Page 1

the Folk art Center

Celebrates National Quilting Day. Fine artist & illustrator

PG

16

al Ramirez.

LeaF’s

HaRt presents Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks and Poe, while nC Stage heats things up with Venus in Fur. PG

PG

8

17

Get tickets now for celebration of global funk, May 8-11 in Black Mountain. PG 27

Western North Carolina AIDS Project’s annual benefit takes place April 24. PG 22

dining Out for Life®

The Great Beauty • The Monuments Men • Robocop • The Wind Rises • Winter’s Tale

PGS

9-12


todd reed

J

since 1992

pg. 17

FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

www.jewelsthatdance.com

+D\ZRRG6WĚ$VKHYLOOH1&ĚĚ+RXUV0RQ6DW

pg. 21

WH

 March 2014 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7


Alon is “...an irresistible powerhouse...” -New York Times

pg. 18

RC

#&&5)07&/5)&

30."/5*$ March 15, 2014 • 8 PM Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 2 Alon Goldstein, piano Bruckner Symphony No. 4 “Romantic”

C o t t o n M i l l S t u d i o s F e at u r e d Art i s t

Cotton Mill Studios

122 Riverside Drive

Daniel Meyer, Music Director

pg. 17

S

www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid River ArtS & CULTURE Magazine — March 2014 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

performances Beethoven and the “Romantic”

t

the asheville Symphony Orchestra (aSO) presents an evening full of beautiful piano and the romance of the orchestra.

BY

MICHAEL J. MOREL

The March 15 concert begins with an early work of one of music’s greats, Beethoven. As he lives with us today in an immortal pantheon of great composers, it’s easy to forget that he was also a brilliant pianist in his own right. Beethoven wrote masterpieces for piano and orchestra as a vehicle for himself, and Pianist Alon Goldstein will perform Beethoven’s the Symphony is excited to Piano Concerto No. 2. introduce Israeli pianist Alon Tickets for the performance are availGoldstein in his Asheville solo debut. Alon able through the Symphony office or the US performs the mercurial Piano Concerto No. Cellular Center box office, and range in price 2, music that projects the clarity and beauty from $20 to $58. Subscriptions are also availof the Classical era while pointing towards a able at pro-rated prices, or on a “pick three” heroism in Beethoven’s later style. basis for $55 to $169. The ASO completes their evening with Discounts for students are available. For Anton Bruckner’s majestic Symphony No. 4, details, call (828) 254-7046. the “Romantic.” Romantic, in this case, refers to the trend in German literature and arts in the 19th Century where mystery and wonder iF mingles with tales from the forest. Whether Asheville Symphony presents YOU evoking the hunt, stumbling upon an imposing gO Beethoven and the “Romantic” forest castle, or gazing at the moon as it takes March 15 at 8 p.m., downtown in nightly flight above the branches, this is symthe US Cellular Center’s Thomas Wolfe phonic music perfectly-suited to our mountain Auditorium. Call (828) 254-7046, or visit home in the Blue Ridge. www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Exciting production of Don Giovanni by Asheville Lyric Opera

t

the 014 opera season begins with Mozart’s dramatic thriller, don giovanni on april 4 at 8 p.m. and april 6 at  p.m. Asheville Lyric Opera (ALO) will introduce a new dynamic production of the infamous retelling of the Spanish fable, Don Juan. ALO is pleased to present nationally acclaimed artists in leading roles such as Metropolitan Opera and Chicago Lyric Opera baritone Galen Scott Bower. Working alongside Mr. Bower will be Asheville’s own, Jonathan Ross as Leporello, the not so loyal servant, and Greenville SC opera singer, Grant Knox as Don Ottavio. Mozart’s classic retelling of the Spanish Don Juan has enticed audiences for centuries with its presentation of love, folly, and poetic justice. The title role of Don Giovanni embodies the Spanish Don Juan as he embarks on his lust-filled conquests. In pursuit of Donna Anna, her father, Il Commendatore, identifies him as an intruder. They duel to the death in

4 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

BY

DAVID STARKEY

which Giovanni prevails. Giovanni’s love conquests continue as he tries to lull both Donna Elvira and the soon to be wedded Zerlina. Leporello, Giovanni’s man servant, assists in his evil ways, but stays seemingly disloyal. Once they figure out the breadth of Giovanni’s wretchedness, they combine forces to bring Giovanni to justice. As they chase each other around in an attempt to bring the immoral Giovanni to justice. Giovanni passes the statue of the Commendatore in town and mockingly invites it to dinner. Later that evening the statue shows up at Giovanni’s castle and casts him into eternal damnation. Returning to perform the title role is nationally acclaimed opera baritone Galen Scott Bower. Last season’s Baron Scarpia in Tosca will be accompanied by his not so loyal manservant Leporello, baritone Jonathan Ross. ‘Opera’ continued on page 6


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

we love this place rd annual asheville Wing War

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Seven

MARCH 2014

www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Harry Brown, James Cassara, Ellen Catlin, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Heart Rose Corwin, Kelly Denson, Amy Downs, Polly Feitzinger, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, Kay Stegall Miller, April Nance, T.Oder & R.Woods, Dennis Ray, Erin Scholze, Patty Smyers, David Starkey, Karen Svites, Greg Vineyard, Kelly Walker, Bill Walz, Dan Weiser, Robert Wiley, Truth Wingfield. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Advertising Sales Manager Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, March 2014, Vol. 17 No. 7

On the Cover:

Oil painting by fine artist & illustrator al Ramirez. PAGE 17

4 Performance

Asheville Symphony Orchestra . . . . 4 Asheville Lyric Opera . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Asheville Area Piano Forum. . . . . . . 7 Asheville Choral Society. . . . . . . . . . 7 NC Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 HART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Hendersonville Chamber Music . . 14

6 Music

Pigpen Theatre Co.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Andy Statman Trio . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 LEAF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Elise Pratt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Underhill Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

9 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 9

13 Columns

Bill Walz – Artful Living. . . . . . . . . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . . Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . .

1 1 4 5 6 6 7 8 4

16 Fine Art

The Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Al Ramirez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Story Book Characters . . . . . . . . . . 19

20 Local Favorites

Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Dining Out for Life . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Lush Life Productions presents an exciting event in which local bars or restaurants battle it out for the title of “Asheville’s Best Buffalo Wings.” With a ticket that includes unlimited wings, beer (while supplies last), and great local music, this event has sold out in the past and is sure to sell out again. The competition will heat up at Asheville Music Hall beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 9. The wings will be judged by a panel of celebrity judges in two categories: specialty and traditional buffalo style. The people also get to have their say with a People’s Choice award. Attendees will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite wings.

This years judges: Stu Helm, the Facebook Food Critic; Mackensy Lunsford, Food Writer at Asheville Scene; Duane Fernandes, Executive Chef at Isa’s Bistro; and a representative from Manna Food Bank. All of the beer will be provided by Sierra Nevada and Pisgah Brewing. Tickets are $15 in advance; $20 at the door. For more details visit www.ashevillewingwar.com. Asheville Music Hall is located at 31 Patton Ave. in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 255-7777 or visit www.ashevillemusichall.com.

Help the get Right Band Record an album The Get Right Band has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise money to record their first full-length studio album. And they need your help! They’ve got a lot of great tunes fans have asked them to record.

The participants for the competition include: Ben’s Tune Up, King James Public House, The Bier Garden, Mojo Kitchen and Lounge, The Barleycorn, Universal Joint, Luella’s Bar-B-Que, Moe’s Bar-BQue, and the Creekside Taphouse.

SpeCiaL SeCtiOnS Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . pgS 14-15 Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 16 Downtown Asheville . . . . . pgS 17-19 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 0-1 Dining Out For Life . . . . . . pgS -

You can support this project by becoming a backer. Help spread the word! There are a ton of great incentives for backers at a wide range of levels. Check out the band’s Kickstarter page to see all of the awesome things you can get! Visit http://kck.st/1ozSfgp The band will be playing an acoustic set every Sunday in March at 5 Walnut in downtown Asheville. To learn more about the band visit www.thegetrightband.com.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social!

23 Noteworthy

Auction for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . .  The Flight Formula Team . . . . . . . 5

30 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

1 1 1 1 1

iF YOU gO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! distributed at more than 90 locations throughout eight counties in WnC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

captivating performances

a

AmiciMusic’s Classical Saturday Brunch Series

amiciMusic, Western north Carolina’s premier chamber music organization, teams up with isis, West asheville’s sensational music hall/restaurant for a new series. The relaxed atmosphere of Isis is a perfect fit for AmiciMusic’s informal presentations of great music which help break the barriers between performers and audience.

tasty trios The first Saturday Classical brunch will be on Saturday, March 8, with two seatings at 10 a.m. and 12 noon, and will feature clarinetist Steve Loew, cellist Franklin Keel, and pianist Daniel Weiser performing music of Beethoven, Debussy, D’Indy and more. Brunches are very reasonably priced between $7 and $11 and include dishes such as smoked rainbow trout, eggs benedict, and a tangy shrimp and grits. Cost for the concert

Tickets are $15. Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com for more information.

the Big apple

Steve Loew, clarinetist and pianist Daniel Weiser.

Roberto Flores

is only $10 more if you reserve online or $12 at the door. Reservations are strongly encouraged. To reserve, please call Isis at (828) 5752737. Visit www.isisasheville.com for details. The “Tasty Trios” concert can also be heard on Friday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the UU Congregation at 1 Edwin Place in Asheville. Cost is $20 for adults, $15 for members of the Congregation, and free for students/ children. Tickets available at the door or reserve online for $18 at www.amicimusic.org.

Short History of the piano ‘Opera’ continued from page 4

Kathy Pyeatt, last season’s Tosca, will return in the role of Donna Elvira. Several debuting singers include Furman University’s new Director of Lyric Theatre, tenor Grant Knox, performing one of his nationally renowned roles as Don Ottavio. Donna Anna will be performed by international soprano Kristin Vogel, and Washington DC’s leading opera soprano, Randa Rouwehya, is the soon to be wedded Zerlina. Her husband-to-be, Masetto, will be sung by local star baritone Dominic Aquilino. ALO is proud to announce the return of the highly talented David Malis. A renowned producer, director, and performer, Mr. Malis has been responsible for the production of many acclaimed operas. Working alongside Mr. Sherman is the brilliant maestro, who last led ALO’s highly acclaimed production of La Traviata, Scott Schoonover. ALO’s Don Giovanni will feature a brand new design concept by resident designer Julie Ross, who adds contemporary nuance with elegant sophistication. The opera will also feature the Lyric Opera Chorus and Orchestra. The opera will be performed in original Italian with English supertitles, providing a wonderful, digital interactive, experience. iF YOU Don Giovanni, Friday, April 4 gO at 8 p.m. Special Sunday matinee

performance April 6 at 3 p.m. Tickets to the preview dress rehearsal, to be held April 2 at 7 p.m., are also available. Call the Asheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670 to make reservations. Performances take place in the Diana Wortham Theater in downtown Asheville. Tickets are available at the theatre box office by calling (828) 257-4530. For more information visit www.ashevillelyric.org.

6 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

Pianist and Artistic Director Daniel Weiser is reviving his popular “Short History of the Piano” series. The series explores music written for the piano over the past four hundred years with interesting stories about the composers and the pieces performed. The first installment takes place on Sunday, March 9 at 2 p.m. at the White Horse Black Mountain.

The next Saturday Classical brunch takes place Saturday, March 29 with two seatings, 10 Amanda Horton a.m. and 12 noon. This program, titled “The Big Apple” celebrates great songs about New York City by Irving Berlin, Vernon Duke, Richard Rodgers, and George Gershwin. The featured singers are Amanda Horton and Roberto Flores with Daniel Weiser on the piano. Cost is $10 online or $12 at the door. Reservations strongly encouraged, call (828) 575-2737, or visit www.isisasheville.com. The “Big Apple” program can also be heard on Saturday, March 29 at 7:30 p.m. at the White Horse in Black Mountain with a $15 admission for adults and $5 for children. AmiciMusic will also perform on Sunday, March 30 at 2 at Congregation Beth Israel in Asheville. Admission is $20 for adults, $15 for Congregation members, and free for children. Tickets available at the door or reserve online for $18 at www.amicimusic.org. For more information please visit www.amicimusic.org

Indie-Folk Band Pigpen Theatre Co.

F

Fresh off a successful fall residency at Schubas in Chicago, pigpen theatre Co. performs in asheville as part of their nationwide tour.

BY

ELLEN CATLIN

Festival in 2010 and 2011. Their performances have earned them critics’ picks from The New York Times, Time Out New York, and New York Magazine, with reviewers ranking The guys of PigPen began creating their unique their productions brand of music, film and theater while attending among the top ten 2013 was a Carnegie Mellon University in 2008. theatrical events of busy year for the both 2011 and 2012. award-winning They are also thrilled to be developseven-member indie-folk band/theater troupe. ing their debut children’s novel with Writers PigPen spent the fall performing the Chicago House, one of the world’s leading young adult production of their critical and commercial hit literary agencies. The group recently gave Off-Broadway show The Old Man and The a TEDx Talk on storytelling, which can be Old Moon at Writers Theatre. viewed on www.youtube.com. In the midst of the three-month run, the band also released their latest EP, The Way I’m Running, as the follow-up to their critically iF acclaimed 2012 debut album, Bremen. Their YOU Pig Pen Theatre Company, recordings have garnered praise from the likes gO Saturday, March 22. Doors open of American Songwriter, Relix, and the Huffat 8 p.m. All ages, $12 at door/$10 ington Post, among others. advance, at The Mill Room, 66 Ashland As a theatre company, PigPen won top Ave. in downtown Asheville. For tickets and honors at the New York International Fringe more details visit www.ashevillemillroom.com


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

performances The Asheville Area Piano Forum’s 9th Spring Concert

B

Bach, Beethoven, and Beyond … What is the first thing concert pianists discover when they relocate to Asheville? The Asheville Area Piano Forum! The Asheville Area Piano Forum (AAPF) assists their professional pianist- members by providing opportunities to network and establish performance and teaching contacts in the area. In return, these pianists give back to the organization and the music community by performing in two annual benefit concerts, the proceeds of which benefit area students who need assistance to continue their piano studies. According to Kimberly Cann, President of AAPF, in the past five years the Piano Forum has provided over $32,000 in scholarship assistance both Teresa Sumpter for piano study and

BY

pOLLY FEITZINgER

to attend summer music camps. Many recipients of AAPF scholarships have already received regional recognition for their performances and have continued their Les Downs piano study in college. The program will include works by Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and Griffes. Forum pianists in the program are: Kimberly Cann, Les Downs, Anna Hayward, Cynthia Riley, and Teresa Sumpter. iF YOU The 9th Spring Benefit Concert by gO Asheville Area Piano Forum concert

pianists will be held Sunday, March 23, at 3 p.m. at Deerfield Retirement Community Center, 1617 Hendersonville Rd. General admission $25; Patron $40; Students 13-21, $3; Students under 13, free. Tickets available in advance at www.ashevillepiano.org or by e-mailing rlrodwell@bellsouth.net.

tHe aSHeviLLe CHORaL SOCietY pReSentS

W

Music and the Movies

Whether you enjoy horror movies like the Omen, or period films such as amadeus, our favorite flicks just would not be the same without the musical score. It lets you know danger is coming or that your favorite character has arrived. It elevates the mood of any scene, such as a character’s heroic triumph or their heartbreaking loss. “I love all kinds of film,” says Dr. Melodie Galloway, Music Director of the Asheville Choral Society. “I really adore some of those more intimate times in the movies where it’s the music itself that draws you into the action and the emotion of the scene.” This one-of-a-kind, epic event will engage the audience not just with the chorus and orchestra, but also with the use of projected images and video clips from various films. The program for “Music and the Movies” includes a wide array of music, such as excerpts from Mozart’s Requiem, and Adiemus by Karl Jenkins, composer of Stella Natalis, which was performed by the Asheville Choral Society in December 2013. There is a choral/orchestra mashup of Ennio Morricone’s Gabriel’s Oboe and

BY

HEART ROSE CORWIN

River from The Mission as well as a George Gershwin medley. In addition, music from the film Demetrius and the Gladiators by composer Franz Waxman, famous for film scores such as The Bride of Frankenstein. iF YOU Music and the Movies, Friday, gO March 7 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday,

March 8 at 4 p.m. Tickets: $20 for adults; $10 for students. Tickets may be purchased at www.ashevillechoralsociety.org or by calling (828) 232-2060. Performances will be held in the Diana Wortham Theatre in downtown Asheville.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

noteworthy NC Stage Heats Things Up with Venus in Fur

a

a sexy provocative comedy that is sure to be the hottest night in asheville.

BY

KELLY WALKER

Immediate Theatre Project’s Willie Repoley (Thomas) will be North Carolina Stage Company co-starring with Hannah Sloat (NC Stage) is excited to work again with (Vanda) who is returning to Immediate Theatre Project to present NC Stage from a recent turn on Venus In Fur by David Ives, a smash Broadway in the Tony Award winBroadway hit that The New York Times ning production War Horse. Angie called, “90 minutes of good, kinky fun!” Flynn-McIver will be directing When Vanda arrives soaked from this talented pair. the rain and late to audition for a play North Carolina Stage Company based on a nineteenth-century erotic is Asheville’s only professional theatre novel, the director, Thomas, is less than celebrating its 12th year producing plays thrilled. The reading quickly turns into a for the Asheville community. Founded tango for dominance between the young by Charlie and Angie Flynn-McIver, actress and the director. the theatre has been voted best local This sexy comedy was nominated theatre in the Mountain Xpress Best of for a Tony Award for Best Play. WNC Poll. NC Stage was also recently awarded the American Theatre Wing “It’s like 50 Shades of Grey but with a National Theatre Company Grant. Tony Award Nomination for Best Play”

O

Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks, and Poe

paRt OF HaRt’S WinteR StUdiO SeaSOn

One of the most popular things to do in the winter is to attend the plays presented by HaRt theatre in the intimate Feichter Studio in Waynesville. The 65 seat space plays host to some the region’s most adventuresome drama. It is a “no holds barred” space, meaning the actors from the area pick plays they want to do with no restrictions on subject matter or content. Over the years everything from light family musicals such as You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown to avant garde works such as Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days, have found appreciative audiences. It is a place for those who truly love theater. This season has been one of the Studio’s most successful, and for March, HART has two productions opening. Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks, by Richard Alfieri, will feature Julie Kinter and Cord Scott as an aging but formidable retiree and the dance coach she hires to give her lessons in her condo. The antagonism between a gay man and the wife of a Southern Baptist minister gives way to profound compatibility as they swing dance, tango, foxtrot, and cha-cha, while sharing barbs and intimacies along with the dance steps.

