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Interview with photographer GD Whalen

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Asheville Lyric Opera hosts Lawrence Brownlee Masterclass. PAGE 7

Interview with Dana Hunter, co-owner of Oil & Vinegar. PAGE 28

River North Dance Chicago at the Diana Wortham Theatre. PAGE 4

Beautiful Creatures • A Good Day to Die Hard • Identity Thief • Safe Haven

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23-26


2012-2013 SEASON

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Daniel Meyer, Music Director Concerts take place in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Saturday

oh, the endless expressions of

MARCH 16 s 8pm

The American Four Seasons

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Water Music Suite No. 2 in D Major Glass Violin Concerto No. 2 “The American Four Seasons� Tim Fain, violin Copland Three Latin American Sketches Bach Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F

Tim Fain

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PILOBOLUS Photo: Eric Dufour

MARCH 19 & 20

ALTAN MARCH 21 tickets/info: dwtheatre.com 2 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

828.257.4530


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at Diana Wortham Theatre

Take some time out to create community, make new friends and spend valuable time with your loved ones. Sing Together offers themed gatherings such as Campfire Songs, Lullabies, Winter Songs, and Get Your Irish On. Diana Wortham Theatre invites you to join family and friends in a special series celebrating the joy of music and singing together. These series are for anyone of any age or skill level who loves to sing. No experience required.

Campfire Songs Friday, April 5 at 6:30 p.m.

Few childhood memories are better than those of times spent singing under the stars by the campfire. Spend an hour learning traditional campfire songs that Beth and Jim Magill everyone can sing. S ‘mores Get Your Irish On will be provided, and at the Friday, March 15 at 6:30 p.m. end of the night each family will receive a song book to take home. Learn traditional Celtic songs to share Led by Beth and Jim Magill. $8 adults, at your next Irish-themed celebration at this $5 children 12 & under; free for children 2 gathering led by Beth and Jim Magill. The & under. Tickets: (828) 257-4530. Advance Forum at the Diana Wortham Theatre. $8 purchase highly recommended. adults, $5 children 12 & under; free for children 2 & under. Tickets: (828) 257-4530. Diana Wortham Theatre, 2 South Pack Advance purchase highly recommended. Square, Asheville. Visit www.dwtheatre.com

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Tradition. Vision. Innovation.

Anst nstA rA Aft At the folk Art Center AllA llA nstAnd And Cr Aft shop A

Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway Asheville, NC | 828-298-7928

The Southern Highland Craft Guild is an authorized concessioner of the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

For more fine crafts visit: Guild Crafts, 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

PG. 32

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4 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

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Performance by River North Dance Chicago followed by Pilobolus

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Combining athletic BY JOHN ELLIS prowess and artistic perspective with bold, theatrical flair, River North Dance Chicago INTERNATIONALLY performs its fresh take on ACCLAIMED contemporary jazz dance. River North Dance Chicago, PILOBOLUS led by Artistic Director Frank A returning favorite Chaves, aims for audiences of Asheville audiences, to feel the complete specPilobolus Dance Theatre trum of human emotions performs its breathtaking in a single evening, and to combination of humor leave them feeling joyful and and invention. Using exhilarated at the end of each everything from acrobatics program. to puppetry and shadow Founded in 1989, River imagery, Pilobolus creates North Dance Chicago has a metamorphosis on stage established itself as one of between physicality and River North Dance Chicago Chicago’s leading dance illusion. Photo: Cheryl Mann companies, and one of the Named after an evermost popular national repchanging organism, and ertory companies, receiving drawing inspiration from critical acclaim in the U.S. biology, Pilobolus has and internationally. created a dance vocabulary River North Dance all its own. With its novel Chicago’s repertoire features approach to dance infused core works by Frank Chaves with humor, science and that are augmented with an incredible feats of the huarray of pieces by nationman body, Pilobolus makes ally and internationally modern dance accessible renowned choreographers. and fun for all. Performed by highly skilled Pre-Show Event and emotive dancers, these pieces explore new types of During the perdance to keep the mix new, formances the theatre but Chaves is careful never conducts a raffle to benefit to let the company stray the Youth Education Scholfrom its jazz roots. arship (Y.E.S.) Fund. The The company’s highly theatre’s Y.E.S. Fund proregarded residency provides children the opportugrams and outreach include nity to experience the arts Street Beat: Dance Through by attending Matinee Series Pilobolus Photo: John Kane the Decades – a social hisperformances. tory of the 20th Century through dance; Patrons can purchase raffle tickets for classroom workshops, open rehearsals and only $5 for a chance to win prize packages curtain talks. from regional businesses and artists such as art and craft gallery items, restaurant gift Intersections Pre-Show Discussion certificates, homemade goods, tickets for For insight and increased enjoyment area performing arts venues and attractions, of the performances, ticket holders can retail and services, and more. attend free pre-performance discussions, Winners are announced at the end of lead by Artistic Director Frank Chaves of each evening. Drinks and snacks will be River North Dance Chicago, in The Forum available for purchase throughout the eveat Pack Place at 7 p.m. before both perforning. All raffle ticket proceeds benefit local mances. students. As part of Diana Wortham Theatre’s ongoing commitment to arts education, IF River North Dance Chicago will visit a local YOU Pilobolus, March 19 & 20 at 8 school to host a master class for young dance GO p.m. Tickets: $48; Student $45; students. Child $20. To purchase tickets call the Diana Wortham IF Theatre box office at (828) 257-4530 or visit YOU River North Dance Chicago, www.dwtheatre.com. Student Rush tickets GO March 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. Tickets: ($10 for students with valid I.D.) are sold $40; Student $35; Child $15. the day of the show, based on availability.


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RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

Saturday, March 23 at 5 p.m. First,

Established in 1997 • Volume Sixteen, Number Seven

MARCH 2013 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Managing Editor: Beth Gossett Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Staff Photographers: Liza Becker, Erica Mueller Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, Sharon Bell, Carol Pearce Bjorlie, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Beth Gossett, Johanna Hagarty, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Marilynne Herbert, John Horrocks, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Kay Miller, April Nance, Ted Olson, Jennifer Pickering, T. Oder, R. Woods, Dennis Ray, Alice Sebrell, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, March 2013, Vol. 16 No. 7

4 Performance

Diana Wortham Theatre . . . . . . . . . 4 Amici Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Lawrence Brownlee Masterclass . . . 7 Do Tell Storytelling Festival . . . . . 34

6 Stage Preview

The Understudy at NC Stage . . . . . 6

11 Books

The Beautiful Game . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 A Love Reborn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Sapphire Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

10 Fine Art

Folk Art Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 GD Whalen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Nancy Silver – Fine Artist . . . . . . . 20

12 Columns

Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . James Cassara - Music . . . . . . . . . . Eddie LeShure - Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . Greg Vineyard - Fine Art . . . . . . . . Bill Walz - Artful Living . . . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon . Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . .

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15 Music

Paper Bird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charlie Parr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jay Sanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Kennedys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wendy Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LEAF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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23 Movie Reviews

Asheville Talent Slam This exciting annual fund-raiser and talent competition is open to anyone at least 13 years old living in WNC who wants to strut their stuff in front of a live audience. Three winners will be awarded: $500 for first place, $300 for second place, and $200 for third place, plus $50 gift certificates for 3rd, 4th, and 5th place. Contestants will also receive professional feedback from local celebrity judges. The event is a benefit for Eblen Charities and the steveNyou non-profit restaurant fund. Admission for both audience and performers is just $10 thru Etix, or $15 day of the show. The showcase will begin at 7 p.m. on March 15 at Jubilee, 46 Wall St. in downtown Asheville. Performers must register by March 4. Visit www.bioflyer. wordpress.com/asheville-sing-slam.

SPECIAL SECTIONS River Arts District. . . . . . . . . . . . PG 9 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 33

select a handcrafted bowl from a collection donated by area potters. Next, fill your bowl with a hearty meal of soup, salad, bread and dessert. Enjoy live entertainment and the company of new and old friends. Take your bowl home with you to keep as a reminder of hunger in our local and global communities. All proceeds from this event will go directly to the Clay and Cherokee County Food Banks. Tickets are $25. Extra bowls may be purchased at the event for $20. Held at the John C. Campbell Folk School, Olive Dame Campbell Dining Hall, One Folk School Road, Brasstown, NC 28902. Call 1-800FOLK-SCH (365-5724), or (828) 837-2775, or visit www.folkschool.org.

Julia C. Burr Awarded Sculpture Commission in Greensboro Black Mountain Sculptor Julia Burr has been commissioned to design, fabricate and install an artistic bus bench and shelter in downtown Greensboro, NC. The artistic bus shelter won the organization’s “Big Idea” 2012 competition. The magic of the transit shelter’s design comes from the curved structure and more than 20,000 translucent green marbles sandwiched between expanded metal walls. Visit www.jcburr.com

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us On Facebook Win monthly prizes to area restaurants and attractions!

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 23

28 Shops

Oil & Vinegar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Thyme in the Garden . . . . . . . . . . . 35

On the Cover: GD Whalen Photography PAGE

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30 What to Do Guide

Rhizome & Frog Sto . . . . . . . . . . . Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 5


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stage preview The Big Dipper: Calendar, Compass and Clock What is the most familiar star pattern in the sky? Red Herring Puppets has created a stellar production that explores diverse cultural legends and scientific facts about the Big Dipper. This family friendly performance features beautifully crafted marionettes, animated projections, live actors, and original music. More than half the world’s population sees the Big Dipper most of the year. Red Herring’s creation includes stories from the ancient Chinese, the classical Greeks, the Micmac Indians of Northern Maine and Nova Scotia, and the southern slaves who sought freedom in the North by following the “drinking gourd.” The tales are supported by visual charts that explain how the stars can be used to tell time, keep track of the seasons, and guide our way at night.

IF YOU GO: The Big Dipper:

Calendar, Compass, and Clock, Saturday, March 23 at the Diana Wortham Theatre at 2 p.m. All tickets are $8. For reservations call (828) 2574530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com

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The Understudy at NC Stage

In The Understudy, playwright Theresa Rebeck takes the audience behind the resa scenes to explore the ridiculousness and brilliance of the business of theatre, film, and acting. The cast includes some familiar faces – Scott Treadway and Neela Muñoz – and a new face to NC Stage, Swannanoa native Matt Lutz. Harry (Scott Treadway) just got an acting job understudying in a runaway Broadway hit production of Franz Kafka’s undiscovered masterpiece. He’s understudying a mid-level action movie star (Matt Lutz) whose most recent movie grossed $67 million in its opening weekend. While they’re slugging it out during the first put-in rehearsal about the nobility (or lack thereof) of each other’s status in the profession, the stage manager, Roxanne

(Neela Muñoz), has had enough! Treadway was last seen at NC Stage in The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged). Muñoz directed the NC Stage production of Boeing Boeing Boeing, which starred Treadway and NC Stage Artistic Director, Charlie Flynn-McIver. Matt Lutz had a recent stint on Broadway in the musical Bonnie and Clyde. IF YOU The Understudy plays through GO March 10. Performances are

Wednesdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. as well as Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $16 - $28, based on day of the week. For more information or to purchase tickets visit www.ncstage.org or call (828) 239-0263.

THE MAGNETIC THEATRE PRSENTS THE WORLD PREMIERE OF

The Strange and Tragical Adventures of Pinocchio

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Or: Why Didn’t I Just Stay a Damn Puppet? A reimagining by John Crutchfield The Magnetic Theatre will present the world premiere of celebrated local playwright John Crutchfield’s The Strange And Tragical Adventures of Pinocchio, or: Why Didn’t I Just Stay A Damn Puppet?, an exciting new reimagining from the author of notable Magnetic hits Landscape With Missing Person and The Songs of Robert. In his latest work, Crutchfield takes

the original story of Pinocchio, famously “prettified” by Walt Disney in the 1940 animated film, and not only returns it to its hallucinatory roots, but turns it completely on its head. Billed as a “morality tale in two inappropriate acts,” the play features local puppet-master Madison J. Cripps as the title character in a wild and irreverent take on what it means to be human.

HART STUDIO PRESENTS Falsettoland HART Studio’s last show, I Do! I Do!, presented a warm portrait of a tradiDo!, tional marriage. For contrast get ready for a very different family. Falsettoland is a modern musical, written by James Lapine, with music and lyrics by William Finn. It’s 1981, the year of Jason’s Bar Mitzvah. Join Marvin, his wife Trina, his psychiatrist Mendel, his gay lover Whizzer, Cordelia and Dr. Charlotte (the lesbians from next door), as they celebrate Jason’s Bar Mitzvah and discover the power of love and friendship in this very “modern” family, while Whizzer comes

Scott Treadway and Neela Muñoz

face to face with a mysterious, lifethreatening, as yet undefined illness. HART’s production includes Rod Leigh, Eric Martinez, Strother Stingley, Tabitha Judy, Kelli Brown Mullinix, Oskar Olszewski, and Jennifer Russ. The production is directed by Justin Slack.

IF YOU GO: Falsettoland, March

1 & 2 at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday March 3 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15 for all adults and $8 for students. HART’s Feichter Studio in Waynesville, NC. To make reservations call the box office

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“The whole thing is slightly crazed, both in theme and scope. It’s definitely the most ambitious thing I’ve ever written,” says Crutchfield, whom audiences will remember as also being the creator of Solstice and Ruth. Crutchfield himself directs an ensemble cast that includes local star Darren Marshall as Geppetto, Laura Tratnik as The Blue Girl, Valerie Meiss (recently seen in the Magnetic hit Sex and How To Have It It) and two actors new to the Magnetic stage, Joe Carroll, Peter Lundblad. The production is stage-managed by Bonnie Currie, with innovative set design by Kehren Barbour, sound design by Mary Zogzas, costume design by Laura Tratnik, and lighting design by Jason Williams. This exciting new adaptation follows on the heels of the hit comedies Sex and How To Have It and The 30th Annual Bernstein Family Christmas Spectacular Spectacular, proving yet again that The Magnetic Theatre has become the go-to spot for Asheville theatre-goers to get thrilling, daring and innovative theatre. Please note that, because of language and sexual content this show is recommended for mature audiences only. IF YOU The Strange And Tragical GO Adventures of Pinocchio. Tickets

Cast of Falsettoland

at (828) 456-6322 and leave a message. Tickets are also available on line at www. harttheatre.com.

$15. Preview show on March 1 for $8. Performances are Thursdays through Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., March 2 through March 23. All performances are at The Magnetic Theatre in the Glen Rock Depot, 372 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www. themagnetictheatre.org


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International opera superstars come only a few per generation. These singers must possess a rare and magical combination of natural vocal ability, expert training, and great artistic sensitivity.

Lawrence Brownlee Masterclass & Recital

of diversity. Area arts educators will attend to discover ways to involve more students who fall outside of the reach of traditional arts programs. One individual who helped open doors for Brownlee was Dr. David E. Starkey, Asheville will be professor emeritus treated to an exquisite of Youngstown State experience as a singer University. He met among the ranks of Brownlee as a high Renee Flemming and school student through Joyce DiDonato plans a community choir to debut a U.S. recital program. Starkey imtour here in the artistic mediately recognized capital of the mounBrownlee’s potential tains. and served as one of Lawrence Brownhis first teachers and lee is recognized worldLawrence Brownlee, operatic tenor. mentors. It is because wide for his singing, of this relationship that but he is also known for Brownlee has scheduled the premier of his the warmth of his character and has done U.S. recital tour through the Asheville Lyric much to set the stage for a new generation Opera, founded and directed by Starkey’s of opera singers. Brownlee’s defining charson, David C. Starkey. acteristics are his unique repertoire focus on The recital will take place at the Diana bel canto tenor roles and a voice “unlike that Wortham Theater and is sure to include of any other modern singer,” (Opera News some of the highest level singing Asheville Magazine), but discussions of race in the audiences have heard to date. operatic world have followed him throughFollowing the recital, Brownlee will out his career. meet opera supporters for dinner and music While a few pioneering singers broke at the Grove Park Inn. Brownlee’s stay at the barriers in past generations, there is still a Inn adds another great name to the roster trend to cast Africa-American singers in of celebrities who have already graced the niche roles. Baritone George Shirley, whom stone-surrounded front doors. His visit Brownlee names as an influential figure, was occurs at a particularly relevant time as the the first male singer recognized for surpassinn commemorates a special portion of their ing racial barriers in opera casting and a few year-long centennial celebration to their female singers, such as Leontyne Price, have incredible tradition of musical guests, inreached international acclaim. cluding the legendary operatic tenor, Enrico The issues of race remain, however, and Caruso. His early March stay also marks the Brownlee’s career has marked the beginning close of Black History Month and shortly of a much more open discussion about the follows President Barack Obama’s stay at realities facing African-American singers the Inn. today, while creating an encouraging picture Asheville area music and opera fans through his success on stages throughout are sure to be thrilled by the events of the the world. weekend and as the effects flow back into Brownlee will engage these topics and the roots of this city as a landmark for great more during the kick-off event to his weekarts education and performance. end in Asheville: a Community Masterclass held at the historic YMI Cultural Center. The masterclass will consist of professional feedback for four vocal performance majors IF YOU Tickets for the recital or seats from WNC colleges and universities. GO at the Grove Park Inn dinner can Brownlee will then take questions be purchased by contacting the from middle and high school students adAsheville Lyric Opera at (828) 236-0670. dressing topics like: artistic development, Attendance at the community masterclass facing economic challenges while pursuing is by invitation only, but if you would like training in your field, and, specifically, the to recommend a middle or high school lessons Brownlee has learned carving out a student, please call the number above. career path in a field notorious for its lack

Seen Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links Free Ad Design Easy Monthly Billing

Motivate your customers to take action. Offer different deals every few weeks. Offer a limited number of free consultations or special deals. “Only the first 50 people….” This gets people to respond now. Rapid River Magazine can help promote your business. Call Rick Hills, (828) 452-0228.

