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Asheville Amadeus Festival PGS 4, 7 & 9 Vibrant Gemstones at Susan Marie Designs Reel Takes Movie Reviews

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ROBERTO VENGOECHEA

Asheville Amadeus Events

Pre-Festival Kickoff

Designer/Goldsmith

Nathan Shirley, and a string quintet of ASO musicians will take you behind the notes of Mozart’s iconic Serenade No. 13, better known as “Eine kleine Nachtmusik.” A plated lunch inspired by Mozart’s home country of Austria will be prepared by Isa’s executive chef. Luncheon Reservation: $60.

Saturday, March 14 at 7 p.m. – Beer Release and Open House featuring music by Sirius.B. Highland Brewing releases a commemorative beer crafted in honor of Mozart, Wolfgang 1756 is a classic Vienna-style lager. A wonderful session beer, Wolfgang 1756 is crisp, light-bodied and refreshing – the perfect pairing of beer and music. Free event. Highland Brewing Company, 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Asheville. Call (828) 299-3370, or visit www. highlandbrewing.com.

It’s All New to Me

Mozart’s The Impresario

Wednesday, March 18 at 7 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Almost Sold Out! Asheville Lyric Opera will debut its production of Opening Night – SOLD OUT Mozart’s The Impresario. Tuesday, March 17 at 8 p.m. Asheville This comic chamber opera Chamber Music Series at the Diana Violist Hsin-Yun satirizes the rivalries, the egos, Wortham Theatre. Brentano Quartet Huang performs and the divas of show business. with violist Hsin-Yun Huang. March 17. ALO artistic staff and Furman University Opera Lyric Theatre Deconstructing Mozart will collaborate under the direction of Grant Tuesday, March 17 at 11:30 a.m. Almost Sold Knox. Performance takes place at the YMI Out! An Asheville Symphony Guild MusiCultural Center. Tickets are $20. cal Feast at Isa’s Bistro. Asheville Symphony Executive Director David Whitehill, composer continued on page 7

pg. 11

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100 Cherry St., Black Mountain, NC 828.669.0065 VisionsofCreation.com

CO - PRODUCED BY

NC Stage AND Asheville Community Theatre

DIRECTED BY

Angie Flynn-McIver

STARRING

Michael MacCauley

March 11-22, 2015 Swells of music and madness pg. 34

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Performances at 35 East Walnut Street, Asheville Wed-Sat 7:30 PM; Sun 2:30 PM $35 Regular Admission; $32 Seniors; $20 Students (17 and Under)

Asheville Community Theatre • 828-254-1320 • www.ashevilletheatre.org 4 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7


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web exclusives RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Eighteen, Number Seven

MARCH 2015

www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Carol Pearce Bjorlie, Teresa Buckner, Jenny Bunn, James Cassara, Kathleen Colburn, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Erik Haagensen, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Karen Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Cheryl Keefer, Michelle Keenan, Peter Loewer, Kay Stegall Miller, Marcianne Miller, April Nance, Wendy H. Outland, Dennis Ray, Haley Steinhardt, Courtney Tiberio, Greg Vineyard, Kelly Walker, Bill Walz, Dan Weiser, David Whitehill, Robert Wiley, J. & R. Woods.

CONTACT US Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Send all mail to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 info@rapidrivermagazine.com

ADVERTISING SALES Downtown Asheville and other areas Dennis Ray (828) 646-0071 dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com Hendersonville, Waynesville, Dining Guide Rick Hills (828) 452-0228 rick@rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, March 2015, Vol. 18 No. 7

On the Cover:

Making Plans, painting by Cheryl Keefer. PAGE 17

4 Performance

Discover More Exciting Articles, Short Stories & Blogs at www.rapidrivermagazine.com

SHORT STORIES

Asheville Amadeus Events . . . . . 4 & 7 NC Stage & ACT – Amadeus . . . . . 8 Abraham.In.Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Asheville Amadeus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

6 Chamber Music

Eggs Benedict in SE Asia, by Jonathan Look Mindfulness: If Not Now, When?, by Larry Cammarata Blue Topaz, by Celia Miles

Hendersonville Chamber Music . . . 6 AmiciMusic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

7 Columns

ONLY ONLINE Charlotte Street Computers hosts their 7th annual Easter Egg Hunt and Family Fun Day on Sunday, March 29.

On the Road (Not Yet the Trail) Again, by John Swart No Chevy, by Michael Landolfi Heart of the Matter, by Nancy Dillingham

Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . 16 Wendy Outland – Business of Art 16 James Cassara – Spinning Discs . . 22 Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . 24 Book Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

10 Fine Art Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Asheville Ceramics Gallery . . . . . . 10 Fine Artist Cheryl Keefer . . . . . . . . 17 Susan Marie Designs . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Spruce Street Market . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Green Room – Caffeinated Art . . . 35

12 Movie Reviews Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan .12

21 Music The Altamont Theater . . . . . . . . . . 21 John Jorgenson Quintet . . . . . . . . . 23

26 Dining Guide Dining Out For LifeTM . . . . . . . .26-28 The Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . 28

29 Artful Living

Becoming the Observer, by Phil Okrend Spring Cleaning, by RF Wilson WHOW! This month we welcome two more new contributors to Rapid River Magazine Online. Jonathan Look retired at age 50 and is pursuing adventures instead of comfort and possessions. He is writing about his travels around the world. Great stuff! Larry Cammarata is a local mindfulness educator, instructor of Qigong and Taijiquan, and a clinical psychologist. He’ll be sharing articles on mindfulness and other mind/body topics.

SPECIAL SECTIONS Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 11 Downtown Asheville . . . . . . pgS 18-19 Points North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 20 Dining Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . pgS 26-28 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 34

The POP Project’s Tumblr page showcases local ephemera.

What do the Lord’s Prayer, a Christmas card from Doug and Geni, and a boarding pass from Atlanta to Mobile, Alabama have in common? All three items were found in books donated to the local book-centric nonprofit, the POP Project.

Book Reviews by Marcianne Miller Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe, by George Friedman The Girl on the Train: A Novel by Paula Hawkins

ATTENTION WRITERS! Check out our new short story feature, Story Lines, a web exclusive! I’ll give you the first line and you write your short story from there. First line for March: “When the snow began to melt on the north side of the ridge that March...” Please visit RapidRiverMagazine.com for section guidelines. I look forward to reading your creations! ~ Kathleen Colburn

Bill Walz – Artful Living . . . . . . . . 29 Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . 29 Healthy, Good Thoughts . . . . . . . . 32 Reflexology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

30 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . 31 Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . 31 Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . 31 Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . 31 Ratchet & Spin by J. & R. Woods . . 31

IF YOU GO: Tell them you saw it in Rapid River Magazine! Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 5


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chamber music concerts

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AMICIMUSIC PRESENTS

Wind Dances and Jazzy Jews

AmiciMusic, the acclaimed chamber music organization, continues its award-winning intimate and educational music series with two different programs in March. The first program, “Wind Dances,” features some exciting and virtuosic arrangements of works for flute, clarinet, and piano. The performers are Lea Kibler, flute; Steve Loew, clarinet, and Dan Weiser, piano. All three have performed around the world and have thrilled audiences on three continents. For this show, they will play a fun version of Bizet’s Carmen along with some Hungarian Dances by Brahms and works by Malcolm Arnold, Saint-Saens, and Mozart.

WIND DANCES On Friday, March 27 at 7:30, they will perform a special House Concert at the home of Kristie and Doug Doll on Buffalo Mountain in East Asheville. Amazing views, great acoustics, incredible intimacy, and fabulous food and wine. This is truly chamber music the way it was meant to be heard. Reservations are required and seating is limited. Cost

JAZZY JEWS

AmiciMusic will reprise “Jazzy Jews,” which explores BY DAN WEISER the fascinating intersection of Jewish folk music (Klezmer) and American Jazz. Steve Loew, is $35pp which includes the clarinet, and Daniel Weiser, food and wine. piano team up for this exciting To pay online, visit adventure featuring some classic www.amicimusic.org or Klezmer music, as well as pieces reserve by emailing daniel@ by George Gershwin, Benny amicimusic.org or calling Dan Goodman, and John Williams. at (802) 369-0856 Lea Kibler This show can be heard on On Saturday, March 28 at Sunday, March 29 at 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m., they present another at a special House Concert in Saturday Classical Brunch at Spartanburg, SC. Come have Isis in West Asheville. Come some bagels, lox, and whitefish, hear great music and eat an and immerse yourself in the incredible brunch. Concert is Jewish experience. $15. Reservations are encourThis concert will be held aged as space is limited. Call in one of the grand old homes Isis at (828) 575-2737. of Spartanburg. Reservations are required and seating is limited. On Saturday, March 28 at Cost is $35pp which includes 7:30 p.m., they play at White Steve Loew, clarinet, the food and wine. To pay onHorse Black Mountain, a and Daniel Weiser, piano. line, visit www.amicimusic.org. truly relaxed and informal Reserve by emailing daniel@ atmosphere where drinks are amicimusic.org or calling 802-369-0856. available in cabaret-style seating and comfortAn abridged version of this show can be able couches. $15 in advance; $20 at the door. heard on Thursday, March 26 at 7:15 p.m. at www.whitehorseblackmountain.com. the Deerfield Retirement Village on Hendersonville Rd. in South Asheville.

HENDERSONVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC PRESENTS

Jason Posnock and Friends

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Brevard Music Center’s Director of Artistic Planning Jason Posnock doubles as Asheville Symphony’s Concert Master.

BY

ROBERT WILEY

Sunday, April 26 – Minneapolis Guitar Quartet

One of the world’s leading guitar ensembles, the Minneapolis Guitar Quartet, has has performed throughout the United States balancing a dizzying array of first-rate repertoire ranging from Renaissance and Baroque to Spanish, Latin American and Romantic.

Posnock will be joined by three other Music Center faculty musicians Sunday, March 8 for an afternoon of intimate chamber music that will include the Ravel Duo for Violin and Cello. Jason Posnock Performers, in addition to Both series and individual violinist Posnock, include Dilshad Posnock, tickets at $20 will be available at the door on flute; internationally acclaimed soprano Alison the day of performance. Subscription holders Pohl MacRae; and cellist Alistair MacRae who will be able to use their four subscription is a regular performer with Carnegie Hall’s tickets for any or all performances. Students Making Music Series. are free.

UPCOMING HENDERSONVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS Sunday, March 29 – Moment Musicale Mary Boone and Vonda Darr, flute and harp duo and principals in the North Carolina Symphony, have scheduled an exciting program of unusual, yet delightful international works.

6 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

IF YOU Hendersonville Chamber Music GO performances are presented on Sunday

afternoons at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine in Hendersonville. Subscriptions are $75 including tax. Mail a check, payable to HFCM, PO Box 271, Hendersonville, NC 28793. More information on Facebook and hendersonvillechambermusic.org.

Daniel Weiser, AmiciMusic founder and Artistic Director

AmiciMusic is a professional chamber music organization dedicated to performing the highest quality music in intimate venues and nontraditional spaces. For more information please visit www.amicimusic.org

Pan Harmonia Sonata Series – Music of Philippe Gaubert, William Hurlstone, and Felix Mendelssohn. Kate Steinbeck, flute; Liz Austin, cello; Fabio Parrini, piano. Thursday, March 5

Kate Steinbeck and Liz Austin

Photo: Lisa Ringelspaugh-Irvine

at 7:30 p.m. White Horse, 105 Montreat Rd., Black Mountain.

Sunday, March 8 at 3 p.m. First Presbyterian Church, 40 Church Street, Asheville.

Tickets: $16.50 advance; $22 at the door; $5 for students. Limited seating; rsvp to office@ pan-harmonia.org. Pan Harmonia (828) 254-7123, www.pan-harmonia.org


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Asheville Amadeus Select Events continued from page 4

Mozart Family Concert

Saturday, March 21 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Blue Ridge Orchestra at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. An introduction to the genius of Mozart, featuring excerpts from some of his greatest works. Find out what “Wolfie” was creating in his early years and how his delightful, joyous music changed the world. Educational, enriching, and entertaining concert. General Admission: $15; Friends of the BRO: $10; Youth: $5

Amadeus

March 11-14 & 18-21 at 7:30 p.m.; March 15 & 22 at 2:30 p.m. NC Stage & Asheville Community Theatre. Starring Michael MacCauley and Directed by Angie Flynn-McIver. Immerse yourself in the rich world of Vienna with stunning costumes and breathtaking scenery. Performances take place at Asheville Community Theatre. $35 for adults; $32 for seniors and youth 17 & under; All tickets are subject to a 7% sales tax.

AT THE ASHEVILLE ART MUSEUM For reservations call the Asheville Art Museum (828) 253-3227

Tot Time

Tuesday, March 17 at 10:30 a.m. Eine Kleine Kinder Musik with Yvette Odell. Bring your newborns to pre-K children for a fantastical musical experience, including a chance to sing along and twirl along to the music of Mozart! Free with museum membership, or $8 plus museum admission and tax. (Children under 5 always free)

Yoga in the Galleries

Thursday, March 19 at 10 a.m. Mozart Yoga. Yoga instructor Evan Hart Marsh will lead a relaxation class inspired by Mozart and the

Lunchtime (Moz)Art Break

Friday, March 20 at 12 noon. Art and Music by Design. Learn how to analyze a work of art and a musical work by Mozart. Free with museum membership or $8 plus admission and tax.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS Santé: March Flight Night – What Wines Would Wolfgang Drink?

Thursday, March 5 at 7 p.m. Santé Wine Bar & Tap Room. Vintner Anne Kaufmann educates and entertains guests through a flight of wines from the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Tickets: $16 (excluding tax & gratuity).

Mozart Requiem Sing-Along

Tuesday, March 17 at 6:30 p.m. Basilica of St. Lawrence. Sing-along with the Asheville Symphony Chorus. Dr. Michael Lancaster, conductor. Free.

Meeting Mozart: His Life and Music

Wednesday, March 18 at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Reuter Center, UNC Asheville. Learn about Mozart through historical background and lively discussion. Live performance by musicians from the Asheville Symphony. Alicia Chapman, lecturer. Free.

Mozart March Madness Concert

Thursday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. First Baptist Church at Asheville. UNCA University Singers, Asheville Singers, combined with the Reuter Center Singers and Orchestra present glorious works of Mozart and emergent music of contemporary composers. Dr. Melodie Galloway, conductor. Free.

Symphony Talk

Asheville Amadeus Partners • Asheville Art Museum • Asheville Chamber Music Series • Asheville Community Theatre • Asheville Lyric Opera • Asheville Symphony Orchestra • Blue Ridge Orchestra • Diana Wortham Theatre • Highland Brewing • NC Stage For more information, please call the Asheville Symphony, (828) 254-7046, or visit www.ashevillesymphony.org

AshevilleBuncombe Youth Orchestra Concert

surrounding art-filled galleries. $8 museum members; $12 non-members. Price does not include tax.

Friday, March 20 at 10 a.m. Diana Wortham Theatre. With WCQS classical music host Chip Kaufmann, Asheville Symphony music director Daniel Meyer, and pianist Emanuel Ax. Free.

Piano Masterclass with Orion Weiss

Friday, March 20 at 3:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Asheville. One of today’s most prolific soloists and collaborators, Orion Weiss will coach three upOrion Weiss and- coming pianists. Get an insider’s look at the fine details of great music-making. Free.

Saturday, March 21 at 7 p.m. Asheville High School Auditorium. The father of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Leopold Mozart, will be celebrated with a performance of his Toy Symphony. Students from Hall Fletcher Asheville-Buncombe Elementary in Youth Orchestra the Asheville Symphony’s MusicWorks! program will join the youth orchestra for this concert. Ron Clearfield, conductor. Free.

Mozart’s Coronation Mass

Sunday, March 22 at 9:10 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Asheville. Attend a special worship service and celebrate the genius of Mozart with excerpts from his Mass in C performed by the UUCA Choir and Blue Ridge Chamber Symphony. Dr. Milton Crotts, conductor. Free.

The Impresario at the YMI

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Asheville Lyric Opera will debut a production of Mozart’s chamber opera, The Impresario, in association with the Asheville Amadeus Festival. This production is in collaboration with Furman University Lyric Opera Theatre, featuring students of Grant Knox, longtime Asheville Lyric Opera collaborator and performer. This will be the first public performance of the Asheville Lyric Opera in the YMI Cultural Center. The cast features two dueling sopranos, Emma Zyriek as Madame Goldentrill, and Abigail Hart as Miss Silverpeal. Join the Asheville Lyric Opera for a night of humor, opera, and Mozart. IF YOU Performances take place Wednesday, GO March 18 at 7 and 8:30 p.m. at the

YMI Cultural Center in downtown Asheville. There will also be a performance for elementary and middle school youth on Tuesday, March 17 at 10 a.m. Admission is $20. Tickets are available by calling (828) 236-0670.

Advertising Sales Representatives Needed Help us promote local arts, organizations, and businesses. Great for earning extra income. Set your own hours. Potential earnings are up to you! Seniors are encouraged to apply. INTERESTED? Call (828) 646-0071, or e-mail info@rapidrivermagazine.com

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 7


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captivating performances Asheville Community Theatre “Tape” Opens in 35below In a cheap motel room in Lansing, MI, three former high school friends find themselves in a situation that is both intriguing and frighteningly possible. Tape is a suspenseful, high-stakes story that examines questions of motive, memory, truth and perception. Tape is written by Stephen Belber and is directed by Elliot Weiner, who is making his Asheville directorial debut. Tape will be performed March 6-22, 2015 with performances Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. All tickets are $15 and are available online atashevilletheatre.org, by phone at (828) 254-1320, or in person at the ACT Box Office.

Broadway Bootcamp begins Saturday, March 7 This 10-week class spotlights the fabulous world of Broadway and ends in a cabaret-style performance on our Mainstage. Broadway Bootcamp will be directed by Jerry Crouch, who helmed such ACT hits as Hairspray, Peter Pan, and Oliver! This class is geared for middle and high school students. For more information, or to enroll, contact Chanda Calentine at (828) 254-1320.

Amadeus CO-PRODUCED BY NC STAGE AND ASHEVILLE COMMUNITY THEATRE

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North Carolina Stage Company (NC Stage) and Asheville Community Theatre (ACT) are excited to announce a co-production of Amadeus opening Wednesday, March 11.

