To be able to make a living transsearch for scientific accuracy. After my mother ferring that splendor to paper is more than passed away I started drawing a small Lady’s anyone could ever hope for in this life. Slipper in all of my pieces in her memory. RR: Where does your inspiration come from She was my biggest fan and it was her favorite when making art, and what is it about your flower. I miss her encouragement. subjects that inspire you? RR: Typically how long does it take for you to tp: Have you ever looked at a small flower finish a drawing from inspiration to framing? up close? Looking through a magnifying glass

‘Classic Wineseller’ cont’d from page 31

(guitar, vocals) entertains Friday, April 11 at 7 p.m., and Joe Cruz (piano, vocals) plays Saturday, April 12 at 7 p.m. On Sunday, April 13, the Classic Wineseller will host its first Gospel Sunday Brunch from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. showcasing gospel vocalist Rockell Scott. Ben Wilson plays hits from the 60s, 70s, and 80s on Friday, April 11. Wilson’s extensive repertoire includes originals, Americana, and acoustic classics. Dulci Ellenberger performs Americana, oldies, and originals on Friday, April 18 at 7 p.m. The Jesse Junior Quartet will perform an evening of Cole Porter music and selections from the Great American Songbook on Saturday, April 19 at 7 p.m. Jazz vocalist Jesse Junior will be joined by Richard Schulman (piano), Zack Page (bass), and Justin Watt (drums). For

 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

DENNIS RAY

Jesse Junior

Dan Keller

only $29.99 per person, enjoy a four-course dinner with the musical performance. On Friday, April 25 jazz guitarist Dan Keller performs at 7 p.m. at the Classic Wineseller. Keller appears regularly at Cedric’s on the Biltmore Estate. The Classic Wineseller, a premier retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restau-

RR: Are you currently working on any new projects or series you would care to share with us?

tp: The drawing on the cover is a

new piece and is a departure from my typical work. It is entitled “Forest Realm” and came completely from my imagination. When I was a little girl I loved to play in the woods around our house by myself. I would make people out of twigs and build little houses for them out of stones. The little flowers and the people I made became magically real to me. I had so much fun drawing the fairies and tiny little creatures in this piece. I believe in angels so why not fairies? I will celebrate 30 years in business in 2015 and I will be doing an anniversary series. Interestingly enough, it is also the anniversary of the national park system. That is the only hint I will give you as to its subject matter.

tpennington art gallery 15 n. Main Street in Waynesville (88) 45-984 www.tpennington.com

rant, and intimate live music venue, presents local, regional, or national talent every Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m. Enjoy daily wine tastings in the underground environs at 20 Church Street in Waynesville. The Wineseller’s restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, serving freshly prepared small plate fare. There is a $10 per person minimum, on non-ticketed live music nights, which includes food, drink, and retail purchases.

iF YOU The Classic Wineseller, 20 gO Church St. in Waynesville.

Seating is limited. Reservations are accepted between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. by calling (828) 452-6000. For more details visit www.classicwineseller.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

classes & workshops CURRentLY On diSpLaY Beth Ann Runnels, a local cover artist, shares her love of the area with her canvases from her studio at Art MoB. Her landscapes and nature related scenes explode with shapes and colors.

CLaSSeS & WORKSHOpS You will leave each class with a completed piece of your art and the skill to continue. Call (828) 693-4545 to register for any of these classes. Find us on Facebook.

Canvas & Corks – Share

JOHn MaC KaH StUdiO – LandSCape OiL painting WORKSHOpS Color & Atmosphere in Oils: Special Effects

Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts, Gatlinburg, NC

april 4-6

June 9-July 1

Start the landscape season with new ways to add atmosphere to your paintings to portray subtle natural phenomena: fog, mist, reflections, rain, shadows, and snow, using a tonalist approach to oils. We will start from my studio, then venture on location in public parks, gardens or nearby trails. $200. Call for more information and supply list. Enroll by April 14.

A rare opportunity to paint on location in the Great Smokies. We will start in the studio and get theory before practice, then take a safari into the mountains to experience the wonder and challenge of true color in nature. Color mixing and color relationships are covered in tandem with the expressive use of drying oils and varnish mediums.

a bottle of wine and paint with friends. April 2, 16, 23 or 30, 6-8 p.m., $35, supplies included. Tuesday afternoon classes also available.

Oil Painting in the Studio and Plein Air at J.C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC

Basket Weaving – Weave an original style

Join me at this wonderful residential location in the south mountains, near Murphy, NC to paint historic buildings, grounds and gardens in order to take advantage of oil paints’ luminosity and rich color. We will make our own supports and grounds, as well as oil-varnish mediums. Painting will be in the studio and on location. Demos, discussion, and lots of

Appalachian Potato Basket. April 7 & 14, 123 p.m., $60, supplies included. Instructor: Teresa Jordon.

