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Daniel McClendon pg 4 Jacqui Fehl pg 9 310 ART

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Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League pg 33

Magnetic 375

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Asheville Symphony Orchestra pg 19 Local Dining Guide

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20-21 • Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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12-15 • What to Do Guide™

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VERDI’S REQUIEM

ROMEO AND JULIET

April 16 8pm

SHEN LU, piano March 12 • 8pm Elgar Chanson de matin and Chanson de nuit

ZUILL BAILEY RETURNS

Mozart Piano Concerto No. 21 Berlioz Selections from Romeo and Juliet CONCERT SPONSOR

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2015/2016 S E A S O N DANIEL MEYER MUSIC DIRECTOR • THOMAS WOLFE AUDITORIUM • DOWNTOWN ASHEVILLE

2 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

CALL FOR TICKETS: 828.254.7046 www.ashevillesymphony.org


Fine Jewelry & Design Studio pg. 18

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue - Downtown Asheville

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Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 3


ANTHONY GUIDONE

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fine art

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Daniel McClendon

NEW SCHOOL EXPRESSIONIST PAINTER

Rapid River Magazine: What “school” of art would your work be categorized under?

INTERVIEWED By

DENNIS Ray

Daniel McClendon: I have a difficult time categorizing my art, as I’m inspired by so much and I’ve never really subscribed to or identified with a specific movement. My techniques and philosophies vary a lot. But for the sake of ease, I would say I fall into the Expressionist/ Abstract Expressionist school. I’m just a “new school” version... RRM: How long have

Snow Birds, Thompkins Park, NY

Printed on Canvas ~ Gallery Wrap ~ 16x20

Price & Order ~ tguidone@gmail.com

Daniel McClendon Photo: Sandlin Gaither

you been an artist and specifically doing this kind of work?

McClendon: I’ve been creating in some capac-

ity my whole life. I painted my first oil painting 15 years ago while in high school and went on to college to get a BFA focusing specifically on painting realism. But, I’ve only been doing the work I’m recognized by, for about five years — I wrote down the initial concept in the middle of the night on March 21, 2011. It

feels like I’ve been around for a while, but in reality I’m a spring chicken. I’m 31. Despite any achievements I may think I have made, I’m just beginning.

RRM: When looking at your work I notice the majority of it is full of bright color and life. What inspires you to create such vivid designs? McClendon: Yes. I love color! I’m just more

attracted to colors that’s enliven. That’s not to say I don’t have muted colors in my paintings, but I typically air on the side of energetic colors. That’s where a lot of the abstraction comes into play. I challenge myself by exploring how colors work together and use them with line and marks to create interesting dynamics. But it’s important to note that I begin every painting (at least currently) with an abstract black and white painting. Those aren’t even colors!

Steer by Daniel McClendon.

RRM: If a painting isn’t going the way you want it to are you inclined to start over or embrace the idea of ‘happy accidents’? McClendon: I always chug on through a paint-

ing, despite frustrations or challenges. There’s no starting over. No reset button. The famous tv artist Bob Ross spoke of happy accidents as mistakes you embrace. But there’s no right or wrong in my paintings. As far as I’m concerned, my whole existence is a happy accident and work reflects my life philosophy. There’s only what happens and what doesn’t happen. Why dwell on what could have been?

RRM: Where can your work be viewed? McClendon: The Lift Studios at 349 Depot

St. in Asheville is my main show space. It’s a studio first and foremost, but it’s a 5,000 sq ft. building, so I use the vast majority for showcasing finished work. The studio is open Tuesday-Saturday from 11-5 p.m.

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web exclusives Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Nineteen, Number Seven

MARCH 2016

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Short Stories: Kathleen Colburn Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Pat Barcas, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Rosalind Buda, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, Melissa Farina, Lori Greenberg, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Bryan Head, Marilynne Herbert, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Maggie Minor, Kyle Mundt, Dennis Ray, Michelle Rogers, Lindsey Solomon, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz, David Whitehill, Robert Wiley, J. & R. Woods, Anna Lee Zanetti, Andrea Zourzoukis.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, March 2016, Vol. 19 No. 7

SHORT STORIES

4 Fine Art

New stories are added each month!

Daniel McClendon . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Jacqui Fehl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 310 ART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Elizabeth Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Riverview Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Elinor Bowman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . . . . . . 17 Johnnie Stanfield. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Haywoood Gallery & Gifts . . . . . 27 SVFAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

6 Performance

Bovine by Daniel McClendon. Article on page 4.

written by Aaron Ybarra

Hiking the PCT - Hello Oregon, Crater Lake and Mount Hood, written by John Swart

Cookout,

written by Terry Ward

Oh, God!,

written by RF Wilson

The Magnetic Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ACT – 35below . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Hendersonville Chamber Music . . . 7 Pan Harmonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Doric String Quartet. . . . . . . . 18 Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . 19

8 Columns

Mind Over Matter - Happiness, written by Ronya Banks

Ji, the incredible young pianist in Android’s latest “Monotune” commercial, will be the featured artist for the Haywood County Ji began playing the Art Council’s Young piano at the age of five. Artist Concert Series, held at Haywood Arts Regional Theatre on September 30.

American Craft Council Show

Borneo, Part Three,

written by Eddie LeShure written by Tom Davis

Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . . 8 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 24 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 28 Kathleen Colburn – Health . . . . . . 28 Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 29

12 Movie Reviews

Short Story Guidelines are available at www. rapidrivermagazine.com. Kathleen Colburn is editor and curator of the section. She is assisted by RF Wilson. rrshortstories@gmail.com

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-15

20 Local Food

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Great American Dog . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Asheville Brewers Supply . . . . . . . . 21 Kyle and Friends Hootenanny . . . 34

22 Music Mr. Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Nolatet Live. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chamomile and Whiskey . . . . . . . . 23

29 Books 30 What to Do Guide

Ji Featured in Android Commercial

Tomorrow I’ll Start Writing,

Staff Picks from Malaprop’s . . . . . . 29

On the Cover:

Day of the Dog,

ONLY ONLINE

River Arts District . . . . . . . . pgS 10-11 Asheville Gallery of Art . . . . pgS 16-17 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 18-19 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 26-27 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 33

Five local artists with studios in Asheville’s Riverview Station were selected to participate in the American Craft Council Show in Atlanta. Maggie Minor, Matt Tommey, Barbara Zaretsky, Cara May, and Suzanne Gernandt will exhibit their works in the juried, indoor craft show.

The Curmudgeon Winter was coming to an inelegant close, having tired all but the staunchest members of the Western North Carolina area, and the balance between Liberal and Conservative seemed to weigh evenly when balanced one to the other. Written by Peter Loewer.

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

COPYEDITING &

PROOFREADING SERVICES

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 31 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 31 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 31 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 31 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 31

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

rrshortstories@gmail.com

828-581-9031

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 5


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performance

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The Magnetic in March SURPRISES & TWISTS

Surprises are in store for audiences when they go to see The Improbables. The Improbables (An Unlikely Comedy) is the Magnetic Theatre’s sixth full length play since 2011, and one in which Artistic Director Steven Samuels serves as writer, director and actor. Samuels describes the play as an absurdist comedy on how everything in our lives is unlikely. Set in what appears to be the wreck of an old mansion What’s on a mountain in lurking Asheville, it tells the story of an underneath? accountant who travels there for an interview – once he arrives, things take a turn. “I’m hoping the audience is startled, and taken on a journey that surprises them turn by turn,”

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6 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

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said Samuels. “It’s about the implications of how little of what we expect is how the world turns out to be. I really wanted to craft this play with a structure and technique that will surprise myself. What’s lurking underneath?” The Magnetic Theatre specializes in works wholly sourced and original to Asheville, something Samuels says tourists and locals alike can enjoy. “This is real theater, created by people who live and work here. All the shows are so different, it’s just a thrill, and the response of the audience is always astounding,” he said. The Improbables runs from March 17 to April 9 at the Magnetic Theatre. The Theatre also presents Asheville’s Reel Comedy: A Funny Film Extravaganza, March 10 to 12. For tickets and more details, visit www.themagnetictheatre.org.

By JENNy

WNC premiere at 35below.

BUNN

Diana and Daniel Hensley as Diana’s husband Dan. They are Bioflyer Productions in partjoined onstage by Isaac Fulk, nership with Asheville CommuLilly Mills, Dylan Henley, and nity Theater is proud to present Archer Faust. the Broadway hit musical Next “No show on Broadway To Normal. right now makes as direct a Directed by Rock Eblen and grab for the heart — or wrings with music direction by Sarah it as thoroughly — as Next to Fowler, this intriguing rock Normal does…brave, breathmusical is about Diana, a mother taking…a work of muscular who struggles with worsengrace and power.” ing bipolar disorder and the ~ New York Times effect that her illness and the “…heart-melting… sensiattempts to alleviate it have on tively crafted show… someher family. It also addresses such thing inordinately powerful in issues as grieving a loss, suicide, the music and the story, which drug abuse, ethics in modern have been meticulously woven psychiatry, and the underbelly of together by the songwriting Beverly Todd plays Diana suburban life. team of Tom Kitt and Brian in the the Broadway musical When Next To Normal was Next To Normal. Yorkey… beautiful songs named the winner of the 2010 that get to the heart of this Pulitzer Prize for Drama, it bedeceptively complex story — and simply get to came just the eighth musical in history to receive the heart.” ~ Washington Post that honor. Next To Normal also won the Tonys for “Best Original Score,” “Best Performance For more information about Bioflyer Productions and by a Leading Actress in a Musical,” and “Best Next to Normal, visit https://bioflyer.wordpress.com/ Orchestrations.” Besides the awards it won, Next bioflyer/next-to-normal/. To Normal was nominated for two Drama Desk Awards and an additional eight Tony Awards, including “Best Musical” and “Best Book of a IF YOU Next To Normal opens Friday, March Musical.” GO 11 and runs through Sunday, March 27 Bioflyer Productions will present the show with performances Friday and Saturday with a live band in the 40 seat theater known as nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 35below, the intimate black box theatre beneath p.m. Tickets are available online, over the phone, Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut or in person at the Asheville Community Theatre St. in downtown Asheville. Leading roles feature Box Office. All tickets are $20. For tickets or Asheville veteran performers Beverly Todd as information about Asheville Community Theatre, please visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.


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chamber music

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Hendersonville Chamber Music Spring Lineup

If you think of chamber music as oldfashioned and stuffy, think again. Hendersonville Chamber Music brings chamber music up to date and then some! Featuring four superb performing groups, the schedule is sure to please audiences who thoroughly enjoy live performances of compelling music, consummately performed by awardwinning international musicians.

The Chanté Piano Trio

March 13 – Chanté Piano Trio Semifinalists in the prestigious 2015 Fischoff competition and winner of NC’s WDAV 89.9 Chamber Music Competition, these young people, Maria Parrini, Paul Aguilar, and Stephen Hawkey are flawless musicians. Maria Parrini, in the summer of 2012, performed with the Brevard Music Center Orchestra as the youngest winner of the Jan and Beattie Wood Concerto Competition. Their program

P

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ROBERT WILEy

will include: Mozart, Piano Trio in C, K. 548; Brahms, Piano Trio in C, No. 2; and Piazzolla, Oblivion.

March 20 – Ivory Piano Trio Take an exhilarating violin and cello, add a prize winning pianist and we have the makings of an extraordinary afternoon. Soloman Eichner has performed at Steinway Hall, Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, Baltimore’s Salon Concert Series, “The Lives of the Piano” Chopin Marathon Concert at Manhattan School of Music in New York City and “Afternoon Concert Series” at the State Department in Washington DC.

April 10 – The Poinsett Piano Trio After having performed together with great success for several years in other chamber combinations, David Gross, Deirdre Hutton, and Christopher Hutton founded the Poinsett Piano Trio in 2008. All three members of the trio live in Greenville, South Carolina and teach at Furman University. They perform frequently on chamber music series in the United States and made international tours as a Trio to New Zealand in 2010 and 2013, and to Germany in 2012.

The Rutherford Chamber Consort

April 24 – Rutherford Chamber Consort A professional arts organization comprised of both string and wind players, the group is dedicated to bringing great chamber music to the Carolina Foothills. Regionally, players perform actively in Charlotte, Greenville, Asheville, Charleston, Spartanburg, Brevard, Winston-Salem, Greensboro, and with the North Carolina Symphony. Both series and individual tickets at $20 will be available at the door on the day of performance. Subscription holders will be able to use their four subscription tickets for any or all performances. Students are free. More information on hendersonvillechambermusic.org. IF YOU All Hendersonville Chamber Music GO performances are presented on Sunday

afternoons at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. Subscriptions for all four concerts are $ 75 including tax. They are available by mailing a check payable to HFCM, P.O. Box 271 Hendersonville, NC 28793.

Counterparts, New Works, Music and Wine!

Pan Harmonia presents a program featuring sonic counterparts bassoon, saxophone, and piano.

world premier works. In addition, Theisen and Buda will perform together in duo and trio with piano, featuring a concerto for bassoon and saxophone Join bassoonist Rosalind by French composer Buda, saxophonist Alan Marguerite RoesgenTheisen, and pianist Ivan Champion. Seng in one of three venues Buda will presto hear what these stunent two beautiful, ning winds offer as soloists romantic works by and in tandem with each David Kirby and other. From romance to Robert Schumann for contemporary creativity and the sonorous bassoon music with Latin flair, this Alan Theisen Photo: Micah MacKenzie and piano. program is sure to enthrall In thanks and and delight! recognition for all of their work, the March 13 Pan Harmonia promotes music both old concert at First Presbyterian Church will be and new, and is thrilled to present three world free to all NC Public School teachers and their premier works featuring the saxophone on this families. Teachers, please write to Rosalind at program. office@panharmonia.org to reserve your seat, The new pieces are dedicated to the peror come to will call on the day of the concert. former Alan Theisen, and all focus on expresCounterparts: Bassoon and Sax featuring sions of nature – Cicada Song, River Songs, Rosalind Buda, bassoon; Alan Theisen, saxoand Absence Wild are the titles of the three

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ROSaLIND BUDa

phone; Ivan Seng, piano. Tuesday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m. Broyhill Chapel at Mars Hill University. Free admission. Sunday, March 13 at 3 p.m. Asheville First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street Downtown Asheville. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 day of, $5 students, plus 7% NC sales tax. Available online at www.panharmonia.org/shop Sunday, March 20 at 5:30 p.m. Music and Wine Interlude at ISIS Restaurant and Music Hall. Pairing beautiful music with delicious food and wine. Tickets are $15; $7.50 students. Food and wine extra. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com/calendar. IF YOU For more information about GO Pan Harmonia, please visit www.

panharmonia.org, or call (828) 254-7123. If price is a barrier, contact us at write office@ panharmonia.org to volunteer.

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 7


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Life’s a Progression

gREg VINEyaRD

LOVE THE MOMENTS

You know those moments where the thought just won’t gel? Not just that you’ve doodled it out different ways and are still struggling with every little aspect of it, but I mean even before that. A theme has been assigned, research is done, URLs are bookmarked, you’ve lit up Pinterest like a Christmas tree at the coffee house, and everything’s really quite exciting. And, despite all evidence showing you are going to make such a stupendous illustration that the universe will make up some sort of special award just to acknowledge this very amazing thing you’re doing… suddenly your whole being suddenly says “I can’t.” Blocked. I’m not saying my intense description here means this has happened to me, of course. (A million times.) But when it may or may not have happened in my world, the fifteenth sketch is as, well, sketchy, as the fourteen before it. By the way, did I mention this usually happens when the deadline is looming, and almost always only then? While I’m talking specifically about art, this could happen on any type of project in any profession. (Fill In The Blank) Block is a broad-spectrum equal opportunity challenge. And this is in stark contrast to those times when a quick scribble on a napkin in a coffee house is simply scanned-in and becomes a working identity on a major project. We tend

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to forget that decades of experience went into that sketch, and that it wasn’t really a lucky thing like a Lotto win, but rather, simply a nice break. Moving on. The hints I use for myself. (Er, IF I had ever had this problem that I seem to know way too much about.) Detach. Clear your mind. I highly recommend Marvel Comics-related movies. Of course. Change Environments. Or at least move to the other side of the coffee house. New perspectives bring fresh insights. Commiserate. Seriously. Go whine to the friend that knows you, and who will listen even though it’s the exact same thing you whined about last time. Start Earlier. I know this is so bleedingly obvious, but… Work in hourly increments. It helps to literally schedule the studio time. Put down that second Marvel movie, and go draw. Know your “hot” times – mine is 5 a.m. If something has to get done, I go to bed an hour earlier, and get up an hour earlier. And I’m not saying I’m typing this very sentence at 5:11 a.m., but… it’s working out, because I scheduled it. Because I know this is my zone. Change Materials. This can be tricky. I don’t mean change from watercolor to oils, because that’s like, a two-year plan that

Thoughts of Home

CULTURAL IDENTITY AND THE EVOLUTION OF AN ARTIST

This exploratory exhibition examines the narrative work of Vadim Bora and three fellowVladikavkaz artists.

satirical pen and ink drawings, lush landscapes and nudes, it is his exuberant narrative works depicting allegorical village scenes, informed by his growing up in the Caucasus Mountains of Russia, that are The exhibition will include recalled by many. several never-before seen Thoughts of Home works that have been in – Cultural Identity and private collections, as well as the Evolution of an Artist large commissioned pieces, Sweet Dreams, Appalachia, features a sampling of works sculptures, stained glass deby Vadim Bora. from Bora’s colleagues in sign, and jewelry. the Caucasus Mountains of Curated by the artist’s Russia, the late Murat Kaboulov, Natalia widow, the exhibition explores “what is home” Abaeva, and Akhsar Esenov. to an artist who has physically left “home.” Is it simply a place, a state of mind? And how does the concept change the longer one is away IF YOU Thoughts of Home – Cultural Identity and when does the new physical settlement GO and the Evolution of an Artist. Opening become home? The exhibition is a look at the reception March 4 from 5-8 p.m. at the notion of home through the eyes of those who Asheville Area Arts Council, 1 Page Avenue, have wandered far, and compared to those Suite 143A, in Asheville’s historic Grove Arcade. who never left. Exhibit runs through April 2, 2016. For more While Vadim Bora was known for his information, please call (828) 258-0710 and visit public art sculptures, expressive oil portraits, www.ashevillearts.com.