In 18th century Vienna, music is the currency of power. And Court Composer Antonio Salieri is the toast of the town. That is, until a young prodigy by the name of Mozart comes on the scene. Reeling from the realization of his own mediocrity in the face of true genius, Salieri swears vengeance on the God that gifted Mozart’s breathtaking talent. Swells of music and madness stir through the Tony Award-winning drama that raises the question: how far would you go to secure your legacy? Amadeus is directed by Angie Flynn-McIver and stars Michael MacCauley. Presented as a part of the Asheville Amadeus

Listen to This In the vein of “The Moth” or “This American Life,” Listen to This features stories and original songs from locals. March’s theme is “Meet the Parents: Couples Co-telling Tales of Family First Encounters.” Unique stories will be presented Thursday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m. in 35below. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $15. Past installments of Listen to This are available at www.ashevilletheatre.org. IF YOU Asheville Community Theatre, GO 35 E. Walnut St., downtown

Asheville. For more information, please call (828) 254-1320, or visit the website, www.ashevilletheatre.org.

KELLY WALKER

Festival, Amadeus is a co-production between NC Stage Company and Asheville Community Theatre. Amadeus stars Michael MacCauley as Salieri and Allen Law as Mozart. The show also features Scott Treadway as the Emperor. The play is directed by Angie Flynn-McIver, the co-Founder and Producing Director at NC Stage. Of the production, Angie says, “Amadeus is a play that we have wanted to produce for years. It’s a director’s dream – it has huge emotions, fascinating characters, genius, revenge, mystery, God...what more could any director want? I am also completely thrilled with the cast we have assembled, and the designers. These artists will bring Amadeus to life in a completely unexpected and wonderful way.” This is the first time that these two organizations are collaborating ACT Artistic Director Susan Harper says, “ACT and the staff are thrilled to be partnering with our colleagues from North Carolina Stage on Amadeus. ACT has had Amadeus on our wish list for a while

KYLE ABRAHAM’S GROUNDBREAKING DANCE COMPANY

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Abraham.In.Motion

Abraham.In.Motion, brings a fresh, unique vision to the stage with When the Wolves Came In.

BY JOHN

ELLIS

its inspiration from jazz legend Max Roach’s iconic 1960 protest album, We Insist: Max Roach’s Freedom Now Suite. This album, originally intended to be released in 1963 to mark the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, was released in the fall of 1960 due to the severity sparked by the sit-ins in Greensboro, NC, and the urgency of the growing civil rights movement in the U.S. and South Africa. Kyle Abraham began working on When the Wolves Came In after a visit to the Hector Pieterson Museum in Soweto, South Africa. While there, he became fixated on the power of perception, and the ways that the 13-yearold Pieterson’s death in a 1976 anti-Apartheid protest shines a spotlight on questions of personal choice and collective rights in the struggle for freedom today. “I keep going back to Roach’s response when asked about the song, ‘Freedom Day,’” says Abraham. “[Roach said] ‘Freedom itself Abraham.In.Motion, one of New York’s was so hard to grasp... “Best and brightest creative talents.” Photo: Ian Douglas we don’t really under-

Abraham.In.Motion was just named one of The Boston Globe ‘s Top 10 Dance Picks in the nation (2014), won the prestigious Jacob’s Pillow Dance Award in 2012, and has been cited as “25 to Watch” by Dance magazine and one of New York’s “Best and brightest creative talents” by OUT magazine. Timely and relevant to the current national spotlight on race and equality, Abraham. In.Motion’s When the Wolves Came In takes

Tom Chalmers

BY

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and this festival was the perfect opportunity. We have great respect for the work done at NC Stage and we are excited by the challenge of figuring out how to work together. Frankly, we’re just enjoying getting together more often and collaborating.” North Carolina Stage Company is Asheville’s only professional equity theatre celebrating its 13th year producing plays for the Asheville community. Founded by Charlie and Angie Flynn-McIver, the theatre is proud to put the community on stage; uniting hundreds of community members of all ages and backgrounds who collaborate to present a unified product to thousands of locals and tourists annually. IF YOU Amadeus, March 11-22 with GO performances Wednesday - Saturday

nights at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday afternoons at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $35 Regular Admission; $32 Seniors; $20 Student Rush (17 and under). Tickets are available online at www. ashevilletheatre.org, by phone at (828) 254-1320, or in person at Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street Asheville.

stand what it really is to be free.’ Kyle Abraham’s dance company, Abraham.In.Motion (A.I.M.), was born into hiphop culture in the late 1970s and grounded in Abraham’s artistic upbringing in classical cello, piano, and the visual arts. The company’s works strive to delve into identity in relation to a personal history, with a strong emphasis on sound, human behavior and all things visual, in an effort to create an avenue for personal investigation and exposing that on stage. A.I.M. is a representation of dancers from various disciplines and diverse personal backgrounds. Combined together, these individualities create movement that is manipulated and molded into something fresh and unique. A 2013 MacArthur Fellow, Kyle Abraham began his dance training at the Civic Light Opera Academy and the Creative and Performing Arts High School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He continued his dance studies in New York, receiving a BFA from SUNY Purchase and an MFA from NYU Tisch School of the Arts. In November 2012, Abraham was named the newly appointed New York Live Arts Resident Commissioned Artist for 2012–2014. Just one month later, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater premiered Abraham’s newest work, Another Night, at New York’s City Center to rave reviews. For more information about the artist, please visit abrahaminmotion.org IF YOU Kyle Abraham / Abraham.In.Motion, GO Tuesday & Wednesday March 24 & 25

• 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Ticket Prices: Regular: $40; Student: $35; Child $20; Student Rush day-of show (with valid I.D.) $10. For more information, or to purchase tickets, call the box office (828) 257-4530, or visit www.dwtheatre.com.


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captivating performances Asheville Amadeus UNPRECEDENTED COMMUNITY COLLABORATIONS

Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

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Asheville Amadeus is the BY DAVID WHITEHILL Asheville Symphony Orchestra’s week-long festival celebrating the music and life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Featuring internationally renowned pianist Emanuel Ax, several performances will be held March 17-22 in an unprecedented collaboration with more than a dozen local and regional arts and culture organizations, venues and businesses. The festival culminates with the Asheville Amadeus finale concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 22, with Ax performing two Mozart concertos along with the ASO and Music Director Daniel Meyer at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Ax will be joined by pianist Orion Weiss, and the orchestra will also perform works by Schubert and Salieri.

Emanuel Ax joins the Asheville Symphony for a celebration of Mozart on March 22.

Asheville Amadeus will include chamber music concerts, recitals, opera, educational programs, yoga and even a special beer release in collaboration with community partners. More than 18,000 people – including every second-, third-and fourthgrade public-school student in Asheville City and Buncombe County schools – will have seen an Asheville Amadeus performance by the end of the 2015 school year. “The opportunity to feature one of the world’s greatest living pianists in Emanuel Ax is, of course, the centerpiece of this extraordinary undertaking,” Meyer said. “I am particularly gratified that Mr. Ax’s residency in Asheville has inspired our community arts partners to also participate in this week-long festival celebrating the genius of Mozart. Nothing like this has ever been mounted in Asheville before, and we hope to showcase what a thriving performing arts culture Asheville enjoys and continues to develop, led by the Asheville Symphony Orchestra.” Ax is a 7-time Grammy Award winner who regularly performs and records with the top orchestras in the world. His recent recordings include Mendelssohn Trios with Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman, Strauss’s Enoch Arden narrated by Patrick Stewart, and discs of two-piano music by Brahms and Rachmaninoff with Yefim Bronfman. Mr. Ax captured public attention in 1974 when he won the first Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Competition in Tel Aviv. Five years later he won the coveted Avery Fisher Prize. Ax, who chose the Asheville Symphony for the five-day residency, will perform twice while in Asheville. On Friday, March 20, he will play a sold-out recital of solo piano works and

Milepost 382 - BlueRidge Parkway, Asheville, NC 828.298.7928

Daniel Meyer directs the Asheville Symphony Orchestra.

Highland Brewing Company has created a commemorative beer, Wolfgang 1756. also join ASO Concertmaster Jason Posnock, Principal Violist Kara Poorbaugh and Acting Principal Cellist Franklin Keel for Mozart’s G minor Piano Quartet, K. 478. Ax will perform with the full ASO for the March 22 finale.The program for the finale concert includes Ax performing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 14 and the composer’s Concerto for Two Pianos. He will play the latter piece with his former student Orion Weiss, whom Ax taught at Juilliard. Weiss was named the Classical Recording Foundation’s Young Artist of the Year in September 2010 and has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, Philadelphia Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony,Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic. “I am thrilled to join the Asheville Symphony for this unique week of events,” Ax said. “This is an opportunity for a soloist and orchestra to make a real impact, not just on stage but in the community. I’m looking forward to working with Maestro Meyer and the musicians of the Asheville Symphony.” Thomas Wolfe Auditorium will be transformed for the Asheville Amadeus finale concert with a 30-foot stage extension that will thrust the Asheville Symphony into the midst of the audience, with as many as 124 seats available onstage. “With the stage thrust deep into Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, this will be a unique opportunity to hear and see two of the world’s finest pianists up close and personal, and a stunning conclusion to a week of special events designed to celebrate the genius of Mozart,” Meyer said. Highland Brewing Company will host a special pre-festival kickoff party at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 14, featuring the release of Wolfgang 1756, a commemorative beer in honor of Asheville Amadeus. The event is free. Other events include the play “Amadeus,” presented by NC Stage and Asheville Community Theatre; a performance of “The Impresario” by Asheville Lyric Opera; “Pianoforte: Homages to Mozart,” a recital held at the Asheville Art Museum; and Mozart Family Concert performances with the Blue Ridge Symphony.

IF YOU Finale concert by the Asheville Symphony, Sunday, March GO 22 at 3 p.m. at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. Tickets

start at $28 ($15 youth). For more information, a full list of events, or to purchase tickets go to ashevilleamadeus.com.

930 Tunnel Road/Hwy 70, Asheville, NC 828.298.7903

26 Lodge Street, Asheville, NC 828.277.6222

WWW.CRAFTGUILD.ORG The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

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Story Book Characters on Parade

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Figurative Art Inspired by Children’s Literature

“GoFigure,” a local group of art doll artists, and Pack Memorial Library join together to celebrate National Reading Month, the birthday of author Dr. Seuss, and “Read Across America” with their third annual “Storybook Characters on Parade” event and exhibit. Local doll artists have created original figurative art based on characters from children’s literature. Pack Memorial Library will showcase the Storybook Characters exhibit during the month of April. The exhibit will be housed in the children’s Lynn Bradshaw, department of the library. Keatts & Heidi GoFigure will kick off the event by visiting local schools during March. Visits by artists are free of charge. Artists will bring their newly created storybook characters and the books that inspired their work to each school visit. This event unlocks the magical world of a child’s imagination Karen Hawkins, through reading, writing The Box Trolls and the visual arts. IF YOU GoFigure Storybook Exhibit, on display through GO April at Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood

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The National Quilting Association, Inc. began sponsoring National Quilting Day in 1991. Quilting groups across the country use the event as a way to raise awareness of the traditional craft. On Friday, March 20, Southern Highland Craft Guild member and quilt historian Connie Brown will demonstrate quilting on a home sewing machine in the Folk Art Center lobby from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Saturday, which is National Quilting Day, Connie will host “Let’s Talk Quilts,” an opportunity for visitors to bring in their own quilts for questions and analysis. Connie will help identify time periods by fabrics and

Connie Brown Photo: Diana Gates

Ceramic Sculpture by Cindy Billingsley

patterns used. She will also curate a small collection of quilts made in the 1970s which she describes as a quirky, fun piece of quilting history. While at the Folk Art Center, visitors can enjoy “Dynamic Narratives,” an exhibition featuring the work of twelve sculptors who are all women. Their work addresses important issues of society using clay to express their point of view individually and collectively. The exhibition will run through April 19, 2015 in the Main Gallery. The Focus Gallery will be hosting

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Pendant by Niki Fisk

Gallery of the Mountains

290 Macon Avenue TOLL - FREE

(800) 692-2204

Asheville, NC

(828) 254-2068

www.galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

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Celebrate the coming of spring with an infusion of color.

Now in our 30th year of supporting American handmade

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In honor of National Quilting Day, the Folk Art Center will host demonstrations and exhibitions celebrating textile arts Friday & Saturday, March 20-21.

Asheville Ceramics Gallery

Local and Regional Handmade Crafts

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March at the Folk Art Center

Street, downtown Asheville.

Located inside Omni Grove Park Inn

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Ronan Peterson’s pottery radiates bright color, with fanciful patterns and a variety of rich textures... a perfect greeting for springtime, budding leaves, and new growth. Inspired by the forests of Appalachia, Ronan’s vessels imply trees, hints of bark, lichens, ferns and the myriad colors of the mountains. Ronan makes clear that the vessels are not actual representations of the trees and rocks, but abstractions and stylizations of these natural phenomena. He seeks to upset quiet earthiness with intense splashes of vibrant color, patterns, and glossy surfaces not commonly associated with tree bark or the rough surfaces of rocks amidst fallen leaves. He is interested in inflated volume and thick line qualities that reference comic style drawings and

10 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

Ronan Peterson, Illuminati Plate

how that can apply to interpreting the natural world. Ronan uses red earthenware clay to make his vessels, employing a wide variety of construction techniques. His complex surface manipulations are created with an encyclopedic array of decorating techniques including the use

ApRIL NANCE

Embroidery by Laura Gaskin

“Natural Inclinations,” featuring the work of Nancy Graham (clay), Tom Zumbach (wood), Marilee Hall (clay), Amy Putansu (fiber), Laura Gaskin (fiber) and Suzanne Gernandt (fiber) through May 12, 2015. IF YOU The Folk Art Center is located GO at Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge

Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 entrance in east Asheville. For more information about the Folk Art Center’s events and exhibitions, call (828) 298-7928 or visit www.craftguild.org.

BY

ERIK HAAgENSEN

of slips, terra sigillata, sgraffito carving, painting, dipping, wax resists, and layering of glazes. His most recent work is influenced by the paintings of Miro, Klee, and Philip Gustin, with a focus on plates as round canvases. Asheville Ceramics Gallery displays contemporary ceramics and traditional studio pottery in an elegant formal gallery environment. Ronan Kyle Peterson’s studio, Nine Toes Pottery, is located in Chapel Hill, NC. He exhibits and teaches workshops nationally. IF YOU Works by Ronan Peterson on GO dislplay at Asheville Ceramics

Gallery, located in the Phil Mechanic Studios Building, 109 Roberts St. in the River Arts District. Open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www.ashevilleceramics.com


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BLACK MOUNTAIN The Little Town That Rocks Rock Your Talents This Winter, Take a Class Create a Unique Piece of Jewelry • Play a Dulcimer Knit a Warm Scarf • Quilt a Baby Blanket • Throw a Unique Pot • Practice Yoga Dance, Paint or Draw Pla Play Bridge, Canasta or Mahjongg • Manage Your Finances or Your Health

Black Mountain Events – March 2015

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March 7 - Auction for the Arts Annual Fundraiser. 6 p.m. $25 reservations. $30 day of auc-

tion. Black Mountain Center for the Arts, (828) 669-0930, blackmountainarts.org

March 14 - Lakeview Center Open House. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learn about the Lakeview Senior Center and all the programs available. Lakeview Senior Center, (828) 669-8610.

March 15 - Opening Reception - Emerging Artists Show. 3-4 p.m. in Upper Gallery, Black Mountain Center for the Arts. (828) 669-0930, www.blackmountainarts.org

EVERY THURSDAY IN MARCH Early Show – The Screaming J’s. Boogie-woogie piano music at it’s finest. The Screaming J’s hold nothing back with their wild and zany performances. Free. 6 p.m. Inside the taproom. Pisgah Brewing, 150 Eastside Drive, Black Mountain. For more details call (828) 669-0190 or visit www.pisgahbrewing.com.

List provided by the Black Mountain-Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce, 201 E. State Street, Black Mountain. (828) 669-2300, 1-800-669-2301, or visit www.blackmountain.org.

March 21 - Spring Equinox Garden Blessing.

ExploreBlackMountain.com 800.669.2301

BLACK MOUNTAIN - 28711

10 a.m. in the Dr. John Wilson Community Garden followed by potluck. Black Mountain Recreation & Parks, (828) 669-2052, www. blackmountainrec.com

March 28 - Spring Egg Hunt. 10 a.m. to noon. Egg hunts and much more at Recreation Park, 10 Rec Park Dr. Free. Rain date March 29 at 2 p.m. Black Mountain Recreation and Parks, (828) 669-2052, www.blackmountainrec.com.

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CREATIVE MOUNTAIN FOOD TOURS MR

March 7, 14, & 28 -

Ultimate Foodie Tour - 2 p.m.

March 13 - Pub & Grub Crawl - 2 p.m. March 22 - Dessert Tour - 2 p.m. March 27 - Pub & Grub Crawl - 2 p.m. Advance reservations required. (828) 419-0590, www.creativemountainfoodtours.com

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company Biscuit Cuisine • Pastries • Bread Cinnamon & Pecan Rolls Baked Fresh In-House

Breakfast in the Mountains

601 W. State Street MB

in Black Mountain

Tues-Fri 7am-2pm • Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

MB

FAISON O’NEIL Arts, Crafts, Fine Gifts

Night in the Mountains by Linda Johnson

128 Cherry Street Black Mountain, NC info@faisononeilgallery.com Winter Hours: Wed-Sat. 11-4; Closed Sun-Tues 828.357.5350 Queen’s Guard by Dan Reiser

www.faisononeil.com

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Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 11


Reel Take Reviewers:

 - Fantastic  - Pretty darn good  - Has some good points  - The previews lied  - Only if you must

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQS-FM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies, and a fundraiser for public radio.

M- Forget entirely For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

50 Shades of Grey 1/2 Short Take: This film adaptation of the bestselling novel is a cross between The Story of O and a made-for-TV movie on Lifetime or Oxygen.

REEL TAKE: While I am not a fan nor have I read the source material by E.L. James, I am absolutely fascinated in 50 Shades of Grey as a cultural tidal wave. Not only is there the book (books actually) and the movie, but numerous product spinoffs as well including a “50 Shades Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson as dominant of Grey Teddy Bear” complete with and submissive in the film adaptation of the popular designer suit and miniature handbestselller 50 Shades of Grey. cuffs that retails for $90. How does a poorly written BDSM novel The Story of O) become this huge jugger(to judge from what I heard in the film and naut? I have my theories but I will keep mum compared to the benchmark of the genre, on that subject as this is meant to be a movie

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THE MONTHLY REEL

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CHIp KAUFMANN

Greetings & Salutations Reel Take readers!