Rug Hooking – Learn the basics. Choose

from four different kits. May 8, 15, 22 & 29, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond.

Bob Ross painting – Instruction on painting landscapes. April 12, 16 or 30, May 17, 21 or 26, 12 to 4 p.m., $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry.

May 11-15

painting time, along with the Folk School’s great food, music and dance events. Visit the J.C. Campbell Folk School website at www.folkschool.org. Painting a Mountain, Cold Mountain Expedition

June 1-15 Painting the mountains has special challenges and pleasures. Join me for an adventure and expedition to paint an icon! We will start from the studio and then travel via the Blue Ridge Parkway where there is a grand view of Cold Mountain and Shining Rock Wilderness. Paint one view in morning light, another in the afternoon or sunset if we are lucky. Pack your lunch and bring your portable easel. $200. Enroll by June 1, 2014.

Students can deepen and develop painting skills while working from life on site to become adept at handling the principles of painting with oils. Designed for all levels, this class offers foundation information in the use of materials and craft of oil painting. Visit the Arrowmont website to find out more and register: www. arrowmont.org. John Mac Kah Studio 1 Riverside drive, asheville (88) 5-5000, www. JohnMacKah.com

zendoodle Mini Workshop – Lines, designs and doodles! Create a small abstract piece. April 26, 2-4:30 p.m., $30, supplies included. Instructor: Catherine Langsdorf. Oil painting Workshops – For all levels.

Supply list provided. April 14, 10-3 p.m., one day workshop, $75. Space limited, register early. Instructor: Deborah Broad.

drawing instruction – Learn the basics:

value studies, contrast and composition. Supply list provided. April 25, May 2 & 9, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $90. Instructor: Deborah Broad.

gourd art – Ink dye & make a beautiful gem or stone top. April 6 or 21, 1:30-4:30 p.m., $42, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display.

Watercolor gouache Resist painting

Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. April 29, 1-4 p.m., $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display.

Mosaic Mirrors – Create a small mirror using fun items. May 1, 1-5 p.m., $75, supplies included. Instructor: Linda Pannullo. Work on display.

art MoB Studios & Marketplace

14 4th avenue east in Hendersonville (88) 69-4545, www.artmobstudios.com

gReat tRee zen teMpLe MeditatiOn RetReatS, MindFULneSS WORKSHOpS

g

Great Tree is a residential women’s zen retreat center in the Soto Zen tradition. The center is located in Alexander, NC and offers meditation programs and practice for everyone. Check their website for Dharma teachings, zazen instruction, family meditation, youth and childrens’ programs and opportunities for community service. Zen Meditation Sesshins

april 4-6; May -7

Sesshins of varying lengths are offered throughout the year, on the first weekend of the month. For more information about Sesshins, call (828) 645-2085 and leave a message, or visit www.greattreetemple.org/ retreat/sesshin-reg/ Your Inner Life Story: a Writing Retereat with Carolyn Wallace

May 9-11

Sesshins consist of zanzen (sitting meditation), kinhin (walking meditation), workservice periods, and oryoki meals. Menus are vegan.

This workshop will take participants deeply into reflection on their life as a spiritual journey, in both the past and present, as they write the story of their inner

FRee Writing Workshops

writing character-based conflict.

Saturday, april 1 at 10 a.m.

Monday, april 14 at 7 p.m.

Desire From the Inside Out. What your characters “want” drives every story. Local author and editor Amy WilloughbyBurle leads this workshop on

Writing Workshop with Annie Fahy. Use elements from Writing Alone and With Others by Pat Schneider. Learn from one another in a generous

Beginning Art Classes for adults every Saturday from 2-4 p.m. with art instructor Chris Baschon. Mandalas for adults workshops every Thursday from 6-8 p.m. with Chris Baschon. For more information, or to register, call (828) 699-0240.

the art House gallery and Studio 5 Highland park Road east Flat Rock, nC 876 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Writers’ Retreat at Folly Beach, SC May 15-18 – The Writers’ Workshop 15th

Silk painting – Learn different methods to paint on silk. April 8, 1:30-4:30 p.m., $45, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display.

adult art Classes

life journey. They will also explore ways to use writing as a meditative practice for spiritual reflection and opening to awareness of one’s true nature. Carolyn Wallace has lived in WNC since 1977. Through her business, Life Story Catcher, in addition to writing workshops, Carolyn digitally records life stories for folks who want to tell rather than write their life stories, creating CD’s and legacy books with family photos and other memorabilia. For more information, or to register, call (88) 685-085 or visit www.greattreetemple.org

atmosphere of both critical craft and personal respect.