8 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

Treat Time!, 2016. Illustration by Greg Vineyard

really won’t help with that deadline that’s on Wednesday. But perhaps try a yellow pad and a Bic pen. You know, at that new coffeehouse. If one is always on the computer, try dusting off the super-nice sketchpad you haven’t cracked. Rewards. For me, I’m talkin’ Skittles. The only human word I think my cat understands is “Treats!” Which I usually say in a bad British accent. (Between that and BBC radio at night, the poor thing probably thinks he’s in England.) Because of the previous comment, I must mention that diet and exercise and sleep can be a huge help. Because treats can’t become the meal. Step Away From The Vending Machine. Trust that it’ll be alright. The magic will come back. The idea will come. The final drawing will be beautiful. The Skittles will not run out. (OK, we know that one is just a total lie. In my house, anyway.) Every experience is another layer of learning, growing, strengthening. Even though each time I (Allegedly, I tell you!) go through this, it feels the same. I continually learn as I bumble along the path. Some days are tougher than others, and some projects are tougher than others, and sometimes tough projects happen on already-tough days. But the most important thing (besides the treats; seriously, ask my cat) is to stay the course. Just like a series of sketches, life is a progression. A trip. A journey. Since each moment is the only one we get, we can appreciate the process as having value.

Greg Vineyard is a marketingcommunications professional, and an artist and writer living in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries his illustrations, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com


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fine arts & crafts INTERVIEW WITH

INTERVIEWED By

Jacqui Fehl

DENNIS Ray

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Fehl: At home I work in water based media including acrylics, graphite, collage, and pastels. When Rapid River Magazine: When did you first start I paint at the gallery, my mixed painting and how did you start you art career? media work is predominantly oil Jacqui Fehl: I have always been creative but have and cold wax. Slower drying time only been painting seriously for the last three allows me to stop and assist clients. years or so. I also work as a voiceover actress I almost always start by laying and record radio and TV commercials from my down a background. Since I use home studio. Longing to create more than funny lots of layers and materials, I try Fehl’s mixed media works are created voices, I set up an art space a few feet away from to stay free and loose without my predominantly in oil and cold wax. my audio booth. thought to composition in the Over the summer I beginning. As I add, I also subtract began showing and painting at Mark by wiping away or sanding. I work mostly intuitively. The work Bettis Studio and Gallery in the River I have been most proud of are those that “just happened.” If I Arts District. Love the vibe and sense don’t like something when it is “done,” I set it aside for awhile of community and I think I am putting and then just paint over it. That happens quite a lot! out better work now. You can see my work at Mark Bettis Studio and Gallery, 123 Roberts Street, Wedge Building in the River Arts District. RRM: What artists have inspired you I have funky chicken paintings at Rocky’s Hot Chicken (modern and historically)? Shack South location in Arden. Fehl: So many artists have inspired me and the list keeps growing thanks to Facebook, Instagram and PinterJacqui Fehl est. Off the top of my head, Picasso, Jacqui Fehl (828) 551-4637, www.JacquiFehl.com Basquiat, Antoni Tapies, Siliva Poloto, www.Facebook.com/JacquiFehlArt Malgorzata Lasarek and Cy Twombly. www.Instagram.com/JacquiFehl

RRM: How would you describe your

style?

Fehl: My style is a blend of contemporary, abstract, grunge, whimsey and outsider. I love lots of texture, layers, text (often illegible) and line…and, it is always evolving. Always Welcome by Jacqui Fehl

RRM: What is your creative process

like?

‘Daniel McClendon’ cont’d from pg. 4

UPCOMING SHOWS Positive/ Negative 31 National Juried Art Exhibition at ETSU’s Slocumb Gallery, Tigers by Daniel McClendon Johnson City, TN. On display until March 4, 2016. “New Faces,” Group show at Upstairs Art Space Tryon, NC. Opening reception March 12 at 6 p.m. On display through April 27, 2016. One-night Pop-Up Show in Durham, NC residence. Opens April 1 from 6-9 p.m.

pg. 33

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Daniel McClendon For updates and invitations, sign up on the contacts page at www.danielmcclendon.com. www.danielmcclendon.com, www.theliftstudios.com

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 9


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Riverview Station

ERIN KEANE Encaustic + Journals RV

310 ART Anniversary Celebration

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This year marks the 10th anniversary of 310 ART.

Represented by 310 ART Gallery and Southern Highland Craft Guild

www.ErinKeane.com

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Riverview Station, Studio 256 • BlueBirdDesigns.com

Contemporary Fine Art Gallery Featuring the Work of 25 Local Artists

AT RIVERVIEW STATION

Yearning, 16x16 oil by Fleta Monaghan

our community and also serve participants who travel from all around the country to study with us. We Located at Riverview now have an outreach Station in the River Arts scholarship program District, the venture giving training to began in 2006 in one emerging college and room, a 380 sq. ft. space university art majors that served as a classroom, who can get instruction a space to show origiin things not offered in nal artwork by founder their programs. Fleta Monaghan and also “We fund this a working studio daily. through sales of our Since then, the space has 310 garments and from grown in size and evolved Ascent by Fleta Monaghan generous donations. into a unique studio. Our encaustic and cold Now five working artists wax program is the largest and most comhave studio work space, the large gallery prehensive in the region, and we teach shows the work of 25 local fine artists all mediums and subjects in the fine arts and artisans and the original room is a with a focus on contemporary and cutting dedicated classroom. In the current seaedge methods and mediums.” son the school offers courses taught by 9 local accomplished artists and 3 traveling artists who are published authors and nationally known instructors. IF YOU 310 ARTists gala party takes place Monaghan says, “It is because of the GO Friday, April 29 from 4-7 p.m. community effort of the artists who There will be refreshments, lots of show work and teach their specialties we artists on hand, some demos and more. have been able to grow even when the The studio is located at 191 Lyman Street, economy was challenging. Our partici#310 (ground floor north) in Asheville’s pants have made fast lifetime friends and River Arts District. For more details, call grown their skills in the fine arts. We (828) 776-2716, email gallery@310art.com and visit www.310art.com. have been able to reach out to many in

Art Instruction for Adults Year Round All Levels Welcomed We are the oldest independent fine art school for adults in the region.

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Escaping the Fire, 24x24 oil by Fleta Monaghan

310 ART • 191 Lyman Street #310

828-776-2716

Ground Floor North • Asheville, NC 28801 Open Mon-Sat • 310art.com

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10 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

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Elizabeth Henderson Fine Art

Elizabeth Henderson has been painting (and sculpting) since early childhood.

they reflect what is going on in her personal life. Elizabeth is a DC transplant and has been living in Asheville She has lived overseas for more than nine and travelled around the years. To see her art, world. She is especially she has a studio in the interested in indigenous Riverview Station as religious art and archiwell as having her art tecture of the various displayed at Gallery countries she has visited 310 ART. (Also at Rivand studied. Visionary surrealist paintings erview Station). You She studied art for 12 by Elizabeth Henderson. will be amazed at how years at the Corcoran different her art is from any other art you School of Art in Washington, DC. Now will see here in Asheville! calling herself a Visionary Surrealist, Henderson paints very unusual one-ofa-kind paintings which reflect spiritual inspiration. She also finds inspiration by Elizabeth Henderson studying different modern artists, such Riverview Station as Paul Klee, Kandinsky, Miro, Picasso, 191 Lyman, Asheville, 28801 Max Ernst, and Charles Burchfield. riverviewstation.com Her paintings are self portraits in that


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Sahar Fakhoury Sandra Brugh Moore Virginia Pendergrass

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FINE ARTISTS AT TRACKSIDE STUDIOS RIVER ARTS DISTRICT

Riverview Station WHERE CREATIVITY MEETS COMMUNITY

It’s been a long journey since the Riverview Station building was erected in 1902. The gateway to the River Arts District is as strong as ever, with the owners casting a maternal instinct over the artist community housed in the large warehouse on Lyman Street. Helaine Greene purchased the building in 1996 with her sister Trudy Gould after occupying 40,000 square feet of it for several years with their candle making business, Candle Station. The River Arts District wasn’t even a concept yet, and the area cast a post-industrial, unfriendly vibe. The building was largely vacant, with barbed wire fencing circling it. “We could feel the excitement of that past industrial age, and just that sense of making something here,” said Greene, who presently manages the building and its 60 artists, craftspeople and entrepreneurs. “It had something special to it.” They sold Candle Station in 2004, which allowed the sisters to focus on the aging building, which Greene said needed care and updating. The roof was replaced at considerable expense, and infrastructure updated, but she said overall it’s been a good investment. “For us, the way we approached our life and our business was, opportunities came Riverview Station is the large to us and we warehouse on Lyman Street. had a choice to either say yes, or not say yes. We always looked at each other and thought, ‘We can do this.’” Pride shows in Greene’s It is home to a community of face as she working artists and people who describes the teach and help create things. tenants in her building, which she watches over and nurtures to their full potential. These are working artists and people who teach and help create things, companies such as Mountain Glass Arts, which employs 23 people and supplies high quality glass blowing artistry supplies to the glass blowers of Asheville. “We were very fortunate to rent a space to them, we’re just thrilled to have them there because they employ so many people, and they’re an art support business. It’s in tune with what’s going on in the rest

by

Pat Barcas

of the building as well,” she said. Tenants will tell Greene their needs, and she always tries to be flexible and accommodating, with no set building hours and a hands off approach. This allows the building to stay at capacity, and grows the local artist community by proxy. continued on page 34 View from Mount Mitchell, 16 x 20 in oil painting by Sahar Fakhoury www.sahar-art.com

Works by Sahar Fakhoury, Sandra Brugh Moore and Virginia Pendergrass at the Asheville Gallery of Art in its NEW location at 82 Patton Avenue, downtown Asheville.

ELIZABETH HENDERSON

Trackside Studios • 375 Depot Street Open Daily 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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Riverview Station, 191 Lyman Studio #217 + Gallery 310 Art Libets2@icloud.com

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RICHARD C. BAKER Fine Ar t and Por traiture

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344 Depot St., Suite 102 • 828-234-1616 RL

in the River Arts District, Asheville, NC

More information on the River Arts District is available at www.riverartsdistrict.com.

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

 - Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

Hail Caesar! 

Short Take: A playful homage to 1950’s Hollywood from the Coen Brothers. It may not be one of their best films, but it’s incredibly fun, especially for movie buffs.

REEL TAKE: Hail Caesar! is a satirical look at

the old Hollywood studio system by the two present-day filmmakers who could do it best, Joel and Ethan Coen. Taking place in the post WWII, anti-communist, Red scared America, the story depicts a day in the life of Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), a fixer for the fictitious Capitol Pictures (loosely based on the real Eddie Mannix who was a heavy for MGM back in the day). Mannix spends his days (and nights) fixing potential publicity problems. On his shortlist this particular day: protecting the wholesome

George Clooney gets the royal treatment from Josh Brolin in Hail Caesar!

image of DeeAnna Moran, a knocked up Esther Williams-like starlet (Scarlett Johansen), transforming a singing cowboy named Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich) into a serious thespian, and finding Capitol’s biggest star,

THE MONTHLY REEL

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Roll up the Red Carpet

By

MICHELLE KEENaN

by a company out of Texas called Cinemark. We don’t know what that will mean for the Asheville Film Society or screenings of the theatres. The good Professor Metropolitan Opera Kaufmann reviews the Michael and other Fathom Moore documentary Where events, but we’ll let you to Invade Next as well as The know what we hear in Witch, an eerie horror film next month’s issue. set in 17th century Puritanical In the meanwhile, New England. Meanwhile, I screenings for the offer my two cents about the Asheville Film Society latest Coen Brothers comedy are scheduled for Hail Caesar! as well as the Does anyone really think Batman March and we have a Maggie Smith dramedy The vs Superman is a good idea? listing for their TuesLady In The Van. day night line up and In local theatre news, we’re the Thursday Horror Picture Show on page looking forward to the opening of the Grail 15. Likewise, you can find the listing for Movie House in downtown Asheville later The Hendersonville Film Society’s March this spring. The Grail will be an indepenschedule (which includes a tribute to Alan dent, locally owned theatre, screening art and Rickman and the 1925 film version of Ben independent films, locally produced content, Hur) on page 14, hosted by our very own classics, and a regular rotation of cinematic Chip Kaufmann. surprises. We’ve also received word that The Carolina Until next time, enjoy the show! Cinemas on Hendersonville Road, which is a small North Carolina chain, has been bought

Awards Season is over, and with its departure, the annual cinematic drought begins.

It’s easy to make snarky quips about many of this month’s major movie releases. I mean, come on, does anybody actually think this Batman versus Superman thing is a good idea?! For that matter, Ben Affleck may take an even bigger publicity beating for his turn as the caped crusader than he did for the demise of his marriage. But, for better or worse, this month’s biggest movie will likely be Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, opening March 24. Other mainstream titles opening this month that will likely fare well at the box office are London Has Fallen, the Gerard Butler action packed sequel to Olympus Has Fallen, the Sacha Baron Cohen spy spoof Crimsby, Disney’s Zootopia, and, the most promising of the lot, Tina Fey’s Whiskey Tango Foxtrot. If, however, you are on the loftier, snobbier side of cinema-goers you are still in luck. We are very fortunate to have some quality smaller films still playing in local

Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who’s been kidnapped by a group of communist screenwriters just before he’s to shoot the climatic scene for Hail Caesar: A Tale of Christ, the studio’s sword and sandal Technicolor epic. Hunting his every step are rival sibling gossip columnists Thora and Thessaly Thacker (both played by Tilda Swinton). Throughout the chaos we also meet Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), the studio’s all-American song and dance man, a la Gene Kelly; dramatic director Laurence Lorenz (Ralph Fiennes), a la George Cukor; and a chain smoking film editor C.C. Calhoun (Frances McDormand), a la Margaret Booth. With all of this ‘a la’ going on, I don’t quite understand why the Coens used Eddie Mannix’s name instead of creating a fictional Mannix-like character especially when their

12 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

version bears only the slightest resemblance to the real Mannix. Brolin is the perfect pick to play the straight front man to a backdrop of such silliness; his comedic talent is perfectly suited to just such a character. Clooney is the Coen brother’s go-to goofball and he’s delightful as ever to watch. Channing Tatum’s Anchors Aweigh like dance number is fantastic (the audience applauded), and I’m sure he will continue to surprise people with this role. But the revelation here is Alden Ehrenreich as the lovable, lasso roping, aw shucks m’am , singing cowboy. He and Ralph Fiennes share a scene that’s funnier than anything since Abbott and Costellos’s “Who’s on First” routine. The Coen Brothers also make good use of his character throughout the story, while some of the others have far less with which to work. The film pokes fun and mocks the old Hollywood system, which was sadly beginning to crumble at the time, but it’s also a love letter to that bygone era. Veteran cinematographer Roger Deakins does a great job recreating the era and there are countless references (including but not limited to: Ben Hur, On The Town, Million Dollar Mermaid, Audie Murphy, Carmen Miranda, gossip columnists Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons, the Lorretta Young/Clark Gable love child that Young was forced to actually adopt to stave off a scandal), and many more I’m sure I missed. Hail Caesar! is clearly going to be funnier to anyone with a movie geek pedigree, but it’s not necessary to enjoy the film. Rated PG-13 for some suggestive content and smoking. Review by Michelle Keenan

The Lady in the Van  ½

Short Take: The “mostly true” story of British playwright Alan Bennett and “Miss Shepherd” the titular Lady in the Van.

REEL TAKE: Nicholas Hytner’s The Lady in the Van is a downright oasis in the otherwise vapid post-award season wasteland. This is especially true for the 65+ Masterpiece Theatre demographic. So under-served are they that the film played to sold out crowds opening weekend. It took me four tries before I finally made it in to see the film. Who knew Maggie Smith Movies continued on page 13


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Touching, charming, sad and funny, The Lady in the Van is anything but [shit]. Rated PG-13 for a brief unsettling image. Review by Michelle Keenan

The Witch  ½

Short Take: Absorbing low budget film set in 17th century New England is genuinely creepy and disturbing but is too slow moving for your average horror fan.

REEL TAKE: When I first heard about The

Alex Jennings takes Maggie Smith for a joy ride in The Lady in the Van.