8 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

Catch Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks March 1 & 2. The show may be held over through March 9. Poe: An Evening of Chills and Thrills will feature “The Raven,” “The Black Cat,” and “The Monkey’s Paw,” all adapted from the works of Edgar Allen Poe. Performers include Tom Dewees, James Bradley, and San and Bob Greenalch. Poe performances held March 14-16. The show may be held over through March 23. By popular demand, comic storyteller C.J. Deering brings her all too true, tall tales of life, recovery and survival in Most Improved Camper: The Real Life Adventures of C.J. Deering. Performances March 28-30. iF YOU Six Dance Lessons in Six gO Weeks. March 1 at 7:30 p.m.

and Sunday, March 2 at 3 p.m. Poe, March 14, and 15 at 7:30, and Sunday, March 16 at 3 p.m. Most Improved Camper, March 28, 29, at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, March 30 at 3 p.m. To make reservations call the HART Box Office any time at (828) 4566322 or visit www.harttheatre.com. All performances are held in the HART Studio Theater, 250 Pigeon St. Waynesville, 28786.

iF YOU Venus in Fur, March 19 gO – April 13. Performances

Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets: $14-$30. Students $10 anytime! PayWhat-You-Can: Wednesday, March 19. Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting www.ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane, downtown Asheville.

Schoolhouse Rock Live!

a

a benefit fundraiser for asheville Creative arts. The Emmy Award-winning 1970s Saturday morning cartoon series that taught history, grammar, math, and more through clever, tuneful songs has been reimagined for the stage with old favorites including “Just A Bill,” “Lolly, Lolly, Lolly,” and “Conjunction Junction.” Based on the series created by George Newall and Tom Yohe, this concert has something for audiences of all ages. Directed by Matt Cosper; featuring Marc Bastos, Ashby Blakely, Maria Buchanan, Olivia Edge, Robbie Jaeger, and Lucia Stetson. iF YOU Schoolhouse Rock Live! gO March 8 at 7:30 p.m. and

March 9 at 2:30. Tickets: $10 children (12 and younger); $15 (adult); $30 VIP (includes reserved seating and donation to ACA); Four at $40 (2 adults and 2 children) At the Masonic Temple, 80 Broadway Street in Asheville. For more details visit www.ashevillecreativearts.org.


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - the previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHip KaUFMann is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MiCHeLLe Keenan is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest RevieWS, tHeateR inFO and MOvie SHOW tiMeS, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRent BROWn is a graphic designer and illustrator. view more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

The Great Beauty (La Grande Bellezza) ∑∑∑1/2

Short Take: An exquisitely filmed but overlong and very confusing look back at an Italian writer’s life on the occasion of his 65th birthday.

ReeL taKe: There’s lots of Oscar buzz

surrounding La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty) as the entry to beat in the Tony Servillo and the rest of the aging “beautiful Best Foreign Film category and by the people” in La Grande Bellezza (The Great Beauty). time most of you read this review we’ll know whether it did or did not win. If it Academy voters especially in a film not made does win I won’t be surprised but it certainly by Hollywood. wouldn’t have gotten my vote (I chose China’s I have nothing against art films with The Grandmaster). It is art with a capital A a capital A but I do object to them when and that’s always something that impresses storytelling (as in Russian Ark from a few

H

years back) gets sacrificed for that concept. If you’re familiar with the Federico Fellini films La Dolce Vita and 8 ½ then you’ll have a head start in knowing what to expect from this movie. However, since we are now living in the 21st century, a lot of technical “improvements” have been added to those basic storylines. The story, if there can be said to be one, focuses on an aging Italian socialite on the occasion of his 65th birthday. He once wrote a highly regarded novel 40 years ago but nothing since then. After the novel’s success opened doors for him he became one of the “beautiful people” and spent the rest of his life doing nothing but being one of them. Now he is withdrawing from that

tHe MOntHLY ReeL

Happy March, dear readers! Happy March, dear readers! February was a wild ride: a snow storm one week and temperatures in the seventies the next. We also said goodbye to some television and movie legends who lived long, satisfying lives, and a tragic goodbye to an amazing talent taken far, too soon. Shirley Temple Black, passed away at the age of 85 on February 10th. She got her start in Hollywood at the age of three and by the age of five she was a singing, dancing and acting star. She brought smiles to faces of people who didn’t have a lot to smile about during the Great Depression. She danced and held hands with a black man, not knowing a thing such as racism even existed. By the age of 22 she left acting behind, married and raised a family. In midlife she became a diplomat, which she really always was. She was one of the first women to publicly speak about breast cancer and the importance of mammograms. What a life and what a lady. We also said goodbye to Ralph Waite, best known for his long-running role as the patriarch of the Walton family on “The Waltons.” Many people don’t realize that Waite had quite a life and career which was obscured by his television success. He was educated at Yale, he battled the

bottle early in his career, and prior to “The Waltons” he was one of Hollywood’s go-to bad guys. The good Professor Kaufmann selected Shirley Temple a great example of this 1928 – 2014 for his DVD pick of the month, Chato’s Land. The proverbial pearly gates were busy that week, also welcoming one of the funniest comedians to ever work in television and movies, Sid Ceasar. Without gimmicks, crudeness or ugliness, Caesar was truly funny. Thanks for the laughs, Sid. The saddest and most shocking goodbye was to 46 year old Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hoffman was found dead due to a heroin overdose, a syringe still in his arm. He was, hands down, one of the best actors of his (my) generation. He was a gifted actor of stage and film. Sometimes I think that gift comes with fragility; a fragility that makes life difficult. The Asheville Film Society will pay tribute to Hoffman this month (see listing on page 10). I also selected Hoffman’s 2008 film Doubt as my DVD pick of the month. RIP Philip Seymour Hoffman. Back in the land of the living, the post Oscar drought has begun, with two notable exceptions, The Past, and In Secret. An

Sid Caesar 1922 – 2014 Ralph Waite 1928 – 2014

world and looking back at his life. Sounds straight forward enough but filmmaker Paolo Sorrentino borrows more than a page or two from the above mentioned Fellini movies and then shoots the film in a style reminiscent of Baz Luhrman’s Moulin Rouge. It seems that the camera never stops moving either in or out and the editing is in the best music video tradition. Combine that with a running time of 142 minutes (it was originally 190 minutes) and you have either a masterpiece of modern expression or a relentless exercise in style that doesn’t know when to quit. I did. I fell asleep about halfway through which forced me to watch portions of it again. The nature of moviemaking being what it is, any exercise in style no matter how relentless, is not without some value. There are moments of great beauty in The Great Beauty, along with moments of real poignancy as the main character looks back with regret on an unfulfilled life. The film opens with a quote which is either its raison d’etre or an excuse for excess. “To travel is very useful, it makes the imagination work, the rest is just delusion and pain. Our journey is entirely imaginary, which is its strength”. It’s up to you to decide for yourself which is which. I already have. The film is currently not rated but it contains a lot of nudity and profanity.

unfortunate audiological malady has sidelined me recently, making the viewing (and hearing) of movies a tad onerous; Philip Seymour I was unable to Hoffman 1967 – 2014 review either of these films by deadline. We have it on good authority from Mountain Xpress reviewer Ken Hanke that both films are worth your while. Chip highly recommends catching Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises at the Fine Arts Theatre and, if you think it might be your cup of tea, I recommend the much maligned Monuments Men.

Until next time, Chip and Michelle

REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN

The Monuments Men ∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: The true, and up to now, little known story of a team of art historians tasked with recovering and returning the stolen treasures of Western civilization, from the Nazis, during WWII.

ReeL taKe: As a History major, English minor in college I wanted, at one time, to switch to Art History and Anthropology curriculum (which my poor, already bewildered parents readily dismissed). Ironically, a few years after college, I ended up working at an art museum. The aforementioned museum in fact has significant ties with the real ‘Monuments Men.’ I tell you all of this because I guess I’m what you’d call a built-in audience. With or without that personal connection

‘Movies’ continued on page 10

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 9

however, and contrary to what you may have heard, The Monuments Men is entertaining and worthwhile. Is it a great film? No. And that’s the problem; with Clooney at the helm and a stellar cast, the world was anticipating greatness. Setting expectations aside, I think Clooney made exactly the film he wanted to make, and the result is a perfectly good, entertaining movie. George Clooney co-writes, directs and stars in the film based on the book “The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in

George Clooney as Frank Stokes and Hugh Bonneville as Donald Jeffries in The Monuments Men.

theatre directory asheville pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (asheville) www.cinebarre.com

the Falls theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine arts theatre (asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

History” by Robert Edsel. Their names are fictionalized in the film so that the creative team could take a few artistic liberties, but the over all story is true. Founded in the belief that the preservation of art is paramount to the life of a civilization, FDR created a special unit to find, protect and repatriate artwork stolen by the Nazis. Leading the effort is museum director Frank Stokes (Clooney). Stokes handpicks his team, a rag tag menagerie of museum directors, curators and art historians; enter Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman, Bob Balaban (a face you know from movies and TV; more recently he narrated Moonrise Kingdom), Jean Dujardin (you’ll remember him from The Artist) and Hugh Bonneville (TV’s Lord Grantham in Dowtown Abbey). They don’t spend much time delving into background. We get just enough information about each of them to know what kind of person they are. From there they gloss through basic training (not a one of them being grade A soldier material), and begin the task of finding where the Nazis have stashed countless masterpieces and collections. It’s late in the war in Europe. Everyone is war weary. This is especially apparent when Damon’s character, James Granger, enlists the help of French curator, Claire Simone (Cate Blanchett), who has been forced to work for the Nazis during the German occupation. Simone seethes with stoic rage and mistrust as Granger tries to earn her trust. To accomplish their mission the team must divvy up; this is both good and bad. While the film consequently suffers some disjuncture, it does allow for some interesting subplots and vital character building between the paired off teams, the best of which happens between Bill Murray’s and Bob Balaban’s characters in an unexpected, yet pivotal Christmas scene. Unfortunately however, Clooney never really succeeds in connecting us emotionally to his characters. I think folks were expecting the Oceans 11 of WWII movies. Instead, Clooney delivers a film that could have come out of the era itself. There’s also a stylistic element and camaraderie a la Kelly’s Heroes, The Dirty Dozen and The Great Escape. It doesn’t quite balance with the overarching reverential and nostalgic tone, but it is fun and it lightens things up a bit. The Monuments Men spends a little too much time telling us that art is important. But then again, in our superficial world where Kim and Kanye are continually ‘trending,’ arts education is continually devalued and its funding constantly threatened, perhaps we need the reminder. Unfortunately it’s a message that won’t be seen or heard by those who need it most. For me, The Monument’s Men was definitely the best treasure hunt ever. It will appeal to people with an interest in WWII and art. If any of this sounds remotely appealing to you, I hope you see it and enjoy it. Rated PG-13 for some images of war violence and historical smoking.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

10 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

almost half the film to do it this time around and while CGI makes more things possible, it shows us too much in an attempt to make us care. By the time RoboCop swings into action it feels rushed and out of sync with the first half of the film. We know he’ll triumph in the end but it doesn’t matter. One of the key elements missing from this new version is the relationship between Samuel L. Jackson as a Glenn Beck-like talk show host Murphy and his fellow officer is the best thing about the remake of Robocop. Lewis played by Nancy Allen in the original. Here Lewis is a man and plays a much smaller part in the RoboCop ∑∑1/2 proceedings, robbing us of that male/female Short Take: Technically sophisticated, dynamic that energized the first film. relatively well acted remake is the one It’s not a complete waste of time. It’s thing RoboCop shouldn’t be…boring! great to see Michael Keaton again and Gary ReeL taKe: As Hollywood continues to Oldman scores as the doctor who creates reboot (to use the current word in fashion) RoboCop. There is also computer visual material from the 1970s and 1980s, there are technology galore and you haven’t lived unsome remakes that are better than others. Rotil you see Samuel L. Jackson as an AfricanboCop isn’t one of them. There are a number American version of Glenn Beck. of reasons for this but the primary one is that it shouldn’t have been remade in the first place.

Paul Verhoeven’s 1987 original, although a cult classic now, was not a box office success when it was first released. A lot of that had to do with the fact that the film initially carried an X rating. The X stigma (and yes it was still a stigma in 1987) kept it from reaching a wider audience even though it was quickly trimmed to an R. Although full of jabs at the corporate and the militaristic mindset, the original was first and foremost an action picture with its graphic novel style violence (which earned it the X rating) deliberately meant to be over the top. It proved to be prophetic as it would influence numerous movies that followed in its wake. The new version from Brazilian director Jose Padhilla (it’s his first English language film) comes with a PG-13 rating and a sincerity that doesn’t sit well with the material. The political and social criticism of the original is still there but it has been elevated to the front rank with the action sequences downplayed. This is a different approach but it frankly makes the film rather boring. The core story is the same. Set in the near future, Detroit police officer Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is seriously wounded and is transformed into the cyborg law enforcer RoboCop. This is done by OmniCorp, a multi-national company that has robot soldiers overseas. Americans don’t want these “drones” policing their streets so OmniCorp head Raymond Sellars (Michael Keaton) sets out to change that by using Robocop as a public relations coup. If successful his company will make millions. The transformation of Murphy into RoboCop in the first movie took 30 minutes. It takes

Rated PG-13 for intense sequences of action, strong language, sensuality, and drug use.

REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN

The Wind Rises ∑∑∑∑1/2

Short Take: Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki’s last work is also one of his most personal and is aimed squarely at adults although children can see it as well.

ReeL taKe: The great Japanese animator

Hayao Miyazaki, who will soon turn 73, has announced that The Wind Rises will be his last animated feature as a director. Unlike his previous efforts, which focus on the efforts of young protagonists showcased against a background of fantasy, this is an adult film meant for adults, although it has valuable lessons to teach children.

The Wind Rises tells the story of Jiro Horikoshi, a real life engineer whose specialty was designing aircraft. It was he who came up with the design of the famous (and later infamous) Zero fighter built by Mitsubishi that was used by the Japanese during World War II although that was never Jiro’s intent when he created it.

The real life consequences of war on a designer’s dreams in The Wind Rises. ‘Movies’ continued on page 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews

L

Mabel Normand: Film Comedy Pioneer Finally Getting Her Due

Last month marked the 100th anniversary of the first appearance of a movie icon.

Romance. Poor Mabel. EvHer friends in the movie business BY CHIp KAUFMANN eryone acknowledged her got her work with comedy producer Hal genius as a comedienne but Roach and she made a few successful two shorts with Roscoe “Fatty” few knew about her skills reelers but by 1927 it was too late. Her Arbuckle and they became as a writer-director or that tuberculosis had worsened and she had But, if it weren’t for the interventhe “Lucy and Ricky” of the later she even had her own to stop working. She died in a sanatorium tion of another film comedy pioneer, his silent era. By 1917 she and studio for a brief period of in 1930 at the age of 37. Having made no first appearance might have been his last. Roscoe had left Sennett time. sound appearances, she was quickly forOn February 2, 1914 Charlie Chaplin and signed lucrative conMabel, like her good gotten. This neglect would last for more appeared in a Keystone comedy called tracts elsewhere. Arbuckle friend Mary Pickford (and than a quarter of a century. Making A Living. He hadn’t discovered went to Paramount while Chaplin for that matter), In the late 1950s, silent comedy the Tramp character yet and he wasn’t Mabel signed with Samuel came from very humble was rediscovered and Mabel’s appearvery funny. Some of that had to do with Goldwyn for whom she beginnings. She was born ances with Chaplin and Arbuckle were the fact that the director cut out most of made a number of features. in Staten Island in 1892. seen and appreciated, but for the next his comic bits but Keystone head Mack Only two survive today and Her mother was Irish and 50 years only her screen appearances Sennett was ready to give him the boot. they’re not in good her father French Cawere recognized. Enter Mabel Normand. She was shape. In 1920 she nadian. He worked as a Slowly but surely already, at 22, a full fledged comedy star Mabel Normand worked as a became head of her carpenter at a local home more information and also happened to be Mack Sennett’s model at an early age. own studio. for elderly seaman, but Mawas uncovered that significant other. She urged him not to It was at this time that Mabel bel, who was attractive at an early age, began showed her addigive up on Chaplin just yet. “Let me became addicted to cocaine which modeling to bring in extra money. At 15 tional contributions handle him” she said, and she did. She aggravated the tuberculosis that she was posing for famed illustrator Charles on the other side of directed Chaplin’s next film Mabel’s she had contracted as a child. The Dana Gibson and entered the fledgling the camera. In 2010 Strange Predicament and gave him the big blow came in early 1922 when movie industry a year later. her “long lost” comtime to elaborate on his classic English her friend and mentor, director Starting at the Vitagraph studios in edy Won in a Closet Music Hall character “The Inebriate.” William Desmond Taylor, was Flatbush, she was noticed and picked up by that she wrote and It was also the first time he wore “The found murdered in his bungalow. D.W. Griffith for the Biograph directed was discovTramp” costume. The results Mabel in Won in a Closet. She was the last person to see him Company and made a number ered in archives in were very funny. In his next alive. Although acquitted of any of shorts before meeting Mack New Zealand and appearance Kid’s Auto Races wrongdoing in his death, the negative Sennett in 1911. They set out has been restored and is now on DVD. in Venice (California), a star publicity seriously damaged her career. for California in 1912 where Hopefully more of Normand’s work was born. In 1924, insult was added to injury Sennett founded Keystone will be discovered and restored so that a Years later in his autowhen her chauffeur shot and wounded Studios and American silent proper revaluation can take place. Along biography Chaplin mentions a millionaire playboy. Her film from the comedy was born. with Alice Guy and Lois Weber she was Normand’s prowess as a peryear before, The Extra Girl, had been a By 1914 she was writing one of the principal woman pioneers in former but says nothing about success but again negative publicity ruined and directing in addition to cinema back when women were considher as a director or writer her comeback. By this time she was off starring in comedy shorts and ered as capable as men before the rise of even though they appeared cocaine but had turned to the bottle. She this is when Chaplin enters Hollywood put a stop to equality behind in several films together married silent film actor Lew Cody in the picture. She later struck the camera. including the first full length In 1920 Mabel became 1926 but they lived in separate houses. head of her own studio. gold in a series of comedy comedy Tillie’s Punctured

