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Dead Man Down • Emperor • Ginger & Rosa • Oz the Great and Powerful • Phantom • Stoker

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Free Hop-On Hop-Off Trolley Tour Friday, April 5th, 5-8pm Park at the Asheville Convention and Visitors Bureau at 36 Montfo fford A Ave. and hop-on the (red) Gray Line Trolley ffor a free tour of participating galleries. Free Trolley is provided by HomeTrust Bank and The Gray Line Trolley Company. I - 240

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Celebrate the First First Friday Art rrt Walk of the Season with a special

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Explore 25 downtown galleries, studios and museums featuring changing exhibitions and opening receptions — all located within a half mile radius.

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Alexander & Lehnert American Folk Art & Framing Appalachian Craft Center Ariel Gallery Artetude Gallery Asheville Art Museum Asheville Gallery of Art The Bender Gallery Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center blue Blue Spiral 1 Castell Photography The Edge Gallery Gallery Asheville The Haen Gallery Handmade in America Mora Designer Jewelry Mountain Made The Satellite Gallery Susan Marie Designs The Updraft V n Dyke Jewelry Va and Fine Crafts W olworth Wa Wo W lk W rking Girls Studio Wo & Gallery ZaPOW!

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performance Asheville Lyric Opera Introduces New Villain in Tosca

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What is it that attracts us to villains? Is it their quick wit, dark charisma, or cunning genius? Whatever it is, Puccini’s opera Tosca presents another villain along the lines of Count Dracula, Captain Hook, and Lex Luthor that audiences love to hate. His name is Baron Scarpia, and he’s the sadistic chief of police who ruthlessly pursues political criminals. The Asheville Lyric Opera brings Puccini’s Tosca to the Diana Wortham Theatre this April 12 and 13. Although set in 19th century Rome during the Napo-

BY

ERIN MOSCONY

leonic Wars, the opera’s themes of love, jealousy, and deception ring true today. In the midst of political turmoil, the conniving Scarpia finds himself fatally attracted to our heroine Tosca, a fiery opera singer. Much to Scarpia’s chagrin, Tosca is deeply committed to painter Mario Cavaradossi. The couple finds their relationship put to the ultimate test when Cavaradossi hides Angelotti, an escaped political prisoner. On the trail to hunt down Angelotti, Scarpia illicitly pursues Tosca. He spins a web of deceit that entangles Tosca and her lover. The all-star cast features Kathy Pyeatt in the title role and La Scala tenor Stephen Mark Brown as Cavaradossi. Pyeatt, an internationally acclaimed soprano, has garnered praise for her vocal beauty and stunning stage presence. Brown has emerged as a tenor of stag‘Tosca’ continued on page 7

2012-2013 SEASON Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Saturday APRIL 20 s 8pm Mozart’s Requiem Pärt Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten Vaughan Williams Flos Campi Kara Poorbaugh, viola

Mozart Requiem Asheville Symphony Chorus WCU Concert Choir

Kara Poorbaugh

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FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION 828.254.7046 U www.ashevillesymphony.org

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Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 3


your fingerprint your words

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4 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8


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we love this place The Bar of Soap and Del Vecchios Join Forces!

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Eight

APRIL 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jordan Ahlers, Judy Ausley, Lee Ann Bubrowski, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Kelly Denson, Amy Downs, Steven Forbes-deSoule, David Troy Francis, Beth Gossett, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, John Horrocks, Gretchen Howard, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Lauren Kriel, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Sean McNeal, Marcianne Miller, Kay Miller, Erin Moscony, April Nance, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Melissa Reardon, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, Ana Woodall. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, April 2013, Vol. 16 No. 8

What’s better than a cold, fresh craft beer while doing laundry? A cold, fresh beer with a slice of hot New York style pizza!

3 Performance

Asheville Lyric Opera – Tosca . . . . . 3 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Dead Man Walking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

9 Interviews

David Troy Francis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Steve Lloyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

11 Fine Art

Weaverville Art Safari . . . . . . . . . . . Downtown Asheville Art District . BlackBird – The Modern Atelier . . The Bender Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . Blue to Black Art Weekend . . . . . . Black Mountain Iron Works. . . . . . QuickDraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Handcrafted and Heartfelt . . . . . . .

11 13 13 13 20 21 24 26

14 Columns

Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Books – Marcianne Miller . . . . . . . James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . .

14 15 16 18 27 28 28 37 43

17 Music

Peter Case at the Grey Eagle . . . . . Jonathan Edwards’ Sunshine . . . . . The Secret B Sides . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eve Haslam & Satin Steel Jazz . . .

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23 Local Favorites

Bogart’s Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . Asheville’s Biggest Dining Party . . Donatelli Cake Designs . . . . . . . . . Festival of Flowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Bicycle That’s Perfect for You . .

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Del Vecchios is now located inside The Bar of Soap and not only offers delectable food to bar and laundromat patrons, but also offers delivery and to-go services. From garlic knots and pasta to fresh salads and hand-tossed New York Style pizza, Del Vecchios runs the gamut of your favorite corner Italian restaurant. They even have wings, paninis, and desserts! “We’ve been looking for the right group of people to run our kitchen and we think Del Vecchios is the perfect fit,” says Sean McNeal, owner of the Bar of Soap. “They’ve got amazing food at an affordable price and we think they’re a perfect match for our clientele.” With over 50 canned craft beers and stateof-the-art laundry equipment, The Bar of Soap recently celebrated its 1 year anniversary as the place to do laundry in Western North Carolina.

The Bar of Soap, 333 Merrimon Ave. in North Asheville

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District. . . . . . . . . . . PG 12 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 22-25 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . PGS 22-23 Festival of Flowers . . . . . . . . . . PG 35 Find It Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 40 Outdoor Fun & Adventure . . . PG 42

Zombie Town Opens April 6 Zombie Town, an immersive, live action, experience, is set to open on Saturday, April 6. Zombie Town allows participants to live out the terror of a full scale zombie apocalypse behind the safety of an airsoft gun. As a participant, you are one of the few survivors, and you need to find patient zero. You will be given a shot gun, some ammo, a flashlight and tasked with finding the cause of the zombie outbreak in a multilevel nightclub that is crawling with undead. You will need your wits about you while you shoot your way through the horde of zombies, uncovering the vital clues that the scientists need to find a cure. Open Friday evenings, and all day Saturday and Sunday all year long, this experience is thrilling and adventurous. Make reservations and purchase tickets online at www.zombietown.net. $120 per person for a one hour experience. Discounts available with an Asheville ID card.

Zombie Town, 38 N. French Broad Ave., Downtown Asheville

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

29 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 29

On the Cover:

Kathryn Mills welcomes you to Bogart’s Restaurant. PAGE 23 Photo: Liza Becker

38 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 5


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captivating performance AMICIMUSIC’S CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES CONTINUES WITH

Brahms, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schubert, and a Ragtime Romp

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Blissful Brahms

Saturday, April 6 at 3 p.m. – House Concert at a Grove Park home featuring clarinetist Brian Hermanson, cellist Franklin Keel, and pianist Daniel Weiser playing great works by Brahms and Mendelssohn. Reservations are required by calling Dan at (828) 505-2903 or e-mailing daniel@amicimusic. org.

Rachel Patrick

Ragtime Romp Saturday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. pianist Daniel Weiser will perform a solo piano show at the White Horse Black Mountain. This program explores the history and music of the wonderful ragtime era with music by Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, Joseph Lamb, and many more. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students/children. For more information and to purchase tickets visit www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Beethoven Lives in Asheville AmiciMusic will present a special free family program on Saturday, April 13 at 11:30 a.m. at the Lord Auditorium at Asheville’s Pack Library downtown. Beethoven Lives in Asheville is an original show designed for children of all ages and adults who are young at heart.

Cellist Franklin Keel

This fun, interactive, and educational show takes the great composer on a wild adventure through time and space to Asheville, where he is inspired by various animals and the beautiful nature around him.

Daniel Weiser as Beethoven

The Jewish Spirit Violinist Rachel Patrick, cellist Franklin Keel, and pianist Daniel Weiser perform two great piano trios by Mendelssohn and Shostakovich. Felix Mendelssohn was a Jewish composer who was forced to convert

PAN HARMONIA CONCERTS Classical Music in the Classic Wineseller Thursday, April 4, 7 p.m. The Passion and the Pinot - Chamber Music with Wine-Tasting. Kate Steinbeck, flute, joins father and daughter Fabio Parrini, piano, and Maria Parrini on cello. The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street Waynesville, NC, Phone (828) 452-6000 for prices and reservations, www. classicwineseller.com. Maria Parrini

Bach & Mendelssohn

Sunday, April 14, 5 p.m. Kate Steinbeck, flute, Fabio Parrini, piano, Maria Parrini, cello & piano. Felix Mendelssohn’s epic Trio, No 1, Op. 49 in D Minor. Tickets: $12 advance/$5 for students available at www. pan-harmonia.org/shop or $15 at the door. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Downtown Asheville, www. myaltamont.com.

Elegy - Holocaust Remembrance Series

Kate Steinbeck and Fabio Parrini.

Photo: Ringelspaugh-Irvine

Sunday, April 28, 5 p.m. Celebrating the creativity of the human spirit. Kate Steinbeck, flute, John Ravnan, viola, Amy Brucksch, guitar, Ian Bracchitta, bass. Music of Ervin Schulhoff and the Sephardic Diaspora. Manheimer Room, Reuter Center, UNCA Asheville. Free Admission.

6 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

because of anti-semitism in Germany. Shostakovich, though not Jewish, wrote a powerful Piano Trio in 1944 in homage of those Amanda Horton Clarinetist Steve Loew, who had died in the Holocaust. and Daniel Weiser There will be three concerts: Friday, April 12 – House Concert in Saturday, April 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the Arden. Admission is $25, which includes White Horse in Black Mountain. Tickets are a potluck supper beginning at 6 p.m. and $15 for adults and $5 for children/students, drinks. Music will begin at 7:30 p.m. Reswww.whitehorseblackmountain.com ervations are required by contacting Dan Sunday, April 28 at 3 p.m. at a House at (828) 505-2903 or via e-mail to daniel@ Concert in the Grove Park area of Asheville. amicimusic.org. Cost is $35 pp, which includes light food Saturday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. at the and wonderful tea and wine. Reservations White Horse in Black Mountain. Tickets are are required and seating is limited. Call $15 for adults and $5 for children/students, Dan at (828) 505-2903 or e-mail daniel@ www.whitehorseblackmountain.com amicimusic.org. Sunday, April 14 at 3 p.m. at the Agudas Unless otherwise noted, you can pay for Israel Synagogue at 505 Glasgow Lane in tickets online at www.amicimusic.org. Hendersonville. Cost is $20 for adults, $15 for members of the Congregation, and $10 for students. A wine and cheese reception will follow the concert. For more information call (828) 505-2903 or (828) 693-9838

Pastorale Featuring soprano Amanda Horton, clarinetist Steve Loew, and pianist Daniel Weiser in a program of music for voice, clarinet, and piano including Schubert’s homage to spring, The Shephard on the Rock. There are currently two concerts scheduled:

AmiciMusic is a professional chamber music organization dedicated to performing the highest quality music in intimate venues and nontraditional spaces.

Daniel Weiser For more information please visit www.amicimusic.org

ACCLAIMED PIANO TRIO

Trio Solisti

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The fifth and final concert of the 60th Anniversary Season of the Asheville Chamber Music Series will feature the acclaimed piano trio, Trio Solisti. The program will include works by: Turina, Trio No. 2 in B minor; Beethoven, Trio in B-flat Major, Opus 97 “Archduke”; Chausson, Trio in G minor, and Opus 3. The Trio Solisti has been hailed as “the most exciting piano trio in America,” by The New Yorker. Terry Teachout of The Wall Street Journal proclaimed, “To my mind, Trio Solisti has now surpassed the Beaux Arts Trio as the outstanding chamber music ensemble of its kind.” IF YOU Trio Solisti, Friday, April 5 at 8 GO p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist

Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place at Charlotte Street. Tickets are $35 and are available at the door. More details at www.ashevillechambermusic.org. Students under the age of 25 attend free of charge.

The Asheville Chamber Music Series presents a performance by Trio Solisti, Friday, April 5.


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performance ‘Tosca’ continued from page 3

gering vocal and emotional power. It is no small accolade that Luciano Pavarotti said of Brown, “this tenor reminds me very much of myself.” The cast also includes Metropolitan Opera featured baritone Galen Scott Bower as Scarpia, Dominic Aquilino as Cesare Angelotti, Ric Furman as Spoletta, Roberto Flores as the Sacristan, and David Fields as Sciarrone. This performance is an original production featuring lavish, multi-level sets by Julie K. Ross that emulate the natural and architectural beauty of 19th century Rome. ALO is pleased to welcome back one of today’s most talented young stage directors, David Carl Toulson. Toulson boasts not only stunning credentials (he has worked alongside Placido Domingo and James Levine), but has crafted a strong identity of his own with the liveliness of his works. Conductor Dan Allcott, music director of the Oak Ridge Symphony Orchestra, guarantees that the music will bring beauty and flourish to match.

Lavish, multi-level sets by Julie K. Ross emulate the natural and architectural beauty of 19th century Rome.

ACT 1 Cesare Angelotti, a political prisoner, escapes and seeks refuge in the Attavanti chapel. Mario Cavaradossi arrives to continue his painting of Mary Magdalene, which very much resembles Angelotti’s sister, the Marchesa Attavanti. Cavaradossi finds Angelotti and quickly hides him as Tosca, Cavaradossi’s lover, approaches. Tosca, overcome by jealousy, is suspicious of him and the inspiration for his painting. Cavaradossi assures Tosca of his fidelity and she leaves. While discussing their next move, Cavaradossi and Angelotti hear a cannon signaling that the police have discovered Angelotti’s escape. They rush to Cavaradossi’s villa. Chief of police, Baron Scarpia, comes to the chapel in search of Angelotti; looking for her lover, Tosca quickly follows. Scarpia shows Tosca the fan imprinted with the Attavanti family crest that he has found among Cavaradossi’s things. He cleverly convinces her of Cavaradossi’s unfaithfulness. Tosca vows vengeance against her lover and leaves. Scarpia dispatches his men to follow her home, hoping it will lead to Angelotti.

ACT II While Scarpia is eating dinner in an upper apartment of the Farnese palace, his spy, Spoletto, arrives with Cavaradossi. Cavara-

Kathy Pyeatt

Stephen Mark Brown

dossi is interrogated while Tosca is heard singing in the gala downstairs. She enters just as Cavaradossi is taken to a new room to be tortured. Scarpia turns his interrogation to Tosca. After struggling with the will of Scarpia mixed with hearing the screams of her lover in the next room, Tosca reveals Angelotti’s hiding place. Furious and betrayed, Cavaradossi is taken to prison. Now alone, Scarpia promises Cavaradossi’s safe return in exchange for a night with Tosca. Scarpia promises to stage Cavaradossi’s execution. Tosca reluctantly agrees to Scarpia’s plan. Spoletto rushes in with news that Angelotti, having been captured, took his own life. Spoletto leaves while Scarpia writes a letter ensuring Tosca and Cavaradossi’s safe passage out of the city. As soon as Tosca has the letter, she stabs Scarpia and flees to her imprisoned lover.

ACT III Tosca arrives at the prison and delivers the good news to Cavaradossi. She tells him of the mock execution and how to convincingly fake his death. The firing squad arrives to take him to his execution. After the soldiers leave, Tosca urges Cavaradossi to hurry; when he doesn’t move she realizes Scarpia’s betrayal. The bullets were real and Cavaradossi is now dead. Spoletto returns to arrest Tosca after finding Scarpia dead. Vowing to face Scarpia before God, Tosca leaps to her death.

CAST Tosca, Kathy Pyeatt; Cavaradossi, Stephen Mark Brown; Scarpia, Galen Scott Bower; Cesare Angelotti, Dominic Aquilino; Spoletta, Ric Furman; Sacristan, Roberto Flores; Sciarrone, David Fields.

IF YOU Tosca will be performed at the GO Diana Wortham Theatre on April

12 and 13 at 8 p.m. To purchase tickets call (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com. Student groups may call the Asheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670 to make reservations for the April 10 Preview Dress Rehearsal at 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

Seen Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links Free Ad Design Easy Monthly Billing

Motivate your customers to take action. Offer different deals every few weeks. Offer a limited number of free consultations or special deals. “Only the first 50 people….” This gets people to respond now. Rapid River Magazine can help promote your business. Call Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228.

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Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 7


Creekside Artists Retreat

Room and Studio Space For Rent • Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $400/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

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Shipwrecked! An Entertainment

North Carolina Stage Company and Immediate Theatre Project are proud to present Shipwrecked! - An Entertainment: The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As Told by Himself) by Donald Margulies. Directed by Willie Repoley, the play is a fantastical story simply told, as we follow our hero from sickly boy to exotic, world famous adventurer — and through the tangles of truth itself! A Pulitzer Prize winner for his play Dinner With Friends, Donald Margulies set out in this play, Shipwrecked!, to reignite and reinvent a bygone theatrical story-telling technique, one that relies on the imagination and what he calls “a ripping good yarn” rather than on modern technical wizardry. The cast of three versatile actors generate live sound effects that transform an empty stage into Victorian London, a rowdy bar, and a tempest-tossed sailing ship, and that’s just to begin. Enter Rougemont’s imaginary world where you’ll see an underwater menagerie, a desert island, an Aboriginal wedding, and a man-eating octopus conjured up by simple theatrical techniques. “Part of the charm of this play, what attracted us to it in the first place, is how simple it is,” says director Willie Repoley. “Immediate Theatre Project is always interested in creating some kind of magic by simple means, and Shipwrecked! is a wonderful vehicle for the kind of stripped-down, hugely imaginative storytelling we love.” He also emphasized the special appeal

Bring It to the Bee!

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A simple quiz: Which of the following is correct: a. ormolu or ormulu b. roccocco, roccoco, or rococo c. sibylline or sybilline d. soliloquuy or soliloquy e. proselytizes or prosyletizes

If you even bothered to take this quiz, have we got an event for you! The Literacy Council’s 22nd Annual Spelling Bee features extreme spelling at its best. This is a rocking, rollicking, nerve-wracking competition, not for the faint of heart. Up to fifteen teams of three adults each will stand off against one another to compete for the glory of being WNC’s best spellers. The Warren Wilson Step Team will perform, as well as cheerleaders, baton twirlers, and such—all the support the spelling 8 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

BY

LAUREN KRIEL

of the play to families with older children. “It’s not written specifically for kids, but I think parents who normally look for a babysitter will be really excited to take their kids to this.” Repoley also emphasized the appeal of old-fashioned storytelling. “It’s a great chance for people of all SHIPWRECKED! An Entertainment runs through April 21. ages to check out of social Photo: Jen Lepkowski media for a few minutes and re-connect with our own Rankin Parking Garage. Performances are capacity for imagination and delight. Those at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays and at 2 are really our most powerful tools of conp.m. on Sunday, April 21. Tickets are availnection,” he says. able from the NC Stage box office in person The three actors tasked with creating or over the phone at (828) 239-0263, Monthis world are Graham Smith, known locally day - Friday from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.. They are for A Number and What The Butler Saw also available online from www.ncstage.org. at NC Stage and regionally in many roles For Shipwrecked! only, the purchase of at the NC Shakespeare Festival and Charany regularly-priced ticket allows the purlotte Repertory Theatre; Tenaya Cleveland chase of a student ticket for just $5. Groups who, though a newcomer to NC Stage and of 5 or more full-time students can also atITP, may be familiar to viewers of Six Feet tend for $5 each. Some restrictions apply. Under, Drop Dead Diva, or Necessary Roughness; and Andrew Hampton Livingston, whose local work includes Angels in IF America for NC Stage and The Glass MeYOU For more information and a full nagerie and It’s A Wonderful Life for ITP. GO calendar of events, call (828) 239Shipwrecked! will be performed in 0263, visit www.ncstage.org or NCSC’s intimate downtown theatre at 15 www.immediatetheatre.org Stage Lane – just off Walnut Street by the

nerds never got in high school! Returning as master of ceremonies this year is the one, the only, the hilarious David Ostergaard of Bright Star Touring Theatre and LaZoom. Prizes will be given not only for the best spellers, but also for the teams that bring in the most money and the most people. There will be prizes for audience members too, for example, best costume (if you feel so inclined), a raffle and maybe some on-the-spot spelling. The Literacy Council of Buncombe County’s mission is to increase comprehensive literacy and English language skills through one-on-one and small group instruction by trained volunteers. The Literacy Council provides individualized tutoring to over 300 students annually in three core programs: Adult Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, and the Augustine Project for children. Tutors are well-trained volunteers, so if you’re looking for a good opportunity to serve your community, contact the Literacy Council at (828) 254-3442 and check out

their website, www.litcouncil.com. Local businesses and organizations fielding spelling bee teams include Malaprops Bookstore, Downtown Books and News, Battery Park Book Exchange and Champagne Bar, Friends of the Buncombe County Library, Verve Magazine, Mountain Express, and Warren Wilson College, as well as many others like the 3-D Spellbinders, Spell It Yourself, and Westwood Cohousing. Home Trust Bank will support two teams of tutors. Oh, you want to know the answers? Simple: ormolu, rococo, sibylline, soliloquy, and proselytizes. These were the easy words. See you at the Bee! IF YOU The Literacy Council’s 22nd GO Annual Spelling Bee, Thursday,

April 11 at Ferguson Auditorium, A-B Tech Community College, at 6:30 p.m. $5 admission at the door. There will be entertainment and refreshments, so we encourage audience members to come at 6 p.m. and join the fun.