Witch, it sounded as if it was going to be a 17th century version of The Blair Witch Project. I hadn’t seen a trailer for it, but the fact that it created quite a stir at Sundance piqued my curiosity. I got to see it at an advance screening for local critics and I was stunned by how good and how singular it was. There have been numerous movies about witchcraft and witches over the years beginning with a 1922 Swedish film called Witchcraft through the Ages (Haxan) which this film resembles in many ways although it is much narrower in scope. Haxan deals with European folklore concerning witches over a long period while The Witch focuses on 1630 New England only.

would be such a hot ticket at the age of 81!? It’s with good reason too. The actress, who has most recently charmed American audiences as the aristocratic Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham (and of piercingly funny one-liners) on Downton Abbey, delivers a pitch perfect performance as the titular character. The Lady in the Van tells the story of the eccentric “Miss Shepherd” and homeless but formidable woman who parked her van on Gloucester Crescent in the Camden Town area of London in the mid-1970’s and stayed fifteen years, most of which was spent in the driveway of British writer and playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings). The experience inspired a book, a radio and theatrical play, and now movie, all written by Bennett, all performances featuring Smith as “Miss Shepherd”. Intelligently and thoughtfully crafted, the film showcases the unlikely friendship (or an alliance of sorts) formed by Bennett and Shepherd. As Bennett gets to know the crusty old squatter in his driveway, he realizes that she is an educated and religious Anya Taylor-Joy gives a remarkable performance (devoutly Catholic) woman. She is proud as the young daughter accused of witchcraft in and feisty, but these attributes are sometimes the visually striking and genuinely eerie 17th overshadowed by mental illness and fear. century horror film, The Witch. The mystery lies in her past; what thing or things happened to her that drove her to such Another movie that has something of the an existence? same feel is the 1970 British cult classic Blood Shepherd’s and Bennett’s paths were well on Satan’s Claw which is also set in the 17th suited to cross. Each was a misfit in their own century. It deals primarily with the children of way – she an outcast of society, he a closeted a small English village who become possessed homosexual, each carefully guarding their or “infected” by witchcraft and what happens secrets. Smith has garnered most of the praise to them as a result. and attention for the film, but Jennings is I mention these two earlier movies because every bit her equal, and together they share a they are personal favorites of mine that I have wonderful chemistry. watched many times. For me, to place The Bennett and Hytner, who have collaboWitch in their company is high praise indeed. rated on several projects, smartly relay the As soon as it comes out on DVD, I plan to add tale with two Bennett’s – Bennett the writer it to my collection. I still collect DVDs for the and Bennett the mild fellow with the batty special features they offer and for their incluold woman living in his driveway. This is a sion of subtitles. creative touch that serves the story especially Those would have been handy for The well. Never once do they sugarcoat it or fall Witch, and this will be a turn-off for many, prey to sophomoric sentimentality – from is written and the dialogue spoken in 17th “Miss Shepherd’s” hygiene to the treatment century English. It’s like listening to the of plight of indigent and mentally ill people – Bible on tape, but that is how these characthey keep it razor sharp and strikingly honest. ters would have spoken back then, and it was As the writer, Mr. Bennett says to the real Mr. very brave of writer-director Robert Eggers Bennett, “If I ever write about this, people will say there is too much about shit.” Movies continued on page 15

Open House/Filmmaker Mixer

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+ Student Film Screenings By

BETH RHyNE

View the Asheville School of Film’s recent student films at the Asheville Pizza and Brewing Company on Merrimon Ave., Sunday, March 6. Congratulate the students for a job well done! Films will be shown from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. No fee or tickets are required, but patrons are encouraged to stay for lunch or a movie. The Asheville School of Film (ASoF) will also host a spring Open House and Filmmaker Mixer on Sunday, March 13 from 3-6 p.m. Join the school’s faculty and local film community as they mingle, socialize, and discuss upcoming classes. Light snacks and beverages provided. RSVP is requested via Facebook or ashevilleschooloffilm@ gmail.com.

The Spring Open House and Filmmaker Mixer takes place Sunday, March 13 from 3-6 p.m.

The very unique and rare opportunity to Shoot and Edit on Actual (Celluloid) Film, will take place during a 4-day workshop, held April 2-3 and 16-17. It will High Concept Commercial Production, allow participants the chance to work with an 8-week course beginning March 7, will 16 and 35 mm film, a rare and discipling guide students through the actual producexperience. tion of a high quality commercial for an ASoF is collaborating with the New Asheville distilling company. York Studio for Stage and Screen, The Meisner Acting Conservatory for the Southeast (NYS3), to host Closing the Chasm in Front and Behind the Camera. Featuring Kelly Mcgillis, this workshop takes place April 30 and May 1. This interactive course is a great opportunity for student directors and actors to work together to understand each other’s roles and become more effective. Details for all classes and deadlines for enrollment can be found at www.ashevilleschooloffilm.com. Students who have Great opportunities for students to learn about completed one course with the the needs of independent filmmakers. Asheville School of Film are eligible for class discounts of 20%. ASoF’s Location Sound Recording On A Budget workshop, with Sid Williams and David Schmidt, held March 19, will IF focus on the needs of independent filmYOU The Asheville School of Film is makers. ASoF also offers Film 101, 201, GO located at 45 S. French Broad Ave. and 301 courses. Ste. 120 in downtown Asheville. Go Teen filmmakers can register for the online to www.ashevilleschooloffilm.com Spring into Film - Youth Moviemaking or call 1-844-AVL-FILM (285-3456) for Project, a 4-day course held during spring more information. break, starting March 29.

UPCOMING COURSES

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film reviews HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used too, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. This month there are only three films as March 27 is Easter Sunday. First up is the movie that transformed Dick Powell from a 1930s crooner into a 1940s tough guy. Next up is the story of how California wines reached equality with French wines. Finally, for Palm Sunday, there’s the beautifully restored original 1925 version of Ben-Hur. March 6:

Murder, My Sweet

(1945) This vivid but watered down version of Raymond Chandler’s Farewell My Lovely revitalized Dick Powell’s career. He plays tough private eye Philip Marlowe who is trying to find a gangster’s moll but winds up discovering a whole lot more. Joining Powell are Anne Shirley and Otto Kruger. Directed by Edward Dmytryk. March 13:

Bottle Shock (2008) This droll, informative comedy follows the exploits of a British wine snob in California who plans to take back Napa Valley wine and enter it in a French wine tasting competition. The movie is based on the 1976 event known as “The Judgment of Paris.” Alan Rickman, Chris Pine, and Bill Pullman are the featured players. Directed by Randall Miller. March 20: Ben-Hur (1925) 34 years before the much better known Charlton Heston version, MGM made this “greatest epic of the silent era.” Utilizing a strong cast and employing every known special effects trick in the book, this original version can more than hold its own with the 1959 blockbuster. The movie stars Ramon Novarro and Francis X. Bushman. Directed by Fred Niblo. March 27: Easter Sunday No show scheduled.

Movies continued from page 13

to do it that way. This makes The Witch a very hard film to recommend for a mainstream audience. The fact that it is being marketed as a horror film makes it even harder. Older audiences generally avoid horror films altogether while younger audiences want lots of action and carnage. There is little of that to be found here although when the movie shifts into horror film mode, it is truly memorable. The basic story is simple enough. A Puritan family is banished from their community for religious difference with the Town Elders. These differences are never specified but they

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Roger & Me”

are unimportant as they are a plot device to get the family out of the village and into a farm where they try to make a go of it. At first things seem to be going well enough but then strange happenings begin to occur and slowly the family begins to disintegrate. It starts with the sudden disappearance of the family infant. After a quick search to no avail (we know that the baby was taken by a witch), suspicion falls on the oldest daughter Thomasin. When her older brother goes in search of the child and then disappears, the rest of the family (Father, Mother, 2 younger siblings) turn against her. To say more than that would be giving away too much but add to the above scenario, ani-

March DVD Picks

Roger & Me (1989)

After seeing Michael Moore’s latest effort Where to Invade Next (see my review this issue), I was immediately reminded of his first effort, the playful but incisive documentary Roger & Me. Back in 1989 Moore was younger, slimmer, and not as overtly angry as he would later become. The trademarks of Moore’s documentary style are all here…the humor, the extensive use of vintage footage, the sense of quiet outrage, and his unabashedly liberal point-of-view. Moore has no intention of being objective which calls into question whether Roger & Me is a true documentary. Yes and no. The facts it presents are real and the footage is real it’s just manipulated by Moore to help achieve the points he wants to make. Using humor to criticize and illuminate is the classic definition of satire so what we have here is a “satirementary”. It may not have been pioneered by Michael Moore but no one does it better. The topic is the closing of the General Motors auto plant in Moore’s hometown of Flint, Michigan (now sadly back in the news for a much more devastating reason). Moore sets out to interview the then head of General Motors, Roger Smith, about why the plant was closed. Along the way he makes several astute social and economic observations about the America of the 1980s. Of course he never does interview Smith. That was never really the point. The point is to show how corporate profits are obtained at the expense of a loyal workforce and how greed is destroying working and middle class America. The vintage footage and the interviews with Miss Michigan (later Miss America 1988) and Bob Eubanks of The Dating Game expose the hypocrisy and the ignorance at work in the American mindset.

14 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

The most disturbing thing about Roger & Me is that it was made almost 30 years ago and that the things Moore shines a light on have only gotten worse. It may also explain why his later documentaries lost the playful tone that he uses here (and recovered in Where to Invade Next). If you want to see the seeds The Big Short in both style and content, this is where you start.

Spotlight (2015)

At press time the Academy Awards have not yet been handed out but my vote, among the nominees for Best Picture, is for Spotlight. Most people I know didn’t seem to think a movie about a group of journalists from the Boston Globe who expose the massive cover up of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church sounded like a fun night at the movies. Now available on DVD, I’m hoping more folks will take the time to watch this must-see movie. The film centers around four investigative journalists who produce the “Spotlight” section of the Boston Globe. Michael Keaton plays Robby Robinson, the editor of the “Spotlight” team. Mark Ruffalo as Mike Rezendes, Rachel McAdams as Sacha Pfeiffer and Brian D’Arcy James as Matt Carroll round out his team, with John Slattery as Boston Globe publisher Ben Bradlee, Jr. When new editor, Marty Baron (Liev Sch-

mals with supernatural powers and real things not being what they seem and you enter a magical but terrifying world experienced from the family’s point of view. Although portrayed in a realistic manner, the film is quick to point out in the ending credits that the events we have witnessed are based not on reality but on what 17th century Americans thought witches were capable of. The performances by a cast of relative unknowns are uniformly fine with Anya Taylor-Joy a standout as the suspected daughter. Ralph Ineson as the father has the look and the voice of the late, lamented Alan Rickman (they were in Harry Potter & the Deathly Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Spotlight” reiber) comes to the Globe by way of the New York Times and the Miami Herald, everyone anticipates a shakeup. When Baron assigns the Spotlight crew a piece about a priest suspected of pedophilia they have their doubts (they are all lapsed or non-practicing Catholics) and they have their concerns; 53% of the Globes readership was Catholic and the church held (and holds) much power in Boston. But as the investigation unfolds it unearths a much bigger story - not just one priest but dozens and dozens. The magnitude of the investigation is lost on no one. Watching journalists research and document their story is not typically riveting stuff, but here it’s fascinating. The Catholic Church’s sex abuse scandal is tough, tough subject to palate but here we can; the film handles a heinous situation with compassionate humanity. We know how the story ends, but somehow it’s still suspenseful. Ultimately Spotlight pulls off everything it sets out to do yet never failing to be deeply moving and compelling entertainment. Director Tom McCarthy (Win Win, The Visitor) strikes all the right notes. The script is stunning. The pacing is perfect. The acting is amazing. There are no false steps, no weak links, and all of it feels so very real. Attention to details and subtle nuance give this film great life. It works on all levels. Even the hue of the film somehow feels like newspaper; don’t ask me to explain it, it just does. In many ways Spotlight resembles All the President’s Men; a few tenacious print media reporters going up against a Goliath. It’s a brand of dogged journalism and integrity that is found in few places these days. Spotlight isn’t a message movie. It’s never preachy, but it effectively shines a spotlight on the societal importance of long format journalism and the search for truth.


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Hallows together). The Witch was stunningly photographed on location in Ontario and was purchased at Sundance for the unbelievably low price of $1 million. If only the majority of films with 50 to 100 times the budget were half this good. Rated R for disturbing violent content and graphic nudity. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Where to Invade Next 

Short Take: Michael Moore’s most accessible documentary since Roger & Me has the filmmaker visiting different countries in search of good ideas to bring back to America.

REEL TAKE: It has been 27 years since Michael Moore first burst on scene with his clever documentary Roger & Me (see my DVD Pick). Since 1989 he has produced seven more docs, several shorts and TV episodes, as well as one completely fictional satire Canadian Bacon (1995) where the U.S. plans to start a war with Canada. Now we have his eighth documentary Where to Invade Next which marks a return to the more whimsical but still perceptive attitudes expressed in Roger & Me. This is a departure from the strident “Rush Limbaugh of the Left” approach that he uses in such films as Bowling for Columbine and Fahrenheit 9/11. I approached Where to Invade Next with caution. While I agree with many of Michael Moore’s conclusions, I’m frequently annoyed at the heavy handed approach he uses to dem-

In Where to Invade Next Michael Moore visits several countries in the hopes of bringing back social ideas for use in America.

onstrate them. For whatever reason, Moore decided to return to presenting the material in a straightforward and deadpan manner allowing us to appreciate the irony and see the results for ourselves. The movie opens with Moore tackling his famous un-objectivity straight away. “I’m searching for roses, not for weeds” he tells us and then he proceeds to visit several different countries in the hopes of coming across some good ideas to bring back to America and make it a better place. In France he encounters the incredible school lunches prepared by French chefs for even the most remote school districts (a real eye opener), and then it’s off to Italy where he learns about Italian workers’ extended paid vacations, which make for a much happier work force. A trip to Tunisia showcases that country’s free health care for all of its citizens. The most surprising segments come from Scandinavia. In Norway he visits several model prisons and then, in the film’s most

powerful sequence, interviews a father whose son was killed along with several other students by a mass murderer who was given 21 years in prison (Norway’s maximum sentence). The father harbors no thoughts of injustice or revenge. In Finland students spend less time in classrooms, have virtually no homework, and yet rank among the best in the world. In Iceland, which had a banking crisis of its own, the perpetrators were jailed (check out The Big Short to see what we did) and now the country is governed primarily by women and thriving. At the end of each visit, Moore plants an American flag and proudly claims this country’s idea for the U.S. The punch line to Where to Invade Next is the ultimate irony. All of these better ideas originated in America but were either abandoned or never implemented. Of course Moore is playing with his usual stacked deck and a good argument could be made that these countries are all way smaller than the U.S and most of them (especially the Scandinavian countries) lack any real diversity. Nevertheless it’s good to be reminded of what once WAS in America and now IS in other parts of the world. The final segment at the Berlin Wall memorial is Michael Moore’s ultimate lesson for America as he and a friend recall how it was protesters and not tanks and guns that brought about the end of the Soviet Union and the re-unification of Germany. As Frank Zappa once said “It Can’t Happen Here” but in an election year, it’s a nice thought to harbor. Rated R for language, some violent images, drug use, and brief graphic nudity. Review by Chip Kaufmann

ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the Society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special Members Only events and screenings. March 8:

Blond Venus (1932) Struggling to pay her husband’s medical expenses while raising a young son, a German nightclub performer’s relationship with a rich womanizer prompts her mate to desert her until, years later when she is a star attraction, they are reunited and all is explained in this classic Marlene Dietrich melodrama. Directed by Josef von Sternberg. March 15: Queen Christina (1933) Greta Garbo stars as the title character, a 17th-century Swedish monarch whose life is chronicled from her rise to the throne, to the moment she gave it up for the love of a Spanish ambassador played by Garbo’s one time lover and co-star John Gilbert. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian. March 22:

Band of Outsiders

THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW The Asheville Film Society presents free horror movies every Thursday night at 8 p.m., in Theatre 6 at the Carolina Cinemas on Hendersonville Road.

a noted psychiatrist, in hopes of freeing herself of a mysterious evil influence. Stars Otto Kruger, Gloria Holden and Marguerite Churchill. Directed by Lambert Hillyer.

of replacing the Monster’s current criminal brain with a normal one. Stars Cedric Hardwicke, Lon Chaney, Jr. and Ralph Bellamy. Directed by Erle C. Kenton.

March 3: Phantom of The Paradise

March 17: Son of Dracula

March 31: Man Made Monster /

(1974) A disfigured composer sells his soul for the woman he loves so that she will perform his music. However, an evil record tycoon betrays him and steals his music to open his rock palace, The Paradise. Stars Paul Williams, William Finley and Jessica Harper. Directed by Brian De Palma.

(1943) Count Alucard (read his name backwards) finds his way from Budapest to the swamps of the Deep South; his four nemeses are a medical doctor, a university professor, a jilted fiancé and the woman he loves. Stars Lon Chaney, Jr., Robert Paige and Louise Allbritton. Directed by Robert Siodmak March 24:

March 10:

Ghost of Frankenstein

(1936) Hungarian countess Marya Zaleska seeks the aid of

(1942) When Ygor brings the Monster to Dr. Ludwig Frankenstein for care, Ludwig gets the idea

Dracula’s Daughter

(1964) Two crooks with a fondness for old Hollywood B-movies convince a language student to help them commit a robbery. The disaffected three plan a burglary, leading to deadly results. Stars Anna Karina, Claude Brasseur and Daniele Girard. Directed by Jean-Luc Godard.