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s

Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Annual Writers’ Retreat is open to a small group of beginning or experienced writers. Daily sessions in fiction, creative non-fiction and memoirs will be led by The Writers’ Workshop instructors. Participants stay at a beach house across from the ocean. The all-inclusive rate (except for meals) is $495 for a private room, or $450 shared. The commuter rate is $55 per session. Space is limited. To register call (828) 254-8111, visit www.twwoa.org, or writersw@gmail.com.

the Writers’ Workshop 87 Beaucatcher Road, asheville www.twwoa.org

Classes & Workshops Listings with Rapid River Magazine List your class or workshop in print and online for just $14.95 for 35 words. Add 20 cents for each additional word. 60 word limit per event. Longer listings can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email info@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number submissions we get, we can not accept entries that do not follow our publication’s format. You must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description, contact details, and location. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide tuesday, april 1

Friday, april 4

Saturday, april 5

april Fools’ day Concert

new Media Student exhibition

Bits & Bytes

Free concert featuring Western Carolina University School of Music faculty members and students. 7:30 p.m. in the recital hall of the Coulter Building. For more details call (828) 227-7242.

Video art, stop motion, digital print, sonic art, interactive, installation and 2d + 3d animation. Opening reception at 3 p.m. in UNCA’s Highsmith University Union, room 113. On view through April 14, 2014. Details at (828) 251-6291, http://nm.unca.edu.

Opening reception 6:30-9 p.m. New art inspired by video games. Free beer, wine, and live music! Meet the artists at ZaPow, 21 Battery Park Ave. downtown Asheville. (828) 400-9125.

april 1, 8, 15 & 

Field Shoot Workshop Tuesdays, 8 a.m. to noon. Photograph spring wildflowers, waterfalls, and other mountain vistas. Learn to get the most out of your equipment. Limited to 12 participants. For more details, or to register, contact Bob Grytten at (828) 627-0245 or e-mail bobgry@aol.com.

april 1, 8 & 15

get growing! Organic Gardening Series, Tuesdays in April, 7-9 p.m. at Jubilee!, 46 Wall Street, Asheville. $15 per class, or $40 for the series. For more details visit www.organicgrowersschool.org

april -19

Women and Wallace Attic Salt Theatre Company presents Jonathan Marc Sherman’s dark comedy at Asheville Community Theatre’s black box theater, 35below. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2:30 p.m. 35 East Walnut St. in downtown Asheville.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Friday, april 4

evolution Series by Reda Kay Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Mysterious landscapes using watercolor, ink, and acrylic. On display April 1-30, 2014. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in Asheville. Details at (828) 251-5796 or www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Friday, april 4

artists of tomorrow Opening reception from 5:30-7 p.m. The East Henderson High School Show Choir will perform. On display through Friday, April 18 at First Citizens Bank, 539 N. Main St., in downtown Hendersonville. More details at (828) 693-8504 or www.acofhc.org.

Friday, april 4

Carl Sandburg Student poetry Contest Celebration 7 p.m. at Blue Ridge Community College, Patton Building, Room 150. Adam Bresson, the 2014 Carl Sandburg Writer-in-Residence, will also read. Details at (828) 693-4178, or visit www.nps.gov/carl

Friday, april 4

Bender gallery Solo exhibition featuring glass sculptor, Toland Sand. Opening reception 5-8 p.m., held in conjunction with downtown Asheville’s First Friday Art Walk. On display through May 31, 2014. Bender Gallery, 12 S Lexington Avenue, downtown Asheville. www.bendergallery.com

april 4-5

auditions for Spamalot Auditions for Eric Idle’s comedy held on Friday, April 4 from 6-8 p.m., and Saturday, April 5 from 12-4 p.m. Bring 16 bars of music. Accompanist provided. Directed by Jeff Catanese. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, april 5

posh Hammer A unique family band with a killer classic rock sound. 8 p.m. at Jack of the Wood, 95 Patton Ave, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 252-5445 or visit www.jackofthewood.com.