Both the Asheville Film Society and the This is your friendly Hendersonville Film Professor Kaufmann speaking Society have five (actually writing). Michelle features this month has taken this issue off (except including Harvey, for a DVD pick) to attend the 7 Wonders of the wedding of a friend in Paris World, The Royal (poor girl!) and so it’s up to me to tell you what’s what this In the near future, Chappie becomes Tennenbaums, and the first robot with the ability to Torch Song Trilogy. month. By the time you read think and feel. A complete schedule this, the Oscars will have been and brief synopsis handed out and you will know of each film can be found on the following how well you did in last month’s Oscar pages. The two interesting DVD picks are tally and whether you should have bet any The Story of O and The Guard. money. Michelle usually gives you a heads up Reviews this month include the on some exciting new releases. There notorious (and ridiculously successful) 50 are several notable releases this month, Shades of Grey, the remarkable biopic Mr. including: Chappie, the story of a robot Turner about the celebrated 19th century with emotions; The Second Best Exotic English landscape painter, Seventh Son, a Marigold Hotel (March 6); Disney’s decent popcorn action flick, and another Cinderella, directed by Kenneth Brannagh remarkable movie, the spy spoof Kingsman: (March 13); and Serena, starring Bradley The Secret Service. Guest reviewer Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence, and set in Marcianne Miller gives us her thoughts on North Carolina (March 27). Enjoy! another high profile film, Jupiter Ascending.

12 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

review not an analysis of a puzzling social Jupiter Ascending 1/2 phenomenon. Short Take: Jupiter Ascending is the So how is it as a movie? It did exceed my latest unusual offering from Andy and expectations which weren’t very high to begin Lana Wachowski, who earlier gave us The with. Sam Taylor-Johnson also directed one of Matrix trilogy, V For Vendetta, and Cloud my favorite films, Nowhere Boy, about a teenAtlas. age John Lennon, back in 2009. After this she REEL TAKE: Don’t pay attention to all the can pick whatever project she wants. 50 Shades negative criticism against this movie. In truth, is already the most successful Valentine’s Jupiter Ascending is terrific – adrenalinemovie ever as well as having the most successpumping, funny, and visually spectacular. ful R rated opening weekend in history. As this I loved all 127 minutes of this gloriously review went to press, it had made almost $100 goofy space adventure. If you demand logic, million domestically in a little over 4 days. however, or subtlety, or even a chance to catch Taylor-Johnson has made a handsome your breath, it’s not for you. film. The photography is designer worthy, the décor is Bruce Wayne stylish, and the music is mostly mood setting and effective, but what of the actors? Dakota Johnson and Jaime Dornan aren’t bad but they and their characters aren’t allowed to make much of an impression. They’re window dressing and nothing more. The movie is all about the situation and several different young performers could easily have filled these roles. Unlike the 1975 film Mila Kunis as Jupiter Jones, the main protagonist version of The Story of O of Jupiter Ascending. (see DVD pick), 50 Shades goes out of its way to seem Jupiter Ascending is the latest offering more serious and important than it is. The from the wild and crazy Wachowski siblings, glossy production values (the tasteful BDSM who exploded on the movie scene 16 years “playroom” belongs in Vogue or Vanity Fair) ago with The Matrix, and its famous “bulletnot only give it faux importance but serve to time” effects, starring Keanu Reeves. In disguise and sugar coat the fact that this is all Jupiter, the filmmakers are cosmic magpies, about a dominant man seeking to impose his poking around in life’s conundrums (Where personality on a not totally submissive but do we go when we die? Are we both male and definitely curious woman through pain and female?) and pulling out glittering threads pleasure (in that order). from other movies. Much of the fun of I confess to liking the first half of the film watching Jupiter is tracing its lineage. Start because of its resemblance to classic romance with TV’s Ancient Aliens, then remember literature. It could have taken place anywhere Soylent Green. On to Star Wars (of course) within the past 300 years with a simple change and throw in Cinderella, Hunger Games, and of costume and setting. Once it switches over even, The Graduate. An homage to the antito the “dark side”, I lost interest. Movies (and bureacracy classic Brazil, includes a hilarious books) like 50 Shades of Grey simply feed our cameo with Terry Gilliam himself. ever increasing voyeuristic culture and it can In Chicago, a young cleaning woman and will be easily misinterpreted. named Jupiter Jones (Mila Kunis) dreams of Rated R for strong sexual content including escaping her boisterous Russian émigré family graphic nudity and unusual behavior and for and living a life of luxury. One harrowing day, strong language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

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Sound intrigued? I certainly hope so because Kingsman is a remarkable film that works as food for thought and solid entertainment. Think of it as The Grand Budapest Hotel of spy movies. But be warned that it is extremely violent (hundreds of people get killed) but their deaths are stylized and mostly bloodless. There are also some segments that may be considered in poor taste especially if you’re a member of a certain headline grabbing fundamentalist church in Kansas.

a horde of ratty-looking ETs tries to kill her. In flies Caine Wise (Channing Tatum) on his gravity-defying skateboard boots. He rescues Jupiter just in the nick of time, something he does a lot in the movie because the gal never meets a balcony she doesn’t want to fall off. Caine is a military hunter who has the genes of a Rated R for strong violence, strong language, and brief sexual content. wolf, but the good manners of Samuel L. Jackson and Colin Firth match wits in the full of a Golden Retriever, meaning Review by Chip Kaufmann surprises spy spoof Kingsman: The Secret Service. no matter how much he wants to make love with Jupiter, he Mr. Turner  James Bond movies with a dash of The Avengremains dutifully chaste – such restraint, of Short Take: Exquisite biopic on the ers (the 1998 movie not the old TV show or course, drives Jupiter and every woman in the life of 19th century English painter the current Marvel franchise) turns out to be audience mad with desire. J.M.W. Turner features a stunning much, much more. There are references from At the house of a bee-keeper named performance by Timothy Spall but its an astonishing number of movies from the Stinger (Sean Bean), who is Caine’s former length, leisurely pace, and subject first Casino Royale (1967), to Pulp Fiction to military commander, Jupiter learns her new matter will not appeal to most Tim Burton’s Batman to director Matthew appellation is “Your Majesty.” She is the reinpeople. Vaughan’s own Kick Ass. carnation of the late matriarch of the universe’s In addition to the movie references ruling Abrasax family. In essence, Jupiter is the REEL TAKE: If this review were from there are shrewd and sometimes savage social legal owner of planet Earth. a purely personal point of view rather commentaries in the actions and the dialogue Everybody speeds off to a galaxy far, than a critical one, Mr. Turner would of many of the characters. Trying to describe far away where Jupiter meets her genetic easily earn 5 stars with no hesitation them in so brief a space as this would be siblings. They are a nasty bunch. Balem (Eddie because it’s simply my kind of movie. impossible. Just go see the movie. While the Redmayne, Oscar nominee for The Theory of However it won’t be that for most overt stuff is precisely that, there are plenty of Everything) is a whispering control freak who people simply because of what it is. It’s subtleties to be savored thanks to a sharp and wants Jupiter dead. Her other evil brother, a large scale cinematic biography of witty screenplay from Jane Goldman (Stardust, Titus (Douglas Booth), is prettier than Jupiter the early 19th century English painter The Woman in Black) and director Vaughan. so it takes longer to realize you have to hiss at J.M.W. Turner and that will keep many Kingsman is a super secret him, too. Sister Kalique (Tuppence Middleintelligence agency, British of ton), resembling a young Hillary Clinton, excourse, that works for no governplains to Jupiter that “time is the most precious ment but uses its agents to try commodity in the universe.” The Abrasax and maintain a proper world. The corporate industry is harvesting human beings agents are all code named after en masse to extract the elixir that bestows the King Arthur’s knights and come family’s immortality. Next target – Earth. from English upper crust. One And on it goes… Jupiter has to ascend of them, Galahad (Colin Firth), to the challenge to save her home planet. takes the lower class son (Taron Caine has to chase after her. One battle after Egerton) of a late agent who another, betrayals and derring-do, countless saved his life, and tries to mold costume changes, incredible architecture, him into a crack agent and perfect weird-looking extraterrestrial, lots and lots of gentlemen (you can’t have one flying, whizzing, zooming, smashing and tons without the other). of fireworks. Oh, it’s wonderful. Timothy Spall gives a virtuoso performance as the Threatening the stability of Rated PG-13 for violence, sequences of sci-fi titular character in Mike Leigh’s astonishing Mr.Turner. the world is Richmond Valenaction, suggestive content, and partial nudity. tine (Samuel L. Jackson), an Guest Review by Marcianne Miller internet magnate who plans to destroy 4/5ths people, mostly men, away from it. of the world’s population through their cell What makes Mr. Turner so phones in order to bring about an end to global Kingsman: The Secret Service outstanding, in my opinion, is the absowarming. Jackson’s wonderfully over-the-top 1/2 lutely uncanny way that director Mike performance as a sort of lisping Jack Nicholson Leigh has recreated Turner’s world. It’s Short Take: This affectionate but highly style Joker is an absolute delight. not just the costuming and the physical irreverent spoof of 1960s spy films is Also in the cast are Michael Caine as settings, which are absolutely flawless, part James Bond, part Pulp Fiction with Arthur, the organization head, Mark Strong as it’s the very soul of the film in what the a touch of Downton Abbey thrown in for the Q stand-in, Merlin and, in a big surprise, characters do and say and especially the good measure. Mark Hamill as a university professor who is way they say it. key to Samuel L. Jackson’s plan (he’s very good REEL TAKE: When I came out of Kingsman: Director Leigh had his actors and virtually unrecognizable). Also we mustn’t The Secret Service I promptly slipped on some rehearse his script long before shooting forget Jackson’s bladed bodyguard Gazelle snowy ice and came crashing to the ground. I got underway so that they could inhabit (shades of Oscar Pistorius) excitingly played wasn’t hurt but I was surprised, but not half as the characters as real 19th century beby Sofia Boutella. There’s even a cute pug that surprised as I was by this movie. Movies continued on page 14 plays a key part in the story. What looks in the trailer to be a spoof of

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ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 p.m. in Theater 6 at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special members-only events and screenings. March 3:

The Royal Tennenbaums (2001) Wes Anderson made his first big splash with this comedy-drama about a successful New York artistic family and their ostracized patriarch. The dream cast includes Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Bill Murray, Gwynneth Paltrow, Owen Wilson and Ben Stiller. Directed by Wes Anderson. March 10: Design For Living (1933) This pre-Code comedy was adapted from a play by Noel Coward. Two men love the same woman who can’t make up her mind between them, so they try living together in a platonic, friendly relationship. Frederic March, Miriam Hopkins, and Cary Grant co-star. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch. March 17: The Sun Shines Bright (1953) John Ford often cited this remake of his 1934 Will Rogers film as his favorite among all his movies. The story concerns Judge William Priest and life in his small Southern town circa 1900. The movie stars Charles Winninger, Arleen Whalen, John Russell, and Stepin Fetchit. Directed by John Ford. March 24: Torch Song Trilogy (1988) Harvey Fierstein stars in this film adaptation of his long running Broadway play about the life and loves of a torch song singing Jewish drag queen in 1970s and 80s New York City. Also featured are Matthew Broderick and Anne Bancroft. Directed by Paul Bogart. March 31: The Lady Eve (1941) Preston Sturges wrote and directed this riotous screwball comedy about a con woman out to fleece the heir to a brewing fortune but things do not go as planned. A perfect mixture of slapstick and satire with sparkling performances from Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda. Directed by Preston Sturges. Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500. For more information go to www.facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310. March 1:

The Seven Wonders of the World (1956) This award winning travelogue, originally shot in Cinerama, gives us a glimpse of a more exotic world that has dramatically changed in the 60 years since this was made. Narrated by Lowell Thomas. Directed by Tay Garnett, Andrew Marton, Ted Tetzlaff. March 8: The Soloist (2009) An inspiring movie based on a true story, The Soloist concerns the friendship between an LA newspaper reporter and a gifted street musician who plays cello and how that friendship transforms both of their lives. Robert Downey Jr. and Jamie Foxx are the principal players. Directed by Joe Wright. March 15: Harvey (1950) This whimsical fantasy features James Stewart in one of his signature roles as Elwood P. Dowd, a gentle soul whose best friend is an invisible six foot rabbit. This causes his social climbing family no end of embarrassment so they decide to have him committed to a local asylum. Directed by Henry Koster. March 22: Kolberg (1945) Unseen for decades, this large scale epic was based on an actual historical incident and was meant to inspire the German people to fight World War II to the bitter end. By the time it was completed it was too late. Kolberg was the most expensive German film ever made but wasn’t publically shown until after the war. Directed by Veit Harlan. March 29: Raise the Titanic (1980) Although this movie became historically irrelevant after the real ship was found in 1985, it’s still an exciting story of a Cold War search for a rare mineral that can power a nuclear defense system. Based on the bestseller by Clive Cussler, the movie features Richard Jordan, Jason Robards, and Alec Guinness. Directed by Jerry Jameson.

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ings. They not only look the part but speak it as well. The script is written in the style of an early 19th century novel and the characters use archaic words and grammatical structure. This more than anything else gives you the feeling that you have been transported back in time. Mike Leigh, now 73 and usually known for his British slice-of-life dramas, has done something similar to this once before. Back in 1988 he made Topsy-Turvy, a film about the creation of Gilbert & Sullivan’s most popular Savoy opera The Mikado. For that film he recreated G&S’s Victorian world down to the minutest detail and that “you are there” feeling is all over that movie as well. Needless to say Topsy-Turvy is also “my kind of movie.” In addition to getting the period settings

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Story of O”

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right, Leigh is also able to draw a series of remarkable performances from his ensemble cast but none more so than from Timothy Spall. He simply is Turner and inhabits the character the way that actor Charles Laughton used to back in the 1930s. In fact, he rather resembles Laughton’s Quasimodo from the 1939 Hunchback of Notre Dame only minus the physical deformities. Yet as much as I admire the film, it is very long (150 minutes) and is paced very slowly. There’s also not a lot of physical action going on. Think of Girl With A Pearl Earring only longer and much more deliberate. In addition to the settings and the performances, the cinematography is breathtaking. Cinematographer Dick Pope not only recreates the 19th century but also the hues and textures not only of Turner’s paintings but of the landscapes that inspired them.

March DVD Picks

The Story of O (1975)

With all the publicity, furor, not to mention box office success of 50 Shades of Grey (over $250 million globally so far), it seems only fitting to recall a much better film that essentially covers the same ground but was not nearly as big a success. It’s hard to believe that it has been 40 years since Just Jaeckin’s Story of O first appeared. Based on the 1954 underground French erotic novel by Pauline Reage’, this Franco-German production was considered so scandalous that it was slapped with an X rating meaning that it could only play in so-called porno theaters outside of the big cities. The outrage was not only over the basic premise of a young woman submitting herself to the world of BDSM but that 1) she enjoyed it, and 2) the film was as stylish and beautiful as a Masterpiece / BBC production which, critics of the time said, made that world look highly desirable. Unlike 50 Shades, O had to settle for publicity in Playboy and Penthouse not People magazine and Vanity Fair. For those who didn’t read the novel or see the movie because they weren’t mainstream fare back in 1975, the story is as follows. A young fashion photographer (billed simply as O) is taken by her boyfriend to a French chateau where she meets an older aristocratic gentleman (Sir Stephen) and is subjected to a number of sadomasochistic practices including bondage, whippings and even having her backside branded with his initials. There are also a number of sexual encounters with all the major characters on several occasions. Finally after surviving every trial she is put to, O asks Sir Stephen if he would be able to endure what she has

14 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

endured for love and he says he doesn’t think he could. In a feminist ending different from the book’s, she brands his hand with her cigarette holder leaving a perfect circle or “O”. The film contains lots of soft focus photography with several stylish sets and features an international cast, including French actress Corrine Clery as O, and former British heartthrob Anthony Steel as Sir Stephen. What was given an X rating originally, passed without cuts for its mainstream DVD release in 2000. While this film is not for everyone, and obviously not for young, impressionable minds, it delivers the goods in a way that 50 Shades of Grey only hints at.

The Guard (2011)

With the recent DVD release of John Michael McDonagh’s Calvary, as powerful and disturbing a film as you’re ever likely to encounter, I thought it would be appropriate to revisit McDonagh’s comic side, displayed in his action comedy The Guard. The Guard was one of the most overlooked movies of 2011, at least on this side of the pond. Now that it’s been out on DVD for awhile, I’ll site St. Patrick’s Day as an excuse to recommend it to you this month although no such excuse is really needed.

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So 4 stars overall for Mr. Turner. It’s an incredibly well made movie that will have a very limited appeal. See it on the big screen if you can for there its vistas will silence any criticism if you allow them too. Rated R for some sexual content. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Seventh Son 1/2

Short Take: Another in the long line of evil witch / fairy tale movies is nothing special but it does boast enjoyable over-the top performances from Jeff Bridges and Julianne Moore.

REEL TAKE: I went to see Seventh Son and got exactly what I expected which in this Movies continued on page 15

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “The Guard” For me, The Guard was the most enjoyable and laugh-out-loud funny films to come down the pike in a good while. Written and directed by McDonagh, brother of Martin McDonagh (In Bruges, Seven Psycopaths), The Guard offers far more levity and is more easily digestible than either of those films and certainly more than Calvary. The film stars Brendan Gleeson (also the star of Calvary) as Gerry Boyle, a rather unorthodox, non-conformist police sergeant in rural Connemara. When a drug smuggling investigation inadvertently teams straight laced, by-the-book AfricanAmerican FBI agent Wendel Everett (Don Cheadle) with Sergeant Boyle, hilarity and a head count ensue. Cheadle plays straight man to Gleeson’s politically incorrect antics. I suppose one could say that Gerry is innocently racist (by cultural perception, not by personal belief or conviction) which somehow makes his remarks appallingly funny rather than just appalling. How Cheadle keeps a straight face is anyone’s guess. His deadpan ‘you-didn’t-just-say-what-I-thought-you said’ looks play well of Gleeson’s innocuous comments. A fantastic supporting cast provides a lively if not unusual ensemble to flank our heroes. Fionnula Flanagan as Sergeant Boyle’s dying mum is a hoot. Mark Strong, Liam Cunningham, and David Wilmot make the funniest trio of philosophizing bad guys since Pulp Fiction. The Guard is a must see for those who enjoy a dark Irish comedy. It is also one of the best vehicles for Brendan Gleeson’s talents. Not one bit of script or storyline is wasted. If this sounds like your cup of tea, then you won’t be disappointed.


