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Asheville Symphony turns up the heat with a passionate performance by violinist Elena Urioste. PG 15

NEA’s 2013 National Heritage Fellow Sheila Kay Adams. PG 7

Live music, dinner, wine pairings and tastings at The Classic Wineseller. PG 20

John Mac Kah, Cotton Mill Studios featured artist for January. PG 18

Enter Rapid River Magazine’s 17th Annual Poetry Contest!

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American Hustle • Her • Inside Llewyn Davis • Nebraska • Philomena • Saving Mr. Banks • Wolf of Wall Street

PGS

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BILTMORE VILLAGE

26 lodge st., asheville, nc 828-277-6222 open mon.-sat.: 10am-7pm, sun.: 12-5pm

www.cRAfTGuILd.ORG

For more fine crafts visit: Allanstand Craft Shop at the Folk Art Center Milepost 382 Blue Ridge Parkway | 828-298-7928 Guild Crafts 930 Tunnel Rd | 828-298-7903

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48"/-",& Febraury 8, 2014 • 8 PM Thomas Wolfe Auditorium

Golijov Muertes des Angel Barber Violin Concerto Elena Urioste, Violin Ravel Pavane Tchaikovsky Suite from Swan Lake

Daniel Meyer, Music Director

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www.craftguild.org


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stage preview HART’s 2014 Studio Season

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Agnes of God

Some of

January 17 & 18 at the best 77:30 :30 p.m.; January 19 at 3 p.m. (Hold over/ theater in snow dates Januthe region! ary 24, 25, 26. Tony nominated Best Lily, an aging Play written by John but formidable rePielmeier; with Lyn tiree, hires Michael, Donley, Suzanne an acerbic dance Tinsley and Hanni instructor, to give Muerdter. Directed her dance lessons by Wanda Taylor. in her condo in St. This is one of Petersburg Beach, Broadway’s biggest Tim Stoeckel in the 2013 production of 21A Florida. Antagohits and a star vein the HART Studio Theater, 250 Pigeon St. nism between a gay in Waynesville. hicle for many great man and the wife actresses, including; of a Southern Baptist minister gives way to Elizabeth Ashley, Amanda Plummer, Geralprofound compatibility as they swing dance, dine Page, Diane Carrol, Jane Fonda, Carrie tango, foxtrot, and cha-cha while sharing barbs Fisher, Lee Remick, and Ann Bancroft. and intimacies along with the dance steps. The play tells the story of a novice nun who gives birth and insists that the dead child was the result of a virgin conception. A psychiPOE, An Evening of Chills and Thrills atrist and the mother superior of the convent March 14 & 15 at 7:30 p.m.; March 16 at 3 clash during the resulting investigation. p.m. (Hold over/snow dates March 21, 22, 23) Directed by San Greenalch. “The Raven,” by Other Desert Cities Edgar Allen Poe, with James Bradley. “The January 31 and February 1 at 7:30 p.m.; Black Cat,” by Edgar Allen Poe, with Tom February 2 at 3 p.m. (Hold over/snow dates Deweese. “The Monkey’s Paw,” a one-act February 7, 8, 9). Tony nominated Best Play by W.W. Jacobs with San Greenalch, Bob - Pulitzer Prize finalist. Written by Jon Robin Greenalch, James Bradley, Tom Deweese Baitz. Directed by Charles Mills with Steve and John Winfield. Lloyd, Lyn Donley, Julie Kinter, Sarah Lipham. The play’s events occur around the ChristMost Improved Camper: The Real Life mas 2004 holiday, when the family of Polly and Lyman Wyeth gather in Palm Springs, CaliAdventures of C.J. Deering fornia. Their daughter Brooke Wyeth returns March 28 & 29 at 7:30 p.m.; March 30 at 3 home after six years. Polly’s sister Silda is also p.m. (Hold over/snow dates April 4 & 5) visiting, out of a time spent in rehab. Comic storyteller C.J. Deering brings Polly and Lyman are Republicans, while her all too true tall tales of life, and recovery Silda is a liberal. The sisters co-wrote a series and survival to the HART Studio by popular of MGM comedies in the 1960s. Brooke demand. announces to her family that she is about to publish a memoir dredging up a pivotal and tragic event in the family’s history—a wound they don’t want reopened.

Frozen February 14 & 15 at 7:30 p.m.; February 16 at 3 p.m. (Hold over/snow dates February 21, 22, 23). Tony nominated Best Play by Bryony Lavery. Directed by Andrew Gall with Eric Martinez, Frances Davis and Jennifer Sanner. Frozen tells the story of the disappearance of a 10-year-old girl, Rhona. The play follows Rhona’s mother and killer over the years that follow. They are linked by a doctor who is studying what causes men to commit such crimes. The themes of the play include emotional paralysis and forgiveness.

Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks February 28 and March 1 at 7:30 p.m.; March 2 at 3 p.m. (Hold over/snow dates March 7, 8, 9). Written by Richard Alfieri. With Julie Kinter and Cord Scott.

Reserve Tickets for the Winter Studio Season

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Every winter we present some of the best theater in the region in the intimate Feichter Studio. The studio seats 65, with only three rows surrounding the playing area. Tickets are general admission but performances often sell out, so patrons are encouraged to make reservations or buy tickets in advance. IF YOU HART Theater, 250 Pigeon St. in GO Waynesville. Call (828) 456-6322, or

visit www.harttheatre.com

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performance Playful and Powerful Eisenhower Dance With virtuosic dancers and thrilling choreography, Eisenhower Dance, one of the nation’s premier contemporary dance companies, blends drama, momentum and force with technical brilliance.

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love is

forever Magick 2014 hearts Signed Limited Edition FINE JEWELRY & DESIGN STUDIO

14k with 2pt. diamonds /cloisonnĂŠ

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Founded by Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower in 1991, Eisenhower Dance has been captivating audiences for more than two decades with an evolving, exhilarating repertoire dedicated to the performance of a diverse range of contemporary dance works. For their January 17 & 18 performances at Diana Wortham Theatre, Eisenhower Dance will perform several works. Begin with the End in Mind is an abstract work by Ron de Jesus that showcases the dancers’ dynamic range, from soft and tender to powerful and athletic. Open Veins by Laurie Eisenhower is a virtuosic pure movement work. Threads is a luscious and passionate work for eight dancers—a signature work by Eisenhower Dance and an audience favorite.

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Music Lesson is a piece by Eisenhower that utilizes old recordings of narrated music lessons spliced with new music samples, giving a tongue-in-cheek version of music history and form. Better Places is a crowd-pleasing suite of five dances to Southern and Blues influenced music, also by Eisenhower. An additional work by a guest choreographer will be revealed at the performances. Eisenhower Dance has received critical acclaim along with enthusiastic audience support from around the world, called “stunning� by the Holland Sentinel and acclaimed as “intelligently crafted repertoire� by Dance Magazine. The company has received numerous grants and awards for its work, including a prestigious Touring Award from the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) to present its work NewDANCEfest during the 2012-2013 season. In addition to the public performances, Diana Wortham Theatre hosts Eisenhower Dance for an extended residency at the theatre.

BY JOHN

ELLIS

“Dance that touches the soul.� ~ Detroit Free Press Activities include an after-school performance, “Kids in Motion,� on Wednesday, January 15 at 3:30 p.m.; a Master Class for the public on Thursday January 16 (location and time to be announced); a Matinee Series performance, “Motown in Motion,� on Friday January 17 at 10 a.m.; and a workshop at Care Partners. Ticket holders of the January 17 & 18 evening performances can attend free pre-performance discussions with Laurie Eisenhower and/or Eisenhower Dance dancers at 7 p.m. both nights prior to the 8 p.m. performances. All activities except for the Care Partners workshop are open to the public; more information at www. dwtheatre.com. Since founding Eisenhower Dance, Laurie Eisenhower has created over 100 dances for the company in addition to works for numerous professional and university dance companies. She has been awarded several Creative Artists grants from state arts foundations, the Michigan Dance Association Choreographers Festival Award, the Women in Art Award for Choreography, Artserve’s Michigan Governor’s Arts Award for Outstanding Michigan Artist and, most recently, the prestigious 2012 Kresge Artist Fellowship. The new entrance for the Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place is marked by the location of the theatre’s new marquee between 12 and 14 Biltmore Avenue. Patrons enter the theatre through the breezeway between Marble Slab Creamery and Circle in the Square restaurants, and into a large interior courtyard for Pack Place with multiple glass doors to the theatre’s lower lobby and new box office. The intimate theatre seats just over 500 and boasts exceptional acoustics and sightlines, making it the premier performance space in Western North Carolina. Visit www.eisenhowerdance.org IF YOU Eisenhower Dance, January 17 & 18 GO at 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre

at Pack Place. Tickets: Regular $35; Students $30; Child $15; Student Rush day-of-the-show (with valid ID) $10. Box Office (828)257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com


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we love this place 2014 Winter Warmer Beerfest

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE Established in 1997 • Volume Seventeen, Number Five

JANUARY 2014 www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Publisher/Editor: Dennis Ray Marketing: Dennis Ray, Rick Hills Copyeditor: Kathleen Colburn Proofreader: Diane S. Levy Poetry Editor: Carol Pearce Bjorlie Staff Photographers: Kelsey Jensen, Keli Keach Layout & Design: Simone Bouyer Accounting: Sharon Cole Distribution: Dennis Ray CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Judy Ausley, James Cassara, Michael Cole, Amy Downs, John Ellis, Rae Geoffrey, Chall Gray, Max Hammonds, MD, Phil Hawkins, Phil Juliano, Chip Kaufmann, Michelle Keenan, Eddie LeShure, Peter Loewer, Marcianne Miller, T.Oder & R.Woods, Dennis Ray, David Andrew Regan, Erin Scholze, David Starkey, Greg Vineyard, Bill Walz. INFO Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine is a monthly publication. Address correspondence to info@rapidrivermagazine.com or write to: Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716 Phone: (828) 646-0071 www.rapidrivermagazine.com All materials contained herein are owned and copyrighted by Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine and the individual contributors unless otherwise stated. Opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine or the advertisers found herein. © Rapid River Arts & Culture Magazine, January 2014, Vol. 17 No. 5

On the Cover:

Steve Tucker and Kay Miller enjoy live music by Joe Cruz at the Classic Wineseller. PAGES 8 & 20 Photo by Keli Keach Photography

3 Performance

HART’s 2014 Studio Season . . . . . . 3 Eisenhower Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 NC Stage – Rounding Third . . . . . . 6 Asheville Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Pan Harmonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

7 Music

Sheila Kay Adams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The he Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Chuck Brodsky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Jesse Earl Junior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Hot Club of Cowtown . . . . . . . . . . 29 Atlas Road Crew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Donna the Buffalo . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

8 Local Favorites

The Strand at 38 Main . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Soapy Dog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Classic Wineseller . . . . . . . . . . 20 Angry Giant Forge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Points of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

9 Movie Reviews

Chip Kaufmann & Michelle Keenan.. 9

13 Columns

Bill Walz – Artful Living. . . . . . . . . Max Hammonds, MD – Health . . Greg Vineyard – Fine Art . . . . . . . . Carol Pearce Bjorlie – Poetry. . . . . Marcianne Miller – Books . . . . . . . Peter Loewer – The Curmudgeon. Judy Ausley – Southern Comfort . Eddie LeShure – Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . James Cassara – Music . . . . . . . . . .

13 13 16 24 25 26 26 27 28

14 Fine Art

Cynthia Homire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Mac Kah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Mahogany House . . . . . . . . . . The Art House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Get your tickets now and shake off those winter blahs with great brews from more than 30 regional craft breweries, awesome music and tasty food at the 2014 Winter Warmer Beer Festival at the U.S Cellular Center in downtown Asheville. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Western North Carolina Alliance (WNCA), who are hard at work protecting our mountains, rivers and forests. Visit the Western North Carolina Alliance online at www.wnca.org or call (828) 258-8737. Purchase tickets at www.AshevilleBeerFest.com. All previous festivals have sold out in advance, so be sure to get your tickets soon! This is also a very cool volunteer gig and we’re going to need lots of help. If you want to lend a hand, please contact Cynthia Camilleri by email to Cynthia@ WNCA.org. The Winter Warmer Beerfest takes place from 3-7 p.m. January 25, and is hosted by ThreeSheets:Design and Brews Cruise, Inc.

The Thirsty Monk Expands 2014 will be an exciting year for the Thirsty Monk, and that means Asheville’s already stellar beer scene will be that much better. Thirsty Monk has announced plans to expand their brewery operation in Gerber Village. “2014 is going to be the year that a lot more people become familiar with our beers,” said head brewer Norm Penn. For New Year’s Eve the brewery released a keg of Thirsty Monk Aged Imperial Amber. Penn described the beer as having hints of vanilla and butterscotch, and a subtle warmth which doesn’t betray it’s 8.8% abv. This beer will only be available at the Gerber Village Thirsty Monk. The brewery has established itself as South Asheville’s best place to find a great selection of beers. Their flagship location on Patton Ave. continues to provide great service for the downtown Asheville beer scene. Thirsty Monk also has a new location under construction in North Asheville. Thirsty Monk Biltmore Park: 2 Town Square Blvd., Suite 170, Asheville, (828) 687-3873. Thirsty Monk Gerber Village: 20 Gala Dr., Asheville, (828) 505-4564. Thirsty Monk Downtown: 92 Patton Ave., Asheville, (828) 254-5470.

SPECIAL SECTIONS

WE’RE SORRY!

Black Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . PG 14 Downtown Asheville . . . . . PGS 15-17 River Arts District. . . . . . . . PGS 18-19 Waynesville . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGS 20-21 Hendersonville . . . . . . . . . . PGS 22-23

Our sincere apologies for last month’s production error which affected the lineup of photos with events in the “What to Do Guide.” We apologize for any confusion this may have caused our readers.

www.RapidRiverMagazine.com Like Us on Facebook We’re Hyper Local and Super Social!

14 18 21 23

24 Noteworthy

Leanna Sain, Wish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

30 What to Do Guide

Best in Show by Phil Juliano . . . . . Callie & Cats by Amy Downs . . . . Corgi Tales by Phil Hawkins . . . . Dragin by Michael Cole . . . . . . . . Ratchet & Spin by T.Oder, R.Woods

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Distributed at more than 390 locations throughout eight counties in WNC and South Carolina. First copy is free – each additional copy $1.50

Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 5


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Rounding Third

STARRING SCOTT TREADWAY AND CHARLIE FLYNN-MCIVER

NC Stage Company is excited to present Rounding Third by Richard Dresser, a hilarious comedy about an odd-couple pairing of men who come together to coach a season of little league baseball. Angie Flynn-McIver is directing the brilliantly funny duo Scott Treadway and Charlie Flynn-McIver. Charlie and Scott were voted the top two best actors in the best of WNC poll. Two men meet on a field for the first time to coach a Little League team on which their sons are players. Don (Flynn-McIver)

is a beer-drinking house painter whose mantra is “winning is everything,” while Michael (Treadway) is a latte-sipping corporate type who stumbled into coaching and believes in “doing the best you can.” The pair inevitably end up clashing as they work together to coach the team. This delightfully entertaining show will appeal to parents, grandparents, former Little League players and coaches. How will two disparate volunteer coaches come together for a winning little league season? North Carolina Stage Company is Asheville’s only professional theatre celebrating its 12th year producing plays

Hilarious and Touching

Dirty Barbie and Other Girlhood Tales

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Named a Top 5 Pick at the 2012 Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Dirty Barbie and Other Girlhood Tales transOther pports orts audiences back to the best (and the hardest) moments of childhood.

BY

RAE GEOFFREY

giving honest and often theatrical motivational talks on weight loss and body image. Dirty Barbie and Other Girlhood Tales is adapted from Stewart’s The show is part of the blog of childhood experitheatre’s Intersections Seences, which she kept ries and is a special event in while working as a wellconjunction with the 2014 ness coach with teenage Asheville Fringe Arts Festival. girls. In Dirty Barbie and Other Featuring a full Girlhood Tales, author/actor season of classes, discusDenise Stewart examines the Author/actor Denise Stewart sions, and performances, secret lives of girls, the way we Intersections is an opportunity for patrons play, and the unsupervised side of childhood in to connect more deeply with the arts, arta show full of humor and depth. ists, and each other. The Forum at Diana In 1978, a mother, newly widowed, Wortham Theatre, a large multi-purpose moved her family from the wide, open spaces space adjacent to the theatre and accessible of Wyoming to a tiny town in North Carofrom the theatre’s main lobby, is the venue lina. Misbehaving ensued. Over thirty years for all Intersections events unless otherwise later, DeeDee Stewart began writing about her announced. childhood, and her mother. Putting the “fun” back in “dysfunctional,” Visit www.deedeeslivingwill.com/p/ spinning tales on scarlet fever, scotch over ice dirty-barbie-tour.html and girls gone wild, this all-American girl takes audiences on an unforgettable ride through the 70s, 80s and 90s with a performance that is IF YOU Dirty Barbie and Other at once wonderfully authentic and effortlessly GO Girlhood Tales, Thursdayhonest. Saturday, January 23-25 at 8 Denise “DeeDee” Stewart received her p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham theatre degree from Catawba College in North Theatre. Tickets: Regular $22; Student Carolina before earning a Master’s in Play$18; $ 2 discount available for Fringe writing from the University of Virginia. In Festival pass holders. Tickets are available addition to her playwriting and performance through the Diana Wortham Theatre box work, she is also a wellness coach. Stewart office by callling (828) 257-4530, or visit honed her theatre performance skills through www.dwtheatre.com.

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“Coaching your own kid is one of the hardest things a man can do.” for the Asheville community. Founded by Charlie and Angie Flynn-McIver, the theatre has been voted best local theatre eight out of the past nine years in the Mountain Xpress Best of WNC Poll. NC Stage was also recently awarded the American Theatre Wing National Theatre Company Grant. IF YOU Rounding Third, January 29 – GO February 23. Wednesday-Saturday at

7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets: $12-$32. Student tickets $10 anytime. PayWhat-You-Can: Wednesday, January 29. Bring your team! Discounts are offered for groups of six or more. Tickets are available by calling (828) 239-0263 or visiting www.ncstage.org. North Carolina Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane in downtown Asheville.

Taste of Opera

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Join Asheville Lyric Opera January 25, 2014 at the Taste of Opera Winter Gala. This magical evening of fine dining and stellar operatic performances now features all table seating. Upon arrival, guests will have the opportunity to meet and mingle as they enjoy specialty hors d’oeuvres from our local caterers. As guests enjoy their drinks and the main course is prepared, the evening will transform into an opera. Act I will introduce performers who will present arias and roles for upcoming seasons. In our first intermission restaurant chefs will present an entrée to each table allowing guests to interact with local chefs in an intimate setting. Once the main course is served, Act II will continue with additional arias. The second intermission will give guests the opportunity to select an elegant dessert as they prepare for the Finale. Included in the evenings festivities will be a silent auction featuring entertainment and weekend packages as well as tickets to regional performances, spa getaways, and gift cards for local restaurants. IF YOU Taste of Opera, January 25 at 6 p.m. GO at the Crowne Plaza Expo Center.

Tables contain eight seats which are reserved at $75 per seat. Tickets may be purchased by calling the opera office at (828) 236-0670 or by the ALO online e-box office at www.ashevillelyric.org.