‘Movies’ continued from page 10

It is the conflict of interests involved and how an initial concept can be transformed from its original intentions that interests Miyazaki. What was intended to be an example of beauty and grace becomes transformed by circumstances and is hijacked for sinister purposes. In addition to the aircraft storyline, the movie also focuses on the relationship between Jiro and his wife Nakao from their chance meeting during an earthquake to their separation as adults because of his work and her recurring illness. However it wouldn’t be a Miyazaki film without some elements of fantasy and here they are dream encounters that Jiro has with the great Italian aircraft designer Giovanni Battista Caproni. Together they share their love of flying and the belief that it’s more fun to design airplanes than to fly them. As one has come to expect from Mi-

yazaki there are several standout animated set pieces. The most notable is probably the recreation of the 1923 massive earthquake that struck Kanto, Japan. The animation is dazzling and recalls the fluid style of early Disney hand drawn masterpieces such as Pinocchio. The dream encounters with Caproni are also beautifully realized. Not only is their creativity a joy to behold but the character of Caproni behaves in the manner of an omnipotent narrator urging Jiro to realize his dreams and then explaining them to him and to us. Finally there are the war sequences which are heartbreaking as we see Jiro’s dreams of beauty and grace, achieved after countless trials, transformed into nightmares of death. The use of color here is particularly effective. Whenever a Miyazaki film is released here the Japanese soundtrack is always dubbed into English. This was done to ap-

pease children and there was good reason for doing that but as this is an adult oriented film, it worked better for me in Japanese. However the English voiceover cast of Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Emily Blunt, and Werner Herzog (to name a few) is top flight. It has been nominated for Best Animated Feature and it should win but if it doesn’t, don’t let that stop you from seeing it. If you love old school animation, then The Wind Rises is a prime example of the type of feature that they soon won’t make anymore. Hayao Miyazaki, you will be missed. Rated PG-13 for some disturbing images and smoking.

REVIEW BY CHIp KAUFMANN

Winter’s Tale ∑∑∑

Short Take: A young man has a date with destiny when he falls in love with a beautiful, consumptive, young woman.

ReeL taKe In a nutshell Winter’s Tale is a

romantic tale of destinies, fate and good versus evil. Unfortunately Akiva Goldman’s film adaptation of Mark Helprin’s expansive novel isn’t presented in a nutshell. It means well. It’s clearly a labor of love. Because of its earnest intentions, you can’t bash too hard . . . The film is set in New York circa 1916, or maybe it’s a parallel universe version of New York circa 1916. Peter Lake is an immigrant orphan turned master thief. He’s on the run from the world’s worst boss (Russell Crowe). Unbeknownst to Peter, the gangster-style Pearly Soames is a demonic enforcer working for the big guy downstairs (and you thought your boss was rough?). Meanwhile a mysterious and rather luminous white horse comes to Peter’s rescue. There’s more to this horse than Peter can possibly fathom; for that matter there’s more to the universe than Peter can possibly fathom. But everything changes when he meets Bev‘Movies’ continued on page 12

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 11


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

film reviews aSHeviLLe FiLM SOCietY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. March 4:

almost Famous (2000) Writer and director Cameron Crowe’s experiences as a teenage rock journalist -- he was a regular contributor to Rolling Stone while still in high school — inspired this coming-of-age story about a 15-year-old boy hitting the road with an up-and-coming rock band in the early 1970s. Stars Patrick Fugit, Kate Hudson, Phlip Seymour Hoffman and Frances McDormand. Directed by Cameron Crow. March 11:

doubt

(2008) When the principal of a Bronx Catholic High School accuses a popular priest of pedophilia, a young nun caught in between the feuding pair becomes hopelessly swept up in the ensuing controversy. Stars Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, and Viola Davis. Directed by John Patrick Shanley. March 18:

Synedoche, new York

(2008) Synecdoche, New York marked the directorial debut of iconoclastic, cerebral screenwriter Charlie Kaufman. Caden Cotard is an eccentric playwright who lives with artist Adele Lack and their daughter Olive in Schenectady, upstate New York. Prone to neuroses, misgivings and enormous self-doubt, Caden also begins suffering from accelerated physical deterioration. Stars Philip Seymour Hoffman and Catherine Keener. Directed by Charlie Kaufman. March 25:

pirate Radio (2009) In mid- to late’60s Britain, an unusual yet colorful subculture sprang up and thrived as a product of the upswing in British pop music, only to meet its doom within a few short years. Stars Philip Seymour Hoffman, Bill Nighy, Nick Frost and a score of other Brit actors. Directed by Richard Curtis.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

‘Movies’ continued from page 11

erly (“Downton Abbey’s” Lady Sybil) while attempting to rob her family’s mansion. Beverly is a beautiful, feverish young woman, dying of consumption. They of course fall truly, madly, deeply in love. The chemistry between Peter and Beverly is palpable and their scenes are wonderful, but unfortunately that whole good versus evil, date with destiny thing just won’t take a back seat. Eventually the story fast forwards to 2014 and Peter is still just as he was 98 years prior. By the end it was, “The Convoluted Winter’s Tale.” To be fair, adapting this woo-woo tale of destiny among the stars is a Herculean task. Ironically for all its attempts at something much bigger, the real magic lies in good old fashioned love. Everything that deviates from that doesn’t work nearly as well. Akiva Goldman, who won an Oscar for his Beautiful Mind screenplay, seems to have focused more

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Chato’s Land”

Jessica Brown Findlay as Beverly and Colin Farrell as Peter have a date with destiny in Winter’s Tale.

on his directorial debut than on his script. I’ve not read Helprin’s novel, but if I had, I’m sure I’d be disappointed with the film. The idea of this novel on screen is beautiful. Visually it is a sumptuous feast. Unfortunately it’s one of those stories that should be left on the page. I give Winter’s Tale three stars on the merit of its stunning aesthetics and its heart. Farrell and Findlay are lovely together and they alone keep the film above water. Russell

March dvd picks

Chato’s Land (1972)

The recent death of Ralph Waite brought back memories of The Waltons but his long stint on that show has obscured his versatility as a character actor which was put to good use in such early 1970s movies as The Stone Killer where he played a dumber than dirt cop and Chato’s Land where he was a member of an incredibly sleazy, religious obsessed family. In this 1972 revisionist Western, Charles Bronson plays a half-breed Apache who is hunted by a vigilante posse for gunning down a white man in self-defense. The posse is led by former Confederate officer Jack Palance. Along for the ride are such veteran character actors as Richard Basehart, James Whitmore, and Simon Oakland. Ralph Waite plays the older son of a racist, misogynistic clan headed up by Oakland. He is thoroughly despicable but is mild compared to his younger brother played by Richard Jordan who meets a shocking (often censored), but well deserved end. Waite gets what’s coming to him as do all the other members of the posse but his is especially creative. You don’t mess around with Charles Bronson. Chato’s Land is about as far from the traditional Western as you can possibly get. The hero is Native American and has one line of dialogue. The white characters are colorful but most are morally corrupt and all are clueless when it comes to tracking their “prey” who leads them further and further into the desert. Parallels to what was going on in Viet

1 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

Nam were not lost on the audience in 1972. Although extremely well made, Chato’s Land can be a very hard film to watch so why recommend it? Because it stimulates thought while never losing sight of the fact that it’s an action film with a high tension factor. Who will get it next and how? It also allows us to see a different side of Ralph Waite then we’re used to seeing and that is both disturbing and a tribute to his acting talent.

Doubt (2008)

This month’s pick simply had to be a Philip Seymour Hoffman film, but which? The man made 50 films in 20 years! Essentially I could recommend a different Hoffman film each month for the next two years and they’d all be worthwhile. Ultimately I settled on Doubt because it is a deeply disturbing, yet satisfying film, and it’s one of Hoffman’s finest performances. Written and directed by John Patrick Shanley (Moonstruck), Doubt was originally a stage play (also by Shanley) that came out at the height of the sexual abuse scandals that

Crowe digs in with a delicious ferocity, but without enough character development to really justify the bite. Jennifer Connelly does her best, but there just isn’t enough for her floundering character to do to make it worth her while. Will Smith has a laughably stiff cameo as Pearly’s boss, and Eva Marie Saint makes a cameo as the world’s best looking 106 year old woman. I really wanted to like Winter’s Tale. I was prepared to suspend disbelief at the door and enjoy the magic, but ultimately Winter’s Tale is simply a hot mess, albeit a beautiful mess. Rated PG-13 for violence and some sensuality.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Web Exclusive Find the Hendersonville Film Society schedule online at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Doubt” rocked the Catholic Church. If you are like me, you may have been reluctant to see the film when it first came out because of its subject matter. I can assure you that this performance-driven power house is well worth any squirm factor. The story is set in 1964 in the Bronx at St. Nicholas Catholic High School. When Father Brendan Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) arrives at the school, full of progressive (Vatican II) ideas, he immediately clashes with Sister Aloysius Beauvier (Meryl Streep), the stern faced school principle who rules with an iron fist. Personally I thought her habit was none-too-coincidentally reminiscent of the Wicked Witch of the West. Soon the school’s first black student arrives on the scene (Joseph Foster II). When the naïve Sister James (Amy Adams) mentions to Sister Aloysius that Fr. Flynn has been spending a lot of time with the boy, Aloysius summons her flying monkeys and sets out to destroy Fr. Flynn. Armed with moral certainty and not a shred of evidence, she launches a campaign to reveal him as a child molester. What Sister Aloysius sets in motion, steamrolls into something bigger than any of them could ever have imagined, and changes their lives forever. Interestingly, we have sympathy for the two opposing characters. Doubt is the consummate actor’s vehicle. Hoffman, Streep, Adams, Foster, and Viola Davis as the boy’s mother, all deliver tremendous performances. Doubt asks a lot of questions and leaves you with even more. The title says it all.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

artful living Buddha’s Four Noble Truths “therefore i tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing?

H

- Matthew 6:25

Having examined The Buddha’s great teaching of the Four Noble Truths in last month’s column, let us review briefly. 1st Noble Truth – To be human is to experience a unique kind of subjective suffering, a suffering of the mind that comes from thinking our experience of Life is never quite satisfactory. This brings unhappiness and causes behavior that increases unhappiness in ourselves and others. Our sense of place in existence feels uncertain. Our experience of being a separate self in a vast world brings insecurity and our mind creates many strategies to compensate for this insecurity, but all these strategies are doomed to create more insecurity and unhappiness for ourselves and others. Human existence is marred by this cycle of suffering. 2nd Noble Truth – There is a reason for this suffering, and it is because of the unique characteristic of the human mind to abstract its experience out of the natural unfolding of Life, to create a kind of virtual reality with the principle experience being of a separate self in a Universe of separate objects. For people it is a struggle for safety and significance. This is called ego, and it creates a delusional sense of self that wants Life to be stable, safe, reliable, and happy — without end. This is not what happens, and we experience much emotional suffering because of it. We cling to this idea of a separate self we call “me” with its creative mind capable of endless scheming in its quest for happiness

d

through material possessions, social standing, relationships, even philosophies and religions that promise the specialness and security we crave. We lose touch with our natural self and mind that is an expression of the infinite and harmonious Universe. Rather, we look to what we are instructed to believe, to our psychological conditioning from family, society and culture, all of whom are as lost in the “wrong view” of egoic thinking as we are. We become more or less crazy trying to figure it all out, but there is no figuring it out because this egoic view of self and the world is delusional. Yet we cling to it because we know of no other way. This is the “clinging” and “grasping” commonly associated with this teaching. 3rd Noble Truth — There is a way out of this suffering, this unsatisfactory way of living, thinking and feeling. 4th Noble Truth – Through releasing attachment to this artificial reality and idea of self, we can “awaken” into the Way that Life really is, and when we realize and live within this Way, we will be free of this unnecessary suffering. To help us, the Buddha offered what is called “The Eightfold Path,” instructions on how to live so as to achieve this release.

The Disease of Kings

Several of the major characters in Charles dickens’ novels suffer from inflammatory arthritis. As Dickens described it, an attack of this arthritis would last for several days, would be very painful with a high fever and a red, swollen joint – usually the big toe, but sometimes the ankle or knee. Almost always this character would be rich, overweight, and gluttonous, consuming large amounts of meat, rich desserts, and alcohol. Common among the rich and affluent, it was known as “the rich man’s disease,” “the king of diseases,” and “the disease of kings,” a disease we call gout. Modern medicine has discovered that genetics plays a large part in developing gout. The disease occurs nine times more frequently in males, peaking at age 70-75. The underlying cause is an elevation in uric acid in the blood stream, usually as a result of the inability of the kidney to excrete uric acid in the urine. The excess uric acid crystallizes in the joints of the body, sometimes in the tendons and

occasionally under the skin. In the joints the uric acid crystals cause an immune inflammatory reaction that results in a hot, red, painful joint, ultimately leading to the crippling total destruction of the joint. Uric acid can also crystallize in the kidney causing blockage and/ or kidney failure. Where does the uric acid come from? Look at the description of the character in the Charles Dickens’ novel. High meat intake, especially the “sweetbreads” (kidney, liver, brains, and other internal organs), seafood (both crustaceans as well as fish), and highfructose products contribute to the increase in uric acid. (Interestingly, high protein vegetable sources do not cause an elevation of uric acid.) Large alcohol intake decreases the kidney’s ability to excrete the uric acid and causes dehydration, increasing the concentration of the uric acid in the blood and the joints. As in our Dickens’ character, gout occurs more frequently in those who are overweight, have high blood pressure, and increased insulin resistance (known as metabolic syndrome

pART 2 BY BILL WALZ the eightfold path Right View – Of course it all begins with Right View, that is, the view that sees things-asthey-are with clarity, which sees the interconnectedness and interdependence of all phenomena. Right View sees the source of unnecessary suffering as self-centeredness, which gives rise to the insecurity of an isolated self that manifests greed, callousness, conflict, exploitation, envy, disrespect, and abusiveness. In the experience of separateness, only the small self and that which is believed to enhance the self is valued. All that is not within the circle of self is irrelevant or threatening, opening the way to harmful, disharmonious action without conscience. Right View also sees that Life exists as both form and energy in perfect balance. To fail to experience Life in its energetic dimension, the energy that gives rise to form, and the energy that gives rise to mind, is to fail to experience the unifying principle of existence. Without the experience of energy as everpresent and necessary for form to hold itself together and relate, there is no understanding of harmony and balance. Ultimately, without a living relationship and experience of the underlying energy of existence we are unable to experience the Source of Everything that is often assigned the word “God.” This “Right View” takes us to a transcendent experience of Life, to a bigger picture

BY

Right View sees the source of unnecessary suffering as self-centeredness. where what is experienced as suffering can be understood, and in understanding, managed, even transcended. Right Speech – Speech is the intermediary between thought-form and physical-form. It has the power to shape reality for those who speak and those who hear. It can be a conveyor of compassion and understanding, or of contempt and violence. It can be a conveyor of indifference. We can soothe and make peace with a word or we can violate, disrespect and create conflict with a word, with an angry or contemptuous inflection of speech. Right Speech is using the power of the word as an instrument of connection, harmony, compassion and peace. This kind of speech is an antidote to suffering. Right Action – Right Action, like Right Speech, is being mindful that our actions shape Karma. Everything that happens is the result of preceding conditions and actions. Every choice we make sets in motion results we often cancontinued on page 32

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

and the major cause of Type II diabetes.) To be sure, not every case of gout occurs in an obese, gluttonous consumer of alcohol (since 60% of the problem is a genetic dysfunction). In addition, the medical management of gout involves the judicious use of several kinds of medications to manage the acute flair-up and the long-term control of the level of uric acid. However, the major lifestyle interventions recommended to decrease uric acid levels and decrease the frequency of gout attacks include discontinuing the use of meat (including poultry) and sweetbreads, seafood, and alcohol, increasing the use of Vitamin C foods, and avoiding obesity. Are you getting the Dickens’ picture? Living the lifestyle of a pauper – a lacto-vegetarian diet low in rich foods and high in Vitamin C, sufficient exercise to maintain ideal body weight, and avoidance of alcohol – will help to control “the rich man’s disease” in those whose genetics predispose them to the gout.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 1


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Culturally Rich HendeRSOnviLLe & Flat Rock

Hendersonville Chamber Music brings chamber music up to date and then some! Featuring four superb performing groups, this year’s concerts are sure to please audiences who thoroughly enjoy live performances of compelling music, consummately performed by award-winning international musicians.

SCHedULed peRFORManCeS March 9 – the luscious sound of the north Carolina Symphony Woodwind Quintet A smash hit when they recently performed for the Raleigh Chamber Music Guild, the group is especially known for its consummate interpretation of French Romantic composers.