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case is a good thing. A nothing special fairy tale / fantasy film that effectively kept me entertained for its 102 minute running time. I enjoy rubbish like this and having two top performers like Jeff Bridges and Julianne Moore not only chew the scenery but make a “soup to nuts” meal out of it, just makes it all the more enjoyable. Joining them in this cinematic banquet are such quality players as Olivia Williams (The Sixth Sense), Jason Scott Julianne Moore has a lot of fun with her not Oscar Lee (Map of the Human Heart), and worthy performance in Seventh Son. Djimon Hounsou (Blood Diamond). It may be just a paycheck to them but all paychecks should be this much fun. In Spook’s Revenge) appeared last year. They tell fact fun is the key word. Seventh Son doesn’t the story of Thomas Ward, the seventh son of pretend to be anything else. It’s a throwback to a seventh son who trains to become a spook or such 1960s popcorn movie fare as The Magic master fighter of the supernatural. Sword and Captain Sindbad only with better I haven’t read any of the books, but acspecial effects. cording to several online comments, the movie The film is based on the first of a series makes several changes (don’t they always) of 13 fantasy novels by Brit author Joseph with the most significant being upping the age Delaney known as The Wardstone Chronicles of Tom who is 12 when the series of books in the U.K. and The Last Apprentice in the begins. Ben Barnes who portrays the titular U.S. The first (The Spook’s Apprentice) character is somewhat older than that. was published in 2004 while the latest (The The movie version of the story follows

the adventures of Master Gregory (Bridges) who roams an unspecified countryside battling witches and their supernatural creatures. In the opening a young Gregory imprisons a powerful witch named Mother Malkin (Moore) who escapes many years later to seek her revenge. She kills his apprentice forcing him to quickly recruit another one. That is how Tom Ward (Barnes) enters the picture. After a rushed and haphazard training period they must battle Mother Malkin and her army of supernatural demons. Complicating matters is Malkin’s niece Alice (Alicia Vikander) who is torn between love for Tom and her mother who is also a witch. Needless to say, as in most young adult fiction of this type, things work out in the end…for now. Director Sergei Bodrov (Mongol: The Rise of Genghis Khan) marshals his actors and moves things along nicely while veteran special effects director John Dykstra (Star Wars) and his crew of technicians do the rest. Seventh Son is not a top drawer fantasy film, but it’s a pleasant enough diversion if you enjoy these types of movies, which I do. Rated PG-13 for fantasy violence, frightening images, and brief strong language. Review by Chip Kaufmann

Amadeus: the Movie AMADEUS – DIRECTOR’S CUT Thursday, March 12 at 7 p.m. The film directed by Milos Forman won eight Academy Awards in 1984, including Best Picture. Tickets: $10. Fine Arts Theatre, 36 Biltmore Ave, Asheville. (828) 232-1536, fineartstheatre.com.

METRO WINES: AMADEUS MOVIE BENEFIT Friday, March 13 at 6 p.m. In conjunction with the Asheville Amadeus Festival, MetroWines hosts a movie showing of the director’s cut of 1984 film Amadeus. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Asheville Symphony Orchestra. Tickets include a glass of Austrian wine and popcorn. Tickets: $20. MetroWines, 169 Charlotte St, Asheville. Call (828) 575-9525, or visit metrowinesasheville.com.

Mars Hill University Receives Funds for Documentary

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The Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership has announced an award of $5,000 to the Liston B. Ramsey Center for Regional Studies at Mars Hill University to support a documentary film about Madison County master fiddler Roger Howell.

A lifelong fiddler, Howell may be best known for his “Memory Collection,” 532 recorded fiddle tunes together with historical information and personal reminiscences about each one. The collection was created entirely from his memory of tunes he had picked up over a lifetime of playing and hearing mountain music. He donated the massive collection to the Southern Appalachian Archives at Mars Hill University. “We are so grateful to the BRNHA for their vote of support for our project,” said Hannah Furgiuele, Programming Coordinator for the Ramsey Center. “Roger is a musical treasure, whose knowledge of tunes, stories, and people is really exceptional.” Furgiuele said she first became aware of Howell’s tremendous contributions to regional music through working with him during planning of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Festival at Mars Hill University, an annual celebration of regional traditional music. “When I started directing the Lunsford Festival in 2011, I quickly learned that Roger was instrumental not only in the festival’s ongoing success, but in the continuation of a

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Theatre Directory

TERESA BUCKNER

tradition of music that could fade away without the efforts of individuals like him,” Furgiuele said. “The idea to do a documentary on Roger first came to me while spending time weekly at his fiddle shop for lessons, hearing his stories and learning about his life. The many ways Roger has immersed himself in the music of this region since his childhood make his story one worthy of sharing with the wider world, and we are excitedly moving forward on this film.” In this grant cycle, the BRNHA Hannah Furgiuele, programming coordinator for the Liston B. Ramsey Center for Regional Studies Partnership awarded 22 grants totaling at Mars Hill University, and master fiddler Roger $170,000 in funding to preserve and proHowell, in Howell’s Mars Hill fiddle shop. mote Western North Carolina’s heritage. “We appreciate and are grateful for all the wonderful work that is being 25 counties of Western North Carolina a done throughout the region to preserve our Congressional designation as the Blue Ridge heritage and improve our communities,” said National Heritage Area in 2003. Angie Chandler, Executive Director of the All of the grant awards will be matched Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnerwith local or state funding and donated services. ship. “This year’s grant cycle was extremely Since its inception in 2003, the Blue competitive – we had 52 applicants and some Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership, a great projects presented, but we simply could public charity, has awarded 133 grants totaling not fund them all.” over $1.9 million – leveraging another $4.2 The grant awards will help support million in matching contributions from local diverse initiatives across the North Carolina governments and the private sector. These mountains and foothills, focusing on craft, grants have funded projects in all 25 counties music, natural heritage, Cherokee traditions, of Western North Carolina. and the region’s legacy in agriculture. These five facets of the region’s heritage earned the

Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

The Strand (Waynesville)

(828) 283-0079, www.38main.com

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 15


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The Fluffier Side of Life

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LOVE AND LIGHT AND CHIPS

You may have noticed that, while I do share from my own experiences – and I often am quite serious about what I’m trying to convey – I still generally aim to keep things more or less on the Fluffier Side of Life. I like chuckles and light-heartedness peppered amongst the observations, ideas and recommendations. However, at times life as it is can temporarily derail us, sometimes just a little, other times, a lot. This is not a unique phenomenon. We all go through similar rites of passage, and over the decades we encounter a healthy dose of contrasts between the lows and the highs which, when navigated, can fuel a creative life. I have many times joked about being older than dirt and having had dinosaurs as pets, but I am really only just at an age where the generation above me is now leaving me behind. I know they are not doing this to me personally, and the reality is I’ve lost people of all ages over the years – as many of us have. Part of grappling with moving forward is how I, as a creative, use these experiences. In my world, this column will be the first one my father will not have read. Every month for years – almost always on the first of each month when the Rapid River on-line version hits the web – this man named Jim, to whom I am related, would email me a short message along the lines of: “I read your column. As always, enjoyed.” Or any number

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of variations of that. I always joked that he was one of my three readers, and when he made it clear he intended to fight back against an illness, I reminded him that he had my support, because I couldn’t afford to lose any portion of my fan base. Some might find that morbid, but he and I chuckled over it. Even with the occasional down or dark time due to any number of influences we encounter in life, creatives are creative to the core. I draw more days than I do not draw, no matter what is going on in the world. That’s as much a given as it is that I will nearly always reference science fiction, or make up fake words, or find another brand of chips that I can eat when a favorite converts to using the dreaded canola oil. (Give up chips? That’s Potatodiculous!) I’ve learned that, for me, I can’t stay down for long. And my father would tell me not to dilly-dally, as he was always encouraging of my endeavors. And several losses during this past year have reminded me that life is short, and wasting it is kind of insulting to Life itself. (Seriously. I called Life and asked. Life confirmed that it is indeed insulted every time I waste It. Life then advised me there was a call coming in on the other line, and that was that.) Since not everyone is always in a bounceback frame of mind, here are some of the most basic of thoughts I find helpful when I need to get back on my creative track:

Sleep. Seriously, go lay down. Preferably with a rescue pet.

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gREg VINEYARD

Nutrition. (I SHOULD say “stop eating chips” here, but…) Re-balance the diet. Exercise. Because eating chips is NOT burning enough calories. Or raising endorphins. Or lowering blood pressure. And all the other beneficial things exercise does. Personal Spiritual Practices. Pray, meditate, attend, assist. No end to the things we do. Be Kind to Oneself. One of my

Comfort Things is… watching scifi. Gee, who would have guessed?

Draw Anyway. Write Anyway. Just

pick up the chalk/pen/whatever, and Drawing Upon Life, 2015. Illustration by Greg Vineyard watch what your brain and body do on that mysterious autopilot funcrives or not, and even if, oh please don’t make tion, where, suddenly, stroke hits paper, and me say it, we run out of chips, we adjust, move the flow continues. forward, put that chalk to paper, and watch the Life is not always roses and t-rexes and hand start to move. chips. But, it turns out that what happens along the way – especially for artists – can become kindling for creative fires. I don’t always Greg Vineyard is a marketing get to draw yippy-skippy yellow cats floating professional, and an artist in fields of happy swirls (But how cool would and writer living in Asheville, THAT be. Oh, wait. I DO do that.), because NC. ZaPOW Gallery carries life is more like one big conceptual, editorial his illustrations, prints and assignment, and it’s all pretty interesting. cards, www.zapow.com. No matter what the circumstances, it’ll www.gregvineyardillustration.com be OK. Whether it’s the best day, or seemingly the worst, whether the monthly validation ar-

THE BUSINESS OF ART

Cultivating Collectors

There is no quick and easy method for creating a collector base. It takes time and persistence to develop your identity so that your name becomes one that art lovers recognize. A great way to learn how to cultivate collectors is to watch artists who are already adept at engaging strangers. Observe their body language and facial expressions, how they get the viewer to look closer at the work, pointing out details that might otherwise be overlooked. Most successful artists are personable and interface with the public in several ways: gallery representation, participating in studio tours, appearing at major art expos across the country, maintaining membership in arts organizations, publishing articles and books, collaborating with other artists on special projects, giving demonstrations and talks about their work, etc. They understand that interacting directly with the public is a must in order to grow their client base.

If you are an introvert and find it difficult to strike up a conversation with a stranger, you can overcome it, believe me. I did, by joining Toastmasters; yours may be a different approach. The good news is that it gets easier with age; we learn to come to grips with our strengths and weaknesses. And we learn to ask for help. To expand your circle of potential buyers, attend more art related events (both locally and regionally) and introduce yourself to others. Invite an outgoing friend; it will help you feel more comfortable when it comes to chatting up strangers. Always hand out your business card; quite often you’ll get one in return,

BY

WENDY H. OUTLAND

which makes follow-up a snap! Invite new acquaintances to your upcoming reception, inform them of your open studio hours, or suggest they visit your website and sign up for monthly updates. Remember that once you get someone to smile, they are likely to chat a little longer and often that includes taking a closer look at your work. If you can get them to laugh, you have an even better chance for an extended dialogue, which could lead to a sale. Most importantly, promptly respond to each serious inquiry about your work. And always remember to thank them for their interest!

Creatives Sketched ARTISTS & WRITERS, PROMOTE YOURSELF Artists and writers are invited to contribute to our new web exclusive section – “Creatives Sketched.” With a rapidly growing readership, the Rapid River Magazine website is a great way to promote yourself, and a great way for potential buyers and readers to learn about you. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com.

WWW.RAPIDRIVERMAGAZINE.COM The Business of Art is written by visual arts consultant Wendy H. Outland. Contact her by email to imwhoknowsart@gmail.com. With more than 30 years of arts administration experience, WHO Knows Art provides visual artists with career development resources and helps galleries and arts organizations function more effectively. Wendy H. Outland (“WHO”) is a qualified juror and curator, also offering personalized consultations and workshops. www.whoknowsart.biz

16 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links & Ad Design Call (828) 646-0071


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Not Everyone in France Speaks English

“I feel there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.” ~ Vincent Van Gogh

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Reflections: Interiors/ Landscapes/Cityscapes

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Asheville Gallery of Art features the work of Cheryl Keefer.

CHERYL KEEFER

French speaking GPS, however, still managed to locate the hardware to As a fellow artist, I have always felt purchase turpentine and linseed oil. befriended by French artists, Monet, Cèzanne, And, lucky for us, the best painting Van Gogh, and Matisse, as well as American supply store in Provence is just off artist, John Singer Sargent, who also painted the main exit in Avignon, about an from life and traveled to paint in Provence and hour from our chateau. Venice. Literally following in the footsteps of The French people are exthese masters, and painting some of the same tremely fond of their amazing artistic lavender fields, mountain vineyards, and canal heritage and are very warm and enscenes, was at the top of my bucket list before couraging to plein air painters. With “bucket list” could be defined by a computer. my easel set up on the narrow streets Cheryl Keefer (wearing hat) in Aurel Provence, France. Happily oil paint, easels, and all supplies of the petit, ochre-colored hill towns, checked on the plane arrived in Marsailles I was rewarded with big smiles one and out on the patio facing the Grand totally intact. We rented a car equipped with and “bravo(s)” from passers by. In Aurel a Canal I sat on the stone steps and took out my small gathering of people watercolor. Immediately I was surrounded by accumulated where I was a group of astute, enthusiastic young college working. As people stopped women from Korea. Each of the ladies were to look at their streets art majors, and even though worlds, and a through my eyes it began couple of generations, apart, we shared a love to rain and my new friends for art and life, and a gorgeous few moments huddled around, protecting together appreciating the rich history of that me and the paintings with place. When they asked if they could take a their umbrellas. On another photo with me I was ecstatic, and now we are day, a band of bright-faced FBF’s forever! children ran out to see what One glimmering Sunday morning I I was doing as I assembled lost my way through San Marco Square and an easel in a sunflower field. beyond till I found no shops, only neighborAs they watched, their lovely hoods with laundry strung overhead, between voices eagerly “très bon-ed” the walled streets, and community squares my painting...I think...and with old stained, but exquisite, marble and they asked many questions. granite churches, gilded inside with ancient Translation was done mostly paintings and statues. I was blessed to witthrough nods and wideness two beautiful services, both in Italian open smiles, conveying good and Latin, amid kind-eyed, faithful Venetian will and happiness. Reliving people. the whole sunny experience Not everyone in France speaks English, still brings such joy. nonetheless, 2014 brought me much more In Venice, Italy, I left than just a painting trip abroad. And, oh yeah, my baggage at Marco Polo I learned a lot about painting and will share a Airport as the vaporettos and Cheryl Keefer, Leaving Town, oil few paintings from the trip in my March show narrow stone walkways are at the Asheville Gallery of Art. no place for hauling luggage. At home in Western North Carolina, In a smaller bag I packed a I continue to find abundant inspiration for few necessities and a Ziplock compositions in everyday scenes, rainy streets bag of watercolor supplies. and the gorgeous blue mountains. Besides Painting in Venice I could an opening at the Asheville Gallery of Art on imagine the passion Engish March 6, plans for this year include teachartist, J. M. W. Turner, must ing Plein Air Workshops through the Black have felt when painting his Mountain Center for the Arts beginning April dramatic scenes of Venice 9-10, 2015, and painting in several National at Sunrise. I was completely and State Parks here in our beloved United arrested by the graceful States. I will demonstrate en plein air and antique architecture, the paint with the Asheville Urban Landscape canals, gondolas, and the Painters and the Western North Carolina people. Plein Air Painters. The Palazzo Venier dei I am so energized by Asheville, and the Leoni, once Peggy Gugother artists in the Wedge and River Arts genheim’s home, houses her District. I hope those interested in my painting extraordinary collection that excursions will sign up to receive my blog includes many modern masthrough my website, www.CherylKeefer.com. terpieces. The day I visited the museum was a glorious Cheryl Keefer, Dog Walk, oil

Her show, “Reflections: Interiors/ Landscapes/Cityscapes,” includes new and recent work in oils. The artist, who paints from life and travels for inspiration, captures scenes that conjure memories and prompt reflection in even the most casual viewer. Keefer’s paintings have won awards throughout the country. Her work, and works by 27 other gallery artists, will be on display through March. IF YOU “Reflections: Interiors/ GO Landscapes/Cityscapes,” on display

March 1-31, 2015. Opening reception Friday, March 6, from 5 to 8 p.m. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. Gallery hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

SpruceStreetMarket.com

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 17


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Downtown

MARCH 2015

Shops, Galleries & Restaurants Downtown Asheville is a great place to begin your exploration of fine food, arts & crafts.

REFLECTIONS Interiors/Landscapes/ Cityscapes

Works by

Cheryl Keefer “Sunflower Field, Provence,” oil

® Asheville’s Premier Chocolate Shop Since 1986

“I invite viewers to contemplate their own light... and time in the world...”

Visit our European style shop for handmade artisan chocolates, chocolate art, and gifts.

Reception 36 Haywood Street

Friday, March 6 5-8 pm

Downtown Asheville www.chocolatefetish.com (828) 258-2353

Show runs March 1-31, 2015

“Walking the Dog,” oil 15

First Friday Art Walks – April through December – 5 to 8 p.m.

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ASHEVILLE GALLERY of ART 16 College Street, Downtown Asheville Gallery Hours: Monday-Saturday 10-5pm 828.251.5796

www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

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18 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

1 - American Folk Art & Framing 2 - Appalachian Craft Center 3 - Ariel Gallery

4 - ArtEtude Gallery 5 - Asheville Area Arts Council 6 - Asheville Art Museum 7 - Asheville Gallery of Art 8 - Bender Gallery

9 - Black Mountain College Museum & Art Center

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N. Lexington Ave.

College St.

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Broadway St.

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N. Market St.

Walnut St.

PACK SQUARE

Patton Ave.

10 - Blue Spiral 1 11 - Castell Photography 12 - Benchspace Gallery & Workshop 13 - The Haen Gallery 14 - Horse and Hero 15 - Jewels that Dance 16 - Lexington Glassworks 17 - Mora 18 - Mountain Made 19 - The Satellite Gallery 20 - Susan Marie Designs 21 - Van Dyke Jewelry & Fine Crafts 22 - Woolworth Walk 23 - ZaPow

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“I paint ethereal landscapes, creating a peaceful, tranquil experience within the physical forms of land and sky.”