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folk music 2013 NEA NATIONAL HERITAGE FELLOW

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Sheila Kay Adams

The National Heritage Fellowship is a lifetime honor presented to master folk and traditional artists by the National Endowment for the Arts.

val in Jonesborough, Tennessee, and the 1976 and 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival as part of The Bicentennial Celebration and Appalachia: Heritage and Harmony. Adams is the author of two books: Come Go Home With Me, a collection of stories The Fellowship, which began in 1982, is published by the University of North Carolina the United States’ highest honor in the folk Press and a 1997 winner of the North Carolina and traditional arts. Each year, fellowships are Historical Society’s award for historical fiction; presented to between ten and fifteen artists or and My Old True Love, a novel published by groups at a White House ceremony in WashAlgonquin Books in 2004. ington, D.C. Sheila Kay Adams was one of She has recorded several albums of balnine artists selected for the 2013 award. lads, songs and stories including My Dearest Dear (2000), All the Other Fine Things (2004), and Live at the International Storytelling Festival (2007). Adams appeared in the movies Last of the Mohicans (1992) and Songcatcher (2000), a movie for which she also served as technical advisor and singing coach. Adams’ devotion to preserving and perpetuating her heritage earned her the North Carolina Folklore Society’s Brown-Hudson Award in recognition of her valuable contributions to the study of North Carolina folklore. In a letter in support of her nomination, George Holt, director of performing arts and film studies at the North Carolina Museum of Sheila Kay Adams, ballad singer, musician and Art wrote, “Sheila Kay Adams is storyteller from Marshall, NC. Photo: Garius Hill the key figure in carrying forward to this day the tradition of unaccompanied balAwardees have included Native American lad singing that has enriched her community basket weavers, African American blues musifor more than two centuries, promoting its cians, traditional fiddlers, Mexican American beauty throughout our country and beyond, accordionists, and all manner of traditional and insuring that it will be perpetuated by artisans and performers of numerous ethnic younger generations of singers well into the backgrounds. The other artists recognized in 21st century.” 2013 were Ralph Burns, Verónica Castillo, Listen to excerpts from “I’m Going Back Séamus Connolly, Nicolae Feraru, Carol to North Carolina” and “Little Margaret” at Fran, Pauline Hillaire, David Ivey, and Ramón www.arts.gov, courtesy of Sheila Kay Adams “Chunky” Sánchez. and Granny Dell Records. A seventh-generation ballad singer, stoA new travel guidebook, “Blue Ridge Muryteller, and musician, Sheila Kay Adams was sic Trails of North Carolina,” features a profile born and raised in the Sodom Laurel comof Adams and other traditional musicians munity of Madison County, North Carolina, in the mountains and foothills of the state. an area renowned for its unbroken tradition of Published in partnership with UNC Press, it unaccompanied ballad singing that dates back is a guide for citizens and visitors to experience to the early Scots/Irish and English settlers in living Blue Ridge music traditions, including the mid-17th century. ballad singing. Visit www.uncpress.unc.edu to Adams learned to sing from her greatorder (article on page 35). aunt Dellie Chandler Norton and other notable singers in the community, such as Dillard Visit www.sheilakayadams.com Chandler and the Wallin family (including NEA National Heritage Fellow Doug Wallin). In addition to ballad singing, Adams is an IF accomplished clawhammer-style banjo player YOU Sheila Kay Adams performs GO Saturday, January 18 beginning at and storyteller. Adams began performing in 7:30 p.m. at the Madison County public in her teens, and throughout her career Arts Center, 90 S. Main Street, Marshall she has performed at festivals, events, music NC. Tickets are $15 plus tax, available by camps, and workshops around the region calling (828) 398-8329 or purchase online at country and the United Kingdom, including www.madisoncountyarts.com the acclaimed International Storytelling Festi-

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sound experience Gypsy Jazz and More at the Classic Wineseller

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The Classic Wineseller will host the One Leg Up gypsy jazz duo on Friday, January 3 at 7 p.m. The Classic Wineseller, Waynesville’s premier retail wine and craft beer shop, small plate restaurant, and intimate live music venue presents local, regional, or national talent each Friday and Saturday night at 7 p.m. The One Leg Up Duo of John Stineman (guitar, vocals) and Steve Trismen (violin, vocals) plays a vibrant mixture of upbeat Gypsy Jazz, Latin, Swing and original jazz compositions. Singer-songwriter and pianist Joe Cruz will entertain with hits of the Beatles and Elton John on Saturday, January 4 at 7 p.m. Cruz has opened for such notable groups as Chicago, Santana, Bonnie Raitt, and Average White Band.

Bohemian Jean, Matt Welborn (L) and Jessi Stone perform Friday, January 10.

On Friday, January 10, Bohemian Jean performs at 7 p.m. Bohemian Jean is a duo comprised of Waynesville residents, singer-songwriter Matthew Welborn, and his vocalist wife Jessi Stone. Stone chooses covers that suit her soulful alto voice — including hits from Janis Joplin, Stevie Nicks, Patsy Cline, and Carly Simon. Welborn complements his wife’s voice with rich harmonies, also adding his own fun covers and original music to the mix. The Classic Wineseller welcomes singer-songwriter, Paul Cataldo (guitar, banjo, vocals) on Saturday, January 11 at 7 p.m. Cataldo has been playing music since he was 14 years old, when he heard Neil Young for the first time.

Three Days of Music on MLK Jr. Holiday Weekend For three days beginning January 16, the Classic Wineseller will present special Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend performances by the DuPont Brothers (guitars, vocals) on Thursday, January 16, Leo Johnson (guitar, vocals) on Friday, January 17, and Joe Cruz (piano, vocals) on Saturday, January 18. The touring DuPont Brothers bring Vermont-made folk-rock-Americana to

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western North Carolina. For years the singer-songwriter siblings honed their skills independent of one another. Visit www.dupontbrothersmusic.com for more information about the DuPont Brothers. Versatile jazz, gypsy jazz, and swing performer, Leo Johnson (guitar, vocals) plays swing from the 30s & 40s on Friday, January 17 at 7 p.m. On Saturday, January 18, Joe Cruz is back at the piano at 7 p.m. delivering the best of the Beatles and Sir Elton John. Ben Wilson Catch Joe Cruz performs hits January 18. from the 60s, 70s, and 80s on Friday, January 24 at 7 p.m. His repertoire is extensive and includes originals, Americana, and acoustic classics. His style has been compared to Elvis Costello, Bob Dylan, John Prine, and Todd Snider. Singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Stuart McNair entertains on Saturday, January 25 beginning at 7 p.m. McNair wows audiences by performing

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The DuPont Brothers, Zack (L) and Sam, perform Thursday, January 16.

on guitars, piano, harmonicas, trumpet, accordion, washboard, mandolin, and other instruments. The Wineseller’s restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays serving freshly prepared small plate fare. There is a $10 per person minimum on live music nights which includes food, drink, and retail purchases. Reservations are accepted between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. by calling (828) 452-6000.

IF YOU The Classic Wineseller, 20 GO Church Street, Waynesville,

NC 28786. (828) 452-6000, www.classicwineseller.com.

The Strand at 38 Main

If you rebuild it, they will come. If you offer artisan sodas and organic popcorn, they’ll keep coming. Thanks to input from the community and a growing cadre of volunteers, The Strand at 38 Main is ready to expand Waynesville’s after-five entertainment options with movies and live music. For three decades, movie nights at the old Strand Theater at 38 N. Main St. appeared to be a thing of the past as attempts to rescue the building were unable to surmount the obstacles presented by a large, long-neglected building. So it is with great pleasure that the theater’s current owners, Rodney and Lorraine Conard, announce that movies have returned to The Strand. Re-invented as an 80-seat boutique cinema, “The Strand at 38 Main” offers a mix of classic movies, documentaries and independent films on Friday and Saturday nights at 7 p.m. they also host live music shows during the week. Visit www.38main.com for the current schedule.

The iconic building, constructed in 1945 with 412 seats, is remembered fondly by long-time Waynesville residents who enjoyed movies there until the balcony was destroyed by fire in 1982. The Haywood Arts Repertory Theatre made use of the theater’s stage from 1985-93 until conditions in the building drove them to find a new venue. A series of subsequent renovation attempts were defeated by the challenges of the structure until its purchase by BrokenMedia, LLC in 2011. IF YOU Movie admission is $6 for GO adults and $4 for ages 12 and

under. Advance tickets may be purchased at www.38main.com or in-person at the box office, 38 N. Main St. in Waynesville, from 6 p.m until showtime. For more information call (828) 283-0079.


Reel Take Reviewers:

∑∑∑∑∑ - Fantastic ∑∑∑∑ - Pretty darn good ∑∑∑ - Has some good points ∑∑ - The previews lied ∑ - Only if you must M- Forget entirely

CHIP KAUFMANN is a film historian who also shares his love of classical music as a program host on WCQSFM radio. MICHELLE KEENAN is a long time student of film, a believer in the magic of movies and a fundraiser for public radio.

For the latest REVIEWS, THEATER INFO and MOVIE SHOW TIMES, visit www.rapidrivermagazine.com

Illustration of Michelle & Chip by Brent Brown.

Questions/Comments?

BRENT BROWN is a graphic designer and illustrator. View more of his work at www.brentbrown.com.

American Hustle ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: A smart, entertaining con job with a glossy 70’s veneer and solid gold soundtrack.

REEL TAKE: Fresh off the shining suc-

cess of Silver Linings Playbook Playbook, David O. Russell delivers another goodie that’s bound to warm critic’s hearts and deliver box office gold (lamé that is!). Very loosely based on the Abscam scandal of the late 1970’s, American Hustle is a smart, entertaining cinematic con job. The real Abscam scandal resulted in an FBI sting that nabbed a handful of U.S. Congressmen, a senator or two, the mayor

Theatre Directory Asheville Pizza & Brewing Movieline (828) 254-1281 www.ashevillepizza.com

Beaucatcher Cinemas (Asheville) Movieline (828) 298-1234

Biltmore Grande

1-800-FANDANGO #4010 www.REGmovies.com

Carmike 10 (Asheville)

Movieline (828) 298-4452 www.carmike.com

Carolina Cinemas

(828) 274-9500 www.carolinacinemas.com

Cinebarre (Asheville) www.cinebarre.com

The Falls Theatre (Brevard) Movieline (828) 883-2200

Fine Arts Theatre (Asheville) Movieline (828) 232-1536 www.fineartstheatre.com

Flat Rock Theatre (Flat Rock) Movieline (828) 697-2463 www.flatrockcinema.com

Four Seasons (Hendersonville) Movieline (828) 693-8989

Smoky Mountain Cinema (Waynesville) Movieline (828) 452-9091

You can email Chip or Michelle at reeltakes@hotmail.com

of Camden, New Jersey and a smattering of other colorful characters. But rather than present a historically accurate depiction, Russell dances in the ambiguous morality of the sting itself. And what a dance it is, complete with apropos soundtrack. You’ll be taken for a joy ride when you see American Hustle. At the center of the shenanious comedic chops. gans is Irving Rosenfeld (Christian Bale), Adams has the more difficult and less a crooked businessman and small time amusing female role, but pulls it off with con man with a ‘bad comb over’. Irving ease. Sporting a magnificent pompadour, is in love with his mistress and cohort in Jeremy Renner rounds out the cast as the crime, Sydney (Amy Adams), but can’t affable, empathetic dupe in Richie and get a divorce from his hilariously crazy, Irving’s scheme. Louis CK and Robert hot mess of a wife, Rosalyn (a scene DeNiro enjoy small but juicy parts, and stealing Jennifer Lawrence). When Irving everyone seems like they had a great time and Sydney are busted by an ambitious making the film. FBI (Bradley Cooper) agent with a coke Ultimately Russell makes a statehabit and a penchant for permanents, ment without heavy handing it. American they find themselves putting their talents Hustle is one of the best movies of 2013 to work for Uncle Sam in exchange for and is a must-see. their freedom. What ensues is too convoluted to Rated R for pervasive language, some sexual possibly try to relay. Essentially it’s an content and brief violence elaborate shell game designed to entrap REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN several politicians and possibly a mob boss. American Hustle occasionally falls victim to its own con, thinking it’s more Her ∑∑∑∑∑ clever than it actually is, but it’s such a Short Take: Beautiful sci-fi romance rollicking good ride it doesn’t matter. of a lonely, sensitive man and the As usual Russell gets vibrant, wiry all purpose Operating System performances from his actors. Re-team(computer) that he falls in love with ing both Bale and Adams (The (The Fighter Fighter) and vice versa. and Cooper and Lawrence (Silver ( LinREEL TAKE: I really wasn’t looking ings Playbook Playbook) in an ensemble was a forward to watching Her. I’m not a huge stroke of genius. fan of Spike Jonze’s movies and I still had Bale has never looked less appealing images of Joaquin Phoenix’s turn in last and never been better or seemed more year’s The Master which was one of my at ease. Bradley Cooper delivers a bit most unpleasant viewing experiences. I am of a hyperbolic performance but, while more than pleased to report that not only annoying, it suits Richie’s hot headed did I like Her, I LOVED it. personality. Lawrence was a revelation It is so well done in every department in Winter’s Bone and last year’s Silver that I don’t know where to begin. Jonze’s Linings Playbook. Here she damn near steals the show, showing off some seri‘Movies’ continued on page 10

The Monthly Reel

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Happy New Year, Dear Readers! Award season is upon us and that’s great news for movie lovers. We’ve spent the last month in movie overload, cramming as many films into our viewing schedules before voting for the Southeast Film Critic Association’s 2013 ballot. We were particularly impressed by the performances worthy of consideration and note this year. We’ve included both our Critical Top Ten lists for 2013 and our favorite films of the year (for the two don’t always coincide). We didn’t have enough time or space to review everything we’d have liked to for you this month, but of what we have included - American Hustle, Her, Her Inside Llewyn Davis, Nebraska, Philomena, Saving Mr. Banks and The Wolf of Wall Street – all are worthy of your time, though you may feel like disinfecting after watching Scorsese’s bacchanalian. Just as we were going to press, we learned that the beautiful Joan Fontaine and the legendary and inimitable Peter O’Toole had passed. We pay tribute to them in our DVD picks this month. The Hendersonville Joan Fontaine Film Society also 1917 - 2013 honors them with showings of Rebecca and The Lion in Winter Winter. Next month will be the big Oscar issue. We’ll include nominations, a ballot, our picks and the Best of 2013 list from the Southeast Peter O’Toole Film Critic’s As1932 - 2013 sociation as a well as our usual reviews. In the meanwhile get yourself to a local theatre and take in some of the best films of 2013.

Until next time, Chip and Michelle

Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 9


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film reviews Our Favorite Films of 2013

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The following films, presented in alphabetical order, are our lists for our personal favorites from 2013. They are not all critically acclaimed and some are not even well known, but they are all movies that we thoroughly enjoyed, reminded of us of why we go to the movies, and that we would not hesitate to see again and again. It was difficult to keep our lists to just ten.

‘Movies’ continued from page 9

original screenplay takes the old story of humans falling in love with an artificial intelligence and totally makes it his own. The dialogue is to the point and sometimes unbelievably poignant. His social observations are spot on and incredibly chilling because of being just that. Joaquin Phoenix’s performance is a complete 180 from The Master which shows just what a range he has as an actor. Other performances from Amy Adams and Rooney Mara are up to his high standard but the voice work by Scarlett Johansson, as the Operating System named Samantha, is in a class by itself. I actually nominated her for Best Supporting Actress on my SEFCA ballot. In the L.A. of the near future, Phoenix composes sympathy letters for others. He’s recently divorced and trying to cope when he purchases a total control Operating System that is designed to meet his every need. As he becomes more and more to depend on the O.S., it (she) is developing her own personality independent of his basic needs.

The Book Thief earned a place in Chip’s heart and on his 10 best lists.

Chip’s 10 Favorite Films * The Book Thief * The Grandmaster * Great Expectations * Her * Java Heat * The Lone Ranger * Nebraska * Saving Mr. Banks * Stoker * Unfinished Song

Released last spring, Mud remained a favorite on Michelle’s lists.

Michelle’s 10 Favorite Films * About Time * American Hustle * The Butler * Great Expectations * Enough * Mud * Philomena * Saving Mr. Banks * The Way Way Back * The World’s End Runners Up – Captain Phillips, Fruitvale Station, In a World, The Lone Ranger, Mandela, Stoker, Unfinished Song.

Joaquin Phoenix reconnects with life with the help of his personal computer (note the earpiece) in the sci-fi romance Her.

The creation of a not too distant future is brilliant and disturbing. Here is a world where everyone is either watching or plugged into their own personal device. There’s no real interaction between people anymore and you can imagine the toll that will eventually take. The world that Jonze has put together on film is so original that it will eventually become timeless. I was totally captivated from first frame to last and actually watched it again (I have an advance screener) something I rarely, RARELY do. It’s science fiction, it’s a social commentary, and it’s a love story. It’s a lot more than that but you’ll have to see it and decide for yourself. I’ve done my part, now it’s up to you. Rated R for language, sexual content, and brief nudity.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Inside Llewyn Davis ∑∑∑ Short Take: Another one of the Coen Brothers movies that you’ll either love or hate. Put me in the latter category.

REEL TAKE: Whenever I go to see a Coen

10 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

test. Inside Llewyn Davis may not turn out to be for you but don’t say that I didn’t warn you. Rated R for language including sexual references.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Nebraska ∑∑∑∑1/2 Short Take: Nearly perfect slice-of-life drama from director Alexander Payne features a strong script and great ensemble performances from its entire cast. Oscar Isaac embodies the phrase “I’ve suffered for my music and now it’s your turn,” in Inside Llewyn Davis.

Everyone in the movie suffers, and before long, you join them.

REEL TAKE: I wasn’t quite sure what to

expect from Nebraska when I first heard about it. I knew that it would deal with coping with an aging parent and that was about it. I thought “there’s no new ground being covered here” so imagine my surprise when the film opens with a retro Paramount logo and then the film turns out to be in black & white. It was like watching Lonely Are the Brave or In Cold Blood or The Misfits or any number of movies from the mid 1960s. It features simple, straight forward cinematography, lots of location shooting, and quality performances from everyone in the cast. The story concerns an old man (Bruce Dern) living in Montana who mistakenly believes he’s won $1,000,000 in a contest. The problem is he has to go to Lincoln, Nebraska to claim his “prize.” No one in his family wants to take him so he plans to walk there. His younger son (Will Forte) relents and agrees to drive him.

Brothers movie I’m never sure as to exactly what I’m going to get and I’m sure that’s intentional. I’ll go on record as saying that I have not enjoyed the last several Coen Brothers films (The Ladykillers, No Country for Old Men, Burn After Reading, A Serious Man). The one exception was their remake of True Grit. If truth be told, out of the 18 films that they have directed, there are only 4 (Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, O Brother, Where Art Thou, The Man Who Wasn’t There) that I would ever want to see again. You can put Inside Llewyn Davis in the NOT category. The film is set in 1961 in the Greenwich Village folk music scene. Oscar Isaac plays the title character, a less than stellar folksinger who is the personification of Bonzo Dog Band co-founder Neil Innes’ famous utterance, “I’ve suffered for my music and now it’s your turn.” Actually it’s more than the music that suffers. Everyone in this movie suffers, and it doesn’t take long before you join them. The film is shot in the bleakest possible colors with several sequences of glistening Bruce Dern and Will Forte as father and son trying to connect for the first time in Nebraska. streets and escaping steam that create a hellish atmosphere. We follow Davis on a Sisyphus journey They stop off in his old hometown where things go from bad to worse to “Ya gotta where, once the word gets out, everyone starts be kiddin’me” and then start all over again. being nice to him including his old business Along the way we encounter his pregnant bitpartner (Stacy Keach) who has an ulterior moter ex-girlfriend (Carey Mulligan), her talented tive. When the older son (Bob Odenkirk) and boyfriend (Justin Timberlake), and an old oddhis outspoken mother (June Squibb) arrive, ball couple (Ethan Phillips & Robin Bartlett). then things really get interesting. Then there’s an obese junkie jazz musician Director Alexander Payne (The ( De(John Goodman) who is truly a character from scendants) is first and foremost a writer so scendants Hell. It WAS nice to see F. Murray Abraham that all of his movies are character driven. again as a Chicago agent who knows a loser Substance, not style, is what he’s after and when he sees one. Nebraska is the deepest character study that As with all of Ethan & Joel Coen’s he has yet produced. Payne’s characters are movies, this one is superbly photographed, always on a voyage of self-discovery but sublimely acted, and beautifully scored (by unlike a number of movies that follow that T-Bone Burnett). The one problem, and it’s path, the discovery in Payne’s movies result a huge one, is the script. It’s so downbeat and in lifting his characters up rather than dragunrelenting in its grimness and so full of unging them down. sympathetic characters that before long I didn’t care and the movie became an endurance con‘Movies’ continued on page 11


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film reviews ‘Movies’ continued from page 10

Yet Nebraska is not without its own style thanks to Payne’s decision to shoot the film in black & white. This helps to accentuate the bleakness of the mid-Midwest where the towns are incredibly small and the life is boringly repetitive. Nevertheless the people manage to go about their daily lives because there is little else to do. How they interact with Bruce Dern and with each other is the heart and soul of Nebraska and what makes it a very special movie. Rated R for some language.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Philomena ∑∑∑∑∑ Short Take: The true story of an Irish woman’s struggle to find her son 50 years after his birth and the journalist who helped her.