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Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 7


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AmiciMusic presents

Jazzical and Song Bird

AmiciMusic will present two great shows highlighting the tremendous variety of musical styles. First up is “Jazzical,” a program that explores the Jennifer Smith convergence of classical and jazz music, featuring Grammy-award winning bassist Eliot Wadopian, flutist Lea Kibler, drummer Byron Hedgepeth, and pianist Daniel Weiser performing Claude Bolling’s Second Suite for Flute, Jazz Piano, Bass, and Drums and Lea Kibler other works. Wadopian has won two Grammys as bassist of the Paul Winter Consort and has appeared on over one hundred CDs and performed in 29 countries, playing a wide variety of styles, from classical to jazz to world music. Flutist Lea Kibler has been hailed by critics as “bewitching and unforgettable” and a “top drawer flutist.” She can be heard on numerous recordings with such diverse artists as Placido Domingo and Gloria Estefan.

JAZZICAL PERFORMANCES Friday, March 8 at 7 p.m. House Concert in Hendersonville. Seating is limited and reservations are required. $35 pp includes dessert/hors d’oeuvres and wine. Reserve online at www.amicimusic.org or contact Dan at (828) 505-2903 or via e-mail at daniel@amicimusic.org

Saturday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m. White Horse in Black Mountain at 105 Montreat Rd. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students/children. Visit www.whitehorseblackmountain. com or call (828) 669-0816

Sunday, March 10 at 3 p.m. First Baptist Church in Weaverville at 62 N. Main St. Suggested donation is $20 for adults and free for children.

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SONG BIRD PERFORMANCES AmiciMusic celebrates Easter and spring with the return of crowd favorite and 2010 Blue Ridge Talent Search winner, soprano Jennifer Smith. Song Bird will Eliot Wadopian Byron Hedgepeth showcase Ms. Smith’s tremendous range and ability to sing in all styles, from clasSunday, March 31 at 3 p.m. sical to jazz to musical theatre to pop. House Concert in Fletcher. $35pp Ms. Smith will team up with pianist includes hors d’oeuvres and wine. Daniel Weiser in this electric show Reservations required and seating is with music spanning over two hunlimited. Call Dan at (828) 505-2903 dred years. to RSVP. You may also pay online at www.amicimusic.org.

Friday, March 29 at 7:30 p.m.

First Congregational UCC in downtown Asheville, 20 Oak Street. Suggested donation of $20.

Saturday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m. White Horse in Black Mountain at 105 Montreat Rd. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for students/children. Call (828) 669-0816 or visit www. whitehorseblackmountain.com.

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Daniel Weiser

AmiciMusic is a professional chamber music organization dedicated to performing the highest quality music in intimate venues and non-traditional spaces.

For more information please visit www.amicimusic.org

ASHEVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES PRESENTS

The Jasper String Quartet

The fourth BY MARILYNNE concert of the HERBERT 60th Anniversary Season of the for the Arts. Asheville ChamSymphony ber Music Series Magazine will include works featured the by Beethoven, Jasper String Opus 18, No.4; Quartet as one Kernis, “Saraof five emerging bande” from The Jasper String Quartet chamber groups Quartet No. 2; in the next genand Schubert, eration of chamber music stars. Quartet No. 14 in D minor “Death of the Maiden.” IF The Jasper String Quartet reYOU Friday, March 8 at 8 p.m. at ceived the Cleveland Quartet Award GO the Unitarian Universalist to quartets on the way to establishing Church of Asheville, 1 Edwin major careers. Many ACMS subscribPlace at Charlotte Street. ers already know they were remarkable after the quartet’s 2011 performances Tickets are $35 and are available at the at the Swannanoa Festival. door. For more information please call They are the ensemble-in resiNathan Shirley at (828) 259-3626, or dence at Oberlin Conservatory, and visit www.ashevillechambermusic.org. Students under the age of 25 may they have recently completed a twoattend concerts free of charge. year residency at the Caramoor Center


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ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTRICT Support Local Artists ❖ Support Local Creativity ❖ Buy Local Indulge and Support Self Expression ❖ Invest in Our Future

ABOUT THE RIVER ARTS DISTICT RC

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The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 165+ artist member strong collective, who, along with dozens of Associate Members and Friends, provides a unique experience Image by Greg Vineyard for locals and visitors alike who are looking for high-quality, affordable art for any aspect of their lives. The River Arts District is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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River Arts Studio Buildings

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More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709 or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

* 240 Clingman * 347 Depot * 97 Roberts Street * Cotton Mill Studios * CURVE studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Northlight Studios * Odyssey Center * The Old Wood Co.

* Phil Mechanic * Pink Dog Creative * Riverside Studios * Riverview Station * Roberts St. Studios * Roots Studios * Studio 375 Depot * The Wedge * Warehouse Studios

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fine arts & crafts The Folk Art Center Celebrates National Quilting Day

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Celebrate National Quilting Day on Saturday, March 16 at the Folk Art Center. Connie Brown and Robin Brooks, who are members of the Asheville Quilt Guild and the Southern Highland Craft Guild, will demonstrate their craft from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. in the center’s lobby. The National Quilting Association, Inc. began sponsoring National Quilting Day in 1991. Quilting groups across the country use the event as a way to raise awareness of the traditional craft. At the Folk Art Center, Connie Brown, who is also a quilt historian, will present a variety of “Trip Around the World” quilts. The “Trip Around the World” pattern is made up of many squares of similar colors pieced on the diagonal

PG. 32

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APRIL NANCE

around a central square. The lines of similarly colored squares surround one center square, and the contrasting light and dark squares give the Trip Around the World quilt. impression of orbiting the world. Visitors are also invited to bring a Appalachian mountains. To become quilt – a family heirloom, an antique a member of the organization, artpurchase, or a vintage quilt with a ists’ work has to pass a rigorous jury unique design, for questions and analprocess, ensuring the work displayed is ysis by Connie. Helpful information always the highest quality. about how to care for quilts and how to learn more about the IF process will be provided. YOU For more information GO about the Folk Art Center’s Robin Brooks will National Quilting Day demonstrate all elements celebration, call (828) 298-7928 or of quilt-making from devisit www.craftguild.org. sign to piecing to machine The Folk Art Center is located at stitching. She will share Milepost 382 of the Blue Ridge examples of all stages of Parkway, just north of the Hwy 70 the process. entrance in east Asheville. During the event, Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center will feature a variety of traditional and contemporary quilts made by members of the by Leicester Valley Clay Southern Highland Craft Guild, which represents Connie Brown selects books from the SHCG Library From March 22-23 Doc Welty to share during National Quilting Day. craftspeople living in the of Leicester Valley Clay will be

Handturned Pottery

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Story Book Characters

Go Figure Dolls, a local group of art doll artists, will sponsor its first exhibit of figurative art based on characters from children’s literature. This exhibit is a fun way to celebrate National Reading Month, the birthday of author Dr. Seuss, and Read Across America. The groups goal is to encourage children not only to read, but also to become young artists and authors. The exhibit will be composed of original art dolls, based

10 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

on characters from children’s literature. Some of the books featured will be the work of local authors. Doll artists and authors will give brief presentations about their work at area schools during the month of March. Presentations are available on a limited basis to interested schools and local libraries. IF YOU Story Book Characters, GO on display from March 1

through April 13, 2013 at the Buncombe County Library. A reception will be held Thursday, March 7 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the children’s department of the Buncombe County Public Library, 67 Haywood Street in Asheville.

offering traditional handturned pottery in booth #14 during the 16th Annual Catawba Valley Pottery Festival. The festival features works by 110 traditional and contemporary potters, as well as antique pots. At the Hickory Metro Convention Center, I-40 exit 125. Friday night preview party 7-10 p.m., with dinner $40. Saturday admission $6.

IF YOU GO: For more information

please call (828) 324-7294, e-mail info@CatawbaValleyPotteryFestival. org, or visit the website, www. CatawbaValleyPotteryFestival.org.


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authors ~ books ~ readings

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Lorca and Neruda and

The Beautiful Game

New Native Press, a small New independent publisher based in Cullowhee, North Carolina, has recently issued a book offering new translations of poems composed by the internationally recognized Spanish-language poets Federico Garcia Lorca and Pablo Neruda. Both of those poets have long been familiar figures to serious fans of poetry, with all of Lorca’s and most of Neruda’s work translated into English over the past half-century by various translators. That being said, this new book—featuring 18 Lorca poems and 26 Neruda poems translated by Asheville-based poet Caleb Beissert—is welcome because it possesses an admirable unity of theme and mood, and that unity is reflected in the book’s title, which is Beautiful. And indeed the Lorca and Neruda poems selected for translation by Beissert—and the resulting translations of those poems—are all, in one way or another, beautiful. The book does not employ that sadly overused word superficially or sentimentally; rather, Beissert is interested in better understanding the true nature of beauty, and this quest constitutes the book’s underlying motivation—to understand and celebrate the beautiful game of poetry as practiced by two masters whose works took shape within the Spanish language yet which have universal meaning. Beissert’s book, though somewhat slim at 80 pages, has large, noble intentions, which is forecast in the book’s profound epigraph from Albert Camus: “Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should stretch out over the whole of time.” Even though they grew up in disparate sections of the Spanish-speaking world

REVIEWED BY TED

Sensitive, memorable translations. OLSON

(Lorca in Spain, and Neruda in Chile) and though their poetry was markedly different (as Beissert explains in his introduction), the two poets knew one another and were near contemporaries (Neruda, of course, lived 35 years longer, given the execution of Lorca by Franco’s army during the Spanish Civil War); both poets in their poetry celebrated their nation (Lorca in fact spoke primarily for a region in Spain) and both were heavily influenced by literary modernism. Beissert succeeds in this grafting of two separate canons because he understands these poets, their worldviews, and their stylistic intentions. The 44 original poems by Lorca and Neruda included in Beautiful (some of the poems being well-known in the U.S. through previous translations by various translators, other poems being overlooked gems from those poets’ canons) bear the extraordinary philosophical heft and stylistic grace long associated with those two poets. Generally speaking, Beissert’s translations “embody the spirit of the original poems” without being bound by the constraints of literal translation. (Potential readers should note that, while the book does not provide the Spanish-language texts of the 44 poems, Beissert’s translations are faithful to the originals.) Beautiful includes a lucid, reflective introductory essay in which Beissert conveys his thoughts about the process and practice of translating poems. Longtime readers of modern world poetry who discover this book will already know something about Lorca and Neruda, yet

MOHSIN HAMID READING & BOOKSIGNING

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Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia tells the aastonishing stonishing and riveting tale of a man’s journey from impoverished rural boy to corporate tycoon. Hamid’s first two novels established him as a radically inventive storyteller with his finger on the world’s pulse. His equally ambitious new novel steals its

shape from the business self-help books devoured by striving youths all over “rising Asia.”

IF YOU GO: Mohsin Hamid Reading

& Booksigning, Saturday, March 9 at 1 p.m. Tickets are $10 each and include a $5 coupon toward a purchase of How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia. Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more details visit www.malaprops. com or call (828) 254-6734.

those relatively unfamiliar with the two poets might yearn for more biographical information and historical context than is provided therein. Both poets led fascinating lives, and yet the book does not direct people excited by these poems to other informational sources offering additional perspectives about the poets (it wouldn’t have detracted from its aesthetic integrity, for example, had the book included a short bibliography mentioning, for instance, such publications as Ian Gibson’s acclaimed biography of Lorca and Adam Feinstein’s useful biography of Neruda). Yet, by showcasing resonant images of oriental visual art on its front and back covers, Beautiful takes a different stance: it is a book less interested in exploring Lorca and Neruda as Spanish-language poets who worked in specific cultural contexts than it is interested in appreciating Lorca and Neruda as individual poets who were infinitely complex as singular visionaries. And what of the translations? Beissert captures their mystery (Lorca’s poems, particularly), their majesty (Neruda’s, especially), and their grace (found in the work of both poets, certainly). As an example, here is Beissert’s evocative rendering of Lorca’s poem “The Six Strings” (“Las seis cuerdas”): The guitar cries out to dreams. The sobs of the lost souls escape from its round mouth. And like a tarantula it weaves a great star to catch sighs, floating in their black cistern of wood. Is there a better poem anywhere that evokes the magical and metaphorical powers of the guitar? Well, I know of a poem that at least equals “Las seis cuerdas” in paying homage to the instrument that Beethoven referred to as “an orchestra unto itself”: a poem entitled “La guitarra,” also by Lorca. I hope someday to read an English-language rendering of that poem in some future collection showcasing more of Beissert’s sensitive, memorable translations.

MARCH

We host numerous Readings, Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING More events posted online.

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Thursday, March 7 at 7 p.m. DANA SACHS, The Secret of the Nightingale Palace. Saturday, March 9 at 1 p.m. MOHSIN HAMID, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia. Tickets are $10 and include a $5 coupon toward a purchase of the book. Saturday, March 9 at 7 p.m. DENISE KIERNAN, The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II. Monday, March 11 at 7 p.m. VLADIMIR ALEXANDROV, The Black Russian. Tuesday, March 12 at 7 p.m. Soul Listening with Nancy Kehr. Wednesday, March 13 at 7 p.m. TAIYE SELASI, Ghana Must Go. Thursday, March 14 at 7 p.m. DEBORAH HICKS, The Road Out: A Teacher’s Odyssey in Poor America. Saturday, March 16 at 7 p.m. CHARLES VESS, The Cats of Tanglewood Forest. Monday, March 18 at 7 p.m. SARAH GRAVES, Dead Level. Tuesday, March 19 at 7 p.m. MARIE MANUCHEHRI, Intuitive Self-Healing. Wednesday, March 20 at 7 p.m. Drinking Water: A History, with JAMES SALZMAN Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. DANNY BERNSTEIN, The Mountains-To-Sea Trail Across North Carolina. Saturday, March 23 at 3 p.m. JAMES MICHAEL SHEA, Plucking Wolf Fur: A Story of One Arm, One Dog and an American Family. Tuesday, March 26 at 7 p.m. JEANIENE FROST, Twice Tempted: A Night Prince Novel. Friday, March 29 at 7 p.m. BRUCE JOHNSON, Tales of the Grove Park Inn.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 32 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Ted Olson was the poetry columnist for Rapid River Magazine from 2009-2012. His most recent book is Revelations: Poems, which he will be discussing and signing at Malaprop’s Bookstore in Asheville on Sunday, May 5.

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 11


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books ~ poetry ~ readings The Poet’s Voice

Poets love the sound of words.

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

The privilege of being the new Poetry – Editor for this magazine carries a responsibility to our community of writers and readers. You know that old saying, “Crime doesn’t pay,” well, APPALACHIAN MEDITATION neither does poetry. Poets write Watching these mountains, because they can’t not write. I want waiting for saints to sing, to celebrate “the word” with you. listening for their thin voices Together, we will be rich! to pierce the cloud-wreathed shroud, I am learning to love a new I hear the hills hidden heartbeat, world. Instead of Minnesota’s landthe lub-dub lub-dub of the green cathedral. scape of sky-reflecting lakes, I am I stand beneath spruce spires, beech buttresses living in the Blue Ridge mountains of and gargoyles: eagle, owl, mountain cat. Asheville, near the French Broad Riv....... er’s shoal-shallow banks. My poems sound the way I talk, using words like “veranda, magnolia,” that made me listen to myself when I said them in St. Paul. IF (No one says, “veranda or magnolia” in the YOU Carol Pearce Bjorlie will give GO a recital and reading from her Upper Mid-West.) recently published book of poems, I grew up in Richmond, Virginia, listenBehind the Cello, at Calvary Episcopal ing to my father quote Romance poets, and Church in Fletcher on March 17 at 4 p.m. my mother sing. I hope to sing on the page. Admission is free. Donations will benefit I began to write when grief put words in Calvary’s Food Pantry. my mouth. My father died on my sixteenth birthday, and I began to write in green ink. What makes you write? In MinneI want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, sota I wrote about clouds. Here, I sing of readers and listeners. We need each other. mountains. Contact Carol by e-mail to thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

IN THE COMING MONTHS... I want to keep you in the loop about readings, festivals, new books, my favorite authors on writing, and also be the teacher I am called to be, introducing my “Poetry Toolbox” along the way. I hope to interview Keith Flynn in April, (National Poetry Month) and review his book, Colony Collapse Disorder, and give you a heads up about Word Fest.