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stage preview INTERVIEW WITH ASHEVILLE PRODUCER

Dead Man Walking

David Troy Francis

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An Opera by Jake Heggie & Terrence McNally

Concert pianist, recording artist, comINTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY poser and producer David Troy Francis has had two amazingly successful theatrical productions Dead Man Walking will be an in the past four absolutely extraordinary production months: the sold – magnificent and transformative. out smash Naughty But Nice, and Asheville Community Theatre’s main stage hit BARK! The Dead Man Walking Musical. David and The Modern American presents both sides of the Music Project (www.tmamp.org), a non capital punishment issue. profit, now present the critically acclaimed I believe people are more opera Dead Man Walking Walking. prone to thoughtful introspection of their own beliefs Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about and more open to change the opera Dead Man Walking Walking, and what to in the non hostile environexpect. ment that this opera offers. David Troy Francis: Dennis, the opera Finally, people who do not is more like a Broadway musical than a Susan Brummell Belcher and composer and producer live in large urban areas David Troy Francis. Photo: Liza Becker traditional opera. The music by composer like NYC or Los Angeles Jake Heggie is Gershwin-esque: glorious, rarely have an opportunity emotional, intense and accessible. Four time to see new musical works. I Tony award winner Terrence McNally has wanted our community to written the libretto which is breathtaking see this stellar work before and heart wrenching. it plays in NYC! Dead Man Walking is the true story RRM: Tell us a little about about Sister Helen Prejean’s experience in the cast and crew. counseling a murderer on death row who had brutally murdered two teenagers. What DTF: My one word deI find interesting is that she did not try to scription would be WOW! convert him to Catholicism; rather, she Rising star soprano Elise wanted him to take responsibility for his acQuagliata sings the role tions, tell the truth and ask forgiveness from of Sister Prejean and the the parents of the victims: things that are young hunk baritone understandable to all and reflective of our Christiaan Smith Kotlarek societal values. is the condemned man. She wanted him to understand that, International elite artist and Christiaan Smith Kotlarek Elise Quagliata irrespective of his brutal crimes, he remained veteran of over 450 Metroa son of God. Finally, she told him that when politan Opera appearances he faced lethal injection, for him to look in Jane Bunnell sings the role of the prisoner’s DTF: Yes, we are overjoyed that Sister Helen her eyes as she would be the face of love (the mother. Noted baritone Marc Embree is the Prejean will indeed attend both perforface of Christ) in the execution chamber for warden of the prison. mances. She will speak at a public forum on him. That is a pretty powerful story. We have completed the cast with truly Friday, April 26 at 2:30 p.m. that is free and amazing local performers like Susan Brumopen to the public. She will be introduced at RRM: How did Dead Man Walking become mell Belcher and Ruth Sieber Johnson the opera and will be available to meet with an opera? who portray the mothers of the murdered people following the performances. DTF: Jake Heggie saw the academy award children; their husbands are Mark Morales Visit www.tmamp.org for more details nominated film of the same name and felt and Eric Martinez. and to purchase tickets. All seating is rethat this story was deserving of and had the The Celebration Singers of Asheville, served so get your tickets today. potential to be a great musical work. He was directed by Ginger Haselden, appear as the right. This opera touches your heart. children’s chorus. The entire cast is fantasIF tic. Francis Cullinan directs this production, YOU The Modern American Music RRM: What drew you to this project? GO Project presents two performances Vance Reese is chorus master/conductor, I DTF: First, the music is magnificent, memof Dead Man Walking. Friday, am musical director and pianist and have the orable, accessible and in English. Goodness April 26, UNCA’s Lipinsky Hall at joy of working with synthesist Brian Turner 8 p.m. Saturday, April 27 at at 3 p.m., gracious, Dead Man Walking opens with a and percussionist Morgen Cobb. Coulter Hall, Western Carolina University, gospel song! But, also, I believe that when RRM: I hear Sister Helen Prejean who wrote Cullowhee, NC. political/moral issues are debated, people the book Dead Man Walking will be atcan harden their positions because the deTickets are $25-$40. For reserved seating tending the shows. Will she be speaking and bates are heated and sometimes filled with or more information visit www.tmamp.org taking questions from the audience? personal attacks. and www.tix.com

Dead Man Walking is an account of faith and redemption based on the prize-winning book by Sister Helen Prejean. The opera tells the modern-day story of a nun who becomes the spiritual advisor to a condemned man on Louisiana’s death row. Out of that dreadful intimacy comes a profoundly moving spiritual journey confronting both the plight of the condemned and the rage of the bereaved; the needs of a crimeridden society and the Christian imperative of love. When extraordinary people come together, extraordinary things happen and we have gathered an extraordinary principal cast including rising star soprano Ms. Elise Quagliata as Sister Helen and handsome, powerful Christiaan Smith-Kotlarek as the condemned man. International opera star and veteran of 450 Metropolitan Opera performances Ms. Jane Bunnell will portray the mother of Jane Bunnell the prisoner. Sensational soprano Susan Brummell Belcher is singing the role of Kitty Hart, the mother of the murdered girl and Nikolas Hedberg as an inmate of the prison.

Master Class in Voice Conducted by international opera star Ms. Jane Bunnell and her respected husband, baritone Marc Embree. Thursday, April 25 in Lipinsky Hall. The master class is free and open to the public.

Dead Man Walking: The Journey Continues A public forum conducted by the real Sister Helen Prejean, activist, author, and the leading voice on death penalty issues in the country. Friday, April 26 from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at UNCA. A reception for Sister Helen follows her talk. Free and open to the public.

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10 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8


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fine art

Tradition. Vision. Innovation. Jewelry by Danielle Miller

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Weaverville Art Safari

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FREE STUDIO TOURS SHOWCASE REGIONAL TALENT

Western North Carolina has long been BY STEVEN FORBES-DESOULE heralded for its rich art scene. The New York Y ork Times, Southern Living Living,, Travel + Leisure, and American Style Magazine have all awarded the region top honors for the vibrant community living in these foothills and valleys. On April 27-28, during the Weaverville Art Safari, some of the region’s most celebrated artists open their homes and studios to the public for a rare glimpse inside the creative process. This unique self-guided tour is a wonderful opportunity to meet and talk with local artists featured in galleries across the Marcus Thomas region and nation. Learn about the process behind each piece and discover the passion and drive that keeps the creative process alive. “One of the things that makes the Weaverville Art Safari so special is it’s a chance for the community to interact with acclaimed artists,” says Tom Hoxie, Chairman of the Weaverville Art Safari and designer of contemporary Asian tansu furniture. “We get to connect with fellow artists and art enthusiasts, and our guests John Ransmeier get to see our most recent work before the Warner Whitfield general public.” early April. This year’s event includes 34 artists. Brochures On Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 will also be p.m., their studios are open to the public for distributed a special viewing of their latest collections. from an Art Art demonstrations and door prizes at select Safari inforstudios make this self-guided tour an exciting mation booth experience that’s perfect for the entire family. Thais Weiner located on “This event is tailored to all ages and inMain Street terest,” says Steven Forbes-deSoule, one of in Weaverville during the show weekend. the original Weaverville Art Safari members A downloadable brochure and full details and a creator of raku vessels and sculpture. about participating artists are also available at “Everyone from age nine to 99 can particiwww.weavervilleartsafari.com. pate and discover new and wonderful ways About The Weaverville Art Safari of artistic expression.” The Weaverville Art Safari is an event Based on their interests and artistic staged twice each year–the last full weektastes, this self-guided event encourages end in April and the first full weekend in guests to go at their own pace through the November–by a group of Western North town and surrounding areas of Weaverville. Carolina artists whose studios are located in Works of art showcased include handmade and around the communities of Weaverville pottery, glass, sculpture, jewelry, furniture, and Barnardsville, NC. paintings, drawings, fiber art, and more. The first Weaverville Art Safari was A special preview party at the Weaverorganized in the spring of 2001 with the ville Town Hall kicks off the event on goal of attracting visitors to this vibrant art Friday, April 26. The fun starts at 7 p.m. and community on the northern outskirts of includes live music, door prizes, heavy hors Asheville, NC. Since then thousands of d’oeuvres, desserts, and more. The highlight people have returned over and over each of the evening is a silent auction featurspring and fall to enjoy the shopping opporing art works donated by each participating tunities and the ambience. Local B&Bs do a artist. Event tickets are only $10 at the door, brisk business. with additional door prize tickets available for $5 each. All event proceeds fund future Weaverville Art Safari events. IF Weaverville Art Safari brochures YOU Weaverville Art Safari, April 27containing maps and artist information are GO 28. For more information on the available at greater Asheville-area gallerand participating artists please visit ies, restaurants, and shops beginning in www.weavervilleartsafari.com.

www.craftguild.org llA Anst nstA And nd Cr rA Aft ft shop A At the folk Art Center All A nst A A

Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway Asheville, NC | 828-298-7928

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

For more fine crafts visit: Guild Crafts, 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

PG. 40

MB

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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTRICT Support Local Artists ❖ Support Local Creativity ❖ Buy Local Indulge and Support Self Expression ❖ Invest in Our Future ABOUT THE RIVER ARTS DISTICT The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide a unique experience for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

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12 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

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fine art Walk into the Arts with the Downtown Asheville Art District

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FIRST FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH ART WALKS

The Downtown Asheville Art District (DAAD) hosts First Friday Art Walks every month m onth April through December. The first walk of the 2013 season takes place April 5 from 5-8 p.m. Trolley service will be provided by our local Grey Line Trolley (aka the red one) offering a fun and safe way to get from one venue to another. Appalachian Crafts features McNeill’s Pottery of Seagrove, NC. Sharon McNeill, husband Jerry, and daughter Windy work together as family producing functional, handcrafted pottery in a variety of glazes. American Folk introduces Face Jugs & Traditional Jugs—The region’s most revered potters exhibit with signature style. Ariel Craft Gallery welcomes new members—Paul Weller, metalsmith and Joel Hunnicutt, woodturner. The Bender Gallery exhibits absurd renditions of the traditional goblet with historical narrative by French Canadian artist Mathieu Grodet, and deeply symbolic cast crystal goblets by Pennsylvania artist Anna Boothe. Blue Spiral 1 features one-person exhibitions showcasing three beloved regional artists—Mitchell Lonas, Olena Nebuchadnezzar, and Ward H. Nichols. Castell Photography presents Story, featuring photo-based works from Gerald Slota. Opens Friday, April 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The mid-career survey includes pieces from multiple bodies of work. Slota will speak at the Asheville Art Museum, Thursday, April 11 at 6 p.m.

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BY JORDAN

AHLERS

Haen Gallery opens Natural Counterpoints, featuring new work from Larry Gray, Francis Di Fronzo, and Clayton Santiago through April 20. New work from Stephen Pentak and Kathryn Kolb opens Saturday, April 27 with a reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mora Designer Jewelry on Walnut hosts a party during the First Friday Art Walk, April 5 from 5-8 p.m. to celebrate the boutique’s successful first year. Mountain Made in the Grove Arcade features new works from Laurel Gordon of Banner Elk, NC. Motown Blue performs live in the Grove Arcade from 6-8 p.m. Van Dyke features pastels and oils by Mark A. Henry, and Diane S. Dean’s mixed media works. Both artists draw inspiration from nature. Woolworth Walk presents Art from Nature—featuring encaustic painter David Pope and potter Cindy Trisler. ZaPow takes on Star Wars, Star Trek, and Dr. Who, in a Space and Time Trifecta. Opening Reception during the Art Walk, April 5 from 7-9 p.m. IF YOU 2013 Gallery Guides GO are available at any of the

participating venues or online at ashevilledowntowngalleries.org.

Morphogenesis

A national juried show for members of The National Association of Women in the Arts. The artists who were accepted into this small works juried exhibition, have explored their individual interpretations of the exhibition theme “Morphogenesis.” Although morphogenesis can be defined as the changing of one organism into another as it matures into adulthood, the artists have also used this theme as a springboard to much broader interpretations, such as the growth and change of civilization, society, and self-awareness. The show will feature paintings, mixed media, and sculpture. For more information about the National Association of Women Artists call (212) 675-1616, or visit www.thenawa.org.

Gapingstock Paperprint by Diane Price

IF YOU On display April 1-30, 2013. Reception Saturday, April GO 13, from 3-6 p.m. at 310 Art, 191 Lyman Street in the When I Was Young by Judith Modrak

historic River Arts district. For more information call Fleta Monaghan at (828) 776-2716.

The Modern Atelier

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FEATURING LOCAL ARTIST ANGELA CUNNINGHAM AND SIX CONTEMPORARIES

Young artists sometimes find their BY JOHN HORROCKS voice in an ages-old tradition. For centuries, the atelier (French, meaning an artist’s studio or workshop) has been a principle venue for art education, wherein students work in a structured program under the hands-on tutelage of master artists. Today, students accepted into such a program have already completed other formal training and demonstrated their talent, a serious work ethic and dedication to a fine art career. Throughout April, BlackBird will host a show presented by several artists who are the product of a leading program in this form of classical training, featuring works that illustrate phases of the Olive Oil, oil on linen by Gregory Mortenson learning process. This show encompasses the work ford (NY), Danny Grant (TX), Gregory of two Atelier studios: the Water Street AteMortenson (NY) and Travis Seymour (UK), lier at the Grand Central Academy in New all accomplished in their own rights. York City and the John Angel Academy in The show not only presents the extraorFlorence, Italy. Angela Cunningham, an dinary product of their craft, but explains award-winning Asheville artist, is joined in this show by several of her peers: Carol Bro‘Atelier’ continued on page 36 man (FL), Todd Casey (MA), Carla Craw-

Narratives at the Bender Gallery

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A three person exhibition featuring the work of glass artists Lesley C S Nolan, Mathieu Grodet and Anna Boothe. The reception is being held in conjunction with Asheville’s initial First Friday art walk of the season. Narratives examines the art of Cordially Yours by storytelling and social Anna Boothe commentary via works of sculptural glass. Tallahassee artist, Lesley C S Nolan records stories of family dynamics and human interaction through fabulous panels of vibrant fused glass. The stories Nolan’s work tell conveys our common need for nostalgia, comfort and halcyon days. Mathieu Grodet is a French born artist living in Quebec. He takes the goblet, an object which has been in existence since antiquity, and transforms it into the fantastic. He blows these delicate goblets as a blank canvas on which to engrave pictorial images and commentary on social issues. Hailing from Pennsylvania, artist Anna Boothe creates luminous translucent goblets of kiln cast glass. Boothe’s goblets are far

Passion by Lesley CS Nolan

Chimere by Mathieu Grodet

from ordinary employing unexpected items such as birds, hands and seed pods to convey themes that recur in our daily lives. Lesley Nolan will be in attendance at the opening reception for discussion and questions. IF YOU Narratives will run through May GO 31 with an opening reception on

Friday, April 5 from 5 to 8 p.m. The Bender Gallery, 12 S Lexington Avenue in downtown Asheville, next door to the French Broad Chocolate Lounge. More information is available by visiting the gallery at www.thebendergallery.com

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 13


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books ~ poetry ~ readings

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The Poet’s Voice

Celebrate National Poetry Month all month long!

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

Cut loose, man/ woman up, dare, blare, revel in words. Buy a copy of the 2012 Asheville Poetry Review Review. Editor, Keith Flynn, has assembled a remarkable selection of poems ranging from Sam Hamill, R.T. Smith, Pablo Neruda, Tu Fu, great poet of the T’ang dynasty, and other memorable selections. Essays, interviews and poems about Sam Hamill, written by Rebecca Seiferle, Esteban Moore, Lisa Morphew, Sebastian Matthews, and Eleanor Wilner enrich the 2012 issue. This journal is a must-read. Keith Flynn will read from his new collection, Colony Collapse Disorder, (reviewed by Rob Neufeld in the March 10 issue of the Asheville Citizen-Times). Keith will read at Malaprops on April 6 at 7 p.m.

NC Poetry News Joseph Bathanti was named North Carolina Poet Laureate. Joseph is professor of creative writing at Appalachian State University where he directs Writing in the Field and Writer-in Residence in the University’s Wautauga Global Community. The Blue Ridge Bookfest will take place May 17 and 18. Check out www.blueridgebookfest.org for more details.

This is a great month to read and listen! AND there’s Word Fest, May 3 and 4, Asheville’s premiere celebration of the word. Joseph Bathanti will read, as well as Cornelius Eady, John Lock, Keith Flynn, Allison Adelle Hedge Coke, and Evie Shockley. Visit www. ashevillewordfest.org for details. Most events will take place at Lenoir-Rhyne University, Asheville. Back to Sam Hamill. Four years ago I heard a young poet say, “It is a poet’s job to be brave.” Sam Hamill has published forty books, fifteen of them poetry. He was founder and editor of Copper Canyon Poetry Journal until he stood up, spoke up, and faced head-on none other than Mrs. Laura Bush. In 2003, he declined an invitation to read at the White House. He set about notifying other invited poets of his decision, and thus gave birth to Poets Against The War. He collected 20,000 poems of protest. Let’s hear it for Sam Hamill, Man of Courage! From his poem, “Lessons from Thieves,” the final two lines: The flower is in the pot/The blossom is in the mind”

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

2013 Poetry Contest Winners A huge thank you to all who entered our 16th Annual Poetry Contest! We had more than 450 poems to choose from.

First Place Winner

1ST PLACE Joyful Marinara Mythic marinara actually. So they tell me. Maybe they’re right. Or just polite. Friends.

Splitting Logs in Summer by Preston Woodruff

They wait while I prepare. Nibbling formaggio; cupping hands around vino. Chianti, of course. And, Asiago, gorgonzola? No, Parmigiano reggiano.

Third Place Winner

Three vessels.

Joyful Marinara by Jim Reid

Second Place Winner

New Year by Lewis Chambliss

Honorable Mentions Year End by Lenore Coberly When He Wore Red by Michael Osorio False Winter by Jeanette Reid

Malaprop’s Celebrates Poetry POETRIO – Sunday, April 7 at 3 p.m. Readings by Terrence Degnan, Jan LaPerle, Clay Matthews, and Ida Stewart.

Poetry Open Mic Wednesday, April 10 at 7 p.m.

Poem in Your Pocket Day Thursday, April 18 at 7 p.m. Elaine Bleakney invites audience members to read from the Poem in Your Pocket anthology.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Café

& Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

A sauce simmers. Tomatoes and paste and puree. Simple. The spices brown in a pan with oil. Not any pan and any oil. Iron that is cast and oil that is olive. Peppers, green and red. Basil, fennel. And great, gorgeous garlic. All on a bed of . . . what? Linguine, mostaccioli, penne, rigatoni? Any. All. Al dente. And ciabatta. We laugh. We love. We nap. We get up — for gelato. Happiness

By Jim Reid

WEB EXCLUSIVE Read all of the winning poems online right now.

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Great values & styles

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FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

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Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

14 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

$49/Month www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com


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authors ~ books ~ readings Looking at the Light: Fighting Cancer with Poetry

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WRITTEN BY JAMES NAVÉ

“I felt surrounded by light”….and “gave myself over to being loved…”

Last week, I was in a vintage book store, looking for a book on crock-pot cooking, Two times a book in a nearby shelf caught my eye. It was a slim volume so it took up little room on the shelf, but it seemed to be deliberately pushing itself out to the edge of the shelf, as if it were beckoning me to pick it up. This happens to me a lot with books but I resisted. I walked around the corner to the next aisle and I swear I could hear that book calling me. I marched back and pulled it off the shelf. Its title was Looking at the Light: Fighting Cancer with Poetry by James Navé.