Judi Dench and Steve Coogan are an unlikely team in Philomena.

REEL TAKE: I’ve been a lucky girl this

month. I was thoroughly entertained by American Hustle,, completely smitten with Saving Mr. Banks,, and utterly undone by the Philomena.. Philomena is the latest film from director Stephen Frears (The Queen)) and it is quite possibly one of the most perfectly made little films I’ve seen this year. It’s not the most entertaining film nor everyone’s cup of tea. But for those for whom it appeals, it is an absolute gem. British comedian Steve Coogan co-wrote the screenplay based on the book The Lost Child of Philomena Lee by journalist Martin Sixsmith. The story was born from an unlikely partnership between a worldly celebrated veteran journalist in need of a career jump start and a not-at-all worldly retired nurse. Coogan stars as Sixsmith and Judi Dench stars as Philomena. In the 1950’s Ireland an unwed Philomena gave birth to a son at a convent. She worked as an indentured laundress there and was allowed to see her son for one hour a day. At the age of the three, without warning, her son was adopted (or sold more likely), leaving Philomena with only her brief memories and one photograph. On her son’s 50th birthday, Philomena confides her long held secret to her daughter. When her daughter meets Sixsmith

at a party, she pitches Philomena’s story and asks him to help. Sixsmith, who doesn’t do human interest stories, eventually comes around and off they go on a journey that ultimately changes both of their lives. To tell you more about their search would ruin the experience from Philomena’s eyes. What I can tell you is that Coogan and Dench are pitch perfect. He is complicated, an agnostic and a cynic. She is simple (not to be mistaken for simple-minded) and holds to her faith even in light of the Emma Thompson as P.L. Travers and Tom Hanks as Walt Disney perfidy of the church. While defy the curmudgeons of the world in Saving Mr. Banks. elements of the story are not surprising, Frears stays above the fray, never falling prey to a more typical Hanks portrayal must berating of the evil church, but simply rewarding us with nuanced reveals throughout have ‘Uncle Walt’ smiling the film. He also does a beautiful job from the great beyond. interspersing flashbacks and present day. Dench is a lock for a Best Actress nomination. Coogan deserves a nominaBrilliantly alternating between early tion for acting and Best Screenplay Ad1900’s Australia and 1961 Burbank, California, aptation, and while the director’s circle we learn how the nanny came to be and what is a tight race this year, Frears should she represents. In sun dappled flashbacks, we certainly be among the ranks. Philomena see Travers as a young girl enjoying a magiis a must-see. See it in the theatre. See cal childhood and the doting affection of her it soon. loving father (played effectively by Colin Farrell). Unfortunately this picturesque world is Rated PG-13 on appeal for some strong short-lived. Her heart irrevocably breaks as she language, thematic elements and sexual watches her father succumb to alcoholism and references. her family crumble. REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN Back in 1961, Uncle Walt and his team work on cracking Mrs. Travers’ stony façade. Watching it crack, if not completely but even Saving Mr. Banks ∑∑∑∑1/2 a little, is a sheer delight. The scenes between Short Take: The backstory of Mary Travers and the Disney creative team are some Poppins. of the best in the film. Hanks turns in a fine performance, REEL TAKE: Saving Mr. Banks is the sweetest balancing the façade of the Disney brand and treat of the season this year. The film tells the the man behind the mouse. There are cheeky backstory of Mary Poppins, who she really was hints throughout including his smoking and and the hoops Walt Disney jumped through to pre-signed autograph cards always at the ready. bring the story of the umbrella toting nanny to But make no mistake, Saving Mrs. Banks is the big screen. Thompson’s movie and it’s a nomination-worJaded, cynical, uptight and unhappy, P.L. thy performance. Travers, author of the Mary Poppins, was the The supporting cast, including Rachel complete and polar opposite of Walt Disney. Griffiths as the aunt who is the inspiration for For twenty years, Disney pursued Mrs. TravPoppins, Paul Giamatti as a chauffeur who ers for the rights to Mary Poppins books. For winkles his way into Travers shriveled heart ‘Uncle Walt’ a spoonful of sugar makes the and Bradley Whitford, Jason Schwartzman and medicine go down. For Mrs. P.L. Travers, a B.J. Novak as the Disney’s creative team all spoonful of medicine probably helped the sugar contribute to the magic. John Lee Hancock is a go down. In 1961, facing financial ruin, Travperfect call by Disney. Hancock deftly handles ers, ever so reluctantly, agreed to finally meet the light and dark elements while still giving with Disney. This is where John Lee Hancock’s the film a shiny Disney finish without overly Saving Mr. Banks starts. sugar coating it. Tom Hanks plays the legendary Walt Is Saving Mr. Banks emotionally manipuDisney. Hanks doesn’t really look like Disney, lative? Yes. Do I care? Not a bit. Let’s go fly a even with the trademark thin mustache, but kite! P.S. Stay for the end credits. it’s what he embodies in bringing the role to life that must have ‘Uncle Walt’ smiling from Rated PG-13 for thematic elements and some the great beyond. Emma Thompson plays the unsettling images. dour, stiff upper lipped Brit. Travers is such REVIEW BY MICHELLE KEENAN a misery, one wonders how this emotionally contorted human being could possibly have ‘Movies’ continued on page 12 created such a beloved character.

Critical Top Ten Films of 2013

Gravity was the cinematic experience of the year.

Chiwetel Ejiofor and Michael Fassbender need to rent tuxes for award season after starring in Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave.

Listed in alphabetical order Chip’s 10 Best Films * 12 Years a Slave * American Hustle * Blue Jasmine * Dallas Buyer’s Club * Gravity * Her * Lee Daniels’ The Butler * The Lone Ranger * Nebraska * Philomena

Michelle’s 10 Best Films * 12 Years a Slave * All is Lost * American Hustle * Captain Phillips * Dallas Buyers Club * Gravity * Mud * Nebraska * Philomena * Saving Mr. Banks

Cinematic regrets of 2013: seeing The Family; not seeing The Book Thief, Her, or Inside Llewyn Davis before deadline.

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HENDERSONVILLE FILM SOCIETY

The Wolf of Wall Street ∑∑∑1/2

If you think they don’t make them like they used to, you’ll enjoy these great classic films. Coffee and wonderful flicks are served up on Sundays at 2 p.m. at Lake Pointe Landing in Hendersonville. For more information call (828) 697-7310.

REEL TAKE: I have a running joke with my

HFS will begin the New Year by honoring the memory of Peter O’Toole and Joan Fontaine. We will feature them in two of their most famous performances. There’s also Robert Duvall and Michael Caine as a pair of eccentric, aging farmers and a Cold War spy thriller written by Harold Pinter. January 5:

Rebecca

(1940) This is the film that brought Alfred Hitchcock to America and made a star out of Joan Fontaine. Throw in Laurence Olivier at his most romantic and Judith Anderson at her most sinister and you have the movies’ premiere gothic romance. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock (Suspicion).

Short Take: A movie about 1980s excess that is as excessive as its subject. In fact it’s even more so. colleague Michelle Keenan that any movie over 2 hours is too long (the recent Great Expectations is an exception). Imagine my delight when I saw that the running time for Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street clocked in at a whopping 180 minutes. My worst fears were confirmed as this movie REALLY was too long with numerous scenes of personal excess stretched way beyond what they needed to be. In fact, I haven’t seen this much sexual activity in a movie since Malcolm McDowell’s Caligula was released in 1979. Speaking of Malcolm McDowell, another element of The Wolf of Wall Street that is troublesome is Leonardo DiCaprio’s voiceover narration. Just as in A Clockwork Orange, the narrator’s tone is geared to make us condone the outrageous acts that we are

Chip Kaufmann’s Pick: “The Ruling Class”

Jonah Hill and Leonardo DiCaprio share a rare moment of non-indulgence in Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street.

witnessing onscreen. There’s nothing admirable about these characters or their actions over the course of the film’s bloated running time. I’m sorry but stockbrokers getting rich at the expense of the small time investor and then spending it all on toys and sex and drugs just bugs the hell out of me. What makes it all so appalling is that this actually happened. The Wolf of Wall Street is based on Jordan Belfort’s book about his

January DVD Picks

rise and fall as an unscrupulous stock trader during the 1990s. His firm Stratton Oakmont defrauded investors out of more than $200 million which he and his cronies spent on themselves. All of this lavish expenditure is graphically and lovingly portrayed throughout the film. Belfort was eventually caught and spent 22 months in prison. Since his release he has paid backed approximately $12 million of the $110 million he owes. As one now expects from a Martin Scorsese “picture,” it is expertly photographed and edited, effectively scored, features dynamic performances in even the minor roles and revels in its down and dirty characters. Leonardo DiCaprio as Belfort channels his inner Jack Nicholson for a wild ride of a performance but it is Jonah Hill who really scores as his secondin-command. It’s a complex performance of a shallow individual. The Wolf of Wall Street will probably appeal to a great number of people. I’m just not one of them. Rated R (down from NC-17) for just about everything imaginable.

REVIEW BY CHIP KAUFMANN

Michelle Keenan’s Pick: “Rebecca”

January 12:

Secondhand Lions (2003) An absorbing comedy-drama about a teenager (Hayley Joel Osmont) sent to spend the summer on his eccentric uncles’ (Robert Duvall, Michael Caine) farm and the various events and revelations that unfold while he is there. Directed by Tim McCanlies (The The Iron Giant Giant). January 19:

The Quiller Memorandum (1966) In this taut British thriller an American spy (George Segal), working for the British, combs West Berlin for a shadowy neo-Nazi organization. The film also stars Max von Sydow and Alec Guinness and features a screenplay by Harold Pinter. Directed by Michael Anderson (Operation Crossbow). January 26:

The Lion In Winter (1968) Peter O’Toole’s second go round with King Henry II (after Becket) earned him his third Oscar nomination and a chance to go head-to-head with Katherine Hepburn (who did win an Oscar). The film also stars Anthony Hopkins, Timothy Dalton and Nigel Terry. Directed by Anthony Harvey (They Might Be Giants).

The Ruling Class (1972) The recent death of Peter O’Toole presents an interesting problem. Which of his eight Oscar nominations or several other fine performances that weren’t nominated should I choose for my DVD pick? Lawrence of Arabia is everywhere, Becket and The Lion in Winter are well known and My Favorite Year is good but slight. I finally decided on The Ruling Class as that was reportedly O’Toole’s favorite among all his performances. It’s easy to see why as it’s an incredible showcase for an actor. After all, how often do you get to play Jesus Christ and Jack the Ripper in the same movie? The film is based on a stage play by Peter Barnes who describes it as “a dark farce”, an understatement if ever there was one. An English aristocrat believes that he’s God (“whenever I prayed, I found that I was talking to myself”). Members of his family want him committed but not before he produces an heir. Once he does, he undergoes a radical treatment and is declared sane. Only now he thinks he’s Jack the Ripper so he fits right in with English aristocracy. This description only scratches the surface of this hilarious, remarkable, and totally outrageous movie. The performances from O’Toole and a wealth of English character actors cannot be bettered and you haven’t lived until you see Nigel Green’s High Voltage Messiah. As savage an indictment of the English upper classes as you’ll ever encounter, it’s

12 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

also a musical of sorts with characters stopping to burst into song. If you enjoy theater, if you’re an Anglophile, or love Peter O’Toole, then you must see The Ruling Class. Once seen it cannot be forgotten.

Rebecca (1940) As regular readers know, I’ve been on a bit of Alfred Hitchcock kick this year. With the passing of Joan Fontaine recently, I thought it was an opportune time to make Rebecca my January DVD pick of the month. Rebecca marked Hitchcock’s American directorial debut and made Joan Fontaine a star. Based on the novel by Daphne du Maurier Rebecca is a psychological thriller of a rather gothic tale. Joan Fontaine plays a [never named] naïve young woman who is traveling as a companion to a loud, tacky American socialite. When she meets the dashing but mysterious widower Maxim Winter (Laurence Olivier) in Monte Carlo, she falls hopelessly in love and marries him two weeks later.

De Winter then brings his young bride to his English country estate, Manderley. There our heroine meets the Manderley’s oh so creepy housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson). Mrs. Danvers adored the first Mrs. de Winter, the titular Rebecca, and scrutinizes the new missus at every turn. Facing bitter consternation from the Danvers and cruel and sudden outbursts of anger from her husband, the second Mrs. de Winter begins to question her relationship with Maxim. To preserve her own sanity and any possible chance at salvaging her marriage, she must learn more about the life and death of Rebecca. Shot in black and white with terrific lighting and atmosphere Rebecca is dated, but stands the test of time. The cast is wonderful, including George Sanders playing a lecherous caller with his signature sleazy charm. Rebecca was nominated for 11 Academy Awards, taking home two, including one for Best Picture. Fontaine was nominated for an Oscar for this break out performance, but did not win. She did however take home the gold statuette the very next year for her performance in Hitchcock’s Suspicion with Cary Grant. As a side note, I watched Rebecca with a companion who thought it was going to be a bore; I didn’t tell him it was a Hitchcock film. He eventually figured that out for himself. At the end he said, “They just don’t make ‘em like this anymore.”


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artful living Just Sit “A meditative practice is not some “airy-fairy” process, but a way of getting in touch with our own life… it will have its effect on every phase of our life, on our relationships, our work, everything.” ~ Charlotte Joko Beck, Everyday Zen

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What do we want from life? Universally, people want happiness. The problem is that all too often what people think will make them happy fails to do so; it may even end up making them miserable. We are looking for happiness in things and circumstances and relationships when this is a short-sighted understanding of the true nature of happiness. When the thing, circumstance, relationship that we want comes along, we are then, for a while, happy, and of course if what we want doesn’t come along, or what we do not want comes along, well then, the result is unhappiness. It is the most elemental teaching of Buddhism that all things, circumstances and relationships are inherently unstable, and when they change or wear out or go away, so does our happiness. Because of this, our lives are dominated by continuous movement of action and mind pursuing circumstances that will bring happiness, and this is an invariably failing strategy. Now, if asked, most of us would generally describe our lives as more or less happy; we’re doing OK. But it is important to ask: what does this really mean? Is there not a great deal of tension, anxiety, anger, frustration, self-doubt, boredom and restlessness in most people’s lives, even if it is not of the crippling variety we would call upon a therapist or medication to help us with? What does real happiness look like? Are we not, in truth, in constant motion looking

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for happiness. And, in truth, aren’t persons with unshakeable happiness and well-being, that is, happiness and well-being that cannot be taken away by a change of circumstance, very rare? Perhaps we don’t even believe such a state of unshakeable well-being is possible. Because of this, Buddhism describes the human condition as marked by “suffering.” But to describe our lives as “suffering” may seem a bit harsh — not really descriptive of the way we would evaluate our experience. Is Buddhism, then, a philosophy of gloom and doom, a philosophy that teaches detachment in the face of inescapable suffering, as many people mistakenly believe it to be, and therefore find it not speaking to their needs and experience? Quite the contrary. What is the truth of the human condition? Isn’t it generally OK but changeable — like the weather — “partly sunny with periods of overcast with a possibility of rain and a slight chance of severe and possibly dangerous storms?” Certainly, we can all agree that a fair

New Guidelines for Elders

In early November new guidelines were published for health care professionals to manage people at risk of cardiac or vascular (stroke) disease. The guidelines were written because the old guidelines did not 1) address the risk of stroke, 2) consider younger patients with risk factors but normal cholesterol numbers, and 3) make recommendations in the area of lifestyle and obesity concerns. The old guidelines focused on cholesterol numbers. The new guidelines focus on the patient. The guidelines written by the American Academy of Cardiology and the American Heart Association address four specific areas:

1. An assessment to estimate a patient’s risk

of having a cardiac or stroke event in the next ten years, based on more than cholesterol numbers; namely sex, age, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood pressure treatment, diabetes, and smoking.

2. Guideline for managing blood cholesterol numbers based on an increasing intensity of treatment for increasing risk, using medications, specific lifestyle interventions, and specific weight management interventions.

3. Guideline for recommending active and

specific interventions in dietary patterns and physical activity patterns. Specifically, diets rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, legumes, fish, poultry, and nuts and low in red meat, sweets, saturated and trans fats, and salt. Health care professionals are encouraged to do more than say “eat right.” They are to arrange for dietary counseling for their patients.

4. Guideline for determining the level of body weight, arranging for proactive intervention by a weight management professional and encouraging steady progress toward goals.

Statins are known to be the most effective drug in lowering cholesterol. But what intervention is most effective in achieving a healthy

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BILL WALZ

amount of suffering happens in any lifetime, some, more than others, but it is not the lives or the times that are marked by indisputable suffering that I wish to address. Rather, I’d like to address the average life and times that are like a typical weather forecast — generally pleasant to OK, not anything big to complain about. I want to address what it means to be OK and to examine whether it represents real happiness, or just a facade of the available happiness and well-being that an ordinary human being, living an ordinary life, is capable of and that Buddhism points us toward. “If I were to scratch the surface of anyone I would find fear, pain and anxiety running amok. We all have ways to cover them up. We overeat, over-drink, overwork; we watch too much television. We are always doing something to cover up our basic existential anxiety.” ~ Beck

There is an alternate translation for the word that is usually translated as “suffering” attributed to Buddhism, and it is, “unsatisfactory.” This is much closer to what Buddhism is getting at than the overtly terrible experiences we usually attribute to the word suffering. It’s the itch we cannot scratch, the general feeling that our lives are not as balanced, peaceful, wise, happy as they might be. It’s just OK — with some sense of an unsatisfactoriness that we are always running from while we run toward what we think will bring us more happiness, or at least, hold unhappiness at bay. Our lives are marked by endless movement and distraction, beginning with endless movement and distraction in our minds, reviewing and planning our strategies in the pursuit of happiness and the avoidance of unhappiness. “What we really want is a natural life… life can be more open and joyful than we ever thought possible… We enter a discipline like Zen practice so that we can learn to live in a sane way… As we sit, we find that the primary thing we have to work with is our busy, chaotic mind… when the mind becomes clear and balcontinued on page 32

It seems we end up settling for the bouts of anxiety, anger, apathy, boredom, depression, and dissatisfaction, along with our addictions, great or small, as normal. It is what happens because we don’t know any other way, and so, we deal with this dissatisfaction by distracting ourselves with compulsive activity, but this is no cure, no path to a more satisfying, even joyful life.