Horror Island

March 29: The Dreamers

(1941) It’s a creature double feature! A mad scientist turns a man into an electricallycontrolled monster to do his bidding in Man Made Monster, and a down-on-his luck businessman organizes an excursion to Sir Henry Morgan’s Island for a treasure hunt only to encounter a mysterious phantom and murder in Horror Island. Directed by George Waggner.

(2003) The tumultuous political landscape of Paris in 1968 serves as the backdrop for a tale about three young cineastes who are drawn together through their passion for film. Stars Michael Pitt, Eva Green and Louis Garrel. Directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

IF YOU GO: Carolina Cinemas, 1640

Hendersonville Rd. For more information, go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety, or call (828) 274-9500.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 15


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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

On display at the Asheville Gallery of Art and Seven Sisters Gallery, Black Mountain

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Gallery of Art

Elinor Bowman

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After a career in business, Elinor Bowman began painting in 1996, first in art-process sessions, then taking lessons in oil painting. Bowman says of her art, “Growing up, I never imagined I would become an artist.” When she moved to Asheville in 2002, she studied at the Fine Arts League of Asheville, where the emphasis was on classical methods of portraiture and figure drawing. Bowman has also

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joyce@joycepaints.com ~ 828-456-4600 www.joycepaints.com

Jane Molinelli

Blue Reflection, oil, 8”x8”

expressive contemporary painter

Mary E. Decker

Works by Cheryl Keefer Available at: NorthLight Studios, 357 Depot Street in the River Arts District Asheville Gallery of Art, 82 Patton Avenue, Asheville Seven Sisters Gallery, 117 Cherry Street, Black Mountain Mahogan House Mahogany Gallery, 240 Depot St., Waynesville Up Against the Wall Gallery, 316 E. Market St., Kingsport, TN

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT: 310 Art, River Arts District pg. 18

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Asheville Gallery of Art, Downtown Asheville jmolinelliart.com

828-450-1104 • www.Cher ylKeefer.com

t.e. siewert

Asheville Gallery of Art • 82 Patton Avenue, Downtown pg. 18

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Chartreuse Moose Fine Art • chartreusemoose.com

ELINOR BOWMAN ASHEVILLE, NC

encaustic landscapes

WORKS ON DISPLAY AT:

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Asheville Gallery of Art • 16 College St. tesiewert.com

Asheville Gallery of Art Downtown Asheville Red House Gallery Black Mountain The Wedge River Arts District pg. 18

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www.elinorbowman.com

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Opening Reception

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“New Horizons” for March

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Asheville Gallery of Art’s March show, “New Horizons,” will feature the work of artists, Anne Bonnyman, Cathyann Burgess, and Johnnie Stanfield.

Anne Bonnyman paints natural and urban landscapes using oils and acrylics. She has lived in the SouthFrench Broad Overflow, painting by eastern US, the Cathyann Burgess Mid-Atlantic, and New England, where she says she has ing for more than five years. The This will be the first “discovered new landscapes injury also prompted her to return to show in the Asheville to celebrate through color the classroom, where she pursued a Gallery of Art’s new locaon canvas.” She now lives in degree as a graphic designer and took tion at 82 Patton Avenue. Asheville and continues to on photography, which she claims is The diverse themes repexplore the worlds of light, an old passion of hers. Stanfield has resented by these three Mountain Memory, painting by line, and color, as well as won various awards for her painting new members highlight Anne Bonnyman the narrative possibilities for and drawings over the years. The artist the range of work found painting from contemporary states, “I am looking forward to being at AGA, Asheville’s images and experience. a part of AGA’s next phase as we move longest-established downtown gallery. Cathyann Burgess states her goals as a into our new gallery.” painter have always been to convey her direct experiences with people, places or things that have been illuminated in a certain way. “Light ‘Elinor Bowman’ cont’d from pg. 16 IF on form is what grabs me,” she says. Her reYOU Meet the artists at a reception GO on Friday, March 4 from 5 to sponse to forms is deeply felt and she believes studied with several teachers, and par8 p.m. “New Horizons” runs painting best tells her story. “I want the viewer ticipated in numerous workshops. from March 1 through March 31. to feel a sense of peace with the inquiry, Bowman’s favorite subjects have Their work and that of the other 26 inviting him or her to escape the noisiness of been people, though she also enjoys gallery members will be on display our real world. If that happens, I am pleased painting still lifes and landscapes. and for sale through the month during because then I have shared my world view as if Experimenting with different regular hours, Monday through in conversation,” Burgess says. mediums— Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The gallery Johnnie Stanfield just recently emerged ink, watercolor is located at 82 Patton Avenue in back on the art scene after a serious injury and oil—also Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. to her right hand that kept her from paintinterests her. For the past several years, Bowman has focused on painting or drawing live models in watercolor and Seated in Gold, ink. As she are being featured as part of the galJohnnie Stanfield has joined the watercolor by works, she says lery’s New Horizon’s show. Stanfield’s Elinor Bowman Asheville Gallery of Art at their new she can see work includes a series of antique location, 82 something of the persona of the subject fishing lures studies. Her “Blast from emerge on the page. “Right now, for Patton avenue. the Past” collection consists of a swirl me, watercolor is the most interesting of electric and acoustic guitars, pianos, Just inside medium. I like the process, not always old radios, antique typewriters, and the double glass being able to predict how the painting of course her favorite subject, equine doors, the gallery will turn out. I’m currently enjoying subjects and horses. is showcasing working with varied subject matter, as Most work is available as originals more than 40 well as seeing how watercolor behaves – reproductions and commissions pieces of work (or doesn’t).” available on request. from various series and size ranges – from 3 x Asheville Gallery of Art Paintings by Elinor Bowman can be 5 inch watercolors found at the Asheville Gallery of Art 82 Patton Ave., downtown Asheville to huge 5 x 5 foot downtown, in the Wedge in Asheville’s Hours: 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tacoma l, watercolor by canvas acrylics. River District, and on her website, Johnnie Stanfield www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com These works www.elinorbowman.com.

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“Night Lights” by Anne Bonnyman

“The Co-Writer: Willie Nelson’s Guitar Trigger” by Johnnie Stanfield

Johnnie Stanfield

NEW ARTIST AT ASHEVILLE GALLERY OF ART

“Winter’s Blanket” by Cathyann Burgess

On Display at Our NEW Location!

82 Patton Avenue, Downtown

ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 82 Patton Avenue

Downtown Asheville www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Opening March 1 Mon. - Sat. 11-6pm pg. 18

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828.251.5796

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Doric String Quartet

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WITH PIANIST JONATHAN BISS

28 Ashland Ave • Downtown Asheville First Friday Art Walks – April through

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1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery 4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery 9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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Surrealist Magician David London

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the Doric String Quartet has emerged as the leading British string quartet amongst the The Doric String Quartet has emerged as new generation, the leading British string quartet amongst the receiving glowing new generation. The concert will be responses from held at the Unitarian audiences and critics across Universalist CongregaIF Pianist Jonathan Biss the globe. Highlights of tion of Asheville. YOU The Doric String Quartet with the 2013-14 season inDescribed by GO Pianist Jonathan Biss, Sunday, cluded return visits to the Amsterdam April 3 at 4 p.m. at the Unitarian Gramophone as “one of the Concertgebouw and the Hamburg Universalist Congregation of Asheville, finest young string quartets,” corner of Edwin Place and Charlotte Laeiszhalle as well as three perforStreet. Tickets are $38 each. mances at London’s Wigmore Hall. Pianist Jonathan Biss has appeared To purchase tickets or for more with the foremost orchestras in the information please visit the ACMS website: www.ashevillechambermusic.org United States, including the Los AngeDecember – 5 to 8 p.m. or call Nathan Shirley at (828) 575-7427 les and New York Philharmonics; the or support@ashevillechambermusic.org. Boston, Chicago, and San Francisco Woodfi n St. Symphonies, and the Cleveland and O 12 Philadelphia Orchestras. L

Broadway St.

WNC’s Largest Selection of Pre-Owned Bikes and Accessories.

Probably the Oldest Bike Shop in the U.S.

The Asheville Chamber Music Series will present the Doric String Quartet with Pianist Jonathan Biss in concert on Sunday, April 3 at 4 p.m.

Magician David London presents a two day celebration of wonder, magic, play and creativity on March 11 & 12.

ing the Imagination. He regularly performs his unique style of magic at theaters, museums, galleries, and festivals, and has presented his shows, workshops and lectures throughout the United States. David London’s Weekend of Magic at the Altamont Theatre will feature two performances of David’s Magic Outside The Box Cabaret Show, and a $2 performance of his family show, The Adventure to the Imagi Nation.

David combines magic with storytelling, comedy, puppetry, surrealism, philosophy, and that which cannot be defined, to create original shows of magic unlike anything you have experienced before. David discovered that he was a magician at the age of seven, and has since Magician David London spent over 20 years trying Magic Outside The Box to figure out just what that Cabaret Show means. Join David London on a journey to He has created five original thesomeplace else. Featuring excerpts from atrical magic productions, including his previous theatrical productions, Cerebral Sorcery, …Art of Dreams, this 75-minute show is packed full of and The Creative Spirit Séance, and laughs, mystery, and the unexpected! has authored eight manuscripts related Recommended for ages 15+. to magic and illusion, including Daydreams, Borderland State, and Imagin-

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The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Beloved Works by Berlioz and Mozart

Asheville Symphony Performs March 12.

By

DaVID WHITEHILL

The scintillating music of appetizers performed in Berlioz’s Romeo and Juliet tandem: Chanson de matin and a beloved Mozart piano and Chanson de nuit.” concerto will be on display Single tickets for all Saturday, March 12, as the concerts are $22 – $62 deAsheville Symphony prespending on seating section; ents its fifth Masterworks reduced youth pricing is concert of the season. available. Single tickets The concert, under the and season ticket packages director of Music Director can be purchased at www. Daniel Meyer, will begin ashevillesymphony.org, by at 8 p.m. in Thomas Wolfe calling (828) 254-7046, or Auditorium. in person at the U.S. Cel“Hector Berlioz wanted lular Center box office at to retell Shakespeare’s classic 87 Haywood Street. Pianist Shen Lu Romeo and Juliet,” Meyer The Asheville Symsaid. “We will present the phony Orchestra performs orchestral portions of this fascinating work, and promotes symphonic music for the including the famous Scene d’Amour, the benefit, enjoyment and education of the Queen Mab Scherzo, and Romeo at the people of Western North Carolina. The Tomb of the Capulets.” ASO presents concerts in the Thomas Shen Lu, Cleveland Institute of Music Wolfe Auditorium in Asheville’s U.S. student and Hilton Head International Piano Cellular Center. Competition winner, joins the ASO for Related organizations include the Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21, one of the Asheville Symphony Guild, Asheville most well-known and best-loved piano conSymphony Chorus, Asheville Symphocertos. Lu also won First Prize in the Hong nettes, and education initiatives such as Kong Open Piano Competition. the Asheville Buncombe Youth OrchesHe has appeared as guest soloist with the tra, Music in the Schools, MusicWorks!, Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra, Spotlight on Young Musicians, SymphoHilton Head Symphony Orchestra, Orlando ny Talk and pre-concert lectures. Philharmonic Orchestra and New England Conservatory Philharmonic Orchestra. His performance with the Central Conservatory IF YOU Romeo and Juliet, Saturday, of Music Youth Orchestra was broadcast GO March 12 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $22 on CCTV, the largest national television – $62 (prices vary depending on network in China. seating section); reduced youth and The program will open with two works student pricing available. Info/Tickets: by Edward Elgar, Chanson de matin and Symphony Office (828) 254-7046, www. Chanson de nuit. ashevillesymphony.org. Tickets available “Elgar is revered for his orchestral masin person at the U.S. Cellular Center terpieces, including two grand symphonies,” box office at 87 Haywood St. Concert held at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium in Meyer said. “He also mastered the miniadowntown Asheville. ture, and this concert begins with two such

‘David London’ cont’d from pg. 18

The Adventure to the Imagi Nation Family Show

Magic, storytelling, and interactive play take children of all ages on a journey to the Imagi Nation – a far away place found within each one of us. Meet the mayor, take a ride in a hot air balloon, behold the phantasmata flower, and that’s just the first

The Asheville Art Museum The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack. The Asheville Art Museum, 2 S. Pack Square at Pack Place, Asheville. Call (828) 253-3227, or visit www.ashevilleart.org.

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Illustration and Pop Culture Art

21 Battery Park • zapow.com That Fun Gallery in Downtown Asheville

www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com 4 Biltmore Avenue 20 828.277.1272

keep the fire alive

Mexican fire opal with orange and yellow sapphires by Paula Dawkins

10 minutes! Recommended for ages 5-11. This show is being presented for just $2! Visit www.MagicOutsideTheBox.com

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

IF YOU Magician David London, March GO 11 & 12 at the The Altamont

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www.jewelsthatdance.com

828-254-5088 63 Haywood St. Downtown Asheville Hours: Mon - Sat 10:30 - 6 Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 19


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Advertise in Our Local Food Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Your Passport to Discovering Excellent Food

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HENDERSONVILLE’S “BEST KEPT SECRET”

Just outside of downtown Hendersonville is a small, independently owned hot dog shop called Great American Dog. But don’t let the name fool you. While they do indeed serve a wide selection of specialty hot dogs, the menu runs the gamut from chargrilled burgers, sandwiches, salads, chicken tenders and seafood baskets to clam chowder.

Fresh and delicious seafood basket. Photo: Amber Combs

Seafood baskets at a hotdog joint, you may ask? Yes, and lobster rolls! And these are like the ones in Maine or Boston. I just got back from a wedding where the groom is from Maine and his family flew down to North Carolina with whole lobsters to make lobster rolls for the pg. 26

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Open Daily for Breakfast and Lunch Featuring the Freshest Food from Local Suppliers.

64 Haywood St ◆ Downtown Asheville Open Daily 8am-3pm C

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Great American Dog

Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

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20 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

By

MICHELLE ROgERS

wedding. These were amazing and very similar to Great American Dog’s lobster meat. But I’m getting ahead of myself. We walked in at 2 p.m. on a Tuesday and there were still people in line at the register and customers sprinkled around the small shop. This many people here this late in the day, told me this is a popular lunch spot. One trip advisor review described it as “the best kept secret in town.” After reading the extensive hand-written board menu, we decided to try the Mixed Seafood Basket to get a sample of everything seafood, and of course, I wanted to try the hot dogs. I went with the Carolina Dog – slaw, chili, mustard, and grilled onions; and the Great American Dog – grilled onions, spicy red relish, mustard, and ketchup. We sat down inside, though there were tables with umbrellas outside, and soaked in the scenery – lots of locals it looked like, many regulars, country music on the radio, and a patriotic decor. Our food arrived promptly and we were taken aback by the spread. After trying everything, Tom came out of the kitchen where he was working and sat down with us to tell us about how fresh everything is at his establishment. He orders New England scallops kept dry, not soaked, which keeps the quality high. And he gets “real deal” lobster and whole clams shipped from Maine. The fried scallops were indeed my favorite – tender, flaky, and buttery. You really don’t need sauce with these. The fried oysters tasted like the ocean, clean and fresh. The shrimp, clams, and clam strips were a nice treat. These were served with hand cut and hand breaded fries and homemade slaw, which had a nice flavor. I often find myself looking for slaw with the perfect ratio of vinegar to mayo, and I would order the slaw here again. One thing I noticed is their prices can fit any budget, ranging from $1.99 for their Great American Dog to $15.95 for a lobster roll (served seasonally). The Great American Dog was my favorite of the two hot dogs I selected. The spicy red relish is what sold it for me, adding a little bit of heat and spice to a delicious

Great American Hotdogs are grilled, not boiled, adding additional flavor.

dog. Both hot dogs had a nice snap when bitten into. They’re made with natural casings from Massachusetts and then grilled, not boiled, adding additional flavor. It is apparent that Tom Cote knows what he’s doing when it comes to owning a food business. From making sure the food is as fresh as possible to taking care of customers. He and his partner, Lisa Copeland, are both such warm and lighthearted people. And, this is not Tom’s first foray into food. He owned and operated a seafood restaurant in Maine for more than 30 years before moving down to Hendersonville. When asked what he likes most about owning a food business, he replies, “The people. It’s all about the people. Forming relationships is the most important part of my day.” His answer doesn’t surprise me. My lasting impression of Great American Dog is Tom and Lisa care about their customers and the quality of the food they serve. I will be going here again and telling my friends to experience the quality and down-home service Great American Dog has to offer.

Great American Dog 808 Greenville Highway Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828) 697-2266 Mon-Sat: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sun: 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Hours subject to change

Michelle Rogers works with independently-owned, small food businesses at Blue Ridge Food Ventures. She has worked in the culinary industry since 1997. She enjoys freelance writing and exploring the outdoors. Contact her at milyro@gmail.com.

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Asheville Brewers Supply

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For more than two decades, Asheville Brewers Supply has been WNC’s home for homebrewing and winemaking.

the pros do, without the use of any malt extracts. We’ll mash, sparge, vorlauf, and By MICHELLE ROgERS other strange words. As in our beginner class, those of legal age will be permitted to sample last month’s brew.

Aside from offering the area’s largest selection at the most competitive prices, we also bring our customers the educational opportunities that they’re looking for to help them brew their best. We offer free classes and workshops every month! For specific dates, times, and events, visit www.ashevillebrewers.com/pages/calendar

Classes are free, but please reserve your space by calling (828) 285-0515, or emailing avlbrewersupply@gmail.com.