But I wasn’t in the mood for poetry. I wanted Author James Navé something reader-friendly Photo: Francisco Guerrero and completely accessible. I flipped through the book. REVIEWED BY Sure didn’t look like poetry on MARCIANNE MILLER those pages. No separate lines or stanzas. Instead it seemed By May, James is sick of these poems were printed as being patient and drinking short prose pieces—I learned green tea. “Like [poet Carl] later that was indeed James’ Sandburg, I have a hankering intention. It was in essence a for some hooch that will fire book of poetry for people who up the poet in me.” think they don’t like poetry. I Now in Taos, he looks walked out of the store with back on his carefree, reckless the book in my hand. days where he always chose It was indeed a “…it seemed to be deliberately the risky road. “Most of our reader-friendly book. stories” he seems to be tellI started it as soon as I pushing itself out to the edge ing all young people who are got home, and even with of the shelf, as if it were rebelling against their parents, “rise from the post-it note marking, I finished it beckoning me to pick it up.” risks we take.” But it is an older, wiser man before bed. James was diagnosed with who is dispensing such advice. “Sometimes I prostrate cancer and decided to write wish I were 20 again, back in the days when a poem a day during his recuperation. I didn’t expect to die.” When I saw the author’s name, I admit He had surgery in Hendersonville and then Off to New York City, where the I was intrigued. Native son James Navé is an stayed with friends in Asheville for weeks. rhythms of life are totally different from internationally known poet, storyteller, and “I’ve seen the sands of Mauritania,” he Asheville and Taos—an “ambulance honkcreativity coach. He’s revered as a leader of writes, “heard Frank Sinatra croon in Vegas, ing,” a “fiddler playing in the corner”… the Spoken Word movement. Think poetry walked rivers in Peru, hitchhiked the Pacific ”stilettos tapping the pavement…at least ten slams and disdain for academic poetry. He Highway, poetry slammed a perfect 30 at the times a day.” But North Carolina is not far is consumed by poetry. He loves it, he lives Green Mill in Chicago, but when trouble from his mind. for it, it seems to pulse through his veins as came, as it did, this winter, I clung to Caro“Of course I’d like to be 33 again,” he essential to his existence as blood. lina like fog drifting over the land.” writes “leaning against my 1968 Plymouth His first post-surgery sight was of his station wagon at the Black Mountain Musibeloved life partner Trish sitting in a chair cal Festival, sky-blue shorts and red t-shirt beside him in the hospital. “I felt surroundhugging a body lean enough to run seven ed by light”….and “gave myself over to THE ARTIST’S WAY miles up any mountain.” being loved and that is a miracle all human One of the many things James In his last poem, the hundredth, James beings deserve.” Navé is known for is his long associaand Trish head to Boston in their friend’s Recuperating at the houses of friends in tion with Julia Cameron, author of BMW, for the celebration of his nephew’s Asheville, James is grateful for their warm The Artist’s Way Way. wedding. Far from their Asheville home, his hospitality. How many of us, truthfully, Her most recent family remains close. have friends with whom we could recuperbook, Prosperous “Ceremony requires ritual opening ate from surgery? As we read all the poems Heart: Creatof the heart, the intense acceptance of fire. in the book, we are struck by not only how ing a World of Warm under apple trees in bells and memomany good friends this man has, but how “Enough” was ries, I sat in the second row, alive in the time much they love him in return. “I wish I reviewed in the and place of three generations.” could gaze into the sky,” he writes, “and see January 2013 everyone I know all at once.” issue. Read it BOTTOM LINE: A heart warming, wonderLike many people facing a major online at www.rapidrivermagazine. ful book for anyone at any stage in their life. disruption in their lives, James realizes he’s com/2012/prosperous-heart. James Can be ordered from your local indepenbeen thinking about prayer a lot lately. “I Navé is teaching The Artist’s Way dent bookstore. have a responsibility to look at the world,” here in Asheville this month. he admits, “face the light, pray with my eyes Looking at the Light: Fighting Cancer with open, chin up.” Poetry, written by James Navé, Imaginative IF YOU GO: The Artist’s Way, On April 22 he writes a passage that Storm Publications, 106 pp., 2012 April 16-May 21, 2013. Six Week Workshop facilitated by James Navé. blew me away—I think it is the most sensual www.imaginativestorm.com Tuesday Evenings, 7-9 p.m. at 261 image I ever read. He is contemplating bees, www.jamesnave.com Asheland Avenue, at the Training which fascinate him. “Perhaps it’s time to Center at Town and Mountain Real bathe my face in honey and wrap my arms Estate. Tuition: $195. To register call around a mountain.” Marcianne Miller is an (919) 949-2113.

APRIL

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Tuesday, April 2 at 7 p.m. TAMASIN NOYES, Grills Gone Vegan. Thursday, April 4 at 7 p.m. GAR ALPEROVITZ, What Then Must We Do? Friday, April 5 at 7 p.m. A.C. GRAYLING, The God Argument. Thursday, April 11 at 7 p.m. Feeding Your Demons, a talk by DEBRA TRAVIS. Friday, April 12 at 7 p.m. ROD DREHER, Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl. Saturday, April 13 at 7 p.m. DALE NEAL, The Half-Life of Home. Wednesday, April 17 at 7 p.m. BEN MILLER, Junkification of a Boyhood Idyll. Friday, April 19 at 7 p.m. THEODORE RICHARDS, Creatively Maladjusted. Saturday, April 20 at 7 p.m. SALLIE BISSELL, Music of Ghosts. Sunday, April 21 at 5 p.m. STORY SLAM, Do Tell: Stories of Sharing Stories. Monday, April 22 at 7 p.m. JILL McCORKLE, Life After Life. Tuesday, April 23 at 7 p.m. WORLD BOOK NIGHT, spread the love of reading. Wednesday, April 24 at 7 p.m. Steve Crimi discusses the work of Alan Chadwick. Thursday, April 25 at 7 p.m. Poems Reaching Toward The Divine. Friday, April 26 at 7 p.m. George Singleton, Tommy Hays, and John Lane, Literary Dogs and Their South Carolina Writers. Saturday, April 27 at 7 p.m. ELAINE NEIL ORR, A Different Sun: A Novel of Africa. Tuesday, April 30 at 7 p.m. NELL DICKERSON, Porch Dogs: A True Southern Tradition.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 40 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Asheville writer/reviewer.

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 15


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Spring has arrived along with a sprightly batch of new discs. What better way to celebrate than relaxing on a hammock with music to love? Just be sure to legally purchase this music at any one of our excellent locally owned record stores. They are the folks who really know their music.

Poco

Fat Opie

All Fired Up Drifter’s Church Music

Victoryville

Given their lengthy and complicated history-few bands have survived more personnel changes than has this venerable combo-there’s something mildly reassuring just knowing Poco are still around, touring the road circuit and releasing albums every ten years or so. Even more admirably, much like their spiritual brethren The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, they are doing so in a soft country rock genre that for the most part no longer exists, has little or no chance of radio play, and will likely never reenergize a new generation of fans. Given that their best days-both creatively and commercially-are well behind them the best Poco can expect might be to hold on to their long standing fan base and maybe pick up a few youngsters whose parents once grooved to “Crazy Eyes” and “Kind Woman.” That’s a tough position for any artist to be in but, to their credit, the band keeps soldiering on. Only vocalist/ guitarist Rusty Young remains from the earliest days-Richie Furay and Jim Messina have long since moved on to other things-but new members (Jack Sundrud (bass) and George Lawrence (drums) and multi-instrumentalist Michael Webb are well studied in the bands’ legacy. As to the songs themselves nothing here adds demonstrably to that legacy, but neither do they detract from it. “Regret” has a nice mid-period Eagles sound-buoyed by a standout vocal effort courtesy of Young- while the “That’s What Rock and Roll Will Do” would have been a FM radio hit. Except of course that avenue has long since disappeared. So too with the witty Neil Young in which Rusty, in a Jimmy-Fallon-would- beproud imitation of Neil’s trademark impossibly high pitched moan insists that “Neil Young is not my brother/ we hardly know each other/the DNA is in /and he’s not my kin.” Of course the two have been friends for years, so it’s pretty much an inside joke. So while All Fired Up is anything butmuch of it merely serves to remind us of their halcyon days-there’s not a damn thing wrong with a band giving the people what they want, even if those people have settled into lives as accountants, teachers, and grandparents. *** 16 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

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The newest release from this San Franciscobased trio rolls out of the speakers like a freight train threatening to leave the tracks and rarely slows down. While the band has been together for twenty years-and have garnered a solid reputation around Northern California, on this coast they’ve managed to stay a well kept secret. With its sturdy songwriting, terse arrangements, and commitment to rock music written by and for grownups (i.e. those of us who prefer actual substance over shine) Victoryville should help change that. Principal songwriter and lead singer Scott Mickelson has a unique voice and works it well to his advantage. While the first emerged as a grunge band Fat Opie have since developed into a polished contemporary rock band, the sort of intelligentsia that is rarely heard these day. The trio of Mickelson on vocals, banjo, and guitar, Robin Hildebrant on bass and vocals, and Dave Tavel on drums, produce a surprisingly full sound the teeters on the edge of discordance but manages to stay sturdy and solid. No one song stands out (although “Target Girl” and “Concrete Kid” kept grabbing my attention) but that speaks more to the consistency of the album than anything else. But don’t take my word for it: go to www.fatopie.com, sample of few tracks, and see if you’re not among the converted. ***1/2

Richard Thompson Electric New West Records The album title is bit disingenuous- Thompson’s 24th studio effort is no more of less plugged in than the totality of his work-and the opening track begins as strange as any he’s ever recorded. But once you slide that out of the way Electric reveals itself as prime Thompson, crackling with limitless energy, superb playing by all involved, and some of his most engaging and tightly written songs. Recorded at Buddy Miller’s home studio in Nashville it certainly skirts around the familiar edges of country but for the most part the spontaneity-emphasizing instinct

over precision-is what carries the day. Even when his trademark Stratocaster is left in the case-such as in the off kilter morality fable (does Thompson write any other kind?) “The Snow Goose” there’s a sense of urgency to get things done, and get them done NOW. As such there’s ample room for the band to stretch out and get playful, best heard in the delightfully daft “Sally B.”, giving Electric an airy countenance that is occasionally missing from Thompson’s work: Even when he gets serious it’s with a hopeful eye. “Where’s Home?” is as mournful and haunting a tune as Thompson’s ever written, and quite possibly near the top tier of his glorious career. As solid as the songs are-and several are among his best- the strongest trait of Electric is its ambiance, how the music leaps and lands, and literally pounces out of the speakers. It’s a good as Thompson gets, meaning it’s about the most assertive, muscular, and intelligent music out there. And be sure to invest a few extra nickels for the eighteen track bonus release which features no mere outtakes but rather an extra helping of a most satisfying main course. ****

Robyn Hitchcock Love from London Yep Roc Records If 2010’s Propeller Time found Robyn Hitchcock in an often minimalist mood then Love from London,, recorded in his East London flat just days after his 60th birthday, finds the ever restless Hitchcock in a more expansive space, reflecting on his four decades in music while embracing his never-ending sonic wanderlust. In many ways Love from London sounds more like a Venus 3- Hitchcock’s recurrent ensemble featuring REM alumni Peter Buck, Scott McCaughey, and Bill Rieflin- than any of his sparsely arranged solo disc. For starters it’s a deliberately layered collection, rejoicing in the sort of dense psychedelia that Hitchcock all but owns. Swapping out the acoustic underpinnings in exchange for a crisp pop/rock sound that would fit in nicely alongside such esteemed Hitchcock efforts as Fegmania or Globe of Frogs this release sounds a bit more intentionally cohesive than the last ‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

decades ‘harvest. The piano-led, dirge-like “Harry’s Song” sets a rather dark tone but things quickly brighten with the spunky “Be Still” and the truly strange “Stupefied.” Love from London works best when the light and dark lay side by side, especially in the hauntingly stunning “Death & Love” and the giddy Flaming Lips like “The End of Time.” Hitchcock clearly loves making records and if that tendency to “throw it at the wall and see what sticks” hasn’t always resulted in great albums it sure as heck hasn’t produced any dull ones. Entering into his seventy decade Robyn Hitchcock shows little signs of slowing down. If anything his recent output, anchored by a pair of multi-disc retrospectives, has cemented his position as one of the truly great figures in rock music. I haven’t the slightest idea as to how one would enter into this vast Hitchcock universe. But for an artist whose oeuvre is as unpredictable as the man himself Love from London is as good as place as any to start. ***1/2

Michael Jefrey Stevens Duets ARC Duets may not be the most original of album titles (a quick online glance came up with well over forty variations) but the music found on local musician Michael Jefrey Stevens latest, a duo recording with vibraphonist Jason DeCristafaro, is anything but derivative. Duets does proudly display its influences, in this case reminding me of some of the “cooler” Bill Evans recordings of the early to mid 1960’s, but there are some nice unexpected touches dancing around the edges that keep things interesting. The mood here is subdued-intended to entice rather than incite a response-but in this case that becomes a positive. While my tastes certainly run towards 1940’s swing and the more expansive hard bop recording of a decade later I still found myself grooving to Duets; there’s a lovely shine to it, a shimmer that seems just right for the advent of spring. ***

IF YOU GO: Those interested in hearing

Stevens perform should check out the following shows: the Michael Jefrey Stevens trio, featuring Billy Cardine on electric dobro and DeCristafaro on vibraphone, Thursday April 18 at the Lexington Avenue Brewery, 9:30 p.m. with an $8 cover; Friday April 19, with Eliot Wadopian on bass, at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts ($10 suggested donation); and Tuesday, April 23 with Frank Southecorvo on saxophones at the Altamont Theatre ($10 cover).

Peter Case at the Grey Eagle

BY JAMES

CASSARA

Peter Case has worn so many hats (including that sharp gray fedora on the cover of his 1986 debut solo release) over his thirty year career that the sheer scope and diversity of his work can be staggering.

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Following tenures in the protopower pop band the Nerves and the much beloved early 1980s Los Angeles based Plimsouls, Case launched a career as an influential American artist: One whose music ranged from finger picked acoustic guitar to redemptive story songs-often focused on societal outcasts and drifters- to full on ballsy rock and roll delivered with relentless soul and energy. Case’s strongest suits are his insightful songwriting, punctuated by vivid and attentive lyrics, and his powerhouse voice. He’s also a brilliant harmonica player, well respected among his peers and a perennial favorite among serious listeners. Finally, Case is a survivor, having recovered from a serious illness and the resultant 2007 open heart surgery. Peter Case grew up on the outskirts of Buffalo, New York and, like many a young lad, saw music as both a personal and geographical means of escape. Elvis Presley and the Beatles were immediate influences but he was equally moved by the blues and folk sounds of Mississippi John Hurt, Leadbelly, and Woody Guthrie. As a teenager, he veered from rock bands to the troubadour’s life, playing coffeehouses and street corners for tips. In 1974, he arrived in San Francisco and was immediately plunged into a bohemian landscape that included Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti; within a year he had joined the Nerves and moved to Los Angeles. That shift led to the 1979 formation of the guitardriven soul-punk band the Plimsouls; punk was the rage, bands such as X were merging its discordant sounds and unfiltered anger with Bakersfield country, and Case wanted to be part of it. The group found success with the power pop standard “A Million Miles Away,” but for reasons never fully understood, disbanded shortly thereafter. Demonstrating the resolve that would exemplify his career Case quickly rebounded. His self titled 1986 debutproduced by a then relatively unknown T Bone Burnett-remains a masterpiece of tribal folk. It included collaborations with Victoria Williams, who was at the time married to Case, along with John

Hiatt, Roger McGuinn, and a host of highly respected studio musicians. Case was among the handful of rockers who had honed his acoustic songs in clubs, helping to launch the so-called “unplugged” movement Peter Case will lay down some gritty, rootsy, Blues oriented, as well as the singer/songRock and Roll on April 10. writer explosion of the ‘90s. In 1989, he released liams, Dave Alvin, and Steve Earle. The Man With the Blue Post-Modern In 2004, Case celebrated 20 years Fragmented Neo-Traditionalist Guitar, as a solo artist (as well as a decade with again enlisting the services of such choice Vanguard) with the release of the commusicians like David Hidalgo, Ry Cooder, pilation Who’s Gonna Go Your Crooked and Benmont Tench. Mile, featuring highlights from his cataIn a 1989 Rolling Stone interview Bruce log there, as well as three new recordSpringsteen cited Case as “the songwriter ings. In 2005, the Plimsouls performed I’m listening most to these days.” That asanother series of reunion shows and sertion greatly increased Case’s visibility. remain on the touring circuit. As testiBut as is typical Case quickly shifted gears; mony to the respect he garners among for 1992’s Six-Pack of Love he ditched the his peers, 2006 saw the release of A Case folk aesthetic for something more rock-orifor Case, a three-disc, 47-track tribute ented. Unfortunately the album flopped, to Case’s songs it featured versions of as did Case’s business dealings with Geffen his songs recorded by fellow musicians Records. Richard Buckner, James McMurtry, and The following year he self-released Amy Rigby, among others. Sings Like Hell (1993), a stark collection of Ever the literate writer Case has also traditional folk songs, favorite covers, and released several books of poetry as well as originals, recorded in his living room. The a pair of spoken word albums. Followbold move earned him a new recording ing his surgery, Case returned to life and contract with Vanguard-a label much more music with renewed vigor, and released aligned with his sensibilities- for which he the raw and rocking Wig! in 2010. The recorded 1995’s Torn Again, a set of potent, Case Files, a collection of demos, outfar reaching songs reminiscent of Blue takes, live tracks and other odds and ends Guitar. drawn from Case’s solo career followed In 1996, the Plimsouls re-formed for a the next year. That Peter Case continues handful of reunion shows and a recording to turn out vital and sincere music, all session that yielded a new album. Over the the while maintaining a grueling road past decade and a half Case has remained schedule, is nothing short of miraculous. active on the acoustic scene, frequently If you’ve never had the opportunity hosting a ‘songwriters in the round’ at Santa to witness first hand his powerful singing Monica’s revived Ash Grove folk club. and playing you truly owe it to yourself Between records for Vanguard, includto do so. An artist among artists, Peter ing Full Service No Waiting (1997) and Case is truly one of a kind. Flying Saucer Blues (2000), he’s developed a musical program for the Getty Museum, performed Beatles songs with Sir George IF Martin live at the Hollywood Bowl, and YOU Peter Case and his guitar GO Wednesday, April 10 at 8 p.m. continued to release albums at a steady Tickets for this seated event are stream. In spring of 2001, he produced Avapriced at $12 advance and $15 day of lon Blues, a Grammy-nominated tribute to show. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman his childhood hero, Mississippi John Hurt, Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or featuring contributions from Lucinda Wilvisit www.thegreyeagle.com Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 17


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sound experience Jonathan Edwards’ Sunshine

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While country/folksinger Jonathan Edwards will likely be best remembered for his sprightly 1971 smash hit “Sunshine” no one song could possibly embrace the essence of his music or his lengthy career. Edwards is known as one of the industry’s “good guys”, an unassuming figure that, having had his taste of fame, chose instead to follow his muse. Born in Minnesota at the start of the post WW 2 baby boom, Edwards grew up in Virginia, immersed in the southern charm and musicality that permeates the region. While attending military school Edwards sought to counter the stiff regimentation of daily life by playing guitar and composing his own songs. After moving to Ohio to study art he became a fixture on local club stages, playing with a variety of rock, folk, and blues outfits, often in tandem with fellow students Malcolm McKinney and Joe Dolce.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

In 1967, at the height of psychedelia the three relocated to Boston, adopted the name Sugar Creek, and became a full-time blues act, issuing the 1969 LP Please Tell a Friend. Intent on returning to acoustic performing, Edwards left the group to pursue a solo career. Near the end of his initial sessions one of the finished tracks was accidentally erased so (out of desperation) Edwards quickly recorded a brand-new composition. The song was “Sunshine,” and when it was released as a single the following year, it immediately became a Top Five hit and the biggest of his career. Buoyed by his newly found success Edwards choose to explore his first musical love. 1972’s Honky-Tonk Stardust Cowboy gravitated toward straight-ahead country; however his label was at a loss as to how to market the record, and over the course of two more albums, Have a Good Time for Me (1973) and the following year’s live

Lucky Day, Edwards’ charting a new and self dealings with his label deliberate path. quickly soured. Faced After touring the with declining sales he nation with a production bought a farm in Nova of the musical Pumping Scotia and dropped out of Boys and Dinettes, Edmusic. wards joined the blueThree years later grass group the Seldom Edwards’ friend EmmyScene, issuing the 1983 lou Harris enlisted him LP Blue Ridge. Followto sing backup on her ing a 1987 children’s sophomore record, Elite record Edwards moved Hotel; the cameo resulted to Nashville; his 1989 in a new record deal and album The Natural the LP Rockin’ Chair, Thing generated the recorded with Harris’ second biggest hit of his Hot Band. Backed by career (“We Need to the same musicians Sail Be Locked Away”) and Boat arrived a year later, Edwards was again a Jonathan Edwards, Warm as summer but Edwards again found hot property. A followsunshine, real as the truth. himself at odds with the up, One Day Closer, cut throat nature of the music industry. He appeared in 1994 trailed two years later with briefly resurfaced with a 1982 live record Man in the Moon. but was willing to do so strictly on his own Since then he’s released a pair of terms: Long before it became the practiconcert albums (one recorded in Holland) cal thing to do Jonathan Edwards formed ‘Jonathan Edwards’ continued on page 19 his own label, Chronic Music, and began

WNC Jazz Profiles: Bill Gerhardt

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“Bill Gerhardt is a wonderful pianist. Not only is he a great soloist and composer, he sure knows how to accompany a singer!”

Bill was surrounded by music while growing up in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. “It was everywhere! Lessons started at nine, as was the fashion then, but I wanted to play long before that. My father turned me on to Art Tatum and Errol Garner and a friend/mentor exposed me to the entire universe of music. I quickly became interested in non-piano groups and artists like Sonny Rollins, Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane. In terms of influences, I give credit to all the great music I’ve experienced in my life.” In high school, Bill accompanied the choral program and participated in stage and marching bands. He was also a student of Herb Drury in Saint Louis for two years before attending North Texas State University. Bill’s professional career began at just fifteen playing solo piano in local restaurants, and he went on the road at age nineteen. After five years, he settled in Charlotte where he honed his writing and arranging skills. His group won the 1988 Down Beat Musicfest and Bill was recognized for his arranging talent. In 1989, he moved to Amsterdam, the Netherlands and used that as a base for the next ten years, performing through-

~ Vocalist Sheila Jordan out Europe, Africa and the Middle East. In 1999, Bill continued his career in New York City. “I wasn’t planning on moving there, but went to record with a friend from Europe. The day the session started, my sister made plans for an extended hiatus away from The City and offered me her apartment. The “band” I was recording with included Billy Higgins, George Mraz, Tom Harrell, Joe Daley, Ron Horton and Jed Levy! Pianist James Williams stopped by the session and all he could do was shake his head when I told him this was my first gig and I’d only been there three days!” Bill has performed or recorded with many diverse artists such as Sheila Jordon, Billy Hart, Dave Douglas, David Liebman, Ben Allison, Benny Bailey, Jeff Ballard, Leonard Gaskin, Francois Moutin, Tony Moreno, Idris Mohammed, Emily Remler, Roswell Rudd, Gary Thomas and Steve Wilson, among others. “In 2002, my mother passed and I relocated to Asheville to be my father’s caregiver. Around that time, I began working with young players in this area to form a non-profit organization called the Jazz Composers Forum.” Recognized as a vital mainstay of the creative community in WNC, the Forum was supported by a

18 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

Bill Gerhardt Photo: Frank Zipperer

diverse audience and enriched the lives of both musicians and listeners. “Gerhardt has a way with music that makes the listener feel as though what he’s playing is brand new to him, like something he’s just discovered for himself, while at the same time conveying a feeling that he could have played it a thousand times before. This balancing act between creative exploration and clear, melodic mastery begs for my attention and keeps me coming back for more.”