Saturdays, april 5 - november 

R

E

M

A

at a funeral. Performances Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:30 p.m. $22; $19 for seniors 65+ and students; $12 for children. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 2541320, or www.ashevilletheatre.org

Saturday, april 1

Local, sustainably produced vegetables, fruits, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, herbs, plants, flowers, and crafts. Live music, cooking & art demos, and face paintings. 8 a.m.-noon at UNC Asheville Campus (Lot C). Details at www. northashevilletailgatemarket.org

asheville vaudeville

angels among Us Archangels Michael and Gabriel painted by Gloria Gaffney will be installed in St. Peter & Paul Orthodox Christian Church in Boone, NC. Details at streetartist@netzero.net

Monday, april 7 & 14

pan Harmonia Concerts Featuring the Opal String Quartet performing authentic, world-class chamber music at the Haen Gallery. Monday, April 7 at 52 Biltmore Avenue, downtown Asheville. Monday, April 14 at 200 King Street, Brevard. Meet the artists and enjoy a glass of wine at 6:30 p.m., music begins at 7:15 p.m. $22 in advance; $24/$8 for students, available at the door. Call (828) 254-7123 or visit www.pan-harmonia.org.

Wednesday, april 9

Same trailer, different tour Kacey Musgraves, winner of the Country Music Association’s “Best New Artist” for 2013 performs at Western Carolina University’s Liston B. Ramsey Center at 8 p.m. For details, call (828) 2277677 or visit http://ramsey.wcu.edu.

Friday & Saturday, april 11 & 1

Films and videos by Mass Communication Students Friday’s show features a juried collection of 2013 short works, including comedy, horror and more. Saturday’s show features Team UNCA “48 Hour” films, and the debut of four shorts celebrating Asheville. Viewer discretion is advised. Free. 7-9 p.m. in The Highsmith Grotto at UNCA.

april 11-7

Cousins, Church, and Corndogs Dearly Departed is a Southern comedy centered on a family coming together

A

Z

I

N

E

north asheville tailgate Market

Sunday, april 6

G

A variety of local talent and performers, with special guest emcee Sneaky McFly. Tickets available at the door. $15 for 7:30 p.m. show; $12 for 10 p.m. show. Toy Boat Community Art Space, 101 Fairview Rd., Asheville. (828) 280-4982.

Sunday, april 1

palm Sunday Luncheon The Greek Ladies Philoptochos will offer a variety of Greek dishes, served cafereria style, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Greek folk dancing performed by the youth dance troup. Take-out line opens at 10:30 a.m. Prices from $1 to $16. Place orders at: (828) 253-3754, Monday–Friday, 9-12:30 p.m.; (828) 254-4754 on the day of the luncheon. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 227 Cumberland Ave., in Montford.

tuesday, april 15

the Book of ages Intersections Book Discussion Group presents The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore. 6:30 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Lively and insightful discussion. Free. (828) 2109837 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Farm & ecovillage immersion application deadline: april 15 The School of Integrated Living provides experiential education in integrated living and regenerative systems. The next session takes place July 4 through August 16. More details at www.schoolofintegratedliving.org

thursday, april 17

aBipa Spring Fundraiser Annual birthday and cancer survivor celebration. Heavy hors d’oeuvres and dancing, 6-9 p.m. FREE, but you are encouraged to bring a monetary donation in lieu of gifts. At the Battery Park Apartments, Roof Top Garden, 1 Battery Square. More details at (828) 251-8364 or www.abipa.org.

april 17-19 & 4-6

the Bog The Magnetic Theatre presents a haunting, strangely comic, emotionally rich drama about three men who meet by accident on a bog island, with unexpected, life-changing results. Written by Julian W. Vorus and directed

by Steven Samuels. 7:30 p.m. at the BeBe Theater, 20 Commerce Street in downtown Asheville. $12. More details at www.themagnetictheatre.org.

Friday, april 18

afropop Band zansa With Juan Benavides Group, and African dancer Barakissa Coulibaly. 9 p.m. Ages 18+; $12; $10 in advance. Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd., West Asheville. (828) 575-2737, www.zansamusic.com, www.isisasheville.com,

Saturday, april 19

easter on the green 2-5 p.m. at Pack Square Park downtown. Bring smiles to children’s faces, share the beauty of spring. Little ones can play in the bounce house or gather eggs in the Easter Egg Hunt.

april 5-7

Last of the aztecs Presented by the Autumn Players’ Readers Theatre. Comedy about an elderly man coming to grips with being the last of his social group to survive, as well as the impending death of his wife. Fri. & Sat., April 25 & 26 in 35below at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St.; Sun., April 27 at UNCA’s Reuter Center. All performances begin at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5 at the door. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Friday, april 5

anastasia Yarbrough Concert Doors open 6:30 p.m.; recital at 7 p.m.; reception to follow. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 20 Oak St, Asheville. Suggested donation for this benefit concert: $25 at the door. For more details call (901) 355-6225. RSVP at www.anastasiayarbrough.com/recital/

april 5-6

Moogfest public art installations Freestanding temporary multimedia and multi-sensory art installations will be on display on the last block of N. Lexington (by the 240 overpass). Moogfest takes place April 23-27, and features Kraftwerk, Pet Shop Boys, and MIA. For more details, and to purchase tickets, visit www.moogfest.com.

april 5-7

grovewood gallery’s Charity Sale 15th annual sale benefits Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. Save 10% on all regular priced items, and up to 50% on sale items. Friday & Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (828) 2537651 or visit www.grovewood.com.