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MAX HAMMONDS, MD

patient who is at decreased risk for heart or stroke events? Modified dietary intake, physical activity, and weight control are easily the most effective in lowering risk AND lowering cholesterol numbers. If you are one of those people who have a higher risk of heart or stroke disease, do not be side-tracked or discouraged by the recent flurry of press coverage of the arguments over who should or should not take statins. Concentrate on those interventions that have proven most effective in lowering risk – dietary modification, physical exercise, and weight control. Only after these three interventions have done their job should medications be considered. These three interventions can establish a lifestyle pattern with fabulous overflow effects in cancer prevention, auto-immune prevention, arthritis prevention – and they have almost no side-effects. Don’t pass up a good deal.

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Cynthia Homire: Vision Quest

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ALICE SEBRELL

Cynthia Homire: Vision Quest will focus on the work of poet, potter and visual artist Cynthia Homire, a Black Mountain College alumna, now in her early 80s, who has worked in a variety of media over the course of her prolific career. Homire was a student at Black Mountain College from 1950-1954, where she studied with Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, and M. C. Richards, among many others. Homire describes this seminal experience with her typical humor and grace. “Yes, I have rubbed shoulders with the Now in her eighties, Cynthia Homire is Untitled Vase, Cynthia pantheon, a few bellies, too. Washed the floor beginning to paint. Photo: Alice Sebrell Homire and Jorge Fick. Merce Cunningham danced on, then went leaping through his class. Jitterbugged with Black Mountain College to her present life in Taos, NM. Rauschenberg… Shared steak with William Carlos WilA 48-page publication will be produced for the show, liams… Breakfast with Brautigan. All these things happen if featuring reproductions of some of her drawings and a you are there for them.” selection of Homire’s poetry. In addition to finding inspiration and room for exThe Black Mountain College Museum + Arts perimentation at BMC, Cynthia also found her life partner Center preserves and continues the unique legacy of there, fellow student and painter Jorge Fick (the last student educational and artistic innovation of Black Mountain to graduate from BMC). Homire and Fick opened the FickCollege for public study and enjoyment. We achieve our ery on Canyon Road in Santa Fe in 1972, where they made mission through collection, conservation, and educaand sold stoneware for over ten years. In 1990, Homire was tional activities including exhibitions, publications, and diagnosed with macular degeneration, inspiring a shift in public programs. her work from pottery to poetry. In 2008, she illustrated and Homire will be present at the opening reception self-published a collection of her poems, entitled Insights on Friday, January 24 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m., and a new & Outbursts. Now in her eighties, Homire is beginning to publication of her poems and drawings will be available paint, even though her vision is impaired. for purchase. The exhibition at BMCM+AC will honor Homire’s lifelong commitment to making art and share her imaginative, experimental spirit with visitors to the museum. The IF show will be installed at BMCM+AC from January 24-May YOU Cynthia Homire: Vision Quest opens Friday, 17, 2014, and will feature a selection of drawings, paintings, GO January 24 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. On display pottery and writings by Homire, spanning from her time at from January 24 through May 17, 2014. Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, 56 Broadway, downtown Asheville. For more details call (828) 350-8484 or visit www.blackmountaincollege.org.

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On Saturday, January 11, the Appalachian Pastel Society meets from 10 a.m. to noon. Marsha Savage, juror of the APS Member Exhibition at the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, will give a video commentary Nancy Thomas, winner, about the exhibit which Best Landscape. ended November 25, 2013. The video will be followed by a panel discussion with four APS artists on painting surfaces, methods, materials, and other topics.

IF YOU GO: Held at Grace Community Church, 495

Cardinal Road, Mills River, NC, 28759. Non-members welcome. For more details contact Suzy Hart at (845) 986-3653 or visit www.appalachianpastelsociety.org.

14 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

More of What Makes Asheville Special

Asheville Symphony Turns up the Heat in February

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February’s concert features composers with a special gift for orchestral drama. Contemporary Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov cannot help but combine the passion of his homeland with his love for tango. In this case, Muertes des Angel is a touching tribute to the tango giant Astor Piazzolla. The Asheville Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is honored to present Sphinx competition winner and BBC New Generation artist Elena Urioste, who will perform one of the most treasured concertos from twentieth century America, Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto. A work of tender beauty contrasted with a fiendishly quick finale, Barber’s Concerto has become a true test of the modern violin virtuoso’s technical ability and musical soul. The concert continues with Ravel’s lovely, miniature Pavane, as the evening segues into the full

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MICHAEL J. MOREL

force of the ASO in music by Tchaikovsky. His score to Swan Lake is considered among the finest he ever penned, and the skill with which Tchaikovsky lavishes every dramatic detail will enable us to bring this performance of some of the ballet’s finest musical moments to life. Golijov Muertes des Angel; Barber Violin Concerto featuring Elena Urioste, VioElena Urioste performs Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto Saturday, February 8. lin; Ravel Pavane; Tchaikovsky Suite from Swan Lake. Tickets for the performance are available through the SymIF phony office or the US Cellular Center YOU Asheville Symphony box office, and range in price from $20 GO Presents Tchaikovsky’s to $58. Subscriptions are also availSwan Lake, Saturday, able at pro-rated prices, or on a “pick February 8 at 8 p.m., in the three” basis for $55 to $169. Significant Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. discounts for students are available. For details, call (828) 254-7046, or For details, call (828) 254-7046, or visit visit www.ashevillesymphony.org. www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Local, Authentic, World-Class Chamber Music

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Artist collective Pan Harmonia brings professional chamber music performances to audiences of all ages in diverse settings ranging from traditional concert halls to homeless shelters and prisons.

by Baroque masters Johann Sebastian Bach and Georg Philipp Telemann, as well as vintage gems from 20th century songwriters and tangos! Baroque Vibes features Kate Steinbeck, flute; Byron Hedgepeth, vibes and percussion; Rosalind Buda, bassoon and Scottish small pipes; and Barbara Weiss, harpsichord.

Now in its 14th season, Pan Harmonia, which is directed by flutist Kate Steinbeck and based in (L-R) Byron Hedgepeth, Barbara Weiss, Asheville, has been awarded grants Kate Steinbeck, Rosalind Buda. Photo: Frank Zipperer from the National Endowment for the Arts and the North Carolina Arts Council for its artistic excellence. Febonio, Frederick Holm and others is in turns ethereal, transcendent, and Full Moon Concert grooving. Featuring: Kate Steinbeck, Come howl at the moon with flute; Rosalind Buda, bassoon; and Pan Harmonia at Horizon Records Amy Brucksch, guitar. in Greenville. Rhythmic and singing, Pan Harmonia musicians create an unforgettable evening of music with an unexpected dreamscape created by flute, bassoon, and guitar. Let go of any preconceived notions of classical music with this ensemble! The music by Tom

Baroque Vibes

This ensemble creates a unique and swinging mosaic! In a spell-binding program transcending the boundaries of the traditional Baroque setting, Baroque Vibes moves the heart and swings Elizabethan-era tunes, ravishing works

IF YOU Full Moon concert held GO Thursday, January 16 at 8

p.m. at Horizon Records, 2A West Stone St., Greenville, SC. Free admission; donations gratefully accepted. Baroque Vibes, Sunday, January 26 at 5 p.m. at The Masonic Temple, 80 Broadway, downtown Asheville. $15 advance/$5 for students available at www.pan-harmonia.org/shop or $20/$5 for students at the door. For more information on Pan Harmonia, please call (828) 254-7123 or visit www.pan-harmonia.org.

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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

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More of What Makes Asheville Special

A Radical New Year

TIME TO REALIZATIONALIZE YOURSELF!

Sometimes the smallest decision can turn out to be quite the radical action.

Detail of installation by Julia Burr

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From Asheville with Love February 2014 Special Issue! Guide to local restaurants, theatres, and performances geared for Valentine’s Day.

Easy Monthly Billing Free Web Ads • Free Ad Design

Reserve Your Spot Now! Call (828) 646-0071 for Special Rates! 16 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

BY

GREG VINEYARD

useful characterizations in addition to the ways I have used it here. And these following explanations can be used like a checklist:

Take deciding whether to get out of bed, for example. If one “Going to the root of does not arise, the chain origin.” OK, so that’s of events of the day sorta math-ish, but after – both the very typical as my complex cat-year well as the unexpectedly calculation above, I’m atypical ones – wouldn’t into it. I relate this to get their fair shake. Dedrilling-down and identispite a lot of routine, each fying an original creative day still also holds much Radical Normalcy, 2013. or business passion. What potential for Endless Pastel by Greg Vineyard am I still not doing that Wonder (my sci-fi nod to I wish to be doing? We “Warehouse 13”). must find the origins! My made-up word, “realizationalize” is an obvious melding of “realization” and “ra“Forming a basis or foundation.” This could tionalize.” Each of which revealed interestalso be seen as slightly obtuse. But it reing definitions in my Ginormous dictionary minds me to make a plan, and then build up that I always go on about. (Because it’s a solid structure. Can the big, bad wolf blow bigger than my car.) “Rationalization,” in my house down? Gotta pour the concrete. the most positive light, means “exploring “Existing inherently in a thing or person.” reason”, and a favorite meaning of “realizaThis third one caught me by surprise. (But, tion” is “making … real of something imagit is a huge dictionary, full of things new to ined.” Given these, perhaps we can imagine me. When I can lift it. Have I mentioned and explore our realities as we address this how big it is?) How awesome is this delineayear’s goals – or even simply face any given tion? I immediately go to considering my day’s opportunities. level of trust in my universe. Is my creativity Back to getting out of bed… I may or (… or my art, plan, idea, business, project, may not have mentioned my rescue cat? intention, love, (insert anything here) really Now and then? Ok, only a hundred times. resident within me? Am I truly connected? Since adopting said cat, I have no choice but to get up early or I may receive (or, because My goal here, aside from trying to drive I have indeed received) an inquiring paw on spell-check crazy, is to offer up “radicalmy face. As I stumble to the kitchen amidst ness” as more of an everyday concept, an aca meowling that sounds as if someone is cessible notion. I want to encourage action, slowly squeezing the air out of Snuffleueven in the smallest ways. pagus, I remind myself that there’s always So, rise from your slumber, feed the more than plenty to do, so the pre-sunrise cat, and see what the new daylight may bring hour is ultimately a good thing. into focus for you. And, at the end of the Friends and I commented recently day, may your slumber be full of dreams that about how 2013 seemed to have whizzed on grant you new realizationisms and rationaliby extra quickly. This feeling actually stems ties for your next day’s endeavors! from the sense of urgency that accompanies having fewer and fewer decades laid-out before us. For really, a year is just a year is just a year. It shouldn’t feel different, but it Greg Vineyard is an does. And then there’s leap year, with that artist, writer and odd, precious extra day of (a paw in the creative consultant in face!) … potential. That extra mark on the Asheville, NC. ZaPOW calendar feels like nothing to us, but it’s 0.02 Gallery in downtown years to a cat. Asheville, (www.zapow. So, what can we do to radically explore com), carries his illustrations, giclees, our realities, to use reason to address and prints and cards. then fuel one’s creative fires? In that same www.gregvineyardillustration.com. dictionary of hugeness, “radical” has many


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Fabulous Downtown Asheville

The Best Shops, Galleries & Restaurants

Join a Bookclub! Monday, January 6 at 7 p.m. Bridging Differences Bookclub – Join Patti Digh for a discussion of the second half of Andrew Solomon’s Far From the Tree. Tuesday, January 7 at 7 p.m. Women in Lively Discussion Bookclub (WILD) – Join local writer and host Susan Blexrud at the Battery Park Book Exchange for a discussion of How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran. Wednesday, January 8 at 12 noon. Autism Bookclub. Catherine Faherty and Carolyn Ogburn will lead a discussion of The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon.

More of What Makes Asheville Special

Wednesday, January 8 at 7 p.m. Malaprop’s Bookclub – Jay Jacoby will lead a discussion of A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash. Monday, January 13 at 7 p.m. Mystery Bookclub – Writer Sallie Bissell leads a discussion of The Dog Who Knew Too Much by Spencer Quinn. Tuesday, January 14 at 5 p.m. Teen/Young Adult Bookclub. Join bookseller Robin for a discussion of Every Day by David Levithan.

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Tuesday, January 21 at 7 p.m. Comix Club – Lauren Napoli will lead a discussion of The Hypernaturals Vol. 1 by Dan Abnett.

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IF YOU GO: Malaprop’s Café & Bookstore,

55 Haywood St., Asheville. (828) 254-6734.

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Get on the Map! Advertise with Rapid River Magazine. Free Web Links. Free Ad Design. Call (828) 646-0071.

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Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 17


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COTTON MILL STUDIOS FEATURED ARTIST

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Advertise with

Rapid River Magazine (828) 646-0071

Free web links • Free ad design Easy monthly billing

John Mac Kah

John Mac Kah has been painting and teaching from his upstairs studio since 1999, and is among the early settlers in the River Arts District.

His studio is one part painting studio, one part workshop space, and one part showroom. With recently expanded gallery space upstairs, the display is expanded into the hallway and open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday. It is shared with other studio painters upstairs, including regular students. Kah also teaches regularly at John C. Campbell Folk School (May & Sept 2014), Arrowmont

School (July 2014) and Penland School (TBA), all with wonderful residential studios programs. “My goals are to give students a solid understanding of how to use their materials, and to develop drawing with a brush. I prefer to work on location, immersing myself in landscape, but this is ‘slow’ painting, building and and layering to create and capture atmosphere and depth. It’s about ‘the painter’s craft’ and skill development to create a vocabulary and fluency in painting. Students can enroll anytime in ongoing classes for all levels. Schedule includes monthly events and workshops, Saturday and weekday classes, both daytime and evening. One new and exciting

John Mac Kah showroom

element: children’s After-School Artists classes taught by Alisa Lumbreras. For more information call (828) 225-5000, visit www. JohnMacKah. com or stop by the Cotton Mill at 122 Riverside Drive in Asheville.

IF YOU GO: Open house and exhibit of last season’s children’s works on Saturday, January 11. Call Alisa at (828) 702-5526 for details.

Historic Cotton Mill Studios • 122 Riverside Drive • (828) 252-9122 • www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Our Monthly Magazine is iPad, Nook, & Kindle Friendly!

ASHEVILLE’S RIVER ARTS DISTRICT RF

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The River Arts District Artists (RADA) is a 175+ artist member strong collective who provide high-quality, affordable art. RADA is just down the hill from Patton Avenue, and is easily accessible from downtown, West Asheville and the Biltmore. One will also find several delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options, the Asheville Area Arts Council, and a variety of unique businesses, all sharing a growing community that features amazing art down every street, in every building.

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18 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

More information on the River Arts District is available by calling (828) 280-7709, or visit www.riverartsdistrict.com.

* The Wedge Studios * Roberts Street Studios * Odyssey Center * Jonas Gerard Fine Art * Noble Forge * Pink Dog Creative * 352 Depot * 362 Depot * Glen Rock Depot * Studio 375 Depot * Northlight Studios * The Lift Studios

* David C. Stewart Fine Art * Switchyard Studios * Tannery Studios * Riverview Station * Warehouse Studios * Curve Studios & Garden * Cotton Mill Studios * Riverside Studios * Galaxy Studios * Hatchery Studios * Phil Mechanic Studios


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The Soapy, Sleepy & Artful Dogs of Asheville’s River Arts District

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Creativity, ingenuity and a love for working with dogs brought Roni Davis, Owner & Operator of ‘The Soapy Dog,’ and Maryanne Pappano, creator of ‘The Artful Dog’, together as a progressive ‘pack’ of local entrepreneurs. Housed under one roof in the River Arts District, the ‘pack’ offers professional grooming, Asheville’s first do-it-yourself dog wash, overnight boarding, dog day care, and customized dog portraits.

in Asheville. “First of all, we both have multiple dogs in our own ‘packs’ several of whom need special care. It was important to design a facility and a program that could accommodate families of all sizes and dogs that fall on different ends of the spectrum with regards to social play and physical ability. Creating a low-stress environment where dogs can receive lots of love Dogs receive lots of love and attention. and attention is our first priority. We want owners to feel safe and secure when dropping them off. We Providing quality love that our owners question ‘Who had more fun – me or my dog?’ when they care and professional pick them up at the end of a vacation.”

Bringing Signature Dog Portraits to the River Arts District

‘The Soapy Dog’ introduces the ‘Sleepy Dog’

In 1998, Roni Davis, travelled across country with two of her own pack. “We The were camping in River Arts between visitDistrict is ing friends in booming New York, Ann with all Arbor and other Boarding at The Sleepy Dog. kinds of art big cities. Before and ‘The bringing dogs dirty from the woods Soapy Dog’ has always brought a colorinto friends’ apartments, I’d seek out ful presence to this vibrant neighborplaces to give them a bath. I found hood. Once the ‘Sleepy Dog’ opened, the convenience of do-it-yourself dog Roni thought that one last splash needed wash facilities a huge help. When I to be added to the tub…a signature Dog moved to Asheville, bringing a similar Portrait Artist. service to our community was a no“Being an integral member of the brainer.” In 2003, Roni moved her River Arts District is very important to signature raised claw-foot tubs into us and we want to offer a custom, spewhat is now ‘The Soapy Dog.’ cial service to our clients and the comSo how did the Sleepy Dog munity.” Maryanne Pappano is a local come to be? “Years earlier, I worked artist whose love for animals allows her with Laura caring for a herd of horses to capture the essence of their personalat a small therapeutic riding program. ity in her portraits. We chose Maryanne Recently, we ran into one another at because she shares our progressive a friend’s wedding reception downvision. All of her art is original, unique, town. She was looking for a new busiand affordable. She is truly dedicated to ness opportunity and investment. We her work and to her customers.” met at ‘The Soapy Dog’ the following Maryanne is excited to be involved Saturday, surveyed the property and in Asheville’s animal community as well dreamed up the ‘Sleepy Dog Boardas creating a new niche in The River ing and Day Care.’” Arts District by showcasing her work in ‘The Soapy Dog’s’ Retail store. An Innovative Approach to Dog

Boarding & Day Care

When designing the facility and daily routine, Roni wanted to bring something new to the boarding scene

The General Store We pride ourselves on carrying quality product lines primarily purchased from small, independently

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customer service for you and your pup.

owned companies. From leashes and collars to toys, treats and home grooming supplies, The Soapy Dog general store offers a wide variety of product lines with which to pamper your pup! Homemade treats from Bonafide Bakery and Crunchers dog bakery are always on hand to reward your pet after being pampered in the tubs. RG

The Soapy Dog has a do-it-yourself dog wash facility.

The Soapy Dog 270 Depot Street, Asheville, NC 28801 Do-It Yourself Baths: Mon-Sat 10-7; Sun 12-7 Day Care: Sun-Sat 7:30-6:30 Sleepy Dog Boarding: Sun-Sat 8:30-6:30 (828) 350-0333 www.thesoapydog.com RF

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INTERVIEW WITH RICHARD AND KAY MILLER OWNERS OF

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The Classic Wineseller

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little about the The Classic

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Wineseller.

INTERVIEWED BY

The Classic Wineseller: The Classic Wineseller is a unique

We were once contacted by a winery in California that no longer had its inaugural vintage. They learned that we had the wine in stock and bought it back from us! We have more than 12,000 bottles and over 1,200 different The Classic Wineseller holds wine pairings, kinds of wine and craft dinners, and tastings. beer, including wine from Photo: Keli Keach Photography countries all over the world like Taiwan and Greece, and wine and beer from right here in western North Carolina. Our underground environs also house a 50-seat small plate, tapas-style restaurant that is open on Friday and Saturday nights with live music. We serve delicious imported and local cheeses, tasty appetizers and entrees, unique flatbreads, and scrumptious desserts.

underground shop located at 20 Church Street in historic underground downtown Waynesville. We specialize in older vintages and highly allocated boutique wines, as well as craft beer. The shop was opened 16 years ago and is family owned and operated. We not only serve western North Carolina but we have shipped all over the US and around the world.

A very unusual space with wonderful old world ambiance.