~ Bassist Mike Holstein Bill currently composes, performs and teaches privately. Creator of “How Music Works”, a practical approach to learning the theory and inner workings of music, since

EDDIE LESHURE

2007 Bill has had four releases on SteepleChase Records, plus one on Art of Life Records with drummer Tony Moreno and bassist Mike Holstein. Recognition has come via enthusiastic reviews and radio play, with both “Stained Glass” and “Thrive” from his quartet Cotangent making Bob Parlocha’s top 40 play lists. Asked about planned recordings, Bill responded, “I’m working on mixing and mastering a live compilation from Trio South with Holstein and drummer Justin Watt, plus a seven-year-old project of the January Band. It’s Brazilian-flavored music and features some great players - Eliot Wadopian, Byron Hedgepeth, Sam Macy, Aimee Sullivan, as well as Sharon LaMotte and Aaron Price doing “Metheny-esque” vocal pads. It’s a big undertaking with a lot of challenges, but it’s almost done.” Bill Gerhardt performs regularly at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse in Asheville with vocalist Rockell Scott (Wednesdays at 6:30), and Trio South (Fridays at 7). www.billgerhardt.net

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently offthe-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.


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Join Us

sound experience The Secret B Sides

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BY JAMES

May 9-12 CASSARA

The Secret B-Sides, Asheville’s most popular (voted Best of WNC two years in a row) soul band, is marking the release of their latest album, Easy Magic, with a special performance at the Highland Brewing Company.

Black Mountain, North Carolina

The CD release party, slated for April 2oth, will give the band an opportunity to premiere some new tunes while treating fans to older favorites. The album is a retrofit of last year’s EP of the same name; the The Secret B-Sides in concert Saturday, April 20. group has remixed the existing five songs and Magic from 2011’s Flowers & Chocolate. added an equal number of new ones. The Lyrically it deals with heavier subjects—poresultant effort is “forty-five minutes of lice brutality, political trickery, loneliness, groovy and psychedelic Soul stylings.” societal collapse—but the joyous groove Francisco Flores, the band’s manager, found therein somehow makes them a bit booking agent, spokesperson, and number lighter. “Flowers & Chocolate was meant to one fan, explains. “After last year’s release tempt listeners into bliss” adds Flores. “Easy party, it became obvious that the next logical Magic is meant to sustain listeners through step should be. So, instead of going harder, trial and tribulation, making life magically the B-Sides went smarter; they put the Easy easier.” Magic EP inside a mysterious black box, In addition to such local lights as Jason turned the AWESOME knob as far as it Moore, Marley Carroll, and Sidney Barnes, would go, and just like that, a five-song EP Easy Magic also hosts a different set of became a fully realized, ten-song listenguests, including Mark Burin on various ing experience. Not only did it make the guitars, Matt Smith on pedal steel guitar, original songs better, but it also added five the Common Foundation horn players, and entirely new recordings to the album.” Franklin Keel on cello. It’s a fuller sound More old-school than new, the deeper than you might expect, and one that is sure grooves and darker vibes differentiates Easy to engage the bands faithful followers. The CD release show, with opening guests Chalwa, is also an opportunity for new fans to ‘Jonathan Edwards’ continued from page 18 climb on board the Secret B-Sides express. while keeping a steady but manageable touring schedule. It’s simply not in his nature to seek stardom: He’s had his taste and clearly prefers to play intimate venues where he can see and make direct connection to his appreciative audience. Currently Edwards is touring in support of his 2011 studio album My Love Will Keep and seems entirely a man at peace with the world and his place in it. IF YOU Jonathan Edwards at the Altamont GO Theater on Friday, April 5 at 8

p.m. Ticket info (828) 348-5327. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. Or visit www.myAltamont.com

Oct 17-20

Play outdoors at LEAF’s friend-&-family festival tradition: zipline, camp, paddleboard, canoe, kick back, dance, relax with yoga in the beautiful Featured Performers Include: Mavis Staples t Steel Pulse tOzomatli tAbigail Washburn mountain Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band tOliver Mtukudzi & the Black Spirits tSolas t Papa Grows Funk camp setting. MC Yogi t Lizz Wright t Ben Sollee tHoney Island Swamp Band t Orgone & so much more!

IF YOU Secret B-Sides on the Highland GO Brewing Company’s outdoor stage

(12 Old Charlotte Hwy). This absolutely free, all ages show, takes place Saturday, April 20 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information go to www.thesecretb-sides.com

WEB EXCLUSIVE Listen to The Secret B-Sides single “Easy Magic” online right now!

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 19


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VISIT BLACK MOUNTAIN ❖ Breathtaking Views ❖ Outstanding Galleries and Studios ❖ Quaint Downtown Shopping

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BLUE to BLACK

Art Weekend May 3-5

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Formerly known as the EAST p.m. Black Mountain art venues of Asheville Studio Tour, Blue and galleries will also be open on to Black Art Weekend is now Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. twice the fun—featuring both the With the addition of several E.A.S.T. Studio Tour and the Blue new members, more than 40 to Black Art Stroll. studios, art venues, and galleries In Hand Crossing Legs I From the Blue Ridge Parkway will open their doors to the public byFace Keith Spencer by Elinor Bowman at Hwy 70 follow the corridor this spring. A variety of media is east of Asheville to explore and represented including glass, fiber, to Black Art Weekend. tour 30+ artist studios located clay, metal, photography, painting, This year the tour, founded in in Fairview, Swannanoa, all the woodworking, and more. 2006, integrates downtown Black way to Black Mountain including The route extends from the Mountain art venues and gallerRidgecrest and Cheshire Village. BLUE Ridge Parkway at Highway 70 ies which will feature works by Blue to Black Art Weekend boasts to East Asheville, Fairview, Swannanoa E.A.S.T. artists as part of the Blue the E.A.S.T. Studio Tour, now in on to BLACK Mountain, where the to Black Art Stroll all over downits 7th season, and the new Blue to event name “Blue to Black” originated. town Black Mountain and the Black Art Stroll. Both events take Large yellow and blue E.A.S.T. signs Village of Cheshire. place the weekend will easily direct you Says Macsherry, “Blue to of May 3-5. along the way to each Black Art Weekend is a terThe weekend E.A.S.T. artist studio rific opportunity for art lovers and kicks-off Friday, then on to downtown enthusiasts to come out, tour the May 3 with an Black Mountain as far studios of our E.A.S.T. artists, visit artist reception and as Ridgecrest. the many art venues and galleries of preview of featured Brochures with Black Mountain, while experiencworks from 5-9 detailed maps are ing the beauty of our region and p.m. at the historic available at AnTHM learning more about its rich artistic Monte Vista Hotel Gallery, the Monte legacy and how it’s being carried Nancy Moore and continues Vista Hotel, the Black forward.” throughout the weekend. Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber & E.A.S.T. Studio Tour hours are Visitor Center, Visions of Creation, IF Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with throughout local businesses including YOU Blue to Black Art GO Weekend is a free, open to extended hours Sunday, 11 a.m. to Asheville, greater Buncombe County, the public, self-guided art 5 p.m. (as offered per individual Hendersonville and at artist studios. tour and stroll. artist). Black Mountain art venue/ “We are proud to continue the gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. strong grassroots tradition of showFor more information visit with Open House-Artist Recepcasing area artists and their works www.bluetoblackartweekend.com, tions at each participating downthrough the E.A.S.T. Studio Tour,” or contact Cappi Macsherry at (828) 419-0049. town art venue/gallery from 5-7 said Cappi Macsherry, director of Blue

E.A.S.T. STUDIO TOUR – East of Asheville to Black Mountain BLUE TO BLACK ART STROLL – Downtown Black Mountain Let It Be Heard!

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On Saturday, May 4, from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. in downtown Black Mountain, eighteen bright red megaphones will transform the central green into a fun audio playground for young and old. Shout, speak or sing into one of these special instruments. For more information please visit www.themegaphoneproject.com.

20 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

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AnTHM Gallery

AnTHM: Arts-Thread-HandMades is an anchor of local and regional art on the east-edge of Black Mountain’s Historic Downtown District. Like a tapestry woven of fine and outsider art, artisan clothing, and handmades, AnTHM’s mission is to promote professional artists in their journey and bring the joy of their work into the lives of art lovers.

AnTHM, 100.5 W. State St., Black Mountain www.anthmgallery.com


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BLACK MOUNTAIN ❖ Quaint Downtown Shopping ❖ Outstanding Galleries and Studios

Blue to Black Art Weekend Celebration & Artist Reception

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IF YOU GO: The Monte Vista Hotel is

located at 308 W. State Street in Black Mountain, (828) 669-8870, (828) 4190049 or visit www.anthmgallery.com

ROCKS!

For more community events please visit www.exploreblackmountain.com

Strings and Threads: Art Quilts

An exhibit featuring works by Stephanie Wilds will be on display in the Black Mountain Center for the Arts Upper Gallery from Saturday, April 13 through Friday, April 26. The Center will collaborate with

the Swannanoa Valley Museum for the opening on April 13 beginning at 10 a.m. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State Street, Black Mountain, NC. Details at (828) 669-0930, or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org

Chifferobe

them home with you! We get new things every week, so stop by often to check out the latest finds. We stock cottage style country antiques and vintage items, fine art, fine crafts, and contemporary folk art by Mike Jones, an outsider artist from northern Georgia. So, join Barbie and her friends at the Chifferobe! It’s a party.

The Barbies are usually frolicking, the local crafts are sparkling, and the old things glow warmly, begging you to take

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downtown Black Mountain

A FREE WALKING TOUR

of art venues/galleries featuring areaartists in downtown Black Mtn.

A FREE SELF-GUIDED TOUR of artist studios from East Asheville, Fairview and Swannanoa all the way to historic Black Mountain and Old Fort.

ekend e W t r A ACK L B o t E BLU

Bill Boyd

Starting in May there will be 60 rocking chairs around Black Mountain painted by local artists. The event begins on May 2 with “Rock the Taste of Black Mountain” and the rocking chair unveiling. More information on the event can be found by visiting www.thelittletownthatrocks.com

When you step inside the Chifferobe you never know what you will find.

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E.A.S.T of Asheville to Black Mountain A WEEKEND CELEBRATION OF ART

The Little Town That

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Art Stroll

EAST

May 2 - 5, 2013

Friday, May 3 from 5 to 9 p.m. The evening will feature a new art collection of portraits, nudes and abstracts in both oil and watercolor, titled “Nudes and Naked Truths.” The featured artists include Nancy Moore, Keith Spencer, and Elinor Bowman, with additional paintings by Bill Boyd, Sally Sweetland and 3D works by Alan Kaufman. Enjoy “Artini” drink specials, appetizers, and live music by NPR theme composer, BJ Leiderman.

BLUE to BLACK

Chifferobe 118 D Cherry Street Black Mountain 28711 (828) 669-2743 www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

From the BLUE Ridge Parkway at HWY 70, through it’s corridor leading into BLACK Mountain, ENJOY this biannual weekend celebration of ART and artists each May and October.

THURS, MAY 2 - TASTE OF BLACK MOUNTAIN sponsored by the Black Mountain Chamber of Commerce at White Horse Black Mountain from 5:30 to 7:30pm.

FRI, MAY 3 - KICK-OFF & ARTIST RECEPTION at the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain from 5 to 9pm.

See website for art events on SAT and SUN.

visit bluetoblackartweekend.com

Black Mountain Iron Works

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CELEBRATING 20 YEARS IN BUSINESS!

Dan & Tekla opened their studio in a metal storage shed downtown Black Mountain in 1993. That metal storage shed is now a beautiful building housing Black Mountain Yoga. Every Saturday for many years they offered a free demonstration for the public on blacksmithing. Any day folks could peer into a window into the working studio from the small gallery. A gallery so small one had to stand and pivot to see all the work on the walls, floor and ceiling. The huge lawn out front displayed monumental sculptures by the couple and other area artists such as Dan Millspaugh and Bob Doster. The couple built a new studio in the year 2000 and the gallery was made bigger to include items by other iron workers, coppersmiths, potters and glass artists. In 2007 the gallery moved 36 steps out its back door to a prime location on Cherry Street. The gallery expanded again and now includes many local artists and others across the United States, all handmade in America. Dan & Tekla continue to make custom creations in steel such as gates, arbors, sculpture, lighting, tables, hearth

Dan & Tekla Photo: Donn Young Photography, www.donnyoung.com

equipment and much more. The gallery is located on Cherry Street in the heart of downtown Black Mountain, while the studio and its sculpture garden are located only a half a mile away just off East State Street on Padgettown Road. One can find large scale sculptures exhibited at the Padgettown Road location.

Black Mountain Iron Works 125 Cherry Street, Black Mountain, NC 669-1001 or 669-8999 www.BlackMountainIron.com

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WILD ABOUT WAYNESVILLE

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INTERVIEW WITH HART’S EXEC. DIRECTOR

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

of your roles with HART.

facility will be a flexible space which will have a full kitchen allowing us to do dinner theater, and cabaret as well as allow others to use the space for receptions. It will sit right beside the current theater and will seat about 160 people in a flexible space. So it will offer a very different look inside from the current theater space.

Steve S teve Lloyd: I’ve been the Executive Director of

RRM: When do you hope to have it

Steve Lloyd

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Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about each HART H ART for 23 years and am in charge of all of the day to day operations of the theater, the selection day of the season, selection of directors, establishment of schedules, and approval of additional programs and events. I also direct at least one show each year and am overseeing the capital fund drive for Stage II.

RRM: What are you most excited about HART’s 2013 season?

SL: I’m most excited about the possibilities for

finished?

SL: That depends on funding. I would hope to have it by the 2015 season. If we got very lucky with our grant requests and some large donations it could be earlier. The main thing is that we don’t want to take on a large amount of debt to make it happen. That is a dangerous thing for an arts organization to do.

get more involved with HART, either through donating time or money?

SL: They can email hart-

building and what it will offer.

SL: Stage II, which is a working

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name for the facility, will allow us to double our performance schedule and double our economic impact on the area. HART’s current economic impact is over $2.4 million dollars a year. It would obviously be a major boost to the economy of the area if we were running full time during the tourist season. The added performances would also allow us to increase staff and the number of professional acting positions we could offer. The

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RRM: How else will the new buildSL: TripAdvisor lists

RRM: How can people

RRM: Tell us a little about the new

worse to have a space that is too big than too small. Nobody wants to sit further away from the stage. ing benefit our community here in Haywood County?

our second theater space. We have a number of grant proposals out for that and are continuing to reach out to the community for support. Aside from that I will be directing “Brigadoon” a grand musical in July which also has my creative spirit engaged.

theater@gmail.com and we will connect them to our volunteer coordinator. We always need help in the Box Office, concessions, ushering and backstage. Anyone interested in running lights or sound during productions are also welcome and appreciated. To get involved with a specific production individuals just need to come by during auditions and sign up.

HART’s Exec. Director Steve Lloyd

RRM: Local architect Joe Sam Queen and builder Pat Burgin created HART’s main building the Shelton House. How involved will they be with the second building?

SL: Joe Sam Queen and his daughter

Sarah Queen are the architects for the building, so it will have a similar look and feel. Once we have funding in place we will put the project out for bids. Pat Burgin was wonderful to work with on the original theater and I would love to work with him again but that will be a decision made much later and unfortunately based on cost.

RRM: Will this new building allow

HART to offer larger productions and greater or better seating?

SL: The new space will be more inti-

mate. It will allow us to do plays and smaller scale musicals in a setting that feels more like the HART Studio. The current theater will be for the larger productions. Ideally a theater wants to perform in spaces that sell out. It is far

HART as the #1 attraction in Waynesville. One half of HART’s audience is comprised of visitors to the community. Those visitors stay over in hotels, and eat in area restaurants and tend to stay longer than other visitors. As a consequence HART’s economic impact on the community is over $2.4 million dollars each year. The new facility would double that. This facility is the key to HART’s growth into one of the major theater attractions in the Southeast and the potential benefits to Haywood County are great. HART is currently closed for 13 weeks because of the need to rehearse and mount the next production of our season. The new space will allow us to go back and forth between the two spaces and remain open with shows running the entire time.

RRM: How has HART grown over

the past ten years and where do you plan for it to be ten years from now?

SL: HART has grown into one of

the region’s most successful theater companies. We have broken box office records every year for the past five years. We have evolved into a semi-professional community theater. continued on page 25


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WAYNESVILLE INTERVIEW WITH BLACK SNEED, OWNER OF

Bogart’s Restaurant

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Bogart’s Restaurant, located in downtown Waynesville, has been long-time noted for great steaks, soups, and salads. They provide a casual family atmosphere in a rustic setting and have a menu noted for its practical value. They are located within walking distance of Waynesville’s unique shops and seasonal festival activities and within one mile of Waynesville Country Club.

INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about Bogart’s.

Bogart’s casual family atmosphere in a rustic setting.

Blake Sneed: Bogart’s

Photo: Liza Becker

Restaurant has always placed top priority on keeping our new and previous customers happy. We have just put out an updated menu with several additions made to accommodate requests that have been made over the past years.

lunch and dinner specials as well as featured items every day! We also post daily on our Facebook page with our specials and features for that day.

RRM: What’s your secret to keeping cus-

BS: The 7 oz. filet mignon is out-

tomers coming in? What have been some of your most successful promotions, and where did they originate?

BS: Our exceptional hostesses and wait

staff are friendly and truly enjoy our customers. This seems to be apparent. We treat them like family. We have daily

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RRM: What dish is your signature

dish and why that particular dish? standing and has been the favorite for years. Consistently tender, hand cut, flame-grilled to order and affordably priced. Doesn’t get any better!

RRM: By the way, what’s your favorite dish off of the menu?

BS: We have started making our own

soups and trying out some different items as specials. We’re trying to give the customers some daily variety. Just call or check Facebook to see what we have for the day. My favorite soup in particular is the chicken and dumplings and I really enjoy the Caesar wraps we have been making for Friday lunch as well.

RRM: Does Bogart’s have any specials? BS: We have hand cut Choice Angus 8 oz. Ribeyes! Served with a side of your choice, salad, and warm bread for $16.99! Friday nights, 4 p.m. until we close.

Bogart’s Restaurant 303 S. Main St. Waynesville Kathryn Mills welcomes you to Bogart’s Restaurant. Photo: Liza Becker

(828) 452-1313 www.bogartswaynesville.com

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 23


Live Music Weekly

Wine . Beer . Tapas

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Like us at Facebook.com/theclassicwineseller

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

Susan Lingg of Sylva

You gotta see it to believe it.

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Always held on the last Saturday in April, QuickDraw at Laurel Ridge Country Club inspires guests and artists alike. Imagine an event that allows you to bask in creative energy as you stroll through 36 studios in a scenic pavilion, witnessing creation in progress. QuickDraw pits artists against the clock – voluntarily – while they work in public. The event, which raises money to help art teachers connect with impact, draws people year after year to attend, paint, contribute, and support the cause of art education.

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WILD ABOUT WAYNESVILLE

Dave Stone

over a buffet, where artists meet you, their newest collector. Display your fresh, fine original work at home, with a backstory you can really brag about! QuickDraw’s fast-paced schedule includes a live demo hour (with a race-the-clock challenge), a lively art auction, and a meet-the-artists social.

So how can live creation be any good?

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ARTISTS CREATE WORKS IN AN HOUR

Live Jazz + Dinner CD Release Concert

$34.99pp before tax and gratuity. Reservations required.

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QuickDraw

Eve Haslam and Satin Steel Jazz

Saturday, April 20 at 7pm

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QuickDraw’s annual ‘art in the making’ event takes place Saturday, April 27 at Laurel Ridge Country Club in Waynesville, QuickDraw puts the fun in arts fundraising. The artists and painters displaying their “performance art” at QuickDraw provide a creative, fun, and eye-popping way you can support arts education in schools. Your art purchase at auction boosts creative teaching, enhances learning and funds college scholarships. It places the funding right where it’s needed: on the shelves of school art teachers and in college scholarships. Stroll among artists, look over the shoulders of regional titans as they build works in an hour! Picture these artists speaking on the block for your entertainment and spirited bidding. Nosh with artists

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No pressure, right? Artists step out of the studios and their comfort zones to visibly support art teaching. Artists mentally reframe how they work, joining a venue to work live, and most importantly speak up for education. Artists offer their originals at auction, donating half or more of the sale for teaching grants and scholarships through the local schools foundation. In 11 years, QuickDraw buyers funded $13,000 in college scholarships and $32K in innovative teaching projects, boosting creativity in every grade. It’s definitely audience participation. Your ticket lets you enter a ‘wow’ experience, great food and fun in a spectacular setting. Buying original QuickDraw art that you saw birthed is a do-good experience, and an education in itself. You’ll come back year after year for the fun, and a fresh piece of art for your life and work. Bring your checkbook, and come early so you don’t miss a minute of the amazing live art hour!