APRIL EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 4 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

what to do guide Saturday, april 6

Saturday night Jazz at the YMi

Best in Show

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

by Phil Juliano

Featuring The Griffith/Stevens Quartet, NYC jazz vocalist Miles Griffith, and pianist Michael Jefry Stevens. $25. 7-10 p.m. at the YMI Cultural Center, 39 South Market Street, downtown Asheville. (828) 257-4540.

White Horse Black Mountain Friday, april 4 – The Asheville Jazz Orchestra. Big Band Jazz. 8 p.m. $15.

Saturday, april 5 – Sultans of String. Acoustic World Music. 8 p.m. $15.

Sunday, april 6 – Hollander Blue. Folk

Saturday, april 6

rock, indie, and pop. 7:30 p.m. $8.

dr. Bart d. ehrman

Monday, april 7 – “Take 2” Jazz Series.

How Jesus Became God: From Good Teacher to Divine Savior. 3 p.m. at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville. (828) 456-6000, or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com

Friday, May 

Pianist Bill Bares and vocalist Rockell Scott. 7:30 p.m. $12/$6 students with ID.

Saturday, april 1 – Yes

Callie & Cats

the Raven and Poet Adrian Rice. Magically beautiful music and soulful poetry. 8 p.m. $15; $12 in advance.

by Amy Downs

Collage Figurative drawings, digital photography, decorative papers, paint, and pastel by Pat Perkerson. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 251-5796 or visit www. ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

May ,  & 4

Writing Workshop

Yes the Raven

White Horse Black Mountain 105C Montreat Road, Black Mountain www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Business in a More Beautiful World Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

The Poetics of Audience: Experimenting with Points of Address in Poetry with Jaye Bartell, Eric Gelsigner, Nathanael Roney, and Bridget Elmer. Lectures, writing exercises, book making, and panel discussions with poets and small-press publishers. Space is limited! Call (828) 350-8484 to register. $160 / $120 for BMCM+AC members and students w/ID.

every Sunday, -4 p.m.

the great innovate Dragin

by Michael Cole

artists, Crafters and vendors Wanted The Historic Frog Level of Waynesville will hold it’s “Whole Bloomin’ Thing” Spring Festival on Saturday, May 10 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The festival is accepting applications from local growers, nature related artists and crafters, health and wellness professionals, and alternative energy and eco-friendly vendors. For more details contact Scott Siewert at (828) 550-6390 or Teri Siewert at (407) 484-9576.

Call for artists

Free monthly networking and education event for those interested in a heart-centered, purpose-driven model of doing business. Every 4th Thursday, 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Avenue. www.businessinamorebeautifulworld.com and www.rapidrivermagazine.com.

arrowhead artists and artisan League

Saturday, May  A team challenge of creative wits encourages creativity and innovation through exploration, risk-taking, play, and practical application. 9 a.m. to 12 noon at Hall Fletcher Elementary School, 60 Ridgelawn Rd., Asheville. Register and learn more at www.great-innovate.com

More details by calling (828) 669-0816.

For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave, in Old Fort. For the full schedule please contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net.

Live Music every Friday & Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare from 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. Call (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods Medical guardian

deadline: June , 014

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Applications are available for the 55th annual Art on Main fine art and fine craft festival in downtown Hendersonville. $3,000 in cash prizes will be awarded. Festival held Saturday and Sunday, October 4 and 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Applications at www.acofhc.org, email acofhc@bellsouth.net, or call (828) 693-8504. Artists must submit four images of their work plus a photo of their booth.

the tax doctor

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 5


R

Find It Here

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

andrew Charles gallery (828) 989-0111

Just ducky www.justduckyoriginals.com

the art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Kathmandu Cafe www.cafekathmanduasheville.com

art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com

Ken Wilson Ford www.kwford.com

asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

LeaF, www.theleaf.org Lenny’s Subs www.lennys.com

BlackBird Frame & art www.blackbirdframe.com Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967 Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com grace C. Bomer art www.gracecarolbomer.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com the Cantina www.cantinabiltmore.com

Lime Leaf thai Cuisine www.LimeLeaf101.com the Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Massie Furniture (828) 456-3311 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain Spirit Wellness www.MelyndaJuicePlus.com Mountain top appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Champa asian Cuisine www.champanc.com

north Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

the Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus garden, www.theOG.us On demand printing www.ondemandink.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com double exposure giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Frog pond downsizing (828) 734-3874 Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

HaRt theater www.harttheatre.com

Susan Marie designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800 Hey Hey Cupcake www.heyheycupcake.com

town Hardware & general Store www.townhardware.com

isis Restaurant www.isisasheville.com Jewels that dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Jonas gerard Fine art www.jonasgerard.com

(828) 646-0071

pattOn ave.