LE

ST

ST

V IL

HW

Y

F L E M M IN G S T

J U S T IC E S T

S IX T H

LO

CU

ST

ST SEV

Hg

AV E

FLE

VE

on Sunday afternoons at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. Subscriptions for all four concerts are $70 including tax. They are available by mailing a check payable to HFCM, PO Box 271, Hendersonville, NC 28793.

HA

ST

K A N U GA R D

G ROVE

ST

E HW

Y

HS

N V IL L

W H IT E

HEBRON RD

GREE

ST

T K IN G S

S P R IN G S T

T W H IT T E D S

D AV IS

An exhibition featuring Henderson County art teachers opens Friday, March ELL ST 14. It is part of MenW N R A B tors & Students, a T GR ELL S CASEW O V series designed to E celebrate the imST portance of art in a child’s life. Opening Best of Show, reception from 5:30 Untitled by Michaela Orr to 7 p.m. On display through Friday, March 28 at First Citizens Bank, 539 N. S PA R T A N B U Main St., in downtown Hendersonville. R T M A IN S

H ST

N ST

ST ALLEN L IL LY PO ND

CHURC

IN G T O

ST

ST

D ST

VE

a

aRt teaCHeRS CReate

HB

W ASH

NG

TTE

T IC E

MMI

WHI

JU S

T H IR D AV E

HR

14 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

iF YOU All Hendersonville Chamber gO Music performances are presented

HM

AV E

F IR S T A

ENT



VE F IF T H A F O RT H

FH

a big band, Carolina Brass will sweep you off your feet and leave a smile on your face. Their winning combination of virtuosity and humor brings a fresh approach to great music of all types, engaging audiences in a vibrant and energetic musical experience. Both series and individual tickets at $20 will be available at the door on the day of performance. Subscription holders will be able to use their four subscription tickets for any or all performances. More information on Facebook and www.hendersonvillechambermusic.org

HendeRSOnviLLe - 879 HE

AV E E IG H T H



The North Carolina Woodwind Quintet performs during the Hendersonville Chamber Music series.

IN

AS

ROBERT WILEY

March 0 – the fabulous versatility of the Kontras String Quartet Singled out by Chamber Music America as one of the most vibrant young string quartets performing today, Kontras, in addition to its international performance schedule is in residence with the Chicago Youth Symphony orchestras. april 6 – the absolute perfection of the Rawlins piano trio Recently chosen to appear at the prestigious performance showcase at the national conference of Chamber Music America in New York City, the trio, all University of South Dakota faculty members, performs regularly throughout the United States and abroad. april 7 – the exhilarating music of the Carolina Brass From the elegance and grace of beautiful classical music to the sound of

ON

FH

BY

MA

FLat ROCK - 876

i

if you think of chamber music as old-fashioned and stuffy, think again.

N.

S

Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. visit www.hendersonvilleartsdistrict.com

Hendersonville Chamber Music Concerts

PA TT

Arts & Culture in Hendersonville



G HWY



iF YOU gO: For more information contact The Arts Council of Henderson County, (828) 693-8504, or visit 401 North Main St., 3rd floor, Hendersonville, NC.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Culturally Rich HendeRSOnviLLe

HMS Pinafore or The Lass That Loved a Sailor

O

Opera Creations, deerfield Chorus and Friends will present a concert version of gilbert & Sullivan’s HMS pinafore on March 1. The production will include professional singers, aspiring professional singers from the area, the Deerfield Chorus, and friends who might like to join us for this adventure. Sopranos Jackie Collison and Simone Vigilante will join tenor Randy Outland and Baritone, David

Fields in the cast. Vance Reese will be the music director and chorus director. Come out and support these talented folk as they portray long-loved characters, such as the commanding officer Captain Corcoran, Little Buttercup, a buxom peddler-woman and Sir Joseph Porter, first lord of the admiralty. You don’t want to miss it! For more details contact John Price at Deerfield Community, (828) 274-1531 x3253, or Judy Woodard at x3208. For more informaiton on Opera Creations visit www.operacreations.org

BY

KAREN SVITES

iF YOU Saturday, March 1 at 7 gO p.m. $20 Tickets available

at the door with cash/check only. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Deerfield Community Blue Ridge Room, 1617 Hendersonville Road, 28803. Free parking shuttle provided from St. Giles Chapel and Wakefield Drive.

HR

HB

HS

HM

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 15


R A P I D

R I V E R

A R T S

fine art The Folk Art Center Celebrates National Quilting Day

Nashville Meets Up with New York

W

When was the last time you sat less than 50 feet from five musical superstars? The internationally known, award-winning Andy Statman Trio will be joined by Grammy award-winning guitarist Tim O’Brien and IBMA-winning fiddler Michael Cleveland in the intimate listening room at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts for one night only. As part of the evening, the artists will gather for a

meet and greet reception in the Upper Gallery. “Andy is from Brooklyn and Tim and Michael live in Nashville. The fact that these nationally known diverse talents would come together at the Black Mountain Center Andy Statman for the Arts is thrilling,” said Photo: Jason Marck executive director Gale Jackson. “It will be a completely unplugged and intimate experience with all the focus on the music.”

iF YOU gO: The Andy Statman Trio, Tim O’Brien

and Michael Cleveland Together, Monday, March 24 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $55 and can be purchased at the Center for the Arts, located at 225 W. State St., or by phone at (828) 669-0930. For more information visit www.BlackMountainArts.org.

BLaCK MOUntain - 8711 Ba

BC

BK

BC

i

in honor of national Quilting day, the Folk art Center will host demonstrations and exhibitions celebrating textile arts.

BY

ApRIL NANCE

The National Quilting Association, Inc. began sponsoring National Quilting Day in 1991. Quilting groups across the country use the event as a way to raise awareness of the traditional craft. On Friday, March 14, Southern Highland Craft Guild member and quilt historian Connie Brown will demonstrate quilting on a home sewing machine in the Folk Art Center lobby from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Saturday, March 15, which is actually National Quilting Day, Connie will curate a small display of antique quilts. Visitors are Feather Study by Caryl Bryer Fallertinvited to bring a Gentry. On display as part of the quilt – a famEyecatchers exhibition in the Folk Art Center Main Gallery through May 11. ily heirloom, an antique purchase, National Quilting Day provides the perfect or a vintage quilt opportunity to see this show. with a unique design, for questions and analysis by Connie. She can help identify time periods by fabrics and patterns used. Information about how to care for quilts and how to learn more about the process will be provided. On Sunday, March 16 the Asheville Modern Quilt Guild, a chapter of the national Modern Quilt Guild will host a pop up exhibition of fiber art in the Folk Art Center auditorium from 1-3 p.m. The public is invited to see the show and to learn more about the organization. While at the Folk Art Center, visitors can enjoy Eyecatchers: The Hunter Collection in the Main Gallery. From the private collection of Barbara & Robert Hunter, the show highlights a variety of designs, fabrics and techniques found in traditional and contemporary quilts. Janice Maddox, a participant in the show and Southern Highland Craft Guild member, will be on hand in the gallery Saturday, March 15 from 1-3 p.m. to discuss her work as well as the techniques used by other artists exhibiting. “Eyecatchers” will be on display through May 11, 2014. iF YOU National Quilting Day, March 14-16. The gO Folk Art Center is located at Milepost 382 of

BA

16 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

the Blue Ridge Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 entrance in east Asheville, NC. For more information please call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

t

pg. 18

pH

More of What Makes Asheville Special

Fine Artist & Illustrator Al Ramirez

the road to being a professional artist has never been straight or narrow, but al Ramirez has been walking that road for as long as he can remember. To support his adventurous journey he has been a TV news editor, grounds keeper, census taker, standup comedian, and surgical assistant, just to name a few. Al’s favorite artist gig was working as a comic book colorist, finisher, and co-illustrator with collaborator and good friend Butch Guice, a nationally known comic book artist now working for Marvel as the inker for Captain America Reborn, the biggest Marvel launch in ten years. From ‘84 to ‘92 he and Butch worked on Superman with DC comics, followed by The X Factor Graphic Novel, Action Comics and Acclaim comic books. Then there were the Nightbreed and Hellraiser comics. Those eight years working with Butch were packed with unbelievably tight deadlines, raw energy, and maximum creative output. Al’s other art jobs included commissioned paintings for the Tri-Star movie Private Eyes with Don Knotts and Tim Conway, shot in Asheville. The Grove Park Inn Resort and Spa in Asheville was one of many local businesses and corporations that hired Al to do commissioned illustrations and free-lance art projects. Al was also the recipient of a N.C. Arts Grant to do stand-up comedy for a few months, not only because he’s naturally funDracula by ny and loves Al Ramirez. to laugh, but that he loves to get other people to laugh too. Certified in television and film production, Al wrote, produced, co-directed, and acted in the horror

cult classic video Satan Place while living in Miami, Florida. Joe Bob Briggs, famous B-movie monster critic, said Satan Place was one of the best of the B movies! Al’s favorite movies to watch are the Film Noir genre, as well as all the old original horror flicks like Frankenstein, Wolfman, and The Thing. For more than five years Al has been a student of nationally known landscape painter John Mac Kah, cofounder of the celebrated Paintings in oil by local artist Al Ramirez. Fine Arts League of Asheville. John says Al’s formal art education at UNC-Asheville and his sensitivity and broad range of mature, practiced skills keep him focused and plugged into that Source where all artists get their creative inspiration and energy and that’s why remarkable paintings continue to come out of his studio. Painting all day long, every day, has been Al’s routine for several years now. He has a long-standing habit of simultaneously working on two to three different projects to keep the creative “Everybody needs beauty... juices flowing. Multiple art places to play in and pray in, projects in different mediwhere Nature may heal and ums are always in the works. “It helps me switch gears in cheer and give strength to my brain; making the paint, the body and soul alike.” energy, and synchronicity come alive. Plus my two ~ John Muir dogs need a few brisk walks each day!” Mountain Birds is a Images are locally printed and strikingly beautiful new series of fine scrupulously matched to the original art Giclee reproductions that capture oil for perfect clarity and color the essence and spirit of each Western reproduction. Additionally, each North Carolina bird depicted and the image is printed on acid free, lignin majestic mountains that we share with free, cotton rag paper. Remember, them. Taking a year’s worth of study keep all fine artwork out of humid and dedication to produce twelve birds, environments, bright light and direct Al has rendered each bird to capture sunlight. With love and care, this not only its tender beauty, but also to fine art work from Al Ramirez will showcase its ancient place within the bring much beauty and joy for many magnificent biodiversity of the southern generations to come. Appalachian mountain range.

pg. 18

T

pg. 18

C

al’s fine art giclee reproductions can be found at the gallery of the Mountains, a fine american craft gallery located inside the historic Omni grove park inn in asheville. Call 1-800-69-04, or visit the gallery’s website, http://galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 17


R A P I D ® Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

Asheville The Best Shops & Restaurants pack Square park, downtown asheville

36 Haywood Street

pH

Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

The sculptural railing on Reuter Terrace was designed and built by Black Mountain artist Julia Burr.

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

S

R I V E R

E

T

O C

B C

J t

M e

p

H g K

S a

pH

A

Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Link 18 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants the asheville art Museum The building housing the museum in Pack Place was also home to the First National Bank, and the old Pack Memorial Library, named after George Willis Pack.

More of What Makes Asheville Special

Story Book Characters

W

With figures from the artist group goFigure, pack Memorial Library will sponsor its second exhibit of Storybook Characters. The exhibit will be composed of original art inspired by children’s literature. All work will be newly created for the exhibit, and displayed in the children’s department of Pack Memorial Library. This event is held in conjunction with National Reading Month. Artists will visit local schools during March to share their creations, their process, and the books that inspired them.

GoFigure is a mixed media figurative art group. The ability of the members range from beginner to advanced to professional. The group meets on the first Tuesday of the month, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, in the West Asheville Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall, 690 Haywood Road, Asheville. Vistors are welcome. iF YOU Storybook Characters, on display at Pack gO Memorial Library, 67 Haywood Street in

downtown Asheville. The exhibit opens on Wednesday, April 2, and will be on display through April. For more information, please contact Karen Hawkins, Storybook Characters Exhibit Chairperson, at karena@charter.net.

pg. 18

K

pg. 32

gF

ks. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071. Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 19


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

WiLd aBOUt

g

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

BY

Nashville-based musician and NC native Lacy Green.

U

R

E

KAY STEgALL MILLER

SC musician Jacob Johnson

entertain with hits of the Beatles and Elton John. Joe has opened for such notable groups as Chicago, Santana, Bonnie Raitt, and Average White Band. Pavel Wlosok performs Friday, March 14 at 7 p.m. Wlosok is a jazz pianist, composer, arranger, and educator born in the Czech Republic. Pavel is a full-time tenured jazz Pavel Wlosok faculty professor at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee. At 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 15 enjoy an evening of gypsy jazz music with Michael Pilgrim mandolin; Drew Kirkpatrick guitar; and, Don Mercz guitar. Mike Pilgrim and Don Mercz have been playing music together for over 30 years. Newcomer Drew Kirkpatrick shares their affinity for the passionate and exhilaratingly up-tempo Gypsy jazz and swing music. Singer-songwriter Matthew Welborn, and vocalist wife, Jessi Stone perform as the duo, Bohemian Jean on Friday, March 21 at 7 p.m. Jessi Stone chooses covers that suit her soulful alto voice — including hits from Janis Joplin, Stevie Nicks, Patsy Cline, and Carly Simon. Welborn complements his wife’s voice with rich harmonies, also adding his own fun covers and original music to the mix. High school sweethearts, the couple’s natural chemistry shines through when they perform the music they love. Versatile jazz, gypsy jazz, and swing performer, Leo Johnson (guitar, vocals) will play swing from the 30s and 40s on Friday evening, March 28 at 7 p.m. The Wineseller’s restaurant opens at 5:30p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings serving freshly prepared tapas-style cuisine and small plate fare. There is a $10 per person minimum on live music nights. Reservations are accepted between 6-7 p.m. by calling (828) 452-6000. iF YOU gO

0 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

T

Live Music at the Classic Wineseller

March begins with a performance by guitar sensation Jacob Johnson on Saturday, March 1 at 7 p.m. Johnson is a young, energetic performer who has shared the stage with songwriting masters from Edwin McCain to David Wilcox. While it is his flashy guitar pyrotechnics that might grab your attention, his songwriting, personality, and performance style are what set him apart from the rest of the young guitarslinging pack. On Thursday, March 6 at 7 p.m., the Classic Wineseller presents three nights of live music beginning with Nashville recording artist, Lacy Green. Lacy grew up in the tiny town of Pilot Mountain, in the foothills of North Carolina. Music was a staple in her family’s home. Lacy says, “My first performance was when I was five years old and my Dad lifted me up to a microphone at one of his shows so I could sing “Somewhere Over The Rainbow.” I was pretty well hooked from that point.” Singer-songwriter James Hammel (guitar, vocals) will perform jazz and pop tunes on Friday evening, March 7 at 7 p.m. Hammel was at the top of the corporate ladder in NYC when 911 hit. Devastating affects to his company and among his co-workers and friends led him to re-evaluate life and return to his love of music. On Saturday, March 8, 22 & 29, singer-songwriter James Hammel and pianist Joe Cruz will

WF

L

WaYneSviLLe

guitar sensation Jacob Johnson and nashville recording artist Lacey green perform live at Waynesville’s premier retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue.

WM

U

The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street in Waynesville. For more details call (828) 4526000 or visit www.classicwineseller.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

WiLd aBOUt

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

WaYneSviLLe WM

WB

WF Wp Wa

WH

~ Waynesville Has it aLL ~

WB

Home Furnishings, Great Food, plus Live Music, and Fine Arts & Crafts.