Easels Old and New QuickDraw showcases favorite artists you’ll want to see, and new ones to discover, keeping it fun and fresh for repeat visitors. You’ll find QuickDraw favorites, with proven success at raising funds for education with their regional presence, crowd-pleasing abilities and enthusiasm. (Ann

Mark Menendez

Vasilik, Teresa Pennington, Jon Houglum, Sarah Sneeden, Bob Martin, Pamela Haddock) New artists contribute with portfolio, medium, and event appeal.

The Medium is the Message Stroll along to find watercolor, oil, acrylic, pastel, colored pencil, sumi-e inks, metal, clay, wood, stained glass, textiles, mixed media, collage, fiber, glass, jewelry. Brave “clock-challenge” live artists challenge themselves to finish in the sixty-minute window. Without the luxury to second-guess, they work by pure instinct and inspiration, for a fresh, pared-down piece. Artists using other media create at a relaxed pace, allowing you to chat. These less-driven demonstrators offer at silent auction a finished original work for your bids while you stroll. After the live quickdraw hour and a stop to mat and frame, artists describe their works on the block for your spirited bidding. Afterward, chat with relieved and relaxed artists over hors d’oeuvres at table. IF YOU QuickDraw, Saturday, GO April 27 from 4:30 until

9:30 p.m. Come to relax, get your auction number, and drink in the view. Tickets are $50 and include the QuickDraw live art hour, social, auction registration, and meet-the-artists buffet. For event schedule, participating artists and ticket outlets, visit www.WNCQuickDraw.com. For more information, call (828) 734-8098.


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WAYNESVILLE Eve Haslam & Satin Steel Jazz

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CD RELEASE CONCERT AT THE CLASSIC WINESELLER

The Classic Wineseller is proud to present the CD Release concert for jazz vocalist Eve Haslam & Satin S atin Steel Jazz with Brian Felix, piano; Zack Page, bass; and special guest, George Clifford, flute and saxophone, on Saturday, April 20 at 7 p.m. The evening includes a delicious dinner prepared in the Classic Wineseller’s kitchen, and music that includes Bossa Nova, original compositions, and classics from A Thousand Years Ago, the group’s first debut album. The per person price is $34.99 plus tax and gratuity. Call (828) 452-6000 to reserve your table or email requests to info@classicwineseller. com. Seating is limited. Haslam’s vocal styles are influenced by Sarah Vaughan, Diane Schuur, Anita O’Day, Elis Regina, Gal Costa, Flora Purim, Nancy Wilson, and Keely Smith. Brian Felix is a Professor of Jazz and Popular Music at the University of North Carolina-Asheville.

‘HART’ continued from page 22

We host the Haywood County Farmer’s Market, and the AARP Free Tax Service, as well as events by other organizations. I want HART to become one of the Southeast’s major theater companies, a destination for people visiting Western North Carolina.

BY

KAY S. MILLER

Zack Page is a regular on the jazz scene in western North Carolina, performing with a variety of groups including Asheville’s hot gypsy jazz group, One Leg Up. The Classic Wineseller presents the area’s best jazz artists up close and personal in a unique, intimate setting. For more information about live jazz and other special events at the Classic Wineseller visit www. classicwineseller.com or at facebook. com/theclassicwineseller. IF YOU Eve Haslam & Satin Steel GO Jazz, Saturday, April 20

at 7 p.m. at The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street in Waynesville. Call (828) 452-6000 to make reservations or email info@ classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited.

Haywood Spay and Neuter, REACH, Haywood Christian Ministries, the American Cancer Society, and many more. You name the cause and we have probably donated tickets or proceeds from special performances, or donated time and materials. HART is far more than just a theater, it is a key to the pursuit of dreams for many, a doorway to a career for some, an economic asset for all. HART’s main stage performances are in the James Auditorium, a 255seat traditional proscenium space that operates April through November. In the winter, productions shift to the 75-seat Feichter Studio Theatre for a second season of more experimental work. Auditions for HART productions are open to the public, and they are always eager to welcome new faces.

Rendering of HART’s new Stage II.

RRM: How else does HART directly benefit Haywood County besides offering great entertainment?

SL: HART works with the community,

offering high school internships and college apprenticeships. HART also supports fund raising events to benefit SARGES,

Haywood Arts Regional Theatre 250 Pigeon Street, Waynesville, NC

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Hitch Your

Wagon TO A

Star Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine I advertise in Rapid River Magazine because of its focus on local arts and culture. Rapid River works with me to get the type of exposure I need for my art based business. ~ Andrew Montrie, Updraft Gallery

Box Office (828) 456-6322 www.harttheatre.com harttheater@gmail.com

(828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 25


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fine arts & crafts

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Handcrafted and Heartfelt

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Join us for the First Annual Southern Highland Craft Guild Auction, Handcrafted and Heartfelt, Saturday, May 4 at the Folk Art Center. Enjoy silent and live auctions, hot hors-d’oeuvres by Marta’s Catering of Asheville, and live music. Event services will be provided by Royston Auctions of Knoxville, TN. The event provides an opportunity to bid on one of a kind crafts made by members of the Southern Highland Craft Guild with proceeds going to benefit educational programs and the Guild’s Permanent Collection. Tickets for the evening are $75 each or $125 for couples. All Auction Shaker Oval Quilt Tray by Jeff Neil items up for bid are featured in an online gallery at www.craftguild.org. The Guild has maintained a permanent collection since 1938. It is comprised of over 4600 artworks and artifacts that date from the late 19th century to present day. Collecting is focused upon American decorative art and craft, especially from the southern Appalachian region. The Folk Art Center has a selection of pieces on display in the exhibition, Craft Traditions: The SHCG Collection. The 200 artworks in the show are arranged thematically to reveal the collections strengths in textiles, furniture, basketry, woodcarvings and dolls. Areas devoted to native materials and modernism show the collection’s range from rural handcrafts to interior design. With funds raised from Handcrafted and Heartfelt the Guild hopes to have the entire permanent collection appraised to achieve museum status, and find ways to present more of the collection in traveling exhibitions and in the Southern Highland Craft Guild shops.

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IF YOU Southern GO Highland

Craft Guild Auction, Handcrafted and Heartfelt, Saturday, May 4 from 5 to 8 p.m. To purchase tickets call the Folk Art Center at (828) 298-7928. The Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 entrance in east Asheville. For more information call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

Christine Kosiba

Blue Ridge Watermedia Society Exhibit

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APRIL 10-27 AT GALLERY 86, WAYNESVILLE

The Haywood County Arts Council opens a show by the Blue Ridge Watermedia Society on Wednesday, April 10, at Gallery 86 in Waynesville. The exhibit features work by Radiant Poppy by Mary Decker members of the Blue Ridge Watermedia Society, a group with more than 100 members. Participating artists include: Wendy Cordwell, Nick DePaolo, Tracy Palmer, Carolyn Taylor, Joseph Honings, Lolly Krieder, Mary Reida, Lynne Wortmann, Peggy Duncan, and Mary Decker. The Blue Ridge Watermedia Society group has grown steadily since it was organized in the early 1990s. Meetings of the Blue Ridge Watermedia Society take place at 6:45pm on the second Tuesday of the month at the Haywood Lynne Wortman Community College’s Continuing Art & Education Building. Members paint in a variety of media, not just watercolor as the name suggests. Members share tips and experiences, and local artists provide demonstrations and teach workshops of which members can take advantage.

IF YOU GO: Blue Ridge Watermedia Society Artist’s

Reception, Friday, April 12 from 6-8 p.m. at Gallery 86, 86 N. Main Street, Waynesville, NC. On display Wednesday, April 10 through Saturday, April 27, 2013. For more information visit www.haywoodarts.org


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artful living

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Life Open-Hand

“Problems cannot be solved with the same consciousness that created the problems.” ~ Albert Einstein Zen teaches us to release grasping, to live life with a metaphorical open-hand. Of course it is also speaking of an open-mind, a non-grasping-mind. Unfortunately, the truth is that we live with grasping hands and minds, that is, hands and minds that are always trying to grasp on to and close around what will complete the experience of life for us because our society and our religions have taught us that we are not enough and haven’t the capacity to be enough. Because of this, we are caught, trapped, living in a limited sense of who we are and what is possible. We are always trying to close our hand and our mind around “things,” material and conceptual, and we are always looking for a material and conceptual amount that will be enough, but there never is an amount that satisfies. So we mindlessly grasp for more and more and more. Buddhism identifies this as “egoic delusion” and the cause of human suffering. We believe that if we can get some hypothetical amount from Life that will be what we need and want, closing our hand and mind around it, we will be enough, we will be OK, but this hypothetical amount is limitless, so we are never OK.

A far richer life becomes available when we open our hands and minds. We believe in this grasping and acquiring approach to life because our culture teaches us to believe that form – objects and ideas, even very abstract ideas such as religion, politics, economics, nations and class structures – are all that exist. We are unable to understand that a far richer life becomes available when we open our hands and minds to the unlimited possibility of a life of infinite connection, within which occurs the limited forms of our material existence. What we must realize is that we are much more than our bodies, our minds, and our circumstances. We must realize that, likewise, the extensions and expansions of our hands and minds that are our families, associations, societies, institutions and their products will not fulfill us. Even our closest relationships, which while having the potential to bring us closer to fulfillment, still leave us unsatisfied when they are modeled on this culture of expectation, acquisition and possession. We can only be fulfilled by realizing we are simultaneously this individual human-being with its affiliations, and we are

the great organism that is humanity, and the great organism that is this planet, and ultimately, the infinite Universe manifesting into the form of a human-being that has hands, a mind, affiliations and context for the purpose of engaging the finite world existing within the infinite complex oneness of the Universe. This is the non-dualistic consciousness that can bring harmony in our material existence and a vast mental and spiritual peace that realizes the truth of our multi-dimensional existence. This is the consciousness of quantum unity that Einstein was suggesting as needed to address the problems facing humanity that have been created by a human society constructed on the consciousness of separateness. We must realize that we are this infinite complex oneness manifested finitely. To have a long, quality future, humanity must come to this realization. Another way of expressing this concept is found in an important article/interview by Naomi Klein in the spring edition of Yes! magazine, entitled Dancing the World into Being. In this piece, she interviews writer, spoken-word-artist, and indigenous activist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, who speaks of the colonialist consciousness that has ruled over the Americas and most of the world for the last 400 years she calls “extractivism,” and this consciousness views all that is in and of the world as resources for extraction to make more wealth. “Colonialism and capitalism are based on extracting and assimilating,” says Simpson. Among her points is that everything of the indigenous American world has been and continues to be extracted and assimilated. There is no true valuing or experiencing of the ecology that was the Native American world, rather, only parts of it are extracted as resources and assimilated for whatever value they may have to the dominant culture, and so what true value there is in its wisdom for today’s world cannot be fully appreciated or applied. She goes on to say “the act of extraction removes all relationships that give whatever is being extracted meaning. Extracting is taking. Actually extracting is stealing – it is taking without consent, without thought, care

BY

BILL WALZ

or even knowledge of the impacts that extraction has on the other living things in that environment.” She makes the point quite clearly of how devastating this mindset has been on indigenous peoples, on the Earth’s plant and animal life and on the land we inhabit, but even more, how devastating this mindset is for all of modern society, bringing us to the brink of collapse, and we are unable to sufficiently escape its grip, to do anything meaningful about this coming apocalypse because our limited consciousness keeps us blind and in denial. As an alternative, she recommends the consciousness of the native peoples before assimilation. She recommends the consciousness of “the seventh generation,” the long view into the future that holds responsibility for decisions as they will affect seven generations. Short-term exploitive profit can never be an acceptable basis for decisionmaking from this consciousness. She recommends “responsibility… Because I think when people extract things, they’re taking and running and they’re using it just for their own good. What’s missing is the responsibility. If you’re not developing relationships (with people, the land, the animal and plant life, the very Earth that sustains you) you’re not giving back… “We’re talking about… a resurgence of indigenous political thought… a concept that’s very fundamental to (indigenous) society called mino bimaadiziwin. It often gets translated as ‘the good life,’ but the deeper kind of cultural, conceptual meaning… translated as ‘continuous rebirth’… “The purpose of life then is this continuous rebirth, it’s to promote life… how to interact with each other and family, how to interact with your children, how to interact with the land… how those communities and how those nations should also interact… You don’t develop as much as Mother Earth can handle. For us it’s the opposite. You think about how much you can give up to promote more life.” Leanne Simpson is a voice channeled from a lost past speaking to us in the present about our future, and about the choices we have for the quality of our present and our future. She is talking about a consciousness that sees the truth of human existence on this limited planet we share with all communities and nations, including the com-

Short-term exploitive profit can never be an acceptable basis for decision-making. munities of plant and animal, even mineral life. It is a consciousness of open-hand, one that emphasizes giving rather than taking as the best value system for humans and their societies. She is absolutely talking about a consciousness that can contribute much to the solving of our problems. We must realize an openness of mind, hand and heart such as America’s indigenous peoples lived within — and that modern Buddhism speaks for today. We must realize that what we are is infinitely intelligent awareness, the non-form dimension of experience that is not subject to the conditions or conditioning of the consciousness that created our problems. We must realize that we are that which holds the infinite complex oneness in vast openness and allows us to see the world as it actually is, a vast interconnected and intercontinued on page 37

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 27


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Last week on Friday, the Curmudgeon came into the General Store, and greeted Mr and Mrs Storekeep, their daughter Tiffinie, not to mention Newsman, Milkman, and arranging greeting cards, the new agent from Atlanta Greetings. “Curmudge,” they said, “where’ve you been?” “I flew off to Zanesville, Ohio, to visit my niece and nephew, who own and operate and old-time soda parlor just a few blocks from the Y-Bridge.” “The Y-Bridge?” “Yep, Amelia Earhart once remarked that the easiest small town in American to recognize in a fly-over was Zanesville, because they have a Y-shaped bridge that allows the driver to head for the other bank of the river, and in mid-stream face a stop-light that enables you to go left or right—but speaking of flying is why I am so disgruntled today.” “What happened?” “Well, in order to get to Zanesville you have to walk from West Virginia or fly to Charlotte from Asheville, then take another flight to Columbus, Ohio, then be picked up at the airport by a willing family member. “First in the Asheville Airport, you must check in with the automatic agent, find out that you are allowed one purse or briefcase plus one item of luggage suitably fitting in the overheads with each extra bag costing $25—then it’s off through security—and remember you must remove your boots or shoes, your belt buckle and the rest of your metallic person with no place to sit down and make the effort. I was wearing boots with steel shanks but Asheville isn’t like any city in Texas, where you can go through security without removing boots.

BY

PETER LOEWER

But allow me to add that in a few weeks you will be able to bring on small knives. Illustration by Peter Loewer “Next in the waiting area a lady with a great deal of hair, announces that the fight to Charlotte is now loading beginning with—oh, and she also announces that today you can leave your bag outside the door before boarding if you attach a label—” “Whereupon a passenger asked: ‘How come?’ and she explained ‘Because this is a full flight and there will not be enough storage space in the overheads.’ “So with a lot of too-ing and fro-ing, bags are tagged and the lady then says they will now load women with small children, and any of our award-wining flyers, and members of the armed forces in uniform. This is followed by a lot of activity. “Next she announces that they are now loading Zone One and Zone Two passengers plus all ticked passengers who have divorced in the past five years and everybody who likes muffins.” “Muffin-lovers and recently divorced?” asked Mrs. Storekeep. “Well, I jest,” said the Curmudgeon, “but I think you get the general idea— “Next the announcing lady welcomed aboard, Visa and Master-Charger holders plus Zone Three and Four. I swear it took over twenty-five minutes before we were ready to taxi out to the field. “Then when I got to Gate E-34 in Charlotte it was over a mile walk, carrying my luggage, to get to Gate C-38 for the flight to Columbus. Then at Gate C-38 we go through the same boarding routine as in Asheville and upon arriving in Columbus it was to find the landscape looking like midJanuary and it was snowing—” “So?” they all asked. “Zanesville was great but coming back to Asheville, because they have cut back in flights, it’s the routine starting with security and ending with the same boarding procedure and this time, allow me to tell you all again about passengers who cough with their mouths open and project diseased phlegm droplets throughout the cabins. Gang, it’s Disease City and as I speak I can feel the fever coming on so it’s home to some honey, scotch, and chamomile tea.” After Curmudgeon left the store, silence reined but finally Mr. Storekeep said: “I suspect he’s correct; until something is done, if you can drive, do so—” Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

28 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

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southern comfort

COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Governor, Do Not Close Our Historic Sites

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Republican governor Pat McCrory is making a dire mistake closing historic sites in western North Carolina. Clearly these decisions are not being made with sober thinking or considerations about the locations. The news that the Vance Birthplace is on the list of closings is absurd. What about the numbers of elementary students who learn the history of the mountains there? And, do not forget the visitors and others who come to this area in summer. The old historic farm that gives youngsters a peek into early homestead living in western North Carolina is beautiful in spring, summer and fall, and a perfect place for a family picnic.

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

There are other ways to cut the budget, Governor.

earth” that closing these facilities will help the economy or the budget in Raleigh. I say prove it, if these plans go through. Just tell us, Governor, in plain words, just how much closing these places will cut costs. Prove it! It makes no sense, in my opinion. Over the years I have spent in North Carolina writing and reporting the news, I have done a number of feature pieces for news outlets and magazines about the Vance Birthplace, and most of us have many photos of the historic farm. It will be a sad commentary if the historic sites in North Carolina are closed. Or is it more of the “old tricks” that I heard when I lived in Durham and worked in Raleigh years ago. No one down there knows a lot about living in these mountains. Western North Carolina is not mentioned much out East, ’cause if they knew more about Drawing by author/artist Lee Pantas, the wonderful places where we www.ashevilleguidebook.com, live in and around Asheville, www.cherryorchardstudio.com places we call home, they would change their minds. Former governor Beverly Purdue loved The site is only five miles from western North Carolina and visited here Weaverville on Reems Creek Road, often during her time in Raleigh. I am not and ideal for families who do not at convinced that McCrory cares that much this time have the means to take trips about our part of this state. I hope he will with their families out of town. change his stance and leave our historic What if it had been the Wolfe sites alone. There are other ways to cut the House in Asheville or some other budget, Governor. historic site in our midst? What would have happened? I can hear the loud voices now if that were to happen. The community spokesman in Old Fort is correct in saying that closWriter Judy Ausley ing the museums there will hurt that has been a reporter town’s shrinking economy. It will also with newspapers cut traffic from tourists visiting the in NC for 40 years. mountains in summer. Visitors who She retired in 2005 otherwise would have stopped to learn and continues to freelance at her more about the history of this area. home in Asheville. She can be contacted I would suggest the governor by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. close the gift shop at Vance Birthplace instead of locking the gates. Perhaps If you know a character in Asheville who cutting hours of those tending the has not had a conventional life, put them museums in Old Fort would be better in touch with Judy for an article in this than closing the entire facility down. column, Southern Comfort. There is no way on “God’s green


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

Monthly Reel

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For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Hello dear readers, we’ve got an interesting array of offerings this month and an even more interesting array of offerings on the horizon. At press time, The Great and Powerful Oz has held the top spot at the box office for the last two weeks. Meanwhile Emperor has received next to no promotion and has been quietly playing to small crowds for a couple of weeks at The Carolina Asheville. Out in limited release, but not yet here in Western North Carolina, is Ginger & Rosa, a coming of age film of two young women in early 1960’s England. This too is bound to be a little known, short run title in Asheville. Be on the lookout for it at either the Fine Arts Theatre or the Carolina Asheville. One of our most interesting takes this month was Stoker Stoker, the latest film from Chan-wook Park. It’s a chilling, but visually lush, psychological thriller. Also of note this month is the Israeli Palestinian Conflict Film Series with The Gatekeepers April 4 at 7 p.m. at The Fine Arts Theatre and 5 Broken Cameras April 18 at 7 p.m. at Alumni Hall on the UNCA campus. The Asheville Jewish Film Festival will kick off this month on April 25 at The Fine Arts Theatre with a screening of Hava Nagilia. Details for this festival are coming soon at the Fine Arts Theatre web site.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Dead Man Down ∑∑∑ Short Take: This modern attempt at a film noir is a real train wreck of a movie and yet another example that a big budget and a high powered cast do not guarantee success.

REEL TAKE: It no longer comes as a

psychological warfare to determine Emperor Hirohito’s fate.