CHUCK BRODSKY This down to earth musical storyteller, with his dry, barb-witted social commentary, knows that the best stories are the little things in the lives of everyday people trying to muddle through with some grace.

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A Love Reborn WRITTEN BY DANA LYONS

A Love Reborn is the tale of Queen Byrgamon and her love of a lifetime, Byrgamon Kedare. Together they were set to rule Africa’s Northern Plains in 8,000 BCE, but fate deals the couple a horrible blow in the guise of power-obsessed General Omon Bahk-ir, the leader of Queen Byrgamon’s armies. Queen Byrgamon possesses the power to manipulate space and matter and between that and her Journal of War, Byrgamon has been unstoppable in waging war against her enemies. This knowledge consumes Bahk-ir and to possess it, he ends the life of the Queen...but not before the Queen hides her Journal of War in her temple. Kedare, unconsolable, swears that he will see Byrgamon’s life avenged. Flash forward to present day. Max Parrish, newly arisen from a coma has made a discovery...a past life...the lover of Queen Byrgamon. After studying archaeology at Brown, Max discovers that, indeed, Byrgamon lives again...in the body of Phoenix Donovan, another archaeologist. Moreover, Bahk-ir has also been reborn and has made the discovery of Phoenix. He approaches her and enlists her to go on a dig...at the temple... where he plans to have her rediscover

Brodsky infuses these stories with humanity and humor, making them resonate profoundly with his listeners.

IF YOU GO: Friday, March, 8 at 8 p.m.

Tickets $12. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. Call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com

REVIEWED BY BETH GOSSETT her Journal of War...and reap the power he lost centuries before. A Love Reborn is a classic read reminiscent of some of the great love stories in history like Othello or Romeo and Juliet Juliet. Lyons has written yet again another wonderful book, which is at times exciting, cheerful and sad while never sliding into sappy or melodramatic which a lesser writer could have easily done. Her prose is tight and never dull. She manages to take hold of the reader on page one and propels her forward as if on a rocket for the next 200 pages. If you’re looking for good read to curl up on a rainy day, this one may be perfect for you. A Love Reborn is available at Amazon for Kindle, and as a paperback. Autographed copies are available at Tribal Trends, Main Street, Hendersonville.

Poetry Contest Winners Due to the overwhelming response, winning poems will be published in the April 2013 issue of Rapid River Magazine.

Great values & styles

Your Book Advertised Here

FREE Wine Tastings on Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Tasting wine is not only fun, but it presents a chance to learn about wine and what it is about a particular wine that you like, or don’t like. You can sip while you shop. Find some new favorites — try it before you buy it. We will usually have a few whites and a few reds open, with the occassional guest speaker. Please stop by!

Wine Retail

~

Tastings ~ Wine Classes

Great wines for any occasion and budget.

12 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

$49/Month www.theAshevilleWineGuy.com 555 Merrimon Ave. (828) 254-6500

In Print & Online!

Call (828) 646-0071 Today www.rapidrivermagazine.com


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books ~ readings ~ lectures AT MALAPROP’S

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Danny Bernstein Reading & Booksigning Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m.

Join favorite local hiker, authoritative guide, and author Danny Bernstein, as she presents and signs The Mountains-To-Sea Trail Across North Carolina: Walking a Thousand Miles Through Wildness, Culture and History History. This travel narrative details the natural and cultural history of the thousandmile trail that stretches from Clingman's Dome in the Smoky Mountains to Jockey's Ridge in the Outer Banks.

IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 254-6734 or visit www.malaprops.com.

Traveling to Marshall Led by the Spirit in the North Carolina Mountains Author Jack Thomas shares his personal story. The book has won awards from the Old Buncombe County Genealogical Society and the North Carolina Society of Historians. Two readings and booksignings will be held. Friday, March 22 from 5:30 until 7:30 at Grateful Steps Publishing House and Bookshop, 159 S. Lexington, Asheville. Call (828) 277-0998 or visit www.gratefulsteps.org. Saturday, March 23 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Penland & Sons, 50 Main Street in Marshall, NC. Phone (828) 649-2811.

Room and Studio Space For Rent

Terry Tempest Williams READING & BOOKSIGNING

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Terry Tempest Williams is the awardwinning author of fourteen books, including Leap, An Unspoken Hunger, Refuge, and Finding F inding Beauty in a Broken World. In When Women Were Birds: FiftyFour Variations on Voice, she recounts memories of her mother, ponders her own faith, and contemplates the notion of absence and presence in art and in our world.

Anne Lamott, author of Imperfect Birds, calls When Women Were Birds “brilliant, meditative, and full of surprises, wisdom, and wonder.”

• Beach and Campfire area • Painting Studio • Woodshop • Mat Cutting/ Framing Shop

IF YOU Terry Tempest Williams Reading GO & Booksigning, Friday, March 8

Terry Tempest Williams, author of When Women Were Birds.

Danny Bernstein

Creekside Artists Retreat

at 7 p.m. Tickets for this event are $18 each and include a paperback copy of the book. Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore, 55 Haywood St., downtown Asheville. For more information visit www.malaprops.com or call (828) 254-6734.

Share house and four outbuildings. 1 acre on Richland Creek in Waynesville, across from park. MUST love dogs. Free Cable. $400/month plus utilities.

Call Rick (828) 452-0228

Local Paramedic Turns International Author

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Rebekah Honeycutt has many titles: Mother; Paramedic; Student, but has recently acquired a new label: author. After selfpublishing her first book, Sapphire Eyes: The T he Secret Society of Magical Medics, Ms. Honeycutt became an international author, by selling her novel in six countries, within the first month. Rebekah takes readers on a journey through the world of Emergency Medical Services, while adding a twist of mystical finesse. Rebekah began her career in emergency services as a volunteer firefighter, and then worked her way through college to obtain the credentials of a paramedic. She is now working on a degree in American Sign Language - Interpreter Education where she plans to not only become an interpreter, but to also educate emergency providers about Deaf culture and American Sign Language. Rebekah had originally created her characters within a dream. Once awake, she frantically scribbled the events which turned into her first novel. As she wrote the last sentence, she knew there had to be more. With the first book in the series complete, she published Sapphire Eyes January 1, 2013 as a New Years’ resolution to initiate her dreams. She is currently working on the second book, Golden Tears which is expected to be completed by 2014.

Kyelena, the main character, is a single-mother and EMT who receives an invitation she can’t ignore. She and her best friend, Layla, are inducted into a male-dominated secret society comprised of medics throughout the globe. By accepting their offer she unknowingly creates a war within the new world she has come to love. Will her newly acquired magical abilities be enough? You can find Sapphire Eyes at Blue Ridge Bookstore in Waynesville, NC where it is available in paperback format. IF YOU Blue Ridge Bookstore will host GO a reading and book signing of

Sapphire Eyes with Rebekah Honeycutt on March 16 at 3 p.m. Blue Ridge Books, 152 South Main Street, Waynesville, NC 28786. Call (828) 4566000 or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com Author Website: www.rebekahhoneycutt.wordpress.com Book Website: www.sapphireeyes.wordpress.com

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 13


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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Let’s take the chill off winter with a smattering of under the radar new releases and a fresh take on an older classic. As always I suggest you buy your music at any of the fine locally owned records shops Asheville is so fortunate to have. With rare exception, downloads are a distant second best.

Lady Lamb the Beekeeper Ripely Pine Ba Da Bing Records Everyone loves a “good things happen to good people” story and there’s few better than that of multi-instrumentalist Aly Spaltro, who records under the curious nomenclature of Lady Lamb the Beekeeper. While working the night shift at a Portland, Maine, video rental shop – the type of job that likely offers plenty of opportunity to observe and dissect human behavior – the 23 year old quietly crafted her music. Written and recorded over a four year period, with Spaltro putting what little spare energy, time, and money she could muster into the project, Ripely Pine is a rather strange beast: It’s a glowing but often bewildering stew of indie rock sing-along folk, and whatever else meandered through her rich but somewhat unfiltered imagination. The pulse is difficult to describe; it abruptly shifts from mellow and melodic to slightly irritating, but there’s a significant charm found in such odd fellows as “Regarding the Stairs” (a bit of dada like nonsense) and the lilting “Florence Berlin.” Spaltro gets the most out of her somewhat limited instrumental skills – none are played with particular precision or vibrancy – and her modest voice is just pleasant enough to carry the day. All of which sounds more like a left-handed compliment than I intend. Despite it all I found myself intrigued enough by Ripely Pine to give it several spins, and I suspect I’ll do so again. There’s plenty of mystery here, and who doesn’t enjoy a good puzzle? ***

Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale Buddy and Jim New West Records An album that might be better described as “Buddy and Jim meet the Everly Brothers” is as frustrating as it is infectious. Anyone hoping that the long rumored pairing of roots rock gods Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale might set new standards in country twang originality is going to be sorely disappointed in this set, but the truth is that expectations ran far too high and their own ambitions aimed a bit too low. 14 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

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Drawing upon a variety of American sounds – country, rock, bluegrass, soul, jazz, blues and rockabilly – Buddy and Jim is as casual affair as you might expect. It’s certainly well-crafted – and with such stellar support players as Stuart Duncan, and Russ Pahl leading the way one can hardly go wrong – but there’s remarkably little zip and energy between the two. The traditional numbers, especially the twangy grin of “The Train That Carried My Gal from Town” work best while most of the new material seem like cast offs from other, more substantial efforts. Only “It Hurts Me” which features Julie Miller on vocals, manages to catch and sustain some real fire in the belly. At less than 35 minutes Buddy and Jim is as offhand as it is dispensable: Nothing here is even remotely offensive, and there is certainly an air of good time fun. But neither will it attract new listeners to the wonderful body of work these two artists have independently created which is darn shame. Okay guys, you go this out of your system. Now let’s go back to making real records again. **

Nightlands Oak Island Secretly Canadian Records As bassist for the band War on Drugs Philadelphia based musician Dave Hartley has achieved a certain profile of success that allows him to branch out a bit, indulging whatever musical whims might strike his fancy while exploring his own inner workings. The son of a genetic engineer Hartley – who plays more instruments than some people can name – began working on his first solo outing, Forget the Mantra, during breaks between the sessions that would eventually become War on Drugs majestic 2011 release Slave Ambient. Two years later, with War on Drugs taking a hiatus for the road and studio, he returns with Oak Island,, an at times brilliant and oft perplexing mix (in a good way) of dreamy pop, loopy lyrics, and layer upon layer of sonic delight. It displays Hartley’s passion science as well as his love of 1970’s soft rock – a sidebar of that decade that hardly engenders fond memories. Yet it does so in surprising and reassuring fashion, turning a few musical conventions into wildly interesting detours. Building on the epic feel of its prede-

cessor Oak Island happily rifts on bands Hartley admires while retaining its own identity. Its skillfully juxtaposes the breeze of MOR radio music (the sort that existed four decades ago) with purposely ambivalent lyrics (“Born to Love”) and infectious pop ( “So Far So Long”). There’s even a bit of Average White Band type brass on “I Fell in Love with a Feeling” and some Weather Report inspired free form fusion. Much like Beck’s tributes to the classic (and not so much) albums he grew up grooving on, your reaction to Oak Island will largely depend on your affinity for the source material; it’s hard to tell whether Hartley is spoofing on or paying homage to a bygone era but either way there’s no shortage of happy memories found herein. And a few decades from now, as my ancestors travel past the boundaries of time and space (listening to music on who knows what devices) Oak Island might just inspire a few memories of their own. ****

Richard Barone Cool Blue Halo – 25 Anniversary Edition RBM Music About the only people who noticed the 1987 debut of former Bongo co-founder Richard Barone were the critics who, at the time of its release, were rightfully effusive in their praise; and while the album slowly gained a bit of cult status it never garnered much in the way of sales or long term momentum. Which remains a darn shame; it’s one of the finest albums of its time, and one that sounds even better with age. Making your debut album a live one was a bold creative move, but not such a great marketing strategy. Released on the fledgling PVC label – just weeks before it went belly up – I first encountered Cool Blue Halo in a dollar cassette bin a year or so later. It became one of those impulse buys – I was barely familiar with Barone but intrigued by anyone willing to cover both David Bowie’s “Man Who Sold The World” AND The Beatles’ “Cry Baby Cry” – that has repaid my meager investment again and again. Barone shifted from the snappy power pop of his New Jersey band (also critical darlings) to atmospheric but never indulgent chamber styled pop, and he did so with con‘CD’s’ continued on page 15


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 14

fidence and authority. He traded his backing band – a traditional ensemble of bass/drums/ guitar, for the innovative percussion of Valerie Naranjo and Jane Scarpantoni’s magical cello; he also added acoustic guitar to his own stripped down electric with brilliant results. The sound remains as unique 25 years after the fact as it was that May 31st evening at New York’s famous Bottom Line club. Difficult to obtain in the CD era, it has now been resurrected with remastered audio from the original tapes and eight bonus tracks for what is the definitive version of this overlooked gem.

A layer upon layer masterwork of shimmering delights. Barone mixes some Bongos tunes, and new (at the time) originals with the aforementioned covers of Bowie, The Beatles, and T Rex; everything is imaginatively rearranged for his backing musicians, in an iridescent, occasionally rocking, always inspired outing. The result is mesmerizing, a layer upon layer masterwork of shimmering delights the like of which is rarely heard. This deluxe reissue includes a companion two CD/DVD live package (released simultaneously but available separately) that finds Barone back in a different small New York City club in 2012, fronting the same stripped down band from way back when. He then adds guests Garth Hudson (accordion and piano), original producer Tony Visconti (on bass) and others that barely squeeze onto the tiny stage, rolling through some new songs and terrific versions of the Stones’ “Child of the Moon” and the Velvet Underground’s “I’ll Be Your Mirror” for a two hour set, beautifully captured on the DVD. A bonus 30 minute documentary reveals the history of the album and the recent concert, providing fascinating behind the scenes details to what is already an absorbing back story. It’s an invigorating concert that shows Barone remains as creative, vital and youthful looking as ever. Despite a solid solo career Barone has never matched the transcendent glow of Cool Blue Halo, and I doubt he ever will. If you missed it the first time around, which nearly everyone did, it’s never too late to latch onto the singer/songwriter’s magnetic, challenging and often dazzling art pop masterpiece. Even better, Barone now owns all rights to the record, so why immersing yourself in some fabulous music you’ll also be putting some well deserved dollars into his pockets. *****

Paper Bird Takes Flight The eclectic Denver based collective known as Paper Bird is certainly soaring high these days.

BY JAMES

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Fresh off of a highly successful fall tour, including several dates with recent multiple Grammy winners The Lumineers, the band sees 2013 as their own breakout year. With a fourth album (tentatively titled Rooms) due out in late March, Paper Bird is determined to move their musical boundaries in an ever expanding direction. Since forming in 2007 the seven piece band, Mark Anderson (drums), Sarah Anderson (voice, trumpet), Paul DeHaven (guitar), Esme Patterson (voice), Genevieve Patterson (voice), Caleb Summeril (banjo, guitar), and Macon Terry (bass), has delighted audiences – and sold out large venues in the process – with their exuberant blend of folk, roots, and Americana. Their distinctive sound is a combination of a dynamic and energetic rhythm section intertwined with seemingly effortless harmonies. Every member of the band writes songs, giving them a backbone of craft not always heard in contemporary ragtag cooperatives. “None of us is the leader” is their creed and it’s one that works well for them. While wildly popular in their home state of Colorado the band continues to tour and develop a national voice and presence. This is their seventh cross country tour and while playing small venues doesn’t always pay the bills, they’re wise enough to know that in the long run establishing a presence will certainly pay off. That rare commitment to the “big picture” has led them to be featured on NPR’s All Things Considered and Mountain Stage. They were voted in the Top 10 Best Underground Bands by the Denver Post three years in a row, as well as being named 2009’s top local band (no small feat given Denver’s size and scope). Paper Bird has released two studio albums, Anything Nameless and Joymaking (2007) and When the River took Flight (2010), as well as a live album, 2011’s Carry On, a collaborative effort with Ballet Nouveau Colorado. Rooms promises to build on a signature sound; the band was determined to make an album that was reasoned and truly represented where they are as musicians and people. They made a bold move by enlisting good friend and accomplished film composer Ryan Fritch, to produce it.

Paper Bird takes the stage Wednesday, March 6 at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall.