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“I love painting people — whether using watercolor, Chinese or black walnut ink, conte crayon, or oil – the persona comes through.”

“A Clear Mind,” watercolor by Elinor V. Bowman

Enjoy & Give the Best ™

Rankin Ave.

The Asheville Gallery of Art features a wide range of talents, subjects, mediums and styles as broad as the Blue Ridge.

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

More of What Makes Asheville Special

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

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CHERYL KEEFER PLEIN AIR ~ LANDSCAPES ~ CITYSCAPES

Susan Marie Designs

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With March, the sun overtakes winter’s waning darkness, soothing blue waters flow from the sky, and springtime begins in radiant bursts of new life and color. Aquamarine, a gemstone with the color of the sea, is a fitting birthstone for this month of renewal. Long held to be a symbol of youth, hope, health and fidelity, this cousin of the Emerald has traditionally been given to inspire harmony in relationships. The serene, cool blue color of Aquamarine beautifully complements spring and summer wardrobes alike. Aquamarine is one of the many naturally Susan expertly selects the most vibrant, well cut gemstones colored gemstones that goldsmith Susan Phipps available for her jewelry designs. regularly incorporates to work with, come in a wide range of natural iridescent into her handmade spring-like colors. Peridot, of lively green color with a jewelry designs. A hint of gold, is an excellent spring choice for pendants G.I.A. Graduate and earrings. And to accentuate all the vibrant gemstone Gemologist, Susan colors, no stone works better than the Diamond, the expertly selects the eternally brilliant birthstone of April. most vibrant, well cut Visiting Susan Marie Designs, you will enjoy seeing stones available for the many beautiful springtime fashion possibilities. use in her work. Her downtown Asheville gallery and studio, Susan Marie Designs, Susan Marie Designs abounds with the 4 Biltmore Avenue, Downtown Asheville colors of spring. Since most gem(828) 277-1272, www.SusanMPhippsDesigns.com stones occur in nature Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in a variety of hues, Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. many possibilities exist for coordination The serene, with spring fashions. cool blue color Tourmaline is especially versatile. Found of Aquamarine in endless subtle varibeautifully ants of greens, pinks and blues, Tourmacomplements line often exhibits two spring and or more colors within the same crystal. Its summer hardness and durabilwardrobes. ity make Tourmaline suitable for use in any type of jewelry. Sapphires are also found in many natural shades, including pinks, yellow, violet and green as well as blue. Often Susan uses several colors of Sapphire together within a . 18 single pendant or pH ring. Even Tahitian Black Pearls, one of Susan’s favorite stones pg

REFLECTIONS: Landscapes, Cityscapes, Interiors On Display March 1-31 at the Asheville Gallery of Art

Opening Reception 5-8 pm Friday, March 6, 2015

Asheville Gallery of Art 16 College Street Downtown Asheville

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Works by Cheryl Keefer are also on display at: Wedge Studios 129 Roberts St., by appt. River Arts District Seven Sisters Gallery Black Mountain

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“After the Storm” Porchoir painting by Rick Hills with handmade bark frame

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The Evolution of the Altamont Theater

In late November of last year, when word began circulating that the Altamont Theater was closing down, it seemed an inevitable consequence of an already crowded club scene in Asheville.

By my count there are nearly twenty venues located near downtown whose primary focus is on hosting live music and other events. Despite our area’s well deserved reputation as one that supports and promotes the arts there is no denying that Asheville may have reached its saturation point. The Altamont, with its excellent layout, acoustics, and intimate feel would surely be missed but at the time of its rumored (and, as it turns out, inaccurately reported) demise I marked it down to the brutal reality of making any new business a success. Originally opened in 2010 the club was a rare gem, hosting under the radar performances by artists ranging from local favorites David Wilcox and Chuck Brodsky to veteran artists and up and coming figures such as Kim Ritchey and The Milk Carton Kids, and in a rare performance by Leon Redbone, a genuine legend. It was one of the few area venues committed to supporting jazz music and standup comedy on regular basis – two art forms that haven’t quite yet found a steady audience hereand was clearly a club artists wanted to play. Located on Church Street downtown, the club was handicapped by a lack of easy parking but, for those willing to make of bit of extra effort, the rewards were well worth it. Fast forward a bit to late January of this year. At the invitation of a friend I attended my first ever TEDx event, assuming it was a farewell of sorts for the Altamont. Imagine my delight in finding out that the Altamont is not only remaining open for business but, under new ownership, has plotted out an aggressive and sustainable model for 2015. “We hear that a lot” said new co-owner Richard Barrett, in response to my assumption that the Altamont would be no more. “But we’re here to stay and have some pretty great shows lined up.”

James Cassara: Talk a bit about the evolution

of the Altamont, how you came to be involved and the change of ownership. Who are the other owners?

Richard Barrett: My history with the Altamont started back in May of 2013, when I was brought on by then owners Brian and Tiffany Lee to manage their newly opened restaurant, The Green Room. While working there (3 doors down from the theatre) I ended up performing various duties at The Altamont and was brought over full time in November of 2013 to focus on private event sales and day to day operations. I developed a professional and personal relationship with production manager, and sound technician Chris Medrano, and got to

BY JAMES

CASSARA

experience firsthand the magic and intimacy that The Altamont Theatre offered the live music community. In August 2014, Brian informed us that he would be closing the doors at The Altamont, as he The Altamont has an excellent layout, great acoustics, was moving to Raleigh and an intimate feel. to spend more time with his family. Chris and I immediately began comfeatures that makes The Altamont the best lising up with ideas to keep this beautiful space tening room in Asheville (writers note, let the open by filling the calendar and continuing the debate begin!). Having the bar located downshows. Unfortunately we kept hitting a wall. stairs provides the perfect environment for While Chris and I have great specific and overperformers to connect with the crowd, without lapping skill sets, we were still having trouble the interruption of clanging glasses and cash keeping the calendar full and fulfilling all the register drawers. For certain shows we offer duties required as a two man team. cocktail service which will allow patrons to stay In November, just as we were ready to in their seats for the entire performance. throw in the towel and call it a day, I received a JC: What’s the history of the building itself? It call from friend, and local promoter Sam Katz, has some remarkable features that would apasking to meet with Chris and I about our ideas peal to fans of music and architecture alike. for the future of The Altamont. Sam was a coowner at Asheville Music Hall and The One RB: The building itself was erected in Stop, which was in the middle of an acquisi1895. I don’t know a whole lot about the histion by New Earth Muziq, (owners of New tory, other than it was mainly used for retail Mountain Asheville). With his interest being businesses, and in the 30s it acted as a speaksold, Sam was looking for something new to easy, and possibly a brothel in the upper floors. move forward with, and thus the missing piece There’s no documentation to confirm that, but of The Altamont puzzle was set in place. we do have the original slide-hole doors on

JC: Great timing that was meant to be. It seems to me any club, especially one in an area as competitive as ours, has to find some way to distinguish itself, a niche that no one else has fully explored. How do you hope to offer something a bit different from the many other venues in a around Asheville? RB: I really believe The Altamont already has a niche. Throw a rock in any direction and you’ll hit multiple 300 capacity (and higher) music venues, yet it seems that there are only a couple of intimate listening rooms. We’ve come to be known as the go-to spot for high end singer/songwriter and acoustic shows. We plan to continue expanding on that and adding full band performances, as well as integrating a regular standup comedy series, business and community summits (like TEDx,) and private event rentals. The beauty of The Altamont is its ability to act as the perfect space for virtually any event with 200 or less in attendance. JC: For those unfamiliar with the Altamont, talk a bit about its layout. I especially appreciate that the drink bar and restrooms are set far away from the stage. For a room with such delicate acoustics that seems essential. RB: The layout is one of the distinguishing

our dressing rooms downstairs. It was gutted, historically renovated, and reopened as the theatre by Brian and Tiffany Lee in 2010. For those who haven’t been, the architecture is stunning, classic with a taste of modern. The split level lobby/lounge and cat walk stair case downstairs receives a lot of attention from those with an eye for architecture, and doubles up as a wonderful gallery space.

JC: Are there any already booked shows for the next few months that you can talk about? RB: When we first took over the lease we didn’t expect the calendar to really fill up until April as most shows are generally booked and promoted 90 days out. However, we received an incredible response from artists and agents alike, and were able to fill in a lot of February and almost all of March. Some notable acts coming in the next few months include: March 7, Kevn Kinney (of Drivin’ N Cryin’); March 20, Celtic Fiddle legend Jamie Laval’s St. Paddy’s Day Celebration; March 28, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra; April 4, Bradford Lee Folk and The Bluegrass Playboys; April 15, Caravan of Thieves. We also host stand-up comedy every Thursday, and we have world beat group Zansa booked for the first Friday of every month. continued on page 33

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spinning discs

CD Reviews by James Cassara

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This month I’m featuring a trio of high profile releases, a nice retrospective of a somewhat neglected great, and a couple of odds and ends. Enjoy the comments, savor some good music, and be sure to support our local independent record stores. More of my reviews can be found at www.rapidrivermagazine.com.

The Decemberists

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What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World CAPITOL RECORDS

If 2011’s The King Is Dead found the Decemberists channeling their inner R.E.M. (and in doing so landing their first number one chart album) it simultaneously alienated those longtime fans who wondered if the band were permanently abandoning the baroque rock roots for a more accessible and commercially viable sound. No worries; with What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World the band manages to have their cake and eat it too, combining irrepressibly bright hooks with a darker and slightly more serious tone. It may be hook-loaded pop but it’s the most intelligent, cultured, and thoughtful dose of such you’re likely to hear anywhere. It also returns the band to their melodiously adventurous roots, replete with unexpected sonic shifts, lavishly adorned arrangements, and the sort of musical gutsiness that few bands would even attempt, let alone pull off. The melodies may be more direct then you’d find on Picaresque or The Crane Wife – a little of this album approaches the narrative sweep of those two masterpieces – but the overall affect is no less exhilarating nor demanding of your attention. What “Lake Song” and “Till the Water Is All Long Gone” lack in adornment they more than compensate for in easy to miss details, subtle changes in tone and tempo that catch you off guard in the best of ways. And while much of The King Is Dead (an album I’ll go on record as adoring) felt like Colin Meloy and company were striving for a hit, the twin upbeat joys of “The Wrong Year” and “Philomena” (the latter being a celebration of teenage lust that few bands could muster) shows how casually they’ve mastered the art of making singles, even If the heyday of 45 rpm platters is long since past. There’s also a bit of self retrospect; “The Singer Addresses His Audience”, the stunning opening track, finds Meloy ruminating on the fleeting nature of fame, our cultures tendency to embrace and discard artistry, and how one keeps their sanity in light of such. Most impressive of all is how What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World feels like the work of a band complimenting and challenging one another to up their game. Sure the Decemberists remain Colin Meloy’s platform, and its precise and mannered texture certainly reinforces his reputation as a control freak. But the contributions of Chris Funk, whose supple guitar work has never been put to better use, or the swaying keyboards of Jenny Conlee coupled with the twin rhythms of bassist Nate Query and percussionist/drummer John Moen are no less complex, vital, or appreciated.

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There’s a sense of creative unity that lifts all boats while perhaps subtly laying down a challenge to other bands: It’s the Decemberists at their intuitive and inspired best, ready and willing to take on all comers. *****

Tony Joe White The Complete Warner Bros. Records

REAL GONE MUSIC

According to the oft spun urban legend, the year was 1969 and Tony Joe White was on his way to Memphis hoping to sell his songs; he misread the map, took a wrong turn and “ended up in Nashville.” It’s a great story, likely as much fiction as fact, but one that nicely sums up the journey that was his, an unlikely success story if ever there was one. That fortuitous miscalculation eventually landed him a songwriting and recording contract with Monument Records, yielding a series of hits best known, but by no means limited to, the notorious “Polk Salad Annie.” The recordings he made for that label have already been anthologized on Rhino’s terrific now out of print and nearly impossible to find 2006 box set. But thanks to the good folks at Real Gone, White’s brief but brilliant stay at Warner Brothers Records is equally highlighted. White made only three albums for Warner Brothers – the label was in a state of flux and in truth they seemed unsure as to how he should be promoted – but all three are killer and, augmented with six non LP tracks, fit nicely onto this two CD set. Besides the songs-a rare mix of intuitive and introspective storytelling set to swamp rock music-the detailed recording information and comprehensive notes (including a current interview with White) make this a first rate package. 1971’s Tony Joe White was produced by Peter Asher, who would soon find a better calling as super producer for James Taylor and Linda Ronstadt, and while Asher might seem an odd choice, he made it work, moving White to Memphis, enlisting the Memphis Horns, and tacking on some tasteful and evocative string arrangements. There’s a nice rootsy feel to the music, best exemplified in the autobiographical “A Night in the Life of a Swamp Fox” while the British born Asher seemed surprisingly sensitive to White’s country pedigree. Legendary producers Tom Dowd and Jerry Wexler – fresh off a string of hits with Aretha Franklin – produced 1972’s “The Train I’m On” with equally strong results, pushing White to fully explore his dusky baritone and mixing it to the front where it should be. The blues rocker “I’ve Got a Thing About You Baby” might have been a hit but the slightly sinister nature of the lyrics (he was stalking his lover long before The Police!)

likely turned off more than a few radio stations. Stranger still is “Even Trolls Love Rock and Roll” a spoken word bit of beat poetry set to a simmering soulful backing track. Dowd returned for the following year’s “Homemade Ice Cream” a more laid back effort in the view of Don Williams. Recorded in Nashville it employed the cream of Music Cities’ studio musicians but failed to dent the charts. It remains among White’s most sadly neglected gems. Thanks to Real Gone for bringing these releases back in with the care they deserve. All three are strong examples of a period in which White was trying to reclaim his early success while expanding his creative forte. He may not have created Swamp Rock – its antecedents pre-date him by at least three decades – but he damn sure made it his own and brought it to the forefront of American music. Now in his 70s White is still at it, touring and occasionally recording. Here’s hoping this fine effort brings him some of the recognition he richly deserves. ****

Diana Krall Wallflower

VERVE RECORDS

A companion of sorts to her 2012 release Glad Rag – on which the amazing Ms. Krall paid tribute to her father’s extensive collection of 78-rpm records – Wallflower finds her revisiting her own teenage roots, radio friendly hits that garnered a bit of snobby ridicule in their day but have gained, with the passage of time, a certain critical acceptance. Weaving her way through the songbooks of such 1970s heavyweights as Jim Croce, Gilbert O’Sullivan, Elton John, and The Eagles, Krall relishes in the presence of retro culture and her particular place in it. She’s a classically trained jazz musician who loves pop music and happens to be married to a world famous Rock and Roll Star. Expanding her definition of 70s softrock, Krall gives, with slightly uneven results, Paul McCartney’s “If I Take You Home Tonight” – a “Kisses on the Bottom” era outtake – a sultry feel that he’d never attempt. She further recasts 10cc’s “I’m Not In Love” as an understated torch song, trading its bombastic (in a good way) production technique for a more modest one. The title track, a 1970s Dylan song originally written for and recorded by Doug Sahm, isn’t particularly well suited for her style but Krall imbues its lazy about country waltz tempo with a bit of much needed sprightly oomph. As for the rest, it’s hard to mess up such beloved classics as “California Dreamin” and “Don’t Dream It’s Over” (a song that seems ideally suited for Krall) and while parts continued on page 13


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of Wallflower feels as if Krall is slumming a bit, keeping things too safe and sound, her love for these middle of the road standards is evident. Wallflower isn’t the sort of adventurous album Krall has demonstrated she can make but it’s a more than pleasant diversion, a slight detour from her already impressive catalog that, while not truly adding anything to the reputation of either the singer or the songs, serves to remind me why I so dearly love both. ***1/2

Tim Mahoney

Peace of Winter: Instrumental Piano Live at MacPhail

While he first came to notice on the television show “The Voice” (which I’ll admit to having never seen), Tim Mahoney was more than a singer, but rather an accomplished songwriter and musician. Peace of Winter highlights his nimble and confident (the cover photo reveals a “Superman” logo tattooed on his left hand) piano work; captured live on stage with no other accompaniment. It’s a complex work, tracing the season from its arrival (“I Am Here”) into “Rain” and culminating in “Snow.” The seven tracks are sequenced accordingly, which settles nicely into the mood of the season, building steadily upon itself in tone and tempo. It tilts itself toward the category of “new age” and I suppose comparisons to the Paul Winter Consort are inevitable though inaccurate; it’s more classical in style while occasionally engaging a certain modest pop groove. “Imagine If” adapts the John Lennon song in ways that are both surprising and wholly sensible. As I listen again to Peace of Winter the temperature outside is hovering near zero and a light snow has fallen. As Mahoney states in his spoken introduction “I just love simple notes” and it’s amazing how much he can do with them. ****

Rhiannon Giddens

Tomorrow is My Turn

NONESUCH RECORDS

While it might be unfair to think of The Carolina Chocolate Drops as “Rhiannon’s band” there’s no denying that early on she became the band’s focal point. With her gorgeous voice – equal parts powerful and delicately restrained – and her stunning visual persona, Giddens is certainly a promoters dream. That she has talent and musical chops to spare is even more of a blessing. Again teamed with producer T Bone Burnett and fresh off their collaboration on Lost in the Flood (with Giddens as a member of The New Basement Tapes) Giddens continues to broaden her fascination with roots music, expanding upon such as she time and

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John Jorgenson Quintet

If some folks just seemed destined from birth to pursue a career in music, then Southern California native John Jorgenson, a three-time winner of the Academy of Country Music award for Guitarist of the Year, is clearly one such person.