REEL TAKE: General Douglas MacArthur

would not have approved with the lack of fanfare and publicity surrounding the release of Peter Webber’s Emperor Emperor. In this instance I would quite agree with him. Emperor is a fine film that has been met with mixed reviews and very little promotion. At press time it has been quietly playing for a couple of weeks at the Carolina Asheville. Word of mouth seems to be the only thing keeping it there; though for how much longer I cannot say. Emperor takes place in U.S. occupied Japan just after Emperor Hirohito (Takataro Kataoka) surrendered. General MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) is the de facto ruler charged with leading the rebuilding of Japan and deciding the fate of Japan’s beloved emperor. To aid him in the latter, he enlists the assistance of a General Bonner Fellers, an expert on Japanese culture and psychological warfare, to lead the investigation to determine Hirohito’s culpability in the war. Fellers has ten days to execute the mission and make his recommendation to MacArthur.

surprise when a foreign director comes off a highly acclaimed small film only to be derailed by a big budget and the “Hollywood” treatment. Danish director Neils Arden Oplev becomes the latest victim with Dead Man Down, his highly anticiNoomi Rapace and Colin Farrell both want revenge but on different people in the convoluted pated follow-up to the Millenium trilogy thriller Dead Man Down. of which the original The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is the best known. Nothing is more frustrating than realizing Dead Man Down has everything that what could have been. money can buy, a first rate cast, glossy cinFilm noir is meant to be a brutal genre ematography, ominous symphonic music, and here Dead Man Down doesn’t disapand a number of high octane set pieces that point. Most of the really violent sequences are truly impressive. What it doesn’t have are highlighted in the trailer in order to get is a coherent storyline or a good enough the people interested in that sort of thing into screenplay to cover up that fact. Plot coherthe theater. However you need to have more ency has never been a strong suit in film than that if you’re going to make more than noir (just look at 1946’s The Big Sleep) but a temporary impression. The fact that Dead trying to keep up with Dead Man Down Man Down dropped out of the box office is downright wearisome because director Top 10 after only one week tells Oplev WANTS you to follow it and that you all you need to know. makes it all the harder. The chances are good that For the record it goes something like this film may be out on DVD this. Victor (Colin Farrell) wants revenge on before you finish reading this Alphonse (Terrence Howard) for causing review (just kidding!). When it the deaths of his family. Beatrice (Noomi does come out you may want Rapace) wants revenge on the man who to give it a try, especially if you disfigured her. After watching Victor kill are a fan of the leading players someone (and capturing it on video), she or just enjoy the film noir genre blackmails him into helping her. Victor’s like I do. Others should think plan is to get two rival gangs (including about renting something else Howard’s) to do each other in a la A Fistful unless you enjoy obtuseness for of Dollars but then there’s Rapace to deal its own sake. with and that’s just the beginning. The performances by the principals Rated R for violence, language throughout and a scene of sexuality. range from intense (Farrell) to uneven (Rapace) to having a good time (Howard). REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN Tommy Lee Jones as General MacArthur decides Emperor Hirohito’s fate with a little help from Matthew Fox as Isabelle Huppert and Dominic Cooper both General Bonner Fellers in the WWII drama Emperor. wind up bringing much needed support and Emperor ∑∑∑∑ there are brief appearances from old pros F. Short Take: When General Adding to his burdens is his anxious search Murray Abraham and Armand Assante that Douglas MacArthur finds himself for a Japanese woman (Eriko Hatsune) he leave you wanting more but in the end you as Supreme Commander of US loved before the war, the woman who first wind up being disappointed. Bad movies are occupied Japan in the wake of Japan’s brought him to Japan. one thing but missed opportunities, or in surrender, he enlists the help of this case blown opportunities, are another. an expert on Japanese culture and ‘Movies’ continued on page 30

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Most people, or at least most people over a certain age, know that Hirohito lives, so that’s not what holds the suspense here. The intrigue comes in learning about this little known investigation and how they get to Hirohito. The task is grim and the proceedings deadly serious, but it is balanced out by Jones’ colorful portrayal of MacArthur (and ‘good old fashioned American swagger’) as well as by the secondary plotline. As Fellers works day and night on the Hirohito investigation, the story is peppered with flashbacks to his relationship with Aya which in turn dovetail back to his current search to learn if she survived the war. The flashbacks serve the story well on several levels, not the least of which is to illustrate the stark contrast between pre-war Japan and post atomic bomb Japan. This difference is important to both General Fellers, and General MacArthur. I have read criticisms of this secondary plot in several reviews. It’s not a Rick and Ilsa love story by any stretch of the imagination, but whatever your opinion of it, this sub-story (albeit a fiction) is integral to creating cultural understanding and empathy and compliments the historical events.

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Webber takes a very simple approach to a very complicated story. The film has an old fashion style and sensibility befitting the era in which it takes place. To this end, Fox cuts quite an old school leading man – sort of Henry Fonda meets Dana Andrews. He does a good job, but there is an uneasiness to Fox that gives him a slightly constipated look during some of his most serious efforts. Jones on the other hand did nothing more to look like MacArthur than don a pair of aviator glasses and a corncob pipe and hit the nail on the head. He inhabits the character with an easy zeal, culminating in the famous meeting between MacArthur and Hirohito. At the time, the American public and American politicians wanted Emperor Hirohito punished regardless of whether he had anything to do with Pearl Harbor or not. Emperor makes one glad calmer heads and cultural understanding prevailed.

peace. As the cold war casts a shadow over their lives, the crumbling relationship between Ginger’s parents also threatens life as they know it. The girls rebel against their mothers, while they gravitate to Ginger’s father, Roland (Alessandro Nivola). Roland is a progressive pacifist and, to the girls, he cuts quite the romantic figure. Roland encourages Ginger’s activism while Rosa’s interest in him becomes something altogether different. This of course brings a new level of strife to their young lives. Carnival magician Oz (James Franco), a flying Ginger finds solace with ‘the Marks’ a monkey, and a china doll head for the Emerald City gay couple both named Mark (Timoin Oz the Great & Powerful. thy Spall and Oliver Platt) as well as their poet friend Bella (Annette Benwasn’t a hit when first released) but also ing). As emotions collide and relationships knew that there was a whole series of Oz whither Ginger struggles to find her place in books. Once I got into the study of silent the world. movies, I discovered that there were several The script is solid but not great. It’s silent Oz films some of them were even Potter’s grasp on the nuances of emotion produced by L. Frank Baum himself. Rated PG-13 for violent content, brief strong that extracts wonderful performances from language and smoking (historical). On consideration, it makes economic her actors and draws the audience in. Their sense at this time to do a new Oz film. Not REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN is an ache at the heart of this film, but it’s only is the original approaching its 75th an ache that holds both pain and hope, the anniversary next year but the Broadway Ginger & Rosa ∑∑∑∑ pitfalls of life and the opportunities of life. musical Wicked is still selling out shows Short Take: A coming-of-age story Elle Fannning, who isn’t even as old as months in advance. Both play a large part in of two young women in early 1960’s her character in this film gives a luminous this Disney endeavor which was directed by England. performance, filled with idealism, Spiderman alumnus Sam Raimi. angst, hurt and innocence. NewLike the 1939 film, Oz opens up in comer Alice Englert is lusty and almost black & white and in the old pre-widescreen tragic as the firey and fatherless Rosa. 1939 aspect ratio and like the original, once Madmen’s Christina Hendricks turns we arrive in Oz the film turns to color and in a terrific performance as Ginger’s becomes fully widescreen. We are then defeated mother, while Nivola is spot introduced to some characters that we are alon as politically progressive but incredready familiar with and some that we aren’t. ibly narcisitica Roland. Spall, Platt and But first, let’s back up a little. Bening do not have big parts, but are Carnival magician Oscar Diggs, known simply nice to have around and offer a as Oz the Great & Powerful (James Franco), wonderful flavor of the time. is whisked away in a balloon by a cyclone Like another recent coming of age and arrives in the fairy tale land of Oz where movie, The Perks of Being a Wallhis coming has been foretold and eagerly flower Ginger & Rosa is not a great flower, anticipated. Theodora (Mila Kunis), a witch, Elle Fanning and Alice Englert are Ginger & Rosa, movie or an important movie, but it is along with a flying monkey named Finley BFF’s forever until life, love and the Cold War a captivating little film. It may also be threaten to tear them apart. (Zach Braff) welcome him and escort him Potter’s most wholey vulnerable and to the Emerald City. The city is currently approachable film to date, and I prefer REEL TAKE: Sally Potter’s Ginger & Rosa is ruled by Theodora’s sister, Evanoria (Rait to her other work. Ginger & Rosa is one a smart, emotionally elegant coming of age chel Weisz) who tells Oz that he must kill of those films that will likely come and go story in early 1960’s England. Born in Lonanother witch Glinda (Michelle Williams) quite quickly and quietly, so watch for it if it don in 1945 in the same hospital at the same before he can claim the throne. sounds like your cup of tea. time, Ginger (Elle Fanning) and Rosa (Alice However things are not what they seem Englert) are best friends from day one. as we already know that Glinda is a good Rated PG-13 for mature disturbing thematic Ginger’s mother (Christina Hendricks) is material involving teen choices – sexuality, witch. It turns out that Evanora is the evil young artist-turned-homemaker, while her drinking, smoking, and for language. one and she turns her sister Theodora into father is a forward thinking, young profesthe Wicked Witch of the West. This sets up REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN sor. Rosa is born to a working class Catholic a final Battle Royale for the Emerald City. family – her mother (Jodhi May), a cleanGive credit to Sam Raimi and company Oz the Great & Powerful ∑∑∑∑ ing lady after her father exits the picture. for coming up with an ending that is quite Short Take: $200 million dollar Disney The girls do everything together and share clever as well as spectacular. prequel to The Wizard of Oz is an everything together. The technical wizards at Disney have engaging film for the whole family By 1962 they are young women, keen come up with a visually ravishing CGI Oz despite a less than stellar performance for grown up adventure. They talk life, that looks like a cross between a Maxfield from James Franco. love, politics and the bomb. Ginger has the Parrish painting and the famous Disney REEL TAKE: I’m of the generation that not soul of a poet and is moved by the ‘Bancartoon Flowers and Trees (1932). I’ve only grew up the annual TV showings of the—Bomb’ movement, while Rosa is more the classic 1939 The Wizard of Oz (which attracted to carnal desires than a desire for ‘Movies’ continued on page 31

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grown rather tired of CGI backgrounds which have robbed movies of the “how did they do that” factor but here the visuals are justified and quickly become part of the cinematic landscape. The performances by the three female leads are first class and give the movie a much needed boost from the bland goings on of James Franco. To be fair, the character of Oz is meant to be unmemorable compared to the others and in that regard, Franco succeeds admirably. Although Oz is longer than it needs to be, it’s makes for an ideal family film. Just save your money and skip the 3-D; it’s unnecessary to the enjoyment of the film. Rated PG for action sequences, scary images, and brief mild language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Phantom ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Retiring Russian submarine commander is sent on one last mission only to have his ship taken over by rogue elements who threaten to start World War III.

REEL TAKE: Phantom is an interesting

throwback to the low budget, performance driven movies of not that long ago. Also like those films it doesn’t overstay its welcome clocking in at just over 90 minutes. It says what it has to say, does what it has to do and then it’s over. Good old fashioned disposable entertainment of the best kind. As the plot synopsis above shows, there’s really nothing new here. Phantom reminded me of quite a few movies that I’ve seen before including Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1960), Ice Station Zebra (1968), and especially The Hunt for Red October (1990). Nevertheless within the first 15

Russian submarine commander Ed Harris has one last mission to undertake before he can retire in Phantom.

acting is solid, the story is interesting, the photography is good, the music is effective, what more do you need? Thanks to the negative reviews, the film came and left Asheville in just one week’s time and this was at three different locations. Part of that reason is that despite the cast and the action-adventure subject matter, Phantom is essentially an independent film with a small budget and no major studio backing so it doesn’t have the clout to stick around and build a word-of-mouth audience. I’m sure that the DVD release is only a few weeks away and when that happens, take advantage of it. Phantom is not a great movie and isn’t trying to be. Being good, solid entertainment is more than enough and should be worth something.

minutes I was interested and thanks to the no frills look of the film and the solid cast, the movie went by all too quickly. Rated R for violence. A worn out naval captain (Ed Harris) is hurriedly dispatched on one last mission to REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN “honor” the retiring of one of the Russian fleet’s oldest subs before it’s sold to the Chinese. Along for the ride is a KGB officer (David Duchovny in a surprisingly effective performance) who, it turns out, has a mission of his own. Suddenly Harris begins to have cryptic visions of disaster (similar to a famous Twilight Zone episode “The 30 Fathom Grave”) and these things come to pass. One of the biggest criticisms leveled against the film is that no one in the cast speaks with a Russian accent. Puh-leez! Speaking with an accent wouldn’t make it more authentic and a bad Russian accent would only deMia Wasikowska and Matthew Goode give tract from the story. Oh for the days dysfunctional family new meaning in Stoker. when a title card said it was Casablanca and that’s all that was needed. Stoker ∑∑∑∑ In fact the film has come in for more Short Take: After the death of his than its fair share of criticism (it has a 38% brother, a mysterious man moves in rating on Rotten Tomatoes) on many fronts with his late brother’s family and both and, frankly, I just don’t understand it. The mother and daughter are strangely attracted to this long lost relative.

Wild & Scenic Film Festival

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The Western North Carolina Alliance invites the community to the 2013 Wild & Scenic Film Festival, featuring a selection of 14 short films that put our work and yyour our into the broader environmental and social context aand nd serve to remind us that we are participants in a global movement for a more wild and scenic world. movement April 4 from 7-10 p.m. at the Fine Arts Theatre in downtown Asheville. Free raffle ticket with entry, door prizes, food and drinks available for purchase, speakers. Raffle prizes include rafting trips, CSA shares and more! Tickets: Students $6; General public $10 (includes general admission ticket and raffle entry) WNCA special membership offer: Students $10; General public $25 (includes general admission ticket, raffle entry and one year membership to WNCA) Tickets will be available at the door but may also be purchased online at www. wnca.org, where you can also view trailers of some of the films we’ll share at the 2013 Wild & Scenic Film Festival. Learn more at www.wildandscenicfilmfestival.org.

REEL TAKE: The title of this film evokes

Vampiric images, and while Stoker has nothing to do with Dracula, it does have a gothic novel-like sensibility. Stoker is a wonderfully stylized and chilling story of family dysfunctionality – talk about skeletons in the closet! Influenced by Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt Doubt, South Korean director Chan-wook Park has a field day with actor Wentworth Miller’s dark web of a screenplay. The story revolves around India (Mia Wasikowska), an odd, saddle shoe wearing loner from a privileged home. She doesn’t like to be touched and she sees and hears what other people don’t. When her beloved father (Dermot Mulroney) dies in a car accident, an uncle (Matthew Goode) she never knew existed comes to live with her and her vapid mother Evelyn (Nicole ‘Movies’ continued on page 32

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special membersonly events and screenings. April 2:

Torrid Zone

(1940) Plagued by revolutionaries that harass his plantation in a banana republic, fruit company exec Steve Case rehires former nemesis Nick Butler to restore order and profits. Stars James Cagney, Ann Sheridan and Pat O’Brien. Directed by William Keighley April 9:

Shallow Grave

(1994) Three friends discover their new flatmate dead but loaded with cash. Stars Kerry Fox, Christopher Eccelston and Ewan. Directed by Danny Boyle April 16:

Lawyer Man

(1932) Idealistic attorney Anton Adam makes headlines when he successfully prosecutes a prominent New York racketeer named Gilmurry. Stars William Powell, Joan Blondell and David Landau. Directed by William Dieterle April 23:

That Night In Rio

(1941) An entertainer in Rio impersonates a wealthy aristocrat. When the aristocrat’s wife asks him to carry the impersonation further, complications ensue. Stars Alice Faye, Don Ameche and Carmen Miranda. Directed by Irving Cummings April 30:

Diplomaniacs

(1933) Barbers, Willy Nilly and Hercules Glub, have opened a barbershop in an Indian reservation. Hearing the usual barbershop banter, several Indians of the Oopadoop nation become ambassadors at the Peace conference in Geneva. Stars Bert Wheeler, Robert Woolsey, and Margaret White. Directed by William A. Seiter

BIG SCREEN BUDGET FILM $5 for members, $7 general. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24:

The Shining

(1980) A family heads to an isolated hotel for the winter where an evil and spiritual presence influences the father into violence, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings. Stars Jack Nicholson and Shelly Duval. Directed by Stanley Kubrick

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. The stars come out at HFS this month with a classic love story, a celebrated tale of racial injustice, a 1970s look at the effects of global warming, and a conspiracy thriller involving General George S. Patton. April 7:

An Affair To Remember

(1957) Director Leo McCarey’s remake of his 1939 film Love Affair, is considered to be one of the most romantic movies ever made. Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr star as a wealthy playboy and a music teacher whose chance meeting on an ocean liner blossoms into love. Directed by Leo McCarey

To Kill A Mockingbird April 14:

(1962) This remarkable film from a celebrated book about racial injustice just celebrated its 50 anniversary. It stars Gregory Peck in his favorite performance and marked the screen debut of Robert Duvall. Directed by Robert Mulligan April 21:

Soylent Green (1973) One of the best remembered sci-fi films of the 1970s shows the effects of overpopulation and pollution on Earth in the year 2022. It stars Charlton Heston as a NYC police officer who uncovers a political scandal with the aid of scholar Edward G. Robinson (in his last film appearance). Directed by Richard Fleischer April 28:

Brass Target (1978) After two issue oriented films, we close the month with this pulp conspiracy thriller about stolen Nazi gold and the effect it had on the death of General George S. Patton. The film stars Sophia Loren, Max von Sydow, John Cassavetes, and George Kennedy as Gen. Patton. Directed by John Hough

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Shoes of the Fisherman”

April DVD Picks

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Shoes of the Fisherman (1968) If you followed the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI and the installment of Pope Francis with interest, then you should check out this 1968 film based on the 1961 book of the same title. Anthony Quinn stars as a Ukrainian archbishop and former political prisoner who is brought to Rome, made a Cardinal, and upon the sudden death of the Pope, elected to the Papacy. He must then deal with a host of problems including a famine in China (brought about by U. S. trade restrictions) and the potential for World War III. In addition to Quinn, the film boasts a strong international cast including John Gielgud, Oskar Werner, David Janssen, and Laurence Olivier. At 162 minutes the film is too long but it has its compensations. The film is well photographed and edited with an appropriately reverential yet stirring score by Alex North and it raises political issues that are still very much with us today. What really makes the film of interest for Catholic and non-Catholic alike is the detailed recreation of how a Pope is elected from the death of the previous Pope through the beginning of the conclave of the College of Cardinals to the white smoke issuing from the Sistine Chapel chimney. It’s an extended sequence but well worthwhile especially in light of the extended coverage of the recent events at the Vatican. The film will not be to everyone’s taste as it deals with a variety of thought provoking issues including several crises of faith. But if you enjoy old school epic

‘Movies’ continued from page 31

Kidman), all is not what it seems. As the insidiously charming Uncle Charlie immerses himself in their lives, India becomes suspicious of him. Curiously the more India learns of his wicked secrets the more fascinated she become by him. Meanwhile the poor widow Stoker also takes a shine to Uncle Charlie, which he deftly uses to provocatively manipulate both of Stoker women. To say much more about the plot would ruin the ride. Suffice it to say the whole thing plays out like cerebral dance. All three of them watch each other, trying to figure out what’s going on with each other. It’s a bit of a head game for the audience as well. We (the audience) never be-

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style filmmaking (think of it as a Catholic version of Gandhi Gandhi) then The Shoes of the Fisherman is well worth your time.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012) After watching Ginger & Rosa, Rosa I was reminded of a recent coming of age movie, last year’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower Wallflower, and it seemed a fitting DVD pick for the month. Based on Stephen Chbosky’s popular novel by the same name, Charlie (Logan Lerman) is a shy and troubled high school freshman. When he is befriended by a couple of seniors, who happen to be stepsiblings, their lives are changed forever. Patrick (Ezra Miller) and Sam (Emma Watson) are not the popular kids in school, but they are super cool in their own way. When they take Charlie under their wing, what we see next in their small group of friends is a series of defining moments in each of their lives. Some of the defining moments, or what it takes to get to those moments, are profoundly sad, but the movie is not a downer. If anything, it is a testament to the friendships that help us through life and is refreshingly affirming.

come emotionally involved. Instead Miller and Park engage our minds and stimulate our visual senses. We watch the proceedings with the same cool detachment that India does when she watches a spider crawl up her leg. This is genius for a game of psychological suspense; done any other way Stoker would be wholly unpalatable. The time and place are current day, but you would scarcely know it from the way Park dresses his characters and the house. This works to build his atmospheric canvas to be sure, but it’s the simple but intriguing imagery he uses to seduce the viewer that really sets the movie apart. Mia Wasikowska is disturbingly good as India. Matthew Goode is the perfect red herring for this vehicle. Nicole Kidman’s character is Stepford Wife meets laudanum

The film takes place in the early 1990’s, though based on the music, I’d have placed as being several years earlier. Regardless of when it takes place its emotional appeal is universal and timeless. I confess I was genuinely moved by this film, by the friendships, vulnerability and honesty of its characters. The Perks of Being a Wallflower is an unexpected gem of a movie and is not to be missed. Part of what creates the film’s universal appeal is its connection to music. Regardless of generation, music plays a huge part. Here it’s all about the art of the mix tape, an essential element for those of us who came of age in the mid 1980’s (a la High Fidelity Fidelity). The music is astoundingly good and figures prominently, adding color and tone to the proceedings. But it is our three young leads who really deliver. Logan Lerman (known to some for the Percy Jackson movies) and Emma Watson (known by everyone as Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter films) both prove they’ve got more acting chops than perhaps previously thought. But it’s Ezra Miller (We Need to Talk about Kevin) who is the show stopper. He pours his heart and sole into Patrick, a young gay man in love with the closeted captain of the football team. There is a dignity and honesty to this story that, in the wrong hands, could easily have been lost. The Perks of Being a Wallflower may not rock your world, and it may not even be a particularly important film, but I dare you not to be moved by it.

laced Southern gothic novel. She doesn’t have a lot to do or a lot to say, but what she does, she does so with cold precision. As someone only vaguely acquainted with Park’s work (Oldboy Oldboy being the best known of his work in this country), I liked this far more than I thought I would. It’s probably the most approachable work he’s done so far, but not saying much. For people who know and like Park’s work, Stoker is a no brainer. If Ginger & Rosa is coming of age story marked by self discovery, first love, heartbreak and idealism, Stoker is a coming of age story of self actualization and first arousal - both carnal and lethal. Rated R for disturbing violent and sexual content.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN


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local favorites

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PRESTIGE SUBARU PRESENTS

Asheville’s Biggest Dining Party!