“Ryan sees music differently than all of us had before this recording process,” said drummer Mark Anderson. “He doesn’t look at a song as having different parts – verse, chorus, bridge – but instead as a collection of individual sounds. His music is not held together by only melody – although it’s beautifully melodic – but instead as a collage of disparate sounds and instrumentation. His input on our music opened our eyes to new ways of writing and experiencing sound, helping to create an atmosphere within the album that did not exist before.” In addition, Paper Bird wanted to try and capture the same energy as their shows, so they made the decision to track live- a daunting task considering there were seven members recording in different rooms. At the same time, they added yet another wrinkle. “We incorporated a slew of new instruments, which haven’t appeared in our other albums, and will most definitely affect our live gigs,” said Anderson. “Our sound really evolved during this process.” The album title stems from the simple premise that every song is like a different room in a house, each having a different feel and layout, something that is even more literal given that every band member contributes to the songwriting. Summeril feels that in many ways Rooms is like a debut release. “It is our first studio album in over two years and the first with the band as it sounds today, with drums and more of an indie-folk sound than a traditional folk sound,” he said. “I think the songs will really translate well to a wider

audience and I think this is our most accessible album thus far. It’s definitely our most mature sound yet, both in musicianship and recording quality.” So while the band feels as if the time is right for them to soar to the next level, they also would not want to compromise the artistic integrity that has become their signature. “I think we are definitely open and interested in any opportunities that come our way, but we are seasoned in our independence,” said Anderson. “But really, the labels we’d be interested in, and most likely that would be interested in us, are generally artist- driven and have adapted creatively to the changing climate of the music business.” That’s as good a summary as any as to what makes this ensemble click: Fierce independence, artistic integrity, and a surplus of talent will win out every time. The band’s future is bright indeed, and catching this bird in flight seems like an opportunity not to be missed.

IF YOU Paper Bird at the newly GO opened (and very popular) ISIS

Restaurant and Music Hall, 743 Haywood Rd. in West Asheville, on Wednesday, March 6. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 day of show for this 9 p.m., all ages, show. For more details visit www.paperbirdband.com

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 15


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Charlie Parr Brings Old Time to a Good Time

“Some of our best music wasn’t “Some made to be mass produced and mass consumed.” That’s a philosophy Minnesota based troubadour Charlie Parr has embraced, a mantra that has taken him across the country and beyond, to venues and towns both big and small, in search of the empirical truisms that govern his musical journey. Even as Parr-instantly noticed for his long scraggly hair, father-time beard, thrift-store workingman’s flannel and jeans, and emphatic, throaty voice-approached the recording of his eleventh studio album, Barnswallow, recently released (and favorably reviewed in the pages of Rapid River), that commitment to purity guided his way. The album, named for a banjo instrumental Parr once recorded with the Black Twig Pickers, features ten songs—eight original and two traditional—and was recorded live to tape at the Winona Arts Center near his home. Parr’s longtime

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collaborator, Tom Herbers of Third Ear Studios in Minneapolis, engineered and mastered the project; and the cover art was done by Winona, MN based artist Jamie Harper; obviously Parr is a proponent of “keeping it local.” As with all of his projects, Barnswallow has that same distinctive timeless feel, steeped in traditional folk and blues yet sounding uncannily fresh and fashionable. The album, bookended by the footstomping opener “Jimmy Bell” and closer “Rattlesnake” as well as “Motorcycle Blues,” offers picturesque counterpoint with the pretty folk numbers “Badger” and “Jesus is a Hobo.” The songs on Barnswallow also reflect a lot of the personal struggles he’s had since 2010. They are mostly in the same vein as his earlier material, but Parr claims that with the more personal songs, “it helps to sing them.” It’s that type of honesty that makes Parr a truly special artist—he’s just like you and me, yet he makes extraordinary music.

BY JAMES

CASSARA

In making that music, Parr employed his trademark National NRP wood-body resonator guitar; he also used a Fraulini 12-string he had custom made, as well as a Kevin Enoch fretless banjo. Rounding out the Catch Charlie Parr on Tuesday, March 5 at Jack of The Wood. players, Barnswallow also features Mikkel Beckmen on Steeped in traditional folk and blues, washboard, Dave Hundreiser on harmonica, and Charlie yet uncannily fresh and fashionable. on vocals (with Emily Parr adding harmony on one track). “It’s a kind of return to the feel of All in all, it is vintage Parr, and will older recordings I’ve done (King Earl and surely go down as one of his best works yet. Jubilee, mostly) in that I had Mikkel and But there are no illusions with Charlie Parr Dave and recorded the whole thing as a about making it in music, so to speak. To trio,” said Parr. “It was also live to tape, with Parr, his view on it is much different. no tracking and using all first and second “I hope folks like the new album,” he takes.”

Continued on page 17

WNC Jazz Profiles: Jay Sanders

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If there is one thing you can say about Jay Sanders, it’s that he’s never stopped following his heart and the path it leads him through music.

The aspect of creativity that he admires most is collective improvisation and collaboration. This philosophy inspired him to organize the inaugural Asheville Improvisational Music Festival, a celebration of local modern jazz and improvisation in February of 2012. He hopes to reinvigorate and continue the event in 2014 as The Asheville New Music Festival. Always the consummate musician, Jay continues to challenge himself to develop new and interesting sounds for both his writing and his technique. This sense of adventure has lead him to the N/S Stick, an 8-string multi-mode instrument with a 5+ octave range that combines the voices of both the guitar and bass into one massive sound. His current project, the avant-garde post-rock band The E.Normus Trio, was formed with clarinetist Steve Alford in 2007. They released their debut record “Love and Barbiturates” internationally in early 2013 and will be recording a second one this spring. “As a fellow bass player, I find Jay to be a consummate artist and a true inspiration. As a music business guy, having managed internationally acclaimed artists both in and out of jazz for many

years, I consider Jay to be a major talent.” ~ Bassist Steve Cohen Born in Nashville, Jay grew up surrounded by the best of Music City. “Many of my earliest influences were the professional musician parents of my friends. I began playing at the age of 13 when a friend of our family offered me a guitar and banjo.” Studying with various guitar players around Nashville, he quickly took to the instrument, displaying a natural talent and quick ear. Jay entered Belmont University where he studied Creative Writing and music, plus he was did a short stint in the Jazz program at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. “In 1993, I moved to Boone where I established a weekly jazz jam session at the local BeansTalk coffee house. It continued until 1995 when I moved back to Nashville for a brief spell to study guitar with Reggie Wooten.” Jay moved to Asheville in 1996. Joining forces with the Pond family and Jason Krekel, he began playing bass and formed the Snake Oil Medicine Show. Together they would record two albums and begin a successful touring career. “Back then, Green Acres Music Hall was a major part of the Western North Carolina music scene. While performing with Snake Oil, I met the McMurry fam-

16 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

Jay Sanders Photo: Frank Zipperer

ily and in 1998 was asked to join Acoustic Syndicate. 15 years, 200,000+ miles and 6 records later, I continue to play and tour with them.” Jay has well over 20 year of touring experience. He is most commonly known for his work with folk-rock pioneers Acoustic Syndicate. He also spent four years touring with Americana roots rock legends Donna the Buffalo, recorded and toured with CX-1 The Blackhole Bluegrass Boys and is one of the primary forces behind AVAS (The Acoustic Vibration Appreciation Society). “Jay is a brilliant and innovative musician. He's there to make whatever style of music he's playing take priority - a chameleon without compromise and a super talent. I'd have him on any session!” ~ Producer Stewart Lerman What characterizes Jay’s music is an

EDDIE LESHURE

overwhelming sense of space, time and genre. His compositions tend towards the melodic and sublime while improvisations can go from the most peaceful melody to full-scale free jazz and noise music. His attention to styles and versatility are the hallmark of his playing. Sanders can either be the “rock,” holding the steady rhythmic heartbeat of a song, or take you down a sensitive melodic road of adventurous organic experimentation. Throughout his career Sanders has had the opportunity to play with many of his heroes including Ornette Coleman, Bela Fleck, Walter Wolfman Washington, Fred Wesley, Sam Bush, Raymond Weber, Paul Barrere and Fred Tackett of Little Feat, Bernie Worrel, Kirk Joseph, Vassar Clements, Casey Driessen, Jim Lauderdale, Tim O’Brien, Larry Keel, Hank Roberts and many more. He has studied with Reggie Wooten, E. Michael Harrington, Jerry Coker and countless other inspiring individual talents. www.enormustrio.com www.acousticsyndicate.com

Eddie LeShure is a jazz radio host, currently offthe-air, who encourages all readers to enthusiastically support local jazz.


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sound experience The Kennedys Return to Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

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Sometimes just thinking and writing about the nonstop activities of Pete and Maura Kennedy can be a dizzying experience. The “hardest working couple in show business” seems to stay in perpetual motion, pausing only long enough to chart their next move in what has long become their own version of an endless tour, making their story nearly as compelling as is their sound. Pete and Maura met in that musical Mecca of Austin, Texas, while Pete was playing guitar in Nanci Griffith’s Blue Moon Orchestra. After an informal evening together, during which they wrote their first song, Pete went to Colorado for a festival but immediately called on Maura; a smart move that has resulted in a nearly two decades of musical and marital bliss. Right away the pair scheduled their first date: a visit to Buddy Holly’s grave, a rendezvous that required them to drive 500 miles from opposite locales. Maura soon replaced future superstar Iris DeMent as harmony singer on Griffith’s tour, and Pete and Maura took Iris’ place as the opening act for the tour’s European leg. During this time they frantically wrote songs, some of which found their way onto their first album, 1995’s River of Fallen Stars. For their second album, Life Is Large (1996), the pair pulled in favors from some of the many musician

‘Charlie Parr’ continued from page 16

said. “But honestly I’ve gotten what I wanted from it, which was a really good few days with some of the best friends I’ve ever had, in a beautiful town, making music that I’m happy with and would’ve been just as happy with if we’d just played it and took nothing with us.” He paused before adding, “But yeah, I do hope folks like it, and I’m happy to be playing those songs now.” Indeed, and Parr fans will be happy he is, too. And by catching him on stage you might just find yourself among the converted. IF YOU Charlie Parr and Company GO at Jack of The Wood on

Tuesday, March 5. Tickets are just $5 for this 9 p.m. show, ages 21 and over only. For more details please visit www.charlieparr.com

BY JAMES

We’ve got the beat. Check out our new inventory of headphones & earbuds from

CASSARA

friends they made along the way: it features such luminaries as Roger McGuinn, Steve Earle, Kelly Willis, Nils Lofgren, the Dixie Hummingbirds, Peter Holsapple, Susan Cowsill, and John Gorka, among others. While most of the disc was recorded in Virginia, many of the cameos were laid down when the pair traveled through Nashville, Austin, and Florida. The nomadic effort was completed while they toured with Griffith. In 1998 the duo took a different path with Angel Fire, their first for Rounder’s Philo label by recording all of the new songs-most written and completed in a single day- at their home studio. The result was their freshest effort yet, an album buoyed by strong material and a stripped down spontaneity that best mirrors their live performances. Evolver (my own favorite of theirs) followed two years later, a gorgeous tribute to the 1960s Britpop and Byrds-inspired harmonies they both love. Positively Live followed in 2001 and for the remainder of the decade the ever prolific Kennedys averaged an album every 18 months. If that weren’t enough, they’ve each released solo records (as well as recordings for and with others), contributed to frequent tribute and soundtrack albums, offered up numerous songwriting and guitar

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ÒApple Specialist

252 Charlotte Street, Asheville — 828.225.6600 300 Airport Road, Arden — 828.651.6600

The Kennedys Photo: Jeremy Lebled

workshops, and toured relentlessly. But despite this frenetic pace the pair readily admits that playing smallish venues sings closest to their hearts. Like many a folk singer they each learned their craft playing coffeehouse and small clubs. And like many an artist the opportunity to continue doing so feels like going home. And what a treat for us to see The Kennedys up close, playing in a venue that always brings out their best. IF YOU Sunday, March 24, the GO Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

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series presents The Kennedys at 6:30 p.m. at the Universalist Unitarian Congregation of Asheville, 1 Edwin Place.

Alex Krug Combo CD Release Show

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Local band, the audience who is Alex Krug Combo listening. At each performs songs live show, the from Divers, a live journey the musialbum recorded at cians and listeners the LAB in downtake together is town Asheville. what keeps her fans Inspired by excited, and evernature, Alex Krug, growing. the self proclaimed The Alex Krug Combo IF YOU GO: Alex conservationist has Krug Combo been bringing her original music to CD release party, Friday March 15 at Asheville for the past four years. She the Highland Brewing Company, 12 layers strong foundational rhythms Old Charlotte Hwy., Asheville. The and roots while still allowing each all ages free show begins at 6 p.m. song the freedom to transform with Phone (828) 299-3370 or visit www. the musicians performing and the highlandbrewing.com for more details.

April 2013 - Wild About Waynesville Biltmore Festival of Flowers May 2013 - Spring Studio Tours June 2013 - River Arts District Call for Reduced Ad Rates • Web Banners (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com Our Monthly Magazine is iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly! www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 17


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fine art INTERVIEW WITH PHOTOGRAPHER

GD Whalen

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Rapid River Magazine:

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INTERVIEWED BY

DENNIS RAY

The first thing I notice when I walk into your gallery is that you have pictures from all over the world. Are you a travel photographer by trade?

GD Whalen: No, I am not. However I do love to travel and

I love photography. The two tend to go hand in hand. I am very lucky to have been able to travel as much as I have to some of the most beautiful places on earth. My photography just seems to be the perfect compliment to that.

RRM: The second thing I noticed was the enormous size of your prints. Why is that?

GDW: First, along with my love for seeing the world and

taking the images I have an equal love for printing my work. The final print is the tangible proof of the image itself. I believe that landscape images need to be large so the viewer gets the most accurate representation of the image I was seeing when I actually took the shot. I can print my images any size but the larger the better.

RRM: Given the size of your printed images you must shoot large format cameras.

GDW: About half of the work presently showing in the gallery is large format film. I shot those with an Arca-Swiss 4 x 5 view camera. About 40% of the prints are shot with my Hasselblad 3d-50 megapixel camera. The Hasselblad produces amazingly sharp and crisp images. Ten percent were shot with my Leica 35mm. Those are primarily the Africa images. PG.

RRM: Do you do your own processing? GDW: When I was shooting film I did develop and print my

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own negatives. I got tired of the chemicals used to develop and print film both personally and environmentally. Digital processing is much cleaner and much better for the environment.

RRM: How long have you been doing photography and why are you attracted to it as an art medium?

Visit GD Whalen’s Gallery in Asheville’s River Arts District.

GDW: I’ll try to keep this answer short. In some form or fash-

ion I have been doing photography most of my life, over 40 years. As a kid I had a Kodak Instamatic camera and in college I shot Nikon and had a darkroom in my bathroom. I think the “why am I attracted to photography” question is really pretty simple. I am a very visual person but I can’t draw or paint at all. I see things but have no skills to paint them. Photography allows me to connect to what I see and put it to paper. Also, I am attracted to the technical aspects of photography. There is a strong learning curve to get images out of the camera as you see them in your minds eye. That can be a challenge and I like challenges.

RRM: The other thing I noticed in

your gallery are the portrait and model images. How does that mesh with your landscape/nature work?

GDW: A lot of people ask me this ques-

tion and the easiest way I can answer it is to say that I don’t really see specific objects. I see colors, shapes and forms and try to make those subjects as interesting or beautiful as I can. I love taking portraits of people but I don’t like taking them in the traditional – sit and shoot format. I like to take portraits of the persons personality, not just their physical self. This may sound contradictory to my shape and form statement but it ties in with wanting to portray someone as they truly are, not as the appear to be. It is complicated but it makes sense to me.

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Sedona GD Whalen Photography

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Continued on page 19


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THE MODERN ATELIER

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Photography allows me to connect to what I see and put it to paper.

Featuring Local Artist Angela Cunningham and Six Contemporaries

RRM: What about commercial work, do you do that?

GDW: To be clear I love shooting any-

thing as long as I can find the beauty of the object. Whether a watch, finished piece of word carving, bicycle, whatever – all objects can be shown in their most beautiful or compelling way. Light is really what photography is all about so having the freedom to shoot a product, the way I see it, can be a very enticing reason for me to do commercial work. Shooting something in a very creative way is one of my strong suits.

RRM: Finally, it is very obvious in

talking with you that you have a very strong passion and love for photography. Why is that?

GDW: Three reasons I think. One,

as I stated earlier I am a very visual person. I see colors, tones and shapes everywhere I look. I am always look-

GD Whalen Photography

ing for the right light and interesting shapes and forms. Secondly, why do I love it so much? I was just born this way I guess. Everyone should have a passion for something, anything. Having a purpose and passion in your life is the very energy that makes our lives interesting. Thirdly, I like challenges. I like taking pictures of things, that may not be overly interesting in first site and making them beautiful. Bringing out

the view of that scene, person or object that someone else would miss. I love the challenge of seeing something like no one else has ever seen it.