RRM: What up-coming events does the The Classic Wineseller have planned?

TCW: We’re planning wine pairings, dinners,

The Classic Wineseller is a unique underground shop. WM

Photo: Keli Keach Photography

and tastings, as well as beer tastings. For one of our dinners we will be Skyping the winemaker during the evening. We’ll also hold charity dinners at the Wineseller. In response to customer requests, we’re adding wine classes this winter to help take some of the guesswork out of the wine drinking experience.

RRM: Tell us a little about your live music. TCW: We offer live music every Friday and Saturday night at 7pm. We have our own Steinway piano and we like to feature it when we can. Our music offerings range from American roots, blues, pop, and ballads, to jazz standards and classical tunes. We feature local, regional and national performers. We enjoy bringing live jazz to Waynesville too and have hosted a fall jazz series and a summer jazz series to help show off the many talented jazz artists in the area.

RRM: What drew you to first open up such an eclectic business? TCW: The business started out as retail only and has

evolved in the last couple of years into an intimate live music venue and to include a restaurant. It offers customers the perfect opportunity to “Come Share Our Passion: Wine, Beer, Food, & LIVE Music!”

RRM: What changes do you have planned for 2014? TCW: We’re planning to open the restaurant on additional nights and there’s the possibility of expanding live music to those nights as well. We continue to offer the Classic Wineseller as a private party location for birthday parties, Christmas parties, WF

20 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

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The January exhibit at the Mahogany House Art Gallery and Studios will feature Dominick DePaulo. DePaulo is an award winning freelance artist whose mastery of several mediums makes him the “go-to” teacher in several western NC towns. His creations range from nostalgic renditions of classic cowboy heroes, as seen recently at the opening of the Strand Theatre, to pen/ink/ watercolor street scenes and realistic waterfall landscapes. His work also includes acrylic abstracts in fluid moveFine artist Dominick DePaulo ment and colored pencil drawings of people, pets and more. DePaulo is currently teaching in Waynesville, Franklin, and Bryson City. His classes provide instant gratification for the beginner with a casual and informative style of instruction.

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The Mahogany House Art Gallery 240 Depot St., Historic Frog Level in Waynesville. Tues. to Sat. 10- 6 and Sunday 12- 5.

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(828) 246-0818, www.themahoganyhouse.com

‘Classic Wineseller’ continued from page 20

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fundraising events, you name it. We have a not-for-profit arm of Expect the the Classic Wineseller called the unexpected! Wineseller Foundation. With it we raise money for local hunger programs and use a program called “Round Up for Hunger” to raise matching funds for our local food pantries. Wineseller is known for. Will you be expanding your entertainment calendar this year? And what may we expect?

& Saturday at 7pm

TCW: We’ll be offering live music every Friday and Satur-

The Classic Wineseller 20 Church Street Waynesville (828) 452-6000 www.classicwineseller.com www.facebook.com/theclassicwineseller

Home Furnishings, Great Food, plus Live Music, and Fine Arts & Crafts.

Live Music

RRM: Live music is a huge part of what The Classic

day night for the first time during the winter. As far as entertainment goes, we say: “Expect the unexpected!” We’ll continue to bring the best local, regional, and national artists that we can attract. We have a very unusual space with wonderful old world ambiance. We have a very nice piano with a piano technician on staff to see that it stays in great shape for the bands and pianists who perform here.

~ Waynesville Has it ALL ~

PG. 32

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Kitchen serves small plate fare starting at 5:30pm on Friday and Saturday

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20 Church Street, Waynesville www.classicwineseller.com

828-452-6000

Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 21


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Culturally Rich HENDERSONVILLE & Flat Rock

JB: We give price breaks on quantity

purchases of two or more items. We are able to handle custom orders with a fast turn-around time. Some of the gifts we craft include fireplace sets, B-B-Q sets, steak turners, knifes for collectors and culinary use, and oneof-a-kind bottle openers. We can also create larger items such as tables and benches.

RRM: Tell us your thoughts on buying and shopping local.

JB: It helps support our

community along with supporting all of the local artists, and it helps us believe in the American dream. Plus it creates pride in great American quality that can be trusted to last. Wouldn’t you like to know that it was made here and not over seas? We give a 100% guarantee on our prod-

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Jason R. (828) 273-3212 Jason B. (828) 785-3091

HENDERSONVILLE 28792

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514 Jones Rd. Fletcher, NC 28732

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Jason Redick

Angry Giant Forge

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I met at college and right away became fast friends. I had never met anyone with as many talents as I have, and we realized that we could start a blacksmithing business together. Some of my talents besides blacksmithing are: artist, glass engraver, stone and metal sculptor, wood and antler carver, leather burner, and lapidary arts and welding. Jason Redick’s talents include: blacksmithing, wood turner,

year specials?

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Jason Brown: Jason and

RRM: What are some of your new

lapidary arts wood worker, leather craft and welder. As a bow and arrow maker, he knaps his own points for hunting and making necklaces. So, with all of our combined talents, we can make virtually anything.

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aabout bout Angry Giant Forge

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ucts; if it breaks under normal use we will fix it or replace it at no extra cost to the consumer. And we try to recycle when possible.

Angry Giant Forge

Rapid River Magazine: Tell us a little

DENNIS RAY

INTERVIEWED BY

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Surrounded by the beautiful mountains, Hendersonville is known as the “City of Four Seasons,” a place where one can be as idle or active as one wishes. Hendersonville offers abundant cultural opportunities for residents and visitors of all ages. The Flat Rock Playhouse (the State Theater of NC), the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, festivals throughout the year, parks and hiking trails, all add to the diverse entertainment and recreational opportunities. We hope you’ll take the time to get to know us a bit better.

INTERVIEW WITH JASON REDICK AND JASON BROWN OF HENDERSONVILLE’S

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Welcome to Hendersonville



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HENDERSONVILLE Game of Hearts

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AT THE ART HOUSE GALLERY & STUDIO

In the 1900s the Dwelle family Valentine’s Day was celebrated with stunning gowns, champagne, elegance presented to the eye, lusciously delicious tastings and most importantly a “Game of Hearts.”

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Susan Olivari, the owner of The Art House Gallery & Studio and owner of the former Dwelle Heights home in Saluda will create a flashback to this time. We’ve put a new twist on this old favorite with a reminiscent game that will make you “Dart for a Heart.” You might Heidi Mayfield, art director be lucky enough to steal of the Boys & Girls Club of away your own painted Hendersonville, and Ben display heart. With support from a sample of the paintings to the children at the Boys be given away during the “Dart for a Heart” game. and Girls Club, their extraordinary paintings will be displayed in the main gallery for you to take home. Along with the children’s heart paintings, local artists will provide artwork for a silent auction that is inspired by their own true love. Also, on display will be new works by an artist of true heart, Veronika Hart. Your ticket will purchase a painting from the students, a night of games, Kir Royale and wine, decadent hors d’oeuvres and a delectable full dinner menu.

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‘Game of Hearts’ cont’d on page 33

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Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 23


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poetry & books The Poet’s Voice OPENED BY WONDER

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My niece sent me a postcard with these words on the front: “I’d rather have a mind opened by WONDER, than one closed by belief.” Karen lives in Denver, CO, a good place for wondering. I’m going to focus on the first half of this quote. (If I go into “one closed by belief,” I know there’d be trouble.) January, named for the good old god of two faces, Janus, one looking behind, one looking ahead, is a good month to ponder and wonder. Listen to the way writer, Jane Hirshfield uses the word, ponder. “The experience of concentration may come as the harvest of long-looking. The self’s deepest ponderings must often be taken by ambush.” I am ambushed by the art world, the natural world, music, children, and love. An ambush can grab me around the neck like a four-year old, cause me to feel faint and fan myself when approaching Picasso’s, Blue Guitar, in the Chicago Art Institute, can close my eyes and make me disappear when listening to Brahms, and weep when a red dragonfly settles on my pen at the lake. Wonder is a verb, adjective, and noun. One of my favorite resources is my good thick Thesaurus by Roget. (It is a wonder!) Won-

RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE

BY CAROL PEARCE BJORLIE – THE POET BEHIND THE CELLO

der has 22 entries. Here are a few: marvel, awe, stupefaction, beguilement, miracle, stupendous, astonish, startle, paralyze, baffle, and indescribable. These words describe my feelings when a jazz ensemble heats up and cooks! These words work for the quiet ecstasy of hearing a fish jump and a loon cry on a Minnesota moon-filled lake. There is no other word than “wonder” when a four-year old says, “What a wonderful flower!” Wonder is alive and well in poet’s words. Read this short poem by Galway Kinnel.

Hide-and-Seek 1933 Once when we were playing hide-and-seek and it was time to go home the rest gave up on the game before it was done and forgot I was still hiding. I remained hidden as a matter of honor until the moon rose. Here, Wonder is “understood.” Mr. Kinnell doesn’t have to wallow in it for the reader to know his connection to awe. Ted Kooser, in his book, Delights and Shadows, (both wonder-filled words) includes this short poem.

A Glimpse of the Eternal Just now, a sparrow lighted on a pine bough right outside my bedroom window and a puff of yellow pollen flew away. I return to two-faced Janus on the cusp of newness. The path ahead is light-filled. Mystery and Non-knowing follow. I will discover the path, and begin. How does a writer keep on going? How do I know my notebook will fill this year? When I look back, I am not disappointed. My notebooks have filled every year since 1961. I look backwards. The words are there, proof of my existence. I have written my way into the world, as I will in 2014, and as you will, in 2014. We can count on one thing: Wonder is alive and well. Stop. Look. Listen. You can’t miss it.

Resources

Enter any unpublished poem 35 lines or less.

Roget’s International Thesaurus, fourth edition, 1977 Delights and Shadows, Ted Kooser, Copper Canyon Press, 2004 Strong is Your Hand, Galway Kinnell, Houghton Mifflin Co. 2006

Deadline January 31, 2014. Winning poems will be printed in the March 2014 issue. Reading fee: $5 for three poems; $1 for each additional poem. Details at (828) 646-0071. Send poems to: Rapid River Poetry Contest, 85 N. Main St., Canton, NC 28716

I want to meet you all, writers, dreamers, readers and listeners. We need each other. Contact Carol at thepoetsvoicerr@yahoo.com

17th Annual Poetry Contest 5 WINNERS! Prizes Include: Tickets to local concerts; Mellow Mushroom Gift Certificates; and books from Malaprops.

24 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

Southern Author, Leanna Sain, Releases Her New Novel, Wish

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When seventeen year old Maddie McGuire discovers a list consisting of twenty-three names – one of them her mother; all of them dead – she’s convinced it’s more than just a coincidence. Was her mom’s death caused by something more than cancer? Had her New York City cop dad found out? Was his “suicide” really murder? And what if the answer was “yes” to one or more of these questions? Who could she turn to for help? The answer comes in the most unbelievable way possible when Maddie closes her eyes and makes a wish just days before Christmas. What follows is a weeklong roller-coaster ride filled with more danger-filled twists and turns than she ever could’ve imagined. But in the end, would she face the same fate as her parents? Though Wish claims a young adult audience, it’s definitely a crossover book, claiming a “wow!” from teens on up. As a “stand alone” novel set in New York City, Wish is a change from Sain’s usual Southern suspense or “grit-lit,” but fans will still get the strong, sometimes-snarky characters, gripping dialogue, and vivid descriptions that they’ve come to expect from Sain’s novels. Sain’s first book, Gate to Nowhere, published in 2008, won Foreword Maga-

zine’s Book-of-the-Year Award, as well as, the Clark Cox Historical Fiction Award from the North Carolina Society of Historians. The sequel, Return to Nowhere, published in 2009, also won the NCSH Historical Fiction Award, and was nominated for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. The third book of the trilogy, Magnolia Blossoms, published in 2010, was nominated for the Global E-book Award. Touring throughout North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee, Sain is especially proud to have been a panel presenter in Nashville at the Southern Festival of Books, a participating author in the Decatur Book Festival, as well as part of the Georgia Literary Festival. For more information about Leanna Sain visit www.LeannaSain.com IF YOU The official book launch takes GO place Friday, January 17 from

5:30-7:30 p.m. at Fountainhead in Hendersonville. Additional signings take place on Sunday, January 19 from 1-3 p.m. at Barnes & Noble-Biltmore Park, and Monday, January 20 from 2-4 p.m. at the Barnes & Noble in Asheville Mall.

TWO MASTERFUL AUTHORS PRESENT NEW WORKS AT MALAPROP’S

Novelists Okey Ndibe & James Scott

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Nigerian-born professor and author, Okey Ndibe, comes to Malaprop’s on Friday, January 17 at 7 p.m. for a reading and signing of his new novel, Foreign Gods, Inc. The novel tells the story of Ike, a New York-based Nigerian cab driver who sets out to steal the statue of an ancient war deity from his home village and sell it to a New York gallery. Despite a degree in economics from a major American college, his strong accent has barred him from the corporate world. Forced to eke out a living as a cab driver, he is unable to manage the emotional and material needs of a temperamental African American bride and a widowed mother demanding financial support. A meditation on the dreams, promises and frustrations of the immigrant life in America; the nature and impact of religious conflicts; an examination of the ways in which modern culture creates or heightens infatuation with the “exotic,” including the desire to own strange objects and hanker after ineffable illusions; and an

CINDY NORRIS ~ MALAPROP’S exploration of the shifting nature of memory, Foreign Gods, Inc. is a brilliant work of fiction that illuminates our globally interconnected world like no other. “Foreign Gods, Inc. reads like the narrative of taxi-driving Faust in modern Nigeria and America. With Moliere-like humorous debunking of religious hypocrisy and rancid materialism, it teems with characters and situations that make you laugh in order not to cry.” ~ Ngugi wa Thiong, author of Wizard of the Crow.

James Scott will be reading and signing his debut novel, The Kept Kept, on Tuesday, January 28 at 7 p.m. The novel begins in the winter of 1897, as a trio of killers descends upon an isolated farm in upstate New York. Midwife Elspeth Howell returns home to the carnage: her husband, and four of her children, murdered. Before she can discover her remaining son, Caleb, alive and hiding in the kitchen pantry, another shot continued on page 26


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authors ~ books ~ readings Books to Bring New Thinking to the New Year

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Martin Scorsese’s new movie, The Wolf of Wall W all Street, stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a drug-addled con man who made millions by hawking worthless penny stocks to legions of unsuspecting buyers. As I sat through the 3-hour greed fest, I kept thinking, “Gee, I’d never be that stupid with my money.” Yeah, sure. I was so smart that I believed the HR person from my former employer, a California tech company, who convinced me I should keep all my retirement earnings in the company stock and not bother diversifying. A year later those earnings dropped 85% in one day. Later, I was so smart I let my ex-husband invest my remaining money in his latest foolproof investment strategy — God help me. I’ll spare you the gory details when, all by myself, I went into Forex, the foreign currency exchange that is so popular right now. Oh yeah, I was one smart cookie with money! If you’re like me (fess up, I know I’m not alone), you’ll want to read the books I discovered as part of my resolution to “Be Smart in 2014.” Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes – And How To Correct Them: Lessons from the New Science of Behavioral Economics (Simon & Schuster,

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MARCIANNE MILLER

1999) is a book I should have read — and memorized — years ago. It’s a solid, reader-friendly, amazing look at why so many of us are stupid with money. Authors Gary Belsky (a money journalist) and Thomas Gilovich (a Cornell psychologist) lay out convincing, and shocking, reasons why we are stupid. The overriding cause of our stupidity, they claim, is over-confidence. Our own, first, of course. We watch a TV money meister for a few weeks and think we’re experts. But also because, in our “Culture of Confidence,” we are induced to equate confidence with actual expertise. Big mistake. But we do it all the time — career coaches teach us that confidence will win the job; spiritual gurus tell us to “act as if” we already possess what we don’t; we’re trained to trust people who act confidently, be it Presidents leading us to war, team leaders spurring projects that the numbers don’t support, or preachers pushing beliefs they themselves don’t act on. And women, alas, as liberated as we are, often still rely on male confidence. Smart People does offer impressive behavior modifications we can easily take on — and real-life investment advice — so when you finish the final page you can indeed be much smarter. I realized (as you might) that money isn’t the only area of life where we make stupid mistakes. Enter The Invisible Gorilla—And

WHY A DISLIKE OF NUMBERS CAN MEAN DISASTER

The three books mentioned above define our thinking problems in psychological terms. In my opinion, there’s another pervasive mindset that causes just as many problems – it’s called innumeracy. Innumeracy is our inability to make sense of the numbers that run our lives. Simply, it’s “mathematical illiteracy.” The phrase became popular in 1988 with the publication of the bestselling book by mathematician John Allan Paulos: Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences (Holt McDougal). Anger at all the stupid mistakes people made because they didn’t understand numbers is what inspired Paulos to write his book. We don’t understand simple math, he claims, or percentages, statistics, probability, or anything with lots of numbers. Here’s the classic example: a TV meteorologist points out there is a 50% chance of rain on Saturday and a 50% chance of

rain on Sunday – concluding, thus, that there’s a 100% chance of rain on the weekend. Innumeracy explains why shocking problems, like stock scams, Medicare fraud, criminal politicians, construction overruns, and battle disasters, are endemic to American culture. Paulos uses math to debunk some of Ashevilleans’ favorite pastimes, such as astrology and tarot cards, which he calls examples of “pseudo-science.” The role of inumeracy brings up many questions on current national issues. Why are some lawmakers demanding that unemployed workers, in an economy in which it is said that there are a hundred applicants for every job, should lose unemployment compensation, as well as food stamps? Innumeracy can explain their illogical cruelty, but maybe only compassion can actually bring about reallife solutions.

How to make better decisions and more money. Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us by psychologists Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons (Crown, 2010). This book points out the “inattentive blindness” with which many of us lead our lives—we don’t see what’s in front of us (like the “gorilla” running through a video that half the watchers never saw). It’s a fact that, instead of taking time to make well-thought out, researched decisions, many of us rely on our instantaneous “gut” reactions or intuition. Can we mention WMD and Iraq? Or the roofer we felt would do a good job despite not having insurance? Or the tenants who seem so perfect we didn’t double check their references? Intuition definitely has its place in life (let’s not forget Malcolm Gladwell’s 2005 bestselling Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking), but the Gorilla authors insist our Thinking decisions must be tempered with more rightbrain, time-consuming (read less exciting) rational decisions. It’s a lively, informative book that Asheville readers, who have a definite bias toward intuition thanks to our influential metaphysical communities, will find quite helpful. For more insight into how our minds work go to www.theinvisiblegorilla.com. In addition to intuition, there are a slew of other quirks that affect the way we make decisions. These are covered, with both scholarly and popular slants, in a fascinating collection of essays by scientists and philosophers: Thinking: The New Science of DecisionMaking, ProblemSolving, and Prediction (edited by John Brockman, Harper Perennial, 2013). These are such new ideas about thinking that you may not have seen them covered in other books yet. It’s mind-boggling, the book points out, how many seemingly insignificant factors go into the way we make decisions. Kind of terrifying too. If you, just a lowly person, aren’t always aware why you make decisions, what can we expect from our world leaders? Thinking makes us aware that our decisions in life, things we don’t often even “think” about, are more complicated than we dreamed of. Yes, indeed, we need to be more “mindful,” all the time. Check out the exciting website about the work of the editor and the book’s authors at www.edge.org.

JANUARY

We host numerous Readings & Bookclubs, as well as Poetrio!