The Western North Carolina AIDS Project (WNCAP) and your favorite restaurants invite you to Dining Out for Life (DOFL) for 2013. On Thursday, April 25 thousands of people will join us for meals out on the town and help WNCAP raise the critical funds needed to fulfill their mission throughout Western North Carolina. Dining Out for Life events will be taking place across the country in over 55 cities. With 110 restaurants participating, WNCAP Chairperson Harry Brown is expecting this to be the best year ever for the premier fundraising event. “Dining Out for Life is about people….. it’s about people who care and step up to support WNCAP and the wonderful restaurant scene in this area. Simply by eating a meal out they are making a difference in the lives of people living with HIV / AIDS” and helping us to educate “at risk” children and

adults, says Brown. “How easy is that”? And, this year’s After Party at the Grove House promises to be bigger and better than ever with headliner Stephanie Morgan and Crybaby performing for our diners, sponsors and volunteers. Of course an event of this magnitude certainly takes a village to put it all together and this year. More than 225 Volunteer Ambassadors are needed to help fill the restaurants to capacity and to serve as greeters for all our special guests. Contact the WNCAP Volunteer Coordinator at www.wncap.org or call the WNCAP office at (828) 252-7489 for more information. IF YOU Dining Out for Life takes place GO Thursday, April 25. To view a list

of participating restaurants and sponsors, visit www.wncap.org or call (828) 252-7489 x310 for more details.

APRIL EVENTS AT THE WEINHAUS Thursday, April 18

Friday, April 26

Join us for dinner at Posana Café. Educated at the Culinary Institute of America, Executive Chef and owner Peter Pollay brings years of restaurant experience to downtown Asheville’s Pack Square. Posana Café utilizes local organic milk, goat cheese, fruits, vegetables, trout, lamb, and pork.

Friday Night Flights presents A Brown Bag White Wine Tasting. Put your skills to the test as we present you with four white wines. You can judge from the aromatics, color, weight, and flavor profile to decipher the grape varietal of each wine. What better way to begin the white wine drinking season offered by spring weather.

Time: 7 p.m. Price: $65 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m.. Held at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC (828) 254-6453

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

visit wncap.org for details Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 33


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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH KAREN DONATELLI OWNER OF ASHEVILLE’S

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Donatelli Cake Designs

Rapid R apid River Magazine: Tell us a little

aabout bout Karen Donatelli Cake Designs?

Karen Donatelli: My beautiful café and pastry shop is truly a product of my imagination. I wanted a place where customers could stop by, relax, and enjoy themselves for a moment. Life is stressful; everyone is rushing, pushing for deadlines, aggravated. I wanted my café to be a moment in time where they could feel like they are welcome, not hurried, spoken to, and perhaps pretend they were in a little café in Europe. A café they used to know, have visited, or dream of visiting someday. I wanted my pastries to be so beautiful to look at, but even more delicious than they thought it would be. Baking and creating pastries is my passion; I want to share my passion with people who enjoy delightful and edible culinary creations. I enjoy seeing people happy.

RRM: I have heard so many glow-

ing praises and recommendations lately about your pastries and business. What’s your secret?

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INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

quality and our customer service is stellar. So you could say that passion, pastries, and people are my business, and my success is from the customers we serve as well as my exceptional employees that serve my customers with the passionate pastries I love to create.

RRM: How was it that you became a professional cake designer?

KD: My first job at the age of 15 was

at a bakery…the rest is history. I was decorating cakes at the age of 16. I was 19 when I began my apprenticeship at the Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach, Florida in the Pastry Department. It was at the age of 19 that I knew I wanted to be a professional Pastry Chef. Back then, being classically European trained, there were very few chefs that were women! I was dedicated to my apprenticeship and thankful for the best training by chefs that believed in me and my talent.

RRM: What are some of your most popular cake requests?

KD: My Chocolate Raspberry Cham-

bord cake and my Strawberry Bavarian cake. Each is made with sensational ingredients that are incredibly delicious. They are adorned with beautiful berries, and a signature scroll design that is elegant.

RRM: What is your lead-time for weddings and large parties?

KD: My secret is that I am truly pas-

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sionate about creating my pastries and little lunch items. As I design and create for special orders, I am thinking of the person that the cake is for, hoping that they will delight in the special pastry creation that someone wanted for them. I also want those that are present to have a special celebration and enjoy the pastries and cakes that were made especially for them. I am thankful for every customer. Our products are

34 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

The Chocolate Cheesecake covered in Chocolate Ganache is to die for!

KD: Brides are booking their wed-

ding cakes ten months to a year in advance. I can accommodate just about anything if time allows and I am not already booked solid. When baking cakes we usually bake a couple of extra just in case, and they are always sold. I prefer to make cakes for a special order. Lead time varies, but I ask as much time as possible. I have been known to make large event cakes and pastries at a moment’s notice, but I don’t recommend it. For large events,

two weeks would be acceptable if availability allows.

RRM: Do you sell ready to go cakes? KD: My cakes that are “ready to go”

usually sell as quickly as they go into the case! My chocolate raspberry cakes are usually in the case, as well as the chocolate mocha cream. We also have a variety of sensational cheesecakes, like my Sicilian Blood Orange, Raspberry White Chocolate Truffle, and a new German Chocolate Brownie cheesecake. The Chocolate Cheesecake covered in Chocolate Ganache is to die for.

RRM: Besides cakes what else do you offer?

KD: Croissants: Chocolate, Almond

(my favorite), Black Forrest Ham and Swiss Cheese, our plain croissant; Orange Brioche, and Chocolate Raspberry Brioche. Classic cookies that are heavenly, especially the mudslide if you dare. Lemon and lime tarts topped with a French meringue in a coconut crust. A large assortment of fresh fruit tarts, napoleons, éclairs, oh the list goes on! Our mocha and caramel mousse bombs are a huge hit, as well as our dessert tira mi su. Plus I have to recommend the salted Peanut Carmel tart, and the petite fours.

Karen Donatelli Cake Designs 57 Haywood St, Asheville (828) 225-5751 www.donatellicakedesigns.com


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festival of flowers Biltmore Blooms with a Festival of Flowers

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THROUGH MAY 31 EXPLORE BILTMORE IN FULL BLOOM

Biltmore’s gardens, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, are alive with color as spring arrives. Enjoy special events and the beauty of tulips, azaleas, and countless other flowers during Biltmore Blooms. For the first time, guests will be able to step down into the Winter Garden to enjoy a display of exotic orchids intimately, just as George and Edith Vanderbilt’s guests might have.

BILTMORE BLOOMS Antler Hill Village

Music on the Bandstand from 4 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. daily in April and May. Grape Stomp at the Winery from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., through May 31.

Darwin Hybrids Tulips at peak in the Walled Garden and Estate Entry. Other estate blooms include spring bulbs, dogwoods, and redbuds.

Exhibition in The Biltmore Legacy – The Vanderbilts at Home and Abroad. Biltmore House

Floral Displays, daily. Winter Garden orchid display open to guests through April 7.

Some of the plants are the same species that were planned for the Biltmore Conservatory in 1894. Outdoors, enjoy a beautiful progression of blooms from tulips to pansies, azaleas, and much more.

Classical music near the Winter Garden. 30 minute sets daily at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1 p.m., and 2 p.m., through May 19. Conservatory

Live 30 minute music sets at 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. daily, through May 19.

Southern Charm in Full Bloom THE NORTH CAROLINA AZALEA FESTIVAL

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For more than 50 years, the folks of Southeastern North Carolina have been throwing the best party in the South and you’re invited! There’s something for everyone among our community’s rich array of artwork, gardens, history and culture. Each April, a full week of natural beauty, big-name entertainment, festive galas, fun family events and Southern hospitality come together to showcase the charms of the Wilmington area. For community pride and springtime pageantry, the North Carolina Azalea Festival has no equal! Each event is a celebration, beginning with the traditional arrival of Queen Azalea at the official opening of the five-day event. Stars glitter throughout town as Southern belles and their escorts promenade through lush gardens at the annual garden party. Everywhere the blooming azaleas offer colorful testimony to the rich heritage of coastal Carolina. The Festival is a great source of

Azalea Festival

Photo: Cape Fear Coast Wilmington CVB

local pride, with the entire community involved in displaying Wilmington to the world in its finest colors. More than 1,000 volunteers are required to stage over 50 events ranging from concerts to art shows, a street fair with interactive displays, home and garden tours, a parade, special exhibits, a circus and a variety of other entertainment and events.

IF YOU GO: For more information visit www.ncazaleafestival.org

Walled Garden

Ask a Gardner Station, open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays through May 19.

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A Gardener’s Place Seminars, through May 19. Topics include: Smell Good Plants (plants and foliage); Terrariums, gardening under glass; Organic fertilizing. IF YOU Biltmore Blooms, through GO May 31. For more details visit

www.biltmore.com.

CELEBRATE SPRING IN WILMINGTON, NC

The C.W. Worth House is an historic bed and breakfast located in Wilmington, North Carolina. Seven guestrooms ranging from intimate to spacious are available to our guests. As you step through the gate, the spacious southern porch invites you to slow down, relax, and enjoy.

C.W. Worth House

A Bed and Breakfast in the Victorian Tradition 412 South 3rd Street Wilmington, NC 28401

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1-800-340-8559 or 910-762-8562 www.worthhouse.com

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 35


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noteworthy The Medium Comes to HART Gian Carlo Menotti’s opera “The Medium” follows Madam Flora, her daughter, Monica, and their servant, Toby, as they cheat vulnerable clients through fake séances.

During one séance, a hand mysteriously touches Madam Flora’s neck, with the incident leading to insanity and murder. The two-act production is directed by Mary Kay Bauer, with musical direction by Bradley Martin, both faculty members in the WCU School of Music. The cast includes WCU music faculty member Kristen Hedberg and WCU students Brandi Moon, Chris Corbin, Lauren Smith and Corinne Minor. WCU students Alex Wooten, Marilyn Bledsoe and Robert Helma will provide technical support, with additional technical support provided by Steven Lloyd, HART artistic director. The production will feature a fourteen piece orchestra and a cast drawn from the WCU music department. The program is made possible in part by the School of Music’s new Artist-in-Residence Program.

IF YOU GO: The Medium, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 6, and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 7 at the Haywood Arts Repertory Theater, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $6 for students. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact the HART box office at (828) 456-6322 or visit www. harttheatre.com.

Storytelling Series Listen to This Thursday, April 25 – Stories and original

songs from locals. In 35below at 7:30 p.m. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $10. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut Street, Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Underbelly

BY

MELISSA REARDON

A Fresh Take on Southern Food Culture, created for foodies by foodies

Underbelly, designed by Darlene Moore and produced by editor-in-chief by Mike Moore, is Western North Carolina’s first publication solely devoted to cuisine, communicated heavily through the voices of local chefs and restaurateurs. Issues can be purchased for $14 each; an annual subscription includes four issues and costs $44. Copies can be purchased in Asheville at Hops & Vines, Brusin’ Ales, the soon-to-open Seven Sows Bourbon & Larder on Biltmore Avenue, and Ambrozia Bar & Bistro on Merrimon Avenue. Subscriptions can also be purchased online at www. blindpigofasheville.com/underbelly.

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The creators of Blind Pig Supper Club, aka Mike and Darlene Moore, have taken the gastronomical concepts and innovations that arise during their popular pop-up dinners, and packed them into a glossy, fullcolor, quarterly journal. Topics including Appalachian food traditions, profiles on small, regional producers, recipes, and opinions on culinary matters are presented by area food writers and chefs in prose that is as fresh and nostalgic as a ripe summer tomato or homemade buttermilk ice cream. “Underbelly means to give chefs, bartenders, farmers and craft food producers a voice, and to act as a central hub for creative and passionate culinary discourse,” says Mike Moore, who’s also the editor-in-chief and a chef at The Admiral in Asheville. A soft launch of Underbelly’s first 36-page installment, The Heritage Issue, happened in November 2012. The upcoming issue, Soul & Comfort, will release the first week in April, and offers articles on Cajun, Creole and ethnic cooking, and an in-depth interview with Chef Nate Allen of Knife & Fork discussing the process of making charcoal. ‘Atelier’ continued from page 13

Mike Moore Photo: Cindy Kunst

The third issue, which tackles the subject of Approach, will include stories on innovation in the kitchen and modernist cuisine, as well as an interview with James Beard award-winning Chef Sean Brock of Charleston’s acclaimed McCrady’s and Husk restaurants.

legitimization of myself as an artist with something meaningful to offer.” She states aspects of the four-year atelier program as that the experience has revealed to her a well. The individual works, all available for “network of ideas, like fragile webs slowly purchase, include preliminary drawings, being spun back together and with each color studies, transfer drawings and both new generation, new information is dismonochromatic (grisaille) and color paintcovered or revised and adapted to modern ings that illustrate elements of the learning world sensibilities.” process. The exhibit was displayed earlier The road leading an artist to atelier this year at the Whistler House Museum training is often years-long, evidenced of Art in Lowell, Massachusetts, and will by Todd Casey’s story of formal studies later travel to Charleston and in Boston followed by Vancouver. years illustrating in NYC Methods vary, but in and graduate school in most ateliers, students learn San Francisco. Finally, a the skills and techniques return to NYC lead him of representational art, the to Jacob Collins’ Water making of two-dimensional Street Atelier, a carriage images that appear real to the house on the upper east viewer. They traditionally side where his students, include sessions for drawonly 12-14 at a time, ing and painting from both painted from life in his casts (for example, a plaster garage for eight hours a sculpture) and live models, day. developing a foundation of “This show is what skills through a program of went on in that Atelier tiered learning. for the next 3-4 years For Carol Broman, “the of study. I finally found study of classical realism has what I was looking for, “Safe Keeping”, graphite on afforded me a much needed paper, by Angela Cunningham the training I searched

36 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

Blind Pig Supper Club provides a scrumptious celebration of the culinary arts through monthly charity dinners and catering services. For tickets and more information, visit www.blindpigofasheville.com.

this country to get. One of the best things, though, were the wonderful people that I met along the way, and their works are in this room today. The artists in this show are more than friends to me, as you spend years studying with people and seeing them every day, they become family. Local artist Angela Cunningham values her atelier training for “the time given to learn patience! There is no better way to understand and see nature for the beauty it is.” Visit BlackBird during April and see what this family of highly trained and immensely talented artists has to show for their pursuit of perfection. Artist Greg Mortenson hopes visitors “will take with them either an appreciation for the craft, or the knowledge that with hard work and dedication they can achieve similar results.”

IF YOU Opening Reception Thursday, GO April 4, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at

BlackBird Frame & Art. On exhibit April 1-30, 2013. BlackBird Frame & Art, 365 Merrimon Ave. Hours are 10-6 weekdays and 10-3 Saturdays. Phone (828) 225-3117 or visit www.blackbirdframe.com.


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healthy lifestyles

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Aspirin is Not a Miracle Drug

Read it again carefully: Aspirin is not a miracle drug. Recent international news flashes are touting the “protective effect” of aspirin against melanoma in females. Aspirin has previously been announced as “preventative” in breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer. Please note again: Aspirin is NOT a miracle drug. Aspirin does NOT prevent cancer. Aspirin does one thing very well. Aspirin blocks the function of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme in the body that is required to produce Thromboxane A2 and certain Prostaglandins. Why is that helpful? Thromboxane A2 causes platelets in the blood to clump together, one

Time = Brain: Are You Stroke Smart? April 19 at 11:30 a.m. As a nurse in Mission Hospital’s Neurology Department, George Waltman, RN took care of stroke victims. He will discuss risk factors for stroke and what actions people witnessing a stroke should take. Free and open to the public at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center, home of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Details at www.olliasheville.com/special-programs or call (828) 251-6140.

‘Life’ continued from page 27

dependent life-form that we are within, and that we are that vast openness. We are awareness that is living with the limited forms of this body, this mind and this world, and they are beautiful when we see the truth of “the good life” as expressed in open minds and hands that believe absolutely in giving so as to promote more life. In this meditation on Life, all questions lead to the next question, and the infinite unfolding of the question becomes the living mystery that is the answer. Here, we are enough, we are complete, we are expressions of The Infinite, and from the perspective of Infinity, all that has to do with the finite becomes very clear. Indigenous peoples understood this, as they lived a form of continuous meditation in complete harmony with Nature, “dreaming” the finite and the infinite together seamlessly. Life is

Aspirin does three things: decreases blood clotting, decreases body temperature, and decreases inflammation. of the processes that leads to clots in the arteries of the heart and the brain – that is, heart attack and stroke. Prostaglandin12 decreases the transmission of pain and modifies the temperature regulation center in the brain. Blocking cyclooxygenase decreases the pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and enhances the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins – which is wonderful for acute pain sufferers and for arthritics. In the process of being anti-inflammatory, aspirin decreases the some of the inflammatory activity that is part of some cancers, but this plays only a small part in the overall beginnings and growth of cancers. Therefore, aspirin does three things: decreases blood clotting, decreases body temperature, and decreases inflammation. But so do many other activities of daily living. Getting 8 hours of sleep at night, regular exercise, avoiding transfats and reducing saturated fats in the diet, and modifying responses to stress ALL reduce inflammation and decrease blood clotting at least as well as aspirin – without the side effects of the aspirin.

Life, is who we are, and our purpose is the celebration and sharing of Life, looking to Life to guide us in our lives. We must open our minds and our hands. This is what America’s indigenous people did for tens of centuries, and it is what is needed so that humanity can have a future of tens of centuries as one people on one Earth in a “beautiful life” focused on giving and sharing, “promoting more life” rather than extracting and assimilating ourselves and this planet to death. We do not have to return to the forests or give up the use of technology; we just have to turn our technology towards truly understanding, protecting, honoring and giving back to Nature rather than always extracting from it and assimilating it into a consciousness of exploitation that promises fulfillment but can never deliver, only take.

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Yes, like all medicines, aspirin has side effects, including bleeding of the stomach and small bowel, brain hemorrhage, interfering with some other medicines, Reye’s Syndrome in children, ringing in the ears, hives, and intolerance. All of these side effects are the result of what aspirin does well – blocking the function of cyclooxygenase – but with unwanted effects in people who do not tolerate this activity in various ways. Remember: People who smoke and exercise have lower heart attack rates than people who don’t smoke and don’t exercise. People who eat a Mediterranean vegetarian diet and exercise regularly have lower cholesterol and triglyceride numbers than people who take statins and eat the usual American carnivorous, high-fat, highly refined carbohydrate diet and don’t exercise. Taking aspirin is associated with a 20% reduction in the incidence of melanoma in females. Protection from UV rays is 80-90% effective in reducing the incidence of melanoma in everyone. A healthful lifestyle is the magic medicine to control inflammatory diseases and cut cancer rates. Aspirin, like other medicines, is a temporary medical intervention for acute symptoms and specific conditions, NOT a preventative for cancer and NOT a substitute for wise lifestyle choices.

Our purpose is the celebration and sharing of Life. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 37


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what to do guide April 1-30

Friday, April 5

New Work by Lana Wilson

Asheville Music School Performance Fund-raiser

An exhibition featuring new work by nationally recognized ceramic artist Lana Wilson. For more information call (828) 688-3599 or visit www.crimsonlaurelgallery.com. Crimson Laurel Gallery, 23 Crimson Laurel Way, Bakersville, NC 28705.

Friday, April 5

$15 suggested donation. Wine and small bites available. Tickets available at the door or at www.ashevillemusicschool.com. 7:30 p.m. at Asheville Music School, 126 College St. Call (828) 252-6244.

Saturday, April 6

Johann in the Sky With Diamonds James Barr presents a concert and discussion through the often-overlooked musical spirituality of the Beatles, as well as the oftneglected emotional content and style of Bach’s work. 7:30 pm on the ACT Mainstage. Tickets from $20-$22.

Friday, April 5

Sandra Brugh Moore Opening Watercolor paintings of florals and landscapes. Opening reception 5 to 8 p.m. at The Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street, Asheville. Call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Free Planet Radio

accompanist is provided. A $5 audition fee is required. At the Diana Wortham Theatre from 5-8 p.m. Enter through the loading dock on S. Market Street.