GD Whalen Photography 191 Lyman, #104 Asheville’s River Arts District www.gdwhalenphotography.com

Young artists sometimes find their voice in an ages-old tradition. For centuries, the atelier (French, meaning an artist’s studio or workshop) has been a principle venue for art education, wherein students work in a structured program under the hands-on tutelage of master artists. Throughout April, BlackBird will exhibit the work of two Atelier studios: the Water Street Atelier at the Grand Central Academy in New York City, and the John Angel Academy in Florence, Italy. Safe Keeping, Angela Cunninggraphite on paper, by ham, an award-winning Angela Cunningham Asheville artist, is joined in this exhibit by several of her peers: Carol Broman (FL), Todd Casey (MA), Carla Crawford (NY), Danny Grant (TX), Gregory Mortenson (NY), and Travis Seymour (UK). IF YOU Opening reception for The Modern GO Atelier will be held Thursday, April 4 from

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at BlackBird Frame & Art. On display April 1-30, 2013. BlackBird Frame & Art, 365 Merrimon Ave, ¾ mile north of downtown Asheville. Hours are 10-6 weekdays and 10-3 Saturdays. Phone (828) 225-3117 or visit www.blackbirdframe.com.

{RE}HAPPENING 2013

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The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and the Media Arts Project will present the 4th Annual {Re}HAPPENING, on Saturday, April 6 from 6 p.m. to midnight in the original dining hall of the former Black Mountain College, now Camp Rockmont. This year there are more than 80 artists participatExcursus, 2012 ing in over 30 projects, performances and installations dotting the buildings and grounds. For the full schedule visit www.rehappening.com.

IF YOU GO: To purchase tickets for the event, which

GD Whalen Photography

includes dinner, cocktails, and entertainment, visit www.blackmountaincollege.org or call (828) 3508484. The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, 56 Broadway, Asheville.

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Musings Upon Inspiration WHAT GETS YOUR CREATIVE JUICES FLOWING?

I often finish my columns mentioning “inspiration,” an everpresent theme throughout my dayto-day living.

BY

GREG VINEYARD

how, and then boomerangs back to our physical plane as we create, collect and share. When I get an idea for a drawing or a series Sure, I have some typical influences, or a show, while I’m certainly aware of life’s like yellow, my cat, sci-fi movies (both good influences, I’m also shocked sometimes at and not-so-much, even though both ends of how fast ideation, and hence my art, flows the spectrum are equally satisfying to me). through me. But many other things also hit the senses I’m also stimulated by wordplay and and prod conceptual thoughts, much like a flowing phrases, as well as by old favorite small pebble in one’s shoe. And small things books and unusual dictionaries. And the can be quite noticeable. Powerful, even. hand-written word is a thrill in our digital While enjoying the aurora through the age – an unexpected note the other day window at Edna’s of Asheville on a recent from an old friend morning, at my motivated me to draw favorite table enjoysomething new. A “Something that touches ing my favorite short happy phone call can Americano in my the soul and goes beyond trigger that response favorite lime green the tangible.” in me, too. mug (eccentric much? I’m lucky enough MOI?), I looked it to have a few BFF’s up. INSPIRATION. who know everything about me. You know There were many definitions to peruse and the type, where if either friend suddenly pick through, and the descriptive bits that passed on, the other wouldn’t have to worry grabbed me most were “bringing about”, that we may have left something unexand, perhaps more deeply, “infusing”. pressed? Muses, they are. In Waynesville, I asked Gallery 262 And a synchronicity that’s going on owner Aaron Stone what the term means all the time rocks my world. Sometimes to him. Despite my somewhat Ninja-AtI’m privileged enough to be granted a bit tack inquiry style, he fielded it beautifully: of awareness to notice it. Same with that “Something that touches the soul and goes visceral energy that runs through everything, beyond the tangible.” plugging everyone’s spiritual and scientific A whole trousseau unpacked in one paths into one grid. High voltage! sentence. I, too, feel it goes beyond, some-

Hitch Your

Wagon TO A

Star Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine I advertise in Rapid River Magazine because of its focus on local arts and culture. Rapid River works with me to get the type of exposure I need for my art based business. ~ Andrew Montrie

(828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

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Nancy Silver – Fine Artist

As a native New Yorker exiled to Ohio, Nancy’s night job was Charge Nurse in an inner city emergency room, level one trauma center, while art became therapy. She first escaped the ER into art school, while singing weekends as a cantorial soloist. Her musical background translates into painting landscapes, especially the lyrical quality found in water. Her architectural choices tend to focus on qualities that Nancy Silver Cheekwood Gardens reflect the passage of time and silent voices of those long gone. Her final escape brought her to Asheville, fall of 2010, and into the Cotton Mill Studios in the River Arts District, along with Nancy Silver Art singing a little jazz with friends. Her work Cotton Mill Studios, 122 Riverside Dr. is available in her studio in Cotton Mill Studios on Riverside Drive, and at The Art (828) 713-8994 www.nancysilverart.com Mob in Hendersonville, NC.

20 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

Inspiration. Mixed-media by Greg Vineyard

The difficulties humans face can also serve to motivate. Oppositional viewpoints, ethical questions, scary doctor visits, financial crises, the loss of precious things. Alternatively, our compassion as we ache for others who go through these events can propel us into action, too. Coming back around into lighter times is also good fodder, akin to a ray of sunshine on the porch in spring. As we absorb lessons, we realize how we can help others. And sometimes the birds are chirping and the breeze is light and there’s a little touch of something like an angel’s wingtips tickling the edge of an ear as we curl up like a cat on his favorite yellow blankie. Regeneration. Of course I’m also spurred-on by my fellow creators, and the arts communities within Asheville, throughout WNC and across the country. All these Makers are living, breathing examples of how inspiration combined with sweat-equity yields awesome visual results. Beauty flows, and I’m dichotomously stunned and invigorated. By all of it. I hope you get a chance to ask yourself: “What inspires me?” and use both the question and the never-ending answers that follow as insightful guides on your path!

Greg Vineyard is an artist, writer and creative consultant in Asheville, NC. ZaPOW Gallery in downtown Asheville carries his illustrations, giclees and cards. Find his clay works at Gallery 262 in Waynesville, and at Taupe Gallery in North Wilkesboro. www.creativewayfinding.byregion.net


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Life as Art

Creating art can be a very healing experience. It can be quite therapeutic to take what is inside and bring it forward into therapeutic some representation or manifestation in the world, and some psychotherapeutic theory holds that when we make conscious psychotherapeutic that which is unconscious, we can begin to free ourselves from whatever demons lurk there. Usually this is done in a verbal exploration, but sometimes, art is used as the medium of the therapy. To paint, sculpt, write, make musical or role-play the conflicts lurking in our minds can often bring about some resolution of painful confusion, while also releasing creative and healthy archetypal energy. When we engage in artistic expression of our demons, there is, in many cases, some relief from their hold and control over us, and new paths for healthier living can open up. While this relief and growth is usually believed to be the result of getting repressed contents of the mind into the light of consciousness, it might be speculated there is also another powerfully healing factor occurring that most psychotherapy hardly pays any attention to at all. It is also possible that if brought to the level of consciousness and integrated, this event, which has nothing to do with the contents of the mind, may be an even more effective and lasting path to healthy and integrated living than the realization of insights into a person’s life story revealed under analysis. This event is an aspect of the act of art itself. As important as the calling forth and claiming of personal experience may be, both in analytical psychology and the making of art, it can be speculated that these experiences have a bit of a backfire to them, in that the person’s sense of identity with the contents of the mind, personal history and perspective may be strengthened, and those contents, while now reinterpreted, remain a kind of prison for the person. There is a perspective, however, that believes that true healing comes about when the person no longer looks for identity in mental activity, past events or personal affiliations, but rather in that which is in contact with the present moment with absolute clarity and authenticity. It is about being in touch, in the literal sense. Buddhist psychology, unlike most Western psychologies, recognizes there is a dimension of intelligence deeper than the mind of thoughts and emotions. We can apply words to this dimension such as Being, Self, or even Soul, but this dimension is vitally deeper than the realm of words, it is pure experience and it is direct contact with the world through the senses and intuition. This is the dimension that witnesses in awareness the mental and physical activity of our lives that is shaped by condi-

tioned experience, which is the very source of the neuroses, while this witnessing dimension is completely unconditioned, and therefore, free of neuroses. When Zen Buddhism asks, “As you are aware of your thoughts and emotions, who is it that is aware?” it is this dimension of awareness, of Being, that Buddhism is pointing to as your true or original self. This koan is guiding us to what is the healthiest, wisest and most creative in a person. The purpose of Zen teaching and practice is to awaken this dimension within us, best named, simply, awareness.

Come into direct and authentic contact with the present moment. Psychotherapy can summon this dimension, and in its best moments, does, but usually by pure accident. A skilled and sincere therapist, using whatever technique, can create an experience of heightened awareness, authenticity and presence for a client when summoning forward their story, resulting in an experience that feels healing. While summoning the story and giving new insight into it is very helpful, it is not the summoning of the story that does the greatest healing. Rather, it is in the person’s opening to the possibility for real authenticity in the moment and the connection with this deeper dimension of awareness in a profoundly shared moment with the therapist in heightened presence that brings the greatest healing. If this experience of authenticity, presence and heightened awareness can be recognized for what it is and how it comes about, an entirely healthy dimension of the person can begin to grow and be integrated. Similarly, artistic expression, and to a lesser degree, being an audience to art, is about letting go of the realm of the ego as the centerpiece of the mind and coming into direct and authentic contact in heightened

BY

BILL WALZ

awareness with the present moment as art is created or experienced. True art comes from the deeper self-in-presence, perhaps using thoughts and emotions as subjects of creative expression, now blended and guided by the deeper intelligence that is whole and one with the moment. This phenomenon of oneness is sometimes referred to as “flow,” and in this flow, the contents of the mind are balanced and mastered, a quite different experience than when, as in day-today experience, the mind-contents are master of us, and there is no flow. We are separated from the oneness of the moment, lost, caught in the matrix of ideas about the world and my place in it. This experience of artistic flow is always clear and unconflicted, and it is happening in an integration of the senses and intuition with our thoughts and emotions, in the present moment. This in-the-moment expression that connects some intuitive and archetypal experience with whatever medium is being engaged creates a temporary clarity and sanity for the artist or the witness to art and as any artist will tell you, they feel the sanest when in the action of their art-form. Years ago, when I was first learning the craft of psychotherapy, I studied under a brilliant Gestalt therapist, who was also a professional improvisational actor. He would ask, “Is your life good theater or bad melodrama?” He taught his students how to access the focused expressed contact with the present moment that makes for good theater into everyday life. He taught how to express oneself creatively, trusting intuition and increased sensory subtlety, gaining insight along the way about how old habits hold us stuck in ineffective ways of being in the world. Through a blending of Gestalt and acting technique, he gave his students the tools to change old habits to healthier ways of expression in the world. This is great therapy, and, of course, it is good theater. I often find that artists can make excellent subjects for healing work because when I tell them to bring awareness to living their life in the way they create their art, that is, in subtle, skillful direct contact with the physical world, in the present moment, trusting their intuitive sense, there is often a kind of “Ah-ha” experience. To a painter, I say, “be in touch with the world the way you are in touch with the

Musicians: be in touch with the world the way you are with your instrument. canvas and the paints.” To a musician, I say, “be in touch with the world the way you are with your instrument.” This instruction works because it’s not hard to understand that living with that kind of immediacy, focus and presence would be far less neurotic, self-absorbed, anxious or depressed than the way they had been living, caught-up in thoughts and reactive emotions that have very little to do with the vibrancy of the real here-and-now. This kind of therapy teaches people to, in the words of the great originator of Gestalt Therapy, Fritz Perls, “get out of your head, and come to your senses,” and he meant this literally. The senses exist in the present moment in clarity, but clarity is lost when the realm of thoughts and emotions distract us from real presence. Our usual relationship with the senses is superficial continued on page 29

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the curmudgeon Connecting with the BBB

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Curmudgeon walked into the General Store last weekend to hold court before Mr. and Mrs. Storekeep, the Breadman, the Postman, and a new young lady sorting through the greeting card rack in preparation for Easter, Mother’s Day, and Father’s Day, not to mention the general run of friendship and sympathy cards. “Just like the phone commands attention by ringing—or buzzing or whatever they are wont to do these days, I wish to describe one morning at my house—” he stopped as he pulled a wad of notes from his jacket pocket then continued, “when the damn thing rang at 8:45, a time when many self-respecting folks are still making their morning absolutions—” the look on the Card Girl was priceless as we later suspected that she thought absolutions probably referred to wayward practices best spoken about on early afternoon TV interview programs, “and my day was ruined.”

Press one if you want to take part – at no cost to you – in the chance of a lifetime. “What happened and who was on the phone,” they appeared to ask in unison. “Robocall,” said Curmudgeon with a mean edge to his voice. “First off, this lady said, without stopping: ‘Good morning and how safe are you today? We are offering you the chance of a lifetime to have a genuine police-sponsored alarm ready to do off either day or night and protect you and your loved ones from most of the dangers facing residents of many small cities and towns all across America.

BY

PETER LOEWER

‘And I wish to advise you, sir or madam, that your name was carefully chosen Illustration by Peter Loewer as representing the kind of American who not only yearns for the good old days, but yearns surrounded by an aura of security as only Day-Glo Alarms can represent.’ “There was a pause,” said Curmudgeon, and she then continued to offer three choices: ‘Press one if you want to take part—at no cost to you—in the chance of a lifetime; press two if you would like to speak directly to an agent; and press three if you would like your name removed from our select list of qualified citizens.” “What did you do?” asked the folks in the store. “Well, first I already knew that if you press either two or three, they know it’s a live circuit and on the computer a star goes next to that number and the interruptions will continue whether it means Mike Huckabee asking for your opinion on the Presidency or it’s a special offer for a new can opener, or where to go to pray when the next meteor flies overhead, so I put the phone mouthpiece—or whatever you call it—on the table and let the woman’s voice rant on until everything stops and then you get that piercing woman’s cry of ‘If you want to make a call, please hang up and try again!’ and I hung up.” “So?” asked the crew. “I called the Better Business Bureau and using that old trick of not answering the auto-voice on the other end, so eventually, thinking you are either stupid or haven’t got a touch-tone phone, somebody real usually signs on.” “So?” “Well, to make a long story a bit shorter, they couldn’t help me because the call came from Houston, Texas—that’s where the Day-Glo Alarm Company resides. So I had to call the BBB of Houston, describe what happened, then go to my computer and email them a filled-out form telling them in writing what I just told them on the phone and lodge a complaint with Houston’s BBB. With waiting between connections this took all-tolled about a half-hour.” “Signs of the times,” said the girl still sorting cards. “In future,” said Curmudgeon, “just set the phone-whatever down and let them rant on until that shrieking voice comes on. You’ll all feel better for it.” Peter Loewer has written and illustrated more than twenty-five books on natural history over the past thirty years.

22 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

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southern comfort

COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

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Remembering Lillie – WHEN I WAS YOUNG

I have been thinking a lot lately about Lillie. Lillie Robinson,was one of about the Black women who worked in the house for my family in 1940s Florida. I was in elementary school and hated having to go to school on a day when Lillie was there. Lillie’s life and being around these people was the most interesting thing going on in my young and naïve mind. I was curious, of course, to no end, but when I was old enough, I was bold enough to try to defend them. Lillie was always dressed in a nice spring dress and her hair covered and wrapped with a pretty scarf in style with many Blacks in the south in that era. Lillie always knew she had to be clean and nicely dressed when she showed up to work for my Mother. She also had a lump of snuff in her mouth as she worked. She surely did a lot of ironing and close to the iron was a small empty can for spitting. I always watched closely and listened when she talked to me about her children. Lillie and her husband, James Robinson also liked to take a drink or two of liquor on weekends when they were not working. Sometimes on Mondays my Dad would have to go to the county jail and bailout some of his men who worked on the farm. In the afternoon, at 3 p.m. after Lillie had finished the chores she did for my Mom, I would walk with her down the dirt, tree-lined road that led to her modest home that Dad built for the Robinsons. I was in awe to go into the wood-smelling home. I would sometimes sit down and look at all the magazine-torn pictures that lined the musty walls. I usually said to Lillie, “Who is that? She would tell me and talk to me about who the person was. Sometimes I would hear my Mother yelling from our house saying, “Judy, it is time for you to come home, it’s getting late.” So I would tell Lillie goodbye and run quickly back to my home. There was not much respect for these hard-working women or their men who toiled in the wide-spread acres

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

and acres of flat-land in St. John County, Florida, back then when I was young. Just about all the white families in the county owned large acres of land and many farmed the rich, black land in potatoes. The Blacks knew all about the land and many had been working there and raising their children for years. My Dad must have understood their needs because there were two families with growing families that he built homes for them to live in. In the next few years as I grew, I always talked about Lillie to my Mother and Dad at the dinner table. And, I always said to them, “I do not understand why Lillie can’t eat lunch with us at the table, it would be nice.” Dad and Mom would say, “Oh Judy, you know that is not the right thing to do.” I never talked back at my parents in disgust, I would just turn my head and decide to bring it up on a different day. One day much later on, I came home one day from college unexpected and when I walked into the kitchen, I heard Lillie’s voice and Mom said, jovially, “come in and get something to eat.” As I went into the kitchen, I hestitated suddenly and looked towards the kitchen table. My dear Lillie smiled as I sat down at the table to eat. Lillie was sitting right next to me at the table with my parents. I touched her warm hand and smiled at her and the best feeling of being at home that day still sticks here in my memories.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

Deborah Hicks’ The Road Out: A Teacher’s Odyssey in Poor America is a

gripping account of her journey of hope and discovery with her students — girls growing up poor in a neighborhood that was once home to white Appalachian working families like Hicks’ own. Reading and booksigning Thursday, March 14 at 7 p.m. at Malaprops Bookstore. Visit www.malaprops.com for more details.