Best Sushi in WNC Since 2005

RECIPES Irish Red - Extract w/grain (5 gallon) 3.3lb Briess Gold LME 3lb Briess Amber DME 1lb Steeping Grains .5 Vienna; .3 Special B; .2 Biscuit 1oz Brewers Gold hops and 1oz Fuggle hops White Labs WLP 004 Irish Ale yeast

Brought to you by the owners of Ichiban Steakhouse

Directions: (1) Place 2 gallons of water in boil kettle and heat water to 160F. Add grain bag and steep for 45 minutes. Remove bag and place in colander. Slowly pour another gallon of 170F through the bag to rinse out trapped sugars.

CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS Beginner Brewing Class

Held the 3rd Sunday from noon-2 p.m. Learn how to make your own quality craft beer at home with minimal time and equipment! It’s easier than you think, and we’ll show you how with some great tips and tricks. For those of legal age, we’ll also be sampling last month’s brew.

All-Grain Brewing Class

Held the 1st Saturday from 1:30-4:30 p.m. This “advanced” class will give you the knowledge and tools you need to brew like

Wasabi :: 19 Broadway :: 828-225-2551 Ichiban :: 2 Hendersonville Rd. :: 252-7885 pg. 18

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www.WasabiAsheville.com

(2) Bring the grain tea to a boil, turn down heat to simmer, then add malt extracts. Return to a boil. (3) After boiling for 10 minutes, add Brewers Gold hops. After boiling another 50 minutes, add Fuggle hops and turn off heat. Chill using an ice bath. (4) Add chilled wort to sanitized fermenter and top off with cold water to the 5 gallon mark. Add yeast and ferment 2 weeks at around 68F. Bottle or keg when finished.

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continued on page 32

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Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 21


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sound experience Let the Sun Shine In MR. SUN AND COMPANY AT ISIS

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When the esteemed fiddler Darol Anger calls you “one of (his) favorite musicians on earth” you know you’ve got the goods. Such is the case with mandolinist Joe K. Walsh, whose playing has been featured on dozens of records-including many International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) award winners-and has been widely hailed as one of the greatest mandolin players of his generation. Walsh tours both nationally and abroad, most recently with the “Bluegrass Supergroup,” Mr. Sun, a provocative ensemble showcasing the talents of Walsh, Anger, guitarist Grant Gordy, and bassist Ethan Jodziewicz. In addition, Walsh plays in a trio with fiddler Brittany Haas and guitarist Owen Marshall, teaches at the Berklee College of Music and is the associate director of the “Berklee American Roots Weekend: Bluegrass, Blues, and Beyond.” Oh, and he also plays a weekly gig at a pizza joint in Portland, Maine, not far from where he lives. Walsh started playing stringed instruments in high school in Minnesota, and moved to the Northeast when he was admitted to the Berklee college of music. While still a student there, he helped found the genre-bending indie-pop string band Joy Kills Sorrow, with which he played for several years. At roughly the same time he worked with both the New England Bluegrass Band and Northern Lights, two of the best string groups to arise from the northeast’s potent music scene. Since 2007 Walsh has lived in Portland, first playing with the Gibson Brothers (a fouryear stretch that produced three #1 records) while also touring and recording with guitarist Scott Nygaard and iconic folk singer Jonathan Edwards. Walsh released a pair of solo albums, including 2011’s Sweet Loam which was coproduced by Anger. That experience helped set the stage for Mr. Sun. At the time I spoke to Walsh he was taking a break from renovating his duplex, enjoying the abnormally mild weather (which ended two days later) and getting ready to kick off the Mr. Sun tour. I sheepishly admitted to being “at best mildly interested in the current Bluegrass scene” but Walsh shook that off. “Music is music,” he said, genuinely grateful for the interview. I found him to be thoughtful, knowledgeable, unusually soft spoken-at times I had to ask him to please speak more loudly-and effusive in his praise of his band mates. In short, he was a pleasure to speak with.

Rapid River Magazine: Talk a bit about the formation of the band. I’m assuming you all knew one another and had played in various configurations. But how did the more formal ensemble of Mr. Sun come together? Walsh: We’d played together, but not in any sort of formal fashion, and while we knew one another we’d never spent all that much

22 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

By JaMES

CaSSaRa

time together. I get credit for being the one who sort of initiated this thing, but really it was just a matter of the stars aligning. We’d talked about it for Mr. Sun comprises three generations of some of the sharpest minds some time but all of to apply themselves to the American String Band — Darol Anger, us had other commitfiddle; Joe Walsh, mandolin & vocals, Ethan Jodziewicz, bass; ments, both musiand Grant Gordy, guitar. cally and otherwise. I have my teaching responsibilities which I had to work around, RRM: Without double checking I think the and Darol in particular is one of the busiest Isis seats around 300 (actually with rearranged musicians on the planet. seating the club lists a capacity of 450).

RRM: You’re all recognized as accomplished players, some of the best around, but there is obviously more to that in bringing a band together. Beyond the musicianship there are the personalities involved. How is it working on that level? Walsh: It’s like any relationship; you have to

stay at it. You’re spending a lot of time together, everyone has their own quirks and such, but you hopefully have a certain determination to see it through. I cannot think of a particular instance where we argued over anything of importance; but sure, there are disagreements that pop up over the arrangements of a song, what the set list might be and relatively trivial things like that. There’s a certain stubbornness that comes with creativity. But we talk it out and put first things first. I think we all look to Darol for guidance, both in the music and the nuts and bolts of the business. He’s done this a lot longer than any of us, and while he probably hates being called the elder statesmen, he sort of is. (Laughs)

RRM: I’m a bit uncertain as to the chronol-

ogy here. Did you tour prior to recording the album or did the album precede any stage performances? Were songs worked out on the road in anticipation of recording them or the other way around?

Walsh: Some of both. We recorded parts of

the album, hit the road a bit, and then finished things up. By necessity our show is much more expansive than the 11 songs found on the album; it includes songs we’ve played with other bands and even stuff we’re trying out for maybe the first time. We mix in a lot of other stuff and I doubt any two shows sound alike. Even if the set lists were the same the way we play them varies according to our mood and the venue. A festival setting gets played differently than a small club.

Walsh: That’s a great size. Large enough to

build a level of enthusiasm but small enough the audience has to work a bit to really listen to the music. I love that.

RRM: In addition to being in great demand as a session artist, you have your hands in so many musical pies. How do you decide which projects to take on? Walsh: Scheduling certainly plays a part with

both my own commitments and those of the other musicians involved. It can be a challenge, a real juggling act. But it has to be a project that appeals to me musically, something I find interesting and feel I can do proud.

RRM: This is a tough question for any musician to objectively answer, but how do you characterize the “sound” of Mr. Sun? It’s based on traditional Bluegrass but is more broad than that, progressive and contemporary with elements of jazz and gypsy folk. How challenging is it to bring those strands together? Walsh: I wish I could say. It’s music I love

playing, and it certainly contains elements of everything you’ve mentioned and more. I listen to a lot of stuff that might surprise people. In no way do I consider myself a Bluegrass “purist” so the idea of mixing genres appeals to me. Let’s face it, everything is built on something that preceded it. I hear David Grisman and I want to hear who and what influenced him, so his music ends up being, among many things, a springboard to a lot of other listening experiences.

RRM: That’s true of most art forms. You discover one painter or illustrator and hopefully get intrigued by who they were influenced by. Had it not been for Eric Clapton by way of John Mayall I might not have ever heard of Sleepy John Estes. continued on page 23


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sound experience

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Nolatet Live

Chamomile and Whiskey

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One simple word to describe Chamomile and Whiskey? Infectious.

Featuring Mike Dillon, Brian Haas, James Singleton, and Johnny Vidacovich touring in support of their debut album, Dogs. As like vibration attracts like vibration, it’s no surprise that after years of collaboration, vibraphonist Mike Dillon, pianist Brian Haas, bassist James Singleton, and drummer Johnny Vidacovich should finally form Nolatet Mike Dillon, vibraphones; Brian Haas, keyboards; and release their debut album, Dogs, James Singleton, bass; Johnny Vidacovich, drums. on RPF. The members of Nolatet have been “When music is truly happening, it leads the in each other’s lives for as long as they can way. When music is kinetic and meaningful, remember. Vidacovich and Singleton have it sets its own agenda. When music is meant backed everyone from Dizzy Gillespie to to be played, the music itself will find a way,” Professor Longhair to James Booker. Dillon says Brian Haas. “This is how Nolatet came and Haas have been sitting in with each other’s into being. After so many incredible nights of bands, including Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, Gacollaborating over the years, while building a rage A Trois and Dead Kenny Gs, on the same deep, enduring friendship, the music simply touring circuit since the mid-’90s. All four demanded it.” have played together countless times in various configurations. Individually, they are fiercely independent iconoclasts and bandleaders who IF compose, play and navigate their musical lives YOU Nolatet, Saturday, March 12. Doors: 7 true to their own idiosyncratic visions. GO p.m.; show: 8 p.m. All ages. Tickets: $20 adv. / $23 d.o.s. / $35 VIP (guaranteed While traditional jazz is the backbone and seating in 1st three rows). The Altamont starting point for the Nolatet, each member’s Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. For tickets or piercing individuality and personal history more details, please call (828) 270-7747 or visit allows innovation to be a constant throughout www.TheAltamont.com. the recording.

‘Mr. Sun’ cont’d from page 22

Walsh: There you go. I love that part of what I do.

RRM: Despite your hectic touring sched-

ule, and some pretty high profile gigs, I’m intrigued by your commitment to playing the local gig in Portland. I assume you find it important to keep some aspect of your career at a more intimate level, really connecting with the audience.

Walsh: When my schedule allows I play

most every week at Otto’s Pizza in Portland. Some nights, there might be 30 people, others nights maybe 10. But it’s a lot of fun. I get free food (laughs loudly) and it’s a great chance to work out new songs in the most casual of settings. The majority of the folks are regulars, so it’s almost like inviting a bunch of friends over to your house.

RRM: As an arts educator I appreciate your commitment to teaching other musicians. Talk a bit about that aspect of your career. Walsh: It’s a way of my paying it back. I was

the very first musician admitted to the Berklee College of Music (in Boston) with a concentration on mandolin. While there I studied with some great teachers, including John

McGann, Matt Glaser and Eugene Friesen. I became the school’s first graduate on the mandolin. It was more like one on one tutoring, an experience I cannot say enough great things about. While still at Berklee I did some teaching of my own, and when the opportunity arose to become a part time faculty member I jumped at it. As you can probably attest, the reward is enormous even if the pay is not.

By

In less than a handful of years, Chamomile and Whiskey have become one of the hottest bands in central Virginia, making serious waves up and down the east coast. This year they have performed at high profile festivals such as Floydfest, Tilted Earth, and The Festy.

Chamomile and Whiskey are Koda Kerl, Marie Borgman, Brenning Greenfield, and Ryan Lavin.

Having released two albums on County Wide Records and after playing hundreds of shows on the east coast, Chamomile and Whiskey is carving out a unique place for themselves on the Americana scene. Much of their success can be attributed to their passionate and energetic live performance. A Chamomile and Whiskey show is a rowdy affair, often sending the sounds of whiskey being spilled, boots stomping, and fans howling, towards the Blue Ridge Mountains. The strong connection with the audience has given them a number of great opportunities, including shows with Railroad Earth, Rusted Root, fellow Charlottesville natives The Hackensaw Boys, and recently the Steep Canyon

MELISSa FaRINa

Rangers and Carbon Leaf. 2013 marked the release of the band’s debut album, “Wandering Boots.” From top to bottom, this collection of songs is a testament to the band’s eclectic nature. From the raucous gypsy title track “Wandering Boots” to the smooth country-fied “Impressions,” to the high-tempo Irish tune “Dirty Sea,” the album’s genre bends with each track. Marie Borgman’s versatile fiddle playing is a key component to the group’s adaptability. While Irish and Old-Time seem her forte, gypsy and classical musings are heard throughout the album. The contrast between Koda Kerl and Ryan Lavin’s songwriting showcases another great blend of sounds. Kerl, who penned six of the nine numbers, has a smooth and soulful voice, heard distinctly on the poignant “Long Day” and the pirate-like “Second Lullaby.” Lavin (a native of Galway, Ireland) brings passionate vocals to his tunes, as well his own brand of banjo playing, elevating the energy with every note. The rhythm pulsates with the thump of hungry musicians, a bottle of whiskey and a purpose. While Chamomile and Whiskey have all the talent and songwriting to make a successful project, they also possess something more – an infectious energy that sweeps across the stage when they perform. The love they share for each other and the music quickly and emphatically reaches the audience. Chamomile and Whiskey are a band to watch. Currently finishing up work on a new album set to release in the Spring of 2016.

IF YOU Chamomile and Whiskey, Thursday, GO March 24. 21+ show begins at 9

p.m. No cover. The One Stop at The Asheville Music Hall, 55 College St., Asheville. (828) 255-7777, www.ashevillemusichall.com

RRM: What can those in attendance at the Isis Music Hall show expect? If you were writing the blurb how might it read? Walsh: I wish I could say but that’s not my skill set. I’m a player not a publicist. Just come out and enjoy some music, energy and great playing.

Make Your Own Beer & Wine Let Asheville Brewers show you how affordable, enjoyable and delicious homebrewing can be!

IF YOU Mr. Sun on Saturday, March 12 at GO Isis Music Hall. $15 advance; $15 at

the door. Doors opens 5 p.m.; Show 9 p.m. General admission seated show with a limited number of tables available with dinner reservations. Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com. Please mention you read this interview in Rapid River Magazine.

712-B Merrimon Ave

~

Asheville

Mon-Sat 10-6; Sun 11-4 ~ Plenty of Parking

~ S  ~

.AB.

--

pg. 32

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The Poet’s Voice

WHEN WORDS SING

When words sing, poetry happens. When words sing, lyricism happens; lyric poetry (and prose) happen. Friedrich Nietzsche declared that the lyric poet “always says ‘I’ and sings us through the full chromatic scale of passions and desires.” Mary Oliver writes: “The lyric poem is brief, concentrated, has no more than a single focus, single voice and employs a natural musicality.” When I studied Virginia Woolf’s work, I heard music in most sentences. I put together a collection of poems from her novels. You can do this, too, only, don’t try to market them. The Virginia Woolf society won’t like it. Next came novelist, Willa Cather. NOW - here’s music! Read this passage from My Antonia out loud. “As we walked homeward across the fields, the sun dropped and lay like a great golden globe in the low west. While it hung there, the moon rose in the east, as big as a cart-wheel, pale silver and streaked with rose color, thin as a bubble or ghost-moon. For five, perhaps ten minutes, the two luminaries confronted each other across the level land, resting on opposite edges of the world.” ~ Willa Cather The first lyric poetry was sung, chanted, or recited to musical accompaniment. Today’s lyric poetry tends towards quiet, inward song like compositions. They appear as sonnets, odes, elegies, haiku, and whatever the poet builds on the page. Now hear this.

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CaROL pEaRCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

Haiku as lyric voice? Listen to these from Richard Wright. (I had trouble choosing. The book contains 809 haikus.)

766 Standing in the snow, A horse shifts his heavy haunch Slowly to the right.

770 My guests have now gone; The grate fire burns to white ashes, How lonely it is. ~ Richard Wright

ville digging on Pablo Cruise & Bob Seger & the heavy night but When Trane came thick on tenor Something snapped, she shifted Into low in that unknown home Where the wind peeled our Heart open to the bone. ~ Gerry Gordon

This poem, Instructions to the Player, could read, Instructions to the Poet. This poem is a reminder to pause. Give silence/linebreaks/ whitespace, a place in your music and words.

Instructions to the Player

Now, a March poem from Wendell Berry. Consider the music of the letter s as you read this poem.

Cellist, easy on that bow. Not too much weeping.

March 22, 1968

Remember that the soul is easily agitated and has a terror of shapelessness. It will venture out but only to a doe’s eye.

As spring begins the river rises, filling like the sorrow of nations - uprooted trees, soil of squandered mountains, the debris of kitchens, all passing seaward. At dawn snow began to fall. The ducks, moving north, pass like shadows through the falling white. The jonquils, half open, bend down with its weight. The plow freezes in the furrow. In the night I lay awake, thinking of the river rising, the spring heavy with official meaningless deaths.

Let the sound out inner mysterioso but from a distance like the forest at night. And do not forget the pause between. That is the sweetest and has the nature of infinity. ~ Carl Rakosi

~ Wendell Berry

The Lake Isle of Innisfree I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made: Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee, And live alone in the bee-loud glade. And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow, Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings; There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow, And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

I will arise and go now, for always night and day I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore; While on stand on the roadway, or on the parents grey, I hear it in the deep heart’s core. ~ William Butler Yeats

24 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

I found this poem by Jane Kenyon in Naomi Shihab Nye’s collection of poems titled, what have you lost?

What Came to Me

Writers, March is your singing month. Sing on!

Resources: Robert Pinsky, Singing School, W. W. Norton, 2013.

I took the last dusty piece of china out of the barrel. It was your gravy boat, with a hard, brown drop of gravy still on the porcelain lip. I grieved for you then as I never had before.