PARTIAL LISTING Visit www.malaprops.com

READINGS & BOOKSIGNINGS Wednesday, January 1 from 12-5 p.m. New Year’s Day Sale! Most items are 25% off. Tuesday, January 7 at 7 p.m. Certified Enneagram consultant SANDRA SMITH explores Type Three: The Achiever. Wednesday, January 8 at 6:30 p.m. The Rag-Picker’s Guide to Poetry: Poems, Poets, Process, a new anthology. Friday, January 10 at 7 p.m. ROGER HUTCHINSON, The Painting Table: A Journal of Loss and Joy. Sunday, January 12 at 3 p.m. Reading and signing by eight local authors with recent self-published titles. Monday, January 13 at 7 p.m. Writing workshop with ANNIE FAHY. Friday, January 17 at 7 p.m. OKEY NDIBE, Foreign Gods, Inc. Saturday, January 18 at 10 a.m. GRETA CHRISTINA, Coming Out Atheist: How to Do It, How to Help Each Other, and Why. Saturday, January 18 at 7 p.m. FAITH HUNTER, Black Arts, features vampire hunter Jane Yellowrock. Friday, January 24 at 7 p.m. SARAH ADDISON ALLEN, Lost Lake. Mystery, magic and surprises. Sunday, January 26 at 3 p.m. LUCY DANIELS, Walking with Moonshine: My Life in Stories. Tuesday, January 28 at 7 p.m. JAMES SCOTT, The Kept, riveting fiction. Wednesday, January 29 at 7 p.m. JEANIENE FROST, Up From the Grave. Thursday, January 30 at 7 p.m. STEVE VINAY GUNTHER, Understanding the Woman in Your Life. Friday, January 31 at 7 p.m. WILEY CASH, This Dark Road to Mercy, edgy thriller.

55 Haywood St.

828-254-6734 • 800-441-9829

Monday-Saturday 9AM to 9PM PG. 32 Sunday 9AM to 7PM M

Marcianne Miller is a local writer and critic. She can be reached at marci@aquamystique.com

Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 25


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Southern Comfort

the curmudgeon

Some readers will recall the end of last month’s column.

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COLLECTED STORIES AND PROSE OF WRITER, JUDY AUSLEY

Illustration by Peter Loewer

married until the lad was six years old and his In brief: Curmudgeon suggested that brother Adrian, was one.” the various members of the General Store “In time, Felix gave up medical school, Membership List might be persuaded to join wrote theatre criticism for a while then, taking him for a jaunt around the area, using his the name of Nadar, moved in a great career Chevy truck for the mode of transportation, revolving around photography, and finally bepromising an early lunch where the food is came enamored with ballooning. He was also reasonably good and local beers are available a big character in the development of Impresin refreshing amounts. sionism as a way of art.” But before we join this merry band it’s “I applaud your memory,” said Curmudnecessary to introduce our readers to a scene geon, “and I hasten to add that when our hero that occurred in the General Store during the took off from the Champ last week of November. de Mars in the Paris of Present for that session 1863, he was blown farwere again, the two Storether east than he wished keeps, Mr. and Mrs. and to be by a furious gale and Cityfella, up from Atlanta to some seventeen hours escape the madding crowd. later he crash-landed in Added to the mix were the Hanover, Germany. But Postman (who had nothing that is not the part of the good to say about the PO’s story that I wish to involve move from Asheville to all those present to take Greenville, SC); the Breadpart in. No, I wanted to man, Sarah and Ginger, the point out Tournachon’s Muffet Sisters (historians in balloon that he called The their own right); and Fred Giant and how he built Furling, a pleasant bachelor his masterpiece.” who was busy deciding if he Again Curmudgeon should run in the next genpaused for effect, took off eral election for Congress. his cap and pointing to Upon entering the balloon emblem said: the store that morning, “The basket of his very Curmudgeon came with a large balloon is recorded number of rolled up papers in the plans I’ve unrolled that suggested their being on the counter and its blueprints of one sort or structure resembled a another while he wore a Gaspard Félix Tournachon “Nadar” two-story-high cottage backwards baseball cap with made of wicker and actually contained a small the insignia of an old hot-air balloon and the dining room, a lavatory, and a small photoletters WNC Flies. lab where upon landing at various townships, “It seems to me,” said Curmudgeon, “that those aboard could sell photos to admirers and all the folks in the village need something new possibly change the course of history.” to set their sights upon, something to inspire a “Remember,” said Curmudgeon in a sense of hope and freedom, something to take fixating voice, “Félix was a friend of Victor our minds off of this state’s continual plumHugo who had written: ‘Raise your eyes to the met into the valley of despair.” heavens ... There I see two kinds of flight, that “Elaine,” (Mrs. Storekeep’s proper name), of the cloud and that of the bird. One is the “could you help me clear a space on the counplaything of the wind [and one] opposes the ter so that I can unroll these plans so I could wind and dominates it. Let our aeronauts be possibly interest you all in a grand project that inspired by the birds.’” I will beg for your help with but will pay the Silence dominated the General Store as costs up front, using some money I’ve set aside those in attendance wondered what Curmudfor a rainy day?” He paused for effect, “It all geon wished to do and how much of their furevolves around the efforts of Félix Tournature existence would be involved in his efforts. chon, one of Europe’s great balloonists of the “I want,” said Curmudgeon, “for you to mid-1800s.” Turning to the Muffet sisters he help me build a great balloon and we will fly added, “and do you Ginger remember this to Raleigh and straighten out the future of great man?” North Carolina!” “I do indeed,” she answered, “he was the gentleman who tried to pilot a balloon that was lost in a great storm. As I recall his birth Peter Loewer has written and illustrated name was Gaspard-Félix Tournachon and he more than twenty-five books on natural was born in Paris in the year 1820 to a printer history over the past thirty years. father and a shopkeeper mother who never

26 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

My Hope for a New Year CREATIVITY AND SUCCESS AHEAD!

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Here we are on the cusp of a new year. Great, 2014 is an even year, thank God! Seems “odd years,” in my bag of memories, like 2013, often are very hard to endure. My 2013 has ended up being one of the worse in my history. Health-wise for sure. I even told my brother in Florida that I really think I am falling to pieces. For once it wasn’t over a relationship gone bad but other issues in real life. During this year I have had to deal with 3 orthopedic doctors telling me that my bones are not as healthy as they once were and that replacement surgeries are in my near future. I have been living with osteoarthritis since 1967, from injuries I suffered in an automobile accident in Tampa, FL before I relocated to North Carolina to live and work. Once it gets into the body it spreads to other bones and “literally wipes out cartilage” that surrounds our bones. Most important are vulnerable bones that are a part of any repetitive use such as hands, arms, knees and ankles are targeted. I had hand surgery in 2008 and after hurting for a year in my right arm, I was told in October that I will have to endure another joint replacement surgery so I can continue an active lifestyle. If I do not have this surgery done my right arm will become stiff and I will have to pick it up with my left hand every time I get on the computer to write. Because I am a writer things like this are very intense and threatening to my entire being no matter how much I try not to think about it. When something threatens my independence I go a little crazy. One true thing is I have always lived on the edge and I am a survivor. I do not give in or give up! There is far too much to live for before I go. I will have a year of intense physical therapy after the surgery.

‘Novelists’ cont’d from page 24

rings out over the snowcovered valley. Twelveyear-old Caleb must tend to his mother until she recovers enough for them to take to the frozen wilderness in search of the men responsible. A scorching portrait of a merciless world—of guilt and lost innocence, atonement and retribution, resilience and sacrifice, pregnant obsession and primal adolescence—The The Kept introduces an oldbeyond-his-years protagonist as indelible and heartbreaking as Mattie Ross of True Grit or

BY JUDY

AUSLEY

Southern Comfort will continue as before, and, thanks to my rock of a friend Simone Bouyer, who fine tunes my work each month in Rapid River Magazine, things will appear as usual. My creative writing will continue too. Yes, if I can clear out more of the cobwebs of the past, there is still a book in me. I do not like this aging thing that we all face sooner than we want. But, I am strong-willed and tough and ready for many more chapters to come. I am quite pleasantly surprised to be still around in my 70s. There was a day and probably more than a few crazy days in my past, when I did not imagine I would be here in 2014, to say Happy New Year to everyone today. I would love to hear from anyone who reads Rapid River Magazine every month and Southern Comfort, especially if you know a person in Asheville/Buncombe who has a real story to tell. Just give me a call in the city at (828) 253-3655.

Writer Judy Ausley has been a reporter with newspapers in NC for 40 years. She retired in 2005 and continues to freelance at her home in Asheville. She can be contacted by e-mail at Judyausley@aol.com. If you know of a character in Asheville who has not had a conventional life, put them in touch with Judy for an article in this column, Southern Comfort.

Jimmy Blevins of All the Pretty Horses, as well as a shape-shifting mother as enigmatic and mysterious as any in recent memory. The Kept marks the introduction of a promising new American writer. “With its vivid sense of time and place, lyrical writing, and complex questions of what constitutes a family, The Kept is an outstanding debut by a bright new voice in American fiction.” ~ Ron Rash, author of Nothing Gold Can Stay and Serena.

IF YOU Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe, GO 55 Haywood St., downtown

Asheville. More details at (828) 254-6734, www.malaprops.com.


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sound experience Chuck Brodsky at the Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse

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The second week of January may be the time for football playoffs and the still early stages of the interminably long NBA season, but when Chuck Brodsky takes the stage, thoughts turn to baseball, even if spring training is yet some six weeks away. Brodsky’s love of the game has helped shape his life, music, and stage presence. As a modern day troubadour, guitar in hand, the down and out underdogs, the greats and near greats and just plan eccentric characters that populate his songs, are part and parcel of America’s pastime. Brodsky’s sardonic wit, tempered with a tangible sense of how nice a guy he genuinely is, is the ideal vehicle for telling his tales. He’s also a heck of a good guitar player, employing a traditional finger pick style that hearkens back to many of the blues singers he grew up listening to. Born and raised in Philadelphia—marking him a lifelong Phillies fan—Brodsky fell in love with the piano at an early age. Despite taking a few lessons, he likes to joke that he “still managed to teach himself to play.” Years later he took up guitar and embarked on what he calls his “enrollment in the school of life.” Influenced by many of the usual

Modern day troubadour Chuck Brodsky.

suspects—Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, Lowell George, John Hartford, Jackson Browne, and Bruce Springsteen among them—Brodsky began playing coffeehouses, house gigs, and anyone who’d let him in the door. After hitch-hiking across the country Brodsky landed in San Francisco, where he took up residence and began performing at a local open mic calling. Lured by the siren call of adventure he then spent a few years singing

for tips on the streets of Europe, returning to this country to work as a fruit picker. Hard times to be sure, but it was the kind of stuff that makes for great experiences that can be turned to song. Settling on a full time career in music Brodsky won the “Emerging Songwriter Award” at the Napa Valley Folk Festival in 1992, and was warmly embraced at the Kerrville Folk Festival in Texas the following year. That helped set a two decade course that has seen him perform at festivals and concerts all across the USA, Canada, Ireland, Denmark, England, Israel, Lithuania, Latvia, Wales, and the Shetland Islands of Scotland. His ten albums have received worldwide critical acclaim, including his 2013 release The Baseball Ballads 2. Brodsky’s passion for our National Pastime and its colorful, off-beat cast of characters is evident in two albums devoted entirely to Baseball, tales so outrageous they must be true: The first white man to play in the Negro Leagues. A pitcher who threw a no-hitter while hallucinating on LSD, and a catcher who was also a spy during World War II, and so many more! Brodsky has performed three times at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and 18

WNC Jazz Profiles: Jesse Earl Junior

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“Of all the vocalists in WNC, Jesse Earl Junior is my favorite. He’s nothing but class. Jesse’s vocal delivery and that rich bass/baritone voice are a wonderful reminder of the great singers from the 40’s & 50’s, such as Johnny Hartman, Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Bob Eberly and

IF YOU Chuck Brodsky at the Mountain GO Spirit Coffeehouse, housed at the

Unitarian Universalist Congregation at 1 Edwin Place. Sunday, January 5 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30). Tickets available at the door. $15 for adults, $10 for students, and free to children under age 14. For more information call (828) 299-4171

EDDIE LESHURE

shows in numerous venues in WNC, including Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, White Horse Black Mountain and Lord Auditorium. Jesse will headline a Cabaret Jazz performance at the White Horse Black Mountain on Friday, January 17. That, and upcoming shows in Waynesville, will keep Jesse ensconced in the music he loves. “Coming full circle here in Asheville with its laid back atmosphere and eclectic music scene, I’ve found a place that fits. The bourgeoning jazz scene here, having my own jazz radio show, a warm and welcoming jazz community…it’s an embarrassment of riches!”

~ Vocalist Harry Schulz

and perform in front of live audiences in the 80’s and 90’s. “I love most musical genres: jazz, classical, gospel, R&B, and I also have a warm spot for Latin rhythms. But I always come back to Miles, Monk, Duke, Billy Strayhorn, Coltrane and Billie Holiday. These are the musical voices that influence me and move me to sing. “My favorite jazz story was meeting Miles at the Village Vanguard and accusing him of not bringing his “A Game” to his performance. I sat with him for ten minutes as he explained that he was having some throat issues. I think it was actually a beautiful lady in the audience that had him distracted, but it didn’t matter. I still love him. He and Billie are my major musical influences, along with Johnny Hartman and Joe Williams.”

CASSARA

of his celebrated baseball story songs have been enshrined in the Hall of Fame’s sound recording library. The 2003 hit motion picture Radio included a cameo appearance by Brodsky as well as his closing title track. In addition “Moe Berg: The Song” can be heard in the 2010 PBS film Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story (2010). His songs have been recorded by Kathy Mattea, David Wilcox, and others and have graced numerous film soundtracks and tribute recordings. But baseball remains at the core of his artistry, and with the cold of winter in full grip I can think of few better ways to celebrate the eventual arrival of spring and the glorious calling of “Play Ball!” Every team is still in first place and hope stays eternal for those of us who love the game and the music it inspires.

BY

“Jesse has a real feeling for every song he sings and what a great instrument he has to deliver them with. While he can be compared with Johnny Hartman and other great baritones for his sound, the way he puts it across is all his own. Finding your own voice, which he has, is the ultimate goal a jazz singer can aspire to.”

A Milwaukee native, NYC expatriate, and now self-described “Asheville Jazzvillian”, singer Jesse Earl Junior is steeped in the Original American Art Form. From his introduction to the genre by his brother, artist and musician Alvin Junior, to mentoring by jazz icon Barry Harris, jazz has been a major part of and influence on all aspects of his musical journey. “Ironically my first awareness of music was polka, growing up in Wisconsin with a large polish community at the time. My father being a pastor in the African American Church, gospel music became a major part of my musical journey. But I think the transformative moment for me was the night that I first heard the Miles Davis album Porgy and Bess. It was literally my musical epiphany.” Jesse was a fixture on the New York jazz scene, singing at various clubs and jazz jams during his time there, along with Cobi Norita’s Universal Jazz Coalition and Voices Inc. Barry Harris’s Jazz Cultural Theater was also a major influence in his musical growth, as it allowed singers to showcase

BY JAMES

Catch Jesse Earl Junior live on Friday, January 17 at the White Horse Black Mountain. Photo: Frank Zipperer

Dick Haymes. He sings to his audience like he’s singing to you and only you.”

~ Vocalist/drummer Russ Wilson Since coming to Asheville, Jesse has hosted two jazz radio shows: “The Jazz Caravan” on Main FM 103.7; and presently “Straight No Chaser” on Internet radio station “Asheville FM”. He has performed at well-reviewed

“I first heard Jesse sing at Tressa’s some years ago. His delivery, style, and grace were outstanding, and I immediately followed him everywhere he appeared. Every time he sings, people stop talking, turn around, and say, “Who IS that singing?!!!” We love the deep rich sound and the sweet smile that goes with it.”

~ Vocalist Heather Masterton Eddie produces “Asheville Jazz Unlimited” each Wednesday 8-11 p.m. on MAIN-FM (103.7/main-fm.org), plus the monthly White Horse Cabaret Jazz Series in Black Mountain.

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spinning discs CD Reviews by James Cassara

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Welcome to 2014! Let’s celebrate another trip around the sun with a few discs left over from last year (meaning I meant to cover them but kept running out of space) and a few brand new offerings.

Mick Turner Don’t Tell The Driver Drag City Music It’s been nearly a decade since Dirty Three guitarist Mick Turner has stepped out on his own but it’s evident the relative layoff (Turner has continued with both band and session work) has served him well. Continuing in that band’s knack for combining traditional and modern folk essentials with exploratory jazz and prog rock, Don’t Tell the Driver is Turner in full investigational mode, showing off his fusion guitar dynamics with meticulously constructed loops, ambient percussion, and echo chamber theatrics. There’s even a bit of vocal accompaniment—a rarity for any Turner associated project—courtesy of fellow Aussie musician/visual artist Caroline Kennedy-McCracken. The end result is an album that, while it occasionally tends to veer into ethereal irreverence for its own sake, has a lot going for it. The opening two tracks, “All Gone” and “Sometimes”, are reflective images one of the other, dabbling in rapid fire acoustic guitar and keyboards with whispering background voices (more recitation than singing) that seem to come from nowhere and everywhere at once. “Long Way Home” tosses in some whispered horns—again, a first for Turner—that seem a bit out of place but you can’t blame him for trying. In many ways Don’t Tell the Driver is a bit reminiscent of the duo of records Robert Fripp and Andy Summer made in the early 1980’s: there’s a certain duality going on that sometimes works, sometimes falls flat, but never fails to interest. That’s really not a bad formula and while Don’t Tell the Driver might be seen as a stopover for the ever adventurous Turner it’s certainly not a bad place to spend a fortnight or two. ***1/2

Roy Harper Man and Myth Bella Union Music Talk about an early Christmas present! By my count the aptly titled Man and Myth is Roy Harper’s 34th album, starting with a phenomenal career dating back to 1966. And what a joy it is. Harper, adored by the likes of Page and Plant, Johanna Newsome, and Kate Bush has always stood on the sidelines of rock music legend. He’s far more a poet than pop star, and while he plays a pretty good guitar and concocts highly agreeable melodies his lyrics can be as baffling as they are opaque. Man and Myth,, his first studio recording since 2000, displays Harper in all his peculiar

28 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

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glory and helps explain why (those of us who know his music really, really, love it) I’ve yet to meet a casual Roy Harper fan. Recorded in both California and Ireland it is vintage Harper, and could have just as easily emerged from 40 years ago. Harper, at age 72, sounds as clear and haunting as ever, and shows no interest in recreating either his image or sound. His voice and guitar are up front—with longtime fan and friend Pete Townsend adding some very tasty licks—and the usual metaphor rich cryptic poetry is strewn across the album’s seven tracks. “January Man”, a poignant look back to early days and loves lost, is as gorgeous as anything he’s ever written (which is saying something) while the exhilarating bombast of “Cloud Cuckooland” gives us a glimpse of Harper the rock and roller. “Heaven is Here” is the albums masterwork, a sixteen minute allegory that is simply stunning in its beauty, romantic imagery, and mythological underpinnings. Drums, guitars, and mellotron converge, clash, and conspire in a breathtaking unification that must be heard to be believed. There’s not a thing about this album I would change. It immediately becomes one of my year’s favorite releases and should restore Harper’s name to the lofty heights to which it should be attached. Man and Myth is as great as it gets. *****

Thelonious Monk Paris 1969 Blue Note/ Capitol The latter half of the 1960’s was not a good time for Thelonious Monk. Ongoing economic problems, made worse by his deteriorating health, were only part of it. Columbia Records seemed determined to reclassify him as a rock musician (take a look at the cover art for Underground Underground) and while other jazz giants were willing to share a bill with rock stars—Miles Davis had recently opened The Fillmore for Neil Young and Crazy Horse!—Monk would have none of that. If that weren’t enough his longtime rhythm section of bassist Larry Gales and drummer Ben Riley had departed for more lucrative gigs, leaving Monk out there on his own. As he began his eighth tour of Europe, excursions which traditionally ended in Paris, he was forced to work out young unknowns. In this case accompanying Monk and saxophonist Charlie Rouse was a Berklee music school student, Nate “Lloyd” Hygelund on bass, and 17-year-old drummer Paris Wright, the son of Chet Baker bassist Herman Wright. This show, the last night of the tour, at the Salle Pleyel (the very same venue as his disastrous 1954 show in which a younger