MeRRiMOn ave. Mp

pa

BiLtMORe ave. gF

BL

ReYnOLdS viLLage

BiLtMORe viLLage

gL

BC Bd

tUnneL ROad

BLaCK MOUntain - 8711 MC Ma

tC

WeSt aSHeviLLe ti BC

MK

RC a

CantOn

Bd

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

ate in a manner that knows no bounds.” From his youth on the blustery shores of Lake Erie to happiness in the Carolina mountains, from playing his first guitar at age 14 on a Florida beach to success in an LA Atonement, acrylic/oil pastel/gel medium on illustration board, recording studio, by John Nelson John has always been compelled to express his artistic nature. Now, framer by day and artist by night, John has never stopped pushing himself creatively. John resides near downtown Asheville with his son Quinn. He works at BlackBird Frame & Art and holds the CPF designation from the Professional Picture Framers Association. In the evenings, he can often be found creating either art or music, or both, on his front porch. iF YOU John Nelson opening reception April 4 from 4-6 gO p.m. Woolworth Walk, 25 Haywood St. in downtown

‘Freedom from Fear’ cont’d from page 17

MaCOn avenUe

WnC aidS project www.wncap.org

v

S

Asheville. On display April 1-29, 2014.

Weaverville art Safari www.weavervilleartsafari.com the Writers’ Workshop www.twwoa.org

T

MB

twigs and Leaves gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

WnC OveRvieW GET ON THE MAP, CALL

Cleveland-born, Sarasota-raised, professional guitarist and, for 25 years, a custom framer, John Nelson moved to Asheville in 2007, trading hot days in the Florida sun and late nights with the band in smoky bars for cool, creative nights in his mountain home studio. Besides earning a living for his family, framing design gave John an outlet for his right-brain tendencies. But his fascination with textures, color relationships, the use of positive and negative space and the use of art as a catalyst for emotional response drove him to create his own art as well. “My paintings employ design to generate tension, and I use color for a release of that tension. I enjoy watching the art reveal itself layer after layer using newly discovered techniques while eliminating subject matter. Having no formal training, I can cre-

Spice & tea exchange www.spiceandtea.com Starving artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

d

during april, the Front gallery of Woolworth Walk in downtown asheville will feature the abstract paintings of John nelson along with glass art by Kyle Keeler.

Soapy dog www.thesoapydog.com Southern Highland Craft guild www.craftguild.org

gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

R

John Nelson Exhibit

tpennington art gallery www.tpennington.com Satellite gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com

A

fine art

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

1 Bones (828) 253-4499

R

Wa

CF H

6 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

HendeRSOnviLLe Rd. HF HF

past, future, and the importance of ourselves. Contrary to what many newcomers to meditation may believe, thinking has a very important role — it’s not the devil. It is a product of the egoic dimension of mind, and ego is not the devil, although most certainly, it can be. The issue is to understand what role ego and thinking play in our total experience. When ego and thinking are the centerpiece of our experience, and are serving as our identity, that’s trouble. That’s suffering. So it is very important to have a “Right” relationship with thinking and ego, and that role is as a tool for engagement with the world on the level of conceptual mind. Rather than experiencing that we are our thoughts, with Right Thinking, thinking has its proper role and dimension as a tool. We “have” thoughts, much like we have hands — for the purpose of engaging the world and working with it. Suffering is the result of identifying with mind, thoughts and emotions as who we are, and then they run our lives, filled with ghosts and goblins. To have, to own, to manage, mind, thoughts and emotions is to be a player in the game of Life, skillfully using understanding and logic to analyze and communicate our discoveries of the miracle of Life made into forms — both physical and mental forms — free of unnecessary fear.

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:0-7:0 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 7 edgewood in asheville. By donation. information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (88) 58-41, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


pg. 36

BC

THE REAL DEAL!

Promotional Packages Starting At...

LOCK IN

2OFYEARS SAVINGS!

2999 with Advanced Receiver Service.

Upgrade to

DISH TODAY!

Per Mo For 12 Mos. After Instant Rebate With 24-mo. Agreement

Advanced receiver fees apply. Minimum 2-room setup required.

NFL SUNDAY TICKET INCLUDED

AT NO EXTRA COST. 2014 SEASON CHOICE™ Package and above.