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

A Good Day to Die Hard ∑∑∑

Beautiful Creatures ∑∑∑∑

Short Take: This 5th installment in the Die Hard series lacks bite due to an underdeveloped storyline and villains who lack charisma.

Short Take: A surprisingly intelligent, well made supernatural love story that is loaded with choice dialogue and solid performances from its young leads and cast of veterans.

Soviet Union now has all of the Western vices especially crime and corruption on an international scale. A powerful Russian official plans to eliminate a whistleblower (Sebastian Koch) who is being protected by McClane’s estranged son (Jai Courtney) who works for the CIA. After an assassination attempt fails, McClane, his son, and the Russian are now on the run. When the whistleblower’s daughter is kidnapped, the trio must decide what their next move is. From Moscow the next stop is the ruined nuclear plant at Chernobyl. Like father (Bruce Willis), like son (Jai Courtney) in this fifth It is here that installment in the Die Hard series. the film’s big “surprise” is unveiled. REEL TAKE: I have seen every one of As surprises go this one is not bad but once the Die Hard movies since the first one it has been revealed there is nowhere else appeared back in 1988. That one was an for the movie to go. What to do? Why not instant classic. Die Hard 2 (1990) was the throw in some spectacular action sequences usual lackluster sequel while Die Hard With involving the world’s largest helicopter. a Vengeance (1995) and Live Free or Die Bruce Willis is now simply a presence Hard (2007) were a return to form especially in the series much like John Wayne was at the latter which showed that it was possible the end of his career. Jai Courtney, memoto make a good PG-13 action film out of rable as a bad guy in the recent Jack Reacher, previously R rated material. is perfectly adequate as the son which is What made the original Die Hard all he needs to be. German actor Sebastian and numbers 3 & 4 so enjoyable were the Koch (The ( Lives of Others) does the best he villains (Alan Rickman in the first, Jeremy can in the role of the whistleblower but the Irons and Timothy Oliphant in the others) part is seriously underwritten. that Bruce Willis’ character had to deal AGDTDH is easily the weakest of the with. Since John McClane is basically an series although there are far worse ways to American version of James Bond, he needs currently waste your cinematic time. A theto have a baddie worthy of him and that’s ater director I worked with many years ago not the case here. In fact there are actually 3 once told me, “If you can’t be good, then be villains but it doesn’t help. fast”. At 97 minutes (credits included) this Having exhausted all the domestic film does its best to fulfill that maxim. possibilities in the first four films, John Rated R for violence and language (including the McClane now has to go overseas to find famous catch phrase). the action and where better to go than our REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN old Cold War nemesis, Russia. The former

REEL TAKE: Clearly I am not the target

showdown will determine the outcome. While there’s nothing new about this supernatural coming of age storyline, writer-director Richard LaGravanese has filled it with clever, intelligent dialogue and infused it with a remarkable visual sense that extends from the small town drabness to the Gothic South mansion and its unexpected ultramodern interior. The special effects, until the very end, are refreshingly CGI free which lends a sense of gravity to the whole affair and that adds to the enjoyment. However the real pleasure comes from the wonderful performances by all concerned. In addition to Irons, Rossum, Thompson and the two young leads, Viola Davis gives a sincere, intense portrayal of the family “help” who has a much larger role in the proceedings than her humble status would suggest. It’s hard to beat good writing and a cast that knows how to bring it to life.

audience for this movie. Not only had I not read the book, but I was unaware that a series of Beautiful Creatures novels existed. Now that I have discovered that fact, I won’t be going out of my way to read them but I found this movie adaptation to be a class act loaded with quality performances and lots of rich dialogue. The setting is the fictional town of Gatlin, South Carolina, a classic Southern backwater which teenage Ethan Wate (Alden Ehrenreich) can’t wait to escape from. For months he has been dreaming of a mystery girl whose face he can’t see. When newcomer Lena Duchannes (Alice Englert) starts attending Ethan’s school, he immediately knows that she’s the girl in his dreams and he wants to know more about her. It turns out that Lena and her family come from a long line of witches and warlocks or “casters” as they call themselves. In addition to Lena’s Viola Davis, Alice Englert, and Alden Ehrenreich seek out warlock uncle a magic spell in Beautiful Creatures. (Jeremy Irons) there’s her siren cousin (Emmy Rossum) Unfortunately, Beautiful Creatures is who can make men do anything and her not faring that well at the box office. Cerdiabolical mother (Emma Thompson) who tain changes made by the filmmakers have can inhabit other people’s bodies. Lena is not gone down well with the fans of the about to turn 16 which means that she will series and some critics are being incredibly become either a dark witch or a light one. shortsighted by dismissing it out of hand. Her mother and cousin want her to become Warner Brothers had hopes of making this the former while her uncle and Ethan try to get her to use her powers for good. A final ‘Movies’ continued on page 24

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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 23

the first of a series but unless the box office improves, this is likely to be it. Catch it on the big screen if you can but it will play just as well on the small screen when the time comes. Rated PG-13 for violence, scary images, and some sexual material.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Identify Thief ∑∑1/2 Short Take: When a man confronts the woman who’s stolen his financial identity, mayhem ensues.

REEL TAKE: As a critic, I really can’t give

Identity Thief a good review, and I really wanted to like it. Instead of being in the league of Bridesmaids or even The Hangover,, it is series of missed opportunities. over However as a critic I must also consider the audience; the audience I saw it with seemed to really like it, and it trounced the competition in its first couple of weeks at the box office. At Rotten Tomatoes, critics give it a 23% approval rate while 64% of audiences give it thumbs up. Between this and Safe Haven,, I guess there’s no accounting for taste. Kidding! What I really mean to say is

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234 Biltmore Grande 1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com Carmike 10 (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com Carolina Cinemas (828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200 Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989 Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

Melissa McCarthy gives Jason Bateman a run for his money in Identity Thief.

that, while I’d hoped both films would be better than they were, they are exactly what they are intended to be – no more, no less. By and large their intended audiences are pleased with the results, and at the end of the day that’s what it’s all about. With that in mind, I’ll try to tread a little more gently than I’d like to. Melissa McCarthy is on a red hot winning streak right now. Jason Bateman has cherry picked some great roles since critical success on Arrested Development. Both are great comedic talents. Unfortunately their talents are largely wasted in Identity Thief Thief. Bateman plays Sandy Bigelow Patterson. He’s a dependable, upstanding, all round nice guy. After he unwittingly gives his personal information to an identity thief over the phone, he becomes a hapless chump. Facing arrest, loss of job and insurmountable financial damage, he decides to hunt down the perpetrator and bring them to justice. His quest for justice brings him to Miami, Florida where he corners (or attempts to corner) the false Sandy Bigelow Patterson (Melissa McCarthy), aka ‘Diana.’ Though she did not deserve the slanderous verbal beat down from Rex Reed, McCarthy’s Diana is every repulsive cliché you can think of in one plus size package. Sandy’s goal is to bring Diana back to Denver police in order to clear his name, but getting there proves challenging [of course]. The result is the road trip from hell. It should have been hilarious, but instead is peppered with a few genuinely funny moments, some painfully strained comedic efforts, and some downright unnecessary and forced humor. It doesn’t seem that director Seth Gordon (Horrible Bosses) allowed his leading the lady the improvisational opportunities where she’s a scene stealer and that’s too bad; Bateman’s straight man to her improv would likely be something to see. Along the way, the two characters eventually forge a friendship of sorts. It

24 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

seems our identity thief may even grow a conscience. I didn’t have a problem with the film having a heart, but, Steve Conrad’s (The Pursuit of Happyness) screenplay just seems a little too contrived. Ultimately it’s a mediocre comedy at best. Here in Asheville it’s the kind of film I refer to as ‘a Pizza Company’ movie; second run movie theatre prices and a pitcher of beer is a perfect combination for Identity Thief Thief. But what do I know, it’s cleaning house at the box office, so we’ll likely be subject to Identity Thief 2. Rated R for sexual content and language.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN

Safe Haven ∑∑1/2 Short Take: The latest film adaptation from the king of schmaltzy popular romance novels.

REEL TAKE: Nicholas Sparks is the reign-

ing king of schmaltzy popular romance novels, and each book seems tailored made for the big screen. While I have not read Sparks’ novels it strikes me that The Notebook must be the best of the lot because it was, and is, the only film adaptation of his work that’s been anything truly worthwhile. Unfortunately, that generalization also applies to his latest book brought to the big screen, Safe Haven. Released on Valentine’s Day, Safe Haven has a target market. It isn’t remotely close to being a great movie let alone a

love story for the ages, but to that target audience, Safe Haven suits just fine as exhibited by the audience rating vs critics rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Critics give it a13% approval rating while 72% of audience members liked it. (My guess is the other 22% were dutiful husbands and boyfriends escorting their valentine to the local Cineplex.) Safe Haven has many of classic earmarks of a Sparks story – a sleepy coastal North Carolina town, easy sunsets, sudden rainstorms, and a man and a woman who fall in love, only to have that love tested by a mysterious past. In this case we are introduced to a young woman (Julianne Hough) holding a bloody kitchen knife. She quickly manages to cut and color her hair and makes her getaway, boarding a bus for Atlanta. During a pit stop in the bucolic town of Southport, NC, Katie gets off the bus and never re-boards. In Southport she meets Alex (Josh Duhamel), a handsome young widower (and apparently the town’s most eligible single dad), who quickly takes a shine to her. Guarded at first, Katie begins to settle into her new life. But just as their romance begins to blossom, the Boston detective (David Lyons) doggedly on her trail, threatens to destroy everything. Julianne Hough, who is known more for her dancing prowess (TV’s Dancing with the Stars) Stars than her acting chops, is quite likeable and natural. Even though Safe Haven integrates issues of domestic violence into the story, the demands for dramatic depth are slight, so it’s actually a good vehicle for her. She and Duhamel have a nice chemistry and he seems very comfortable in the role, although the dialogue is often wanting. Pleasant but banal, the whole thing is perhaps made slightly more interesting by a mysterious wrinkle that’s not as smart as it thinks it is and by a ludicrous (albeit not entirely surprising) plot twist that must have translated better for readers than it does on screen. No disrespect to Mr. Sparks, but I question the source material in regards to the film’s failings. Director Lasse Halstrom, whose credits include Chocolat, Chocolat The Shipping News, News What’s Eating Gilbert Grape, My Life as a Dog and even another Sparks novel, Dear John, (which modestly better notices) is competent director of adapted works. I had actually hoped for a little more from this film because of Halstrom. Bottom line, Safe Haven is easy on the eyes and a sweet enough pill to swallow, especially if you are its target audience. You know who you are. Rated PG-13 for thematic material involving threatening behavior and for violence and sexuality.

Josh Duhamel and Juliana Hough find a second chance at love and safe haven in each other’s arms.

REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN


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film reviews Monthly Reel

BY MICHELLE KEENAN

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As the good professor, Chip Kaufmann, and I sat down to discuss the March issue, it was clear we were both suffering from acute cases of early onset movie malaise. This seasonal disorder, which predominantly affects movie geeks, begins in late winter after award season nominations have been doled out and the studios are waging campaigns to bring home as many statuettes as they can. It’ll be many months before said studios start courting critics for next year’s award season, and a few months before the summer blockbuster season is upon us. Year after year, March seems to be the month when we struggle the most to bring the issue together. Frankly, the only thing I’m anticipating moviewise right now (we are writing this on a February deadline) is the 85th Academy Awards telecast, and that’s just as much about the red carpet arrivals and the fashion police as it is the awards. Of late, television has in fact held much more interest than the cinema; Turner Classic Movies has been running its 31 days of Oscar, Masterpiece Classic has riveted audiences with sea-

Too bad it left almost as soon as it arrived; Stand up Guys teamed Christopher Walken, Alan Arkin and Al Pacino.

Beautiful Creatures and even some fun with the 5th (and hopefully last) Die Hard movie. I meanwhile reviewed Identify Theft and Safe Haven. Both were exactly what they were supposed to be, nothing more, nothing less, and nothing to rave about. Looking ahead to the coming weeks, the Fine Arts Theatre will be opening The Other Son, what looks to be the powerful story of two young men, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, who find out they were switched at birth and the complex repercussions facing them and their respective families. Also coming soon to a theatre near you: Stoker Stoker, Dead Man Down, Down Oz, the Great and Powerful and Jack the Giant Slayer.

son three of Downton Abbey (I intend to write a strongly worded letter to Mr. Fellowes after his devastating season finale), and AMC’s zombie apocalypse drama The Walking Dead. Chip and I did see some films this month that were worth their salt, but which will not likely be playing by the time the March issue comes out. Standup Guys and Quartet are fun takes for aging baby boomers; the former showcasing the talents of Christopher Walken, Al Pacino and Alan Arkin, and the latter featuring Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon and Billy Connelly. When we realized it too Films for retiring baby boomers abounded would likely this past year – Quartet was the latest. be gone from If what’s reviewed here and what’s theatres by the time the issue on the horizon doesn’t hold much allure came out, neither Chip or I for you, check out the offerings from could quite bring ourselves to the Asheville Film Society (AFS) and see Michael Haneke’s Amour. Amour the Hendersonville Film Society (HFS). Brilliant performances aside, Both have great March schedules and Haneke’s abstract style and the the Greta Garbo classic Grand Hotel on subject matter spelled absolute the big screen is must-see! downer. After several incredWe hope you’ll take the opporibly rewarding months of tunity during the post-Oscar draught award-caliber screenings, Chip to explore some of these classic titles and I decided to take in some and maybe some of the pictures you purely mainstream offerings. The cure for movie malaise: Dan Steven and Michelle missed at the theatre last year, now Chip had a lot of fun with Dockery keep audiences riveted to the small screen in available on DVD. the southern gothic drama this year’s season finale of Downton Abbey.

UNC ASHEVILLE’S F-WORD (FEMINIST) FILM FESTIVAL

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March 4: Invisible War

March 5: Jennifer Pozner

Academy-award nominated documentary by Kirby Dick explores the problem of sexual assault in the U.S. military. 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union Grotto.

Pozner presents a talk, “Project Brainwash: Why Reality TV is Bad for Women (…and men, people of color, the economy, love, sex, and sheer common sense!)” Pozner is the author of Reality Bites Back: The Troubling

Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV TV. UNC Asheville’s Sherrill Center, Mountain View Room, 7 p.m.

If you think they don’t make them like they used, take in great classic films Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up. For more information call (828) 697-7310. Although there are five Sundays in March, the last is Easter so there will be only four films. Featured this month are a non-musical version of Les Miserables, a non-Shakespearean Richard III III, the story of a hitman and his assistant, and a silent comedy-drama about a golddigger and the man she entraps. March 3:

Les Miserables (1978) Of the many non-musical versions out there, this one is probably the most faithful in tone and spirit to Victor Hugo’s original novel although it’s heavily streamlined. The movie stars Richard Jordan as Jean Valjean and Anthony Perkins as Inspector Javert. Directed by Glenn Jordan March 10:

The Tower of London (1939) Now that the bones of King Richard III have been found, it’s time to rediscover this non-Shakespearean version of the story. Basil Rathbone makes a fine Duke of Gloucester aided by Boris Karloff as a sinister executioner. A young Vincent Price appears as the Duke of Clarence. Directed by Rowland V. Lee March 17:

The Mechanic (1972) Arthur Bishop is a professional killer who arranges “accidents”. When a bored young man becomes Arthur’s assistant, what is his real motive for wanting to learn the tricks of the trade? Charles Bronson, Jan-Michael Vincent, and Keenan Wynn are the featured players. Directed by Michael Winner March 24:

IF YOU GO: Both events are free

and open to the public. For more details please visit www.unca. edu/news-events.

HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY

Jennifer Pozner

The Battle of the Sexes

(1928) When a golddigger sets her sights on a wealthy businessman, there are a number of complications for everyone involved. This late silent comedy-drama features Phyllis Haver and Jean Hersholt. Directed by D. W. Griffith

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film reviews ASHEVILLE FILM SOCIETY The Asheville Film Society will show the following films on Tuesday nights at 8 in the Cinema Lounge at the Carolina Cinema on Hendersonville Road. Tuesday night screenings are free, but membership dues for the society are only $10. Membership gets you into any special membersonly events and screenings. March 5:

Red Dust

(1932) The owner of a rubber plantation becomes involved with the new wife of one of his employees. Stars Clark Gable, Jean Harlow and Gene Raymond. Directed by Victor Fleming. March 12:

Bombshell

(1933) Sexpot film star Lola Burns seeks a new image and tries marrying a marquis, adopting a baby – all sorts of schemes which go awry. Stars Jean Harlow, Lee Tracy and Frank Morgan. Directed by Victor Fleming. March 19:

Silk Stockings (1957) A musical remake of Ninotchka: After three bumbling Soviet agents fail in their mission to retrieve a straying Soviet composer from Paris, the beautiful, ultra-serious Ninotchka is sent to complete their mission and retrieve them. Stars Fred Astaire, Cyd Charisse and Janis Paige. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian. March 26:

Lady For A Day

Frank Capra.