Monk arrived drunk and surly) was recorded for French television; for which we should all be grateful, as the sound quality is astoundingly robust. The band had been on the road for six weeks and had just completed a triumphant three night stand at Ronnie Scott’s in London. They were in high groove and while they don’t often add much to the arrangements—Monk was keeping the improvisation to a minimum—there is an almost brutal force to their playing that comes through loud and clear. The familiars, “Straight No Chaser”, “Bright Mississippi”, and “Light Blue” are played pretty much note for note. Wright is a perfectly competent hard bob drummer, still discovering his own style, while Hygelund keeps ideal time. Rouse, who had played with Monk for the better part of a decade, might seem as if he’s dialing it in but such is not the case. He’s simply so familiar with his boss that the two seem as one. For his part Monk, despite his age and declining health, remained a monster. There’s no playing around the edges as he dives right into the gut and soul of each song. His sense of timing, harmony, and swing, are just astonishing. His long stretch on “Ruby My Dear” must have been jaw dropping to see up close. 44 years later it is no less so. Does any of this make Paris 1969 essential Thelonious Monk? Not really. There are so many highlights to his herculean output that this release, welcome as it is, doesn’t quite make that cut. Still, for the new initiates, Paris 1969 should give them some sense of how Thelonious Monk was a true giant of jazz while dispelling the oft repeated notion that towards the end he’d lost the swagger that was his. ****

RocketNumberNine MeYouWeYou Small Town Super Sound Music While RocketNumberNine are generally mentioned in connection with their demigods Radiohead and their pals Four Tet they are more than capable of standing on and carving out an identity all their own. With the streamlined MeYouWeYou, band members Ben and Tom Page have done just that. It’s a more intently focused version of the band, one that doesn’t let go of the organic improvisation that is their stock and trade but keeps it to a level that emphasizes edifice over ambience. That’s not to say their honored mix of jazz, electronica, and dance floor pulse aren’t present, just fine tuned. Tom Page’s rhythms ‘CD’s’ continued on page 29


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sound experience ‘CD’s’ continued from page 28

are pushed front and center—where they best serve the songs—while the interaction between Tom and Ben, as well as drummer Steve Reid, is finely nuanced and tempered. Take for instance the cleverly built “Rotunda”, wherein electronica giddily meets South American world beat, or the delightfully coy “Black and Blue” in which the brothers show off their jazzier notions (after all the band does take its name from a Sun Ra track) with confident ease. Other highlights include the rock heavy “Lone Raver” and the more coolly intellectual “Symposium”. Like other electronica bands, RocketNumberNine do occasionally place brash over brawn (and I admit to this being an unfairness on my part) but by and large MeYouWeYou reflects a nice step forward for the band, a direction I hope they continue to survey. ***

Eric Clapton Give Me Strength: The 1974/1975 Studio Recordings Polydor/ Universal Following the implosion of Derek and the Dominoes, Eric Clapton essentially lay fallow for three years; a handful of session work and the Rainbow Concert in London were about it. Confused, exhausted and in the dark throes of heroin addiction Clapton came perilously close to being just another Rock and Roll casualty (15 years later booze would nearly do him in). Released in July of 1974 461 Ocean Boulevard was his comeback, a near perfect record that helped him reclaim his standing as one of the biggest rock stars in the world. Those sessions, produced by Tom Dowd and recorded at Criteria studios are the nucleus of this fiveCD/one-BluRay box set documenting a vital chapter in the Eric Clapton discography. If nothing else this substantial collection of tracks gives evidence to how incredibly productive the original sessions were; apparently 461 was the mere tip of the iceberg. Disc 1 is the entire original album plus various alternate takes and unused songs, the best of which are a scorching reworking of Big Bill Broonzy’s “Lonesome Road Blues” and a lilting acoustic slowing down of “Please Be With Me”. Disc two settles in There’s One in Every Crowd, an album not highly regarded but Crowd one I admit to having a deep fondness for. It’s a bit of a rag tag effort, and those hoping for Clapton’s fiery dynamics are going to be disappointed, but for me its leisurely reggae/funk groove has always struck a chord. The addition of several previously unheard tracks, including a pair of Peter Tosh songs, makes it essential. Next up (discs 3 and 4) is an extended version of the live EC Was Here, unwisely trimmed to a single disc upon its initial release. We’re also treated to a disc of various jams, including a sublime extended session with Fred-

Hot Club of Cowtown Swings into the Grey Eagle

BY JAMES

CASSARA

The Western swing revivalist trio Hot Club of Cowtown have defied many odds during their almost two decade tenure, persevering with a nimble mix of musical expertise, showmanship, and a love of the genre that has guided their existence.

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The group, formed out of New York in 1996, were exploring and expanding a style of music that had been all but forgotten. The fact that Western swing music, as practiced today by bands including Big Sandy and His Fly Rite Boys, Wayne Hancock, and (to a lesser degree) Dave Alvin still exists can be traced in part to Hot Club. They were among the first to revitalize a proud tradition and continued praising its origins and influences before it became fashionable to do so. Originally a duo, pairing singer/violinist Elana Fremerman (now Elana James) and singer/guitarist Whit Smith, a subsequent move to Austin (what better place to perfect Western Swing than the home state of Bob Wills) included the addition of bassist Billy Horton. The three signed to the than fledgling Hightone label and began a cycle of non-stop touring that has continued to this day. In late 1998 they released their debut Swingin’ Stampede to strong critical reaction. While the album initially underperformed in sales, to the credit of both band and label (one of those too rare instances of mutual support) Hot Club continued to tour and sharpen their repertoire. A year later Tall Tales followed, and buzz about the band and the style of music they were championing continued to grow. In 2000, just prior to the recording of Dev’lish Mary bassist Horton departed and was replaced my Matt Weiner. Two years later Ghost Train was released, an album that became critical to the group’s evolution. The album was a more tightly focused effort, with the band depending less on cover songs while developing their

die King (disc 5), and a somewhat superfluous pair of remixes of 461 and TOIEC (disc 6). Did we really need all this? Probably not, and Give Me Strength might easily have been trimmed down to a “mere” four discs without losing any of its potency. Much of the live material, largely subdued and slow burning, is quite different from that previously collected on the Crossroads boxed set which more than justifies its inclusion. The 60 page booklet is a treasure trove of Clapton trivia while the Freddie King sessions give a hint of what might have been had the pair made good on their promise to make an album together. Taken in its entirety Give Me Strength is an exhaustive and at times exhausting overview of a slice of Clapton’s career that has been largely overlooked. It nestles nicely between

own compositional skills. It gathered very strong reviews and sold enough to confirm Hightone’s faith in the band. 2003’s Continental Stomp continued that trend as the band set a personal best record of nearly 300 performances in a year. It would be six years before Hot Club of Cowtown would record another album. During the interim Weiner left and was quickly replaced by current bassist/vocalist Jake Erwin, while Smith and James both pursued other interests. James found herself in Hot Club of Cowtown performs Friday, January 10. great demand as a session and touring artist, recording with such names as Willie Nelson, Ray Price, and Merle Haggard. Wills, it’s no surprise that their sound is She also spent the better part of 2005-2008 as equally steeped in jazz and country. Those a member of Bob Dylan’s stage entourage. At two influences swing easily one into the her suggestion Ervin also toured with Dylan, as other and Hot Club of Cowtown have well as The Mavericks, Squirrel Nut Zippers, always made the best of both worlds. It is and the ever present Nelson. James also found music that both respects and adds to its time to record a very fine 2007 solo album. heritage of equal parts head and heart. The 2009 release of Wishful Thinking put The interplay between James, Smith, the band back front and center. All three put and Ervin has never been more proaside other interests to concentrate on taking nounced; nuanced in ways that exhibits Hot Club to a higher level of exposure. A 2008 a bravado mix of gifted musicianship and ballpark tour with Dylan and Nelson gave endless time spent on the road. It’s been them a much wider audience and they wisely far too long since the band has played took advantage of that visibility. our town; making this an early New Year In early 2011 the band gave full praise to must see show. their spiritual mentor with What Makes Bob Holler, a collection of tunes performed by Holler Bob Wills. 2013’s Rendezvous in Rhythm was IF a return to songwriting, a solid connection YOU Hot Club of Cowtown on that remained true to the band’s roots while GO Friday, January 10, at 8 p.m. expanding upon familiar themes. (doors open at 7). Tickets are Given that the band derived its name from priced at $12 ADV/$15 day of show for the Paris “Hot Club” nightspot made famous this partially seated, all ages show. The by Stéphane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt, Grey Eagle, 185 Clingman Ave., Asheville. and the dusty Cowtown environs traveled by (828) 232-5800, www.thegreyeagle.com

the 2011 super deluxe Layla boxed set and this year’s equally overstuffed reissue of Slowhand, Slowhand creating a historical context that only Clapton diehards might fully appreciate. ****1/2

Good Ol’ Freda DVD Magnolia Pictures Before they became the biggest band in the world, Freda Kelly, an admittedly shy Liverpool teen,

took a job—and a chance—by becoming the all-around “Gal Friday” for The Beatles. She had an insistent faith in the boys, having no way of knowing how far they would go and what her pivotal role, largely off stage, in that amazing journey would be. For just over a decade Kelly answered correspondence (boy did she ever!), ran errands, and helped keep the Beatle ship afloat. Others entered and left the inner circle but Kelly was there for the duration. Surprisingly her story has never been told; countless books and documentaries about the Fab Four have been made but Kelly’s role has been either glossed over or outright ignored. Which is what, for all its faults, redeems Good Ol’ Freda. The story is so fascinating, filled with bits continued on page 34

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what to do guide Friday, January 3

Eileen Ross Exhibition “Colors of Jazz,” depicts Eileen’s impressions of jazz musicians as she paints to the rhythms of her favorite jazz pieces. Reception from 5 to 8 p.m. On display January 1-31, 2014.

Events and Classes at The Art House Masterpiece Series January 3 & February 7 – First

Friday of every month from 5-7 p.m. Paint your own masterpiece to take home. We supply all materials. Van Gogh, Monet, Picasso and more. BYOB. Instructor Susan Johnston or Chris Baschon. Cost $37.50.

Art Movie Night Saturday, January 4 Sax and the City, acrylic by Eileen Ross

Asheville Gallery of Art, 16 College Street in downtown Asheville, across from Pritchard Park. For more information, call (828) 251-5796 or visit www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com.

Saturday, January 4

Todd Cecil and Back South Old time, live music at the Tasty Weasel Taproom at 7 p.m. Trolley departs at 4:45 p.m. from Westville Pub in W. Asheville and drops back off at 8:45 p.m. Departs at 5 p.m. from the Aloft Hotel in Asheville and drops back off at 9 p.m. Reserve your seats for free at www.oskarblues.com. Oskar Blues Brewery, Brevard, NC.

How to place an event/ classified listing with Rapid River Art Magazine Any “free” event open to the public can be listed at no charge up to 30 words. For all other events there is a $14.95 charge up to 35 words and 12 cents for each additional word. 65 word limit per event. Sponsored listings (shown in boxes) can be purchased for $18 per column inch. Deadline is the 19th of each month. Payment must be made prior to printing. Email Beth Gossett at: ads@rapidrivermagazine.com Or mail to: 85 N. Main St, Canton, NC 28716. Call (828) 646-0071 to place ad over the phone.

– Disclaimer – Due to the overwhelming number of local event submissions we get for our “What to Do Guide” each month, we can not accept entries that do not specifically follow our publication’s format. Non-paid event listings must be 30 words or less, and both paid and non-paid listings must provide information in the following format: date, time, brief description of your event, and any contact information. Any entries not following this format will not be considered for publication.

Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010). Cost $10. From 6-9 p.m. Refreshments included. Please RSVP at (828) 595-9500.

Story Drama Saturday, January 11 – A morn-

ing of fun and play with Flat Rock Playhouse’s YouTheatre. Step into a story; use improvisation and create characters using your imagination. Ages 3-5 from 1010:45 a.m.; ages 6-9 from 11-12 noon. Cost $5. Instructor Molly Carlin. RSVP at (828) 595-9500.

The Art House Gallery & Studio

5 Highland Park Road East Flat Rock, NC (828) 595-9500 www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

and intermediates. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Harvest House (Asheville Parks & Recreation), 205 Kenilworth Road, Asheville. $80 for Asheville residents, $90 for non-residents; class limited to eight. Call (828) 350-2051.

Wednesday, January 15

Zendoodle Mini Workshop Have fun creating a small abstract art piece using Zendoodle. Instructor Catherine Langsdorf will guide you along the way but gives you freedom to explore your style. 12-2:30 p.m. $30, all supplies included. Call (828) 693-4545 to register. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace, 124 4th Avenue East, downtown Hendersonville. More details at www.artmobstudios.com.

Friday, January 17

Moonshine and More A look at the history of moonshine by Dan Pierce, chair and professor of history at UNC Asheville, and the author of “Corn from a Jar.” Free and open to the public. Lunch available in the Reuter Café; brown bags welcome. 11:30 a.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Info: (828) 251-6140 or visit www.olliasheville.com.

Friday, January 17

Homecoming Job Fair Connects qualified job seekers to quality jobs in advanced manufacturing, health care, and other growth industries. The 8th Annual Homecoming Job Fair takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the WNC Agricultural Center, Airport Road, Asheville. Employers from a variety of businesses will be attending with information on available jobs in the Asheville area. For details visit www.homecomingjobfair.com.

Tuesday, January 14

Beginning Clay Sculpture Eight-week class begins on Tuesday, January 14. Learn the basic construction techniques for making clay sculpture. Class intended for beginners

The play will be presented in April at White Horse Black Mountain. For more information contact Sam Hobson, 704-898-1893. Visit the theatre online at www.facebook.com/BlackMountainTheatreCompany

Tuesday, January 21

Intersections Book Discussion Group Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. 6:30 p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. An opportunity for book lovers to gather for lively and insightful discussion. Free; the only requirement is that you read the book. Info/reservations: (828) 210-9837 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Wednesday, January 29

7 p.m. in The Forum at Diana Wortham Theatre. Ticket holders can attend prior to the 8 p.m. performances to increase insight and enjoyment of the artist. Please arrive early as space is limited; latecomers will not be permitted. Info/show tickets: (828) 257-4530 or visit www.dwtheatre.com.

Sunday & Monday, January 19 & 20

Auditions for “Smoke On The Mountain” Black Mountain Theatre Company is holding auditions at the White Horse at 7 p.m. The musical is set in 1939 at a small mountain church in NC. The songs used in the production are mostly old hymns. Actors must also play instruments. There is one role for a male, late 20’s, that does not need to play an instrument.

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UNCA Martin Luther King Jr. Week Events Tuesday, January 21 – American Promise, a documentary chronicling the lives of two young boys making their separate ways through one of the nation’s most prestigious private schools. This intimate documentary presents complicated truths about America’s struggle with issues of race, class and opportunity. 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union, Alumni Hall.

Friday, January 24 – Spoken

Word and Poetry Slam. 8 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Highsmith University Union, Grotto. Free and open to the public. Info: at msp.unca.edu or (828) 251-6585.

Thursday, January 23

Blue Ridge Orchestra Rehearsal Community orchestra directed by Milton Crotts. 7 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Free and open to the public. Information at (828) 251-6140 or www.olliasheville.com.

Over the Andes

Eisenhower Dance PrePerformance Discussion

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Roles needed: two males, late 40’s; male 17 yrs., female 17 yrs.; female 23 yrs., must play guitar, fiddle, upright bass, mandolin, or banjo; and female, mid 40’s, must play piano. Be prepared to sing a gospel song with your instrument.

Friday, January 31

January 17 & 18

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A crash course in all things opera. 3 p.m. at UNC Asheville’s Reuter Center. Free. Info: (828) 251-6140 or www.olliasheville.com.

Winterlude

Wednesday, January 8

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Opera 101

Sunday, January 5 Concert with Jonn Serrie, Richard Shulman and special guest, Marina Ray. 1:30 p.m. at the Center for Spiritual Living, 2 Science of Mind Way, Asheville, (828) 253-2325. For more details call (828) 658-9604 or visit www.RichHeartMusic.com.

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Friday Night Flights presents a wonderful evening in the Weinhaus Cork&Keg bar area from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The price is $10 for four tasting pours. Gourmet light fare is available from The Cheese Store of Asheville for an additional $5. Held at The Weinhaus, 86 Patton, Ave., Asheville.

Friday, January 31 & Saturday, February 1

Two Plays in One Weekend Aquila Theatre’s “two plays in one weekend” begins Friday, January 31 at 7 p.m. with Ray Bradbury’s visionary parable Fahrenheit 451 and its pertinent issues of censorship, the effects of technology on society and literature, and the means by which knowledge is gained. Pre-performance discussion Friday, January 31 at 7 p.m. On Saturday, February 1 Aquila Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s irresistibly charming Twelfth Night. The performance includes a remarkable original musical score that promises to thrill and enchant. Performances begin at 8 p.m. at Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place. Tickets: Regular $35, Student $30, Children 12 and under $15; Student rush day-of-show (with valid I.D.) $10. Tickets/Info: (828) 257-4530 or online at www.dwtheatre.com.

Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Martin Luther King Jr. Week keynote speaker. Founder of Youth Speaks and Life is Living. 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville’s Lipinsky Auditorium. Free and open to the public. Info: cesap.unca.edu or (828) 258-7727. For more information, contact Lamar Hylton, director of UNCA’s Multicultural Student Programs, at (828) 251-6585. For a complete list of events please visit msp.unca.edu.

Monday, February 3

Diana Wortham Theatre’s Matinee Series for Students and Families Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night Night, a hilarious story of identical twins and mistaken identity, explores the themes of love and all its effects on human behavior. This performance by the Aquila Theatre Company provides a rare opportunity for students to see a critically renowned touring theatre company. Recommended for grades 6-12. Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 10 a.m. Tickets $10-$11. Tickets/Info, (828) 257-4530, www.dwtheatre.com.

JANUARY EVENTS ~ ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ OPENINGS ~ SALES 30 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5


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what to do guide NCPS Poet Laureate Award

Best in Show

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by Phil Juliano

John Mac Kah Studio Saturday, January 11 – Join us for a

A single prize of $100 will be awarded for a serious poem, any subject, any style, maximum of 110 lines. Contest open to adults currently residing in North Carolina.

Children’s Art Show from 3-6 p.m.

Saturday and Evening Classes Now enrolling all levels, beginning to advanced.

Entry fee for submissions sent by mail: $5 for NCPS members; $10 for non-members. Entry fee for on-line submissions: $6 for NCPS members; $12 for nonmembers.

Thursdays,

Dragin

by Michael Cole

ics. Beginners welcome.

New! Every Tuesday & Thursday from 3-6 p.m. After-School Artists, drawing and painting for kids with Alisa Lumbreras.

Winter Workshops January 25 & 26 – The Painters’ Craft:

Contest rules, guidelines and a list of other contests and awards can be found at www.ncpoetrysociety.org/adultcontests.

Renaissance painting.

February 1 & 2 – Color in Nature.

John Mac Kah

Callie & Cats

by Amy Downs

2014 William Matthews Poetry Prize The Asheville Poetry Review is now considering submissions for the 2014 William Matthews Poetry Prize.

Saturday, January 18 from 10-4 p.m. Light

and Shadow with Lorelle Bacon. Choose oils or acrylics to create a painting with realistic shadows and light for drama and impact. For intermetiate painters. $95 supplies furnished or $80 if bringing your own.

1st Place: $1,000, publication in the Asheville Poetry Review Review, and a featured reading at Malaprop’s Bookstore in Asheville.