Mary Oliver, A Poetry Handbook, A Harvest Original, Harcourt Brace and co. 1994. The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms, Chris Baldrich, Oxford University Press, 1990. Wendell Berry: New Collected Poems, Counterpoint, Berkeley, 2012. ~ Jane Kenyon

You may also read Elizabeth Bishop’s The Complete Poems for lyric pleasure. From Mixed Voices: Contemporary Poems about Music, there’s a poem in tribute to jazz great, John Coltrane, by Gerry Gordon.

Gas after John Coltrane Riding high into the night on John’s Good gas we shot thru Ravenna & Rootstown and Shalers-

Mixed Voices: Contemporary Poems about Music, edited by Emilie Buchwald and Ruth Roston, Milkweed Ed., 1991. Naomi Shihab Nye, what have you lost, A Greenwillow Book, Harper Collins, 1999. Read more poems online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com


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Priceless and Unique Books

There are books that just cannot be repeated. This has been the case with Categories on the Beauty of Physics, by Hilary Thayer Hamann, slices of art and physics and literature on shared pages filled with short bursts of fine and thoughtprovoking information. The editor was in our store many years ago, and since then I have treasured this collection and will continue to do so. At times I am convinced that great writing happens or arrives from the space between contemplation, art and science. Or maybe I just resonate with writing that arrives from that direction. I like art that allows the viewer to “fall into” a painting; that is how I came to follow Gerhard Richter’s art and later his writing in The Daily Practice of Painting. I wish MIT Press would reissue this book so everyone could have access to his landscapes, both inner and painted, in the answers he provides to questions posed by critics. The Q & A style of presentation feels truer, since spontaneity is priceless and unique. Both titles above are out of print, but used copies are available through our Out-of-Print service at Malaprop’s or Downtown Books and News. Now, there are also many exciting books that are readily available, and I need to bring your attention to a few authors in particular. While these aren’t new books, they stand the test of time (at least for me).

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Short Stories, a Web Exclusive Contribute to Rapid River Magazine’s online short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works in more than 20 genres. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. For submission guidelines and special editing rates, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Please contact Kathleen Colburn with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copy editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com

POETRIO Sunday, March 6 at 3 p.m. Readings by three poets: Adrian Rice (Hickory Station), Vievee Francis (Forest Primeval), and Jonathan K. Rice (Killing Time).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

…drumroll please… Ellen Gilchrist’s In the Land of Dreamy Dreams…. Dreams Leslie Marmon Silko’s Delicacy and Strength of Lace… Lace Gretel Ehrlich’s Solace of Open Spaces and This Cold Heaven… I cannot imagine my life without the contribution these books have made to it. I owe to these books my appreciation of the beauty of wonderful writing that keeps me centered. Hold Still and Deep South by Sally Mann are not only visual beauties but exemplify thought-provoking writing that makes me jump around in my brain for joy. Sylvia Plachy’s photo essay of Hungary, When Will It Be Tomorrow, invited me into a world where the camera’s captured moment allows me to travel through decades of memories both true and created.

F

By

EMOKE B'RaCZ

This is truly one of the most important results of reading. Books can be fodder for a reader’s creativity….that reader being you, me, and all of us. For independent booksellers this is the greatest gift we can give, and we gladly give it. Speaking of giving… imagine this scene as it unfolded recently: as I am ordering books for next fall from university presses at our front counter, a smiling gentleman purchases a gift certificate for $100 and proceeds to give it to a family with five children in the store. The noise level from those children when they realize they are able to choose and take home a book is deafening in a joyful way! Now that is what I call a great day in our store. Come see us, because you never know what good thing will come about.

Malaprop’s Recommended Reading

FROM HANNAH RICHARDSON Getting my spring back in my step!

Growing up, March 1st always marked the first day of spring for me. It was the day spring sport practices began, daffodils were coming up in full force, and I no longer had the long-running “coat” battle with my mother each morning before school. Spring also marks the time where my reading becomes a porch activity and I look for books that match my spring yearning for growth, adventure and light, fresh foods. That said, below are a few of my favorites: Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney. It’s over 30 years old at this point, but this beautiful childhood classic still rings true. It tells the tale of Great Aunt Rumphius’ worldly adventures as she seeks to make the world a more beautiful place. When Women Were Birds by Terry Tempest Williams. I read the last paragraph and was instantly hooked to this poetic meditation on her life, her family, and the natural world around her. She writes with such ease and grace that you are forced to slow down your reading and take each paragraph in like it’s its own reflection. The Taco Cleanse. Soups, stews, dense breads and heavy desserts are what make my world go ‘round. Unfortunately, all good things must come to an end, and so I reach for The Taco Cleanse: Part detox diet, part humorous food blog, part delicious taco extravaganza. Nothing will prepare your mind and body for summer romping like a few months of taco cleansing….and it even comes with a certifi-

cate of completion! This Road I Ride by Juliana Buhring. While perhaps not a literary masterpiece, this all-inspiring true story speaks so honestly to my adventuring nature that I have come away believing that cycling solo around the world can’t really be THAT difficult, right? What makes this truly remarkable is her sheer doggedness; especially given the fact that she’d never been a cyclist before this journey. This is perfect for those us who dream of big, athletic adventures but perhaps don’t have the time or tenacity to make it happen on our own. This book will be released in May, just in time for cycling season!

FROM MELANIE MCNAIR Spring fever! Love and turbulent romance, anyone? Garth Greenwell’s What Belongs to You and Matthew Green’s Home are now out in hardcover. Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door is a beautiful memoir of friendship, love, and loss. All of these great authors will come through town to read this spring, so check our events calendar so you don’t miss them. For something a little different, check out Maggie Nelson’s genre bending The Red Parts, coming out in paperback in April. It is part memoir, part reporting on the trial of her aunt’s murder 35 years after the fact, and part cultural criticism.

MARCH

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Monday, March 7 at 7 p.m. TRAVIS MULHAUSER, Sweetgirl, coming-of-age novel. Wednesday, March 9 at 7 p.m. TEGAN WREN, Inconceivable!; SAMANTHA BRYANT, Going Through the Change. Thursday, March 10 at 6:30 p.m. Zelda Fitzgerald Day! Readings and more! Friday, March 11 at 7 p.m. JIM GRIMSLEY, How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood. Saturday, March 12 at 7 p.m. BRYCE PALMYRA, Things to Bring My Family When I Die: A Go-To Guide for the Southern Chef. Sunday, March 13 at 3 p.m. MATT CASHION, Last Words of the Holy Ghost, short stories. Monday, March 14 at 7 p.m. ANNIE NOVAK, The Rooftop Growing Guide. Wednesday, March 16 at 7 p.m. MELISSA BURCH, My Journey Through War and Peace. Thursday, March 17 at 7 p.m. DANA CARPENTER, Bohemian Gospel; ERICA WRIGHT, The Granite Moth. Friday, March 18 at 7 p.m. NICOLE SARROCCO, Ill-Mannered Ghosts. Saturday, March 19 at 7 p.m. BRIAN FREEMAN, Goodbye to the Dead. Tuesday, March 22 at 7 p.m. LIBBY WARE, Lum, winner of the Stonewall Book Award. Wednesday, March 23 at 7 p.m. ERIK LARSON, Dead Wake. $17 book & ticket. Tuesday, March 29 at 7 p.m. MATTHEW GRIFFIN, Hide, gay love in the shadows. Wednesday, March 30 at 7 p.m. KEITH MORRIS, Travelers Rest; scary.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

pg. 18

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Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine!

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A remix is when you take something apart and reassemble it in a different order, to create something new, or unexpected. Musicians do it, DJs do it, and HART’s next Studio Theater production is an example of a play being rethought. In this case the play is William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, which has been remixed by UNC School of the Arts Graduate Henry Williamson to create The Fall of a Sparrow. The production began life as a thesis project for Williamson, who last season brought audiences an exciting production of Anton Chekov’s The Sea Gull. As Williamson describes it, audiences will be treated to Hamlet, cut, spliced, reordered, cross-faded, sped up, slowed

A Gallery Where Art Dances with Nature

Anticipating Spring’s Renewal

WR WO WT WG

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98 N. Main St., Waynesville

828.456.1940 www.twigsandleaves.com WB Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071

26 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

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The Fall of a Sparrow

70 Main Street • Clyde, NC 28721

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down, rewound and repeated. The goal, to reintroduce audiences to a familiar work in an unexpected way and bring back a “what happens next?” suspense to the evening. Williamson’s Mountain Art Theatre has assembled a cast that includes Williamson, Badi Mirheli, Chelsey Lee Mirheli, Elliot Weiner, Sam Stewart, Rachel McCrain, Allen Law, Dwight Chiles, and Josephine Thomas. The Fall of a Sparrow will run March 4 & 5 at 7:30 p.m., and March 6 at 2 p.m. Reservations for the HART Studio are recommended as productions often sell out.

HART’s Center Stage Café serves a full menu on the theater’s main stage beginning 90 minutes before show time. The season will continue with it’s final production 12 Angry Men on March 11. Season tickets are available for the studio. Regular ticket prices are $10 for all adults and $6 for students. IF YOU To reserve a seat for the GO studio or café, simply call

the HART Box Office at (828) 456-6322 and leave your name, phone number, the number of guests and the date of performance you would like to attend. Seating is general admission. Tickets may also be purchased at www.harttheatre.org. All performances are at the HART Theatre, 250 Pigeon St., in downtown Waynesville.

R. Bruce Brennan and Maureen Simon Exhibits

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Artists Maureen Simon, photographer, and Bruce Brennan, painter, are exhibiting at the Haywood County Public Library at Canton. Maureen is showing in the meeting room of the library, while Bruce is in the main patron usage room. Both artists have been exhibiting since December 1, 2015, and the duration of the show is through the end of March 2016. The exhibits are open to the public to view during normal library business hours. Maureen Simon’s photography exhibit shows life on the streets of New Orleans. As she strives to do in all her work, she plays up the people, colors, and beautiful scenes of everyday life through her travels. To learn more about Maureen, visit www.ofifoto.photography.

Contemporary artist R. Bruce Brennan’s work boasts expressionist land and seascapes that capture dawning and setting suns, mountains, and seas. The award winning Artist resides in Weaverville, NC. He received his BFA, from the San Francisco Art Institute. His work is

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LINDSEy SOLOMON

in many private collections in the USA and internationally throughout Europe. Visit Brennan’s website at www.rbrucebrennanfineart.com

We invite all to come out to enjoy these great exhibits. The Haywood County Arts Council is a non-profit agency that serves all artists and arts organizations in Haywood County. As an affiliate of the North Carolina Arts Council, the Haywood County Arts Council seeks to fulfill its mission to build partnerships that promote art and artists, explore new cultural opportunities, and preserve mountain artistic heritage. The Haywood County Arts Council and its Gallery & Gifts is located at 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville, North Carolina. For additional information, please call (828) 452-0593, email info@ haywoodarts.org, or visit www. HaywoodArts.org. IF YOU Works by Maureen Simon, GO photographer, and Bruce

Brennan, painter are on display at Canton Public Library, 11 Pennsylvania Avenue in Canton. (828) 648-2924


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from Restaurants to Art to Clothing to Jewelry to Furniture...

DOWNTOWN WAYNESVILLE Love the Locals!

www.DowntownWaynesville.com

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Abilities Illuminated

ARTISTS OF LIFESPAN OPENS MARCH 3

The Haywood County Arts Council partners with LIFESPAN for their March gallery exhibit. The show will feature art created by individuals of LIFESPAN including painting, ceramics, mosaic art, sculpture, and jewelry. LIFESPAN empowers children and adults with disabilities by providing education, employment, and enrichment opportunities to live, work, and play in their communities. The art for the March show will be provided by LIFESPAN Arts, an inclusive art studio where artists can experience working with different artistic medium.

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LINDSEy SOLOMON

Learn more about upcoming exhibits at HaywoodArts.org. To learn more about LIFESPAN, visit lifespanservices.org.

About the Haywood County Arts Council

The Haywood County Arts Council is a non-profit agency that serves all artists and arts organizations in Haywood County. As Tapestry by Robert Rogers an affiliate of the North Carolina Arts Council, the Haywood County Arts Council seeks to fulfill its mission to build partnerships that promote art and artists, explore new cultural opportunities, and preserve mountain artistic heritage.

Flowers, acrylic on panel, by Hunter Mills

Featuring Local Sunburst Trout

IF YOU Abilities Illuminated opens March 3, with an GO artist reception from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday,

March 11. The Haywood County Arts Council and its Gallery & Gifts is located at 86 N. Main Street in Waynesville. For more details, please call (828) 452-0593, email info@haywoodarts.org, or visit HaywoodArts.org.

128 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC 28786

Open Daily Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 • Dinner: 4:30 to 9:00

Acrylic on canvas painting by Eugene Walls

When asked about the show, Michael Dodson, Arts Assistant of LIFESPAN Creative Campus Waynesville said, “Our artists view the world around them through a different set of Forest, acrylic and lenses. Their unique gifts Wood, Lifespan Arts and talents are expressed through the creation of the art exhibited. The individuals of LIFESPAN appreciate the opportunity to exhibit their work at the Haywood County Arts Council.”

Burr Studio

Gallery of American Art & Craft pg. 26

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828-456-7400

136 N. Main Street Waynesville, NC

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828-454-5400 www.BlossomOnMain.com

10 Reasons to Buy Local 1. Keep money in the neighborhood 2. Embrace what makes us different. 3. Get better service. 4. Enjoy a more diverse range of product choices. 5. Create more good jobs.

6. Help the environment. 7. Buying local supports community groups. 8. Invest in the community. 9. Your taxes are put to good use. 10. Show the country we believe in WNC.

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 27


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Reflexology ~ Reiki Reiki Drumming

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artful living

Bowen Training Instructor Reiki Master / Teacher

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RIP Harper Lee

Linda Neff

NCBTMB #582633-09

Harper Lee, the author of the iconic To Kill a Mockingbird – one of the most beloved works of American literature – died in February in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala. She was 89.

One Hour Session: $40. FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

513-675-2819 828-565-0061

Health & Healing are Just Two Feet Away Mountain Spirit Wellness 254 Depot Street • Waynesville

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Thursday, March 10 has been proclaimed as Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Day. Harper Lee

Published in 1960, To Kill a Mockingbird became an immediate bestseller, won the Pulitzer Prize and was made into what has become a classic movie. The book has been a steady seller since it was published—most American students read it at least once in school. Set in the 1930s in a small town like Lee’s hometown, the story is a coming-of-age, Southern gothic tale, dealing with pervasive racism, inequality and legal injustice from the point of view of a young girl, Scout. The book is revered for its narrative style, its sense of humor and its vivid and eccentric characters. Lee was famously reclusive, declining interviews, uncomfortable with her fame and success. Still, she was a powerful presence in the world of literature—and we will miss her.

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Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was a vibrant and talented writer, painter and dancer. In the 20’s she and her husband, F. Scott Fitzgerald, heralded in the birth of the Jazz age with large parties. During the last twelve years of her life she lived in Asheville. It is speculated that she may have had Bipolar Disorder. Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Celebrate Zelda! will take place around town with readings, art, music and fashion. Orbit DVD, 781 Haywood Road, West Asheville, is hosting a Zelda! gaming competition. Readings from Zelda’s works take place at 6:30 p.m. at Malaprops, 55 Haywood Street, Asheville, and at Firestorm Cafe & Books, 610 Haywood Road, West Asheville. A silent auction plus live music by the Firecracker Jazz Band begins at 8 p.m at the new South Slope Arts Incubator on 207 Coxe Avenue. Roaring 20’s attire is encouraged! Complimentary glass of bubbly while it lasts. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 and can be purchased at www.aurorastudio-gallery.com.

Nutrition For Your Health

New Year’s resolutions fading fast?

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MaX HaMMONDS, MD

Heart Health month (February) encouraging you to eat more healthfully? There are so many ideas out there. What to do? Time Magazine, Dec. 28/Jan. 4, (usually known more for fads than facts about healthful eating) published six factual, rational, practical guidelines for food choices – just in time to address those winter doldrums. Without repeating the article, here is the kernel of truth from each of their six considerations. Protein is over emphasized. Cut back on refined carbs and trans or saturated fat, but don’t be anxious that protein must be added. While amino acids are necessary to build body parts, only 10% of calories as protein are required to do the job. If you eat enough calories, you get enough protein – 56 grams for men and 46 grams for women – a day. When the diet contains more than 20% protein, the risk for cancer goes up 400% and the risk for heart disease climbs as well. High protein diets promote high rates of aging, disease and death. Take out the artificial flavors and colors? Yes. But what to put in the food is the question. What is the best diet? The winner is . . . real food – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds. Ignore the latest health fads. There are NO super foods. A balanced diet of whole foods with their natural nutrition work just as well as any super food fad. What basic nutrient are 97% of Americans missing in the diet? Fiber. Fiber “scrubs” the bowel, captures and eliminates cholesterol, and hastens and eases bowel evacuation. Fiber optimizes gut bacteria to decrease Type II diabetes, autoimmune diseases, obesity, and arthritis. Fiber decreases heart disease and cancer, gall bladder disease and appendicitis. Eat more fiber! To lose weight, avoid hidden fats and sugars? Yes. But also avoid artificial sweeteners which change the brain’s response to the “sweet” taste in food, making one more hungry. They also alter the gut bacteria which alters the body’s response to insulin – glucose intolerance – which leads to Type II diabetes. The answer? Cut down on the sweet taste, period – real or artificial. It’s addictive.

28 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

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Celebrate Zelda!