Wp

Live Music

Michael Pilgrim

n

Every Friday & Saturday at 7pm

noted for his entertaining disposition and skill on the mandolin, Michael will be performing at the Waynesville public Library on March 16 at  p.m. Michael picked up his first musical instrument at the age of four. He first performed professionally at the age of 15, and has taught music lessons since the age of 22. Michael is proficient in performing classical, Celtic, Old Time, Gypsy Jazz, bluegrass, standards, swing, Latin, blues, rhythm and blues, and gospel music on the mandolin, guitar,

and fiddle. Come out to the library for an entertaining and warm performance by the Michael Pilgrim you’ve come to know and love. And you can’t beat the cost: free of charge; donations at your discretion.

pg. 32

WV

Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

WA

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 1


pg. 32

VN

R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

local favorites Dining Out for Life: Thursday, April 24

t

the Western north Carolina aidS project’s (WnCap) 1th annual dining Out for Life® benefit will take place on april 4th in asheville and the surrounding communities. The acclaimed national fundraiser, has raised more than 30 million dollars for AIDS service organizations across the country and in Canada since it began. Locally, more than 110 fine dining restaurants will generously donate 20% of their gross sales that day for breakfast, lunch and dinner. In return, there will be an intense marketing campaign to increase traffic in each restaurant through media ads, social media, and PSAs on local TV and radio stations.

pg. 32

TI

“It’s a day full of true community spirit,” says Harry Brown, Chairperson for the event. Friends, clients, co-workers and families gather at their favorite restaurant or visit a new one, and simply by eating out, are making a donation to WNCAP. It’s a win-win situation for everyone.” The funds raised during Dining Out for Life (DOFL) directly support

WNCAP’s vital community work. Currently, more than 450 clients are receiving free HIV/AIDS related care, with thousands more provided with free prevention programs to suppress the further spread of HIV. WNCAP provides services to 18 counties across the region, and with the addition of Madison County this year you can now enjoy your meals at restaurants in eight of these counties. Last year’s event raised $165,000, thanks to the generosity of our presenting sponsor, Prestige Subaru, our amazing restaurants and volunteers, plus extra donations from more than 11,000 diners in WNC. The Asheville fundraiser ranks 5th in the nation in actual dollars raised, out of 55 cities producing the event across the country and in Canada. For a list of participating restaurants visit www.wncap.org/dofl. WNCAP is busy putting together a team of more than 250 enthusiastic volunteers needed to support this exciting event. “We will have a person at every restaurant for each meal called an “Ambassador,” explains Chris Winebrenner, WNCAP’s Volunteer Coordinator. They will attend a training party for volunteers

pg. 32

BD

pg. 14

Hg

 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

pg. 18

g

and be assigned to one of their favorite restaurants. It’s a fun day for volunteers as they encourage their friends, clients, family and co-workers to eat at their restaurant that day. Simply by donating a few hours of their time, they are making a difference in the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS.” Mark your calendars, check out this year’s participating restaurants, and make your reservations today for Dining Out for Life 2014 on Thursday, April 24 — you just might help save a life. If you are interested in participating as an ambassador, please contact Chris at (828) 252-7489 or www.wncap.org/dofl. DOFL raises much needed AIDS awareness and serves as reminder that our community is still being affected by HIV. iF YOU Dining Out for Life, gO Thursday, April 24. Visit or

www.wncap.org/dofl for more details and a full list of particpating restaurants.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

noteworthy aUCtiOn FOR tHe aRtS On Saturday, March 8 the Black Mountain Center for the Arts will host its popular 9th Annual Auction for the Arts. The evening begins at 6 p.m. with a catered reception and silent auction in the Upper Gallery. At 7 p.m. the exciting live auction with auctioneer John Hill begins. Items diverse as vacation accommodations, musical instru-

ments, garden sculpture, and a hand-painted toy chest will be up for auction. There are only 75 seats available. Reservations made before March 8 are $25. Tickets are $30 the day of the auction, provided there are seats left. Call (828) 669-0930 to make sure you have a seat and a paddle number.

iF YOU gO: The Black Mountain Center for

the Arts, 225 W. State Street. For more details visit www.BlackMountainArts.org

pg. 32

BC

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

pg. 18

B

Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

authors ~ books ~ readings Farewell, Laurey

L

Laurey Masterton, activist, restaurateur, beekeeper, downtown asheville pioneer, died on February 18 after a long bout with cancer. She was an incredible woman, radiant and curious and generous, and always ready to offer a helping hand. Every moment Laurey lived her motto “Don’t Postpone Joy.” Laurey, you will be greatly missed. You can find Laurey’s spirit, as well as some of her stories and her favorite recipes, in the two terrific books she wrote. Elsie’s Biscuits: Simple Stories of Me, My Mother and Food (Wilmer Press, 2007) is perhaps the most entertaining memoir I have ever read. It would make a wonderful movie. The Fresh Honey Cookbook: 84 Recipes from a Beekeeper’s Kitchen (Storey Publishing, 2013) will turn you into a sweet gourmet.

Laurey’s Cafe and Catering 67 Biltmore ave., downtown asheville 8801 (88) 5-1500 Laurey’s wonderful website www.laureysyum.com

A Varied Bouquet of Spring Reading

C

Coal has been in the north Carolina news a lot lately. Coal ash is the residue left over from the burning of coal at power plants. An estimated 50,000 to 82,000 tons of it spilled from a closed coal plant into the Dan River near Eden. It’s a huge mess and will no doubt be the epicenter of longlasting environmental concerns. There are hundreds of coal ash dumps across the country. Environmental issues weren’t talked about much in the early days of American coal mining. More important was finding new coal deposits and supplying the coal-hungry country with its favorite fuel. Coal mining was a dangerous and unpredictable way to make a living. Thousands of men were injured in the early days of the century, leaving their families destitute. The Depression was particularly hard on miners, creating pockets of poverty that have never been relieved. Before FDR came into office and his alphabet programs began to create jobs, times were not cheery in the Appalachian coal country. Alabama author Suzanne Pickett has

REVIEWED BY

MARCIANNE MILLER

written a fascinating memoir about these times. In The Path Was Steep, she doesn’t gloss over the hard life of the Appalachian coal miners. Not at all. Everything she remembers is tinted with her unquenchable good humor and love of life. In essence, a memoir that could have been filled with despair and anger, turns out to be a heart-warming tale about people who are determined to make the best with what life gives them. Suzie, as she was called, met David Pickett in the summer of 1926 and they married in October. Two lovely daughters followed soon after. Throughout the 200-some pages of her story, Suzie remembers she found something rare in life—a good-looking man who keeps her madly in love with him—who also

tiCKeted BOOK LaUnCH FOR FiRSt-tiMe nOveLiSt

B

Bryan Robinson, a licensed psychotherapist, and professor emeritus at UnC Charlotte, is the author of more than 5 nonfiction books. Book #36 is a change of pace. It’s his first novel, an offbeat mystery with humor and quirky southern characters—and it’s wowing local critics. Limestone Gumption, a Brad Pope and Sisterfriends Mystery, takes place in Whitecross Florida, known for its magnificent underwater caverns, not its busy undertakers. The special book launch is a ticketed event. Robinson will read from his book, Matthew Alexander plays music, and Stefanie Wilder provides the food. It all comes with the purchase of Robinson’s book, at $25.95. Call Malaprop’s at (828) 254-6734 to order Limestone Gumption and your ticket will be waiting for you. Come early for a good seat. iF YOU gO

Book launch for Bryan Robinson’s Limestone Gumption. Friday, March 7. 6:30 reading; 7:30 reception. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

JOin a BOOKCLUB! Women in Lively discussion (Wild) - Tuesday,

Comix Club - Tuesday, March 18 at 7 p.m. Host Lauren Napoli leads a discussion on Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh.

March 4 at 7 p.m. Host Susan Blexrud leads a discussion on The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall at the Battery Park Book Exchange.

politics of Food Bookclub - Monday, March 31

Mystery Bookclub - Monday, March 10 at 7 p.m.

iF YOU gO: Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55

Host Sallie Bissell leads a discussion on The Poison Tree by Erin Kelly.

4 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

at 7 p.m. Join host Dan Rosener for a discussion of Garbology by Edward Humes.

Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

A heart-warming tale about people who are determined to make the best with what life gives them. happens to be a hard worker. It was David’s unquenchable ambition that kept food on their table. And the Picketts also had another unique asset—a noisy 1926 Studebaker, named Thunderbolt. Back and forth across the coal fields of Alabama and West Virginia, the car would take the Picketts on David’s search for work. For years, they would live in one cramped house after another, sharing sleeping quarters and rarely having privacy. Though her memoir concentrates on the friendships and fun times the Picketts had in the Depression, the labor struggles are not far distant. Early in her tale, a group of miners asked management for a loan to buy food for their children. The boss told them to send the children off into the nearby forest and “let them eat hickory nuts.” The miners never forgot this cruelty. Years later, in 1934, there was a famous confrontation at Coleanor, Alabama. All the elements were there for bloodshed—angry miners and the mine owner’s armed guards. But the peaceful leaders of the union prevailed and violence was avoided. Many considered it a miracle. Mrs. Pickett died in 1999 at the age of 91, in the spacious house her beloved husband was able to buy her. The Path Was Steep is a beautifully written memoir that calls up a different time, when family ties were wide, the community shared whatever they had, and married people stayed in love. It’s a delight. the path Was Steep: a Memoir of appalachian Coal Camps during the great depression, by Suzanne pickett, (01 newSouth Books) 10 pp.

Marcianne Miller is a local writer and critic. She can be reached at marci@rapidrivermagazine.com

Rapid River Magazine’s poetry Contest Winners Thank you to everyone who submitted poems! The winners will be announced in the April 2014 issue of Rapid River Magazine.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

poetry ~ books ~ classes

F

The Poet’s Voice

Find YOUR OWn vOiCe the title for this column comes from a musician of profound ability and charisma, amit peled. Mr. Peled is professor of music at The Peabody Conservatory of Music, at John Hopkins University. As a teacher, Mr. Peled believes in ‘the nature of nurture.’ Ah! If only I had started cello with a teacher like this. I did begin my poetry study with a teacher like Amit Peled. My teacher was Jim Moore. I worked with him for four years in St. Paul, Minnesota. Jim and I first met at Cafe Con Amore. (My husband wondered if we couldn’t meet somewhere else.) I had mailed ten poems to Jim. When we met he placed the pages on the table next to my latte, and said, “This is really poetry.” I could have swooned, slipped under the table and kissed his feet. Instead I glowed, gleamed, held back tears. I had been writing since I was sixteen years old, and other than my mother, no one had praised my work like this. Jim Moore said more than once, “Let your authentic voice speak.” I search for my authentic voice in music and words. If my cello could speak, it would do so with a magnolia-laced Virginia accent underlying an Italian opera. (My cello speaks Italian.) Fuse the two, and you have “Un Bel Di,” an aria from Madame Butterfly, sung beneath luscious live oaks, heat and humidity dreaming you to sleep. When one of my MFA professors in St. Paul read my work aloud, a classmate would announce, “That’s Carol’s!” I can’t hide the real me or my voice. Every one of us has an authentic voice. Read your poetry out loud. Revise for sound.

BY

CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

(I can’t stop thinking about the sound of Every one of us has an words, the subject of my February column.) Presently I’m reading Ron Rash and Charles authentic voice. Read your Wright. I learn language from them. I don’t poetry out loud. copy them, but search for words that are mine, hoping to connect with readers. I love hearing poets read their work. When words come alive, jump from the page and dance around the The final verse of Dover Beach by Matthew room, that’s poetry! Arnold follows. I wish I could have heard him say There are readings near you. these words. There will be someone spilling their voice in your neighborhood. Check from dOveR BeaCH UNCA’s Great Smokies Writing . . . Ah, love, let us be true Program (agc.unca.edu/great-smokto one another! for the world, which seems ies-writing-program), Malaprops To lie before us like a land of dreams, (www.malaprops.com/event), Warren So various, so beautiful, so new, Wilson College (www.themfaproHath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, gramforwritersatwarrenwilsoncolNor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; lege.com), or a bookstore near you. And we are here as on a darkling plain I will read from my book, BeSwept with confused alarms of struggle and flight hind the Cello, and bring my oldest Where ignorant armies clash by night. dearest friend (my cello) to several locations. I always have my cello with ~ Matthew Arnold me because he likes poetry. He also likes to sing. • Thursday, March 20 between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. at The Renaissance Hotel, 31 Woodfin St., downtown Asheville.

Resources

• Friday, April 11 at 2 p.m. at the Hendersonville library, 301 N. Washington St.

The Golden Treasure of Songs and Lyrics edited by Francis T. Palgrave.

• Sunday, May 11 at 3 p.m. at the Music Academy in Hendersonville, 235 Duncan Hill Rd.

Peabody Magazine, Spring 2014.

My reading at the Hendersonville library will be accompanied by a slide show of nature photographs by Ruth Rosauer. Words and image are fused into a sensual landscape of collages and slide shows. We call our collaboration, Poemscapes.

MaRCH

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING visit www.malaprops.com

ReadingS & BOOKSigningS tuesday, March 4 at 5:0 p.m. KatHY & BRendan ReiCHS, exposure, Ya novel. Saturday, March 8 at 7 p.m. neil Hinson and paul Freiderich, Man v. Liver, comic. Sunday, March 9 at  p.m. aMY gReene, Long Man, historical prose. thursday, March 1 at 5 p.m. Shakespeare Salon, with dr. Susan Harlan. Friday, March 14 at 7 p.m. eRiCa ROBUCK, Fallen Beauty, about a poet. Saturday, March 15 at 5 p.m. denise Kiernan, girls of atomic City. Sunday, March 16 at 5 p.m. poetry: Jim tolan, nicole Callihan & Lorraine doran Wednesday, March 19 at 7 p.m. andrew Knapp, Find Momo, for dog lovers. thursday, March 0 at 7 p.m. Jan-pHiLipp SendKeR, a Well-tempered Heart.

i want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

Friday, March 1 at 7 p.m. asheville poetry Review, with Keith Flynn, Kathryn Stripling Byer, and Richard Jackson. Saturday, March  at 7 p.m. andRea WeigL, pickles & preserves. Monday, March 4 at 7 p.m. david CHRiStOpHeR LeWiS, advanced Studies of the Human aura. tuesday, March 5 at 7 p.m. HaRLan COBen, Missing You, live streamed event. Wednesday, March 6 at 7 p.m. nataLie gOLdBeRg, Living Color: painting, Writing, and the Bones of Seeing. thursday, March 7 at 7 p.m. ROn RaSH, nothing gold Can Stay.

tHe WRiteRS’ WORKSHOp

Writing Historical Fiction with anne Barnhill, Saturday, april 19 from 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members.

in advance only, by mail or online at www. twwoa.org. Financial aid in exchange for volunteering is available.

Write Your Life with Richard Krawiec, Saturday, March 1 from 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members.

The class will learn vital aspects of writing historical fiction, including how to make historical figures ‘come alive’, how to use dialogue from another century, where to find research materials, and much more.

Friday, March 28: Potluck!

In this supportive writing-intensive class, participants will learn how to draw on the “material” of your life to write and revise memoirs, stories, or plays.

We will be doing writing exercises geared to historical fiction, as well as taking a brief look at some historical novels to see how other writers work.

A monthly potluck is held on the last Friday of the month at 6 p.m. at The Writers’ Workshop. Members and guests are invited. Please bring a dish to share, a poem or short story to read, or your books for sale! RSVP at least 48 hours in advance to writers@ gmail.com, or (828) 254-8111.

Elements covered include time compression and expansion, how to focus on theme, recognizing your purpose, and developing your piece professionally.

Anne Barnhill is the award-winning author of numerous books, including At the Mercy of the Queen; Coal Baby; and What You Long For. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from UNC-Wilmington, and teaches workshops throughout the state.

Workshop, or to renew your membership. Members receive discounts on all classes and contests for a full year – plus invitations to member gatherings. Go to www.twwoa.org and click “register.”

Richard Krawiec is the author of numerous books and poems such as Breakdown: A Father’s Story, Faith in What?, and Time Sharing. His work is published in Shenandoah, Florida Review, and N.C. Literary Review, among others.

CLaSS LOCatiOn: Classes, for any level

writer, meet at 387 Beaucatcher Road in Asheville and include a lunch break. Registration is

Friday, March 8 at 7 p.m. CHRiStY JORdan, Come Home to Supper. Saturday, March 9 at 7 p.m. girls gone Sci-Fi, Ya panel.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM pg. 32 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

JOin US! It’s only $35 to join The Writers’

FOR MORe detaiLS about any of these

events, contact (828) 254-8111, writersw@ gmail.com, or visit www.twwoa.org.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 5


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

the curmudgeon

W

(Mrs. Storekeep believed that every day a bit of new air should replace that air that might have been used up by the shoppers of the day before), “did you all go out and shop last Monday in an attempt to bring back the lost tourist dollars to the state tax coffers on that great and patriotic holiday we now call President’s Day? “And under the threat of the continuing bad weather that only promises to get worse, year by year as we march down the path of Global Warming, while buying quarts of milk and rolls of toilet paper, which president did you mentally assign your purchases to, Lincoln or Washington?” “Boy, talk about loaded statements,” said Cityfella in a low tone, “Curmudge certainly knows how to pack his explanations with just a bit of bombastic ammunition,” then in a louder tone added: “When it comes to shopping for necessities, I pick no favorites. I was just delighted to have been able to drive on local roads and come down here to get some needed coffee and a copy of the New York Times.” “How did you make out during the storm?” asked Storekeep who was busy sweeping up ashes that had collected in front of the old pot-bellied stove.

aMY gReene Reading & Signing Smoky Mountain native Amy Greene returns with her second novel, Long Man. Based on historical events, Long Man refers to a river in Tennessee whose dam will flood a small town in the name of electricity and jobs. Greene is also the author of the novel Bloodroot. “Readers will never forget this vividly drawn landscape, the journeys of those who hold tight to this remarkable place in America even as it disappears before their eyes. Long Man is a novel about redemption and resurrection and love in all its forms.” ~ Jill McCorkle, author of Life After Life

iF YOU gO: Sunday, March 9 at 3 p.m.

at Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

BY

pETER LOEWER

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

Southern Comfort

The Curmudgeon Lashes Out

“Well,” shouted the Curmudgeon as he strutted like a peacock through the open door of the general Store...