(1933) A gangster tries to make Apple Annie, the Times Square apple seller a lady for a day. Stars Warren William, May Robson and Guy Kibbee. Directed by

Big Screen Budget Film $5 for members, $7 general. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 13:

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “Tower of London”

March DVD Picks

Tower of London (1939) Now that the bones of Richard III have been found, it’s time to rediscover this well made, non-Shakespearean version of the story. Released in 1939, this film is what used to be known as a historical melodrama. In order to sell it to the general public as a horror picture (successfully as it turned out), Universal created a fictional role for Boris Karloff. He plays Mord, a dour, clubfooted executioner who kills all of Richard’s victims for him. It would be the least sympathetic role that Karloff would ever play. The real show here though is Basil Rathbone who was rarely given a lead role that showcased his talents as completely as Tower of London. He gets to play a wide range of emotions from fake concern to rejected lover to insidious plotter who will do anything and remove anyone to gain the throne of England. Of special note is a scene involving a drinking contest with a young Vincent Price who was 28 at the time. The rest of the supporting cast is equally fine especially Rose Hobart as Anne Neville, Miles Mander as the senile King Henry VI, and Ian Hunter as a robust and wily Edward IV. Look carefully for a young Leo G. Carroll in a small role as Lord Hastings. Among the films many strengths, historical accuracy isn’t one of them. In addition to repeating Shakespeare’s Tudor propaganda, no attempt has been made to provide accurate costumes for the principals especially in the Battle of Bosworth Field that concludes the movie. An original score of period music by Charles Previn (father of Andre) was scrapped and already composed music from the same year’s Son of Frankenstein was excerpted and plugged in here and there. Like so many movies from Hollywood’s Golden Age, Tower of London is worthless as history but is wonderful as solid, old fashioned entertainment. The

movie is full of quotable dialogue, florid characterizations, and delicious machinations. In fact it would serve as the inspiration 10 years later for a more famous British film called Kind Hearts & Coronets. It’s available for local rental as part of The Boris Karloff Collection and comes as a single disc from Netflix.

Argo (2012) When I wrote my review for the Argo back in October, I knew Argo was an early front runner for award season, but I didn’t know how if it would stay at the head of the pack. As we put this issue to bed, Argo has taken the top honors at the Golden Globes, SAG Awards, BAFTA and more, and I’m hoping it will take Best Picture at the 85th Academy. Curiously the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences seemed to think the film directed itself and snubbed Ben Afleck for a Best Director nomination. Argo just came out on DVD, so if you didn’t have a chance to see in the theatre before its windfall of accolades, you may want to see it now. Actor, director Ben Afleck brings the story of the covert operation to free six Americans during the 1980 Iranian Revolution to the big screen. For those of us who remember the Iranian hostage situation that began in 1979 and ended just as Reagan took office in 1980, one would not think a big screen dramatization of the story would hold much suspense, as we all know how it ends. What we didn’t know was what was done to get them out. Afleck’s latest turn behind the

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Argo” camera turns the now declassified story of the extrication of six Americans, during the Iranian Hostage Crisis, to safety and home into nail biting suspenseful, crowd-pleasing entertainment. Afleck plays Tony Mendez, a CIA agent brought in as a consultant to the government when the tensions in Iran escalate and six American Foreign Service workers take refuge with the Canadian Ambassador to Iran. Mendez has what his boss (Bryan Cranston) calls, “the best bad idea we have.” Mendez proposes that they pose as Canadian film crew for a Science Fiction movie. To lend legitimacy to the cover he enlists the help of a Hollywood makeup and special effects man (John Goodman) and a Hollywood producer (Alan Arkin). Hence “Argo” is born. Mendez (under a different name) will serve as Executive Producer in order to personally handle the extrication of the Americans. Afleck strikes just the right balance of comedy, intensity and humanity. Actual news footage is seamlessly integrated with the production, which looks as if it was indeed shot in the 70’s. As the climax builds Afleck heaps the suspense on in layers, stopping just short of laughable. We know from the get go they make it out, so the fact Afleck manages it at all (though just barely) is a feat in and of itself, but that aforementioned balance between all elements really makes it work. He takes liberties with the actual extrication of the Americans (it apparently wasn’t nearly as close a call as it is in the film), but it works. Political observation of the Carter administration, and the role the Middle East has come to play in our politics, is made plain, and this too works for the film. I remember the audience applauding after the credits finished rolling; that tells you a lot. Have your own crowd pleasing night of smartly done entertainment when you rent Argo.

Grand Hotel

(1932) A group of very different individuals staying at a luxurious hotel in Berlin deal with each of their respective dramas. Stars Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford. Directed by Edmund Goulding.

Carolina Cinemas, 1640 Hendersonville Rd. (828) 274-9500.

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ACT YOUTH PRODUCTION CLASS - FREE TO BE YOU AND ME

Authored by Marlo Thomas, Free To Be… You And Me encourages boys and girls to realize they can achieve anything! Asheville Community Theatre’s Youth Production performance of Free To Be… You And Me takes students

For more information go to www. facebook.com/ashevillefilmsociety 26 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

from the first day of rehearsal to the final curtain call of a performance. The performance is open to students ages 6-12. Classes begin Tuesday March 19, and meet every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon from 4:306 p.m. until April 25.

Three performances will be held on ACT’s Mainstage on May 10 at 7:30 p.m. and May 11-12 at 2:30 pm.

IF YOU GO: For tuition information or

to register, please call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org or


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PRESTIGE SUBARU PRESENTS

local favorites

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Dining Out for Life Ambassadors Needed!

Serve as a “meet and greet” host at a participating restaurant in your area for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Each restaurant has agreed to donate 20% of their sales on Thursday, April 25. The number one job you have is to fill your restaurant up with your friends,

co-workers, relatives, clients, etc. It’s a great way to socialize and raise much needed funds at the same time. To get involved visit www.wncap.org, contact Chris at (828) 252-7489 ext. 315, or email wncapvolunteer@wncap.org

PG. 32

TC

Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

PG. 32

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Wireless Internet Access!

visit wncap.org for details Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 27


PG. 32

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local favorites INTERVIEW WITH DANA AND TERRY HUNTER, OWNERS OF ASHEVILLE’S

Oil & Vinegar

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Oil & Vinegar’s “culinary gift shop” concept brings together a wide range of international food and cooking products in alluring, Mediterranean-style surroundings. PG. 32

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Their mission is to be the consumers’ first choice when looking for a unique and “tasteful” gift for any occasion. The focus is not only on the attractiveness of the gift, but ultimately its flavor and ability to accent both the palate and table.

INTERVIEWED BY DENNIS RAY

Rapid River Magazine: Tell

us a little about Oil & Vinegar.

Dana & Terry:

Dana Hunter, co-owner of Oil & Vinegar, a culinary gift shop.

Oil & Vinegar is a franchise from the Netherlands. It was started in 1999 and arrived in the US a few years later. It is truly a culinary gift shop. We are very passionate about taste. We have between 60-70 oils and vinegars, over 300 different accouterments and unique pottery from around the world. Our number one priority is taking care of our guests.

RRM: What are your most popular bottled and “on-tap” oils and vinegars?

DTH: Some of our most popular oils are the single Estate extra virgin olive oils from places like Italy, Greece, France, Spain, Morocco, also our nut, grape seed, and infused extra virgin olive oils are very popular. Our extra virgin olive oils have great health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol, improving hair, skin, nails and even digestion. We have pre-bottled and

on tap balsamic vinegar from Modena Italy, which are very popular. Some flavored vinegars that are popular are Berries, White Truffle, and Fig.

RRM: Tell us a little about your sauces, salad dressings and olives.

DTH: We have several types of sauces,

including finishing sauces, wasabi sauces, and salad dressings for all flavor palates. We have a wide variety of olives, stuffed and non- stuffed, in oil and in brine.

RRM: What is your personal favorite Mediterranean dish to serve guests?

DTH: We love to serve Bruschetta to

our guests as an appetizer. It is one of our most popular items after the oils and vinegars. It starts with a dry mix and is hydrated with water and mixed with olive oil, then it can be served hot or cold on crusty bread and sometimes cheese is added.

RRM: What is your most favorite part

of running a business in the Asheville area?

DTH: The people in Asheville, our cus-

The Weinhaus – March 2013 Events SATURDAY, MARCH 2 The Grovewood Café, located behind the Grove Park Inn, offers an elegant setting for our wine dinner expertly served by Chef Larry Waldrop and his staff. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $60 all inclusive. Call the Weinhaus for reservations.

THURSDAY, MARCH 28 The Corner Kitchen – atmosphere, service, and meticulous cuisine. PG. 32

BD

Call the Weinhaus for reservations as this event consistently fills to capacity. Time: 7 p.m. Price: $75 all inclusive.

FRIDAY, MARCH 29 Friday Night Flights – sample a wine each from France, Italy, Germany, and Spain. The wine will be accompanied by light hors d’ouvres. The price is $10. Time is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Held at The Weinhaus.

The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Avenue, Asheville, (828) 254-6453

28 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

tomers, are our favorite part of having our business in Asheville.

RRM: Any new food products or accessories you’ll be offering this spring you would care to tell us about?

DTH: We have a type of extra virgin

olive oil, called Novello, which means “early harvest”, we will be centering an entire promotion around different country’s Novello variety.

Oil & Vinegar Biltmore Park Town Square, Asheville (828) 676-1678 www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com


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healthy lifestyles Another Problem with Sleep Apnea?

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The optometrist leaned back in his chair. To Chuck, it looked like a position in which to deliver bad news. “Chuck, take a look these results of your visual field test.” “Yeah, I noticed that you took longer on this test than the last time. I thought the test would never be over,” Chuck commented, his mouth dry with worry. “Yes, I did the longer test,” Dr. Tim said. “This time I wanted to make sure we got a good look, especially at your left eye.” Chuck looked down at the two small charts that Dr. Tim held in his hand. “You’ll notice that the right eye shows good responses all around. No places are blacked out. You have excellent perception in all four quadrants.” Then Dr. Tim pointed to the left-hand chart. “But here on the nasal side of your left eye. This blacked out space. You consistently missed seeing any of the squiggly lines right here.” Chuck sat back. “It’s the glaucoma, isn’t it?” Dr. Tim nodded his head. “We thought you might not be developing it, but it’s here.” He looked up seriously. “I’ve been following you for more than four years now. You have a longer than normal eye – that’s why you have myopia, uh . . . near-sightedness.” Chuck nodded. He’d worn

‘Life as Art’ continued from page 21

and distorted by projecting our ideas about what is going on rather than opening us to what really is going on. However, when we train ourselves in subtle, undistracted presence so that the senses can fully drink in the moment as-it-is, an amazing dimension of intuitive insight opens, full of creativity and wisdom, just as happens for an artist in a moment of genius. Awareness sharpens. Presence is absolute. Our sense of self expands into the moment with a paradoxical sense of infinity. The challenge is that this flowing awareness in expanded presence is generally not experienced outside the specific context of special moments of creativity, since the habit patterns of egoic mind are so persistent and subtly insidious. It therefore makes sense to turn our everyday life into creative context, applying the insight that just as to learn an art form takes a great deal of

There are many diseases which are made worse by the lack of oxygen caused by sleep apnea. thick glassed for most of his life. “And I know that you have a thicker than normal cornea – the clear outside layer over the front of your eye where the light gets in.” Chuck nodded again. “We’ve talked about this before. I thought that might be why you had somewhat higher than normal pressures some time back.” “But the pressures started to coming down about two years ago,” Chuck responded with irritation. “They were normal just six months ago.” “It’s true, they were.” Dr. Tim pressed on with the bad news. “But here’s the evidence I was afraid I might find,” he said, holding up the charts. Dr. Tim moved his rolling chair more squarely in front of Chuck. “There are two common types of glaucoma: one where the eye angles are open and one where the eye angles are closed. Both types have high pressure inside the eye. Both types can be treated with medicines and, sometimes, with surgery. But in the recent past we have had a rise in a third type of glaucoma that has normal pressure in the eye, but still has the same loss of nerves in the back of the eye – in the retina. It’s still glaucoma.” Dr.

practice and instruction, to learn lifeas-an-art-form will also take deliberate effort, that is, conscious application of directed awareness into the moment, learning technique and mastering medium. In this case, the technique and medium are meditation and mindfulness taught by a master, just as we seek instruction from a master of an art form. Overcoming the resistance of years of conditioned habit and neurotic identity is a truly great challenge, but for those who will do the “practice,” the pay-off is even greater and more fulfilling than a perfect arpeggio or brush stroke. Life can be the canvas, the instrument, the stage, the page where a dull, chaotic or overblown story becomes impeccable poetry, and the result will be an expanding experience of flowing sanity, clarity and creativity as presence in the world becomes your home, and art your way of life.

BY

MAX HAMMONDS, MD

Tim rolled back slightly. “You don’t look like someone who has it . . . but . . . has anyone ever told you that you have sleep apnea?” Chuck glanced at his wife in the far corner. “I got my sleep apnea machine about a year ago. But I thought sleep apnea caused high blood pressure and heart disease . . . and other things.” “True enough,” Dr. Tim said, “there’s a myriad of diseases that are made worse by the lack of oxygen caused by sleep apnea. But in my field of optometry normal pressure glaucoma has shown a relationship to sleep apnea. We don’t know that exact relationship. We don’t know the exact cause and effect. But the association is there between sleep apnea and normal pressure glaucoma.” “It’s a good thing I started on that machine, huh?” “Yes, it’s a good thing.” Dr. Tim nodded. “What we don’t know is if the glaucoma will be arrested by using the machine . . . or if the glaucoma with continue to progress. I don’t want you to lose anymore vision. We should treat you with the glaucoma drops now.” “Can we wait a while? See if the glaucoma will stabilize with the machine?” “Three months. Let’s see you in three months. And we’ll hope for the best.”

Life can be your canvas...

Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a private-practice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness. He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays, 7 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 29


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what to do guide Friday, March 1

Sunday, March 3

March 7-10

Inside and Out

Limited Palette, Unlimited Possibilities

Grease: School Edition

New series of landscape and interior pastels by Frances Greenberg. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. On display through Stairway, by Frances Greenberg March 30, 2013. Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville. For details (828) 251-5796 or www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

March 1-3

The Mikado Opera Creations presents an operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan. Performances Friday & Saturday, March 1 & 2 at 7 p.m., and Sunday, March 3 at 3 p.m. $28 per adult and $15 for students 18 and under. At the Pingree Theater on the Christ School campus, 500 Christ School Road in Arden. Tickets available at www.operacreations.org.

Opening reception from 2-4 p.m. at the Red House Studios and Gallery, 310 W. State Street in Black Mountain, NC. On display February 28 through April 29. Phone (828) 669-0351.

Presented by the North Buncombe High School March 7-9 at 7 p.m. and March 10 at 2:20 p.m. Tickets are $8 until March 6, then $10 at the door. For more information contact Ricky Webb at (828) 645-4221.

Sunday, March 3

Friday, March 8

NGU Quintet

Apotheosis Opening Reception

Led by pianist Fabio Parrini, this acclaimed all faculty performance begins at 3 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, Fifth Avenue and White Pine, in Hendersonville. Tickets are $17 and are available at the Hendersonville Visitors Center, and at the door on day of performance. More details at www. hendersonvillechambermusic.org.

Friday & Saturday, March 8 & 9

Tuesday & Wednesday, March 5 & 6

Opening reception from 6-9 p.m. for Tom Pazderka, a conceptual mixed media artist. Apotheosis is a critique of cultural ideology and the use of power. On display March 7 through April 6, 2013 at the Artery, 346 Depot Street in Asheville’s River Arts District.

River North Dance Chicago

Leahy - Music & Dance

Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

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Canadian musical powerhouse showcases its spectacular blend of music and dance at 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre. Tickets: Regular $38; Students $33; Child $18; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Tickets/Information (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Experience one of the country’s top touring dance companies performing its dynamic and evocative repertoire. Diana Wortham Theatre, 8 p.m. Regular $40; Student $35; Child (ages 12 and under) $15. Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Information (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Saturday, March 9

Appalachian Pastel Society Meeting & Workshop

Wednesday, March 6

In Celebration Of Women Work by Mary Alice Ramsey will be shown at the Intercultural Center at UNC Asheville’s Student Union Center. Opening reception at 7 p.m.

Red, by Mary Alice Ramsey

The Appalachian Pastel Society meets from 10 a.m. to noon. A free demonstration of using pastels to create paintings of whimsical characters and fantasy by illustrator Walter Stanford. Black Mountain Library, 105 N. Dougherty St., Black Mtn., NC. For

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Sunday, March 10

Opening Reception for Emerging Artists Annual Exhibit 3-4 p.m. at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts Upper Gallery, 225 W. State Street. Students, ages 8 through Poppies by retirees, who take Susan Hanning painting classes at the Center under teachers Bob Travers and Cheryl Keefer will exhibit their work. Show continues through April 5. For more details call (828) 669-0930 or visit www.blackmountainarts.org.