FREE PREMIUM MOVIE CHANNELS FOR 3 MONTHS. CHOICE™ PACKAGE AND ABOVE

CALL NOW!

800-871-6763 ALL DIRECTV OFFERS REQUIRE 24-MONTH AGREEMENT.** Offer ends 4/9/14

pA

BA

Not eligible for Hopper or iPad mini offer

FREE WHOLE-HOME GENIE HD DVR UPGRADE

pg. 36

pg. 36

FOR 12 MONTHS

$

Minus additional $5 off for 12 months for low and medium-risk customers

mo

CALL NOW – SAVE UP TO 50%!

1-800-467-3417 Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0114 Important Terms and Conditions: Promotional Offers: Require activation of new qualifying DISH service. All prices, fees, charges, packages, programming, features, functionality and offers subject to change without notice. After 12-month promotional period, then-current everyday monthly price applies and is subject to change. ETF: If you cancel service during first 24 months, early cancellation fee of $20 for each month remaining applies. HD Free for Life: Additional $10/mo HD fee waived for life of current account; requires continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing. Premium Channels: 3-month premium offer value is $165; after promotional period, then-current everyday monthly prices apply and are subject to change. Blockbuster @Home requires online DISH account, broadband Internet to stream content. HD-only channels not available with select packages. Hopper Features: AutoHop feature is only available with playback the next day of select primetime shows on ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC as part of PrimeTime Anytime feature. Both features are subject to availability. Installation/Equipment Requirements: Free Standard Professional Installation only. Certain equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Upfront and additional monthly fees may apply. Recording hours vary; 2000 hours based on SD programming. Equipment comparison based on equipment available from major TV providers as of 9/19/13. Watching live and recorded TV anywhere requires a broadband-connected, Sling-enabled DVR and compatible mobile device. Miscellaneous: Offers available for new and qualified former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer agreements. State reimbursement charges may apply. Additional restrictions and taxes may apply. Offers end 6/12/14. © 2013 DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. All new customers are subject to a one-time processing fee.

pg. 36

CF

Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

sound experience French Broad River Festival

F r e e Yo u r F u n k y S e l f a t L E A F !

MAY 8-11

FESTIVAL

Beats Antique

2014

38th

AT BEAUTIFUL LAKE EDEN CLOSE TO ASHEVILLE & BLACK MOUNTAIN

& Fall LEAF: October 16-19

Los Lobos 40th

Bootsy Collins

Anniversary

H

Have you ever floated down Section 9 of the French Broad River? 17 years ago a couple of friends thought it would be fun to “race” down Section 9 of the French Broad River and then have a party on it’s banks in Hot Springs, with any proceeds from the party going to charity. Well, the “party” has grown exponentially to a weekend outdoor and family music festival encompassing the entire Hot Springs Campground. National and local recording artists perform on multiple stages, and a mountain bike race is held, along with a whitewater raft race, a kid’s village, arts and craft vendors, outdoor vendors, and great food. The 17th annual festival takes place May 2-4 where the French Broad River meets the Appalachian Trail at the beautiful Hot Springs Campground & Spa. Musical acts include Toubab Krewe, Sol Driven Train, Hillstomp, Dangermuffin, The Jeff Sipe Trio, Pierce

Edens & The Dirty Work, The Accomplices and more! This festival always has a few surprises, such as a juggling fire show, kid’s parade, trapeze artists, fireworks, and late night acoustic jams. Proceeds from this year’s festival will be donated to American Whitewater and the Hot Springs Community Learning Center. iF YOU The Festival begins at 4 p.m. on gO Friday, May 2 and ends Sunday, May

4. Early Bird tickets are $80. For the full musical lineup, race information, directions, and to purchase tickets, visit www.FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com. Go to www.nchotsprings.com for details about the campground, and to make spa reservations.

& the Funk Unity Band

50+ Healing Arts Workshops

Red Baraat

Juried Handcraft and Art Show

AND MUCH MORE! FESTIVAL SCHOOLS & STREETS INTERNATIONAL

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

#1 0XVLF)HVWLYDOÔ #1 Festival For .LGVÔ #1 Festival For Camping

Music. Dance. Poetry. Kids Villages. Great Outdoors. Local Brews & Eats. Lake Sports. Camping & Cabins. 8 April 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 8

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

pg. 20

B

Wireless Internet Access!