L

COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Illustration by Peter Loewer

“Could have been worse,” answered the Curmudgeon. “I took advantage of the lull in traffic to make some notes about our coming march to Oz, I mean Raleigh. Our march to shake up the apathy of the public here in our rural counties as day follows day in the idiotic proclamations of our public officials who claim that education is improving along with the economy—” He paused in midstride to step over the growing pile of dust-bunnies, bits of wood ash, cookie crumbs, and a lone gum wrapper that had been collected by Storekeep as he continued to sweep up. “—and I’ve got our route pretty well mapped out, beginning here at the store, walking along the new-old-waiting to be finished Interstate, until we reach the bypass to the UNC-A grounds, where I hope we’ll have a pep-rally with as many adults as we can muster, along with a good collection of students. Then we’ll continue to the parking lots where we’ll pick up the busses that will carry us to Oz, I mean Raleigh, for our attempt to bring national attention to the precipitous decline of our state among the other states of the union.” “Generally, I don’t always cotton to your ideas about government and rural life,” said Mrs. Storekeep, “but after watching our political and social demise I’m with you one hundred percent in your continuing battle against the one-percent. “I’ve kept quiet in the past because our livelihood depends on the store, but with the latest tirade from the wealthy, that the attacks against their wealth are worse than what some folks suffered from the insanities of the Second World War, makes me cringe. And, I suspect, the more I vocalize, the more support I’ll find because people who think this way probably number less than twenty percent of the total population.” “Do you know,” said Cityfella, “these selfish folk are truly in the minority but regardless of their claims they control much of the media?” “Here! Here!” said Curmudgeon. “That’s precisely why we are planning our march on Oz, I mean Raleigh, and I suspect we will be legion in our ranks.” As he spoke there was a clash of winter thunder that accompanied a bolt of lightning that hit the big oak to the side of the store and everyone jumped, a bit unsure of what the changing weather would be bringing. In her heart, Mrs. Storekeep knew the future was not going to be easy but she kept those thoughts to herself. peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

6 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

Laurey’s Life Cherished Among Those Who Knew Her

i

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

Asheville will not be the same place it used to be with Laurey no longer here. The tone at her resWith Laurey Mastertaurant downtown will be ton’s death on Tuesday there softer and reverend as we is a real void in my heart. I visit. In a place where so am one of her many friends much happiness occurred, in Asheville who thought she there will be some sadness was getting well from her for those of us who survive last bout with the dreaded to see another day in our cancer that riddled her life journey. The place insides with disease. will be Laurey’s for a long The battle was over for time, but she is no longer Laurey in February. She had at home. fought most of her adult life I was relieved to hear under the threat that cancer that Adam will continue would return with venLaurey Masterton, chef, to manage the restaurant geance someday and close entrepreneur and activist. just as Laurey had prepared the door on her life. She was Photo courtesy of the Black Mountain him to do. 59 years old. News/Citizen-Times. I can say at 73, Laurey I know the feeling was 14 years younger than me. I said this of despair associated with losing loved week to friends that I wish I could have ones and friends to cancer. My father and given her some of my years in order for her mother died from cancer. There are no anto spread more good deeds in this world. swers to fit the moment when this disease For Laurey— when I think of her takes possession of a person’s body and life now—she no longer has pain. Perhaps a on this earth for a last time — death. higher being made the decision that she was Although I take medication for depresneeded in another place that we the living sion, I have had a few days of sadness and can only imagine. The “why now” we aljust plain “funk” as we say. Being a writer ways ask about death will not be answered. and very gifted at reading people as I have We friends can have comfort that she is for years, Laurey was a woman I truly continuing her work in a new place. She respected in this Asheville community of will continue to watch over us as we live in special people. Not only was she a savvy this ‘crazy’ world. business woman, but a sweet soul that cared I will miss you, Laurey and I wish we about so many of us when we crossed her could have had more laughs together at the path and got to know her. restaurant. In addition, I suggest to everyone who cared about Laurey, to read the poem, “Honey Bee,” written by Laura Hope-Gill. It is beautifully written. Gill wrote the poem for Laurey.

i lost a good friend this past week.

Laurey’s Memorial, tribute & Cookbooks

A public appreciation ceremony for Laurey Masterton is planned for March 22. The memorial begins at 2 p.m at the First Baptist Church of Asheville, 5 Oak St. Stop by Laurey’s Catering and Gourmet To-Go at 67 Biltmore Ave. to contribute to the memorial wall for Laurey. The shop is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. For more information please visit www.laureysyum.com, or call (828) 252-1500.

Writer Judy ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in nC for 40 years. She retired in 005 and continues to freelance at her home in asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. if you know of a character in asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience LEAF presents a Celebration of Global Funk

L

LeaF is thrilled to announce the stellar lineup of performing artists for the Spring 014 LeaF Festival, taking place May 8-11 in Black Mountain.

bending performances from soulful and funky multi-instrumentalist Zach Deputy, transcendental folk-rockers Elephant Revival and many more. Funky costumes and festive attitudes welcome! LEAF musicians provide “Free Your Funky Self” at the Bootsy Collins the soundtrack to a memo38th LEAF Festival and experience rable experience filled with multiple cultures with Grammy-wincultural treasures and fun around every corner. ning Funk-master Bootsy Collins & the Funk LEAF combines a great diversity of names and Unity Band; American Chicano rockers Los faces with a myriad of community dances inLobos celebrating their 40th anniversary; and cluding Salsa, Swing, the Waltz and traditional, the experimental world fusion trio known as contemporary and techno forms of ConBeats Antique. tra; poetry and puppetry slams; healing arts Returning LEAF favorites include Afroworkshops; folk art and handcraft exhibitions, pop and Reggae influenced Sierra Leone’s installations and interactive demonstrations; Refugee All Stars and a Brooklyn Bhangra camping, watersports and outdoor adventure; dance party with Red Baraat. The 38th LEAF and kid’s activities throughout the festival. features more Grammy nominated performers such as the harmonious duo, Darrell Scott & Spring LeaF performing artists Tim O’Brien (Americana/Roots), Boukman Bootsy Collins & the Funk Unity Band • Los Eksperyans (Hatian Rock/Reggae) and twiceLobos (40th year anniversary) • Beats Antique nominated Locos por Juana (Afro-Caribbean, • Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars • Red Hip-Hop/Funk). Baraat • Darrell Scott & Tim O’Brien The lineup rounds out with genre-

WnC Jazz profiles: Elise Pratt “elise has a voice that’s as beautiful as her smile and she finds a way of bringing a child-like sense of discovery to old faithful favorites from the american songbook. While carving out a niche for herself in the asheville music scene, she also makes plenty of time to try and cultivate new music venues for local musicians, as well as special guest artists from out of town. We are truly blessed to have such a talent with us.”

B

~ Bassist Mike Holstein

Born in California, Elise attended college in Missouri and Oklahoma, studied French abroad and used those skills as a Pan Am flight attendant to travel around the world, work as a graphic artist at the French Embassy in NYC, and design album covers for Reader Digest’s recorded music division. This led her to becoming co-owner of the Greenwich Village jazz spot, Syncopation, in the 1970s. “We featured people like Sonny Stitt, Cedar Walton, Chico Hamilton, Slide Hampton and Randy Weston. Bill Cosby supported our venture in spirit by letting us add ‘Bill Cosby’s Hangout’ to our awning. I had no time to work on singing myself, but I listened to some very high level jazz and wouldn’t trade that experience for anything! “Our small record label, Finite Records, produced several albums including one for Sonny. I met Milt Jackson, Papa

BY

TRUTH WINgFIELD

Boukman Eksperyans • Zach Deputy • Elephant Revival • Locos por Juana • The Lee Boys • Town Mountain • Roosevelt Collier Presents: Funk in the Round • Zing Experience • Turkuaz • Billy Jonas Band Contra w/ Wild Asparagus & Locos por Juana will perform at LEAF. Perpetual Emotion • Alash Tuvan Throat Singers • Kim & Reggie Harris • The Whitetop Mountaineers • Empire Strikes iF Brass • The Fritz • Adams, Queen & Rifkin • YOU 38th LEAF Festival, May 8-11. Molasses Creek • Techno Contra w/ DJ JorgO Tickets are discounted through D • Unifire Theater • One Leg Up • Zulu March 31. Adult prices start at Connection • Montuno • Infinite Geometry $41 for the day or $147 for the weekend. • Darrell Rose • Whee Ahh Fairie Kin • Toy Additional discounts for commuting residents Boat Circus Arts • Jake Hollifield Art V Expeand youth ages 10-17. Children 9 and younger rience • The Screaming J’s • Kickin’ It Crew are free. Limited car camping, lodge rooms Jelly Dome • LEAF Poetry Slam w/ James and cabins are available. Nave • Rushfest Contra Experience • Alex Purchase tickets at www.theLEAF.org or by Krug Combo • Contra Callers: Diane Silver, phone at (828) 686-8742. George Marshall, & Jesse Edgerton.

BY

EDDIE LESHURE

one of her own duo performances or a concert she’s organized, the intention and motivation is a pure love of jazz. The audience is always left feeling good.”

~ Pianist Bill Gerhardt

“My singing repertoire comes from the American songbook - jazz Jo Jones, Cecil Taylor, Jimmy songs dating from the 20’s, Rowles, Charles Mingus, Hank the swing era of the 40’s, Jones, Tommy Flanagan, Max Elise Pratt Photo: Ashley Gillett musical theater tunes and Roach… they all came in. It was bebop. It reflects influa wonderful time.” ences from my father, a jazz sax player from Elise then moved to St. Simons Island, the University of Mississippi who played with Georgia, where, in 1995, she first sang jazz in the Glenn Grey Orchestra in early Big Band public and got married in 2001. “My husband days. He instilled a love for great music, from Bobby and I eventually made Hendersonville jazz to classical. our home and he passed from Parkinson’s “My favorite singers include Billie disease in 2008. I started singing and studyHoliday, Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat ing with Mike Holstein and Bill Gerhardt at King Cole, Carmen McRae, Anita O’Day, Sharon LaMotte’s vocal workshops a few years Julie London, Morgana King, Blossom Dearie, ago, and Mike and I have done quite a bit of Frank Sinatra, and Mel Torme.” duo gigging together over the past two years. Elise has appeared at numerous venues There is no greater thrill than that magical with not only Holstein and Gerhardt, but Jonamusical conversation in which you say things than Pearlman, Michael Jefry Stevens, Pavel you didn’t even know you knew.” Wlosok, Geary Moore, Marc Yaxley, Aaron “Elise Pratt has a most wonderful Coffin, Patrick Boland, and Jason DeCristofaro. enthusiasm for this music… the kind of “I also enjoy singing at retirement energy necessary to be involved in jazz homes, especially at Spring Arbor where my on multiple levels as she is. Whether it’s

very lively 99 year old mother lives in nearby Laurel Park. I love bringing WNC area jazz performers to venues like Tooley’s, the Green Room in Hendersonville, The Horse Shoe Café, and the Sunset Jazz Concert Series at The Cummings Cove Golf and Country Club.” Elise donated a Perzina Grand Piano to The Cummings Memorial United Methodist Church where she had two benefit concerts, with a third featuring Pavel Wlosok coming up on March 29. She also created The Art of Jazz In-Home Concert Series to make jazz available to audiences by bringing it into people’s homes. “Elise Pratt embodies the jazz aesthetic in every aspect. My favorite thing above all about her though is her tireless dedication towards studying the artistic process of jazz. She is always about the music first, which is apparent in her promotion of jazz throughout Western North Carolina.”

~ Percussionist Jason Decristofaro eddie produces “asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday from 8-11 p.m. on Main-FM (10.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 7


R

A

P

I

D

spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

R

I

Mountains, Beaches, Cities Relativity Records

Following their 2012 breakthrough album Cabaret I couldn’t help but wonder in which direction this Tennessee quartet might go. As it turns out they’ve upped the ante with considerable verve, offering up an album that expertly balances intimacy with swagger. Mountains Beaches Cities aims high and, for the most part, lives up to its own lofty ambitions. Produced in house by guitarist Spencer Thompson and keyboard wizard Wes Bailey, MBC sounds polished, deliberate, and exciting as all heck. Be it the wild exuberance of “The New Black” or “Running Wild” Moon Taxi continues to evolve at an impressive rate, sounding like a band far beyond their experience and budgetary limitations. The end result is an album that is immediately accessible yet nuanced and intricate enough to sustain repeated listens. Put Moon Taxi on your list of bands to watch! ****

Don Williams

Given that his career reaches into six decades, anyone approaching a new Don Williams album should have some notion of what to expect. Williams has rarely been interested in reinventing himself—and when he has the results have been less than stellar—preferring to instead refine an approach that has withstood many a trend and fashion. Much like his vocal delivery, Williams’ career has been subtle, refined, and deliberate. At 76 years of age Williams has certainly slowed down a bit, curtailing his once promethean touring schedule, comfortable in maintaining his formidable legacy. Reflections (by my count his 35th studio offering!) demonstrates that to the hilt, finding Williams caught between the aches and pains of growing old and the grace and wisdom of looking back. Among its ten tracks are somber ruminations on outliving your peers, making amends, and deciding how to move forward. It’s the latter of these, best summed up with “Back to the Simple Things” that gives Reflections its bounce, moments that reinforce the album as far more than an early eulogy. Likewise with “Stronger Back”, a testimony to Williams’ personal and artistic resolve. Co-produced by Garth Fundis—a savvy veteran who knows how to stay current—Reflections features songs by Jesse Winchester, Merle Haggard, Townes Van Zandt, and

8 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

With so much music landing on my desk I’ll again keep my comments brief and to the point. Next month I hope to have a new music blog up and running, wherein those who enjoy these comments will have plenty more to peruse. As always for those of us “old school” listeners, be sure to support your local independent music store.

Moon Taxi

Reflections Sugar Hill Music

V

Williams himself. It’s a tried and true formula that again shows Don Williams taking two steps onward by ever looking back. Long may he run. ***1/2

Angel Olson

Burn Your Fire For No Witness Jagjaguwar Music

Angel Olson’s 2012 debut Half Way Home was a model of minimalist folk, quaint and highly engaging arrangements that reflected an aesthetic that leaned more towards the 50s than our current day. It was a mightily good effort but repeated listening suggested that it was merely the tip of an iceberg swollen with ideas. Burn Your Fire for no Witness builds on that with assurance and audacity, expanding in numerous directions while finding a depth of emotion that its predecessor only hinted at. Some of the credit goes to producer John Congelton—whose sonic flourishes and adornments add sparkle and verve—while the rhythm section of drummer Josh Jaeger and bassist Stewart Bronaugh anchor the album with skill and taste. But the biggest difference is how much Olsen has grown as a songwriter and vocalist. Her singing is both more deliberate and daring. She can raise the roof (“Forgiven/Forgotten”) or melt your heart (the epic “White Fire”) with equal confidence. Burn Your Fire rarely wavers, never feels the least bit artificial, and gives every suggestion that Angel Olsen will continue to push her creative boundaries for years to come. ****

Rob Nance

Lost Souls and Locked Doors

Spruce Pine may be better known for feldspar mining and small town charm but its geographic setting places it at a crossroads where the essentials of bluegrass, country and Americana mingle, and where Doc Watson is rightfully given the reverence he deserves. Lost Souls and Locked Doors—the full length debut of singer/songwriter Rob Nance—was recorded in Boone and is the sort of down to earth album that would have made Doc proud. For the most part, its eleven selfwritten tracks are sparsely arranged, direct, and void of any fuss or bluster. Nance sings of the virtues of hard work (“Hand’s Like Mine”) and perseverance (“Ain’t Losing Yet”) with equal conviction and charm. It’s a winning formula that shows how the basic combo of guitar/mandolin/and drums doesn’t have to sound predictable and

can still toss us a twist or two. Nance’s vocal delivery is straightforward and appealing but can, when the occasion calls for it, rev things up a notch, as best heard in the early 70s Neil Young like romp “Light In The Dark.” All of which adds up to an album that sits on ground as rock solid as the mountains from whence it is spawned. ***1/2

Laura Cantrell No Way There From Here Spit and Polish Records

Laura Cantrell may be Nashville born and raised but her songs and sentiments are miles away from the glitter and glitz too often associated with Music City USA. It’s a style that hearkens back to the classic 1960s sides of Kitty Wells and Loretta Lynn, but does so with an awareness that could only come from living in this century. Her songs may lean towards the sad but there’s always a sense of hope, a conviction that better times are sure to come. She’s willing to examine her own feelings, and does so with refreshing honesty in the delightful “All the Girls Are Complicated”, and has a knack for making her concerns sound both deeply intimate and universal. Be it “singing in the kitchen with the radio on/pouring out my heart to an old love song” or finding herself powerless in the face of love, Cantrell continually surveys themes that reach across and explore the challenges we all face. Her entire career has been a model of determination—she’s released a scant five albums in 14 years—but such scarcity only adds to the pleasures of each new release. These are uncomplicated tales of complicated people, and Laura Cantrell delivers them with the keen eye, ear, and heart of an artist who revels in value over measure. Sure I wish she’d put out records more often but if in doing so she had to sacrifice some of the quality that inculcates No Way There From Here, then I’m more than happy to endure the wait. ****

Nate Jones Band The Nate Jones Band EP NJB Music

This five song set is the ideal introduction to Nate Jones and company, showcasing his energetic vocals, terrific five piece band and songs that make their point and get out of the way. “Wandering Love” is a joyful romp that befits anyone who finds themselves head ‘CD’s’ continued on page 29


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

sound experience Underhill Rose

BY JAMES

JOnatHan SCaLeS FOURCHeStRa & gaLen KipaR pROJeCt

CASSARA

Over the course of a scant five years the three piece collective known as Underhill Rose have become one of the most respected and creative voices in the asheville music scene.

p

Proudly steeped in the Appalachian traditions of our mountain culture the three sirens that comprise the band—Salley Williamson, Eleanor Underhill, and Molly Rose—each bring a distinctive set of influences and vocal component to the band. Adjectives to describe music are often temporal and elusive, but their own self-description of “heartfelt country soul” seems as good as any. Armed with banjo and harmonica, guitar, and upright bass, Underhill Rose is as known for their engaging stage presence as they are for narratives, songs that aren’t afraid to detail the trials of life and love with a bit of sass and irreverence. Since forming in 2009, Underhill Rose has played live regionally and across the country including numerous festivals and our own Warren Haynes Christmas Jam. They’ve shared the stage with the likes of Jim Lauderdale, Kevn Kinney, and Larry Keel; in doing so they’ve steadily gained a faithful following and continue to build upon their reputation as North Carolina’s “preeminent female trio.” The 2013 album Something Real spent over 20 weeks in the Americana Music Association Airplay charts and was a top 100 pick for the year. In anticipation of a spate of upcoming shows, bass player/vocalist Salley Williamson graciously took the time to chat.

James Cassara: To readers that might be

unfamiliar with the band can you give a brief summation as to how Underhill Rose came together?

Salley Williamson: Molly and Eleanor met and began playing music together at Warren Wilson College and haven’t stopped since. I met Molly at a dance class several years later, and Underhill Rose called me when they had an opening for a bass player. The timing worked out perfectly, and we’ve been an all-female trio since I joined in the fall of 2011.