Not only do calories count, but the kind of calories really count. Refined carbs are absorbed quicker and elevate insulin levels higher, resulting in the refined carbs being quickly stored as fat, leaving the person still feeling hungry. The result? Extra fat stored in a person who still feels hungry and wants to eat more. Instead, olive oil and nut oils decrease the insulin spikes and actually increase calorie burning. Basic health information, good science, and simple rules lead to healthy eating. KISS.

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HEALTHY GOOD THOUGHTS The Value of Advice

I’ve been thinking about how attached we can get to the advice we give.

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KaTHLEEN COLBURN

And by we, I mean me. What I share with people I care about comes from my heart because I truly want the best for them. And what’s best is a very personal decision, right? The challenge is to give freely and not be attached to the outcome. With over 30 years of my life devoted to holistic health and nutrition, I have accumulated a lot of knowledge and formed a few opinions. Most of us want to share our experiences with the hope of being helpful. This is human nature and when our intentions are aligned with our heart, good things can occur. Please keep thinking and sharing good thoughts! Kathleen is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s short story editor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email: rrshortstories@gmail.com


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artful living In Praise of Intelligence “One of the best human qualities is our intelligence, which enables us to judge what is wholesome and what is unwholesome, what is beneficial and what is harmful. Negative thoughts, such as anger and strong attachment, destroy this special human quality; this is indeed very sad. When anger or attachment dominates the mind, a person becomes almost crazed… Under their power we commit all kinds of acts—often having far-reaching and destructive consequences. “A person gripped by such states of mind and emotion is like a blind person, who cannot see where he is going. Yet we neglect to challenge these negative thoughts and emotions that lead to near insanity. On the contrary, we often nurture and reinforce them! By doing so we are, in fact, making ourselves prey to their destructive power. When you reflect along these lines, you will realize that our true enemy is not outside ourselves.” - Dalai Lama

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Increasingly, this nation, founded by individuals dedicated to rational enlightenment and as a haven from intolerant religion, is drifting toward the legitimization of irrational politics manifesting many of the characteristics of irrational intolerant religion. Within our political discussion there is, among a growing segment of our population, an embrace of bitter anger for anger’s sake and for attachment to opinions that have no basis in fact. In both this type of politics and this type of religion, beliefs are held because they appeal to the dangerous human tendency towards sectarianism where those who are not members of the sect are held in suspicion and fear. What is believed to be true and not true is determined by what the clergy (in this case politicians, media figures and politicized clergy) say is true and not true. It is not surprising that there is a great overlap of those who identify with both this type of religion and this type of politics.

Dealing with our society’s problems has become nearly impossible. This is not an entirely new phenomenon in American history; it is, in fact, a continual thread where intolerance, resistance to progress, economic inequity and militarism runs strong, whipped into frenzy with emotional sloganeering devoid of factual basis. Should we fail, however, to address our very real problems with intelligence and humility, the consequences will be deep and long lasting. This sectarianism threatens to fracture our society and to steer its national purpose away from addressing commonly shared needs and challenges, diverting energy from rational address of very real problems toward emotional posturing over issues of political dogma. Already, the summoning of common will to deal with our society’s problems has become nearly impossible and the current political climate threatens to make it even more so.

On issues of the economy, the environment, international relations, our political process, immigration, and social-and-economic inclusiveness, intolerance of honest debate, even the denial of scientific fact is steering this group’s political agenda. Ideology has become taken as truth because the leadership says it is so, and an echo-chamber of slogans substitutes for intelligent discussion. Why is this happening? We live in times of unprecedented change. The speed with which technology, economic centralization, globalization and shifting demographics are affecting particularly the white working class’s sense of place and security in the society in which they once felt secure is evoking a disorientation and fear that makes for easy manipulation by those who would use their familiar symbols as rallying cries to stop needed change. Rallying around conservative religion, guns, military strength and adventurism, getting government and its taxes out of their lives, restoring and taking back “our country,” and severely limiting immigration are all seductive and intoxicating arguments when shilled by bombastic preachers of fear and anger whose real motives are power and the entrenchment of those who currently profit from holding the economy and society in their control. Anxiety and fear about the future is well-founded, only it is those who are the real cause of this insecurity who are pointing fingers and diverting the anger upon those who are not. We are making the catastrophic error of dumbing down our politics and our social agenda, of confusing cleverness at advancing and defending self-interest and sectarian dogmas as intelligence. Nothing could be further from the truth. True intelligence, as The Dalai Lama said, “enables us to judge what is wholesome and what is unwholesome, what is beneficial and what is harmful.” To build a society based in respectful inclusiveness and fair sharing of the society’s wealth and benefits is

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BILL WaLZ

wholesome. To allow a small oligarchy of wealth to control our economy and social agenda towards their own benefit at the expense of the common people is unwholesome. To ignore pressing problems that threaten catastrophic consequences such as environmental degradation, climate change, a middle-class being pushed toward poverty while the impoverished are completely marginalized and our infrastructure goes neglected is harmful. To divert political energy from a healthy society’s highest priority which is to provide economic security and opportunity for betterment to as wide and diverse a circle of the population as possible is not only harmful, it is crazy. These priests of radical conservatism use the same tactics and strategies that every corrupt and power-hungry leadership has used throughout history. We should be able to recognize the themes. They lie about the nature of our problems and who is responsible, and they do so with a shrillness and urgency that intensifies the unease and suspicion that people already feel because their lives are indeed insecure. This insecurity is ginned into fear and anger, and the people and the society becomes almost crazed. “When anger or attachment dominates the mind, a person becomes almost crazed… Under their power we commit all kinds of acts—often having farreaching and destructive consequences.” Real debate and discussion of the society’s problems is rejected, substituted with accusations of weakness, lies and even treachery projected on those who hold differing views and those who would dare to question. Complex problems are reduced to simple equations with the political opposition and the scapegoat populations as the culprits to blame. “We neglect to challenge these negative thoughts and emotions that lead to near insanity. On the contrary, we often nurture and reinforce them!” Shrill accusation and blame replaces intelligent political debate without any consideration for what is true and what is not true. “By doing so we are, in fact, making ourselves prey to their destructive power.” This is all very disheartening and frightening to those who want to engage in a positive and inclusive political process towards addressing pressing and real problems that will determine the quality of the future for all. Buddhism recognizes compassion, equanimity, charity, humility, non-judgmentalism, and above all, discernment into the truth of

The adjective “right” is not some moralistic judgment. what is as marks of intelligence. The truth of what is tells us that we need to have faith in our ability to be increasingly enlightened – that is open-minded and inclusive – as individuals and as a society. It is very telling that whereas Americans once looked to the future in utopian terms, now it is almost always a dystopian future portrayed in our literature and scientific projections. The current celebration of anger, hatred and misplaced blame as the mainstay of the political right-wing’s agenda points us only in such a dystopian direction. Buddhism calls upon right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration (The Eightfold Path) as the guide to wisdom, peace and happiness – as the essence of intelligence. While the political right drapes itself with words like morality and patriotism, Buddhism looks to these principles, regarded as virtues, in which the adjective “right” is not some moralistic judgment, but rather a discerning quality that can see things as they are and knows that only through recognizing and respecting the interdependence and interconnectedness of all people, and in fact, of all life, can we live virtuous and happy lives. Intelligent inquiry into continued on page 32

Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 29


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what to do guide through March 19

Saturday, March 5

Friday, March 11

70s Vibe

Pink Talking Fish

Jacob Johnson & Antsy McClain

An interpretation of the 1970s plus the first wave of Boomers turning 70. Trackside Gallery, a brand new gallery representing 15+ artists. 375 Depot Street, River Arts District, Asheville. www.tracksidestudios375.com

March 3-19

Glengarry Glen Ross

All-female production of the play by David Mamet. Desperate sales agents sell undesirable real estate to unwitting buyers. Thursday through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $18 in advance; $21 at the door. BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. (828) 254-2621.

Friday, March 4 & April 1

London District Studios

New home furnishings oriented studio, gallery and retail space hosts monthly art opening. 8 London Road at the intersection of London Road and Sweeten Creek in Biltmore Village.

Saturday, March 5

Imaginer!

Tim “T-Bone” Arem performs a mashup of mime, magic, music, comedy and circus arts at 12 noon. Part of ACT’s Saturday Family Series. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 254-1320, www. ashevilletheatre.org

Hybrid fusion of Pink Floyd, The Talking Heads, and Phish. 21+. Doors: 9 p.m. $10 adv.; $15 d.o.s. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Avenue. www. AshevilleMusicHall.com

Saturday, March 5

The Elegant Statement

Exhibition opens from 5-7 p.m. Featuring 27 book artists and letterpress printers working across the United States. Asheville Bookworks, 428 1/2 Haywood Road, Asheville. (828) 2558444, ashevillebookworks.com

March 6 & April 3

Spinterview

A live jazz mash-up prepared by Robin Tolleson, music journalist, DJ, and drummer. First Sundays at 4 p.m. at The Loft, Asheville Music School, 126 College St. $5 adults; $2 students. (828) 252-6244, www.spinterview.media.

Sunday, March 7

Classical Music Concert

Vocal recital with bass Bradley Williard accompanied by Bob Strain on piano. By donation. 3 p.m. at St. Matthias Church, 1 Dundee St., across from the Public Works Building on S. Charlotte and Max Streets.

March 9-20

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

With Perry Houlditch. Reception from 5-8 p.m. Asheville Area Arts Council, 1 Page Avenue in the Grove Arcade, downtown Asheville. (828) 258-0710, www.ashevillearts.com.

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Wednesday, March 23

Donna the Buffalo

Olde Virden’s Super Happy Trivia Challenge

Free meeting and demonstration featuring Ron Laboray, 10 a.m. to noon. Deborah Kidwell Johnson workshop from 1-4 p.m. Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River. Registration required. Visit www.Appalachianpastelsociety.org.

A soulful, electric, American mix infused with elements of cajun/ zydeco, rock, folk, reggae, and country. City of the Sun opens. 8 p.m. doors; 9 p.m. show. $20 adv.; $22 d.o.s. 18+. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. (828) 398-1837, theorangepeel.net

Saturday, March 12

Friday, March 18

Farm-to-Table Dinner

5:30 p.m., following the Annual Organic Growers School Spring Conference, at the UNCA Campus, Asheville. Reception and organic, four-course meal. Tickets are $75 to $125 each. Details at organicgrowersschool.org.

Saturday, March 12

The Asheville Symphony

Pianist Shen Lu performs selections from Berlioz’s Romeo and Juliet. Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, downtown Asheville. Tickets: $22-$62. (828) 2547046 or www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Saturday, March 12

Stray Local

Girls on The Run at ZaPow!

Paint Making Demonstration

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Thursday, March 17

Appalachian Pastel Society

Saturday, March 12

Friday, March 11

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Saturday, March 12

Asheville’s Reel Comedy

Deadline: March 11 Students in grades 3 to 12 may submit up to three poems written in any style. The theme for 2016 is “Legacy.” Submission forms and contest rules are at www.nps.gov/carl. For further information, call (828) 693-4178.

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Live in concert at 7 p.m. Tickets at 38main.com. The Strand, 38 Main in Waynesville.

March 10-12

Carl Sandburg Home Student Poetry Contest

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Temple Drumming, 2 to 4 p.m. $45 each workshop, plus donation. Baha’i Center, 5 Ravencroft Dr., Asheville. Presented by Great Tree Zen Temple. (828) 645-2085, greattreetemple.org

Comedy about the difficulties of relationships, and, of course, the meaning of life. At NC Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane, Asheville. Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. (828) 239-0263, NCStage.org.

A collection of the most absurd, satirical, and hilarious local or Ashevilleadjacent films. 7:30 p.m. at Magnetic 375. $10 at the door. 375 Depot Street in the River Arts District.

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Shell. 7 p.m. at the Buffalo Nickel, 747 Haywood Road in West Asheville. $12 at the door or $10 online at www. eventbrite.com. Dinner reservations are suggested by calling (828) 575-2844.

Wilmington-based Americana band is a reminder of why the South is known for music that makes you feel at home. 6-8 p.m. French Broad Brewery, 101 Fairview Rd., Asheville. (828) 277-0222, www.frenchbroadbrewery.com.

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Opening reception 7-9 p.m. Recognizing personal power and responsibility; embracing differences and finding strength in connectedness. On display March 12 through May 2, 2016. ZaPow Gallery, 21 Battery Park Ave., downtown Asheville.

Sunday, March 13

Taking the Pegs Out of jpegs

Nancy Smeltzer will show how to take photos of art works and turn them into .jpegs as part of the Art League of Henderson County meeting. Social at 1:30 p.m., meeting at 2 p.m. followed by the presentation. Free. Held at The Opportunity House, 1411 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville.

Wednesday, March 16

Word!

A celebration of the spoken word featuring Raymond Christian and Steve

Harvest House Sculpture Exhibition Works by Harvest House class members. Opening reception from 5-7 p.m. On display March 14 through April 3, 2016. Miya Gallery, 20 North Main Street, Weaverville. (828) 658-9655.

Friday, March 18

Annie and the Hot Club

Smokin’ swing with a twist of Nashville. 9 p.m. $15 advance; $20 door. For dinner reservations call (828) 575-2737. Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. Details and tickets at www.isisasheville.com.

Friday, March 18

Peacemakers

The Asheville Singers, Reuter Center Singers and University Singers in Concert. Choir, percussion, brass and soloists, and texts by Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Teresa, Percy Shelley and Anne Frank. 7 p.m. in UNCA’s Lipinsky Auditorium. Free. Info: music.unca.edu

Saturday, March 19

Taiko Drumming Workshop

Explore the cultural and spiritual aspects of this ancient art form with Rev. Shuichi Tom Kurai. Taiko drums will be on hand for practice. Japanese Folk Drumming, 9 to 11 a.m. Buddhist

F-Word Festival Feminist Film Festival March 21 – Screening and dicsussion of Three to Infinity, the first feature documentary on people who are neither male nor female. March 22 – Screening and dicsussion of Maha Marouan’s documentary, Voices of Muslim Women from the U.S. South. 7 p.m. both days in UNC Asheville’s Karpen Hall, Laurel Forum. Free. Info: wgss.unca.edu

A live, unscripted panel show featuring local actors and personalities who try and answer esoteric questions. Hosted by Adam Arthur. 7:30 p.m. in 35below. $12. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. (828) 2541320, www.ashevilletheatre.org

Friday, March 25

Grovewood Gallery

Helen Purdum shares her inspired techniques of surface design on bisque fired bowls and cups, focusing on the delightful caricatures of her Girlfriends series. 12 to 4 p.m. Free. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Rd., Asheville. (828) 253-7651, www.grovewood.com.

Friday, March 25

The Larry Keel Experience

CD release show. Flatpicking guitar phenom presents his 15th self-released album, Experienced. Doors 8:30 p.m.; show 9 p.m. 21+. $12 adv.; $17 d.o.s. Asheville Music Hall, 31 Patton Avenue. www.AshevilleMusicHall.com

March 25 - April 9

Montford Park Players

Dark Lady of the Sonnets, by George Bernard Shaw, and The Upstart Crow, by Vincent Dowling, directed by Scott Keel. An evening celebrating William Shakespeare. At Asheville’s Masonic Temple. Pay What You Like! (828) 254-5146, montfordparkplayers.org.

Saturday, March 26

The Art of Paper Cutting

Krista Skrede will demonstrate the intricate art of paper cutting, revealing delicate and dramatic 2D and 3D compositions. Free. 12-4 p.m. Grovewood Gallery, 111 Grovewood Rd., Asheville. (828) 253-7651, www.grovewood.com.

Moog’s Circuit Bending Challenge Deadline: March 27 Take a battery powered device and circuit bend it into an instrument capable of creating new and unique sounds. Winners will receive passes to Moogfest 2016, as well as a Moog merch package. Details at moogfest.com.

Wednesday, March 30

From One Generation to the Next

Mountain music concert and storytelling program featuring David Holt and Josh Goforth. Fundraiser for

MARCH EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 30 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7


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what to do guide John Mac Kah Studio

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

NEW STUDIO LOCATION Riverview Station #236, 191 Lyman St. (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

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Diana Wortham Theatre

Diana Wortham Theatre 2 S. Pack Square, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 210-9837, or visit www.dwtheatre.com

Fee: $75; $70 Writers Workshop members. Saturday, March 12 – Writing Children’s Books, with Bobbie Pell. 10-4 p.m.

March 31 - April 3

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Saturday, March 19 – Editing and Revising Your Own Work, with Karen Ackerson. 10-5 p.m. The Writers’ Workshop 387 Beaucatcher Road, Asheville (828) 254-8111, www.twwoa.org

Learn Filmmaking

Affordable part-time and weekend classes in film production for all experience levels. Asheville School of Film, 45 S. French Broad Ave., Ste 120, Asheville. 1-844-AVL-FILM (285-3456), www. ashevilleschooloffilm.com.

Greening Up the Mountains Festival Call for Vendors

Dragin

by Michael Cole

310 Art Classes

Painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Arrowhead Gallery Workshops & Classes

Friday, April 1

Oils, pastels, watercolor, acrylics, drawing, pen and ink and scratchboard led by Lorelle Bacon. Clay workshops and children’s classes available. Call (828) 668-1100. Arrowhead Gallery, 78 Catawba Blvd., Old Fort, NC.

Town Mountain

Celebrating the release of their 5th album, Southern Crescent. Raw, soulful bluegrass with plenty of swagger. $12 adv.; $15 d.o.s. 21+. The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 2325800, www.thegreyeagle.com.