As the product of a musical family – his father conducted for the Benny Goodman Orchestra – the classically trained musician demonstrated enormous talent early on. Jorgenson idolized Goodman and often played with various members of the band while his father was leading the way. After graduation from high school Jorgenson took a job as a member of the onsite jazz and bluegrass group at Disneyland, a “temporary” gig that ended up lasting eight years. While there Jorgenson relentlessly perfected his skill, mastered the mandolin and guitar while also playing saxophone and clarinet. As evidence of his astounding versatility he was, at one point, the featured bassoonist for the Camerata of Los Angeles, a highly respected city symphony. But it was through guitar that Jorgenson found the greatest level of expression, reaching a degree of expertise that led to work with the 1980s reunited Byrds, as well as extensive sessions for artists ranging from Roy Orbison to Bob Dylan, John Prine, Bonnie Raitt, Dan Fogelberg, and Michael Nesmith. In 1986, complimenting his hectic schedule as a musician in demand, Jorgenson teamed up with Byrds co-founder and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Chris Hillman in Hillman’s latest adventure, to be tabbed The Desert Rose Band. Along with noted session player (and longtime Jorgenson friend) Herb Pedersen,

genre hops throughout the last century or so of Americana. But what separates her from the pack, and elevates much of this record, is her ability to coalesce the old and the new; far more than an adherent, she has, much like Burnett himself, become a keen student of the music upon which much of our culture was built. She’s respectful of the material and its consequence, but unafraid to tamper with convention. Thus a standard such as “Black Is the Color,” best known as a vehicle for Nina Simone, is recast with a hip-hop vibe that casts it in an entirely new light. On Patsy Cline’s “She’s Got You” Giddens blends the country ethos with a nice bit of southern soul, evoking the sort of juke joints Cline likely played before hitting it big. When she plays it closer to the bone, as she does in more straightforward renditions of Elizabeth Cotten’s “Shake Sugaree” and Dolly Parton’s “Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind” she still manages to inject a bit of playfulness, dropping a syllable here and stuttering a tempo there; understated swings that are a joy to discover.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

the three, supported by members Bill Bryson, Steve Duncan, and Jay Dee Maness, achieved nearly instant critical and commercial success. By 1988 they’d been named the Academy of Country Music’s Touring Band of the Year, an honor they repeated in 1989 and 1990. Yet despite their success the group amicably parted ways in 1992; Jorgenson was restless to tackle new projects and Hillman wanted to cut back on the touring life. Jorgenson Guitarist John Jorgenson, rhythm guitarist Doug Martin, briefly assembled an instrumental violin player Jason Anick, bassist Simon Planting, band dubbed The Hellecasters, and and drummer Rick Reed. while they achieved only limited success (recording two albums) the seeds for an are well worth seeking out. instrumental outfit were planted. With a pair of new studio albums and From 1995 through 2002 Jorgenson was a an in concert DVD in the works, Jorgenson featured member of Elton John’s touring band. remains as busy as ever. His praises are sung While continuing with various side projects, by the likes of Billy Joel (with whom he including a pair of bluegrass albums with Rose toured), and guitarists as far ranging as Duane Maddox, he began delving into the lucrative Eddy and Peter Frampton. But, the best way to world of film scoring. During the early 2000s, discover what they already know is to see firsthis interest in gypsy swing became evident; he hand an artist who is leaving a lasting legacy in portrayed Django Reinhardt in a film (Head in the art of guitar performance, a virtuoso whose the Clouds), and formed a quintet including lofty status is not only well deserved, but perrhythm guitarist Doug Martin, violin player haps under estimates his amazing talent. Jason Anick, bassist Simon Planting, and drummer Rick Reed. IF Their debut album, American Music YOU The John Jorgenson Quintet, Sunday, appeared in 2004, followed by Ultraspontane GO March 29. Doors open at 7 p.m. for three years later. Their two most recent efthis 8 p.m. all ages seated show. Tickets forts, Istiqbal Gathering, and the live recordare $15 in advance and $18 day of. The Grey ing One Stolen Night, continued Jorgenson’s Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 232-5800 or visit www.thegreyeagle.com fascination with Gypsy Jazz; both were favorably reviewed in Rapid River Magazine and

Gidden’s informal approach (perhaps a bit too much so) is nicely balanced by Burnett’s sense of artistry mingled with instruction while the sometimes frosty tone of his overly precise production tastes is in turn balanced with the inherent warmth of her voice, making the pair an ideal match. And while she’s committed to future recordings with The Chocolate Drops – a summer tour is rumored to be in the works – it is evidently clear that despite the title of her debut effort, Rhiannon Gidden’s turn is here and now. ****

Michael Jefrey Stevens (with Eliot Wadopian) Mountain Song

In a similar vein to the above, Asheville based jazz pianist Stevens continues his string of excellent releases, this one in tandem with fellow area resident Eliot Wadopian on bass.

After spending much of the past few years abroad, Mountain Song, (recorded back in 2012) is a travelogue of sorts, citing specific locales (“12 Chatham Road” actually references upstate NY, not Asheville!) and the broader sweep of regional geography (the title track and “The River Po” composed while Stevens was in Italy). “What About the Future” and “Raga” are more freely formed expansive numbers, allowing the playful interaction between Stevens and Wadopian to strut out a bit. One can easily imagine the smiles and nods that took place during the recording! Stating the obvious, the musicianship is top flight; Stevens and Wadopian are seasoned professionals who know their instruments in and out, helping to fuel and sustain our area’s resurgent jazz landscape. Stevens seems to be in constant motion, recording and performing at a staggering rate. Be sure to check michaeljefrystevens.com for news and updates regarding his local appearances. Sample a few tracks and I’ll guarantee you’ll want to hear more.****

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Rapid River Magazine is looking for writers to contribute to the online edition’s short story section. We’re accepting submissions of a variety of works including flash fiction, articles, travel journals and short stories in more than 20 genres. Writers are encouraged to submit works that have been properly edited. All submissions will be reviewed for appropriateness and quality. If editing is required, the writer has the option of working with the section editor. Submission guidelines and special editing rates are available at www.rapidrivermagazine.com. Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor, Kathleen Colburn, is editor and curator of the section. Please contact her with questions and submissions by email to rrshortstories@gmail.com Kathleen is a freelance copyeditor available for a variety of literary projects. Visit her website, www.aptitudeforwords.com

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

18th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops. Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Deadline May 31, 2015. Winning poems will be published online. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071.

Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest 85 N. Main Street Canton, NC 28716

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It is also National Peanut Month, National Nutrition Month, National Women’s History Month, and American Red Cross Month. The flower of the month is the daffodil; aquamarine is the gem. In Minnesota, March has the dubious “honor” of being The Snowiest Month. Some days we receive four seed catalogues. Does Park Seed hire poets? Consider: Apricot Delight, Saucy Seduction, Angel’s Breath, Hello Yellow, Polarstar, Miss Manners, Raspberry Splash, and Summer Daze as flower names. My husband’s eyes glaze as he reads. He makes lists, stares at the yard, and daydreams. Our rhubarb is up, and the poet daffodils beg to bloom. Perhaps basketball coaches hire poets. There’s Sweet Sixteen, the Cinderella Story, Elite Eight, and Final Four (complete with alliterations!) As of this writing, Kentucky remains undefeated. Poets wallow in the extremes of March, wind, rain, spring green (my favorite color today), and the promise of rhododendrons, lilacs, crocus, tulips and daffodils. I smell them now. Poets have no problem answering Mary Oliver’s question, “How to love this world?” We follow her advice: pay attention, be astonished, tell it. Anne Lamott agrees with Mary. Anne writes, “This is how we are supposed to be in this world: present and in awe.” Poet, Jane Hirshfield, is in the same boat: “As elsewhere in life, attentiveness only deepens what it regards.” Imagine Mary, Anne, and Jane in a boat together! May Sarton adds, “…if one looks long enough at almost anything, looks with absolute attention at a flower, a stone, the bark of a tree, grass, snow, a cloud, something like revelation takes place. Something is given and perhaps that something is always a reality outside the self.” Following are March poems. Wendell is back, accompanied by Emily. I can’t let Emily alone, or she won’t let me alone! She tugs my hand and in a breathy voice whispers, “Me. Choose me.” I take her down from my bookcase. (What would happen if I didn’t?)

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March-Mad May Sarton The strangely radiant skies have come To lift us out of winter’s gloom, A paler more transparent blue, A softer gold light on fresh snow. It is a naked time that bares Our slightly worn-down hopes and cares, And sets us listening for frogs, And sends us to seed catalogues To bury our starved eyes and noses In an extravagance of roses, And order madly at this season When we have had enough of reason. Wendell Berry Through the weeks of deep snow we walked above the ground on fallen sky, as though we did not come of root and leaf, as though we had only air and weather for our difficult home. But now as March warms, and the rivulets run like birdsong on the slopes, and the branches of light sing in the hills, slowly we return to earth. Emily Dickinson A Light exists in Spring Not present in the Year At any other period When March is scarcely here A Color stands abroad on Solitary Fields That Science cannot overtake But Human Nature feels.

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Asheville Poetry Review Celebration

The literary journal, established in 1994, has published original poetry and translations, as well as reviews, interviews, and essays by more than 1,500 writers from 22 countries. They have published new work by Sherman Alexie, Robert Bly, Eavan Boland, Cathy Smith Bowers, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Robert Creeley, Debra Kang Dean, Menna Elfyn, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and many others.

24 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

IF YOU GO: Celebrate the

Keith Flynn

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CAROL pEARCE BJORLIE – THE pOET BEHIND THE CELLO

I found a beautiful haiku by a Japanese poet new to me, Nakamura Tei-jo, and Robert Louis Stevenson wanted to be heard. Elizabeth Bishop is know for her poem, “A Cold Spring.” I didn’t have room to include it, but it deserves to be read in its entirety. Spring poems abound. Wind, rain, daffodils and clouds deserve attention. Pay attention. Be astonished. Tell about it. (or Mary will come after you with her dogs.)

Keith Flynn is the founder and editor of The Asheville Poetry Review.

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APR’s 20th Anniversary on Friday, March 13 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www. malaprops.com. More details about the Asheville Poetry Review can be found by visiting www. ashevillepoetryreview.com.

It waits upon the Lawn, It shows upon the furthest Tree Upon the furthest Slope you know It almost speaks to you. Then as Horizons step Or Noons report away Without the Formula of sound It passes and we stay A quality of loss Affecting our Content As Trade had suddenly encroached Upon a Sacrament. Nakamura Tei-jo Born in 1900 in Kumamoto, Nakamura Tei-jo promoted women’s haiku writing through mass media. Come out! You can almost touch the spring moon

The Wind Robert Louis Stevenson I saw you toss the kites on high And blow the birds about the sky; And all around I heard you pass, Like ladies’ skirts across the grass O wind, a-blowing all day long, O wind, that sings so loud a song! I saw the different things you did, But always you yourself you hid. I felt you push, I heard you call, I could not see yourself at all -Oh wind, a-blowing all day long, O wind, that sings so loud a song! O you that are so strong and cold, O blower, are you young or old? Are you a beast of field and tree, Or just a stronger child than me? O wind, a-blowing all day long, O wind, that sings so loud a song! I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at bjorlie.carol@yahoo.com

POETRIO Sunday, March 1 at 3 p.m. Readings by poets Rick Mulkey (Ravenous: New & Selected Poems), Louise Runyon (The Clearing), and Susan Odell Underwood (Love and Other Hungers).

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55

Haywood Street, Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.


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authors ~ books ~ readings

The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing

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What I remember most about this novel is that I laughed my head off.

When I wasn’t close to tears, that is. Or blown away by the quality of the writing. This is a novel worth praising to the sky, in the hopes prayers might bring the author’s next novel out right away. The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing is the first novel by Brooklyn, New York author Mira Jacob. For 13 years, every other Thursday night, she invited other writers to read at Pete’s Place, creating a legendary writer-audience experience that is still going on. Like the East Indian-American family in her novel, Jacob grew up in New Mexico in a neighborhood where people didn’t know what kind of “Indian” she was. Apache? Or Mexican? It took her ten years to write Sleepwalker’s, a monumental risk that paid off in the carefully crafted, beautifully written story it

Into the Heart of the Feminine

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You have likely heard REVIEW BY COURTNEY TIBERIO of Asheville Jungian analysts and authors Bud and Massimilla Harris.

They are known nationally in the world of depth psychology and are considered true gems and a valuable “institution” in Asheville. Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way, has offered this praise: “Bud Harris is a lantern on the path — clear eyed, big hearted and illuminating.” Asheville Jungian analysts and authors Bud and Massimilla Harris have authored nine books. Their latest book, Into the Heart of the Feminine: An Archetypal Journey to Renew Strength, Love and Creativity, has been described as clear eyed, big hearted and illuminating by Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way. Into the Heart of the Feminine is a powerful book, written in a way that makes the material truly accessible to a wide audience. The authors’ own personal and professional experiences are dynamically woven throughout the book in the form of rich and compelling stories. www.budharris.com IF YOU Into the Heart of the Feminine, GO booksigning with Bud and Massimilla

Harris, Sunday, March 29, at 3 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 2546734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

became. It has won numerous awards. Amima is a young woman who loves her family in the desert, but she also knows for her own sanity she can’t be trapped by them. She heads off to rainy Seattle where she works as a wedding photographer. Being the photographer at many weddings, instead of the bride at one, is a woeful disappointment to her mother, who goes into noisy and verbose despair every time she wonders if she is ever going to get grandchildren. Amima’s father, the wellrespected brain surgeon Dr. Thomas Eapan, comes home every night after a busy day at the hospital, sits out on the back porch, and talks to dead people. Reluctantly Amima moves back home and agrees to stay until she can find out what is happening to her father. In doing so, she, and the rest of her family have to deal with the secrets they’ve all tried to ignore. Like an onion that won’t stay buried, the past insists on unpeeling itself.

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Thomas keeps his thoughts to himself for the most part, fearful perhaps that if he allowed himself to face what is bothering him, he would explode. It’s Kamala, the matriarch, the earth mother, the gourmet cook, who gives constant vent to her feelings. She’s uncensored and unrepentant, convinced that she is the only person in the family whose head is screwed on correctly. Her barrage of love erupts in fractured English that is the most hilarious dialogue I’ve ever heard. Because of the wonderful verbal quality of the novel, I strongly recommend you read the audio version, which is nicely narrated by Mira Jacob herself. The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing, by Mira Jacob, Random House 2014, 512 pp. Random House Audio: 15 hours. Visit the author’s website: www.Mira Jacob.com

rhythms on a flaming drum

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Every reader is familiar with George Orwell’s dystopias of 1984 and Animal Farm, and the imagined future worlds of Orson Scott Card and similar writers. But Michael Hopping’s rhythms on a flaming drum is more in the tradition of documentaries like Gasland or Citizenfour, or a TV show like Person of Interest, where we need not travel decades into the future to encounter the world we fear: we are in it already, it’s around us and with us, and its success rests in the fact that we don’t even notice. Released in January by Pisgah Press, rhythms on a flaming drum is available at www.pisgahpress.com, at Asheville’s Grateful Steps and other bookstores, and online from

Where All Light Tends to Go

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Stunning debut novel by David Joy.

Where All Light Tends to Go is already receiving fantastic early praise from critically acclaimed novelists like Daniel Woodrell, Ron Rash, Tawni O’Dell, and Ace Atkins. Joy’s depiction of Jacob McNeely’s struggle to fulfill his obligations to his meth-dealing family while pushing against the encompassing wall that hems in his hopes of a better future, will stay with you for quite some time.

IF YOU GO: Where All Light Tends to Go reading and booksigning, Sunday, March 8 at 3 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookstore & Cafe, 55 Haywood Street, downtown Asheville. Call (828) 254-6734, or visit www.malaprops.com.

Amazon.com. Michael Hopping lives near Asheville, North Carolina. In a former life he was a practicing psychiatrist and medical director for a community mental health center. In search of less industrialized approaches to coping with today’s world, he eventually left the field. For several years Michael served as an investigative reporter, features writer, and occasional commentator for alternative news outlets in and beyond Asheville. His short fiction and creative nonfiction have appeared in Spoiled Ink, The Great Smokies Review, fresh, the Mad Hatters’ Review blog, and Chrysalis Reader. His acclaimed collection of short stories, MacTiernan’s Bottle, was published in 2011 by Pisgah Press. A novel, Meet Me in Paradise, was published in 2007.

MARCH

PARTIAL LISTING

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Salons! Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Wed., March 4 at 7 p.m. MAC McCLELLAND, Irritable Hearts: A PTSD Love Story. Thurs., March 5 at 7 p.m. TINA FIREWOLF, Beneath the Chatter: The Wise Self Awaits. Fri., March 6 at 7 p.m. KELLY JONES, Akashic Records Soul Dialogues. Sat., March 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Kids Craft with JEAN VAN’T HUL, The Artful Year. Sat., March 7 at 7 p.m. JULIE DANIELSON, Wild Things!; on children’s literature. Thu., March 12 at 7 p.m. HOLLY LeCRAW, new novel, The Half Brother. Sat., March 14 at 7 p.m. NATHAN POOLE, Father Brother Keeper; short story collection. Wed., March 18 at 7 p.m. SHANNON BURKE, Into the Savage Country; American frontier. Thu., March 19 at 7 p.m. FRED CHAPPELL, I Am One of You Forever, and Farewell. Fri., March 20 at 7 p.m. SKYE TAYLOR, A Monk in the Bee Hive. Mon., March 23 at 7 p.m. DR. RONA FIELDS, Against Violence Against Women. Tue., March 24 at 7 p.m. JEREMY HAWKINS, The Last Days of Video. Fri., March 27 at 7 p.m. CHRIS CANDER, Whisper Hollow, and CHARLES BAXTER, There’s Something I Want You to Do. Sat., March 28 from 7-8 p.m. Stella Vinitchi Radulescu, I Scrape the Window of Nothingness: New & Selected Poems Tue., March 31 at 7 p.m. SARA GRUEN, At the Water’s Edge; WWII-era Scotland. Tickets are $15 and include a coupon for $10 off the book.

55 Haywood St.

(828) 254-6734 • 800-441-9829 Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM Sunday 9AM to 7PM

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www.michaelhopping.com IF YOU Meet the author and get your GO autographed copy at the book launch

party, Thursday, March 12. Grateful Steps, 159 S. Lexington Avenue in downtown Asheville. Call (828) 277-0998 for more details. 5:30 p.m. reception; 6 p.m. reading followed by Q&A. At 7:15 p.m. follow us around the corner to STORM Rhum Bar & Bistro, 125 S. Lexington, to celebrate the publication of Mike’s third book. RSVP by calling (828) 301-8968.

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 25


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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Caffeinated Art WOOD

Grandee Revival Thursday, April 2

FIRE

KITCHEN

Reception 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Art Show & Maundy Thursday Dinner 6:30-8:30 p.m. Reservations only Art exhibit runs month of April

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Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Artisan Crafted Scrumptious Food Made Fresh with Local Ingredients

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p Yummy Wood Fired Pizza Creative Salads • House Made Pastas Fresh Seafood • Fine Meats

New Wine, Beer & Coffee Bar Introducing Chef Nicolas DeSorbo 828.692.6335

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Thank You Rapid River Magazine Magazine. I was pleasantly surprised by the wonderful response my cafe attracted when I advertised in your monthly magazine magazine.