Jimmy Webb

Vesta

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine

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Friday, March 15

March 1-10 A family struggles with a variety of end-of-life issues. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $5 for all shows. Performances take place at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, located at 20 Oak Street, in downtown Asheville.

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The MultiGrammy Award winner performs his timeless classics. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30; Students $25; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Tickets: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

gratuity. 7 p.m. at the Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street, Waynesville, NC. Call (828) 452-6000 or visit www. classicwineseller.com. Reservations are required.

Saturday, March 16

Contra & Square Dance with Jim Morrison, Joe Fallon & Friends 8-11 p.m. An evening of contras and squares, as well as a few easy Irish sets in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. Beginners should come promptly at 8 p.m. Admission: adults $7; ages 12-18, $4; under 12, $3. At John C. Campbell Folk School, One Folk School Road, Brasstown, NC 28902. Visit www. folkschool.org

Sunday, March 17

Writers at Home Readings by writers Beth Keefauver and Katherine Min at 3 p.m. at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., in downtown Asheville. Free. For more information visit agc. unca.edu/writers-home-series or call (828) 254-6734.

Tuesday, March 19

Asheville Quilt Guild

Friday, March 15

Monthly meeting at 7 p.m., at the Folk Art Center featurs Ann Holmes describing her French fuse technique, “No Sewing Until You Quilt It!”

A Sense of Place

Tuesday & Wednesday, March 19 & 20

Fine art by Bonnie Cooper and Don McGowan on display at Grateful Steps Bookshop. Meet-the-artists reception from 6-8 p.m. Open to the public. Grateful Steps Publishing House and Bookshop, 159 S. Lexington, Asheville. Call (828) 277-0998 or visit www. gratefulsteps.org

Saturday, March 16

Live Jazz and Dinner Gifted jazz vocalist, Wendy Jones will be joined by a jazz trio. Tickets are $34.99 per person plus tax and

Pilobolus Dance Theatre Internationally acclaimed for its mix of humor, invention and drama, Pilobolus brings its daring and unparalleled work to Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place at 8 p.m. Regular $48; Student $43; Child (ages 12 and under) $20. Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Information (828) 257-4530 or online at www. dwtheatre.com.

Thursday, March 21

Rhizome and Frog Sto: Catching Flies

www.thetalesofreveries.tumbler.com

Altan: Traditional Irish Music

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Altan performs at the Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place at 8 p.m. Tickets: Regular $30; Students $25; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Tickets/Information (828) 257-4530 or online at www. dwtheatre.com.

MARCH EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 30 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7


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what to do guide Sunday, March 23

Asheville Community Band

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

Friday Night Live @ 7 p.m.

Concert and Music Education Scholarships at 3 p.m. Admission: $8, Students Free. Asheville High School Auditorium.

Wine, beer, tapas. Live music weekly.

Saturday, March 23

March 8 - Uncle Elvis & the Flea Bitten

March 1 - Kate Steinbeck, flute; Fabio Parrini, piano.

Acro Balance Basics and Pyramid Building Workshop

Dawgs, ukuele duo and drums.

March 15 - Gypsy Bandwagon, celtic. March 22 - One Leg Up Duo, acoustic

2:30-4:30 p.m. Nicky Virgin, along with acro balance instructor Jeff “Tree” Anderson host a workshop dedicated to explaining the basics of acro balance poses. This workshop is designed to teach some of the foundational poses in acro balance in an easy and safe way. Students will share in learning a fun sequence that will allow them to string the poses together. Students will have the opportunity to learn all the different parts in the series, as base, flyer, and spotter.

swing.

March 29 - Jay Brown, piano, guitar, harmonica.

Dragin

by Michael Cole

Roller Derby 2013 Season

Following partner play, we will all come together and use our new skills in pyramid building. Not only will this workshop inspire play, but it will provide a platform to work on mutual trust and communication. Price: $20. Asheville Community Yoga, 8 Brookdale Rd., www.ashevillecommunityyoga.com.

Asheville’s Blue Ridge Rollergirls return to the U.S. Cellular Center! Asheville will be the home of the WFTDA South Central tournament in November, and BRRG will fight for a Top 10 spot in order to compete.

Monday & Tuesday, March 25 & 26

Auditions for Kiss Me, Kate Be a part of Cole Porter’s classic and classy musical! Auditions will be held from 6-8 at Asheville Community Theatre. Please prepare 16 bars of music and bring your sheet music to the audition in the key in which you will be singing. We will provide an accompanist. All roles are available to anyone in the community. Directed by Chanda Calentine with musical direction by Brad Curtioff. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville, NC. For more details please visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

Stories and original songs from locals. In 35below at 7:30 p.m. Hosted by Tom Chalmers. Tickets are $10. Asheville Community Theatre, 35 East Walnut St., Asheville. For more information call (828) 254-1320 or visit www.ashevilletheatre.org.

Caravan of Thieves Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

GYPSY SWINGING SERENADING FIREBREATHING CIRCUS FREAKS! Friday, March 15 Driving gypsy jazz rhythms, acoustic guitars, upright bass and violin lay the foundation for mesmerizing vocal harmonies and fantastic stories. It’s theatrical and humorous.

Saturday, April 6

Educational Program for Children and Parents Steve Jones, author of Life in America, and Dr. J. Terry Hall, author of Notes from the Chalkboard. Reading and discussion begins at 12:30 p.m. Nutritious lunch served at 12 noon. Grateful Steps Publishing House and Bookshop, 159 S. Lexington, Asheville. Call (828) 277-0998 or visit www.gratefulsteps.org

March 9 – WNC Agricultural Center April 27 – U.S. Cellular Center June 1 - U.S. Cellular Center August 24 - U.S. Cellular Center October 12 - U.S. Cellular Center November 16 - WNC Agricultural Center www.blueridgerollergirls.com

Thursday, March 28

Storytelling Series: Listen to This

The Classic Wineseller, (828) 452-6000 20 Church Street, Waynesville, NC www.classicwineseller.com

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Classes at River’s Edge Studio All skill levels welcomed! 191 Lyman Street, Studio #310 in the historic river arts district. For more information and schedule call (828) 776-2716 or visit www.fletamonaghan.com.

It’s musical and intense. It entertains, dazzles and defies classification while welcoming the spectator to join the band throughout the performance in momentary fits of claps, snaps and sing-alongs. If Django Reinhardt, the cast of Stomp and the Beatles all had a party at Tim Burton’s house, Caravan of Thieves would be the band they hired. 8 p.m. at The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church St., Asheville. Tickets $12 advance / $15 door. For tickets and more details call (828) 270-7747 or visit www.myAltamont.com

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 31


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find it here AmiciMusic www.amicimusic.org

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Great Smokies Creations (828) 452-4757

Mellow Mushroom (828) 236-9800

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Appalachian Craft Center

www.appalachiancraftcenter.com

C.W. Worth House www.worthhouse.com

Great Trade Solutions www.greattradesolutions.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

Sola Salt Cave www.solasaltcave.com

Asheville Symphony www.ashevillesymphony.org

Diana Wortham Theatre www.dwtheatre.com

Great Tree Zen Temple www.greattreetemple.org

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

Dogwood Restaurant & Lounge (828) 665-3800

HandMade in America www.handmadeinamerica.org

Oil & Vinegar Asheville

Storm Rhum Bar & Bistro www.stormrhumbar.com

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Donatelli Cakes & Pastries www.donatellicakedesigns.com

Hearn’s Bicycle (828) 253-4800

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Charlotte Street Computers (828) 225-6600

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

High Country Style (828) 452-3611

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Studio 375 Depot BarbaraFrohmaderArt.com www.silverpoemstudio.com

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

Frame It To a T www.frameittoat.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

The Chocolate Bear www.thechocolatebears.com

Frugal Framer www.frugalframer.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Satellite Gallery www.thesatellitegallery.com SIGNARAMA www.wncsigns.com

Claying Around www.clayingaround.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Mountain Top Appliance

www.mountainviewappliance.com

www.asheville.oilandvinegarusa.com

Thyme in the Garden http://thymeinthegarden asheville.blogspot.com Updraft Fine Art Gallery www.updraftgallery.com The Wine Guy www.theashevillewineguy.com

Nancy Silver Art www.nancysilverart.com

PATTON AVE. / ASHLAND AVE.

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Live Music Weekly

Jazz Vocalist Wendy Jones at the Classic Wineseller

Experience four of the region’s greatest jazz artists up close and personal in a unique, intimate setting while dining on delicious food from the Classic Wineseller’s kitchen. The per person price is $34.99 plus tax and gratuity. Call (828) 452-6000 to reserve your table or email requests to info@classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited. Wendy Jones delivers smart and arresting jazz vocals with such passion and skill that she has become one of the most popular jazz artists in Western NC. She consistently receives accolades for her energetic and entertaining renditions of cool, bop, and post bop standards. She has held the #1 spot on the Reverbnation Jazz Charts for Asheville since November 2011. Ms. Jones is currently on faculty at the University of North Carolina-Asheville where she teaches voice and improvisation to jazz voice majors. For more information visit www.wendyljonesmusic. com or check out her Reverbnation page: www. reverbnation.com/wendyjones Steve Davidowski was keyboardist for the Dixie Dregs band with founding member Steve

Wine Beer Tapas St. Patrick’s Day Weekend: Live Jazz + Dinner

KAY S. MILLER

Morse. He toured with well-known fiddler, Vassar Clemmons, of “Orange Blossom Special” fame. Zack Page has played with artists such as Billy Jazz vocalist Wendy Jones Higgins, Eddie Daniels, and Babik Reinhardt (son of Django Reinhardt). Rick Dilling has played for some of the greatest musicians of all time including the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, Margaret Whiting, Clark Terry, Ernie Watts, Herb Ellis, Joe Temperly, Billy Taylor, and the Unifour Jazz Big Band.

Saturday, March 16 at 7pm. Reservations required. Wendy Jones, jazz vocals Steve Davidowski, piano Zack Page, bass Rick Dilling, percussion

20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

Like us at Facebook.com/theclassicwineseller

IF YOU The Classic Wineseller presents jazz vocalist, GO Wendy Jones with Steve Davidowski, piano;

Zack Page, bass; and, Rick Dilling, percussion, on Saturday, March 16, 2013, at 7 p.m. The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street in Waynesville. Call (828) 452-6000 to make reservations or email info@classicwineseller.com. Seating is limited.

Pan Harmonia Concerts

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Friday, March 1 Prélude to an aperitif, 7 p.m. Pianist Fabio Parrini and flutist Kate Steinbeck interpret César Franck’s Sonata in A Major. At Angelino’s Piattino Ristorante, located inside the Classic Wineseller. Dinner at 5:30 p.m. $10 per person Kate Steinbeck minimum food/wine and Fabio Parrini. purchase. Suggested Photo: Ringelspaugh-Irvine donation of $5-20 per person. The Classic Wineseller, 20 Church Street, Waynesville. (828) 452-6000

PG. 32

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Thursday, March 7 Rare Modern Treats, 7:30 p.m. Kate Steinbeck, flute, Fred Lemmons, clarinet, Rosalind Buda, bassoon. Vintage 20th Century works. Admission is free. Broyhill Chapel, Mars Hill College, 100 Athletic St., Mars Hill.

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Sunday, March 10 2nd Sunday @ 5 p.m. Kate Steinbeck, flute, Fabio Parrini, piano. César Franck’s Sonata in A Major. A sumptuous, romantic treat. Tickets: $12 available at www.pan-harmonia.org, or $15 general at the door, $5 for students. The Altamont Theatre, 18 Church Street, Asheville, www.myaltamont.com.

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noteworthy Do Tell Storytelling Festival INTELLIGENT ENTERTAINMENT FOR ADULTS AGES TEN AND OVER TAKES PLACE APRIL 6 & 7

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Saturday, April 6 – Storytelling Workshop 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., $20. With Geraldine Buckley.

Saturday, April 6 – Showcase of Storytellers

PG. 32

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Rapid River Magazine

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Now iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly!

1 to 5:30 p.m., $12. Features an appealing mix of regional tellers: Gwenda LedBetter, Asheville’s “Story Lady” and veteran teller at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, TN, Marvin Cole, renowned performance artist who appears nationally as Mark Twain, along with Karen-Eve Bayne, Ronny Pepper, and Shanita Jacksonn Cole. The performance features tales from traditional to modern to marvelous.

Saturday, April 6 – Best of Festival 7:30 p.m. $12. Featuring Geraldine Buckley. Through folk stories and tales from her own life Geraldine takes the audience on a magic carpet ride of adventure, laughter and insight that leaves listeners both entertained and moved.

Sunday, April 7 – An Afternoon of Stories and Songs

www.issuu.com/rapidrivermagazine

3 p.m., $12. Donna Marie Todd is known as the “Singer of Stories” based on her unique storytelling style combined with songs in her soaring soprano voice. She is from Black Mountain, and is well-known for the theatrical flair she adds to her deeply insightful stories.

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IF YOU Downtown Flat Rock Playhouse, 125 S Main GO Street, Hendersonville. Advance ticket purchase

recommended. For more information call (828) 693-0731, or visit www.dotellfestival.org.

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34 March 2013 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 16, No. 7

Donna Marie Todd

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spring forward Thyme in the Garden

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Early spring is a busy time for gardeners. The urge to get our hands in the soil has been building in the colder months as we’ve ordered seeds and made garden plans. Now it is time to start seeds, divide and transplant perennials, and finish pruning projects. It is also an excellent time to plant perennials if they have been raised in a cool house. You can spruce up outdoor containers with cool-loving pansies, herbs and interesting foliage perennials. Many of these can be incorporated later into plantings either in the ground or left in the container to add interest to summer annual arrangements.

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Thyme in the Garden 190 Weaverville Hwy., Asheville, NC 28804 tigthyme@hotmail.com, (828) 658-3700 thymeinthegardenasheville.blogspot.com

LEAF Celebrates Voices of Tradition

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LEAF presents an incredible lineup of performing artists for the Spring 2013 LEAF Festival, taking place May 9-12 in Black Mountain. Headlining the 36th festival are R&B icon Mavis Staples; urban Latino culture-mashers Ozomatli; Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band, led by the bluegrass legend; Zimbabwean maestro Oliver Mtukudzi & the Black Spirits; and Abigail Washburn, Appalachian songbird and long-time LEAF favorite. From American folk, vocal jazz, and gospel traditions, to Tibetan a cappella, Zimbabwean afro-pop, and classical choral customs, you’ll experience a blend of voices both familiar and new.

LEAF’s performing arts passport will take you all over the world: the favelas of Brazil (Matuto); the swamps of New Orleans (Papa Grows Funk & Honey Island Swamp Band); the kelly green hills of Ireland (Solas); the tablas-tuned halls of India (Talavya); and right back to LEAF’s own Western NC backyard (The Broadcast). Combining the diversity of names and faces you’ve come to love at LEAF with a myriad of dancing – Contra, Latin, Swing, Cajun, Square – poetry slams, folk art and craft exhibitions, outdoor adventure, and the LEAFlet Kid’s Village – a festival in

BY JENNIFER

PICKERING

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?d^c<gZViIgVYZHdaji^dch CZkZgEVn8Vh]6\V^c lll#<gZViIgVYZHdaji^dch#Xdb and of itself – LEAF never ceases to offer new and exciting cultural connections.

LEAF’S SPRING LINEUP Mavis Staples; Ozomatli; Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band; Oliver Mtukudzi & the Black Spirits; Abigail Washburn; Solas; Papa Grows Funk; MC Yogi; Lizz Wright; Ben Sollee; Honey Island Swamp Band; Yungchen Lhamo; Dirk Powell Band with Riley Baugus; Orgone; Secret Agent 23 Skidoo; The Broadcast; Como Mamas; Matuto; Sheila Kay Adams; Talavya; Sirens in the Round; Blue Ridge Orchestra; Unifire Theatre; Green Grass Cloggers; The Spring Chickens; WWC Old-Time String Band; Royal Kingdom of Happyland; Freewheelin MaMas; Art Farm; Toy Boat Circus Tent; Warren Wilson Gamelan Ensemble; Asheville Community Movement; Whee Ahh Faerie Kin; 40 Fingers & A Missing Tooth. IF YOU Tickets and volunteering GO opportunities are available through

www.theLEAF.org, or by calling the LEAF office at (828) 686-8742. Tickets are sold in advance only, so get yours today!

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Vol. 16, No. 7 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — March 2013 35


PG.

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170 N. Main • Waynesville, NC • 828.452.6844

March 2013 Rapid River Magazine  
March 2013 Rapid River Magazine  

On the cover: GD Whalen..p18; Performance: Diana Wortham Theatre..p4; Amici Music..p8; Lawrence Brownlee Masterclass..p7; Do Tell Storytelli...

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