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Cultural Concepts and Teachings In this section you will find the cultural concepts and teachings presented at the professional learning day for grade one and two teachers. These cultural components were infused throughout the day. These cultural concepts and teachings are not the intellectual property of any one person. The knowledge shared comes from teachings provided by different elders and mentors. When sharing these with a class of students it is important to find a community resource person or elder who has this knowledge and is willing to visit the school to speak to a class or two. Traditionally, teachings are passed down orally and are heard many times over a person’s lifetime. Individuals learn different elements and concepts at different times depending on a person’s age or where they are on their learning journey at the time the teaching is received. Traditionally, these teachings would have not be written down but learned through listening, reflecting and retelling. It is our hope that by capturing some of these teachings in a written format, teachers will be able to reflect on the teachings received. This will help develop an understanding of important cultural concepts that are highlighted in children’s storybooks or other resources. IMPORTANT: Please do not copy or distribute these as part of a lesson or for students to read or to be read to students. If you would like these teachings shared with your students, please seek out the appropriate person to share them with your class in the traditional way, orally.

There is no expectation, nor would we want teachers to feel responsible to retell these teachings to their students.

Cultural Concepts and Teachings


As teachers infuse First Nation, Métis and Inuit learning opportunities into their programs, it important to remember that not all First Nation, Métis and Inuit people identify in the same way. Not only are these distinct groups of people with different histories, cultures and traditions there are also distinctions within groups. Not all First Nation, Méties and Inuit people have the same knowledge, and/or values. It is also important to keep in mind that First Nation, Métis and Inuit children and youth may not have this knowledge or other knowledge related to their histories cultures and traditions. With this in mind, we ask that teachers not single out and question First Nation, Métis and Inuit students about their cultural, historical and/or traditional knowledge. If your students and their families do have knowledge and traditions related to their culture, they will be more likely to share this with you once a trusting relationship has been established. References to First Nation, Métis and Inuit values and worldviews and mention of spirit should not be confused with religion. The values and worldviews have developed from living a life that is closely connected to nature, the land and life on the earth. All things on earth, including people and animals are interconnected and depend on each other. At the same time, every individual has unique gifts, talents and strengths. Given that everything is interconnected, the choices we make have an impact on everything else around us. We are given the gift of being able to make choices and understand that the choices we make will have a significant impact on ensuring a balanced world for the next seven generations.

Cultural Concepts and Teachings

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