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

sound experience LEAF: Fun for the Entire Family

t

the Spring 014 LeaF Festival takes place May 8-11 in Black Mountain, nC. LEAF’s kids’ village will starburst across the festival grounds into seven mini-villages within the Land of Lake Eden. Every village will have food, handcraft and healing arts elements, mixed with interactive art activities for all ages. “We are answering the call of the parents and making the entire festival more of a family experience,” said Morgan Markowitz, LEAF’s Family Adventure Director. Classic lake activities like swimming, the zipline, canoes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards will still be a big part of the LEAF Festival. Youth and parents will easily find their way from village to village with a treasure quest map, specifically made for kids. LEAF musicians provide the soundtrack to a memorable experience filled with cultural treasures and fun around every corner. LEAF combines a myriad of community dances, such as Salsa, Swing, the Waltz, and traditional, contemporary, and techno forms of Contra, with poetry and puppetry slams, healing arts workshops, folk art and handcraft exhibitions, installations and interactive demonstrations, camping, watersports and outdoor adventure.

‘Joe Kendrick’ continued from page 27

articles by me and various collaborators. One of our videographers for the interview shows, Tony Preston, wanted to work with me on a new version of the show loosely modeled after At Guitar Center with Nic Harcourt. He built a new studio last year in Arden called Moonlight Mile, and early this year we began the series which features an interview with the artist and their performance in front of a live audience. That footage is then distilled into a roughly half hour show plus individual song videos.

JC: You’ve since fine-tuned the concept, working to make it more focused and purposeful. Was this in reaction to what you sensed the musicians needed? How much feedback were you getting?

JK: The first shows involved so many people

and were incredibly difficult to produce on a shoestring budget with a volunteer staff. I was trying to replicate what TED productions were doing on a DSL line. It worked, but barely. After that first round I wanted to keep the collaborative spirit alive and draw on the talents of music professionals while continuing the show in a more condensed, simpler way.

JC: You’re now hosting the shows at Tony

Preston’s studio. Having attended a pair of shows there, it really seems like a great fit. What do you see Tony bringing to the effort, and how does that best benefit the artists?

JK: Tony is a wonderful partner. He built

BY

TRUTH WINgFIELD

Returning LEAF favorites include Afropop and Reggae influenced Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, and a Brooklyn Bhangra dance party with Red Baraat. The 38th LEAF features Grammy nominated performers Funk-master Bootsy Collins & the Funk Unity Band, Darrell Scott & Tim O’Brien (Americana/Roots), Boukman Eksperyans (Hatian Rock/Reggae), and twice-nominated Locos por Juana (Afro-Caribbean, Hip-Hop/Funk). The lineup rounds out with genre-bending performances from soulful and funky multi-instrumentalist Zach Deputy, transcendental folk-rockers Elephant Revival, and many others.

pg. 20

O

iF YOU Purchase tickets at www.theLEAF. gO org or by phone at (828) 686-8742.

Adult prices start at $41 for the day or $147 for the weekend. Additional discounts apply for local commuting residents and youth ages 10 through 17. Children 9 and younger are always free. Limited car camping & bunks in lodge rooms are available.

Moonlight Mile almost completely himself, which is another testament to his wide range of skills and tenacity. He brings a wealth of experience as a musician, audio engineer and video producer to the show. We are a great fit, as Tony gets to produce a video series that also advertises his services, while I get to bring in artists and host the show.

JC: What do you see as the future of Lingua

Musica? We’ve talked a bit about some possible revenue streams, so don’t be shy about both the artistic and financial aspects of making this work.

JK: We’re attempting to thread the needle of

garnering an online audience so that we can be sponsored, as well as attracting a studio audience that will pay to see the show live. It’s a bit like being a new band with solid talent that is playing out for the first few times. To succeed, we need to go from the arena of open mics to larger and larger stages, gathering the fans of each of our featured artists while attracting an audience of our own.

JC: What shows are coming up? How far in advance do you typically book?

JK: Red June is April 4 and Emily Easterly is

April 19. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. with my interview preceding their performance. I haven’t yet booked beyond April but for now I plan on producing two shows a month. Anyone who’s interested in attending can contact me or visit the Moonlight Mile website for details at www.linguamusicalive.com

6YkZgi^h^c\I]ViLdg`h

I have had my studio at 140 D, Roberts Street for more than five years. I believe that advertising in Rapid River Magazine has brought traffic to the River Arts District, creating one of Asheville’s best tourist destinations. Thank you Rapid River Magazine!

~ Grace Carol Bomer, Fine Art Abstract Expressionist Paintings

Visit G. Carol Bomer’s studio at 140 D Roberts St. in the River Arts District, or online at www.gracecarolbomer.com.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 8 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — April 2014 9


pg. 20

E

®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com pg.

36

HF

36 Haywood Street

Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

pg. 36

RC

pg. 36

TC

pg. 36

BK

April 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
April 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Interview with Fine Artist Teresa Pennington..p32; Inside: Celebrate spring during the Weaverville Art Safari..p9; Jonas Gerar...

Advertisement