~ Gary Taylor, owner of Cafe 64

Café 64, 64 Haywood St., downtown Asheville 828-252-8333 • www.cafe-64.com

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com

26 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7


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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food Dining Out For LifeTM Rapid River Magazine, along with our generous advertisers, are committed to helping the Western North Carolina Aids Project (WNCAP) raise awareness and find a cure for HIV/AIDS. You can help by making a donation and dining at a participating restaurant on Thursday, April 30, 2015. By dining out, 20% of your dining total will be donated to WNCAP.

Please go to www.wncap.org for a list of participating restaurants.

RAPID RIVER MAGAZINE

Arts&Culture

GREAT FOOD! GREAT BEER! GREAT SERVICE! ANYWAY YOU LIKE IT! pg. 32

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Eclectic Homemade Cuisine Mon - Fri 11:30am - 2am Sat & Sun 10:30am - 2am Kitchen open until 1am Daily

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777 Haywood Road, Asheville

828.550.3610

Bar & Grill · Pool & Billiards

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pg. 32

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(828) 225-9782

www.westvillepub.com

Downtown Waynesville pg. 32

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

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15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800 Open 7 Days a Week

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC pg. 18

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Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

Delicious Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones Wireless Internet Access!

Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 27


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LOCAL FOOD & DINING GUIDE

Advertise in Our Dining Guide ~ Free Web Links ~ Free Ad Design

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Eat, Drink, Explore Your Guide to Excellent Local Food

Live Music at the Classic Wineseller

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Call now for a great deal! (828) 646-0071

The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premier small plate restaurant, retail shop, and intimate live music venue, will feature jazz, pop, rock, and original music this month.

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student of the jazz guitar great, Sal Salvador, Hammel was a finalist in the Great American Song Contest. His original songs have charted on Billboard’s Top 500.

Friday, March 6 - Sheila Gordon piano, vocals. Pop, originals. Sheila Gordon’s beautiful voice moves effortlessly between musical genres such as blues, jazz, gospel, and popular music.

EVERY SATURDAY Joe Cruz – Piano, vocals. Cruz performs

Thursday, March 12 - Seated Wine Tasting.

Wines of New Zealand’s Hunky Dory Winery, led by industry professional Sara Helmcamp. $5 per person; free with wine purchase. 6:30-8 p.m. Reservations at (828) 452-6000.

Sheila Gordon

Friday, March 13 - Kittle-Collings Duo

saxophone, guitar. Jazz, originals. Tyler Kittle speaks seven different languages and draws his inspiration from music from all over the world. Michael Collings is a first-call guitarist in both the classical and jazz worlds. Collings has taught classical and jazz guitar for more than 13 years and is currently accepting students at Wonderworks music studio in Sylva.

Friday, March 20 -

Ben Wilson

Ben Wilson guitar, vocals. Pop, rock, originals. Wilson James Hammel performs his awardwinning originals as well as thousands of covers. He toured the U.S. for more than 15 years before settling in Asheville.

Friday, March 27 - James Hammel vocals, guitar. Jazz, pg. 34

KAY STEgALL MILLER

pop, originals. Hammel was born with a story to tell. A

the music of the Beatles, Elton John, and James Taylor every Saturday this month. As a child he began singing and playing piano in church. By the time he reached his early twenties he was a regular on the New York City club circuit. He has toured internationally and opened for Chicago, Bonnie Raitt, Santana, and the Average White Band. The Wineseller’s retail shop and wine bar opens at 11 a.m., Tuesday through Saturday. The kitchen opens at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday serving small plate and tapas-style cuisine. Dinner and music reservations are taken anytime by calling (828) 452-6000. Seating is guaranteed until 7 p.m. on non-ticketed evenings. After 7 p.m. seating is on a first come, first served basis. Visit www.classicwineseller.com for additional information about wine dinners, tastings, and weekly live music events.

The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street in Waynesville 828-452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com

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a Culinary Gi Shop 8 Town Square Blvd. Asheville, NC 28803 828-676-1678

asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com 28 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7


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artful living

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Perception & Reality A reader contacted me with a question, and I decided a good column could come from answering it. Here’s the question: “Could you write about something that came up in a recent discussion? Someone said to me recently, ‘perception is reality.’ I said that it’s not and they were stunned. To me, perception depends on a person’s happiness or unhappiness; their optimism or pessimism. I’d like to hear what you think. Thanks.”

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In answer to the question “is perception reality,” I have to say, no and yes.

Is perception reality in an absolute sense? From the standpoint of human senses and the intellect’s capacity to symbolize and understand experience, no, it cannot be. Absolute reality is the Universe-as-it-really-is, far beyond the capacities of human senses and intellect. The Universe is, as modern science is discovering, a single quantum field of energy manifesting matter/consciousness, but that is not what our sensory perception tells us. We can create only a representation of a very limited portion of reality and then create images and ideas about this incomplete information, and this information tells us we are separate and alone in the universe. Is this perception experienced and acted upon as reality? Most certainly, yes. And there lies the problem. We tend to act as if our subjective experience of separateness is reality, when it is only a perspective on reality. From this perspective, it must first be recognized that human beings experience reality very differently from other species who have very different sense organs and brains. Then, amongst humans, perception

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will be strongly influenced by psychological and cultural factors. At this personal level, every individual lives in their own reality to a greater or lesser degree. Within a given cultural grouping, a person’s conformity to reality as a cultural norm is the basis of our measurement of mental health and illness at the most basic level. This variance of the subjective experience of reality is also the source of most human conflict. One person’s reality can be so different from another’s they will want to kill each other. Think of the current conflict between Islamic Jihadists and European-culturebased societies. Then, at subtler levels, we come to just how one individual sees things versus another, right down to small tastes and preferences. So here, as the questioner noted, a person with a psychological predilection to happiness will experience a more positive “reality” than a person with a pessimistic and negative predilection. This is why we can predict how a predis-

And we make the connection: “Everything that tastes good is bad for you and everything that tastes bad is good for you.” Is this true? Must we choose between health and happiness? Medical research tells us that we do not have to choose between these two options. Can you learn to like that which is good for you and dislike that which is bad for you? The answer is “Yes”! How do we come to enjoy certain things and dislike other things? Is it because we have intellectually determined that they are good for us or bad for us? No, we generally have learned to enjoy certain foods, activities, books, or clothes styles because in our family or culture or peer group, we were taught that these are the things one should enjoy. Likes and dislikes are learned choices. The truth is that as mature adults, we can learn to enjoy that which we habitually choose to do.

If a man who has enjoyed salty soup all his life now starts a low-salt diet for his high blood pressure, he will dislike the low-salt soup initially, but over 3 months time he will develop a taste for the low-salt soup and extremely dislike the salty soup that he once loved. Taste is a choice. Likes and dislikes are trainable. We can intellectually choose that which we know is good for us, and choose to leave off that which is bad for us. And when we choose to do it repeatedly, we will begin to enjoy it and dislike the bad that we chose to discontinue. Our brain has the remarkable ability to develop new enjoyments. However, there are three ways to sabotage this wonderful choosing function of our brain. If this good choice is emotionally connected to a powerful, negative experience in our past, our emotions may not allow us to make the good choice. When we recognize this “good-bad connection,” we can purposefully combine a positive activity with the good choice which will allow the emotions now to accept this good choice and lead to enjoyment of this activity.

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posed anxious or angry or depressed person will perceive and react to the same event in very different ways, and how persons with differing styles of being-in-the-world will differ from each other in how they express themselves. We experience “reality” in vividly personal ways, so it is very important to realize that our perception is literally only a point of view. An important question, however, remains: can humans intuit actual reality? In other words, beyond the limitations of senses and brain and culture and individual psychological bias, can a human have a sense of the Universe-asit-is through its levels of organizations, from the microscopic to the macroscopic? From the perspective of Buddhist teaching, we have to say, “yes.” We in this culture too often fail to acknowledge a deeper level of knowing than the intellect. This knowing arises from the silent intelligence of intuition and has no words for it transcends the realm of language. It is just a knowing, and is the source of both mystical and scientific insight into the true nature of the Universe. Intuition is capable of this because intuition is the consciousness that is both individual and universal. This non-duality is expressed within Oriental cosmologies

Changing Bad Habits for Good

We are told by our mothers that eating too many cookies is bad for you and that eating nasty-tasting cooked spinach is good for you.

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when Buddhist masters instruct us to realize ourselves and the universe as one. A very non-Buddhist source, astrophysicist and cosmologist, Mark Whittle, Ph.D., states a similar intuitive insight that is an example of what leads the cutting edge of science: “The Universe has, in a sense, made us in its own image… We’re descended from stars… and evolving within Nature has shaped our intuition in such a way that we can comprehend the cosmological story. In a sense, we’re children of Nature, at home in the Universe.” The great challenge to those of us raised in a psychologically dualistic society, accustomed to mistaking technology for science and thinking for intelligence, is to grasp that the true scientists, such as Whittle, Einstein, or Tesla, are reaching into their intuitive knowing in order to understand what lies beyond the limits of accepted technology. They then use and shape technology to further the reach of our scientific understanding. Thinking comes after the intuitive insight, to organize and communicate their insights In the psychological/mystical/spiritual dimension, this same opening of intuitive insight continued on page 32

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

If we constantly harbor negative feelings for the good choice every time it is chosen and carried out, we will never develop enjoyment of that activity. Enjoyment requires a “positive attitude” toward that good choice. Enjoyment requires that we “visualize” what we are gaining and not what we are losing. If we reward ourselves for giving up the bad habit by occasionally indulging in that habit, we will always be looking forward to the next reward instead of focusing on the wonderful results of the good choice being made. No rewarding! We must make a “clean break” in order to actualize the good choice we have made. Have an attitude of gratitude to God for the fact that you have the ability to choose. Make a “clean break” with the old bad choice; practice a “positive attitude” toward your good choice; “visualize” the wonderful benefits that you will receive – and enjoyment will follow – every time. (A condensation of a two hour lecture series by Dr. David DeRose)

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Tuesday, March 3

Gallery Opening

New show celebrating the ceramic art of MaryJane Findley, Anne Jerman, and other gallery members. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue, Asheville.

Thursday, March 5

Design Matters

Ecology, Culture and Art in the work of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects. 6-8 p.m. Free for Asheville Art Museum members and students with ID. $5 for non-members. Diana Wortham Theatre, Pack Square, Asheville. www.ashevilleart.org

Friday, March 6

Reflections: Interiors/Landscapes/Cityscapes

Works by Cheryl Keefer on display at the Asheville Gallery of Art, March 1-31. Reception from 5 to 8 p.m. 16 College Street in Asheville. (828) 2515796, www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Saturday & Sunday, March 7-8

Organic Growers School Spring Conference

Workshops on organic growing, permaculture, homesteading, urban farming, and rural living. UNCA Campus, Asheville. $60 Saturday, $55 Sunday. www.organicgrowersschool.org

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Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Send to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716; call (828) 646-0071; or email ads@rapidrivermagazine.com to place your ad. – Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date of event, title, description and time, cost, location, and your contact info. Please do not type in all caps. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

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The Writers’ Workshop Saturday, March 7 – Writing the Young Adult Novel with Bobbie Pell. Readings and discussion will target specific aspects of the YA novel, with the goal of creating a highly motivating, dramatic story. 10-4 p.m. $75/$70. Saturday, March 28 – Poetry Workshop with Katherine Soniat. Learn new approaches to writing and revising poetry. Bring a poem in progress, or an image or story as a springboard. 10-4 p.m. $75/$70 members. The Writers’ Workshop 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville (828) 254-8111, www.twwoa.org

Saturday, March 7

Chuck Brodsky Album Release

Finely crafted songs that accentuate the eccentric, the Photo: David Simchock profound and the holy. Release of new album, Tale Tell Heart. 8 p.m. at The Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. (828) 2325800, www.thegreyeagle.com

Sunday, March 8

Ana Blanton Exhibit

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine

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Abstract paintings on display at the Hilton Asheville Biltmore Park in the lobby level. Reception 1-3 p.m. Refreshments will be served. On display Through mid-April. 43 Town Square Blvd., Asheville.

March 11-22

Amadeus

Performances Wednesday-Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $35; $32 Seniors; $20 Student Rush (17 and under). Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut Street Asheville. Call ACT at (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org

Thursday, March 12

Liz Longley Album Release

Stunning vocal prowess and songwriting capabilities provide the perfect balance in her self-titled collection of intimate and moving tales. $10-$12; 8 p.m. at ISIS Music Hall, 743 Haywood Road, Asheville. (828) 575-2737

Thursday, March 12

Comedian Claude Stuart

Explosive, in-your-face, rapid-fire, madman has evoked comparisons to Steve Martin, Robin Williams, and Jim Carrey. He has performed on The Tonight Show and Last Comic Standing. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. (828) 255-7777, www.thealtamont.com

Friday, March 13

Asheville Playback Theatre

Using no scripts and no elaborate sets or costumes, the stories that come to life on stage are provided, on the spot, by random audience members. 8 p.m. Jubilee Center Garden Room, Patton Ave. $10; $5 youth. Contact Robert, (828) 273-0995, or visit www.ashevilleplayback.org .

Call for Submissions Deadline: Friday, March 13, 2015 The 8th Annual Music Video Asheville celebrates the collaboration of Asheville musicians and filmmakers. Contact Kelly Denson, (828) 515-1081, or email Kelly@LushLifePro.com. Guidelines at www.musicvideoavl.com

Saturday, March 14

Second Saturday Event

Demonstrations, refreshments, and a showcase of ceramic arts. Odyssey Cooperative Art Gallery, 238 Clingman Avenue, in the River Arts District.

Friday & Saturday, March 20 & 21

Tuesday, March 10

Classic Hike of the Smokies

Hike the Smokemont Loop Trail. 6.2 miles; moderately difficult. Led by hiking guide and author Danny Bernstein. Hikers will visit the historic Lufty Baptist Church. $35; includes membership to Friends of the Smokies. To register, contact AnnaLee@friendsofthesmokies.org. www.friendsofthesmokies.org

Lindsey Kelley Dance

Asheville’s newest professional modern dance company, presents Ladle Weiss, 8 p.m., at the Asheville Masonic Temple Dining Hall. For more information, email lindseykelleydance@gmail.com

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Saturday, March 28

Burly Beers & Barleywines Festival

Soumu

Oskar Blues will be pouring 2013 Ten FIDY Imperial Stout and 2014 brandy barrel-aged GUBNA Imperial IPA. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., Mills River. Tickets at sierranevada.com/burlybeers.

www.ashevillesoumu.com.

Saturday, March 28

March 20-22

Jonathan Scales Fourchestra

Friday, March 20 African celebration and benefit. Performances by Zansa, Adama and his drummers, Arouna Diarra, La’Ney West African Dance Troupe, and Zabumba Brazilian Dance. African cuisine by Soce, a kids area, demos, an African marketplace, and more. New Mountain, 38 N. French Broad Ave., Asheville. Tickets and more details at

WNC Home, Garden & Green Living Show

At the US Cellular Center in Downtown Asheville. www.homegardenandgreenlivingshow.com

Saturday, March 21

Get in Gear Fest

Product demos, gear clinics, beer from local breweries, raffles, races, and more. A portion of beer sales will support RiverLink. Free. 12 to 4 p.m. Rain or shine. 144 Riverside Drive in Asheville. Hosted by Outdoor Gear Builders of WNC, outdoorgearbuilders.com

Saturday, March 21

Carolina Film-Institute

Free Open House and Student Film Screening. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meet our faculty and tour the facility. Learn about our Spring Class and fast track your career in the film industry! Contact Beth for more details. (828) 3017830, Carolinafilm2010@gmail.com. Carolina Film Institute, 518 Hunts Bridge Rd., Greenville, SC, 29617. www,carolinafilminstitute.com

Tuesday & Wednesday, March 24 & 25

Abraham.In.Motion

Born into hip-hop culture in the late 1970s and grounded in classical cello, piano, and the visual arts, choreographer Kyle Abraham and his company Abraham.In.Motion create meaningful works with movement that is fresh and unique. 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: $40; Student $35; Children 12 and under $20; Student Rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Thursday, March 26

Asleep at the Wheel

CD release party for The Girl I Left Behind Me. Western swing, at the New Mountain Theatre, 38 N. French Broad Avenue, Asheville. (828) 7851701, www.newmountainavl.com

Incredible and intricate songwriting from this Asheville-based virtuosic band. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville. (828) 2557777, www.thealtamont.com

Sunday, March 29

Greek Palm Sunday Luncheon

Slow roasted lamb shank, béchamel topped pastichio, spanakopita (spinach and buttery filo), keftethes (meatballs), and a bake sale. Food service begins at 11 a.m. and continues until 2 p.m. Phone (828) 253-3754 weekdays to place orders for pick up. On the day of the luncheon phone (828) 254-7424. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church and the Morris Hellenic Cultural Center are located at 227 Cumberland Avenue in Asheville’s Montford area.

Sunday, March 29

Richard Shulman Performance

Playing piano with the Heather Masterton Quartet. $10. In the upstairs lounge 6-8 p.m. at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall 743 Haywood Rd., Asheville. (828) 575-2737

Through March 31

Ebb and Flow

An exhibition of 310 ART artists in the AAAC’s Artist Resource Center. Wide range of different techniques. Terri Monette, Neuron Trance Dance Asheville Area Arts Council, One Page Ave., Asheville. www.ashevillearts.com

through March 31

Swannanoa Valley Fine Arts League Current show features works with the limited palette of “Black, White and Red” at The Red House Studios and Gallery in Black Mountain This show runs through March 31. Go to www. svfalarts.org for details. Gallery winter hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. www.svfalarts.org

MARCH EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 30 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

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Spruce Street Market

Participate in a weekly artist vending area located in Downtown Asheville! It takes place every Saturday in July, August, and September from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information please visit www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

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Best in Show

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The Strand Theater March 20 - April 1: Imitation Game

WINTER MOVIE SHOW TIMES Friday, Tuesday & Wednesday, 7 p.m.; Saturday 5 & 7 p.m.; Sunday 2, 4, & 7 p.m. Free Kids Movie, Saturdays at 12 and 2 p.m.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

LOVE THE LOCALS SPECIAL Buy one movie ticket, get one free.

LIVE MUSIC Thursday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m. Darren Nicholson Band, Bluegrass. $15; $12 in adv. Friday, March 13 - The Dupont Brothers Saturday, March 14 - The Scofflaws Sheila Kay Adams, Dan Lewis, and Branson Raines. $18; $15 in adv.