3rd Place: publication and a featured reading at Malaprop’s Bookstore.

January 25 & 26 from 10-4 p.m. Intro to

Corgi Tales

by Phil Hawkins

The final judging process will be “blind” (all identifying information will be removed from the poems). Final Judge for 2014 is Billy Collins. All submissions will be considered for publication. Send three poems, any style, any theme, any length, with a $20 entry fee (payable to Asheville Poetry Review) to: William Matthews Poetry Prize, c/o Asheville Poetry Review, PO Box 7086, Asheville, NC 28802. For more details please visit the website at www.ashevillepoetryreview.com.

122 Riverside Dr., Cotton Mill Bldg. in Asheville’s River Arts District (828) 225-5000, www.JohnMacKah.com

310 Studio Classes

Postmark Deadline: January 15, 2014

2nd Place: $250, publication, and a featured reading at Malaprop’s Bookstore.

drawing with a brush.

from 7-10 p.m. Painting in oils,

Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oils & Acryl-

Mail entries to: Stan Absher, PO Box 99396, Raleigh, NC 27624-9396. Submit questions to jsabsherphd@gmail.com.

See page 24 for details on Rapid River Magazine’s 17th Annual Poetry Contest.

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Deadline: January 10, 2014

The winning poem will be selected by the NC Poet Laureate. North Carolina Poetry Society membership dues may be submitted with contest entries submitted by mail. Dues may also be paid online at www.ncpoetrysociety.org.

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Cold Wax and Oils – Methods in Abstraction with Cindy Walton. Comprehensive intro to Cold Wax. Experiment with nontraditional tools pigment sticks, powdered pigments and more to achieve texture and finishes similar to encaustic without the “caustic” fumes and heat. $295 includes some materials.

Thursday, January 30 from 12:30-4 p.m. A

Ratchet and Spin

by T. Oder and R. Woods

Storm is Brewing – Sepia Watercolor with Jo Ridge Kelley. Create a long mountain landscape with dramatic clouds, winter trees and evergreens in Sepia. Master value with a rich dark, elegant brown on hand-made Rag Paper. Tuition: $95, all materials included, Beginning and up.

River’s Edge Studio

191 Lyman Street, in the River Arts District www.310art.com

Live Music Every Friday and Saturday

at the Classic Wineseller

Medical Guardian

Live music 7 p.m. Restaurant serves small plate fare 5:30-9 p.m. 20 Church St., Waynesville. (828) 452-6000, or visit www.classicwineseller.com.

Top-rated medical alarm and 24/7 medical alert monitoring. For a limited time, get free equipment, no activation fees, no commitment, a 2nd waterproof alert button for free and more – only $29.95 per month. 1-800-892-4631.

www.jackiewoods.org • Copyright 2012 Adawehi Press

CLASSES ~ AUDITIONS ~ ARTS & CRAFTS ~ READINGS Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 31


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Hearn’s Bicycle

Art Appraisal Services, LLC www.artappraisalcarolina.com

Hey Hey Cupcake www.heyheycupcake.com

The Art House www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com

Jewels That Dance www.jewelsthatdance.com

Asheville Salt Cave www.ashevillesaltcave.com

John Mac Kah www.johnmackah.com

BlackBird Frame & Art www.blackbirdframe.com

The Mahogany House www.themahoganyhouse.com

Black Mtn. Stove & Chimney www.blackmountainstove.com

Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe www.malaprops.com

Blue Ribbon Frame Shop (828) 693-7967

Mellow Mushroom

Bogart’s Restaurant www.bogartswaynesville.com

Mountain Top Appliance www.mountainviewappliance.com

Cafe 64 www.cafe-64.com

Newbridge Cafe www.thenewbridgecafe.com

Cheryl Keefer www.CherylKeefer.com

North Carolina Stage Company www.ncstage.org

The Chocolate Fetish www.chocolatefetish.com

O’Charley’s www.ocharleys.com

Cottonmill Studios www.cottonmillstudiosnc.com

Octopus Garden www.theOG.us

Double Exposure Giclee www.doubleexposureart.com

On Demand Printing www.ondemandink.com

Earth Guild www.earthguild.com

Points of Light www.pointsoflight.net

Faison O’Neil Gallery www.faisononeil.com

Potter’s Mark www.pottersmark.com

Julia Fosson Fine Art www.juliafosson.com

Soapy Dog www.thesoapydog.com

Fresh Produce Clothing www.freshproduceasheville.com

Southern Highland Craft Guild www.craftguild.org

Gallery of the Mountains galleryofthemountains.blogspot.com

Spice & Tea Exchange www.spiceandtea.com

GD Whalen Photography www.gdwhalen.com

Starving Artist (828) 693-3191

Grace Carol Bomer Fine Art www.gracecarolbomer.com

Susan’s European Gifts (828) 694-1022

The Green Room Cafe www.thegreenroomcafe.biz

Susan Marie Designs www.susanmariedesigns.com

HART Theater www.harttheatre.com

Town Hardware & General Store www.townhardware.com

(828) 253-4800

(828) 236-9800

WNC OVERVIEW GET ON THE MAP, CALL

(828) 646-0071

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‘Just Sit’ continued from page 13

anced… there can be an opening — and for a second we can realize who we really are.” ~ Beck So what is this “sitting?” In a way, it can be looked at as a way to work with, understand, and master the restless movement and distraction in our lives, to really get in touch with this “unsatisfactoriness.” We will come face-to-face with this unsatisfactoriness when we sit in meditation as boredom, restlessness, and aversion to just letting things be naturally what they are as we encounter what it feels like to be still, to stop our habitual movement and searching for stimulation. We will experience the sitting as uncomfortable, challenging, in a way, unsatisfactory, and this is why Joko Beck, and all teachers emphasize the need for discipline. It is a very challenging practice. We experience that while, for a short time, anyway, it isn’t a problem to make the body still, what we soon realize, in a manner we only dimly understood previously, is how resistant our minds are to being still. And so, we sit there, attempting to follow the instructions for meditation — focusing awareness on breathing, noticing the activity of the mind and how it distracts us from focusing on our breathing, and returning awareness to the breathing. Simple instruction, but — it is unbelievably challenging. Along the way, since we are focusing awareness, and experiencing the breathing and the activity of the mind, we begin to notice the content and themes of the mind. We notice how judgmental our minds are. We notice how it has difficulty staying in the present moment, how it careens between past and future. We notice how when judgmentalism and past and future come together we experience distressing and uncomfortable emotions. We want to stop this. We want to be distracted from this. We want to stop sitting and go “do something.” And then…. As we stay with the sitting, as we stay with the breathing, as we stay with awareness, for a moment, the mind becomes quiet. There is an experience of balance. There is a feeling of what it is to just be. It is spacious and comfortable. It has the feel of absolute sanity. Then, the compulsion of the mind to go back into movement, into judgment, out of time, returns, and we’re back to our anxieties, our tensions, our unsat-

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We have touched Heaven while doing nothing, not even thinking, and we have gotten a glimpse of the source of Hell. isfied mind. A great discovery is made. We have touched Heaven while doing nothing, not even thinking, and we have gotten a glimpse of the source of Hell. When the thinking starts up again, so does the restlessness, the unsatisfactoriness. “What we really want is a natural life… life can be more open and joyful than we ever thought possible.” In our sitting, we have glimpsed that natural life. We have glimpsed the experience of openness and joy — more than we ever thought possible. So we sit some more. We discover that sitting isn’t “airy, fairy.” We discover that it is work, and it takes discipline, and we discover that we are capable of happiness and well-being, not as the result of something we do, but by stopping all the doing to discover who we really are when not caught up in trying to make our lives happy. We discover that in just sitting, doing nothing — not even thinking — that life happens all by itself, and it is good — a good beyond circumstances. So we continue to sit and learn more and more about how we make ourselves crazy and we learn how to quiet the spinning mind that is the source of the craziness while we learn to open into this miracle of discovering our natural self in a quiet mind. And with enough practice, we can stand our bodies up from the sitting, and walk into our lives and still be “sitting” in the quality of our presence with the moment. We discover the remarkable teaching that Zen (which actually is just the Japanese word for “sitting”) is everyday life. Happiness is everyday life, experienced with a mind that knows how to be still, that knows how to sit quietly when the activity of thinking is not needed for its appropriate and helpful function of working through something for a specific purpose. We discover the true intelligence of a quiet mind, and the true beauty of senses that are open, subtle and receptive. We begin to live our lives, just “sitting” and “it will have its effect on every phase of our life, on our relationships, our work, everything.” So, just sit. If you have the courage and discipline to really settle your unruly mind, you will find a life that is never unsatisfactory, and that is what real happiness is about.

MACON AVENUE

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MUSIC & DANCE AT THE ART HOUSE

January 18 & 26 – Circle Dance Classes

BILTMORE VILLAGE

WAYNESVILLE

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32 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

He holds a weekly meditation class, Mondays from 6:30-7:30 p.m., at the Friends Meeting House, 227 Edgewood in Asheville. By donation. Information on classes, talks, personal growth and healing instruction, or phone consultations at (828) 258-3241, e-mail at healing@billwalz.com. Learn more, see past columns and schedule of coming events at www.billwalz.com

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Bill Walz has taught meditation and mindfulness in university and public forums, and is a privatepractice meditation teacher and guide for individuals in mindfulness, personal growth and consciousness.

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artful living

Interactive Maps are on our website! www.RapidRiverMagazine.com/maps

Angry Giant Forge angrygiantforge@hotmail.com

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For adults from 4-6 p.m. Cold Moon Circle Dance, Ostara Circle Dance, Blossom Moon Circle Dance, May Pole Circle Dance, Honey Moon Circle Dance, and more! Cost $10; instructor Tarleton Brooks. Call (828) 699-0240 for details.

IF YOU GO: The Art House Gallery and Studio, 5 Highland

Park Road, East Flat Rock. For more details call (828) 808-9500, or visit www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com.


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local favorites Points of Light

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A “must see” destination!

Points of Light crystal and mineral gallery, located in North Asheville on Merrimon Avenue, is a wonderful source for fine crystals, gems, minerals and living art. The gallery, which boasts an amazing collection of huge Quartz crystals, including a seven-foot-tall Agate geode, is much more than just another rock shop. Points of Light's collection includes many unique Quartz clusters and Amethyst geodes in addition to

Bolivian Amethyst Cluster

healing stones, mineral specimens and Quartz Angel a wide variety of books on stones. They specialize in breathtaking interior design pieces and one-ofa-kind Quartz Sphere specimens for decorators, collectors and healers. Every item on display has been carefully and lovingly handselected for quality, beauty and energy. The gallery works with a renowned group of internationally acclaimed crystal and mineral arti-

‘The Art House’ cont’d from page 23

sans, and as a result carries some of the finest cut and polished pieces available anywhere in the United States. Points of Light is also home to one of the largest selections of crystal singing bowls on the east coast, as well as a comprehensive and truly beautiful group of crystal healing wands, including tools cut by world-famous lapidary artist, Lawrence Stoller. From museum pieces weighing more than a ton, down to the smallest of their tumbled stones, the quality and scope of their inventory is unsurpassed. Points of Light is a “must see” destination in Asheville!

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Canvas & Corks

Art MoB has a fun new way to get together with friends, share a bottle of wine or other sorts of bubblies, and paint away. Classes include Pop Art Dogs; Cottage Garden by the Sea; Café Delights; Potted Flowers; a crazy Chicken; and, a beautiful mountain landscape. We offer bachelorette parties, girl’s night out, date nights, and special occasions. We will even come to you! $35 fee includes all supplies. Canvas & Corks classes are held most Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m., or Tuesday afternoons. We can add classes to meet your needs. Call to reserve your spot!

IF YOU GO: Canvas & Corks, January 8, 15, 22, 29. Art MoB Studios & Marketplace 124 4th Avenue East, downtown Hendersonville. (828) 693-4545, www.artmobstudios.com.

Ben, Clara, Calvin, and Osiel of the Boys & Girls club put their hearts into paintings for the “Game of Hearts” benefit at the Art House.

This event will help you give back to the community and will benefit The Boys and Girls Club & the American Heart Association. Please join us from 6-8:30 p.m. on Valentine’s Day, February 14, for a romantic evening. Price for this event will be $58 per person. Seating is limited. RSVP by calling (828) 5959500 or (828) 808-3594. IF YOU Game of Hearts, 6-8:30 p.m. on February 14. $58 per GO person. Seating is limited. RSVP at (828) 595-9500 or

(828) 808-3594. The Art House Gallery & Studio, 5 Highland Park Rd., E. Flat Rock, NC, between W. Blue Ridge Rd. and N. Highland Lake Rd. For more details visit www.arthousegalleryandstudio.com.

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Lunch with Wiley Cash

Blue Ridge Books will host a luncheon with author Wiley Cash on Friday, January 31 at noon. Cash is is wellknown for his first novel, A Land More Kind than Home. At the luncheon he will discuss his second book, This Dark Road to Mercy, which will be released JanuMercy ary 28, 2014. Tickets include a copy of Cash’s new hardcover novel and catered lunch by Kanini’s. Seating is limited.

IF YOU GO: Reading and booksigning with author Wiley Cash, Friday, January 31 at Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main Street, Waynesville. For more information call (828) 456-6000, or visit www.blueridgebooksnc.com.

To everyone who supported Rapid River Magazine in 2013, whether as a valued reader, advertiser, writer, distributor, or ad whisperer, we appreciate you! Thank you for your:

Cash – always needed. Ideas – excellent. Time – there is never enough. Ingenuity – big props! Zingers – we love a good joke. Expertise – so many geniuses out there. Niceness – everybody needs a hug sometimes. Sharing – cooperation makes everything possible. You are all excellent C-I-T-I-Z-E-N-S!

Author Wiley Cash

Special thanks to the Madison County Arts Council for the CITIZENS acronym.

Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 33


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sound experience Atlas Road Crew

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More energized and focused than ever before, roots-music troubadours, Donna the Buffalo, debut their first studio album in five years.

Charleston’s Atlas Road Crew will make their first appearance in Black Mountain at the Pisgah Brewing Co. on January 18. Atlas Road Crew’s oldschool sound oozes vintage 70s rock, dripping with influences ranging from the Rolling Stones, to The Band, to the Allmans, but with modern influences like Kings of Leon and The Black Keys. Playing in a storage unit on Atlas Road in Columbia, SC (hence the name), the band molded, tweaked and perfected an old-school rock ’n’ roll sound. Despite the sweltering heat in the small space, the band has produced a guitar-driven, easy riding sound that seems to come naturally.

Donna the Buffalo

Atlas Road Crew

Tonight, Tomorrow and Yesterday Yesterday, the group’s 10th studio album, showcases the bands eclectic and extraordinary sound—traditional mountain music infused with elements of Cajun, rock, folk, reggae, and country.

IF YOU Atlas Road Crew, GO Saturday, January 18. 18+.

$5 adv.; $7 day of. Doors 8 p.m. Show 9 p.m. at Pisgah Brewing Co., 150 Eastside Drive, Black Mountain. More details at www.pisgahbrewing.com

Donna the Buffalo

‘Spinning Discs’ cont’d from page 29

of trivia and asides that one cannot help but be drawn in. Rarely do we get such an up close look as history unfolds. We play witness to the personal and artistic evolution of the band from a perspective that was rarely offered, and 50 years after the fact it remains as fascinating as ever. Made with the blessings of Paul and Ringo, Yoko Ono and Olivia Harrison, it features a number of carefully chosen (and wonderfully placed) Beatle tracks, creating a soundtrack to their lives and ours. Yet despite all this there is something lacking, a particular deficiency that’s hard to pinpoint. Filmmakers Ryan White, Kathy McCabe, and Jessica Lawson, who collectively wrote, directed, and produced Good Ol’ Freda, pour a lot of love into their brainchild but despite

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Bring in this Ad and We’ll Take

15% Off Your Order Excluding Alcohol 1 Coupon Per Table

(828) 236-9800

Delicious

Open 7 Days a Week

Hoagies & Pretzels Fresh-Baked Calzones

50 Broadway ~ Asheville, NC Specialt y Pizzas • Spring Water Dough • Salads Vegan Soy Cheese, and other Vege tarian Options!

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Wireless Internet Access!

34 January 2014 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — Vol. 17, No. 5

extensive interviews we never really get to know what makes Freda tick. As the subject of the film, Kelly plays things cautiously, never revealing more than a quick glimpse of life with The Beatles. I suspect this is out of respect and deference but more than a few times I wish she’d drop her guard and let the interviewers dig a bit deeper. One gets little sense of the wonder of The Beatle years, and I suspect anyone who didn’t live through that time won’t have their understanding of the band and the phenomena that surrounded them enhanced. Still it’s hard not to love Good Ol’ Freda for what it is; a thoroughly pleasant trip through Pepperland. But somehow I wanted and expected a bit more. ***

Founding members and songwritervocalists Jeb Puryear (vocals, guitar) and Tara Nevins (vocals, guitar, fiddle, accordion, scrubboard)—joined by David McCracken (organ, clavinet), Kyle Spark (bass), and Mark Raudabaugh (drums)— convened in a rustic church in Enfield, New York, along with co-producer Robert Hunter. The group recorded take after live take to old-school analog tape, with as few overdubs as possible, creating 14 organic and authentic tracks for Tonight, Tomorrow and Yesterday Yesterday. IF YOU Donna the Buffalo, Saturday, GO January 18. The Whiskey

Gentry opens. 18+. Doors open at 8; show at 9 p.m. $18 adv./$20 dos. The Orange Peel, 101 Biltmore Ave., Asheville. Call (828) 225-5851, or visit www.theorangepeel.net. Check out the band at www.donnathebuffalo.com.


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noteworthy Blue Ridge Music Trails of NC A GUIDE TO MUSIC SITES, ARTISTS, AND TRADITIONS OF THE MOUNTAINS AND FOOTHILLS

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The music and dance traditions of North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains are legendary. Residents continue a musical heritage that stretches back many generations. In this lively guidebook, noted folklorist Fred C. Fussell puts readers on the trail to discover the many sites in western North Carolina where this unique musical legacy thrives. Organized by region and county, Blue Ridge Music Trails of North Carolina welcomes readers into the rich worlds of bluegrass, old-time, gospel, and string band music, as well as clogging, flatfooting, and other forms of traditional dance. The book, a project of the North Carolina Arts Council and its partner, the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area, features a CD with more than 20 songs by musicians profiled

in the book, historic recordings of the region’s most influential musicians spanning nine decades, and songs based on true stories of love, crime, and tragedy set in the North Carolina mountains. The book includes: • Maps and driving directions • Venue contact information • Color photographs and profiles of prominent mountain musicians • Informative sidebars on musicians and performance styles • A CD with 20 music tracks Blue Ridge Music Trails of North Carolina; written by Fred C. Fussell with Steve Kruger; published by the University of North Carolina Press in association with the North Carolina Arts Council. PG. 32

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We at Moe’s Original Bar B Que appreciate the team at Rapid River Magazine Magazine. Thank you for your long lasting commitment in highlighting the creative culture of Hendersonville and our greater western North Carolina region.

Aaryn Joyner

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As a new restaurant on N. Main Street, we’re thankful for the opportunity to showcase our delicious Bama-style BBQ!

Moe’s Original Bar B Que, Hendersonville, NC • (336) 469-1536

Advertise with Rapid River Magazine Free Web Links, Ad Design, Easy Monthly Billing (828) 646-0071 • www.rapidrivermagazine.com Vol. 17, No. 5 — RAPID RIVER ARTS & CULTURE MAGAZINE — January 2014 35


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January 2014 Rapid River Magazine  
January 2014 Rapid River Magazine  

Live music, dinner, wine pairings and tastings at the Classic Wine Seller, pg 20. Asheville Symphony Turns up the Heat with a performance by...

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