JC: The three of you obviously mix on a

musical level but going out on the road, and

‘CD’s’ continued from page 28

over heels while “Honest Man” might be the same gent six months later, realizing that relationships are hard work damn it, but finding himself committed to the long haul. His cover of The Band’s “Ophelia” might not reach the lofty heights Levon Helm bestowed upon it but his interpretation is no less valid and distinct.

having to deal with all the logistics of being in and maintaining a band can be pretty challenging. How do you manage to juggle all those demands and maintain some sense of sanity?

SW: All three of us have a great home

base here in Asheville. We find a lot of Underhill Rose live at the Flat Rock Cinema. solace at our homes between times on Cruz did a great job of taking all three of the road. In between shows, we do our best our opinions into account while adding his to get lots of sleep and to exercise regularly. own spin to the music. And while we’re on the road, we try to see the We spent several days and nights on sights and do fun things in the towns where preproduction, and Cruz’s suggestions for we perform. Making the most of our down the arrangements of our songs added a fresh time helps to balance out the hectic pace of life perspective to the music. He is also featured on the road touring. on guitar and keys for some of the tracks on JC: You’ve now made three albums so I asthe album. sume you’re becoming more comfortable JC: You have a number of local shows comwith that process. Can you talk a bit about the ing up, and from what I’ve gathered it looks band’s artistic evaluation? like a busy summer schedule. What can SW: Well, to clarify a bit, Underhill Rose has your fans expect, and any plans to record actually recorded two albums and a holiday this year? single. The first self-titled album was created SW: We are thrilled with the momentum by Molly and Eleanor and released in May that we created in 2013 and are looking to 2011. I wasn’t part of that project. But to ango full steam ahead this year. We recently swer your question all three of us contributed filmed a new music video for the song songs to our latest album, Something Real, “Helpless Wanderer,” which we will unveil and critics pointed out that combining the on March 22. perspectives of three writers contributed to the We will also launch a Kickstarter camstrength of the album. paign at that time to fund the recording of Along with three perspectives, our sound a new album. We are completely grateful to also prominently features the combination of our fans for the success of Something Real three unique voices in harmony. The band’s and are looking to go above and beyond overall process involves bringing songs to the with our next recording, which we hope to group and then working together to shape the release in the fall. song through adding the voice of our respective instrument and our harmony. For more information visit the band’s website at www.underhillrose.com JC: How would you describe the contributions of producer Cruz Contreras? Years ago I knew him when he was in Robinella and the iF CC String Band but I’d lost track of what he’d YOU Underhill Rose, Sunday, March been up to. gO 9. This 3 p.m. show is part of

SW: Underhill Rose was the first band that

Cruz Contreras produced outside of his own projects with Robinella and the CC String Band and his current group, The Black Lillies.

While Jones’ own songwriting occasionally loses focus there’s more than enough wallop in these five songs to give strong suggestion of how good he might get. I love the EP format and dearly wish more bands would liberate their music in smaller and more manageable chunks. In these days of digital domination, in which physical product is in danger of becoming some mere afterthought, EPs might just be the way to go. ***1/2

Jonathan Scales Fourchestra is an example of musical sincerity. Weaving together collective and individual influences without compromise, they are as much themselves as they are a unit—a crucial trait of landmark instrumental ensembles. Equally captivating is steel pannist and founder Jonathan Scales’ compositional skill as is his tasteful, avant-garde improvisational approach.

Jonathan Scales Fourchestra Photo: Mike Morel

Crafting a fusion of folk, classical, jazz, and blues, Galen Kipar Project has been hailed as “complex yet accessible” and “cohesive and poignant” with “experimental folk masterpieces.”

iF YOU gO: Jonathan Scales

Fourchestra, Saturday, March 15 at 9 p.m. $10 advance / $12 door. Isis Restaurant & Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road Asheville, NC. (828) 575-2737, www.isisasheville.com

tHe StRaY BiRdS

Drawing upon the richness of American folk music traditions, the signature power of The Stray Birds lies in outstanding songwriting spun with a stirring subtlety and grace.

the Magnolia Acoustic Concert Series. Tickets: $15. Flat Rock Cinema, 2700 Greenville Hwy., 28731. Call (828) 697-2463 or visit www.flatrockcinema.com.

nora Jane Struthers & the party Line The high energy quintet perform originals with tight, three-part harmonies, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, acoustic guitar, bass, and drums. Saturday, March 1 at Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. Call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

The Stray Birds were born of a compelling collaboration between two unique writers and vocalists — the pure, luxurious voice of Maya de Vitry and Oliver Craven’s richness of tone and depth of delivery. Grounding their sound in the unshakeable groove of bassist Charles Muench.

iF YOU gO: The Stray Birds, Saturday,

March 22 at Isis Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in west Asheville. For more details call (828) 575-2737 or visit www.isisasheville.com.

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 9


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

U

what to do guide Saturday, March 1

i Love the 90s Les Femmes Mystique perform burlesque cabaret inspired by the 90s. 8 p.m. $15 advance, $17 door. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 669-0816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Saturday, March 1

Luminous paintings on Metal Leaf Demonstration by Melissa Enloe Walter. 1-5 p.m. at Gallery 86, 86 N. Main Street, Waynesville. For details call (828) 4520593, or visit www.haywoodarts.org.

Sunday, March 

tuatha dea Celtic tribal fusion Gypsy Rock, 7:30 p.m. $12. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. (828) 6690816, or visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

Sunday, March 

the Squirm Burpee Circus Unique blend of slapstick comedy, highskill circus acts and classic melodrama. At Western Carolina University’s John

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center. For tickets or more details call (828) 227-2479 or visit http://bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

Monday, March 

take  Jazz duets Series Pianist Bill Bares with vibraphonist Jason DeCristofaro, 7:30 p.m. $12. White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. Call (828) 669-0816, visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

thursday, March 6

Saturday, March 8

appalachian pastel Society 10 a.m. - noon with a free slide Dune Design, presentation by James Smythe pastelist James Smythe. Workshop ($45 members/$55 non-members) from 1-4 p.m. At Grace Community Church, 495 Cardinal Road, Mills River, 28759. Visit www. appalachianpastelsociety.org or call Suzy Hart, (845) 986-3653.

anything for Love

tuesday, March 11

Based on Tom Anton and his wife, Sandi Russell’s, true love story, Anything for Love was filmed entirely on location in New Orleans. 7 p.m. screening at the Dunham Auditorium on the Brevard College campus. This event is a kick off for the newly formed Brevard Film Society. $10, students $5. To view the trailer go to www.atlastthemovie.com. For more details visit www.brevardfilmsociety.com.

Illustrations by Greg Vineyard. Proceeds to benefit the YWCA’s MotherLove mentoring for teen moms program. Opening reception 5-8 p.m. at The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, 640 Merrimon Ave. On display through March. Call (828) 2542224 for details.

thursday, March 6

Women’s History Month exhibit Faces, Flowers and Super Powers – acrylic paintings and mixed Mary Alice media works by Mary Ramsey Alice Ramsey, at UNCA’s Highsmith Art Gallery. Windows, Doors and Glass Ceilings – photographs and encaustic paintings by Bet Kindley, in UNCA’s Intercultural Art Center. On display through March. Opening Bet Kindley reception from 5 until 6:30 p.m.

Friday, March 7

Landscapes in abstraction Exhibition featuring Karen Keil Brown’s semi-abstract oils. The subtle, rich layering and depth in her work are an invitation into her ethereal atmospheric landscapes. The show will be on display from March 1 through March 30. Opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For more information, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Love! Love! Love!

tuesday, March 11

auditions for Come Back, Little Sheba The Autumn Players will hold auditions for William Inge’s classic drama from 10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. Performed as reader’s theatre, no previous experience required. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Friday, March 14

the paul McKenna Band The Paul McKenna Band honors traditional Celtic music alongside the innovative and has established itself as one of the brightest young bands on the scene. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. Tickets: Regular $30, Student $25, Children 12 and under $15; Student Rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com.

March 14-16

the Hobbit Performed by a class of students ranging in age from 10 to 16. Performances are Friday, March 14 at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, March 15 and Sunday, March 16 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $5. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 2541320, visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Sunday, March 16

Friday, March 7

Love is Covered in dust CD release party from guitar virtuoso Yes the Raven. 8 p.m. at the White Horse, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. For more information visit www.whitehorseblackmountain.com, or call (828) 669-0816.

the Lightning Bugs A rocking Americana ensemble fronted by Asheville couple Jenny and Jason Martin. Timeless songs from

R

E

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

E

the Weinhaus thursday, March 0 Educated at the Culinary Institute of America, Executive Chef and owner Peter Pollay brings years of restaurant experience to downtown Asheville’s Pack Square. Posana Café utilizes local farmers and purveyors for items such as organic milk, goat cheese, fruits, vegetables, trout, lamb, and pork. We look forward to your joining us in their private dining room. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $70 all inclusive. Please call the Weinhaus for reservations at (828) 254-6453.

Friday, March 8 Friday Night Flights presents Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon. Please join us for a wonderful evening in our Cork&Keg bar area. The price is $10 for four tasting pours. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $5. From 5:30-7:30 p.m. at The Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave., downtown Asheville. across genres and decades make up their diverse setlists of indie, classic, and original rock and roll, and Appalachian old-time gospel tunes. Jenny’s warm, powerful vocals and keyboard work interplay with Jason’s acoustic and electric guitars, bass, and ukulele. Performance at the Canton library at 3 p.m. 11 Pennsylvania Ave., Canton. For more details call (828) 648-2924, or visit www.haywoodlibrary.org

Friday, March 1

Cabaret Jazz Series My Favorite Things: A Reimagining of Beautiful Standards with Stephanie Morgan and Cry Baby (Chuck Lichtenberger, Jonathan Pearlman, Grant Cuthbertson, Timothy Haney), with special guest Justin Ray. Tickets $15; music 8 p.m.; optional buffet dinner from 6:30-7:30 by Black Mountain Bistro. White Horse Black Mountain, 105c Montreat Road, Black Mountain. For more details, (828) 669-0816, or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com

Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 

the Chase Brock experience One of WNC’s most notable young cultural prodigies: Hendersonville native Chase Brock, choreographer of Broadway’s Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark, brings his New Yorkbased dance company to

Asheville to perform some of its hottest, hippest works. Lecture/demonstration dance performance recommended for Grades 6-12 held Friday, March 21 at 10 a.m. Tickets $8-$9. Mainstage Dance Series, Friday & Saturday, March 21 & 22 at 8 p.m. Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: $40, Student $35, Children 12 and under $15; Student Rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com.

Odyssey ClayWorks A variety of 8-week classes begin March 4. Legends: Peter Callas, twoday demonstration and workshop will be held March 9-0. More details at www.odysseyceramicarts.com

thursday, March 7

Storytelling Series Listen to this Stories and original songs from locals. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $10. 7:30 p.m. in 35below at Asheville Community Theatre. 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Call (828) 254-1320, or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Friday and Saturday, March 8-9

Masters Series pottery Workshop Two-day demonstration workshop by Asheville ceramic artist Angelique Tassistro will highlight hand-built skills. 9-4 p.m. Fee is $190. Register online at www. thevillagepotters.com. The Village Potters, 191 Lyman Street, #180, in Asheville’s River Arts District. Call (828) 253-2424 for more details.

Friday & Saturday, March 8 & 9

LeO: the anti-gravity Show In this gravity-defying one-man show fluid, real-world handstands, tumbles and falls are projected by an ingenious video stage concept, and the simple act of standing up is transformed into a stupendous feat, while walking up a wall becomes the most natural and effortless event. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets: $35, Student $30, Children 12 and under $15; Student Rush day-of-show $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com.

every Sunday

arrowhead artists and artisan League For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. 2-4 p.m. at the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave, in Old Fort. For the full schedule please contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net.

MARCH EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 0 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

&

C

U

L

T

what to do guide art MoB Studios

Best in Show

U

R

E

M

G

A

Z

I

N

E

by Phil Juliano

CURRentLY On diSpLaY

events at the Strand The Strand is a boutique cinema and listening venue offering a mix of classic films, second run movies, and live music.

Oil artist Deborah Broad continues her exhibit of high-contrast color arrangements of small round fruits and portly jugs, positioned as if interacting, revealing an impressive sharpness and clarity.

the Muppets

Saturday, March 1 at 2, 5 & 7:45 p.m.

gravity

Friday, March 7 at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, March 8 at 5 p.m. & 7:45 p.m.

CLaSSeS & WORKSHOpS You will leave each class with a completed piece of your art and the skill to continue. Call (828) 693-4545 to register for any of these classes. Find us on Facebook.

A

Cataloochee – a Local documentary Sunday, March 9 at 5 p.m.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Canvas & Corks – Share a bottle of wine and paint with friends. March 5, 12, 19 or 26, 6-8 p.m., $35, supplies included. Tuesday afternoon classes also available.

dallas Buyers Club

Friday, March 14 at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, March 15 at 5 p.m. & 7:45 p.m.

Breakfast at tiffany’s

Friday, March 21 at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, March 22 at 5 p.m. & 7:45 p.m.

Basket Weaving – Weave an original

daren nicholson Band Live

style Appalachian Potato Basket. March 10 & 14, 12-3 p.m., $60, supplies included. Instructor: Teresa Jordon.

Thursday, March 27 at 7:45 p.m.

Frozen

Rug Hooking – Learn the basics. Choose

Friday, March 28 at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, March 29 at 2, 5 & 7:45 p.m.

Bob Ross painting – Instruction on

Live music: $12 advance, $15 at the door. Movies: $6 adults, $4 children (12 and under); $3 for all 2 p.m. matinees.

from four different kits. March 13, 20, 27 & April 3, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., $100, supplies included. Instructor: Sharon Richmond.

tiCKet pRiCeS Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

painting landscapes. March 5, 15 or 26, 12 to 4 p.m., $55, supplies included. Instructor: Pete Kerry.

the Strand, 8 n. Main Street downtown Waynesville (88) 8-0079, www.8main.com

Silk painting – Learn different methods to paint on silk. March 11, 12-3 p.m., $45, supplies included. Instructor: Kim Anderson. Work on display.

zendoodle Mini Workshop – Lines,

John Mac Kah Classes & Workshops

Oil painting Workshops – For all levels.

Register anytime. Saturdays in the Studio. Thursday evenings Studio Painting/Drawing. Intro to Oils, Studies to Studio, Plein Air Workshops & Excursions. 122 Riverside Drive, Cotton Mill Studios. For more information, (828) 225-5000, jmackah@ gmail.com, or visit www.JohnMacKah.com

designs and doodles! Create a small abstract piece. Call for class dates. 12-2:30 p.m., $30, supplies included. Instructor: Catherine Langsdorf.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Supply list provided. March 18, 10-3 p.m., one day workshop, $75. Space limited, register early. Instructor: Deborah Broad.

drawing instruction – Learn the basics:

value studies, contrast and composition. Supply list provided. Tuesdays, 10 a.m.12:30 p.m. beginning April 1 for three weeks, $90. Instructor: Deborah Broad.

Live Music every Friday & Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller

gourd art – Ink dye & make a beautiful

Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare from 5:30 until 9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. Call (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

gem or stone top. March 16, 1:30-4:30 p.m., $39, supplies included. Instructor: Laraine Short. Work on display.

Watercolor gouache Resist painting

Create watercolors that look like woodcuts. March 25, 1-4 p.m., $35, supplies included. Instructor: Miriam Hughes. Work on display.

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods Medical guardian Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

Mosaic Mirrors – Create a small mirror

using fun items. March 24, 1-5 p.m., $75, supplies included. Instructor: Linda Pannullo. Work on display.

the tax doctor

art MoB Studios & Marketplace

14 4th avenue east in Hendersonville (88) 69-4545, www.artmobstudios.com

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2014 Adawehi Press

Reduce your past tax bill by as much as 75 percent. Stop levies, leins and wage garnishments. Call The Tax DR now to see if you qualify. 1-800-764-0725.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 1


R

Find It Here

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

the art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Just ducky www.justduckyoriginals.com

art MoB Studios www.artmobstudios.com

Kathmandu Cafe www.cafekathmanduasheville.com

asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Ken Wilson Ford www.kwford.com

BlackBird Frame & art www.blackbirdframe.com

LeaF, www.theleaf.org the Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967 Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com grace C. Bomer art www.gracecarolbomer.com Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com the Cantina www.cantinabiltmore.com Champa asian Cuisine www.champanc.com the Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com double exposure giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com HaRt theater www.harttheatre.com Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800 Hey Hey Cupcake www.heyheycupcake.com isis Restaurant www.isisasheville.com Jewels that dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Massie Furniture (828) 456-3311 Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800 Mountain top appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com the newbridge Cafe www.thenewbridgecafe.com north Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Octopus garden, www.theOG.us On demand printing www.ondemandink.com tpennington art gallery www.tpennington.com

Starving artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

not imagine. Mindfulness of action helps us consciously to be instruments of peace and well-being. We are at a choice-point with every action to be in service of self — which will be divisive and disharmonious — or to be in service of the moment as an instrument of harmony, skill, peace, creative expression, and celebration of Life and its wonder, what can be called the realm of Being. Honoring the right of others, through our actions, to exist, express themselves, and be in dignity and freedom is essential if we are to be a presence in the world that alleviates rather than causes suffering. Right Livelihood – Is the work we do, the means of support of ourselves and our family, an expression of service and honoring the community of Life, or is it exploitive, a source of harm, diminishment, fraying at the bonds of community and dignity for all? Ultimately, much of what society assigns us as livelihood, in the big picture, is in the service of someone’s selfishness at the expense of others. A society is an aggregate of occupations that define whether the society is compassionate or exploitive in its expression and purpose. Exploitation is violence. Occupations that exploit human weakness or vulnerability or defile Nature are not expressions of Natural order and harmony and are therefore sources of suffering. The redirection of human society into mutual service and honoring of all Life will require a redirection of human occupation toward the elimination of suffering of all life on the planet.

WnC OveRvieW GET ON THE MAP, CALL

v

(828) 646-0071

the Writers’ Workshop www.twwoa.org

Bd Wa

WnC aidS project www.wncap.org

H

WeSt aSHeviLLe MeRRiMOn ave.