Safe Step Walk-In Tub

Saturday & Sunday, April 2 & 3

Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Alert for seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by the Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic jets. Less than 4 inch step-in. Wide door. Antislip floors. American made. Installation included. Call 800-886-8956 for $750 Off.

Sell your structured settlement or annuity payments for CASH NOW.

Saturday, April 16

You don’t have to wait for your future payments any longer! Call 1-800-301-2258.

Figure Drawing Workshop

With Francesco Lombardo. Live male and female models. All skill levels. $75 includes materials. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 9 a.m. set up and coffee/cookies. 115 Blannahassett Island in Marshall. Sign up at www.francescolombardo.com

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The Writers’ Workshop

the Center for Cultural Preservation. The Bo Thomas Auditorium on the campus of Blue Ridge Community College at 7:30 p.m. $20. Call (828) 692-8062; go to saveculture.org.

Learn how to approach clay from a sculptural point of view. The Village Potters, Riverview Station, 191 Lyman Street. More details at (828) 253-2424, www.thevillagepotters.com.

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Thursday, March 31 and Friday, April 1 – Rhythmic Circus at 8 p.m.

Studio Painting – Thursdays, 6-9 p.m.

Workshop with Shadow May

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Friday, March 25 – Dervish at 8 p.m.

Thursday Morning Demos – 10 a.m. to noon

Apply by Friday, April 1, 2016 Seeking artists, mountain crafters, environmental and food vendors for the 19th annual festival, which takes place Saturday, April 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sylva, NC. Call (828) 631-4587. Applications available at www.greeningupthemountains.com.

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Friday, March 18 – Color Me Goodwill. Reception at 6 p.m. Fashion show at 7 p.m..

Children’s Art with Alisa – Tuesday & Wednesday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

A 3-day, collaborative, creative festival exploring intersections of photography and craft. Exhibitions, talks, and panel discussions on photography and craft will be held throughout downtown Asheville and the River Arts District. For details and schedule, go to www.photocraftavl.com.

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Friday, March 11 – Ballet Conservatory of Asheville presents Winter Works Innovations and Variations at 7:30 p.m.

Drawing or Painting – Monday & Thursday, 9-4 p.m.

photo+craft

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Classes, Workshops, and Private Fine Art Instruction. Complete schedule at www. JohnMacKah.com.

Landscape on Location – Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain?

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients, call Health Hotline now! 1- 800-408-9017.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 31


Find It Here

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John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

Anthony Guidone tguidone@gmail.com

Johnnie Stanfield www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

ArtFields® www.ArtFieldsSC.org

Joyce Schlapkohl www.joycepaints.com

Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

K-9 Curriculum, Inc. www.k9curriculum.com

Asheville Community Theatre www.ashevilletheatre.org

Kathmandu www.CafeKathmanduAsheville.com

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

LEAF www.theleaf.org

Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com

Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Mary E. Decker www.chartreusemoose.com

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Matt Tommey www.matttommey.com

Blossom on Main www.BlossomOnMain.com

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 www.mellowmushroom.com

Blue Bird Designs www.bluebirddesigns.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Burr Studio www.facebook.com/burrstudionc Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Richard C. Baker (828) 234-1616

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Seven Sisters Gallery www.sevensistersgallery.com

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Downtown Waynesville Association www.downtownwaynesville.com Elinor Bowman www.elinorbowman.com Elizabeth Henderson www.Elizabethhendersonartist.com Erin Keane www.ErinKeane.com

Greening Up the Mountains www.greeningupthemountains.com Hearn’s Bike Shop (828) 253-4800 www.facebook.com Hendersonville Chamber Music hendersonvillechambermusic.org Jane Molinelli www.jmolinelliart.com Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

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Irish Red - All-grain (5 gallon) 11.25lb Maris Otter .25 Crystal 60 .25 Swaen Aroma .25 Roasted Barley 1oz Challenger hops White Labs WLP004 Irish Ale yeast Directions: (1) Mash grains with 3.75 gallons R.O. water treated with ½ tsp calcium chloride for one hour. Vorlauf/recirculate while heating 5 gallons of sparge water, also treated with calcium chloride, to 175F. (2) Sparge until a pre-boil volume of 6.5 gallons is reached. Bring wort to a boil. (3) Once wort comes to a boil, add Challenger hops. Continue to boil for an hour. (4) Chill to 68F and transfer to sanitized fermenter. Pitch yeast and ferment two weeks at around 68F. Bottle or keg when finished.

Asheville Brewers Supply 712-B Merrimon Avenue, Asheville (828) 358-3536, www.AshevilleBrewers.com

MERRIMON AVE.

Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs at www.billwalz.com

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Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

WNC OVERVIEW

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com Wasabi www.WasabiAsheville.com WNCAP www.wncapgala.org Zapow www.zapow.com

GROVE PARK INN

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Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness.

t.e. siewert www.tesiewert.com

French Broad Artists www.virginiapendergrass.com

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‘Brewers’ cont’d from pg. 21

the “what is” of life is its cornerstone. The Buddhism I present here is not a proselytizing religion, but rather a philosophy, a psychology of proven guides to liberating humans from suffering and ignorance. It welcomes questioning and challenge. It welcomes sincere people of any religious or national orientation to test its principles and adopt what shows its merit rationally. It suggests that we explore for ourselves the validity of its teachings. It recognizes compassion, generosity, kindness, empathy, the application of mindful awareness and discerning intelligence as our highest human qualities, while aggression, anger, greed, selfishness, prejudice and hatred are our greatest threats. This is a teaching proven true in our personal lives and our collective historic experience over and over again. The happiest, most peaceful and stable societies manifest these virtues as do the happiest, most peaceful and stable individuals. This cannot be denied. It is in the application of open-minded intelligence that this assertion is validated – and it is in holding our political discussion and our government to the standard of these virtues that we have the best chance for a quality, even utopian, future for all.

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

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‘In Praise of Intelligence’ cont’d from pg. 29

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps 310 ART at Riverview Station www.310art.com

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HENDERSONVILLE RD.

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PATTON AVE.

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GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071

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Zest Jewelry www.zestjewelry.com

WAYNESVILLE

WAYNESVILLE

RUSS AVENUE

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Connect to Arts & Culture! Bonus content exclusively for our digital subscribers! Join our FREE Newsletter.

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Go to www.rapidrivermagazine.com 32 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

WAYNESVILLE

GREAT SMOKY MTN EXPY. WV

TUNNEL ROAD TC

HICKORY, NC YH


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Creative Sparks Fly

Viewers encouraged to look beneath the surface.

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Winter is a great time to explore. We’re rocking year-round!

For Karen Paquette and Eileen Ross their Studio #5 at the historic Red House in Black Mountain, NC is a tribute to their fortitude and dedication to being artists in spite of their limitations. Karen has Fibromyalgia, and Eileen, Multiple Sclerosis. Both refuse to let these medical labels define how they see the world or the world sees them. Eileen and Karen are seasoned artists who Jazz Impressions These studio mates met when work well together in their small studio space. by Eileen Ross Karen started an experimental art group for the Swannanoa Valley find something that sparks your imagination! This is what Fine Arts League in 2009. Both are intuitive painters non-objective art is all about.” and share a love for mixed-media, collage, mark Ross’ work is lyrical and metaphorical rather than making and water media art techniques. representational. Her themes range from jazz musicians Karen uses her lifetime experiences in working and circus performers to lively impressions of her mood. with many different mediums: ceramics, weaving, Indeed, her beautiful and sometimes haunting collages are textile arts, basket making, and papermaking to an apt representation of the renewal and reconstruction of a explore these multiple layered life. “My art is an expression of me, at the many dimentime I make it,” says Ross. sions of art in painting. She soaked copper IF YOU View recent creations now in Studio 5 at The Red flashing strips GO House Studios and Gallery, 310 West State Street in in vinegar to Black Mountain. Home of the Swannanoa Valley get the patina Fine Arts League, (serving NC for 49 years). Hours: 11-3 look to make Tues-Sun. Free parking and free admission. For more elements for information, call (828) 669-0351, and visit svfalarts.org her “Interpretive Layers” series, which includes the piece BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711 Turquoise Memories “Turquoise by Karen Paquette Memories.” “I don’t want you to look for something realistic in my work, says Paquette. “I want you to look beneath the surface and discover the layers of mystery… to

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SVFAL’S STUDIO 5 ARTISTS GET INSPIRED

Warm and inviting shops. Art & craft galleries. Specialty shops, including furniture and antiques. More than 35 restaurants, 3 breweries, and music venues! Spend a few hours or stay a while at a cozy B&B, cabin, or cottage. We have just what you're looking for!

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Breakfast in the Mountains

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Auction for the Arts

The fun begins at 6 p.m. on Monday, March 7 with a reception, catered by the Ale House, and a silent auction. Among the items up for auction are entertainment discounts and packages, gift certificates, textiles, pottery, and jewelry. Tickets are $25; $30 the day of the auction. Held at Black Mountain Center for the Arts, 225 W. State St. Call (828) 6690930, or visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

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craft gallery MB

117 Cherry St., Black Mtn. Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 12-5

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SevenSistersGallery.com • 828-669-5107 Vol. 19, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2016 33


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noteworthy Kyle and Friends Hootenanny

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Feeding Friendships in the Community – a benefit for the Hickory Soup Kitchen. “Hootenanny” is a Scottish word meaning “celebration” and/or “party.” With the Scots being one of the biggest groups of settlers in the Appalachian region of North America (bringing with them their whiskey-making tradition and methods, leading to the area’s “moonshining” tradition) it is not surprising that hootenanny became an Appalachian colloquialism. There is so much fun to be had at the Kyle and Friends Hootenanny! The night begins at 6 p.m. with live tunes crooned by our favorite house band, Wires and Wood. More than 25 of the Southeast’s Best Chefs will offer tasty and tempting nibbles. Nosh while sippin’ regional spirits and wines, and chuggin’ craft brews. Tuck in your kerchief as the chefs prepare swine to feast on, side dishes to devour, and desserts to tempt the sweetest tooth. Grab a partner and come on down! The best part of

the hootenanny? Proceeds from the evening will benefit the Hickory Soup Kitchen!

The Hickory Soup Kitchen In March of 1983 lay leaders of six “downtown” churches began serving the hungry on a rotating basis. By 1985, the kitchen was serving 25-90 people five days a week and the old Highland Fire Station became its first permanent home. During 1990, the kitchen outgrew its space and needed more space. The City of Hickory offered the old Post Office Annex for a new facility. This is the present location of the Hickory Soup Kitchen. A building campaign raised $220,000 for renovations, including a walk-in freezer/refrigerator, shower facilities, and a modern kitchen with up-to-date institutional appliances. Destination Hollar Mill includes Highland Avenue, Hickory’s premier fine dining restaurant, and The Crossing at Hollar Mill, a 10,000-square-foot full-service rental venue and concert hall. The businesses were founded

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NaTaLIE STaCHON

with a mission to offer extreme hospitality to each guest. The company is committed to preserving Hickory’s history and honoring it with sustainable and thoughtful development. IF YOU Kyle and Friends Hootenanny, GO Monday, March 28 at Highland Avenue

Restaurant. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $175 per person. Purchase before March 6 and save $25. Purchase tickets online at www. brownpapertickets.com/event/2501062. For more information, call (828) 267-9811 or visit www.highlandavenuerestaurant.com

Highland Avenue Restaurant 883 Highland Avenue SE Hickory, NC 28602 Open Monday – Saturday at 5 p.m. (828) 267-9800 www.highlandavenuerestaurant.com

The Crossing at Hollar Mill 883 Highland Avenue SE Hickory, NC 28602 (828) 324-9464 www.thecrossinghickory.com

Annual Palm Sunday Luncheon

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This year will mark the 51st year for the fundraising luncheon. An array of delicious foods like slow roasted lamb shank, béchamel topped pastichio, spanakopita (spinach and buttery filo), and keftethes (meatballs), will be offered. The pastries table will be filled with all the favorite Greek pastries like Baklava, Kourambiethes, Galatoboureko, and many more. Think honey, nuts and, yes.... buttery filo. They are the perfect finale to the vast buffet of savory foods you will find here. There will be Greek music and dance presentations as well. Proceeds from luncheon go to charities world-wide. Locally, the Ladies Philoptochos Society are involved with programs for the homeless, children, and hunger. Food service begins at 11 a.m. and continues until 2 p.m. with takeout beginning at 10:30 a.m.

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aNDREa ZOURZOUKIS

Phone (828) 253-3754 weekdays to place your orders for pick-up. For the last minute deciders, call (828) 254-7424 on the day of the luncheon and your order will be packaged for you upon arrival. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church and the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center are located in Asheville’s Montford area at 227 Cumberland Avenue. All are invited and welcome. IF YOU The 51st Annual Palm Sunday GO Luncheon takes place Sunday, March

20 from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. at the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center, 227 Cumberland Avenue in Asheville. It is sponsored by the Greek Orthodox Ladies Philoptochos Society of the Trinity Greek Orthodox Church.

‘Riverview Station’ cont’d from page 11

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34 March 2016 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 19, No. 7

“It’s a real working relationship with everyone here. It’s been real special to build this community. For Trudy and me, it’s more than just real estate we’re renting out. It’s a sense of building community and supporting artists. We feel passionate about helping people build their dreams, and we’re supportive of that,” said Greene. She said there’s very few original owners of art space in the RAD, and she’s not interested in selling, saying she doesn’t want the building to turn into strictly a high rent gallery, or even a brewery. “I feel like there’s enough breweries. What would that really add? Owning this building was always very exciting and it still is today, to me,” she said. “I don’t think that when we purchased the building that we ever had the idea that it would ever blossom into what it’s become.”

We feel passionate about helping people build their dreams.

Riverview Station 191 Lyman, Asheville, NC, 28801 (828) 231-7120 www.riverviewstation.com


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fun and adventure Annual Get in Gear Fest

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The 2nd Annual Get in Gear Fest, held Saturday, March 19, will benefit RiverLink, a local nonprofit that works to revitalize the French Broad River. The Blue Ridge Mountains are a mecca for hikers, bikers and paddlers alike, but not everyone realizes just how much of the adventure gear they’re using is manufactured right here in WNC. At Get in Gear Fest, outdoor enthusiasts from across the region can get handson with locally designed and manufactured gear as they get ready for the spring season, compete in exciting events and races, and meet the people who design and make the gear they use to get outside and play. “We want the WNC community to see and try the amazing and innovative products that are being made in their own backyard,” says Kyle Mundt, Direc-

Get hands-on with locally designed and manufactured gear.

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tor of Marketing and New Product Development for SylvanSport and one of the founders of the Outdoor Gear Builders. “This is a great chance for all these great companies to get together and show our community what’s See and try amazing and innovative products. new for 2016.” Visitors will be able to see firsthand, the thriving outdoor gear Participate in the manufacturing industry that is represented by the Outdoor Gear Builders of family-friendly WNC, and how the region’s status as an Adventure Races. outdoor recreation hotspot and its history of high-quality manufacturing have comtalents, encourage new ideas and inspire bined to make a powerful new economic each other. Their member brands are force. According to the Outdoor Industry dedicated to creating exceptional outdoor Association, the outdoor industry in gear with a focus on responsible manuNorth Carolina now employs almost facturing, cutting edge innovation and 200,000 people and generates $1.3 billion economic growth in our region. in tax revenues for the state. The Get in Gear Fest is presented by In addition to the great equipment, the Outdoor Gear Builders of WNC. games, and people on hand will be new Their motto is: “Extraordinary Gear features and events including a unique, Made Here.” family-friendly Adventure Races, gear raffle, auction, a beer garden with an extensive selection of local craft beers IF on tap, live music and the Squeezebox YOU The free Get in Gear Fest will National Championships, with proceeds GO take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 19 at all benefitting local nonprofits. RiverLink Plaza in Asheville. The Outdoor Gear Builders of WNC are Western North CarolinaFor more information, please visit www. based companies collaborating to share outdoorgearbuilders.com.

Classic Hikes of the Smokies

Shake off the winter blues and stretch your legs with Friends of the Smokies’ first Classic Hike of the year in Great Smoky Mountains National Park on Tuesday, March 8. Hikers will experience the remote Little Cataloochee area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) and visit historic structures including the Hannah Cabin, Cook Cabin, and Little Cataloochee Baptist Church. The guided hike is led by outdoor enthusiast and author Danny Bernstein. Little Cataloochee Trail is 6.6-miles roundtrip and is moderate in difficulty with a total elevation gain of 1,450 feet. Participants will also learn how donations made to Friends of the Smokies

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help fund projects in the Cataloochee area including elk management and monitoring. Funds raised for this program by Friends of the Smokies allow the park to purchase GPS collars to more easLittle Cataloochee Church Photo: Sam Hobbs ily track elk and gather information about their movements and habitat use. IF Monthly guided day hikes in this seYOU Register for all ten hikes for GO the price of eight by mailing ries are $20 for members. New members a check for $160 to Friends may join Friends of the Smokies and hike of the Smokies, 160 S. Main Street, for $35. Donations benefit the Friends’ Waynesville, NC 28786. Smokies Trails Forever program.

Visit hike.friendsofthesmokies.org for additional information.

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March 2016 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  
March 2016 Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine  

On the cover: Daniel McClendon..p4. Inside: 310 ART..p10; Asheville Gallery of Art..p17; Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League..p33; Hendersonvi...

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