2nd Tuesday Ukelele Jam

Meets 2nd Tuesday of each month at Lourey’s Catering on Biltmore Ave. from 5:30 to 7 pm. Beginners and stringed instruments welcome.

Thursday, March 19 at 7:30 p.m. The Don Juans. $20; $18 in adv.

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

Thursday, March 5 - The Main Squeeze. Exciting and talented young funk band out of the Chicago.

Thursday, March 26 at 7:30 p.m. Linda McRae. $20; $18 in adv. Saturday, March 28 at 5 p.m. Comedian Glen Singer. $12; $6 kids. Great family fun. The Strand Theater 38 N. Main St., Waynesville, NC 28786 www.38main.com

Saturday, March 7 - PitchBlak Brass Band. 10-piece, hip-hop, Brooklyn brass band. Friday, March 13 - SeepeopleS. One of Asheville’s favorite bands.

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller

Wednesday, March 18 - Melvin Seals & JGB. Powerful, high-spirited, Hammond B-3 organ, and keyboards.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Restaurant serves small plate and tapas starting at 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Live music at 7 p.m. 20 Church Street, Waynesville. Details (828) 4526000, www.classicwineseller.com.

Arrowhead Artists and Artisan League

Asheville Music Hall 31 Patton Ave., Asheville (828) 255-7777 www.AshevilleMusicHall.com

Every Sunday, 2-4 p.m. For those interested in painting, drawing, pastels, or other media. Materials provided free of charge for the first two sessions. To continue, join the league for $25 per year. At the Arrowhead Gallery & Studios, 78 Catawba Ave., in Old Fort. Contact Helen Sullivan at helensullivan@wildblue.net.

Opening at HART Brighton Beach Memoirs – Opens April 24. Director Wanda Taylor.

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March 6-18: Birdman

Classes in painting, pastels, watercolors, drawing, encaustic, and more. 310 ART, River’s Edge Studio, 191 Lyman St., Asheville. www.310art.com.

Saturday, March 21 - Celebrating the music, memory and spirit of Michael Houser. With Sam Holt & Friends.

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Now through March 4: Theory of Everything

Art Classes

Asheville Music Hall

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Vendors Wanted

For the third annual Art in the Park…ing Lot. Monthly art and jewelry show held the second Saturday of each month, May through September, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is a juried show. Cost to participate is $40 per show. For more information, call Michele Sparks, (828) 693-4545. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Ave. East, Hendersonville. www.artmobstudios.com

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Ratchet and Spin

by Jessica and Russ Woods

Nunsense – Opens May 22. Directed by Suzanne Tinsley. The 39 Steps - Opens June 19. Directed by Julie Kinter. Oklahoma! – Opens July 10. Directed by Steve Lloyd. Chorus and dance auditions May 3 & 4 at 6:30 p.m.

Turn Your Car Into a Moving Advertisement and Get Paid For It

We seek regular citizens to drive 200 miles a month with our specially designed AD on your vehicle to draw attention to your car and get paid for it. Interested participants should email JT Auto Wrap Inc., Jamesfillenworth2@gmail.com, for more details.

Medical Guardian

HART, 250 Pigeon Street, Wayensville (828) 456-6322, www.harttheatre.com www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2015 Adawehi Press

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 31


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Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps AmiciMusic, www.amicimusic.org Asheville Brewers Supply www.AshevilleBrewers.com

Kirk’s Collectables, (770) 757-6814

Asheville Gallery of Art www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com

Mellow Mushroom, (828) 236-9800

Asheville Locksmith Now www.AshevilleLocksmithNow.com Asheville Symphony Orchestra www.ashevillesymphony.org

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com Mountain Area Information Network main.nc.us Mountain Made www.MtnMade.com

B & C Winery, (828) 550-3610

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Linda Neff, NCBTMB lneff68@yahoo.com

Black Box Photography www.blackboxphoto.info www.doteditions.com

Modesto Trattoria, (828) 225-4133

Black Mountain Swannanoa Chamber of Commerce www.exploreblackmountain.com

Norbury Books www.facebook.com/norburybooks

Blue Ridge Biscuit Company www.facebook.com/ BlueRidgeBiscuitCompany

Octopus Garden, www.theOG.us

NC Stage, www.ncstage.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com Brixx Pizza, www.brixxpizza.com

O’Charley’s, www.ocharleys.com Oil & Vinegar Asheville asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

BT’s Burgerjoint www.btsburgerjoint.com

The Pink House www.facebook.com/ ThePinkHouseAsheville

Cafe 64, www.cafe-64.com The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

Spruce Street Market www.SpruceStreetMarket.com

Classic Wineseller www.classicwineseller.com Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeilgallery.com Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com The Green Room Café www.thegreenroomcafe.biz HART Theater, www.harttheatre.com Hearn’s Bicycle, (828) 253-4800 Heart & Soul www.thesingingtelegram.com

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is necessary, and just as the theoretical scientist learns to trust their intuitional insights into the mystery of the Universe, we can, through training, examine the moments of our lives with the silent intelligence of awareness. We begin to experience, as the Japanese Zen tradition would say, the “Thusness” or “as-itis-ness” of existence on the multiple levels of our existence. We can engage in what is known as the Zen practice of Shikantaza.- a form of meditation that is the direct seeing and experiencing of the moment without preconceived judgment, not intellectualizing, but rather, being the truth of the moment realized in awareness. Training in meditation, mindfulness and awareness is meant to expand our ability to experience more of the everything of existence, utilizing more of our perceptive and mental capacities in a non-judgmental manner to create a more accurate experience of reality-as-it-is. This is, of course, a continuum, and each of us is somewhere on this continuum between what Buddhism calls “egoic delusion,” living almost entirely out of the projected condition-

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He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns, video and audio programs, and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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I’ve been thinking about whole foods and supplements.

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness.

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ing of our ego, and awakened awareness, experiencing Life-asit-is, in both the conditioned world of form and the energetic absolute Universe where form and consciousness are like the particle and wave of quantum physics. Through our training and practice, we move on this continuum closer and closer to absolute reality “The fundamental delusion of humanity is to suppose that I am here and you are out there.” – Yasutani Roshi Through both scientific and mystical intuitive inquiry, we can come closer to the realization that we and the Universe are both matter-energy and consciousness-energy, all One. We can experience how any small movement of our sense of self-inthe-world (perception) from egoic delusion toward awakened awareness brings us closer to the living reality of existence, and with it, significant expansion of our capacity for well-being and security as the gap between perception and reality grows smaller. We begin by narrowing the compassion gap that separates us from understanding ourselves and our fellow humans. This reduces the conflicts we have within ourselves and with other people. We then have to narrow the gap that separates us from identification with our fellow creatures, with Nature and the Earth that is our home. Eventually, we awaken into the realization, what Zen calls the “felt sense,” that we and the Universe are one. This is what Zen calls realizing our original nature, where perception resonates much closer to actual reality. Thanks for the question. Perhaps this will start a new trend for the column – a dialogue with the readers.

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Visions of Creation www.visionsofcreation.com Westville Pub www.westvillepub.com

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If you have a question you would like to see examined, e-mail to healing@billwalz.com . I just might use it.

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

Twigs and Leaves Gallery www.twigsandleaves.com

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artful living

Starving Artist www.StarvingArtistCatalog.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

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‘Perception & Reality’ cont’d from pg. 29

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

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KATHLEEN COLBURN

For many years there’s been lots of buzz about the benefits of eating whole, minimally processed foods. Veggies and fruits for sure. Healthy fats, yes. In the personal choice category: dairy, grains, beans, fish and meat. The choices should be based on how you feel when you eat various foods. Keep in mind that organic is best for avoiding unwanted chemicals. I’m a daily smoothie consumer. A whole lot of nutrients can be packed into one. I use soaked seeds, an apple, blueberries, fresh kale, seaweed, fresh ginger, lemon juice and cinnamon. For me it’s the best way to start the day. It is widely believed that if we eat a healthy, whole foods diet we are getting all the nutrition we need. Maybe so, but there can be contributing factors that diminish the nutrient density of our food including soil conditions and water purity. For meat eaters those factors include the diet and living conditions of the animals. continued on page 33

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This year’s Spruce Street Market will be a lively, artist-filled, community event. The market will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. every Saturday beginning July 4 and ending September 26. We welcome and encourage local and regional artists. There is a one-time application fee of $26. After acceptance, you may pick the dates you’d like to participate. There is a charge of $50 for each date, or you can sign up for all the shows for $38 per date.

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‘The Altamont’ cont’d from pg. 21

We’re booking more and more everyday! If you’d like to be on our mailing list to receive updates and recently booked shows you can sign up on our Facebook page or email us on our contact form at www.thealtamont.com

JC: I assume you’re also open to booking for private events and such. What’s the process for that?

RB: We are absolutely booking for private events! Over the past year we’ve had 10-15 wedding receptions, rehearsal dinners, commitment ceremonies, and private parties. The Altamont is a wonderful choice for almost any event, and we allow clients the freedom to transform the room into any theme they can imagine. We’ve seen the room turn into a masquerade ball, a red carpet New York night club, and rustic farm style banquet all with just a few alterations and decor options. If you or someone you know is interested in renting the space please contact me at rtbarrett@gmail. com for pricing and availability. JC: Anything else you’d care to add? RB: We now have regular box office hours Tuesday-Thurs-

Space is limited! To apply, please visit www.sprucestreetmarket.com, or visit the Spruce Street Market Facebook page, www.facebook.com/spruce.street.market. We look forward to your participation in this great downtown Asheville art event. This year we have new sidewalks and new pavement. The street looks great! The Spruce Street Market is produced by Andrew Montrie and Muddie Knees Designs, and Appalachian Crafts Center.

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day, 3-6 p.m. so that customers can buy tickets without etix processing fees. Please keep an eye out for upcoming events at The Altamont! Our mission is to provide a unique, highquality space and experience for community arts, entertainment, and enjoyment. We can’t achieve this goal without the support of this community. If you have any questions about programming, events, or facility rental please feel free to contact me by email. And thank you so much James, and to the staff and readers of Rapid River for your continued support of arts and entertainment in this, the most creative, conscious, and cultured community in the region. We look forward to seeing everyone soon at The Altamont Theatre!

‘Healthy, Good Thoughts’ cont’d. from pg. 32

KIRK’S COLLECTIBLES & Custom Framing Your Jersey and Shadowbox Custom Framing Experts

Mega March Madness!

The Altamont Theatre 18 Church Street, Asheville • www.myAltamont.com

There can also be environmental and genetic factors that contribute to our need for higher concentrations of certain nutrients than what we can reasonably get from diet alone. Fish oil is one and research has shown it to be good for brain function and mood regulating; arthritis and inflammation; as well as healthy cholesterol and cardiovascular health. Vitamin D3 is said to be good for bone strength and immune function. I mentioned curcumin last month. It’s known to be great for inflammation. You’d need to eat a couple teaspoons of turmeric a day, with oil, to get a therapeutic amount of curcumin. Please, always educate yourself as to what supplements are right for you and how much. When we take the time to eat well, pay attention to how our bodies react to foods and educate ourselves, we can feel good and healthy!

Richard Barrett, Owner, Sales and Operations Manager (404) 580-7645, rtbarrett@gmail.com

Signed and Unsigned Helmets, Footballs, Jerseys, Basketballs, Baseballs and more!

Kathleen is a whole foods personal chef with over 30 years of experience. She is Rapid River Magazine’s copyeditor and a freelance editor available for a variety of literary projects. She can be reached by email: rrshortstories@gmail.com. Visit her website: www.aptitudeforwords.com.

We’ll Beat Any Advertised Price on Custom Framing! Mention this ad to receive 25% OFF our Regular Low Price

140 Airport Road • Arden, NC

You Need to Know if Your Advertising is Paying Off When it came to publicizing our meet the artist tours, concerts, or storytelling in the park, the overwhelming response was “We read about it in Rapid River Magazine.” Thank you for supporting the arts and entertainment community. ~ Ruth Planey

1 mile East of I-26, across from IHOP on left, next to Subway pg. 32

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1-770-757-6814 emkkom@hotmail.com Mon-Sat 11-8 Sunday 12:30-6

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Celebrating 8 Years of Ownership in March!

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~ Thanks, Carrie & John

98 N. Main Street, Waynesville

828-456-1940 www.twigsandleaves.com Live Webcam www.downtownwaynesville.com

Reflexology ~ Reiki ~ Reiki Drumming Bowen Training Instructor ~ Reiki Master / Teacher FREE Session the First Thursday of the month.

Health & Healing are Just 2 Feet Away

Linda Neff, NCBTMB #582633-09 68 Sugar Grove Ct., Clyde, NC 28721 513-675-2819 • 828-565-0061

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A gallery where art dances with nature

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All Types of Major Appliances Bonded & Insured

828-456-4989 Fax: 828-456-7021 Mark1462@Att.net

Mountain Top Appliance Service Mark Atkinson • Reputable Repairs

91 Smokies Ridge, Waynesville, NC 24 Hour Emergency Service 828-646-7422

34 March 2015 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 18, No. 7

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Reflexology is a technique based on the applying of pressure to specific locations on the hands, feet, and ears. Studies have shown that nerve endings in these areas connect to various locations all over the body, such as organs, major muscle systems, and more. Reflexology uses these pressure points to access and heal blockages or imbalances throughout the body, improving circulation and providing stress relief while doing so. Linda Neff uses reflexology to access “There and heal blockages or imbalances are reflex throughout the body. points in the body along the meridians,” reflexologist Linda Neff explained, “and they correspond with acupressure points. What I’m doing with the reflexology is I’m finding points of pain, places where there needs to be a release, and I work on those areas to release them. Not only can you do this on the feet, the hands, and the ears, but I’ve learned that I can also do that on the rest of the body as well.” Linda Neff has been working in the health and wellness field for more than 40 years. She began her wellness path as a Health and Fitness teacher and basketball coach. In the late 90s, Linda came down with a case of plantar fasciitis. She then spent years going to a traditional doctor with no resolution of the issue. Frustrated, she turned to a school nurse for advice and received a recommendation to try reflexology. “Within one month of going to the reflexologist,” Neff shared, “I had my feet feeling 100% better. And that’s when I noticed they had a school for reflexology, so I signed up to go to their school. It was a year-long program.” Neff has been a certified reflexologist since 1999. If you’d like to try reflexology and see how it can benefit your life, your health, and your overall wellbeing, you can call Linda Neff at (513) 675-2819, or email her at lanff68@gmail.com. You can also visit her on the web at www.Soul2SoulHeals.com. Linda offers free sample treatments the first Thursday of each month at Mountain Spirit Wellness in Waynesville.


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Rapid River Magazine is seeking experienced advertising sales people, and account executives. Contact dennis@rapidrivermagazine.com

Auto, Residential & Commercial

Caffeinated Art Show

Photographer Needed

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What do you get when you combine quirky and fun with an infusion of color?

A trendy trio of artists who infuse both humor and exceptional creativity in their art. The return of the popular exhibit Caffeinated Art will have its grandee revival on Thursday, April 2 from 4:30 until 6:30 p.m. at The Green Room Cafe in Hendersonville. The event will feature a cash bar for beer, wine, and coffee drinks, along with artisan crafted appetizers created by hosts Ben and Sue Green, and Chef Nicholas DeSorbo. After the show, celebrate The Green Room’s newly remodeled space at a reservation-only dinner. They will present their signature spring dinner menu, featuring scrumptious food made fresh from local ingredients. Call (828) 692-6335 to reserve your table. Sandee Setliff, a mixed media artist, creates from the inside out, letting her imagination run free. Setliff takes familiar objects and arranges them into whimsical layered pieces. She works with both traditional and innovative techniques, incorporating current trends into her art such as beading and hand sewing, boldly mixing acrylics with inks and gelatos. Always trying to depict a positive message with words and sometimes quotes, you will quite often find the written word somewhere on her canvases. Her unique collection of artwork, titled “Liquid Wisdom,” spans the world

Live Music at Bogarts Restaurant & Tavern Waynesville’s favorite steakhouse not only offers the best steaks in town, but continues to offer many other entrees, sandwiches, fresh salads, homemade soups and a wide variety of desserts to appeal to the ultimate foodie. With exceptional service geared towards true customer appreciation, we offer live Old Time/Bluegrass music on Thursday nights at 6:30. Featuring local favorites and a few travelers. We’ll look forward to seeing you on a Thursday night. Thursday, March 5 – Ragtime Hawks, Old time/ Rag time string band Thursday, March 12 – The Freight Hoppers, Old time string band Thursday, March 19 – The Carolina Catskins, Old time/ Rag time string band Thursday, March 26 – Eddie Rose & Highway Forty, Bluegrass

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Detail from work by Jamie Miller

of fantasy and reality, flavored with coffee, tea cups, and quotes. Color, pattern, stories, and emotion all contribute to Miriam Hughes love of creating art. Lately Miriam has been creating and showing work in mediums and styles that excite her sense of design and color, often with unexpected results. While well known for creating canine portraits in pastel, she has begun working with new mediums and substrates. Miriam says, “I feel more exposed as an artist because my mediums of choice for this show are fairly new to me, but it energizes me knowing I can only get better.” For Jamie Miller, art, literature, and water have always been a solace. They have been friends never abandoned, the family that always encouraged, and the mentors that continually challenged. In college she discovered painting and, thusly, found her niche. She’s always been a dreamer, a wanderer, and to quote a friend a “bohemian mermaid,” which are all aspects you can find in her works. She thinks it makes perfect sense, for “art is meant to expose the soul.” The Green Room Café specializes in artisan crafted scrumptious food made fresh from local ingredients. They offer premium beer and wine, Fair Trade locally roasted primo espresso and coffees, and an assortment of loose-leaf teas. Pop in for an ice cold beer or a glass of wine paired with one of their delicious appetizers, or a primo coffee drink paired with homemade desserts.

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IF YOU GO

Caffeinated Art reception, Thursday, April 2 from 4:30 6:30 p.m. Art Show & Maundy Thursday Dinner, 6:308:30 p.m. Please call (828) 692-6335 to make reservations. Art exhibit on display from April 2-30, 2015.

Plenty of Parking!

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Bogart’s Restaurant & Tavern 303 South Main St., Waynesville

536 North Main, Hendersonville (828) 692-6335 www.TheGreenRoomCafe.biz

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Vol. 18, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2015 35


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March 2015 Rapid River Magazine  
March 2015 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: Cheryl Keefer at the Asheville Gallery of Art..p17. Inside: Asheville Amadeus Festival..p7; Susan Marie Designs..p19; Folk Art...

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