BC

RC a

Susan Marie designs www.susanmariedesigns.com town Hardware & general Store www.townhardware.com

A

‘Four Noble Truths’ continued from page 13

Soapy dog www.thesoapydog.com Southern Highland Craft guild www.craftguild.org Spice & tea exchange www.spiceandtea.com

R

BiLtMORe viLLage

nORtHSide - 8804 ti BC

vn

Mp MB

tUnneL ROad

RiveR aRtS diStRiCt

pattOn ave.

tC Bd

pa

MaCOn avenUe

RC

gF

WaYneSviLLe

RB

HendeRSOnviLLe Rd.

T

S

&

C

U

L T

U

R

E

CantOn Wv CF

 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

Right Diligence (or Effort) – This has to do with intention. In everything we do, including our spiritual practice, we must be diligent that our effort is guided by an intention to express selfless wisdom, to not do harm. This is closely linked to Right View, brought into the world of action. Do we truly understand why we do what we do, and is it motivated by noble and compassionate rather than self-aggrandizing motives? Diligence in these choices will determine whether our lives are sources of well-being or suffering for ourselves and others. Right Mindfulness – The Eight-fold Path to the cessation of suffering cannot be actualized without Right Mindfulness, for Right Mindfulness is the awareness of the moment-as-it-is and allows our intuitive knowing to inform us, that is, to “in-form” us, to bring into form the energy of a wise mind, of Buddha-mind. Only with Right Mindfulness can we see the-moment-as-it-is and let it be our guide to actualize harmony, skill, compassion, action and view. It is to see this moment, With Right Mindfulness we feel this mocan see the moment as it is. to ment, to hear this moment, to know this moment as who we are. It is to realize awareness as who we are and that all that co-arises with us in this moment are our sacred brothers and sisters, and to live in this realization is the key to living the Buddha’s teaching as an agent of well-being rather than of suffering. Right Concentration — If we cannot tame the wild swirling mind of ego; if we cannot stop the momentum of our conditioned mind through concentration into the moment, then we cannot break free of the fog of egoic delusion. The swirling activity of the mind has one primary purpose, and it is to hold together the conditioned false view of reality built around the primacy of self-interest. To stop this swirling virtual reality of mind-activity is of absolute necessity. This is realized through Shamatha – “Peaceful Abiding” meditation, without which, our progression into Vipassana — Wisdom and Insight — and Vastness – Right View of the truth of the nature of existence – is impossible. We must learn to stop, to look deeply, non-judgmentally yet with discernment, into the what-is of the moments of our existence and into the unboundaried vast interconnectedness of our existence to be freed from suffering. This is why our first step in realizing The truth of the nature of suffering and its transcendence is to learn to concentrate clearly through our meditation practice — first into the immediacy of the present moment with awareness of our senses and the physical world they connect us to, and then into the interconnections and infinity of the energetic present moment with our silent intuitive awareness. In the stillness we will discover that awareness is who we are, and therefore, Buddha is who we are. We will have come full circle to naturally discover Right View where the nature and cause of suffering and the path to liberation from suffering is as clear to us as it was to Siddhartha Gotama twenty-six hundred years ago. Suffering happens again and again, but by looking deeply into suffering so as to understand its cause, and constructing our lives based on the Eightfold Path, we have the opportunity to transmute it into enlightened understanding and action — again and again. Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:0-7:0 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 7 edgewood in asheville. By donation.

gReat SMOKY Mtn eXpY. RS

R

artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

amiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

E

HF HF

information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (88) 58-41, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com


advertising Sales Representatives Rapid River Magazine is Seeking Sales Personnel Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses in these areas: Black Mountain, North Asheville, and Weaverville. Great for retirees needing extra income. Set your own hours – potential earnings are up to you! Some experience necessary. Seniors are encouraged to apply.

inteReSted? Call (88) 646-0071,

pg. 32

or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

RS

THE REAL DEAL!

Promotional Packages Starting At...

LOCK IN

2OFYEARS SAVINGS!

29

with Advanced Receiver Service.

$

99

Minus additional $5 off for 12 months for low and medium-risk customers

Not eligible for Hopper or iPad mini offer

Upgrade to

Advanced receiver fees apply. Minimum 2-room setup required.

NFL SUNDAY TICKET INCLUDED

AT NO EXTRA COST. 2014 SEASON CHOICE™ Package and above.

FREE PREMIUM MOVIE CHANNELS FOR 3 MONTHS. CHOICE™ PACKAGE AND ABOVE

CALL NOW!

800-871-6763 ALL DIRECTV OFFERS REQUIRE 24-MONTH AGREEMENT.** Offer ends 4/9/14

pA

DISH TODAY!

Per Mo For 12 Mos. After Instant Rebate With 24-mo. Agreement

FREE WHOLE-HOME GENIE HD DVR UPGRADE

pg. 32

mo

FOR 12 MONTHS

CALL NOW – SAVE UP TO 50%!

1-800-467-3417 Call 7 days a week 8am - 11pm EST Promo Code: MB0114 Important Terms and Conditions: Promotional Offers: Require activation of new qualifying DISH service. All prices, fees, charges, packages, programming, features, functionality and offers subject to change without notice. After 12-month promotional period, then-current everyday monthly price applies and is subject to change. ETF: If you cancel service during first 24 months, early cancellation fee of $20 for each month remaining applies. HD Free for Life: Additional $10/mo HD fee waived for life of current account; requires continuous enrollment in AutoPay with Paperless Billing. Premium Channels: 3-month premium offer value is $165; after promotional period, then-current everyday monthly prices apply and are subject to change. Blockbuster @Home requires online DISH account, broadband Internet to stream content. HD-only channels not available with select packages. Hopper Features: AutoHop feature is only available with playback the next day of select primetime shows on ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC as part of PrimeTime Anytime feature. Both features are subject to availability. Installation/Equipment Requirements: Free Standard Professional Installation only. Certain equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Upfront and additional monthly fees may apply. Recording hours vary; 2000 hours based on SD programming. Equipment comparison based on equipment available from major TV providers as of 9/19/13. Watching live and recorded TV anywhere requires a broadband-connected, Sling-enabled DVR and compatible mobile device. Miscellaneous: Offers available for new and qualified former customers, and subject to terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer agreements. State reimbursement charges may apply. Additional restrictions and taxes may apply. Offers end 6/12/14. © 2013 DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. All new customers are subject to a one-time processing fee.

pg. 32

RB

pg. 32

CF

Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 


paid advertisement

“Being Diabetic, I never had pain-free feet - UNTIL NOW!”

Pain Doctor Discovers Blood Flow-Busting Pain Doctor Discovers Blood FlowMaterial – CreatesInto ‘Miracle Socks’ for Busting Material ‘Miracle Socks’ Diabetics and Sufferers! for Diabetics andFoot FootPain Pain Sufferers! Breakthrough circulation-boosting fibers improve blood flow, relieve swelling, boost oxygen flow, and eliminate foot fatigue - naturally in as little as 5 minutes!

What part of your swollen, tired, or achy feet would you like to see ‘go-away’? If you suffer from poor circulation, injury, swelling or any condition that leaves your feet fatigued and sore, then read on to discover the breakthrough that can change your life. Good news comes in the form of a ‘pain-busting microfiber’ that is used to weave a circulation-boosting sock, called BambusaTM. Better Blood Flow The ‘miracle sock’ is made from a new, patented anion-technology that is weaved into every strand of thread used to make a BambusaTM sock. This special micro-fiber thread is made from revolutionary bamboo charcoal to stimulate blood flow and revitalize feet. When this material comes in contact with body-heat it is proven to release circulation-boosting ions. The 3D-weave technology used in the material has been compared to infrared light therapy to help revitalize stiff and sore muscles. The manufacturer, who also makes a back and wrist sleeve, says the material provides almost instant relief to any part of the body it touches, making it ideal for diabetics, athletes, inflammation, stiffness and swelling. Anne M. from California agrees. “Bambusa socks are absolutely the most comfortable socks I have ever worn! My feet are no longer fatigued!” Therapy Without A Prescription! When the socks were photographed using a thermographic imaging camera, results showed up to a 17% to 22% increase in blood flow. This helped to improve muscle oxygenation and decrease foot fatigue. The socks have been proven to provide extended relief from cold, swollen and fatigued feet. Doctor Recommended Pain specialist of 30 years, Dr. Jahner comments on the 3D-weave technology. “Infrared therapy has been used for years at medical clinics to treat vascular and circulatory conditions. Physical therapists use infrared therapy to speed recovery. Better blood flow equals less pain. This microfiber works much the same way.”

Thermographic Imaging Without Wearing BambusaTM sock

Max Temp with no BambusaTM 29.4o C

After Wearing BambusaTM sock

Max Temp with BambusaTM 33.4o C

The infrared anions generated by the charcoal bamboo increase blood flow and deliver oxygen to the tissues. After wearing for only minutes there is an increase in temperature due to the increased blood flow, resulting in improved comfort and reduced swelling. Twenty minutes after using the anion-fiber infused socks, patient has better blood flow and less numbness. "Circulatory dysfunction affects MOST of the adult population in the United States. Heart Disease, Strokes and Diabetic conditions are at epidemic levels; anything that improves circulation improves cellular health and vitality. I use the Bambusa product myself and recommend it to my clients. It really works!” states Dr Jahner. Results in Minutes? John G. of California claims he felt immediate results with his tired, swollen feet. “Without exaggeration the relief was almost instantaneous. It is like a heating pad set to low and wrapped around my calf. I will be replacing my entire set of dress socks with these socks!” Relief for Tired, Swollen Feet BambusaTM socks are not a medical device or compression socks because they don’t restrict blood flow. Utilizing the special negativeanion technology, they comfortably increase blood flow and oxygen to tissues. “My feet felt wonderful, cool, and I never got that pins and needles feeling anymore. I love my BambusaTM socks,” says Nancy, from NJ. They are ideal for diabetics and those suffering from neuropathy or injury from repetitive use. BambusaTM socks can also bring comfort to tired legs within minutes of putting them on, energizing individuals who spend long hours on their feet. Goodbye to Pain and Numbness Marilyn H. has suffered persistent foot problems for years and noticed fast results. “The issue for me was persistent numbness in my toes - it was gone completely after a few days of wearing these socks! Being diabetic, I never had painfree feet - UNTIL NOW!”

“I went out on the golf course for 18 holes of golf, and when I got home my feet weren’t swollen, they weren’t sweating and my feet didn’t hurt,” says Lou B. from New York. BENEFITS: • Increased blood flow and oxygen • Reduced swelling and pain • Anti-microbial • Wicks away moisture • Increased range of motion IDEAL FOR: • Neuropathy • Raynaud's Syndrome • Cramping • Cold Feet Tom from NJ reports, “I suffer from chronic foot cramps. My feet were sore for days after the cramping. My wife gave me the BambusaTM socks, I wore them, and the foot cramps stopped. I replaced all my socks with BambusaTM. My feet feel great now.” Try Bambusa Risk Free! Order Bambusa™ at no risk and receive two bonus pairs of socks absolutely free! The technology used in BambusaTM socks is independently tested to boost circulation, blood flow and oxygen. These circulation-boosting socks allow you to wrap yourself in relief. BambusaTM is backed by a satisfaction guarantee so you can experience the short and long term results risk free.

Receive 2 Free Pairs of Socks!

1-800-902-8248

This product has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. It is not intended to cure, treat or prevent any disease or illness. Individual results will vary. Dr. Ronald Jahner is compensated for his opinions.

4 March 2014 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — Vol. 17, No. 7

R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

fine art

O

Ruth Meaders

JOURneYS UndeR BLUe SKieS

Our highly-creative Western north Carolina art community grants us a type of continuous discovery-mode. We’re seeing new art and meeting the fascinating people who make it. Artists offer the magic of shared journeys, providing connection, inspiration and real joy. I first met Ruth Meaders last fall on a snowflake-fluttery day in a Weaverville coffee house, and I suspected even then that her dynamic, radiant strength was what was keeping the snow from actually reaching the ground. A combination of intelligence, humility, humor and genuine kindness make for an inspiring visit, and Ruth brings all of that to a conversation. Not to mention her art is beautiful. Ruth’s path to Weaverville began in Novia Scotia, before moving on to Bermuda, Southern California and then West Texas. Many of her paintings include an appreciation of the big, blue canopies that connect all these places. Ruth’s expertise with the brush, and ability to translate her viewpoint with an emotionallyconnected vitality, helps me feel like I’m really seeing her scenes. I appreciate art driven by true experience, which allows one to become immersed. It’s about energy in addition to process. I also recently had the pleasure of sitting down with Ruth in her artistic home to chat a bit more over tea. Her space, containing special objects here and there, yet uncluttered, is bright and airy. I notice a horizontal landscape of West Texas, full of buttes and valleys, which contains an expansive sky. Ruth mentions that it is one of her favorites, and I think that it is one of mine, too. A large cloud scene leans near the fireplace, and even only halfway through, it is a powerful study in darks and lights.

greg vineyard: I have always drawn, since

earliest memory – have you been a life-long artist?

BY

gREg VINEYARD

Big Bend, by Ruth Meaders

Ruth brought out examples of the Goddesses. She encountered marbleized paper with gold overprinting, where she saw shapes throughout, much as she sees the forms of people and other objects in trees. Using watercolor pens, she then draws these images directly on the paper, interweaving something new to see within the patterns.

gv: Describe a perfect day for you. RM: Arising early and seeing the sun rise over

the mountains, taking a walk, seeing something in nature like the resident bear, maybe lunch with some friends, and some creative work. Nature, as both inspiration and subject matter, abounds in Ruth’s paintings. She also shared with me about some of the artists and friends who inspire her, some of whom we have in common, as this region has a delightful, “small-world” aspect to it. And we talked about creating art right up to the end – for there is no “retirement” for artists – and the purity of her dedication and vision is really quite intoxicating. As usual, I am inspired. The morning that I wrapped up my editing, the skies were quite blue - a preview of warmer weather to come. I’m sure Ruth looked up and noticed that, too, and continued applying brush to canvas. visit www.deepintheheartart.com

Ruth Meaders: (I have) always been into something creative, even as a child.

gv: What is your favorite medium? And has it changed over the years?

RM: I love oils, but I hate cleaning up brushes, so I have done quite a few acrylics in the past few years.

gv: Has any travel, or places you’ve lived,

See Ruth Meaders’ art during the Weaverville art Safari, april 6-7. From mid-april to mid-May works by Meaders’ will be part of a show with Leo Monahan at andrew Charles gallery, 60 n. Merrimon (Reynolds Mountain, next to the YMCa in north asheville).

influenced anything about your art?

RM: Italy, for one, with the bright colors and textures. Also, West Texas and New Mexico. Really, everything excites and influences me.

gv: What are you working on now? RM: I have a large oil of a North Carolina

sunset, a cloud painting in acrylic, and several smaller acrylics, and some Thai Paper Goddesses.

greg vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in asheville, nC. zapOW gallery in downtown asheville, (www.zapow.com), carries his illustrations, giclees, prints and cards. www.gregvineyardillustration.com.


R

A

P

I

D

R

I

V

E

R

A

R

T

S

noteworthy Business in a More Beautiful World

W

We believe in the hope and possibilities for a more beautiful world. There is a consciousness shift happening around the planet that has us on the brink of a tipping point. We’re changing the way we think about business, career and the way we “earn a living.” We’re finding our way to a fulltime activation of the very thing we are most passionate about. It is because of this that we are excited to announce this new column. In this space each month we will explore what a more integrated human story would look like. This is a story in which family, career, spirituality, art, pleasure, passion, purpose, strengths and gifts are not all separate and compartmentalized boxes. This is a human story that exudes integrity, wholeness and the beautiful gift that we all are. To help you to start moving in the direction of this new story for a more beautiful life, we’ll be sharing our gifts and passions with you. Join us as we explore the edges of this new frontier of heart-centered business, collaboration and cooperative ownership, sustainable social enterprise and new economy

BY KATHLEEN COLBURN AND THE FLIgHT FORMULA TEAM

practices. We’ll talk about how the practice of conscious communication can transform and deepen relationships. We’ll start a dialogue on the many aspects of a gift based economy. The Flight Formula Team is Asheville’s new incubator for current and aspiring entrepreneurs, artists, change makers and movement leaders. We are sponsoring events every 4th Thursday of the month at Edna’s of Asheville. These events are free to the public. Find out more about the people behind the column and the live events that we host both locally and online at www.businessinamorebeautifulworld.com iF YOU “Business in a More Beautiful gO World” will be presented on March

27 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Edna’s of Asheville, 870 Merrimon Avenue in Asheville.

pg. 32

MB

6YkZgi^h^c\I]ViLdg`h

I have had my studio at 140 D, Roberts Street for more than five years. I believe that advertising in Rapid River Magazine has brought traffic to the River Arts District, creating one of Asheville’s best tourist destinations. Thank you Rapid River Magazine!

pg. 17

O

~ Grace Carol Bomer, Fine Art Abstract Expressionist Paintings

Visit G. Carol Bomer’s studio at 140 D Roberts St. in the River Arts District, or online at www.gracecarolbomer.com.

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 7 — Rapid RiveR aRtS & CULtURe Magazine — March 2014 5


pg. 17

E

®

Enjoy and Give the Best ™ We Ship Nationwide Order Online Now www.chocolatefetish.com pg.

32

HF

36 Haywood Street

Downtown Asheville, NC (828) 258-2353 © Copyright The Chocolate Fetish

Voted Best Chocolate Shop in Western North Carolina Twelve Consecutive Years!

pg. 32

RC

pg. 32

TC

pg. 14

BK

March 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
March 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Oil painting by Al Ramirez..p17; Inside: LEAF presents a Celebration of Global Funk..p27; Dining Out for Life® benefit..pg22;...

Advertisement