Thursday, April 11

Release Your Inner Animal A fundraising party to benefit Animal Compassion Network’s lifesaving programs. The jungle themed event will be an animal costumed evening with vegetarian and vegan hors d’oeuvres. 6:30-9:30 p.m. in Asheville Brewing Co.’s Mill Room, 66 Asheland Avenue. Details at www.animalcompassion-

network.org

At Laughing Waters Retreat on top of the scenic Hickory Nut Gorge at 7:30 p.m. Outstanding jazz-fusion grooves. $12-$15 door. (828) 625-4780

Saturday, April 6

Bling, Bling Bash! Fundraiser for AAUW-Asheville’s Scholarship Endowment. Sale of vintage jewelry, handbags, scarves, accessories. From 10-2 p.m. at the Beaverdam Fire Station, 450 Beaverdam Rd., North Asheville. Call (828) 505-3826.

Sunday April 7

Serpentine Jazz Spells Serpentine makes her Asheville jazz debut with a concert at Saint Matthias Episcopal Church at 3 p.m. Featuring Bill Bares on piano, Zack Page on bass and Michael Davis on drums. Saint Matthias Episcopal Church, 1 Dundee Street, Asheville.

Tuesday, April 9

Go Local Social Celebrating the partnership of Asheville Grown and Asheville City Schools Foundation. A family friendly celebration of unchained and independent Asheville. The Hop is donating 50% of all sales to the Big Love Festival and ACSF. Go Local Cards will be on sale at the event. Locally-made, lovingly scooped ice cream paired with great folks from our community. 5-8 p.m. at The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, 640 Merrimon Avenue, North Asheville. More details by visiting the Asheville Grown Business Alliance, www.ashevillegrown.com

Thursday, April 11

Auditions for Carousel and Suor Angelica Open to all singers regardless of experience. To schedule an audition call the Asheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670. Office hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday. Applicants must provide a current resume and headshot. An

Friday, April 12

The Fritz Asheville based rock-funk group gets their groove on at the Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Avenue. $8 in advance, $10 at the door. 21+show starts at 9 p.m. Visit www. ashevillemusichall.com

Saturday & Sunday, April 13 & 14

Battle of the Bands Unplugged From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Benefit to save Mrs. Hyatt’s Music House, a treasured landmark for Applachian regional music for more than 60 years. A “Poker Run” for motorcycle enthusiasts will take place on Saturday, April 13. Check in at Anderson Nissan, 629 Brevard Road in Asheville at 10:30 a.m. Original songwriters, acoustic Old-Time, Bluegrass, Gospel, Country and Mountain music will compete for a $2,000 prize, awarded June 1 at JamFest. Entry forms and tickets at www. mrshyattsmusichouse.org. For more information call (828) 633-1136.

Saturday, April 13

Old Time Plowing and Folkways Old Time Plowing and Folkways; meet draft horses and learn to plow the Cradle’s garden the old way. Living history volunteers bring the past to life. (828) 877-3130; www.cradleofforestry. org; $5 for adults; under age 16 admitted free. Cradle of Forestry, Pisgah National Forest, NC Hwy 276.

Wednesday, April 17

Gangstagrass Gangstagrass brings their unique hip-hop-meets-bluegrass sound to The Grey Eagle. Local hip hop duo Crazyhorse & Colston to open. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. 21+show starts at 9 p.m. 185 Clingman Ave. in Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com

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Thursday, April 25

Jeffrey Presented in 35below Jeffrey’s friends introduce him to the man of his dreams, who also happens to be HIV-positive. What follows is an audacious and moving romantic comedy. Performances Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. No performance April 25; additional Sunday matinee May 5 at 2:30 p.m. More details at www.differentstrokesavl.com.

Saturday, April 20

VietNam Laying down their renowned signature cocktail of apocalyptic street blues at the Double Crown, 375 Haywood Rd. in Asheville. (828) 575-9060, www. facebook.com/TheDoubleCrown

Saturday, April 20

Eve Haslam & Satin Steel Jazz Waynesville’s Classic Wineseller presents a Cd release concert at 7 p.m. 20 Church Street. Tickets are $34.99 per person. Reservations are required. Call (828) 452-6000 or email info@ classicwineseller.com.

Comas Intense drive and top-notch technical skill. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30; Students $25; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, April 27

Broadway’s Next H!T Musical The only unscripted theatrical awards show, presents a night of hilarious audience-driven musical comedy. A special benefit performance for Diana Wortham Theatre. Reception at 7:30 p.m.; Performance at 8:30 p.m. VIP Tickets, reception plus orchestra-level seating, $75; Regular tickets, performance only, balcony seating, $50. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, April 27

Saturday, April 20

Asheville Sound Collective

Asheville Creativity Symposium

Experience the collective power of the piano, gongs, crystal bowls, Tibetan bowls and bells, drums, mbira, shruti box, and didgeridoo with local artists. Concert begins at 7 p.m. $20 at the door. The Light Center, 2196 Hwy. 9, Black Mountain. For details call (828) 669-6845 or visit www.URLight.org.

With hosts, worldrenowned musician River Guerguerian, and creative entrepreJames Navé neur and poet James Navé. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Creativity Concert at 7 p.m. $25 for Symposium and concert. $8 for the concert only. Proceeds will benefit the LEAF Foundation. The Odyssey School, 90 Zillicoa St., Asheville. For more details visit www.jamesnave.com or call (919) 949.2113

Saturday, April 20

Writing Historical Fiction Workshop with Anne Barnhill. Learn how to make historical figures ‘come alive’, how to use dialogue from another century, where to find research materials, and much more. Register at www.twwoa.org. For more information call (828) 254-8111.

May 4

2nd Annual GeekOut Convention WNC’s popular arts convention will celebrate all aspects of pop culture; from film, television, and animation to costuming, comics, and stage performance. Celebrity guest appearances and panels, two full days of tabletop and card gaming, a film and animation track, and workshops on independent filmmaking and writing for science fiction. Two performance stages will showcase theatrical and musical acts. At UNCA’s Sherrill Center and Kimmel Arena. Register on the website, www.geekoutavl.org.

May 3-5

Wednesday, April 24

24th Annual Spring Herb Festival

6th Annual Music Video Asheville A showcase to highlight the pairing of Asheville musicians and filmmakers. Networking Party at 6 p.m.; Screening 7-10 p.m.; Awards 10:30 p.m. $8 adv/ $10 at the door. At the Cinebarre, behind Biltmore Square Mall, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville, NC, www. cinebarre.com. More details by calling (828) 665-8661 or visit www.musicvideoasheville.com.

60+ growers and vendors. Free to the public; free parking; free shuttle service. At the WNC Farmers Market, 570 Brevard Road, Asheville. Info: (828) 301-8968, (828) 253-1691, or www.ashevilleherbfestival.com

APRIL EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 38 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8


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BLUE to BLACK Art Weekend

Best in Show

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Dragin

by Michael Cole

Follow BIG FOOT to the stroll, FIND him for an unusual treat. Downtown Black Mountain.

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

Friday Night Live @ 7 p.m. Wine, beer, tapas. Live music weekly.

May 3, 4 & 18

April 5 - Joe Cruz, piano and vocals April 12 - Paul Cataldo, guitar and vocals April 19 - Ben Wilson, guitar and vocals April 26 - Marshall Ballew, Blues guitar,

Under the Sea

banjo, vocals

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

The Classic Wineseller, (828) 452-6000 20 Church Street, Waynesville, NC www.classicwineseller.com

Michael Jefry Stevens Concerts Thursday April 18 – $8 show at 9:30 p.m. at

the Lexington Ave. Brewery. Trio featuring: Billy Cardine, electric dobro; Jason DeCristofaro, vibraphone; Michael Jefry Stevens, electric keyboard.

Saturday, May 4

The National Day of Puppetry Free Puppet Performances and a Giant Puppet Parade. For a small fee you can Red Herring Puppets make a puppet. Play puppet themed games; bounce house; balloons and more! From 11-3 p.m. in downtown Asheville’s Roger McGuire Green in Pack Place. For more information and full schedule go to www.ashevillepuppetry.org.

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Friday, April 5

May 3-5

Under the Sea features underwater photography by Dr. John Highsmith. On display, May 1-27, 2013. Opening reception Friday, May 3 from 6-9 p.m. Family Craft Workshops will Dr. John Highsmith be held May 4 and May 18 Bonaire Cup Coral from 2-4 p.m. $5 includes supplies. Maxmium of 15 children ages 4 to 7 years old. Call the Haywood County Arts Council at (828) 452-0593 to sign up. Gallery 86, 86 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC. For more information, visit www.haywoodarts.org.

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Includes the E.A.S.T. of Asheville Studio Tour, with a greater emphasis on Black Mountain artists. The BLUE to BLACK Art Stroll applies to Cheshire Village and downtown Black Mountain Art Venues and Galleries. Open house Saturday, May 4 from 5-7 p.m. Contact Cappi Macsherry at (828) 707-7615, or visit www.bluetoblackweekend.com

Blue to Black Art Stroll

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Friday April 19 – Black Mountain Center

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

for the Arts. $10 suggested donation. Featuring Eliot Wadopian on bass.

Tuesday April 23 – 8 p.m. at the Altamont Theatre, $10 donation. Music of Frank Southecorvo featuring Frank Southecorvo on saxophones. www.michaeljefrystevens.com

Sunday, May 5

Big Love Fest Locally owned and independent businesses, including makers, crafters, artisans, food based businesses, entertainers and more. 1-8 p.m., Pack Square Park, downtown Asheville.

Friday, May 10

Richard Shulman Performances Thursdays, April 4, 11, 18, & 25 – Playing

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

keyboard with the Heather Masterton Quartet from 8-11 p.m. at Olive or Twist, 81 Broadway, Asheville.

Sundays, April 7, 14, & 28 at 11 a.m.

R&B Legend Mavis Staples

Music at the Center for Spiritual Living, 2 Science of Mind Way, Asheville. (828) 253-2325

Staples most recent solo album, “You Are Not Alone,” picked up a Grammy for Best Americana Album. She will be joined by her sister, Yvonne, and a fabulous four-piece at the LEAF Festival. The LEAF Festival takes place May 9-12 in Black Mountain. For the full schedule visit www.theLEAF.org.

Saturday, April 27 – Playing piano with the

Asheville Sound Collective in a concert/ sound healing event at the UR Light Center on Rte. 9 in Black Mountain, 7:30-9:30 p.m. For more information call (828) 658-9604 or visit www.RichHeartMusic.com www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 39


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find it here AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Downtown Asheville Art District

www.DowntownAshevilleArtDistrict.org

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Sola Salt Cave www.solasaltcave.com

AnTHM www.anthmgallery.com

Chifferobe

www.chifferobehomeandgarden.com

Faison O'Neil Gallery www.faisononeil.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com

Liberty Bicycles www.libertybikes.com

QuickDraw www.WNCQuickDraw.com

The Spice & Tea Exchange www.spiceandtea.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Claying Around www.clayingaround.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

Black Mountain Iron Works

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Mountain Top Appliance

www.mountainviewappliance.com

Satellite Gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com

Studio 375 Depot

Blue to Black Art Weekend

www.bluetoblackartweekend.com

C.W. Worth House www.worthhouse.com

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Dogwood Restaurant & Lounge (828) 665-3800

HandMade in America www.handmadeinamerica.org

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

David J. Simchock www.vagabondvistas.com

R. Bruce Brennan

www.rbrucebrennanfineart.com

Donatelli Cakes & Pastries www.donatellicakedesigns.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

www.BlackMountainIron.com

www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

PATTON AVE. / ASHLAND AVE.

TUNNEL ROAD

BREVARD RD.

www.BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com Updraft Fine Art Gallery www.updraftgallery.com The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

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40 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8


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PG. 40

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unique shops Charlotte Street Computers Recognized as Apple Premium Service Provider

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For demonstrating BY LEE ANN BUBROWSKI commitment to premium service and technical excellence, Charlotte Street Computers has been named as an Apple Premium Service Provider. As the only Service Provider in Western North Carolina with this designation, Charlotte Street Computers will continue to provide their customers with the highest level of service for Apple products. Charlotte Street Computers is a multi-location computer repair company founded in 2002. Today the company has grown to a staff of 31 team members, including 13 of the top service technicians in the area. CEO Jennifer Mayer operates the company with a continued focus on customer satisfaction and philanthropic marketing. Charlotte Street Computers provides upgrades, networking, troubleshooting, and repairs for home computers and small business systems for both Macs and PCs. The company also provides daily computer classes, one-on-one tutoring and rental computers for customers who are having their systems repaired. Charlotte Street Computers is a one-stop shop for exceptional repair and retail, and sells the full line of Apple computers at both of its locations. Charlotte Street Computers is located at 252 Charlotte Street in Asheville, with a second location at 300 Airport Road in Arden. Both stores are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday. The Charlotte Street location is open on Sunday from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

6JKP KUKP ÒApple Specialist We’ve got your Mac.

PG. 40

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252 Charlotte Street, Asheville — 828.225.6600 300 Airport Road, Arden — 828.651.6600

Rapid River Magazine

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Our Monthly Magazine is iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly! www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

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For more information or to register for classes, visit www.charlottestreetcomputers.com or call (828) 225-6600. To find out about contests, giveaways, and the latest computer trends and products, become their fan on Facebook.

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outdoor fun & adventure Getting a Bicycle That’s Perfect for You

PG. 40

1378 Hendersonville Rd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-274-2453 libertybikes.com

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How many of us loved and enjoyed riding a bike as a youth? The joy and fun of a bike brings back fond memories for many. I know that the bike was my first freedom I experienced in my tween years. Riding the roads and gravel roads of Western North Carolina with my family and friends let me explore and find that passion for cycling I still have until this day. How many of us miss those days and would like to recapture some of the fun and passion while gaining fitness and doing something good for the environment. Cycling is one of those sports that a person can do for life. Whether a person is 2 or 102, there is a bike that is perfect. Unlike many other sports that can be hard on the joints, bicycling is a very low impact sport with high calorie expenditure and great aerobic benefit. Done regularly, cycling will lead to a fitter body, stronger lungs and heart and much reduced stress. Many people don’t know where to get started when looking for the right bike. Below are some tips that should help in making sure you get the right bike for the type of riding you will be doing. First, always buy a bike from an independent bicycle dealer. These individuals are invested in your community and will want to get you on the proper bike. A good bicycle shop will have a good selection, but most importantly be willing to ask you lots

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BY

SAM WHITE

of questions about where and how you may be using your bicycle. Be willing to answer these questions and you will be directed toward Comfort and safety are built into every bike we sell. not only the rides more comfortable. There are correct size bike, but one that will shorts to suit every rider. For those work perfectly for the terrain you will who really do not like the lycra look, be using it. there are baggies with liners that are There are many styles of bikes very comfortable. out there today. There are road, I hope this article helps anyone mountain and hybrid bikes that every who may be looking to jump back on bike shop will stock. Try not to get a bike after many years away. You will confused at all of the choices. If a not be disappointed. good salesperson has done their job, No matter if you are looking to they will be able to narrow down to do some road riding on the Blue Ridge the two or three bikes that will be Parkway, trail ride at Bent Creek or most appropriate for you. At that use the bike for transportation, the point, the process gets fun. Test ride health and life benefits can enrich your the bikes and get any of your concerns life. I look forward to seeing you out answered. Make your choice and you there on the roads and trails. will be riding that afternoon. Do keep in mind that the bike is the first step, there will be some Liberty Bicycles accessory and clothing items that will make your experience safer and more Sam White, General Manager comfortable. Items such as helmets, 1378 Hendersonville Rd safety flashers, flat repair kits and Asheville, NC 28803 water bottles with cages are typically (828) 274-2453 some of the first items you may need. www.libertybikes.com Oh yeah, and don’t forget a good pair of cycling shorts to make those

French Broad River Festival - May 3-5

Seen

Come spend the weekend listening to great regional and national recording artists in Hot Springs, NC. Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine

Free Web Links Free Ad Design Easy Monthly Billing

May 2013 - Spring Studio Tours June 2013 - River Arts District Call Today! (828) 646-0071

Enjoy shopping for new outdoor gear at the live auction or with one of our many art and craft vendors. Try participating in Paddle with the Pros, the 8th Annual FBRF Mountain Bike Race, or the 16th Annual French Broad River Raft Race. Come on out for a weekend of fun, family, art, music and adventure! Tickets include weekend camping (Friday-Sunday), music, registration fees for whitewater and biking events (if you have your own boat/bike), one raffle ticket, festival schwag, and good times. If you don’t have your own boat,

42 April 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 8

but would like to be in the raft race, a limited number of tickets are available for $115 if bought prior to April 20. These include a spot in a raft for the raft race with a guide plus everything the $75 ticket offers. This is a great deal for a guided raft trip alone! Festival gates open at 8 a.m. Friday, May 3. Tickets include camping for the entire weekend. If you want to arrive earlier and secure a prime campsite, you can reserve a site by calling the Hot Springs Campground & Resort at (828) 622-7676.

FRENCH BROAD RIVER CLEANUP Join the Nantahala Outdoor Center, Riverlink, and The French Broad River Festival on a raft trip to clean up the French Broad River from Barnard

to Hot Springs. This year’s cleanup will take place on Friday, May 3. Volunteers will meet at 10 a.m. at NOC’s French Broad Outpost near Walnut, NC. Shuttle service will be provided. Lunch will also be provided. By helping, you will receive a $15 discount to the French Broad River Festival. If you would like to volunteer for the cleanup please contact Zuzana Vanha, NOC Events Manager for more details at zuzana.vanha@noc. com or (828) 488-7285. IF YOU Ticket prices: $75 plus GO Ticketweb fees if bought

online before April 20. After April 20 price will be $90. Children under 11 get in free. More details at www.FrenchBroadRiverFestival.com


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Weird Yet Critical

MUSINGS FROM YOUR SCI-FI LOVING SHUT-IN

As a fan of Earth Day BY GREG VINEYARD (April 22, www.earthday. org), one of my favorite quite a bit of time, but one bumper stickers reads: of those dominos toward EARTH with ART highthe end of the line is… us! lighted in a different color, The “why” of it all thereby communicating is simply conservation, two relevant topics in a which involves awaresimple yet impactful way. ness and action. There are Which makes me many opportunities for think about how creative each of us to take little, types can take on causes often easy, actions that add with their art. In addition up. Like, start recycling, to feeding my inner sci-fi stop littering, take the bus geek beast by working on more, teach the next genvarious versions of Spock of eration to conserve better Star Trek fame for the next World Tapir Day. than before, create an aweZaPow Gallery group show, Mixed-media by Greg Vineyard some bumper sticker. and a cartoon line called One could also take “Space(d) Kitties” for Geek on global issues, like the Earth Day Network Out 2013, I’m also very excited at this writing does, from saving whales and preserving about my World Tapir Day series. ecosystems, to renewable energy and green I know, two questions: economies. 1) World What? And 2) Why? Conservation can also be personal. This bizarre-looking mammal, so critiWhat in our lives might we want to precal to ecosystem stability in each place in the serve? Papers and photos? Mementos? Our world in which the four species reside, is brains and bodies? Pondering what we endangered. World Tapir Day falls each year would like to be remembered for can help on April 27, shortly after Earth Day. us decide upon a course to take. Although baby tapirs are so cute it can I hope to maintain my ability to draw make your teeth ache, adult tapirs simply are until my last breath, and I hope some of my not, so overall, their plight tends to get miniart does some good. I’m using what I have at mal attention. Young tapirs are all speckled my disposal to do my little bit, hoping each and stripey in tawny colors for fall, and they person out there is also discovering their look like they’re smiling. All the time. own unique opportunities to safeguard the I suspect any animal on the hunt would planet and the creatures on it, including the not only move on, but also immediately humans. become a vegetarian. Back to the adults… What can you do with your art, or your they can be a bit, ahem, behaviorally lowlove of art, and your skills and spheres of brow. In fact, many zoos post warnings that influence to do something today to commutapirs can spray urine backwards up to about nicate a concept that’s important to you? fifteen feet. During April, my illustration display inTapirs are large herbivores – and thereside ZaPow Gallery, 21 Battery Park Ave. in fore the main seed-dispersing species in their Asheville (across the street from Chai Pani habitats. This makes them like prehistoric Restaurant), will include my Tapir-themed Johnny Appleseeds, but with genetics tied to art, with 25% of my proceeds on those items horses and rhinos. Habitat destruction and going to a tapir conservation fund. hunting have reduced ranges for all tapirs, For more information on WTD visit with some populations now so low that www.facebook.com/pages/World-Tapir-Day breeding programs may be their best hope. Their perilous situation also serves as a reminder that species extinction is rampant. Greg Vineyard is an Ecosystem elimination also means we artist, writer and creative will never discover other useful things in consultant in Asheville, NC. those habitats, including natural medicinals ZaPOW Gallery in downtown that could ultimately help us survive as a Asheville carries his species. Not to mention rainforest and other illustrations, giclees and habitat losses contribute to increased atmocards (www.zapow.com). spheric and temperature problems. Find his clay works at Gallery 262 in Species extinction is kind of like one of Waynesville and at Taupe Gallery in North those fancy dominos-on-end setups: when Wilkesboro. the first one falls, so go the rest of them. It could be a very long chain reaction, and take www.gregvineyardillustration.com

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Vol. 16, No. 8 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — April 2013 43


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April 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
April 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Kathryn Mills welcomes you to Bogart’s Restaurant..p23; Inside: Performance: Asheville Lyric Opera, Tosca..p3; AmiciMusic..p6;...

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